The East Carolinian, November 12, 1992






Opinion
Liberty and justice?
Right-wing, so-called-Christian leaders pry on
ignorance and fear of homosexuality to gain votes
and pass un-American legislation.
See story pg. 4
Lifestyle
Dive on Galgo
Members of the ECU Maritime History
program traveled to Bermuda to explore
he 16th Century Spanish ship the Galgo.
See story pg. 7
Sports
Arkansas Racists
I ECU will crush Arkansas State in foot-
I ball this weekend. Besides, any team
that has a mascot which degrades
Native Americans deserves to lose.
See Story pg. 10
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 20
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, November 12,1992
New system allows class
registration by phone
10 Pages
By Joseph Horst
Staff Writer
With current and upcoming im-
provements in telecommunication lines,
ECU will put itself on the cutting edge of
technology within the next five years.
The existing telecommunications
network is based on a coaxial cable sys-
tem, similar to that used in cable TV. The
present network is also a broadband net-
work, meaning that it only served admin-
istrative purposes and very little academic
ones.
Costing about $12-14 million, the
new network will be comprised of fiber
optic lines. The lines will include the en-
tire ECU campus as well as the School of
Medicine.
The network will not only cover all
geographical and organizational areas,
but it will also combine and integrate
voice, data and video traffic into a single
infrastructure. The combination will
eliminate redundant management sys-
tems and software protocols.
Richard Brown, vice chancellor for
business affairs, said the new system is
designed with the needs of the campus as
well as the students in mind.
"We want the students to have the
capacity to dial from their room to the
library (for electronic card catalogs or
CD-ROM information) Brown said. "We
also want them to be able to use electronic
mail to contact faculty or turn in assign-
ments. "
One of the biggest and possibly most
needed improvements to the telecommu-
nications system will be the addition of
telephonic registration. When hooked up,
a link will exist between the phone sys-
tem and the SIS (Student Information Sys-
tems) database.
Students can then register for their
classes over the phone, as is being done in
other North Carolina colleges, like North
Carolina State in Raleigh. The phone link
will also allow students to be connected
to an attendant if assistance is needed.
When contacting the attendant, the
student's file will automatically be for-
warded to the attendant's terminal. This
capability will save time for both indi-
viduals and reduce the feeling of the stu-
dent just being a number.
Another aspect of the new network
will be the enhancement of student-fac-
ulty interaction. Instruction can now be
done between separate rooms and build-
ings, with equipment being established
for 10 teleconferencing and teleteaching
rooms on campus.
Grant proposals and files can now
be transferred almost instantaneously;
databases would be available from fac-
ulty offices and labs.
Instruction would be done on a
regional basis with the new network.
The School of Medicine will be able to
search on-line clinical and research da-
tabases; they will also be able to per-
form remote telemedia diagnosis.
Campus security will also benefit
from the updating of the present tele-
communications network.
Campus officers will be able to see
the origin and other information on a
911 call � even from a residence hall
room, which is currently not available
on the system.
The idea of a single I.D. card to
enter residence halls or other buildings
after hours is also being discussed.
Residents in the residence halls will
also be provided with access to major
cable TV channels after the network is
installed. This will improve not only
entertainment offerings but also educa-
tional and emergency broadcasts as well.
Courtney Jones, SGA president,
said she agrees with Brown on the vir-
tually limitless possibilities that the net-
work will offer ECU.
"I think we've been needing some-
thing like this for a long time Jones
said. "It's going to transform our cam-
pus. It's a very thorough plan that al-
lows for future improvements
Brown commented on the image
that the network wi II portray about ECU.
"ECU is very well-positioned to
move ahead of most universities with
this type of network Brown said. "We
can take advantage of the most up-to-
date technologies and put ECU on the
cutting edge
Funding for the program will come
See Tele page 3
Photo by Oail Reed
The General Classroom Building has bad air. Although the university has improved ventilation in the building, the air still
contains high levels of carbon dioxide. A final report of air quality in the GCB is pending.
Bad air plagues General Classroom
By Tracy Ford
Staff W-iter
Modifications were made to Gen-
eral Classroom Building ventilation sys-
tem after a state survey reveled high
carbon dioxide levels.
The North Carolina Department
of Health and Environmental Resources
conducted an air quality questionnaire
and survey to determine any heal th haz-
ards that may be present to the faculty,
staff and students.
"Apparently there had been sev-
eral complaints with everything from
headaches to skin rashes sincewemoved
into the building four years ago said
Brian Harris of the Foreign Languages
Department.
"What they were looking for were
organic compounds beingomitted from
furniture, carpeting and building ma-
terials. Also they were checking for
carbondioxidelevels'said Phil Lewis,
of the Department of Environmental
Health and Safety.
The ventilation system improve-
ment lowered the carbon dioxide lev-
els by introducing more fresh air into
thebuilding but did notsolve the prob-
lem.
Faculty voiced their complaints
of headac hes, skin rashes and lethargy
in the survey which prompted action
by the state.
"Headaches can be caused by a
numberofthings'HarrissaidTthink
it is clear that buildings with poor cir-
culation that have high levels of car-
bon dioxide can cause health prob-
lems
ECU is awaiting the final report
and recommendations to make any
further changes to General Class-
room Building.
"We took additional readings
and the carbon dioxide levels
dropped Lewis said. "Whether
they're at an acceptable level now
were not really sure
According to Lewis, the carbon
dioxide levels have dropped from
the dangerous levels previously re-
corded and faculty and staff are not
in danger of serious illness.
"Usually common complaints
associated with indoor air would be
headaches, eye, ear and throat irrita-
tion and respiratory problems
"I think we've taken a good
step toward identifying the problem
and hopefully toward some solu-
tions Harris said.
Candlelight vigil honors POWMI A(s)
By Elizabeth Shimmel
Assistant News Editor
The Arnold Air Society of
ECU'S Air Force ROTC held a
candlelight vigil Tuesday night
to honor POWMIA(s) during
national POWMIA awareness
week.
The vigil officially recog-
nized every POWMIA from
all wars, but also had a roll call
of the names of specific POW
MIA(s).
"This is something that
provides awareness of POW
MI A(s)to everyone said Kevin
McLaughlin, commander of the
Arnold Air Society. "It is a
very special recognition and we
are proud of that
The Arnold Air Society
sponsored the vent during the
awareness week which started
Nov. 7 and will end Friday,
Nov. 13.
Other events sponsored
by the Arnold Air Society this
week include tying yellow rib-
bons around the trees on the
mall, a formal retreat and a 24-
hour vigil with cadets repre-
senting a prisoner of war.
The formal retreat was
held a Minges Coliseum along
with an official inspection of
all of the cadets uniforms.
After the inspection, the
Color Guard proceeded with
Open house puts
ECU on display
�� r rr-rr Photo by Jason Bosch
Air Force ROTC cadets honor America's POWMIA(s) with a candlelight vigil. The vigil, sponsored by the
ROTC's Arnold Air Society, was part of a week-long series of events for POWMIA awareness week.
the official taking down of
the flag.
"A formal retreat is the
official taking down of the
flag said Glenn Tussing,
Public affairs officer for the
Arnold Air Society. "It is a
way to show respect for the
flag
Angel Flight also helped
to sponsor all of these events,
along with the Arnold Air So-
ciety and the Air Force ROTC.
"Civilians can't join the
Arnold Air Society, and this
offers them a chance to help
out with the ROTC
McLaughlin said.
"Angel Flight is involved in
a lot of community service, and
they are very supportive of the
corps said Melissa Stewart, di-
rector of operation for the Arnold
Air Society and also a previous
member of Angel Flight.
See POW page 2
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
ECU will hold its annual
Fall Open House for prospec-
tive students on Nov. 14 begin-
ning at 9 a.m. in Wright Audito-
rium.
Hosted by
the ECU Office of
Undergraduate
Admissions, the
program provides
a chance for pro-
spective students
to see what ECU
has to offer.
According to
Admissions Coun-
selor Julie Hinton,
"We sent out invi-
tations to students
"ECU has
followed the
national
trend of adult
students re-
turning to
school by ex-
panding its
"ECU has followed the
national trend ofadultstudents
returning to school by expand-
ing its admissions to include
more adults Hinton said.
Dr. Thomas E. Powell, di-
rector of admissions, will ad-
dress participants
in the opening
session Saturday
morning. Green-
ville Mayor
Nancy Jenkins
willjoinother uni-
versity adminis-
trators in speak-
ing to the group
as well.
Following
the opening re-
marks, academic
information ses-
w uiiuijunuuii 3CJ-
whoappliedtothe admiSSWnS tO sions will be held
university for next
fall. We're expect-
ing mostly local
North Carolina
students, but in the
past, we've had
people come from
as far away as New Jersey
Hinton said he expects
close to 1,000 people to partici-
pate, not only high school se-
niors and their parent but also
transfers and adult students.
i
include more
adults
Julie Hinton,
Admissions Counselor
where represen-
tatives from the
various depart-
ments will speak
about their degree
programs. Ac-
cording to
Hinton, "Professors from each
department will explain to par-
ents and prospective students
the requirements for specific
See House page 3





2 The East Carolinian
NOVEMBER 12, 1992
POW
Continued from page 1
Students becoming workaholics
The burnout rate among students is increasing from year to
year. "There is a sense, nationwide, that mental health staffs are
seeing more distressed college students said Philip Meilman,
director of counseling at the College of William and Mary in
Virginia. Students are working more part-time and full-time jobs
while getting paid less for their efforts. Educators have com-
plained that students often put academics on the back burner in
order to concentrate on rent and tuition.
New York college begins publication
On Oct. 5, Adelphi University officials reached an agree-
ment with editor Amy Demner that ended an ongoing dispute
between the Delphian and the administration. The university
shut down the paper for six issues after an August 14 deadline was
missed for the printing of a libel disclaimer. The disclaimer would
say that the Delphian's views were not necessarily those of the
school's or its students and disclaiming liability. In return, the
administration agreed to cover the paper with libel insurance
protecting the paper in the event of a lawsuit. Both the paper and
the administration are pleased with the accord. "It was very
equitable Demner said. "The paper prints the paper and the
college protects the paper
Citadel to admit women
A South Carolina higher education commissioner, Fred
Sheheen, told the military institution, The Citadel, that it should
admit women or risk losing a court fight. The Citadel has been
sued by three female veterans on the grounds that they should
have access to day classes, instead of the separate school for
women that The Citadel has now. Sheheen said that he can only
recommend the action, not enforce it because of lack of legal
authority. The only other state-run school that is military and all-
male, Virginia Military Institute, recently won a federal appellate
court ruling in October. The ruling said that VMI need not admit
women, but they must provide equal opportunities for equal
education.
Florida needs more dorms
Studies show that Florida's nine public universities will
need at least 10,500 more dorm beds between 1992 and the year
2006 to keep up with increasing student demand. The state
university system, currently enrolling 185,000 students, expects
an additional 80,000 students in the next 14 years. A spokesman
said that current dorms mustalso be renovated. Officials estimate
the cost of adding the beds at $200 million, and another $200
million to upgrade existing dorms. Florida's current on-campus
population comes to about 12 percent, under that of the national
30 percent figure.
Compiled by Joseph Horst. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Just like any other frater-
nity, the members of the Arnold
Air Society consider themselves
to be a brotherhood of the elite
member of the Air Force ROTC.
"We have a pledge period
just like any other fraternity
McLaughlin said. "However, we
do allow women to join
Throughout the week, both
the Arnold Air Society and the
Angel Flight will be selling
POWMl A bracelets, shirts and
lithographs in front of the
Wright Annex.
All of the proceeds from
the sales will go back into a
POWM1A fund.
"We are a non-profit orga-
nization, so we are not allowed
to make any money off of this
McLaughlin said. "The whole
point here is just to promote the
awareness itself
All news writers are cordially
invited to attend the mandatory
meeting today at 3:30 p.m.
Thanks,
J.B.
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3
House
NOVEMBER 12. 1992
Continued from page 1
degrees and what one might
expect to do with a certain
degree
The information sessions
will be held in the General
Classroom Building.
Financial aid workshops ,
camps tours and student life
seminars will also be a part of
the Open House.
"Representatives from dif-
ferent campus organizations
such as SGA, the Panhellenic
Council, and Minority student
groups will show prospective
students how they can get in-
volved' Hinton said.
Several residence halls and
the student bookstore will also
be open to visitors.
The program concludes at
noon with participants invited
to attend the football game
against Arkansas State Univer-
sity in Ficklen Stadium. The kick-
off is scheduled for 1:3(1 p.m.
To register or for more in-
formation about the ECU Fall
Open House , call the Admis-
sions Office at 757-6640.
Telecommunications
Continued from page 1
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The East Carolinian
November 12, 1992
Opinion
Page 4
DePuy asked to clarify wiretapping
The ECU wiretappingcasedemands further
investigation. The U.S. attorney assigned to the
case, David Folmar, decided in October to drop
the case, ma inly because witnesses changed their
testimony and made the case confusing.
"If you get people telling different stories
on the witness stand than they told the FBI or the
grand jury, you cannot use that typeof testimony
against people' Folmar told Vie East Carolinian.
"Their testimony would never hold up in cross-
examination. " Folmar wasn 't the only one in the
courtroom who was startled by the changes in
testimony. Members of the jury said the case
became muddy, and they acquitted the two
defendants, Teddy Roberson, the formerdirector
of telecommunications, and John Burrus, a former
Public Safety captain.
The jurors who acquitted Burrus and
Roberson said the defendants were scapegoats.
The jurors also said they thought Burrus' or
Roberson's superiors authorized the wiretap
rather than the two defendants.
The difficulty Folmar encountered in his
prosecution,coupled with jurists'beliefs that the
defendant's superiors are guilty and remain
uncharged, indicates that the case deserves more
investigation rather than be abandoned in the
THE BUCK STOPS HERE
confusion of conflicting testimony.
Investigations into the case of illegal
wiretapping that occurred at East Carolina
University must continue. Two of the three
employees named in thestateaudit report, Burrus
and Roberson, have been acquitted, but one re-
mains: Director of Public Safety James DePuy.
These contradictions and denials have
muddied the case, but nevertheless indicate the
need for further investigation.
The public has the right to know who
authorized the wiretapping that took place on
ECU property in 1991. Roberson and Burrus lost
their jobs, but they were found innocent. The
university has paid over $250,000 in out-of-court
settlements to 16 people whose conversations
were taped illegally. The federal prosecutor
investigating the case is encumbered by changes
in testimony. Still the guilty party remains
uncharged.
DePuy testified to the same grand jury that
indicted Burrus and Roberson. DePuy was not
indicted, which provides evidence towards his
innocence, but both Burrus and Roberson testified
that DePuy ordered a wiretap.
Nevertheless, we feel DePuy could, and
should, face a grand jury.
By Mike Joseph
Racial conflict
(Editor's note: The following
column will be nm in three parts.)
Our nation is stampeding
into a new era of racial conflict.
Tragically, this era forebodes con-
sequences which bear sharp con-
trast to both martin Luther King's
"dream and to the intent of the
major civil rights legislation wen
over the past quarter of a century.
Even more tragically, this era is
being ushered in by deceit, suspi-
cion, destruction and death. The
monetary costs of this epidemic
are becoming staggering, but the
true drain will be on the coffers of
the American spirit. Already,
Americansare suffering from that
mix of fear, rage and confusion
which are the recipe for panic.
We are being dragged into
an unmanageable situation when
we see Los Angeles cops beating
Rodney King, and then see a gang
of blacks beating a white truck
driver nearly to death on the
streets of a city in flames. We are
slapped into disbelief when the
white sheriff of tiny Oak City is
killed by a black bank robber, and
then when one of the robber's
black hostages is shot to death by
copsduringthe ensuing shootout.
We see on the national news the
faceof a young white woman who,
along with her three-year-old
child, was hijacked on a public
street. The child was left at a
daycare center, the woman was
found stabbed to death in a ditch
and a black man is sought for the
crime. How can we comprehend
and how do we react when a group
of Detroit police officers, at least
one of whom was black, beat a
young black man to death, even
(some say) after he was hand-
cuffed.
These are but a few of the
more sensational symptoms of our
growing plague of hatred. But
there is subtler, less dramatic,
much less publicized evidence of
what our future holds.
Specifically, there is increas-
ing emphasis on separation and
segregation. This idea seems
predicated on the belief that
people become powerless and
in America growing rapidly
sufferevengreaterdiscrimination thing. Whites are plagued by in-
when they attempt to assimilate
into a common society. Black lead-
ers such as Tony Brown claim that
African-Americans lose when they
are sprinkled among predomi-
nantly white society. Brown ad-
vocates that blacks should coa-
lesce into their own economically
and culturally independent and
inter-dependent communities.
The citizens would support
each others' businesses and other
social needs instead of contribut-
ing their resources to enterprises
which are not specifically focused
on the concerns of African-Ameri-
cans. This idea should be very
appealing to white groups who
feel that their culture is diluted
and weakened when it is com-
pelled to function arm-in-arm with
persons of color.
Further evidence of this
"splitting-up" is the resurgence of
Malcolm X to near-saintly status.
Malcolm X was not merely an ad-
vocate for what he perceived to be
the loss of African identity; he was
a militant proponent of a separate
black Muslim nation.
Closer to home is the push
on the campus of the University of
North Carolina for a free-stand-
ing black cultural center. Ironi-
cally, some proponents of the cen-
ter are working to force less-ada-
mantlv pro-center blacks to be-
come more vocal in their support.
The Associated Press
recently reported that an
anonymous group calling
themselves "The Brotherhood of
the Sierte" sent "veiled threats" to
some black faculty members a
UNC because "they're not
speaking out loudly enough in
support of a black cultural cen-
ter According to the AP report,
one letter from Sierte warned that
"the last thing that white people
need to know is that black folks
will stab each other in the back in
spite of their common wishes
This statement by Sierte is
poignantly naive. Whites have
been stabbing each other in the
back for so long that it would come
as no great revelation to them that
people of other races do the same
fighting. About 150 years ago in
the United States, it was Irish ver-
sus German versus Eastern Euro-
pean versus Catholic versus Prot-
estant. Nowadays, the nationality
lines between whites haveblurred,
but religious and geographical
differences still cause significant
problems.
Among modern blacks, it is
not uncommon to find prejudices
between lighter-skinned and
darker-skinned African-Ameri-
cans. Groups like Sierte seem to
have taken it upon themselves to
define just how black an African-
American should be.
And that raisesanotherques-
tion. Just exactly what is an Afri-
can-American? It is popular for
American blacks to identify with
the culture and history of Egypt.
Many claim direct lineage to the
supposed origins of humankind
in the fertile crescent of
Mesopotamia. But Egyptians are
not of the same stock as many of
those blacks claiming to be the
sons and daughters of pharaohs.
The vast majority of African-
Americans descend from the sub-
Saharan peoples of Africa. For
these Americans to claim Egyp-
tian descent deprives true North
Africans of their legitimate heri-
tage, and essentially proclaims that
sub-Saharan culture is not worth
remembering.
So racial conflicts run deep,
even among members of a com-
mon racial group. Our cultural
identity is indeed important, but
it is not as important as our com-
mon culture. It is upon this that
our survival depends. At the mo-
ment, the shared culture that is
America is tense and grappling
for a clear picture of why things
are as they are There is no simple
answer, but understanding is es-
sential if we ever hope to heal this
festering wound.
It's easy to see that we have
a problem. It's harder to under-
stand why. It's even harder, still,
to resolve it.
Part 2 of this series will
attempt to deal with the whys of
the racial crisis in America.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Slltorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Bobbi Perfetti, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Billiard, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Classified Advertising Tech.
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. Vie East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, Tlw East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor. 771c East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Quote of
the Day:
If the
blind lead
the blind,
both shall
fall into
the ditch.
The Bible
(Matthew 15:14)
By Amy Wlrtz
Constitution excludes homosexual behavior
An anti-homosexual-rights
measure was passed by Colorado
voters recently. This measure pro-
hibits the legislature and every
city from passinganti-discrimina-
tion protection for homosexuals.
It also repeals gay-rights ordi-
nances in Denver, Aspen and
Boulder.
Officials from those cities
have stated that they will do ev-
erything possible to challenge the
measure in federal court and the
backbone of this challenge will
undoubtedly be the 14th
Amendment, which guarantees
equal protection under the law for
all citizens. I hope they can do just
that.
The backers of the anti-gay-
rights measure, namely, a group
called Colorado for Family Val-
ues, say that they do not support
discrimination against homosexu-
als.
They believe that sexual ori-
entation should not give people
special rights and that it should
not figure into government.
These right-wing
conservatives are determined to
have everyone live according to
their rules.
Certainly acceptance,
tolerance and compassion do not
figure into their plans. Unless, of
course, you are straight, white and
a man.
I hear the cry of an ignorant
people: "Gays have hidden agen-
das Hidden agendas? Please, ho-
mosexuals just want to go to their
jobs and have a home and a family
and the opportunities that hetero-
sexuals continually take for
granted.
Imagine being told that you
cannot have basic human rights
� those that are supposedly
guaranteed in the Bill of Rights �
because you happen to be attracted
to members of the opposite sex.
It's unfathomable, right? Well, it
is just as absurd when African-
Americans, women, Hispanics,
Asian-Americans (and thelistgoes
on) are denied the basic human
liberties that this country was
founded on.
Many gay groups have ex-
pressed concern that the measure
would ignite violent attacks on
homosexuals and lead todiscrimi-
nation in housing and jobs. Ho-
mosexuality is not contagious, no
matter how much the elite, sup-
posed Christian leaders would like
you to believe it. These people �
the Jesse Helmses, Pat Buchanans,
Pat Robertsons, and George
Bushes (to name only a handful)
�call themselves good, Christian
men and then publicly and pri-
vately attack those who are differ-
ent than them. It is appalling for
me to think that these are the men
in power.
This Colorado for Family
Values group campaigned vigor-
ously in churches and found much
support.
Why Christians feel so
threatened by homosexuals, we
will probably never know. Gays
have been shunned by their
churches repeatedly for seemingly
no particular reason.
And now homosexuals are
being told that their government
has no place for them. There is a
bill floating around Washington
that may allow self-insured em-
ployers to cut benefits as they see
fit. This, if passed, can set up nu-
merous opportunities for employ-
ers to discriminate against work-
ers who are in need of, let's say,
AIDS treatment.
This is not to say that
homosexuals are the only people
who contract AIDS. The opposite
is true, in fact: AIDS in the
homosexual community has
declined steadily since the out-
break was acknowledged and now
the highest percentage of cast s are
found in women and children. To
be denied health care is a crime.
To be denied health care simply
because you are gay is, in my eyes,
sinful.
But the issue that hasn't been
looked at yet, and which is prob-
ably the most important, is the fact
that the homosexua Is in Colorado,
and throughout the nation, are
being told that there are people all
around them who hate them, scorn. -
them and are afraid of them.
Now we are dealing with
human emotions; the pain,
confusion and anger in the
homosexual community is
heartbreaking. Homosexuals are
being told that they are inferior
and now are seen by the
government as second-class citi-
zens. The knowledge of scorn from
so many neighbors and co-work-
ers must be a terrible burden to
wake up to every morning.
Our country has lost its
vision. "With liberty and justice
for all" is not only a hollow cry,
but also a slap in the face.
By Jim Shamlin
'Free' deemed political term, not economic

(Editor's note: The following is
the second part of a column that was
begun on Oct. 10)
If the answer is "no then
there are several things each of us
must do, a unifying philosophy
we must adopt and put into prac-
tice as soon as we can. We must
realize that the word "free" in re-
gard to government is a political
term, not an economic one; we
must realize that "we the people"
are composed of all people, of in-
dividuals whose rights are equally
important; we must realize that
government is a watchdog to
guard over the rights of all, not an
attack dog with which one group
suppresses and enslaves another.
And we must realize, once and for
all, that the peoplecontrol the gov-
ernment � it is not the other way
around.
The government we have
today, if put on trial, would be
found unconstitutional to its core.
There is not a single item in the Bill
of Rights, no basic freedom, that
has not been abridged, restricted
or abolished. This is not solely the
fault of crooked politicians � the
blame is equally shared by the
irresponsible voters who elected
them.
To install a responsible gov-
ernment, we must be responsible
as voters. We must consider our
candidates carefully, consider
their stand as politicians, not their
image as celebrities. We must re-
frain from using our vote to extort
economic benefits for ourselves at
the expense of others, understand-
ing that it always works both ways.
We must stop using our govern-
ment to enforce religious and
moral standards, accepting that
freedom of religion applies to all
religions, not the dominant de-
nomination.
For now, the damage is done
� those whom we have elected
will remain in office for the next
four to six years. We can write
them letters of protest, but it will
do little good � they're already in
the system, free to do as they wish
and to blame it on their opponents
when the next election comes. We
will pay for their mistakes. We
will pay until the next election, or
until this country crumbles, which-
ever comes first. Either alterna-
tive is possible.
All in all, our only hope for
the future is that we leam from the
suffering we are about to face �
that the years of hunger and of
economic decay will leave a scar
on our memory that no media
image or crafty rhetoric will wear
away. For those who will die, ei-
ther from waiting for medical care
or from economic hardship, we
must build a monument in our
hearts. For those who will flee the
country, seeking a long-forgotten
corner of the globe where liberty
still exists, we must rebuild this
country from the ruins, making it
a place they will feel proud to call
home. For all the generations to
come, we must remember.
It is not the intention of this
letter to invoke wrath at any given
candidate or political party: all of
them are infected. Bush, Clinton
and Perot all have their own so-
cialized medicine packages; and
all of the political parties want to
dabble in the economy, each ap-
plying its own brand of govern-
ment control, each wanting to
spread the disease in a different
sector of the population. They are
all equally worthless and corrupt.
The intention of this letter is
to clarify our need fora new politi-
cal philosophy, a new generation
of voter and politician devoted to
the rights of all citizens. This may
necessitate the formation of a new
political party, or an extensive re-
vision of the platforms of existing
ones. In any case, the need for
change is unmistakable. For those
who need proof, the coming years
will provide more than enough.





The East Carolinian
NOVEMBER 12, 1992
R )R RENT
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS
:1 and 2 bedroom apartments. En-
ergy-efficient, several locations in
town. Carpeted, kitchen appli-
ances, some water and sewer paid,
washerdryer hookups. Call 752-
8915.
FOR RENT- One bedroom apart-
ment walking distance to class.
Avail, now call 758-3092.
HOUSES FOR RENT: 800 E. Wil-
low Street, 3 BR-1.5 Baths, $600 per
month. 1108 Forbes Street, 4 BR-2
Baths,$600permonth. 2608Tryon
Drive, 3BR-1 Bath, $550 per month.
1 YR lese and security deposit.
Duffus Rental 756-2675.
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female
nonsmoking roommate to share
new 2-bedroom apartment with
graduate student, beginning De-
cember or January. Low rent and
utilities, good area. Call 321-0538
FEMALE ROOMMA;1;
NEEDED: To share a bedroom in
Wilson Acres. Will have own
room. $158.66mo. 13 utilities.
Call 830-9213.
ROOMMATE - Non-smoking fe-
male roommate needed for 2nd
semester. Large 2 bedroom apart-
ment. Bus avail. Rent 187.501
2 utilities. Call 758-2549 or 758-
3092.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED for Jan. 1 to share 2 bed-
room. Tar River apartments with
2 other girls. $150month and 1
3 utilities. Prefer someone fun yet
studious. 757-2639.
NEEDED 1 OR 2 FEMALE
ROOMMATES for apartment in
Wilson Acres. 13 rent and utili-
ties. Available Dec. or Jan. Please
call 830-9066.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
3bedroom house. l4rent($140
month) 14 utilities. Deposit
negotiable. 5 blocks from campus.
Call 758-6810 leave message.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male
non-smoking roommate wanted
to share 2 bedroom apt. beginning
Jan. 1st. FREE AC, HEAT, and
HOT WATER. $182.50month
12 utilities. 2 blocks from cam-
pus. Call 758-6924.
FOR SALE
Classifieds
Page 5
FOR SALE
FOR SALE 1982 Red Chevy S-10
PU. Blue Book$2300 asking $1300
OBO. Needs some engine work.
Call Rich 752-3754.
FOR SALE: One way ticket.
Leaves Greenville Airport Nov. 25
4.00 pm and arrives at Dulles Air-
port Nov. 25 7:23 pm. Change-
over in Charlotte. Best Offer: Call
WANTED
PAY IN-STATE TUITION? Read
Residency Status and Tuition, the
practical pamphlet written by an
attorney on the in-state residency
application process. For Sale: Stu-
dent Stores, Wright Building.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED
CARS,trucks, boats, 4 wheelers,
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Available your area now. Call 1-
800-333-3737 ext. c-5999.
BIKE FOR SALE: 1992 16" TREK
820. Excellent condition. Only 1
mth old. Female owner. Hardly
used: CALL JILL AT: 752-8504.
FOR SALE: A six drawer chest
with mirror. In great condition.
$30 or best offer. Call 830-0551.
TREK 7000 (Aluminum Frame)
Derore components. Very nice
$400.00.757-1961.
FORSALE: 5 piece Cherry B.room
set. Moving - must sell! $395.00.
Call 946-9653.
FREE KITTENS call 752-7423 day
time or 551-1232.
GUARANTEED WORK AVAIL-
ABLE. Excellent pay for EASY
home based work. Full part-time.
Rush self-addressed stamped en-
velope: Publishers (G2) 1821
HillandaleRd. 1B-295 Durham, NC
27705
$360UP WEEKLY. Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull-time. Set own
hours! RUSH self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers (G1)
1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
SAVE ON SPRING BREAK '93!
Jamaica,Cancun, and Florida from
$119.00. Book earl and save $$$!
Organize group and travel free!
Sun Splash Tours 1-800-426-7710.
YOUTH BASKETBALL
COACHES: The Greenville Rec-
reation and Parks Department is
recruiting for 12 to 16 part-time
youth basketball coaches for the
winter youth basketball program.
Applicants must possess some
knowledge of the basketball skills
and have the ability and patience
to work with youth. Applicants
must be aole to coach young people
ages 9-18, in basketball fundamen-
tals. Hours are from 3:00 pm until
7:00pm with some nignt and week-
end coaching. This program will
run from December to mid-Febru-
ary. Salary rates start at $4.25 per
hour, formoreinformation,please
call Ben James or Michael Daly at
830-4550.
EASY WORK! Excellent Pay!
Assemble Products at Home. Call
Toll Free 1-800-467-5566 ext. 5920.
SPRING BREAKERS - Promote
our FloridaSpringBreak packages.
Earn MONEY and FREE trips.
Organize SMALL or LARGE
groups. Call Campus Marketing.
800-423-5264
POSTAL JOBS available! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-
800-333-3737 ext.3712.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOY-
MENT - Make money teaching
English abroad. Japan and Tai-
wan. Make $2000- $4000 per
month. Many provide room &
board otherbenefits! Financially
& Culturally rewarding! For In-
ternational Employment program
and application, call the Interna-
tional Employment Group: (206)
632-1146 ext. J5362
NOW HIRING SPRING BREAK
REPS for Panama City Beach:
Greeks, Organizations, Individu-
als earn cash, free trips & experi-
ence. Call Joe (ENDLESS SUM-
MER 1-800-234-7007)
HELP WANTED
67068L, Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44222
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is an-
ticipating 3 advertising represen-
tative vacancies for the spring se-
mester. We can offer you valuable
experience before you graduate.
For more details look for our ad on
page 6. Application deadline is
111392. Please submit an appli-
cation and a resume to the director
of advertising for a personal inter-
view.
WE AREGETTING READYFOR
CHRISTMAS Are you? Brody's
is accepting applications for part
time sales and customer service
positions. Apply at Brody's in the
plaza Monday and Tuesday be-
tween 1 and 4 pm.
IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A
tremendously groovy job and you
are a potential computer analyst
(or somewhat knowledgeable)
contact Karen at The East Carolin-
ian at 757-6366 for the chance of a
lifetime! If you think you might
have a shot rt this position and
you don't call, hit yourself in the
head a couple of times
something's loose in your attic!
Look for our ad on page 6.
WANTED: Student with pickup
or van to travel from Northern
New Jersey to ECU. Need to get
dresser to school. WILLPAY! Call
Wayne at 758-5351.
SER V FCES ()FFERED
PERSONALS
HELP WANTED
APPLY IN PERSON AT
CARPET BARGAIN CENTER.
1009 Dickinson Ave.
8am - 6pm M-F
Earn $500 - $1000 weekly
stuffing envelopes. For details
RUSH $1.00 with SASE to:
GROUP FIVE
57 Greentree Drve, Suite 307
Dover, DE 19901
SERVICES ()FFERED
EARN COMMISSIONS & SKI
FREE by becoming a group sales
representative for southeast ski
area. Must be active & sales ori-
ented. Send resumes to Paul Ma-
son, Director of Marketing, New
Winterplace Inc PO Box 1, Flat
Top, WV 25841
EARN S1000WEEK at home stuff-
ing envelops! For information,
send long self addressed stamped
envelope to CJ Enterprises, Box
'TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
In Calfl. (213)477-8226
Or, rush $2.00 Io: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave. �206-A. Los Angles. CA 90025
PARTY! PARTY! PARTY!
SPRING BREAK
HOW ABOUT IT IN THE
BAHAMAS OR FLORIDA
KEYS. WHERE THE PARTY
NEVER ENDS. SPEND IT ON
YOUR OWN PRIVATE YACHT.
ONE WEEK ONLY
$385.00 PER PERSON
INCLUDES FOOD AND MUCH
MORE
EASY SAILING YACHT CHARTERS
1-800-780-4001
YOUR CAREER IS AT STAKE!
Are you applying to graduate school
or medical school? We are academic
scientists with extensive experience
as members of graduate and medical
school admissions committees. We
will wok with you on your application
and strengthen your personal essay to
give you that competitive edge.
For free information, contact:
AIKENDAIL Academic Consultants,
703 Ninth Street, Suite 233, Durham,
NC 27705-4802, (919) 493-0343.
F.N.IOY SINGING?
JOIN THE UNIVERSITY
CHORALE. NO AUDITION
REQUIRED FOR STUDENTS
CAMPUS WIDE. MEET M,W,F
12:00 TO 1:00 ROOM 105
A.J.FLETCHER.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: GOLD CHARM bracelet
on Halloween night, in the down-
town area. Sentimental value.
Reward offered. Call 758-5096.
LOST: WATCH in the biol. build-
ing or outside. Citizen elegance
with initials CJP 1990 on the back.
REWARD call Chris 757-0641.
PERS( )NALS
"SPRING BREAK : Bahamas
Cruise (10 meals) $279! Panama
City with kitchen $119! Cancun
$429! Jamaica $479! Daytona
(kitchens) $149! KeyWest $249!
Prices increase 121192! 1-800-
678-63-86
GUARANTEED FREE SPRING
BREAK TRIP to Bahamas or
Panama City! Cancun, Jamaica,
Daytona, Keys! Sign-up before
121192! Springbreak! 1-800-678-
6386.
QUALITY WORD PROCESS-
ING: Specializing in letters, re-
sumes, business and medical tran-
scription term papers, thesis,
manuscripts. Anything that needs
to be typed. Dictaphone transcrip-
tion available. Call 321-2522
HOW CAN YOU GET COMPA-
NIES to answer job inquiries?
SEND A REPLY POSTCARD
WITH YOUR RESUME! 50-$5.00,
100-S9.50, $1.50 P&H. Send
checkmoney order to: Create-A-
Response, Dept.2F, PO Box 1707,
Cartersville, GA 30120.
MOBILE MUSIC PRODUC-
TIONS jams with ECU Greeks
Top 40, Dance, Alternative, Rap,
Classic Rock, Beach, Country,
we've got it all. Call early for book-
ings. 758-4644. Ask for Lee.
RESEARCHINFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VteaMC or COD
800-351-0222
KRISHANMURTI Study Group
being formed. Are you interested?
Evenings, 756-0429 Ask for ')
I CANT BELIEVE IT It's too
good to be true! The creative, tal-
ented, original, friendly, crazy,
super members of the Science Fic-
tion & Fantasy Organization are
meeting this Sat. Nov. 14 from 6-9
pm in the TV room, located in the
basement of MendenhalH All wel-
come! No turtles please.
WRITERPHILOSOPHERMU-
SICIAN and poetic soul seeks
friendship and correspondence
from like-minded lady. Photos
and letters to MV PO Box 8663,
Greenville, NC 27853.
SIGMAS, Hope everyone has an
awesome, time at formal! Con-
gratulations Meridith Mangum
(Best Pledge), Nicole Federinko
(Most Outstanding), Kristen
Tillery (Most Spirited), Tracy
Anderson (Most Helpful), and
Kimbeny Lass and Kristen Capolla
(Best Big Sis Lil Sis). Hang in
therepledges. You're doing a great
job. Love, the Sigmas.
SIG EP, Get ready to tailgate! See
you guys on Saturday (Bright and
early) Love, the Sigmas
DELTA CHI: We has a great time
at the pre-downtown! Congrats
on getting your charter. Love, Al-
pha Phi.
DELTA CHI: If only the walls
could talk! Well, the second floor
of the Hilton would have plenty to
say about Sat. night. 11:00 pm-our
party ventured to the Hilton with
or charter in hand. 11:30 came and
the halls were filled with bros. and
dates in fup states. 12:00 and
the second floor was a mess-filled
with trash and some pissed off
guests. 12:30-TCP meeting was
called to order, phone calls were
50 cents, but all I had was a quar-
ter. 1:00 "Whose room is thisI
said whose room is this" (Green-
ville PD) 1:30-MIA Holloway
"Where the hell is he?" 2:00-Afew
staggering brothers were closing
the Rio down. Four Kamikazi's
made up the last round. 2:30-Back
to the rooms and still no Holloway!
Someone said he drove home.
HaHaHa! 3:00-Unidentified girl
found in Scott's bag. Hey Jason,
where's you're date? Jabba's plan
started to unravel. 4:00-Hot rub-
bers returned with bathing suits in
hand. One with only a tuxedo coat
leading the drunken band. 5:00-
Who am I? Why am I here? 5:30-
Last person fell, night ended with
one missing, but none in jail.
PI KAPP - Tailgating with you all
is going to be an experience to
remember! Let's make it as fun as
the last time we got together but
no thong panties this time ANDY
- Looking forward to Saturday!
Love - ZTA
DELTA CHI - Congratulations on
receiving your charter. You guys
deserve it and we knew you could
do it. Love, The Zetas
THETA CHI - Can't wait for our
socialtonightwithyouguys! Love,
ZTA
PI LAMBDA PHI - Thank you for
the pre-downtown party. We had
a blast! Nice bod Rich! We'll have
to get together sometime soon.
Love, Alpha Omicron Pi pledges
HEY BETA RHO'S - Nice job with
the T.P but remember paybacks
are hell Just teasing! You guys
are undoubtedly the SHIT Jill.
Lisa, and M .issa.
FROM THE PLEDGES OF PI
LAMBDA PHI TO the wonderful
women of Alpha Omicron Pi- WE
HAD AN INCREDIBLE
EVENING. LET'S DO IT AGAIN
SOON!
JEAN McALEESE - Panhellenic
has come a long way since you
took over as president that day.
Thanks for all that you do-after
you graduate we will really miss
you! Love, Panhellenic.
PERSONALS
person writing the so called po-
ems. So to everyone who knows
me I am neither crazy nor desper-
ate.
TO THE TWO MEN who far sur-
passed those around you: Thank
you for reaching out and changing
my course. No one will ever know
of your deed, but I will always
remember your kindness. Thanks
for the pizza and honesty.
KEVIN J. - A back scratch for a
chest rub. Sound even? (No pinch-
ing allowed) Love, Your Brown
Eyed Girl.
DELTA CHI, Congratulations on
your charter. It's been a long time
coming. We know what you've
been through, it's a great achieve-
ment. The brothers of PHI KAPPA
PSI
ALPHA PHI SOCCER PLAYERS:
Keep up the good work! You're
doing awesome!
DEAR STUDENTS: I am writing
in response to the letters by Jeff
Jones shown in recent editions of
the newspaper. As it turns out my
name is also Jeff Jones. I am just
making it clear that Jeffery Paul
Jones from Plymouth is not the
TO THEECU FOOTBALL TEAM:
Two 97 yarders - way to go! Love,
Delta Zeta
TODD: We'd love for you to be
our Greek god! Good luck! Love,
the sisters and pledges of Delta
Zeta
CONGRATULATIONS to
Christie Carver on her recent en-
gagement! We couldn't be more
thrilled for you! Love, Delta Zeta
sisters and pledges.
THANKS TO THE KA'S and Der-
rick - It was quite a show! Too bad
she couldn't see it! Love, Delta
Zeta.
TWO GIRLS ON THE ECU CAM-
PUS who also happen to be room-
mates have one thing to say to the
"men" in and around Greenville
You are lower life forms than any-
thing we can wrap electrical tape
around and explode in the micro-
wave The High Rollers Ride
Again!
PI DELTA, We had a great time
last Thursday. Let's do it again.
ALPHA OMICRON PI - Twas
the night of our lock in and all
through the house a creature was
stirring,but it wasn't a mouse. The
pled ges were huddledonthecouch
in fear, - that Victoria soon would
appear. With JT on the CD and
Ms. E on the prowl, we all settled
down and the dogs began to howl.
When up in the attic there arose
such a clatter - the chicken shits
sprung up and yelled, "What the
hell's the matter?" While deliver-
ing a tooth brush, what should we
see, but 10 anxious eyes that were
spying on BP. To the attic we
headed with our hearts full of
fright, to catch the "invaders" who
put up a fight. When the night was
over we all said good-bye, saying,
"We bonded with all and all has a
good night
CONGRATULATIONS to our
new ZTA initiates: Paige Almes,
Heather Burgee, Deana Cale, Edy
Cline, Gretchen Crisson, Krista
Dalkowski, Michelle Giardinella,
Leigh Green, Tammy Hardison,
Laura Hogan, Hillary Krimm, Jen
Lyons, Tara Martinelli, Lisa
Milisauskas, Leslie Murry, Alicia
Nisbet, Leslie Reno, Roxanne
Reynolds, Natalie Richards, Krista
Roth, Jennifer Shetzeley, Jennifer
Sparboe, Susan Spears, Rhonda
Sortino, Jennifer Stuart, Renee
Tinch, Jennifer Tysinger, Leigh
Ann Watkins, Sandra West, and
Robin Wilson. You are a great
pledge class and we know you
will make wonderful sisters!
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY
Good locations. Reasonable rent.
Call 752-8320 from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm.
3 BEDROOM DUPLEX - Brand new and
ready to rent immediately. Great location, close
to campus. Call 752-8320 from 9:00 am to 5:00
pm, or 355-4826 after 6:00 pm.
Announcements
CRFENVILLEAREABI-
SFXUAIGAY-LESBIAN
GROUP
Group activities and discussion
of issues relating to same-sex ori-
entation. Meetings are closed. Call
757-6766 11:00-12:15 Tues. and
Thurs. or 1:00-4:00 pm Wed. for
information.
TRAVELSTUDY OPPORTU-
NITIES
Are you interested in visiting
another region of the world?
Would you like to live and learn
another culture with other ECU
students? Learn about the oppor-
tunities available for summer or
semesterstudy abroad through the
Study AbroadExchange Expo to
be held in the lobby of the General
Classroom Building from 9:00 am
to 2:00 pm on Wednesday, No-
vember 18. We can find the right
program for you! Remember to
stop by the General Classroom
Building on Wednesday - you
might discover an opportunity you
wouldn't want to miss! If unable
to be there, contact Ms. Stephanie
Evancho, 757-6769, for more infor-
mation.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STU-
DENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student
Center inv ites you to worship with
them. Sunday Masses: 11:30 am
and 8:30 pm mass at the Newman
Center. 953 E. 10th St two houses
from the Fletcher Music Building.
For further information, please call
Fr. Paul Vaeth, 757-1991.
NEWMAN CENTER AND THE
STATUS AND ROLE OF
WOMEN COMMISSION
An inter-denominational semi-
nar on Women and Their Ministry
is scheduled forThursday, Novem-
ber 12 from 2:00 - 5:00 pm in
Mendenhall Student Center at
ECU. This program is designed to
broaden our understanding of
ministry outside the traditional
churchclergy framework, and
spotlights women who work with
the homeless, for the environment,
as teachers, social workers, hospi-
tal chaplains, and AIDS ed ucators.
A workshop for the enhancement
of ministry skills, including listen-
ing, comforting, nurturing and
organizing, will begin at 2:00 pm.
Facilitators are Maggie French, a
faculty member at Pitt Commu-
nity College, and Dan Earnhardt,
campus ministeratECU. The panel
presentation will begin at3:45, with
discussion following. The public
is invited to both events. CallRoch-
elle at 758-2030.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS
THUR November 12�ECU
Concert Band; Scott Carter, Con-
ductor (Wright Auditorium, 8:00
pm, Free). SAT Nov. 14 �ECU
String Orchestra; Fritz Gearhart,
Conductor (Fletcher Recital Hall,
8:00 pm, Free). MON Nov. 16�
Faculty Chamber Recital; Donna
Dease, mezzo-soprano; John B.
O'Brien, piano; Nathan.Williams,
clarinet; and Jonathan Bagg, guest
violist (Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00
pm, Free).
ANIMAL RIGHTS
ECU students for the Ethical
Treatment of Animals (SETA) will
hold its first general meeting on
Thursday, Nov. 12, at 6:30 pm in
GC 2016. All students desiring of
a more equitable world for ani-
mals are encouraged to attend.
WOMEN'S STUDIES PRO-
GRAM
The Women's Studies Program
is offering a variety of classes for
the spring semester, including
classes in World Literature, Holocaust
Literature, Women and Religion, His-
tory of Black Americans in addition to
courses on aging and ethnic studies.
For information on the undergradu-
ate minor or graduate program in
Women's Studies, call our office at
757-6268.
CAMPUS CIVITAN
Campus Civitan Interest Meet-
ing November 12, 5:30 pm,
Mendenhall 212. Come meet with
us for a chance to serve your com-
munity.
PERFORMING ARTS SE-
RIES
The Hanover Band will per-
form on Friday, November 13,
1992 at 8:00 pm. This band uses
authentic instruments and pe-
riod principles of interpretation
to create an awareness of the
time period in which the classi-
cal music they play was com-
posed.
TIBETAN LAMA TO SPEAK
The Venetable Dzogchen
Ponlop Rinpoche, a recognized
Master of Bud d ist Ph iloscphy, will
speak on Compassionate Action
on Monday, November 16, at 7:30
pm in Room 244 of Mendenhall
Student Center. At 7:30 pm on
Tuesday, November 17, at the
Courtney Square Clubhouse, he
will speak on The Nature of the
Mind. For the latter talk, bring a
cushion for sitting and wear com-
fortable clothes.
EAST CAROLINA HONORS
ORGANIZATION
ECHO - will be meeting
Tues Nov. 17, in the GCB Room
2017 at 5:00 pm. We are plan-
ning to have teachers from some
of the Honors classes next se-
mester to come and tell a little
more about them. All Honors
students welcome regardless of
prior attendance.
jws
.





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tmmmmmmmtm
The East Carolinian
November 12. 1992
Lifestyle
Page 7
Hands-on learning gained through Bermuda field school
By LeClair Harper
Staff Writer
During the month of September, 11 ECU
graduate students in the Maritime History
and Nautical Archaeology Program attended
field school at the Bermuda Maritime Mu-
seum. The students conducted a shipwreck
survey on the reefs around Bermuda.
ECU students have been attending the
field school since 1984. These field schools
give students the opportunity to work on
shipwreck sites and use a variety of special-
ized equipment.
Students dove on the 16th century Span-
ish ship Galgo hoping to find structural re-
mains. The ship had been salvaged for arti-
facts by treasure hunters in the 1960s.
"Unfortunately what we found out was
that (previous salvers) did not leave the hull
structure intact, and they, in all likelihood,
destroyed it to get under it to make sure there
were not other artifacts associated with it'said
Gordon Watts, the underwater archaeologist
in charge of the Bermuda field school.
The students surveyed the coral reef by
being towed behind boats on specialized
boards to locate previously known reefs. They
used a state-of-the-art global positioning sys-
tem to record accurate positions of the wrecks
once they were found by the towboarders.
"This is the first year that we've had the
equipment to fix an accurate location for
wreck sites we discover said Watts. "One
of our objectives wa s to do a su rvey to get an
accurate location and a preliminary assess-
ment of all the shipwreck material that we've
found
One of the main goals of the field schools
that ECU offers is to provide students with
hands-on experience.
"Bermuda offers such a wide range of
wrecks and sites to learn from said gradu-
ate student Mike Krivor.
Students not only get the chance to see a
variety of wrecks but also get to operate
equipment such as the global positioning
system and the magnetometer, a device that
locates metal objects.
"As far as field experience, this is prob-
ably the most beneficial semester of all since
I'm not mechanically inclined Adrienne
Askins said. "It's a chance to work with a lot
of equipment I haven't worked with before,
such as learning to drive the boat and run-
ning the different compressors
Watts said that this experience is an es-
sential part of the students' study and pro-
videsan understanding thatcan'tbe received
in the classroom. "The students have al-
ready developed ideas about work to look
for, and they've seen some of the sites � 18th
See Maritime page 8

Phoio by Jonathan Breem
The field school crew at Bermuda Maritime Museum. Pictured leftto right inforeground; Billy Ray Morrison, Gordon Watts
and Shawn Holland. Pictured in background is Matt Russell, Hans van Tillberg, Mike Krivor, Harry Peccorelli, Richard
Manesto, Thomas Stoltmann, Dan Warren, Chris and Adrian Askew.
Raleigh rave raises
money for LIFEbeat
By Woody Barnes
Staff Writer
Friday night and into Saturday
morning, over 300 people raved 'til dawn
as Legends in Raleigh hosted an after-
hours event.
Part of the proceeds from the door
went to raise funds for LIFEbeat, an
HTV-disease support and resource or-
ganization of the
American music in-
dustry.
"Whatlammost
proud of is the fact
thatwecan help give
support back to the
community Maria
Wallace, manager of
Legends, said. "We
are active partici-
pants with the com-
muni ty for fund rais-
ers concerning gay
issues. I believe in
LIFEbeat
Therewasaposi-
; ttive feeling about the
' Jevening as the predominantly gay
crowd danced to a DJ mix of hard-
thumping techno, industrial and acid-
house beats while swirling in the warm
feel-good glow of black lights and
strobes on the dance floor. A raised
platform centered on the dance floor
gave room to those lost in the grooves of
fast music and lights. Also, a backdrop
of computer-animated videos enter-
tained the dancers.
There was a finger painting wall
where happy partiers could make their
own impressions and designs with
glowing neon paints of purple, green,
yellow, pink and orange. When the mu-
few?
ral was complete, some people began
painting each other's face, arms, hands
and chest.
Party favors included lollipops and
Pixie Stix for the candy rushers.
EMI Records donated a free CD of
their la testcompilation'Rave'til Dawn"
mat was raffled along with free ful 1-color
stickers and remixed singles from the
album. "Rave 'til Dawn" is a compila-
tion of songs repre-
sentative of the
many subtleties
covered by the mu-
sical term "techno
Numbers include
titles from Praga
Khan, Lords of
Acid, 2 Unlimited
and Ottorongo,
who have all en-
joyed success on the
dance floor. These
artists are consid-
ered by true lovers
of the rave scene re-
sponsible for some
of thebestand most
outstanding tracks to recently emerge.
LIFEbeat, the organization to which
funds will go, helps mobilize the celeb-
rity talent and musical expertise of the
entertainment industry as a funding
source for programs dedicated to the
dissemination of life-saving medical in-
f orma tion, I inka ges to serv ices and AIDS
advocacy.
It's genesis is based on the basic
belief that the AIDS crisis can end and
until then, we must help those who are
fighting for their lives.
"We will definitely be doing late
nights again since this one was so suc-
cessful Wallace said.
Stevie Ray's legacy lives on
By Michael Albuquerque
Staff Writer
It has been over two years since a
helicopter crash claimed the life of mu-
sician Stevie Ray Vaughan, and although
the great blues guitarist is gone, his mu-
sic lives en as a legacy for his all-too-
brief career.
Fortunately, through the efforts of
Epic records and the
Vaughan estate, older
brother Jimmie
Vaughan in particular,
S.R.V. fans have been
treated to a new album
of previously-
unreleased material
each of the last two
years.
With the release of
In the Beginning Oct. 6,
another gem has been
found buried deep
within Epic's musi:
vaults.
Beginning docu-
ments Stevie Ray's in-
credible journey from
a street-wise kid play-
ing barrooms in Aus-
tin, Tx to a blues leg-
end admired by the
likes of Eric Clapton,
Buddy Guy and Robert
Cray. Unlike his seven
other albums, In the Be-
ginning documents Stevie Ray's career
before the first major record deal, when
he was simply known as Stevie Vaughan.
Because the show would be broad-
cast live on KBLJ-FM in Austin, Stevie
Ray realized this could be the break he
and his band, Double Trouble, were
looking for. They approached the
evening with an incredibly loose en-
erg)
'There's noth-
ing like being
in a place
waiting for the
concert to
start Ire-
member being
14 years old
waiting to see
Cream.
There's always
that energy
outthere'
� Stevie Ray Vaughan
"There's nothing like being ina place
waiting for the concert to start Stevie
Ray once said. "I remember being ener-
gized when I was a kid, waiting for
somebody I wanted to see come out �
Buddy Guy, Bobby Bland, B.B. King,
Albert King, Fats Domino. I remember
being 14 years old waiting to seeCream.
There's always that energy out there.
"Sometimes I'm able to get that feel-
ing from the other side.
There's a kind of calm
just before we go on. I
don't say much. Then I
go out on stage and �
click! It's there
On April 1, 1980,
in a little bar in Austin
called Streamboat 1874
it was definitely there.
Taken from a two-
track recording of the
simulcast radio broad-
cast, Stevie Ray went
at the audience full
force, as he did every
night, resulting in one
of the best concerts
ever recorded.
After an opening
plug for the concert's
sponsors (i.e Steam-
boat 1874, Picker's
Paradise and
Reelsound Recording)
by the house an-
nouncer, Stevie Ray be-
gins the set on this nine-song CD with a
powerful rendition of Freddie King's
instrumental "In the Open
TheTexas bluesman then breaks into
an original groove called "Slide Thing"
which offers only the second � and best
� recorded glimpse of Stevie Ray on
slide guitar.
Next up, Stevie Ray tips his hat to a
couple of his guitar heros, Eddie Jones
and Otis Rush, on the classic cover tunes
of "Guitar Hurricane" and "All Your
Love (I Miss Your Loving)
He follows these songs with another
cover song, "Tin Pan Alley which
would later surface on his second al-
bum, Couldn't Stand the Weather. This
piece, which is almost eight minutes
long and has a couple of screaming solos,
is the high point of the concert and
sounds even better than the studio ver-
sion.
Stevie Ray then returns with an-
other original, "Love Struck Baby" and
a Chester Burnett (a.k.a. Howlin' Wolf)
song, "Tell Me which were both in-
cluded on S.R.Vs 1983 debut album in
their studio format.
"Shake For Me a Willie Dixon song
with an infectious groove, offers another
listen to the frenetic guitar playing which
made Stevie Ray a living legend among
his peers during his career.
After a quick introduction of the
band members, Chris " Whipper" Lay ton
on drums and Jackie Newhouse on bass,
Stevie Ray takes off again with another
original song, "I'm Cryin to close out
the album.
I only have a couple of complaints
about this "new live album: five songs
were edited out of the officially released
album (including a 10-minute rendition
of the classic "Texas Flood") to reduce
the concert to only 45 minutes.
Also, "I'm Cryin' " is mistakenly
labeled "Live Another Day" in the liner
notes, an unforgiveable sin considering
Jimmie handled executive production
duties for the album.
Despite these minor flaws, this is a
remarkable album with some of the fin-
est fret-work you will ever hear.
This concert marks the beginning of
Stevie Ray's rise to the top and is a must
for budding guitarists and blues fans
eveywhere.
Cinematic perfection arrives only a few times a year, if Redf Ord'S 'River' lUllS aS masterpiece
that. 'A River Runs Through It' has arrived
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Photo courtesy Columbia Pictures
-Craig Sheffer, Brad Pitt and Tom Skerritt star in the drama, "A River Runs Through It adapted from
the acclajned novella by Norman Mclean and directed by Robert Redford.
Every so often a film comes along
that can be lauded as a masterpiece, a
consummate work of art. Films that
fall into this category stir the soul,
elicit strong emotions and provide
immeasurable entertainment.
A River Runs Through It qualifies
as a masterpiece.
All facets of this film flawlessly
fit into place. The characters seem so
real because of the perfect comple-
ment of director, actors and script.
A River Runs Through It was
directed by Robert Redford, a man
more known for his acting than his
directing. Still, Redford has shown
promise in his two previous directo-
rial efforts Ordinary People and The
Milagro Beanfield War.
Redford shows that the compas-
sion he usually displays on screen is
part of his very fiber. The wonderful
treatment he gives this film verifies
Redford's deep artistic sensibilities.
He cares deeply about life, as exhib-
ited by his art.
The actors Redford collected for
A River Runs Through It mesh per-
fectly into the story. Tom Skerritt plays
a stem Presbyterian minister devot-
edly raising his two sons, Paul (Brad
Pitt, the hitchhiker in Thebna and
Louise) and Norman (Craig Sheffer).
Emily Lloyd, who gave a bratty per-
formancein Wish You Were Here, gives
a decidedly laid-back touch to the
role of Jessie, the girl with whom
Norman falls in love.
The real marvel in A River Runs
Through It is the story.
Norman Maclean, who wrote the
novella of the same name, oversaw
the initial production phases of this
film until hisdeath shortly after shoot-
ing began. Maclean's story is an a u to-
biographical account of life in
Missoula, Mont.
Most of the story centers on the
summer beforeMacleanwenttowork
at the University of Chicago as an
English professor. Maclean had spent
six years at Dartmouth prior to this
summer. The last summer of his youth
serves as a metaphor for his family
life up until that point.
Before this summerarrives in the
film, a thorough family background
is developed. It is this early develop-
ment that allows the audience the
chance to know thecharacters in later
life.
Redford begins the film by read-
ing from Maclean's book; "In our
family there was no clear line be-
tween religion and fly-fishing Fish-
ing serves as a way to bring the fam-
ily together. Amid the majestic moun-
tains of Montana, the bonds between
family members seem as clear as mat
stream.
Love flows freely between these
characters though the only way they
seem to be able to express it is to fish
together. Noneof the malecharacters
hug, although they do occasionally
shake hands. Watching the way the
family relates will touch most view-
ers deeply.
So much of this film explores the
relationship between brothers and
the relationshipeach brother has with
his father. Norman is an obedient,
See River page 8
M ��





i II� �-
i�- i�ii S i mr- ii hit
5 77� �as Carolinian
NOVEMBER 12, 1992
Maritime
Continued from page 7
century sites, 19th century sites,
16th century sites � and are now
aware of some clues and that's
really experience that you just
cannot get in the classroom he
said.
While a month in Bermuda is
certainly wonderful, the students
spent almost all of their time
working, having only four days
off the entire time and spending
from seven to nine hours out on
the boats most days.
After the students returned
to the fort, the boat had to be
unloaded and all gear had to be
washed and hung to dry. After
dinner, the students wrote up re-
ports of what was found during
the day marked the positions of
the finds on a nautical map, de-
veloped pictures, viewed videos
taken of the sites and worked on
personal conservation projects in
the lab.
On their days off, the stu-
dents explored the rest of the is-
land, touring the cities of
Hamilton and St. Georges and
relaxing on the pink beaches of
Bermuda. Students also spent
time at the Frog and Onion Tub,
just outside the museum, drink-
ing pints of Bass Ale and doing
the Marange dance.
The students were stationed
at a hostel in the Bermuda Mari-
time Museum, an early 18th cen-
tury fort located in the Royal Na-
val Dockyard of Bermuda. The
hostel is comprised of separate
sleeping areas for the males and
females with rows of bunk beds.
One student, Sean Holland-
Moore, was in charge of prepar-
ing all the meals.
The museum is located on
the tip of Bermuda allowing a
beautiful view of the ocean and
the rest of the island.
River
Continued from page 7
well-disciplined child who wants
to grow u p to be like his father. Ta u 1
wants nothing to do with his father
and grows up to be a profligate. He
gambles heavily,drinksheavily and
fights regularly.
Despite their differences the
brothers accept oneanother for who
they are.
They both love fishing and that
bond is stiong enough to cement a
solid relationship.
Paul, it turns out, is the better
fisherman. He is, as Norman de-
scribes him, an artist. To watch Paul
fish is to witness perfection.
Ironically it is Paul who seems
to have the fuller appreciation of
life (although tlii point could be
argued) even though it is Norman
who has so poignantly told this
touching story of love and life.
A River Runs Through It is not
to be missed while in theatrical re-
lease. The wide screen accentuates
the beauty of the Montana of
Norman Maclean. The tale is too
powerful to wait until video.
Cinematic perfection arrives
only a few times a year, if that. A
River Runs Through It has arrived.
By all means, go see it.
The East Carolinian is now accepting applications for the
positions of Assistant Sports Editor and Staff Writer.
Applications are available at our office in the Publications
Building from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.
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ilk - � - -
The East Carolinian
November 12, 1992
Sports
Page 9
ECU v. Arkansas State Er
Lerican Indians victims of racism
-SiS-
Arkansas State University
:1991 record: MO
Primary offense: Multiple Pro
Primary defense: Multiple, 4-3 Base
-Offensive lettermen returning,lost: 45,15
-Defensive starters returning, lost: 6,5
-Head Coach: Ray Perkins
-Record at School: 1-8-0 (first year)
-Career Record: 33-23-1 (5 seasons)
-General Information
-Location: Jonesboro, Ark.
Enrollment 10,000
Colors: Scarlet and Black
-Conference: Independent (Joins Big
"West in 1993)
Stadium: (33,410)
-Surface: Grass
1992 Schedule (1-8)
Sept. 5 lost to Toledo, 0-49
Sept. 12 lost to Oklahoma, 0-61
Sept. 19 lost to N. Illinois, 0-31
Sept. 26 beat S. Illinois, 42-38
Oct. 3
Oct. 10
Oct. 17
Oct.24
Oct. 31
Coach Ray Perkins
Kendrick Bullard
lost to NW Louisiana, 18-24
lost to Troy State, 7-41
lost to Memphis St 7-37
lost to Mississippi State, 6-56
lost to Louisiana Tech, 0-23
mm
mm
IF A Defensive
Player of the
Week
Ernie Lezvis
Sr.3L,OLB,
6-1,216
NCAA Statistical Ratings
Category ECU
Total Offense 13
Pass Offense 4
Rush Offense 80
Scoring Offense T29
Total Defense 105
Rush Defense 106
Pass Defense 95
Scoring Defense 103
Net Punting 84
Turnover - T93
Kickoff Returns 31
Punt Returns 9
Individuals (Top 50 Only)
Michael Anderson
total offense - 9th
ASU Peter Zophy
106 receptions per game - T46th
81 Clayton Driver
106 recievingyardsg-46th
107 Morris Letcher
104 all-purpose rushing yard
107 21st
102 receprionsg-T39th
107 Greg Grandison
87 interceptions - T31 st
T103 Junior Smith
75 rushing yardsg - 45th
93
Arkansas State has no
qualifiers
By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
Before I touch on a subject that is
much more important than touch-
downs and the win column, let me
talk a little about the game.
ECU will beat the Arkansas
State Indians, 52-17. No contest. We
will beat them so badly, I predict a
Deke Owens field goal. If we lose, I
will jab me eyes out with a pencil.
Both defenses are terrible. ASU
is ranked 104th in the nation with
ECU a close 105th.
However, ECU'S offense is one
of the country's best. ASU has not
scored 20 points in a game all season.
It is highly possible they could score
their season high against us, but I'm
trying to make the defense feel a
little better about the loss to West
Virginia.
I was close on last weeks score
�the final was41-28,1 picked it34-28
(I gave the defense just a little too
much credit). A mere touchdown is
all that kept me from silencing my
critics. Probably just luck. Let's see
how I do this week.
There really isn't much left to say
about the game.
Thereis,however,a serious prob-
lem with Arkansas State's nickname
and mascot. With the above excep-
tion, there will be no references made
to it on The Enst Carolinian sports page.
It is a disgusting symbol of racism.
Athletic teams should not have
a race of people as a nickname or
mascot
American Indianprotestwas said
to have cast a shadow over an other-
wise glowing World Series a year ago.
Such priorities must be reversed in the
minds of non-bigots. The World Series
is not more important than civil rights.
This season's Series did not spark
nearly as much controversy, in part
due to the relative subsiding of the
"tomahawk chop
Don't begin to mink this is an old
controversy. It is still a problem that
must be addressed and the fact that it
has yet to be solved speaks pxxirly of
the media and athletics in general.
Most of the major media ques-
tioned the timing of the American In-
dian protest during the '91 Series �
"Why did they wait until now?" was
heard in press boxes and news rooms
Blatant Racism: The caricature of Arkansas State's mascot makes a
mockery of American Indians. The other "mascots" try to make a point
across the country.
The American Indiansdidn'twait
until now. They have been trying to
get the point across for years. That is
disheartening.
There has been protest on this
issuefordecadesand,intypicalWASP
fashion, the American Indian voice
was muffled my the typically uncar-
ing media � no matter how loudly
they yelled.
By the late 1960s, Dartmouth
dropped the "Indian" as thei r mascot
That was almost 33 years ago�long
before most people reading this article
were bom.
In the early 1970s, Stanford and
Syracuse dropped their"lndians" and
"Saltine Warrior" nicknames, respec-
tiveiy, d ue to the feeling of mockery of
American Indian culture. Nearly 20
years later, very few schoolsand teams
have come to the same obvious con-
clusion and followed suit. Why?
"Army had a mule for a mascot,
Navy had a goat Georgia had a bull-
dog and Syracuse had an Indian
Oren Lyons, a Syracuse alumnus and
Iroquoischief, recalled. "Itwasas if we
were less than human
Feeling less than human might
not be a feeling many white people
can relate with.
Unfortunately, an American In-
dian child may look upon the Atlanta
Braves'symbol with the same eyes an
African-American child uses when
confronted with Sambo. Caricatures
and mcKkery of a race has serious
underlyingconsequences onachild.
Even though sport is entertainment,
and not to be taken too seriously, it
should not be excused from respon-
sibility.
Remember Amos & Andy?
Thought so.
In 1987, the efforts of a Sioux
social worker and an advertising
agency in Minneapolis helped shed
light on the racism forced on Ameri-
can Indians by obvious, racially de-
gradingnames and logos. The adver-
tising agency produced posters with
mock team names, such as "San Di-
ego Caucasians "KansasGtyJews"
and "The Niggers followed by the
Cleveland Indians. The bottom of the
poster read: "Maybe now you know
how Native Americans feel The ef-
forts paid off only locally. The rest of
America remained oblivious to the
situation.
The Washington Redskins tout
the most derogatory name in all of
sports. To most American Indians,
the name carries connotations asdeep
and painful as the word "nigger
Jack Kent Cooke, the team's owner,
doesn'tseem to care very much. How
about you? Do you care about the
pain that is being caused to an entire
culture?
This nation must wake up to the
expanding wall of insensitivity built
around the most oppressed culture
and race in US. history. How may
people would be comfortable with
theEastCarolina African-Americans
or the Arkansas State Blacks? What
about the Georgia Crackers or North
Carolina Tar Babies? Does the New
York Hymies bother you?Howabout
the Los Angeles Wet Backs or the
Washington Gooks? The San Anto-
nio Spies has a nice ring to it
People better start listening and
being a little � no, a lot � more
considerate and tolerable of all the
cultures in this country.
Have I made myself clear?
Crystal Balls
ECUASU
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor5217"We better not have too much trouble spanking one of the worst teams in the country. I really don't want to jab my eyes out with a pencil, run through Ficklen naked and impale myself on a rusty fork
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor5610"The Pirate air attack will obliterate the ASU defense
Richard Eakin, Chancellor4210"East Carolina is back on the winning track
Nancy Jenkins, Mayor of Greenville3723"The only winning Arkansas (State) will do is with Clinton
Brian Bailey, Sportscaster, Channel 94914"The Pirate defense will vent out much of its season-long frustration on a totally outmanned (ASU) squad.
Kevin Hall, WZMB Sports Director -3817"The seniors will leave Ficklen stadium on a positive note
Courtney Jones, SGA President28 43 ease17 15 no wager"The Pirates will finish strong in their final home game
(This is for entertainment purposes avg. jnly. PIing. No spitting on the subway. No jaywalking. Don't talk in class and sit up straight.)
Waam's
Pick
ASU not in same
league as Bucs
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
Anyone who enjoys watching
"air attack" football should be in
Ficklen Stadium Saturday to watch
the ECU Pirates destroy Arkansas
State.
After a two-game losing streak,
the Pirates are looking for a victim and
Perkins' unsuspecting 1-8 team will
do just fine.
The Pirates, troubled by their in-
ability to sustain critical offensive
drives, will have no problem with
ASU, who rates 102nd in pass de-
fense and 107th in defending the run.
Watch for Junior Smith and Charles
Miles to each rush over 125 yards
Saturday, as ASU opponents have
averaged 290.6 yards on the ground
mis year. Even more devastating to
ASU will be the Pirate passing game.
Despite losing their past twocon-
tests, the "Pirate Airlines" are still
flyingstrong, withtheMichael Ander-
son-led passing offense rated fourth
in the nation. Look for Anderson to
make Greenville's skies not at all
friendly for Arkansas State, as he is
likely to have a career day.
The Pirate defense, although sta-
tistically worse than the ASU unit,
will outshine ArkansasState'sorfense
and give Anderson and company
plentyofopportunitytooperate.Look
for Tony Davis and Jerry Dillon to
give ASU quarterbacks a nightmare
behind the line and for the Pirate
secondary to come up with more in-
terceptions than in previous games.
ECU'sdefensiveunitwillpitchanear
shutout if they play to the level of
intensity they played in the first and
fourth quarters of the West Virginia
game. With ASU ranked 106th in
total and rushing offense, the Pirates
should be able to contain the unit by
concentrating on pass defense.
ASU, only averaging 82.6 rush-
big yards a game, does not possess
the rushing power to give ECU the
problems they have faced in their
losses.
Head Coach Ray Perkins, after
an NFL coaching career, is doing an
admirable job in helping ASU make
the transition to a Division I-A pro-
gram. Perkins- and hjs team are find-
ing out this season how difficult mat
transition will be.
If Perkins stays at ASU, who
knows? Perhaps in a few years, they
will develop into a formidable foot-
ball power, but they aren't there yet.
They aren't ready for Greenville's
resident passing phenomenon.
Perkins' team will lose, and lose big.
Someone fire up those air-raid
sirens, the Pirates are back in town.
Batson dials
long distance
for award
This week's AT&T Long Dis-
tance punt return award in NCAA
Division I-A
: college foot-
rball went to
.E a s t
;Carolina's
:D e r r e k
- Batson, who
:returned a
:punt 97
; yards for a
: touchdown.
But it
;w a s n ' t
lenough as
: the Pirates plummeted to a 41-28
: defeat at the hands of West Virginia
on Saturday.
Batson shares the award with
! Oregon State's DwayneOwens, who
� also returned a punt 97 yards for a
j touchdown against UCLA.
I A 5-foot-9,180-pound freshman
-wide receiver from Miami, Florida,
Z Batson broke a scoreless tie midway
See Batson page 10
�4-
ECU Swim team rides wave of victories
Derrek Batson
Fr-Rs, WR, 5-9,
168 pounds
By Brent St. Pierre
Staff Writer
The ECU men's and women's
swim teams road a wave to huge
victories at William and Mary Sat-
urday. The men defeated the Tribe
149-85 while the women cruised to
a 146-96 victory. The men won 11
of 13 events while the women took
care of business by winning 10 of
13 in their events.
ECU Head Coach Rick Kobe
was ecstatic to say the least: "The
times were really outstanding con-
sidering how early in the year it is.
For the men the upper classmen
were key, they did what they had
to. For the women it was great to
see those kind of performances
from freshmen, hopefully who can
use this great victory as a spring-
board into our next meet Nov. 20th
against Richmond
The Pirate men's honor roll was
spearheaded by Derick Nelson who
won all three events in which he
swam. Nelson was first in the 200-
meter free style with a time of
1:45.16, first in the 500-meter
freestyle with a time of 4:48.70.
The southern Virginia water
was equally inviting to the Lady
Pirates as well.
The ladies were led by a pairof
freshmen: Jackie Schmieder and
Photo by Oail Raid
No lifeguard on duty: ECU's men and women have made a big splash in the
water this season.
Beth Humphry. Schmieder won the
1000 freestyle in 10:39.80 the 200 IM
in 2:13.60 and the 500 free in 5:13.10.
Humphry splashed her way to vic-
tory in the 200 free with a time of
1:57.60 as well as in the 200 fly in
2:12.40. Humphry's third win came
in the 400-meter freestyle relay.
Senior co-captain Tia Pardue al-
most pulled off the hat trick as well.
She was first in the 50-meter free in
25.30, first in the 100 free in 54.80and
swam anchor on the400-meter med-
ley relay with Rachel Atkinson,
Hilary Stokes and Tracy Garrett. They
finished second with a time of 4:10.30.
Tara Roland reigned supreme on
the board. She was first in the one
meter competition with 106 points and
first in the three meter competition
with 115 points.
Other impressive performances
included Rachael Atkinson's third
place finish in the 200-meter back, her
time was 2:17.40. Co-captain
JacquelineSilber finished third as well
in the 200-meter breast with a time of
2:35.20.
Ruggers fall
short on verge
of best season
By Richard J. Hooton III
Staff Writer
On Saturday, the East Carolina Rugby
team lost a hard fought match to Mary Wash-
ington. This match decided which team would
advance to the East Coast regional tourna-
ment. Both teams were chosen to represent
their states as wild card teams. On this cold
Saturday morning it would be the Virginia
team which was victorious; they scored 19
points in the last 20 minutes of play to defeat
the Pirates, 25-18.
The match was highlighted with hard hit-
ting and brutal rucks and mauls from both
teams. East Carolina controlled much of the
loose play. Chris Carney and Jason Webb kept
the pressure on the Mary Washington backs
and were causing major problems for the ball
transition on their wing. Open field tackling
became very rough and it was evident that high
tackle penalties would not becalled. Both teams
took advantage of this, but it was Bob "Homer"
Thomas (6-4, 260 pounds) who enjoyed it the
most. Thomas was burying the Mary Washing-
ton ball-carriers; and as a result, tempers and
"extracurricular" activities began to flare.
The only score Mary Washington could
manage was a thiee-point penalty kick which
made the score 8-6. This inability to convert
See Ruggers page 10
I





10 The East Carolinian
NOVEMBER 12. 1992
Batson
Continued from page 9
through the opening period as he
established a school record. He had
one reception in the game for three
yards.
For the season, the 19-year old
Batson has returned two punts for
95 yards and caught 26 passes for
288 yards and a pair of touchdowns.
In recognition of his accom-
plishment, AT&Thas donated $400
to the NCAA's Degree Completion
Scholarship Fund.
Batson will be awarded an en-
graved plaque in recognition of his
achievement.
"AT&T is proud to contribute
to this college athletic program so
that athletes � both present and
future � can continue their educa-
tions Mary Reiling, national di-
rector of sponsorships and promo-
tions for AT&T's Consumer Com-
munications Services, said.
Ruggers
anything led winger JJ. McCain
to zig-zag through their defense
and pass to Michael Culligan who
sped 30 meters for the Pirates' sec-
ond try of the day.
Stephenson's kick was wide
right and the score stood, 13-6.
East Carolina continued their cer-
tain onslaught as Jay Keller and
Bert "the Donkey" Hewitt con-
trolled thebrain-scrambling rucks
and mauls. With 25 minutes left to
play, Carney scooped up the ball
and began to drag two would-be
tacklers into the try zone when he
passed to Hewitt who scored an
easy try to put the Pirates up 18-3.
However, Mary Washington
did not give up as they rose to the
occasion by scoring 19 unan-
swered points in the last 20 min-
utes.
The Pirates were still dazed
when the final whistle was blown.
Continued from page 9
East Carolina had out-played
the Mary Washington team in
all aspects of the match, save
one, the score.
Whooo, Weee!
Get off. No more
late nights with the
lights on. To be the
best, you gotta beat
the best, baby girl.
There is only one .
She who hesitates
is lost. (a.ka. Drake,
Base,Dolph, Vanilla,
The Acknickalous
O n e, T G M A).
WeeeeRYaKnoiv!
I
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11 THRU WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 25. 1992 I
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STUDENTS
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imily, Per Visit W
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ch
embe
mber
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Oj
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 12, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 12, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.908
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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