The East Carolinian, November 10, 1992






Anti-social
Monkee snubbers
Arkansas who?

i
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 20
Circulation 12.000
(ireenville, North arolina
I uesdav, November 10. 1902
S Pages
libraiy expansion remains on hold
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Student says lack of money
cost him seat on city council
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Students take advantage of job fair Resume workshop will
help grads find jobs
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Grad into


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Delta Chi fraternity
receives national charter
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2
NOVEMBER 10, 1992
The East Carolinian
Resume
Cflpflnufid torn pa�e 1
Questions surround student's death
The murder of a Middle Tennessee State University stu-
dent and the beating of her fiance has left officials with nothing
butquestions. Senior Heather Urfelmanaccompanied her fiance,
Jeremy Rolfs, to Marietta, Ga to meet with a prospective busi-
ness client. Rolfs was to meet the client in a hotel room on behalf
of his employer, Halsey International of Nashville. Rolfs was
beaten and hospitalized with head injuries, requiring 40 stitches,
but was able to attend Uffelman's funeral. "Heather was just
tragically in the wrong place at the wrong time said Capt.
Walter Parker of the Marietta Police Department.
Student sues Chili Peppers
A former George Mason University student has filed a $4
million dollar lawsuit against the Red Hot Chili Peppers for
damages as a result of a 1989 sexual assault. The woman was
assisting band members outside their dressing room when lead
singer Anthony Kiedis asked whether she would have sex with
him and thrust his penis in her face. Kiedis was convicted of
sexual assault and indecent exposure in 1990 in Fairfax County,
Va. He was fined and sentenced to one day in jail. Kiedis
appealed the case, but the appeals court upheld the conviction.
Blacks push for change in UNC system
Black student leaders from three North Carolina universi-
ties gathered recently on the Brickyard at North Carolina State
University and denounced a system that they said is stacked
against them. About 100 students represented the UNC-CH
Black Awareness Council, N.C. Central University and NCSU.
Thabiti Anyabwile, a student from NCSU said cultural integra-
tion efforts are unacceptable because they are governed by
whites. "The problem with multi-culturalism is has been taught
from European prejudiced perspective Anyabwile said. All of
the students asked for a change in the treatment of minority
students in the UNC system.
Students graduate 50 years later
It was 50 years late, but 19 Japanese-American classmates,
clad in caps and gowns, finally held formal commencement
exercises at the University of California at Berkeley. The 1942
graduates had received their original diplomas by mail while
imprisoned at a World War II internment camp. About 90 mem-
bers of the class were located and attended the fall convocation.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
WHY A NURSE
ANESTHETIST SHOULD
BECOME AN OFFICER
IN THE ARMY RESERVE.
The reasons are quite clear.
� Leadership. Working with
our professional health care
team affords you many oppor-
tunities to develop strong lead-
ership qualities as a commis-
sioned officer.
� Continuing Education.
Such opportunities in the Army
Reserve are an important part
of a nurse's career path.
� Profrnaional Expo�.
Greater exposure to top health
care professionals, with oppor-
tunities to exchange views
and ideas.
There are other reasons, of
course, and our Nurse Recruiter
can discuss them with you. Find
out why Army Reserve Nursing
is for you. Call:
1'800-6627473
BE ALL YOU CAN BE
ARMY RESERVE
and references.
"A student should never
send a resume without a cover
letter Pittman said. "Also,
misspelled words are definitely
not good. A student has 20 to 30
seconds to make their point, and
it must be clear and concise
References should be of-
fered in the resume, but not in-
cluded in the actual one-page
document, Pittman said.
Career Services offers a
service where students can have
a reference list on file.
Employers can request the
references from Career Services
(usually no less than three) or
students can have them on a
separate sheet of paper.
"The time frame deter-
mines whether or not you'll give
the references along with the
resume Pittman said. "For per-
manent work, it's advised that
the student should hold off and
wait until they're asked for
Career Services, located in
Bloxton House between
Mendenhall Student Center
and Greene Residence Hall,
offers one workshop a week.
Students are not required
to sign-up for workshops and
will meet one-on-one after their
first workshop.
"A resume is like a tag
on a piece of clothing
Pittman said. "Itwill tell em-
ployers what you're made of
Health
Continued from page 1
Michael Patterson, an occupational
therapy major. "They practically
grabbed me out of the hall. One
company told me they had been
trying to fill a position for three
months
After the event, $100 scholar-
ships were given to randomly se-
lected students who signed in at the
registration desk. Westmoreland
said the scholarships will be
awarded as credits toward a
student's tuition balance.
"It was a positive day for the
university, allowing students and
employers to interact on a personal
level Westmoreland said. "I be-
lieve the peopleleft here today with
good feelings about our students,
and our students left with a better
idea of their career plans
The East Carolinian
Check it out
A workshop will be
offered Nov. 12 at 3
p.m. and another on
Nov. 16 at 5:30 p.m. at
the Bloxton House.
For more information,
call 757-6050.
TTT
Most CollegeGraduates Enter the
i Real World As A Sales Representative
After Graduation
You need the experience and we can help you
XXX Sain experience before you graduate.
?
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TRACK THE
PIRATES
TO MEMPHIS
If you're going to any out-of-town
game this season get to the
3 Memphis State game Nov. 21
in Liberty Bowl Stadium. Make
your plans now. Swing in Friday
h night and hang out at Overton
J Square. Eatin milling, listening
and grazing. Crash late Saturday, beat your feet on
Mud Island, see the Pyramid, Graceland, a little
milk and cookies, whatever. Then the game and
wind up on Beale Street, where red, hot and blues
are guaranteed. Crawl home Sunday with enough
stories to last your 50th class reunion. Call today
for all the stuff you need, 1-800-873-6282, it's our
quarter. Make your reservations and all that jazz.
GET OUT OF TOWN
GET TO MEMPHIS
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street Hours:
The Lee Building 757-0003 Monday - Friday
Greenville NC 8:30-3:30
GREENVILLE MOTEL
"SUPPORTING ECU STUDENTS
AND PIRATE FOOTBALL"
Enjoy the Hospitality, Clean Rooms, Free Cable TV,
and Free Local Calls at the Greenville Motel.
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
From November 13th to the 15th.
2309 S. Memorial Dr.
Greenville, NC 27834
(919)756-1130
?Student ID Required
The East Carolina University Performing Arts Series
proudly presents
Qualifications:
�AfuU-time student with no more
than 15 semester hours of classes
�At least a 2.0 grade point
average
�Your own transportation
�An excellent work ethic and
a willingness to learn
�Available to work about 20
hours per week, Monday
through Friday
�Previous sales experience
is not required
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The Hast Carolinian is
currently accepting
applications for
Advertising
Representatives
irft
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Ik-Adv.
1 )i rector.
East Carolinian is an equal opportunity employer ????j
HANOVER
m
The Hanover Band was formed in 1980 by its Artistic Director,
Caroline Brown. The band uses authentic instruments of the Hanoverian
period. It also follows the principles of interpretation that were in use
during that time.
In order to create a classical orchestra which could revitalize
and expand the listener's musical awareness of the rich repertoire of the
period, research has been made into playing techniques, tempo, pitch,
set-up of the instruments, and use of the original or exact replicas of the
instruments of the period. This ensemble often consults original manu-
scripts and first editions of compositions in order to replicate music as the
composers would have scored them.
Friday, Nov. 13,1992 Wright Auditorium - 8:00 p.m.
Public $20 ECU FacultyStaff $15 ECU StudentYouth $10
Group rates are available. All tickets $20 at the door.
For tickets contact:
The Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Phone: 919-757-4788 or, toll free, 1-800-ECU-ARTS
jf , Presents
COLLEGE
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Every TUESDAY
9:00 pm until 2:00 am
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Dr. Doug spins the best
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NOVEMBER 10, 1992

Pitzer
and stmients, and if it came down
to a student running against a citi-
zen there, 1 know all the citizens
would vote. 1 don't think, that would
work
Pitzer said hedidn'tknow how
much longer he would be in Green-
ville, and said he doubted if he will
run in the next council election.
"My options are open now
he said. "I'm not tied down to hav-
ing this job on the city council, so
right now running again isn't really
in my future. I think it is an idea that
should be pressed so thatsomebody,
somestudent,shouldtrytorun.Prac-
tice makes perfect
Pitzer's advise for any student
wanting to run for the council:
"The main thing is flyer
Continued from page 1
advertisement around campus. Just
something big that has your name
on it
Jack Wall won theat-largeseat
with 5,2(X) votes, and Chuck Patrick
placed second with 4,542.
The original election for the at-
largeseat wasscheduled for Novem-
ber 1991. However, because of there-
drawing of the voting lines after the
1990 census, the Greenville munici-
pal elections were d el ay ed until M ay
5,1992.
The election for the at-lager
seat was again delayed until No-
vember alter violations in the vot-
ing laws during the May election.
The next election for the Gre-
enville City Council will be in No-
vember 1993.
NURSE OPPORTUNITIES
NURSING AT
ITS FINEST.
You'll find pride
and professionalism
as a member of the
100 BSN Army
Nurse Corps-plus
the pay and benefits
of an Army officer and excellent oppor-
tunities for higher education.
Call your Army Recruiter now.
1-800-6627473
ARMY. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
Seafood House & Oyster Bar
I0W SERVING OYSTERS AT OUR OYSTER
BAR
STUDCNT SP�Cim
$ 1.00 OFF Any Meal �xcept Specials!
rouponjooodthru 113192 uuith Student I.D.
Shrimp Plate $3.95
Trout & Shrimp Plate $4.95
Ocean Perch $4.95
Offer Good Mon-Thurs
u. . ABC Permits
Washington Highway Take-outs Welcome
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Interested in a
Career
as a Paralegal?
Legal Assistants Program
� A certificate program open to qualified women
who have a baccalaureate degree
� Approved by the American Bar Association
� Intensive summer schedule May-August; part-time
evening schedules beginning January or September
� Placement service for graduates is without fee to
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Applications Deadline for the 1993 Summer Program: March 1,1993. For details,
contact: Legal Assistants Program, Continuing Education, Meredith College,
3800 Hillsborough Street. Raleigh. NC 27607-5298 (919) 829-8353.
Meredith College admits women students without regard to race, creed, national or
ethnic origin, age or handicap. i m i -4-t
The East Carolina University
Student Union Special Concerts Committee
with
First Citizens Bank
proudly present
Live! In Concert!
Charles Kuralt and Loonis McGlohon
in
North Carolina
Is My Home
Wednesday, November 11, 1992
Wright Auditorium - 8 p.m.
Public12 ECU FacultyStaff $10 ECU StudentYouth $8
Group rates are available. All tickets $12 at the door.
For tickets contact:
The Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Phone: 919-757-4788 or, toll free, 1-800-ECU-ARTS
Fraternity
Continued from page 1
dean of students, congratulated
the Delta Chi chapter and en-
couraged them to be leaders of
the student body. Schardein de-
fined a fraternity beyond its so-
cial significanceand specifically
as the "love between each
other
Another Alumnus and re-
gional member, Bill Williams,
also wished the new charter
members well. Williams met
the fraternity members last year
at the Regional Conference and
encouraged them along the way.
Williams thanked all the
parents for their support in help-
ing gain the charter and focused
on the foundation that Delta Chi
has now made for the future.
Sam Matheny, Delta Chi's
alumni relations chair, passed
out awards. Special mentions,
as well as plaques, were given
toexceptional alumnusand out-
standing members for their
help.
Finally, Delta Chi was
presented with its charter and
was acknowledged as the East
Carolina chapter of Delta Chi
international fraternity.
Michael Carroll and Paul
Bohlman, national executive
members, issued the charter
after boasting over the
fraternity's accomplishment.
The current president of
Delta Chi, Jason Alexander, ac-
cepted the charter on behalf of
Delta Chi's brothers.
One associate member
summed up the overall feelings
by saying, "Delta Chi is the
brotherhood of a lifetime, and
I'm proud to be a part of it
MSg2MM&MfflMBfflMMMMBBB&33&

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Only one vendor coupon will be accepted per item
purchased





g.
The East Carolinian
November 10, 1992
Opinion
Page 4
Rock the Vote urges more voters
On Nov. 3, a significant increase of people in
the age group of 18 to 24-year-olds showed up at
the polls to voice their opinions.
Since 1971, the year when 18-year-olds were
given the right � and privilege � to vote,
participation by young people has declined ev-
ery year. In 1988, a whopping 36 percent of
voters that age took the time to make a differ-
ence in their country's future. So members of the
recording industry decided to encourage this
group to become involved in democracy and
politics.
Thus Rock the Vote was born.
Rock the Vote is a non-profit organization
who recognized that 18 to 24-year-olds have
shown a massive indifference to civic participa-
tion. Rock the Vote believes that young people
can make a difference in their society by electing
politicians, passing laws and implementing
policies.
The U.S. Census Bureau reported that out of
a total of 25,569,000 18 to 24-year-olds in the
United States, 12,321,000 were registered to vote
and 9,255,00 voted in the 1988 election. This
means that 36.1 percent of the total 18-24 popu-
lation voted and that 75.1 percent of registered
voters voted in 1988.
In the 1992 election, 11,440,000 young people
voted out of a total of 26,392,000. This raised the
figure from 36.1 percent to 43.3 percent. This
A VIEW FROM ABOVE
Clinton's schemes will destroy industries
may not seem a large increase (7.2 percentage
points); but when figured, the voter turnout has
been raised by 20 percent over the last four
years.
Also, when looked at in conjunction with
the population increase of young people (that of
3.2 percent), statistics show that only a small
part of that 20 percent came from population
growth. Statistics also show that the overall
population increased by only 8.9 percent, cut-
ting in half the 18 to 24-year-olds' percentage.
An increase of this size can only be ap-
plauded. The statistics show that young people
are more concerned with their country and how
it is run. They want a say in who gets elected and
what laws are passed; the years of sitting idly
by, zapping that remote control are over. Voices
are being heard.
Efforts by Music Television and Rock the
Vote should be applauded also. Through con-
stant reminders, the youth of today can see their
effect and know that their one, lone vote does
count. If enough lone votes are tallied, then
things will change.
Apathy towards our society and its changes
could possibly be the biggest challenge that we,
as college students, face. By showing that we are
concerned with what happens in our futures,
students show the politicians that they just can't
disregard us.
By T. Scott Batchelor
Election day has finally come
and gone. Dustfrom the campaign
trail and the confetti from Gover-
nor Clinton's victory party has
settled, so now we can take a clear,
comprehensive look at the presi-
dent-elect's pet policies.
Let's start with theConstitu-
tion, specifically the Second
Amendment to that document.
You know, the one that says op-
pressive government-can't strip a
citizen of the right to bear arms.
Well, Governor Clinton doesn't
agree with that tenet. He is in fa-
vor of banning a certain class of
guns loosely termed "assault
weapons According to this clas-
sification, an "assault weapon" is
just about any weapon that doesn't
look like the shotgun your grand-
father used to go bird hunting
with, or just about any semi-auto-
matic rifle that holds more than
one bullet in the magazine at a
time. Ignorance and unreasonable
fear of firearms are the impetus
for this policy.
Remember Clinton's pledge
tocreate more jobs? President Bush
said Clinton would create jobs,
but that they would be mostly
makeshift work. Not so, said
Clinton. Yet one of the main items
on his legislative agenda is a $20-
billion-a-year spending plan for
highways and bridges to create
jobs � ones that are just more
taxpayer sustained government
jobs. Read as "makeshift work"�
at our expense.
Clinton also favors a law
which would prohibit companies
from hiring permanent replace-
ments for striking workers. This
policy exposes the president-
elect's affinity for labor unions and
his disfavor of business (which,
by the way, creates real jobs, not
just taxpayer supported busy-
work). It's this kind of mindset
mat cost Clinton 60 percent of the
vote.
In a truly free democracy,
citizens should be free to decide
whether or not to vote. Forcing a
person to voteisan ironic concept.
Similarly, if a person doesn't want
to regis ter to vote, he or she should
have mat right also. Those who
complain that they don't have the
time or the gumption to register
probably wouldn't vote anyway.
Clinton, however, is in favor of
forcing people to register to vote.
He proposes a system in which
states would automatically regis-
ter people to vote when they ap-
ply for adrivers' license. Of course,
aside from the erroneous govern-
mental implications of this plan,
another big, federal government
bureaucracy would be created (a
completely needless one), and
guess who'd foot the bill for it?
You got it. You would.
President-elect Clinton also
has grand (and expensive)
schemes for stopping crime in our
country. He wants to hire and de-
ploy 100,000 new police officers
through what he terms a national
police corps. A national police
corps. Scary, isn't it?
So far J haven't mentioned
one Clinton policy on the environ-
ment. Fear not, gentle readers, the
governor isn't wanting in that de-
partmenteither. He wishes to limit
carbon dioxide emissions to 1990
levels by the year 2000. (Clinton
and his vice president-elect Al
Gore, a.k.a. Ozone, have a theory
about there being global warm-
ing, but this theory hasn't gained
much acceptance among the sci-
entific community.) Manufactur-
ing industries produce carbon di-
oxide. Clinton vowed to increase
the industrial base in the U.S. and
step up manufacturing. Yet he
wants to strangle industry by lim-
iting carbon dioxide emissions.
Interesting concept, that.
Along these same lines,
while campaigning for president
up around Michigan, Clinton
pledged his support for the auto-
motive industry. Yet one of his
goals is to set a 40-mile-per-gallon
efficiency standard within the next
eight years. Do you know what
this would do to automobile mak-
ers like Ford, Chevrolet and
Chrysler? Cripple them, that's
what. (By the way, another blow
to industry by Clinton.) Fortu-
nately for Detroit, the governor
has remained true to form and has
waffled on whether he will ag-
gressively pursue this standard.
One of governor Clinton's
big selling points during the cam-
paign was his plan to set a two
year cap on welfare payments at
the end of which those who could
work would have to. What would
happen to those who sHll hadn't
found employment after the two
years expired was not answered.
But Clinton did say that he would
implementeducation training and
childcare programs (Federal
babysitting) for welfare recipients
during those years. In other words,
although Clinton says he'll cut
welfare expenditures, they will
probably increase disguised as
new "training" and "childcare"
programs.
And finally, our next presi-
dent supports a policy of favoring
the welfare of animals above that
of displaced workers in determin-
ing whether animals should be
protected under the Endangered
Species Act. If there's a choice be-
tween whether a human and his
family survives and the preserva-
tion of a habitat for an owl � the
owl wins, talons down. Another
blow to industry and private sec-
tor employment. Amazing.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Bobbi Perfetti, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Classified Advertising Tech.
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed toThe Editor, Tlie East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
ftl�
fbUKAW
mitePluKs
HfcU'We
Quote
of the
Day:
it
makes no
difference
who you
vote for �
the two
parties are
really one
party rep-
resenting 4
percent of
the people.
Gore ViM
By Jim Shamlin
Socialism will p
(Editor's note: Because of
space constraints, this column will
be run in two parts.)
I vaguely remember, almost
a decade ago, when America's fa-
vorite bimboappeared on the tele-
vision screen and pouted, "Don't
do drugs Six months later, the
country was a cleaner place. But
there was one at the time, a laugh-
ing cynic, who was dismayed.
What she had done was a good
thing, he conceded, but the power
she had distressed him. "I'm
afraid he said. "If that bimbo got
on the screen and said, 'Eat crap
daily America's breath would
reek for years
And now, years later, that
same bimbo popped up again,
wrapping herself up in a flag and
pouting, "Rock the vote and
many people did. This was, all in
all, a good thing. But at the same
time, she sold this country poison,
using all her smarm and sleaze to
disguise a cancer seed as a vitamin
pill � and America ate it.
As a result, our breath will
remain clean, but for years � for
the next four years, at least � we
will be dying a slow, agonizing
death from a political cancer called
socialism.
On the surface, socialism
looks healthy enough � it prom-
ises free food, free money, free
everything. The government, like
Santa Claus, gives presents to ev-
eryone � pretty little packages of
health care services, economic
improvement and technological
progress.
People, by and large, are so
distracted by the gifts laid out be-
rove bane of mankind's existence
fore them that they don't realize
what's going on behind them:
Uncle Sam, with a gun in his
pocket, is takingmoney from their
wallets, money to pay for all the
presents,even those that they don't
want, and money to waste, and
money for himself � for the fat
paychecks of congressmen, for
their disproportionate retirement
funds and expensive "business"
vacations and jets and limousines
and and so many things we, as
citizens, can't afford because our
money, money we earned, some-
how disappeared from our wal-
lets.
With the fall of Soviet Rus-
sia, the world should have learned
its lesson. In the early 1900s, the
Bolsheviks were mak'ng the same
promises our leaders are making
today � everything the people
always wanted, at no charge. It
was supposed,to be free, but gen-
erations of Soviets have paid the
price. There are some who would
argue that the fall of Russia is be-
cause they took socialism too far,
to too extreme a degree � but the
nature of socialism is like that of a
disease. It starts small and grows
as the politicians see how easy it is
to milk a socialist system. They
bring it in, little by little, until it
infects the entire system.
Still, people think a little so-
cialism couldn'thurt�they think
a small dose of it would actually
help. Even if this were true, how
would one define an acceptable
amount? What is an acceptable
amount of cancer in one's body
tissues? What is an acceptable
amount of HIV in one's blood-
stream? What is an acceptable
amount of socialism in one's po-
litical system? The answer to all
three is "None
The politicians present an
idyllic vision of what could hap-
pen if we used socialism in small
doses � to improve our economy,
our healthcare system, our
country's industry. Rather than
listening to what they hope will
happen, we need to consider what
has happened. Look at history,
look at the citizens of countries
that adopted socialistic policies,
and ask questions:
� Ask any Soviet artist, who
spent half his life in a prison cell
because he dared glorify man
rather than the state, what his so-
cialist regime has done for the arts.
� Ask any Englishman, who
watched the best minds flee his
country during the "brain drain"
of the 1960s, what his socialist re-
gime has done for technology.
� Ask any Canadian, who
lies dying while his name is on a
two-year waiting list for a coro-
nary bypass operation, what his
socialist regime has done for health
care.
� Ask any Ethiopian, starv-
ing in the filthy ghettoes that once
were great cities, what his social-
ist regime has done for his stan-
dard of living.
History provides the an-
swers to these questions, and none
of them are as pretty as the politi-
cians paint them to be�but there
is still another question that Ameri-
cans must ask themselves: "Is this
what you want to happen in your
country?"
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Parking to come before new dining hall
To the Editor: muter parking. Even though this
I, for the most part, as an ECU lot near college hill is relatively
student will better make it if I try large, it is already filled by 9 A.M.
to find out what's right about this
place, but there's the occasional
exception.
News has it we are building a
new cafeteria and eating estab-
lishment in the coilege hill area
that is to be paid for by the sales of
bonds. I feel that there are greater
needs than this new cafeteria,
mainly more parking and better
areas for study in the campus area,
other than the library.
Every Tuesday and Thursday I
line up with others to play the
game of pick and win with corn-
On Oct. 13, the competition was
especially fierce, making me al-
most late for class. With persever-
ance I did finally get a space. I
would like to see bonds sold for a
new commuter parking lot.
With regard to the need for
more study areas, students on the
campus end nearest the Biology
building have quite a walk to get
to the library.
Evidence for the need is seen
everyday in the WrightSoda Shop
as studying students take seats
other students, lunch in hand,
need. Thereespeciallyneedstobe
on this end of campus more areas
for study, perhaps a special build-
ing or lounge erected. Students
having an hour or more between
classes have little except hall floors,
the ground or back-breaking
benches like those in General
Classroom.
In any event, more attention
needs to be given to actual student
needs. My proposed idea for the
new commuter parking would be
squarely in the middle of where
the new cafeteria is to be. I'd
rather go to class on an empty
stomach than not go there at ari.
Carl ton Carver
Dispute over condoms and AIDS rages on
To the Editor:
In recentissuesof your news-
paper, there has been a dispute
over the effectiveness of condoms
in deterring the risk of AIDS and
the credentials of John Harris.
First, published in AIDS Re-
search and Hutnan Retrovintses, the
Surgeon General of the United
States, Antonio C. Novello, ad-
dressed the annual meeting spon-
sored by the Laboratory of Tumor
Cell Biology and National Cancer
Institute. Novello states that a
study "concluded using scanning
electron microscopy on 50 samples
of stretched and unstretched latex
condoms; no pores were found in
any condoms even when viewed
at a magnification of 2000x With
even more supporting evidence,
she concluded that "these data
indicate latex condoms can serve
as an effective mechanical barrier
to HIV transmission
Now, in all my searching for
Harris' credentials, not one direc-
tory in the Health Science Library,
nor Joyner Library, had any men-
tion of him. Furthermore, it must
be acknowledged that Harris' ap-
pearance on this campus is be-
cause of a campus Christian orga-
nization. Harris'intentions in edu-
catingyoungpeopleareobviously
tainted by religious virtue.
It is a severe insult accusing
(L. Paige) Rider of consulting MTV
for her knowledge; she is a pre-
med student and has most cer-
tainly done her research. (Shane)
Deike's interest in Harris seems
capricious.
David Walser Yarbrough
Art Graduate





HHHMHHiflfiMHiMUHIi

77�? �terf Carolinian
November 10, 1992
Lifestyle
Page 5
Fiddle Puppets clog happiness into kids
By Marjorie McKinstry
Staff Writer
Most other groups would have
run�theiraudiencewasamassof
giggling, bubbling and spastic chil-
dren, and a few tormented adultsas
well.
Saturday these children were
to witness a small group of people
with more contained (and some-
times uncontained) energy than a
classroom of kindergarteners on
Hershey bars and Jolt soda.
The Fiddle Puppet Dancers,
clothed in brightly colored Appala-
chian style d ress and wearing large,
clod hopper shoes, smiled energeti-
cally from the stage toward the au-
dience.
The dancers started off with a
thundering rendition of Appala-
chian clogging, and the purpose for
the ungainly shoes was soon ap-
parent. As each foot and heal
slammed against the wooden floor,
it was possible to see how this rhy th-
micdancing eventually evolved into
a.more polished and less heartfelt
style of dance called tap.
The Fiddle Puppets also dem-
onstrated forms of perc ussive danc-
ing from Ireland, Canada and Af-
rica. The group explained to the
audiencehow working-class people
on different continents developed
similar styles of dance. They told
the children how the protective
shoes from coal mining in England
and diamond mining in Africa in-
spired the miners to produce music
with their feet.
More than simple entertainers,
the Fiddle Puppets requested the
lights be raised so the children and
adults in the peanut gallery could
Broadway musical tells
Buddy Holly's story
The five person Fiddle Puppet troupe entertained an audience filled with energetic children and worn-out
parents by teaching dance and song for all ages.
be included in an impromptu Children quickly learned to slide
their feet in a country style of
hamboning lesson. The children
were taught various forms of body
music, including head taps, bass
riffs from the chest and a mouth
slapping version of "shave and a
haircut
The Fiddle Puppets continued
theaudience's ed ucation by request-
ing everyone to stand and try to all
step together in rhythm with a
fiddle. After this simple step was
completed, the lesson became more
advanced and many people ran to
the aisles for foot-stomping room.
a
moonvval king, and progressed from
this step to a more difficult cross-
over step that baffled some of the
adults. Hands tucked into armpits
as the Fiddle Puppets encouraged
the new dancers to emanate chick-
ens � the barnyard expanded as
roosters and bulls emerged from
the various dances.
But sadly, the afternoon had to
end; seated once more, moms, dads
and munchkins, cheeks flushed
from dancing, watched the Fiddle
Puppets conclude their perfor-
mance. As the fiddle twanged, the
dancers stomped, clogged and even
did a little tap in synchronicity, but
they also jumped into spontaneous
solos expressive of their individual
talents and personalities. For the
first time, thedancers cavorted with
spins and leaps as weli as the tradi-
tional dancing.
This final dance was actually
more indicative of the art of Ameri-
can clogging because it showcased
the joy and spontaneity of barn-
yard dancing.
By Mike Harrison
Staff Writer
Musiclistenerswhoweren'tsit-
ting in Wright Auditorium Friday
night missed a Broadway musical
that was nothing short of spectacu-
lar.
"The Buddy Holly Story"
chronicled toe short career of rock
'n' roll's legendary singer and
songwriter of the '50s.
The plot was easygoing, never
complicated and, unlike other mu-
sicals, it was never disjointed by the
high-energy musical numbers that
continuously popped up.
The play began by showing
Holly trying to reject his country
music background that he and a
friend had established for them-
selves.
A bass player joined toe duo in
1953, ultimately changing toe name
from "Buddy and Bob" to "Buddy
Holly and The Crickets" and bring-
ing Holly to change the sound of the
group to Rhythm and Blues.
However, R & B was seen by
'50s America as being "black mu-
sic'Themusicindustry'sreluctance
to accept an all-white R & B group
was a major obstacle to overcome.
The group performed on radio
stationK-DAV.Theysoonrecorded
somedemo albums, became a sup-
port band for Bill Haley and His
Comets, opened a show for Elvis
Presley and finally went on tour.
Fame swept through the lives
of toe band players as their tunes
climbed record charts in the United
States and United Kingdom.
Meanwhile, rising conflicts be-
tween himand The Crickets,as well
as his manager,caused himtobreak
off from them.
Byjanuary 1959,Hollyheaded
'The Winter Dance Party a music
extravaganza thatincludedTheBig
Bopper,RitchieValens,Dion&The
Belmonts and Frankie Sardo.
The group traveled by bus but
chartered a plane to carry them to
theSurfballroominQear Lake Feb.
2,1959. The plane crashed, killing
everyone aboard.
Doing a play in which the au-
dience is collectively aware of the
inevitable tragic ending had to be
noeasy task. Morbidity and a sense
of impending doom would have
seemed to dominate the entire pro-
duction. Instead, toe play was very
entertaining and uplifting.
Nevertheless, a poignant mo-
ment came during the latter half of
the second act Holly's wife awoke,
franticafterdreamingaboutaplane
aash.Tocalmher,Hollysangsoftly,
consoling her. This was to be their
last moments together.
All toe songs were excellently
choreographed. The audience was
bombarded with thecast'sobvious
enormous talentforsongand dance.
The mesmerizing energy lev-
els of everyone on toe stage never
ebbed for a second. Aside from a
rare overacted line of dialogue, the
play was perfect, totally absorbing.
The audience was brought to a re-
sounding standing ovation even
before toe last few notes of toe final
number were finished.
Musical numbers were
splashed through the show, some
of which include "That'll be the
Day "Peggy Sue "La Bamba"
and "Johnny B. Goode
Industrial music shows
'Terminal Power"
Minnesota's Style Monkeez received
in Greenville by pathetic crowd
By Andy Sugg
Staff Writer
Abraham Lincoln once wrote in
a book review, "For people who like
this type of book, this is the type of
book they'll like
The same idea applies to Termi-
nal PowerCompany's Run Silent Run
Deep; for people who like this type of
music, this is the type of music they'll
like.
Forget guitars, pianos, drum-
and stuff � this music is all elec-
tronic. The beat is definitely heavy
and inspires dancing. However, af-
ter listening to several tracks, it seems
only the lyrics change�thebeatand
the music tend to get a trifle monoto-
nous, but I understand this to be an
aspect of industrial music.
Terminal Power Company is
John Roome and Paul Aspel;they
� are the writers, composers and pro-
ducers.
The songs are dark, with pain-
ful, violent images that assault and
burden the listener with the respon-
sibility for the world's ills: "Neon
lights suffuse with the dinRetina
bum, Audio sinNapalm children,
toe cathode rayYou know toe time,
you know the dayEarth is chok-
ingThe burning sunThe hand in
leather upon the gun" (from "Slow
Motion Riot").
At other times, the lyrics fail
to achieve any substantiality:
"Caughtina trapNo wayback
The fire and the gateMy altered
state" (from "The Hunger toe
Heat").
Songs like "Burning
Chrome "Blood,Hesh&Sand
and "Getting toe Fear" all contain
these depressing images of a
world ravaged by toe excesses of
its inhabitants.
The best track on Rim Silent
KimDeep is foeseven-minute "Ur-
ban Tsycho This song is long,
with music that's not quite so
repetitive and the lyrics are spo-
ken in what can best be called a
forceful whisper in a concrete tun-
nel.
But what scary images! "The
lightsareon But there's nobody
homeThey're out with the chil-
drenIn the killing zoneI'm the
gasolineIn humanities fireThe
lastbaptismThebloodysireI'm
toe last v ision Your only friend
Just call me PSYCHOThe very
end
Seven minutes of it. Yum.
So if you like this type of
music, you'll loveTerminal Power
company's Run Silent Run Deep.
I'm sure if I did, I would have.
Crowd size surprised both the
Monkeez and opener, Animal Bag
Photo by Dail Reed
Despite the small crowd, the Style Monkeez, led by singer Greg
Spearick, gave an enthusiastic performance Friday night
By Bobbi Perfetti .
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Greenville, mislabeled "popu-
lar" for its party atmosphere this
weekend, hosted a disappointed
.band Friday night at the Attic. The
Style Monkeez played for a handful
of people, most of whom had left by
the end of the show.
The whole town missed out by
not attending the concert. The
Monkeez played light thrash and
their songs were hill of spastic en-
ergy. Their concerts are definitely
not something you could sleep
through.
From their opening song to the
last set, the band rocked hard, un-
fortunately only to a barely existent
audience. Their remake of
Madonna's "Justify My Love"
brought down what house there
was. Vocalist Greg Spearick had a
hard time singing over the excel-
lent, hard-hitting drum talent of
Shawn Walker. Bassist Brent Alwin
and guitaristTroy Sennettkepttime
with cool riffs and strange bass
sounds.
The Style Monkeez is a unique
group of guys. Not only is their
music style off-beat, so is their style
of dress�the lead singer wore sweat
shorts covering sweat pants with a
tee shirt and ragged suit coat. Sitting
by the drummer was a lighted plas-
tic Joseph from a nativity set. This
Joseph wore a dredlock wig and a
cowboy hat.
The Style Monkeez played all of
the songs on their only album en-
titled Schmelt Fry in Antigo. The al-
bum contains 13 tracks which will
keep you on your toes, even the
narcoleptic. Though the words are
unintelligible at times, the lyrics have
meaning.
"Style Lord" complains of the
trendy fashion-conscious people
who only wear designer clothing.
The Style Monkeez relived the
70s nightlife in "Disco Man "I've
got a satin shirt leisure suit and plat-
formshoes And with my gold chains
you know I can't loseAnd cause of
dancing class 1 know how to move
my ass The album has a variety of
crazy background noises such as
whirlytoys and armpit farts.
Hats off to the guys who drove
from Minnesota to Greenville and
gave the tiny audience their best If
toe Style Monkeez ever grace us with
their talent again, make sure to rush
downandbringyourmoshingshoes.
� Ugly Kid Joe's latest album dubbed 'Least Wanted'
By Mark Brett
Staff Writer
Photo courtesy Stardog Records
Mark Davis, Klaus Eichstadt, Dave Fortman, Whitfield Crane and Cordell Crockett make
up the comical Ugly Kid Joe. Their latest, "America's Least Wanted is a semi-flop.
Ugly Kid Joe's new release, America's
Least Wanted, is good on same superficial
level.
IistmingtoitlighUy(Ukefromadifferent
room than die stereo), it kicks like a spirited
young horse. The beats are crunchy and have
the crushing, powerful feel that only the best
nKk of the 70s achieved. I found myself
enjoying a hard rock album for the first time
in years. Then I really listened to it
Thealbum starts off (mapromisingnote
with "Neighbor It is a dissection of middle-
class life; the ugly American laid bare in full,
disgustingglory;a veryeffectivesong. Unless
you've hard the Dead Milkmen's "Stuart a
mudi more venomous (and funnier) take-off
of toe same idea.
The next song, "Goddamn Devil is
gtxifyhin.Thistunesoundslikeafiery Baptist
sermon listing the various crimes that can get
you into hell. Basically a bunch of lurid non-
sense, the piece becomes satirical with the last
verse, which offers one way out of hell for the
wicked: "As Sa tan's child you'll start a band
And spread the word across toe land
These two songs are the major highlights
of the album until it finally ends with "Mr.
Recordman A hilarious indictment of the
industry's rush to book "hot "young" and
"different" bands, this is the best song offered
here.
Between "Goddamn Deil" and "Mr.
Recordman"isapaddedcollectionofmusicof
uneven qualityatbestFirstfoereisanattempt
at relevance. "ComeTomorrow a pictureof
urban decay, is a song that never quite gels.
Moving away from toe heavy stuff, toe
Ugly boys hit us with "Busy Bee a lovey-
dc ney-touchy-feely-hippy song. It has a lot of
neato jangley guitars, but toe effect is blown
completely by the insertion of toe dreaded-
yet-ineitable power chord. VVhy does every
cheezy piece of metal ballad crap have one of
these things? Itwasn'tgood whenTed Nugent
did it, and it is worse now.
America's Least Wanted rolls on with "So
Damn Cool whidi rips off theopeningriff of
Alice in Chains "We Die Young Then there
is "Same Side a "universal harmony" tune
that sounds like the Chili Peppers after a few
too many six packs. Next, Ugly Kid Joecomes
dean about their derivative ways with a nice
cover of the familiar Henry Chapin classic,
"Cat's in the Cradle At this point, the album
goes south entirely. "Everything About You"
and "Madman first released on last year's
multi-platinum As Ugly As They Wanna Be,
appears again for our edification and amuse-
ment The use of these songs show how lame
this new album is.
Ugly Kid Joe can be quite an entertaining
band at times. "Everything About You" is a
funny song and the attacks on middle class
America are suffidently bratty to elicit a few
sympathetic chuckles. When they try to be
serious, these guys fall on their butts.
N
� . �;��������.�






rfmmmh7 urnkZ.�Jm
The East Carolinian
i
NOVEMBER 10, 1992
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS: 1 and 2 bedroom
apartments. Energy-efficient,
several locations in town. Car-
peted, kitchen appliances, some
waterand sewer paid, washer
dryer hookups. Call 752-8915.
APARTMENT FOR RENT:
One bedroom, $275 a month. 4
blocks from campus, energy
efficient, free basic cable,
washerdryer hook-ups.
Available January 1 (nego.).
Apt. 3 Captain's Quarter. Call
830-6902.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Fe-
male nonsmoking roommate to
share new 2 bedroom apart-
ment with graduate student,
beginning December or Janu-
ary. Low rent and utilities,
good area. Call 321-0538.
NEED 3-4 PERSONS to as-
sume lease at Georgetown apt.
Call-830-9546 ask for Dave or
Brian.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: To share 2bedroom
inWilsonAcres. Willhaveown
room. $158.66mo. 13 utili-
ties. Call 830-9213.
NEEDED 1 OR 2 FEMALE
roommates foi Apt. in Wilson
Acres. 13 rent and utilities.
Available December or Janu-
ary. Please call 830-9066.
ROOMMATE- Non-smoking
female roommate needed for
2nd semester. Large 2 bed-
room apartment. Bus avail.
Rent 187.50 12 utilities call
758-2549 or 758-3092.
FOR RENT- One bedroom
apartment walking distance to
class. Avail, now call 758-3092.
APARTMENT TO SUBLET-
One bedroom: $280 a month. 4
blocks from campus. 2 can
share. Available December 18.
Lease ends in May. Apt. 202
Kings Arms. Call 758-4366.
FOR SALE
PAY IN-STATE TUITION?
Read Residency Status and
Tuition, the practical pamphlet
written by an attorney on the
in-state residency application
process. For Sale: Student
Stores, Wright Building.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
CONDO- One bedroom unit.
Children out of school, I want
to sell fast. Call (919) 847-1557
Raleigh, NC.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED
CARS,trucks, boats, 4 wheel-
ers, motorhomes, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available your area now.
Classifieds
Page 6
FOR SALE
Call 1 -800-333-3737 ext. c-5999.
FURNITURE FOR SALE:
EXCELLENT condition, per-
fect for college student or newly
married couple. Lamps, Brass
bed and 3 piece livingroom set.
Excellent prices- Call Angie at
830-0168.
BIKE FOR SALE: 1992 16"
TREK 820. Excellent condition.
Only lmth old. Female owner.
Hardly used: CALL JILL AT:
752-8504.
MATERIALS FOR INTER-
MEDIATE EDUCATION Ma-
jors Professional File. 758-5988.
FOR SALE: A six drawer chest
with mirror. In great condi-
tion. $30 or best offer. Call 830-
0551.
TREK 7000 (Aluminum Frame)
Derore components. Very nice
$400.00. 757-1961.
FOR SALE: 5 piece Cherry
B.roomset. Moving-must sell!
$395.00. Call 946-9653.
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
EOJVi USED CD'S
HELP WANTED
GUARANTEED WORK
AVAILABLE. Excellent pay for
EASY home based work. Full
part-time. Rush self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers
(G2) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham, NC 27705
S360UP WEEKLY. Mailing
brochures! Spare full-time. Set
own hours! RUSH self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope:
Publishers (Gl) 1821 Hillandale
Rd. 1B-295 Durham, NC 27705
SAVE ON SPRING BREAK
'93! Jamaica, Cancun, and
Florida from $119.00. Book earl
and save $$$! Organize group
and travel free! Sun Splash
Tours 1-800-426-7710.
YOUTH BASKETBALL
COACHES: The Greenville
Recreation and Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth basketball
coaches for the winter youth
basketball program. Appli-
cants must possess some
knowledge of the basketball
skills and have the ability and
HELP WANTED
patience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 9-18,
in basketball fundamentals.
Hours are from 3:00 pm until
7:00 pm with some night and
weekend coaching. This pro-
gram will run from December
to mid-February. Salary rates
start at $4.25 per hour, formore
information, please call Ben
James or Michael Daly at 830-
4550.
EASY WORK! Excellent Pay!
Assemble Products at Home.
Call Toll Free 1-800-467-5566
ext. 5920.
STUDENTS OR ORGANI-
ZATIONS. Promote our
Florida Spring Break packages.
Earn MONEY and FREE trips.
Organize SMALL or LARGE
groups. Call Campus Market-
ing. 800-423-5264
POSTAL JOBS available!
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call 1-800-333-3737 ext.3712.
INTERNATIONAL EM-
PLOYMENT - Make money
teaching English abroad. Ja-
pan and Taiwan. Make $2000-
$4000 per month. Many pro-
vide room & board otherben-
efits! Financially & Culturally
rewarding! For International
Employment program and ap-
plication, call the International
Employment Group: (206)632-
1146 ext. J5362
IMMEDIATE OPENING for
typistsecretarial person. Ap-
ply in person between 9:00 -
5:00 Monday thru Friday at SDF
Computers, Inc 106 E. 5th St
752-3694
NOW HIRING SPRING
BREAK REPS for Panama
City Beach: Greeks, Organiza-
tions, Individuals earn cash,
free trips & experience. Call
Joe (ENDLESS SUMMER 1-
800-234-7007)
EARN COMMISSIONS &
SKI FREE by becoming a group
sales representative for south-
east ski area. Must be active &
sales oriented. Send resumes
to Paul Mason, Director of
Marketing, New Winterplace
Inc PO Box 1, Flat Top, WV
25841
EARN $10O0WEEK at home
stuffing envelops! For infor-
mation, send long self ad-
dressed stamped envelope to
CJ Enterprises, Box 67068L,
Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44222
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is
anticipating 3 advertising rep-
resentative vacancies for the
spring semester. We can offer
HELP WANTED
you valuable experience before
you graduate. Formore details
look for our ad on page 2. Ap-
plication deadline is 111392.
Please submit an application
and a resume to the director of
advertising for a personal in-
terview.
BASKETBALL OFFICIAL'S
MEETING: The Greenville
Recreation and Parks Depart-
ment will be holding their or-
ganizational meeting for any-
one interested in officiating in
the men's winter basketball
league on Tuesday November
10,1992 at 7:30 pm at Elm Street
Gym. All interested officials
should attend this meeting. For
more information, please call
Ben James or Michael Daly at
830-4550 or 830-4567.
WE ARE GETTING READY
FOR CHRISTMAS Are you?
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tions for part time sales and
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Apply at Brody's in the plaza
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A tremendously groovy job and
you are a potential computer
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edgeable) contact Karen at The
East Carolinian at 757-6366 for
the chance of a lifetime! If you
think you might have a shot at
this position and you don't call,
hit yourself in the head a couple
of times something's loose
in your attic! Look for our ad
on page 8.
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Ask for �
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though our ski lifts were bro-
ken, you showed up in force
for our freak snow storm. Ev-
eryone had a winter wonder-
ful time. Thanks a lot what
ever your names were. Sorry it
took so long for the pen to thaw
out. Beta
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too good to be true! The cre-
ative, talented, original,
friendly, crazy, super members
of the Science Fiction & Fan-
tasy Organization are meeting
this Sat. Nov. 14 from 6-9 pm in
the TV room, located in the
basement of Mendenhall! All
welcome! No turtles please.
DREW ANDERTON - This is
a personal. Can you say PER-
SON-AL? I knew you could!
By the way have you been hus-
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I guess I'll go.
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Call 752-8320 from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm.
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ready to rent immediately. Great location, close
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Announcements
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SEXUAL-GAY-LESBIAN
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Group activities and discus-
sion of issues relating to same-
sex orientation. Meetings are
closed. Call 757-6766 11:00-
12:15 Tues. and Thurs. or 1:00-
4:00 pm Wed. for information.
SPEECH-LANGUAGE &
AUDITORY PATHOLOGY
All General College students
who intend to major in Speech-
Language and Auditory Pa-
thology and have R. Muzzarelli
or M. Downes as their advisor
are to meet on Wednesday,
November 11,5:00 pm in Gen-
eral Classroom 1026. Advising
for early registration will take
place at that time. Please pre-
pare a tentative class schedule
before the meeting.
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FELLOWSHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray,
study God's word, be involved
in social and service projects?
Need a refuge from time to
time? Campus Christian Fel-
lowship may be what you are
looking for. Our weekly meet-
ings are at 7pm Wednesdays at
our Campus House located at
200 E. 8th St directly across
Cotanche St. from Mendenhall
Student Center. Everyone is
welcome. For more informa-
tion, Call Tim Turner, Campus
Minister, at 752-7199.
REGISTRATION FOR
GENERAL COLLEGE
STUDENTS
General College students
should contact their advisers
the week of November 9-13 to
make arrangements for aca-
demic advising for Spring Se-
mester 1993. Early registration
will begin November 16 and
end November 20.
ADULT CHILDREN OF
ALCOHOLICS
Meets every Tuesday at 4
pm in the upstairs lounge at
the Methodist Student Center,
501 E. Holly Street. All are
welcome. �
25 AND OLDER:
UNDERGRADORGRAD
STUDENT
Family responsibilities
(spouseand orchildren). Join
us for brown bag lunches on
Wednesdays from noon to 1:30
pm. Come for part or all of the
time. This rap group is an in-
formal gathering designed to
be supportive and help meet
the needs of students with fam-
ily responsibilities. Informal
discussions and presentations
are the format. Yes, there are
many students at ECU facing
the same concerns as you!
TIME: Wednesdays Noon to
1:30 pm. PLACE: Counseling
Center (313 Wright Building)
For more information, phone
George Gressman at 757-6661.
SCHOOL OF NURSING
DEPARTMENTAL MEET-
ING.
The School of Nursing will
hold departmental meetings:
Freshman and Sophomores-
Tuesday November 11,5 pm-
NB 101. Juniors and Seniors-
Wednesday November 12, 5
pm- NB 101. All general col-
lege students who intend to
major in nursing should attend
the FreshmanSophomore
meeting. All majors are
strongly encouraged to at-
tend Early registration and
admission to clinical courses
will be discussed.
ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH AND SAFETY
Recycling Assistant needed
I-Classification 1035. 4 posi-
tions. 20 hrs per week. 4.25-
5.00perhour. Job description
requirements- Assist Recycling
program with daily recycling
tasks and special projects.
Material handling, sortmg,
pick-ups and office tasks. Must
be eligible for financial aid and
have CWS-2 form.
ATTENTION PRF-PHYSI-
CAL THERAPY STUDENTS
Registration advising for
spring semester, 1993, will be
held on November 9th, 10th,
and 11th (Monday, Tuesday
and Wednesday) evenings
form 7:30 until 9:30 pm in the
Physical Therapy lab (Belk
Building). All pre-physical
therapy general college stu-
dents are expected to attend
one of these sessions to have
spring semester schedules ap-
proved and signed by a physi-
cal therapy adviser.
RECYCLING DROPOFF
College Hill- Tuesday, 8:00
am to Wednesday, 8:00 am.
Campus Mall-Wednesday, 8:00
am to Thursday, 8:00 am.
Greene Hall-Thursday, 8:00 am
to Friday, 8:00 am. Campus
Mall- Friday, 10:00 am to Mon-
day, 10:00 am. Above times
are approximate as to recycling
trailer arrival and departure.
FPSILON PI TAU
Meeting at 5:00. Meeting
will be held in Room 106
Flanagan. Pizza and drinks will
be furnished. (Members only).
SOCIETY FOR ADVANCE-
MENT OF MANAGEMENT
SAM-Society for Advancement
of Management speaker meeting
will be held Tuesday 1110 in
GCB1028at3:30. The speaker will
be Mrs. Marge Franck, Past Presi-
dent of Women Business Owners
of Pitt County and owner of a
local accounting firm. Elections
will be held after the meeting.
Refreshments will be served
also.
RESUME WRITING WORK-
SHOP
The Career Services office an-
nouncesitsworkshopsonresume
writing to be held on Thur. Nov.
12 at 3:00 pm and Monday, Nov.
16 at 5:30 pm in Bloxton House.
Participants will learn about for-
mat, content and production of a
professional resume. Handouts
will be available. This workshop
isespecially designed forprospec-
tivegraduates,butisopen to any-
one.
S.N.C.A.E.
Attention! All education
majors, S.N.C.A.E. meeting:
Thursday, November 12th at
4:30 in Speight 308. Come all!
FCU TAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will be
holding its next meeting on No-
vember 16that5:l 5pm in Ragsdale
218. Students from any major
who ere interested in attending
law school are invited to at-
tend.





The East Carolinian
November 10, 1992
Sports
Page 7
BOX SCORE
WVa. 0
East Carolina 7
17
0
14
7
10
14
41
28
FIRST QUARTER
ECU - Derek Batson 97 yd. punt return (Owens PAT
Good) (0 plays, 97 yards 0:00)
SECOND QUARTER
W.Va. - Mike Vanderjagt, 33 yd field goal (14 plays, 64
yards, 5:19)
W.Va. -Jon Jones, 5yd touchdown run (Vanderjagt PAT
CoodXS plays. 25 yds.232)
W.Va. -Studstill, 4-yd touchdown pass to Cappa
(Vanderjagt PAT Good) (5 plays, 57 yds, 1:43)
THIRD QUARTER
W.Va. -Studstill, 6yd. touchdown run (Vanderjagt PAT
Good) (11 plays 57 yds, 431)
ECU - Michael Anderson 1-yard pass to Charles Miles
(Owens PAT Good) (11 plays, 75 yards, 5:09)
WVa - Woodard, 31 yd touchdown run (Vanderjagt
PAT Good) (5 plays. 57 yards 1:42)
FOURTH QUARTER
ECU - Ernie Lewis 99 yd fumble return (Owens PAT
Good) (0 plays, 0 yards, 0:00)
W.Va. - V�nderjagt32yd. field goal (7plays,37-yards, 3:11)
ECU - Michael Anderson 11-yard touchdown pass to
Morris Utcher (Owens PAT Good) (10 plays. 80 yards,
2:24)
WVa- Ford 13 yard touchdown run (Vanderjagt PAT
Good p plays, 37 yards, ST)
Pirates unable to
stop W.Va, Rush
TEAM STATISTICS
liiitcsMountaineers
First Downs2032
Rushing621
Passing128
Penalty23
3rd EFF4ofll5ofl4
Total Net Yards339521
Total Plays6S90
Average Gain5.05.8
Net Rushingn379
Rushes2763
Average Per Rush3.266.07
Net Yards Passing251142
CoinpAttempts23411527
Yards Per Pass10.99.4
Sacked: Yards-lost21200
Interceptions362130
Average Per Punt31.447.0
Return Yards7510
Punt Returns212323
Kickoff- Returns576794
Fumbles: Lost2241
Possession Time25:1734:43
PLAYER STATISTICS
Missed field goals:
W.Va. 13
ECU Rushing: J.Smithl5-45,C.Miles5-41, Anderson7-
2,
ECU Passing: M. Anderson 34-21-237, S McConnell 7-
2-14
ECU Receiving: P. Zophy 1 -8, C. Driver 4-32, D. Batson
1-3 D. Hicks3-40. M. Letcher 6-110(1 TD),J. Smith 14
Lin�illel-14,C Miles2-10(l TO), Crumpler3-30
DEFENSIVE STATISTICS
TTlFR Pass Pass Pass
H AT TDT YDS YDS ntc BrUp Sacks
Dillon7 3102
Render10 010
Davis8 0
Lewis4 261(99) 1
Grand ison5 16
Carter4 15
Cooper4 151
Floyd, G.4 04
Foreman. M3 25
Cooke2 24
Cunmulaj1 2311
Libiano3 03
Crumble2 13
Boothe0 33
Walker0 22
Seekford1 01
Jon�,T.1 01
Scott, W.1 01
Walker. F.5 05
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
The East Carolina football
team, plagued by turnovers and
missed opportunities, lost a piv-
otal game Saturday against West
Virginia. They also severely jeop-
ardized their chance at a winning
season. Despite hard-nosed play
by the Pirate defense, the team
could not overcome turnovers at
key times in the contest with quar-
terbacks McConnell and Ander-
son throwing three interceptions,
combined.
The Pirates, unable to contain
the Mountaineers' high powered
rushing game, fell 41-28 in a loss
that was much closer than the ac-
tual score.
The ECU defensive unit
started the game playing exces-
sively stingy, blocking a W.Va.
field goal attempt and shutting
out the Mountaineer offense in
the first quarter. A 97 yard punt
return by freshman Derek Batson
put the Pirates ahead by a touch-
down mid-way through the first
quarter, and the Pirates ended the
first period
in the lead.
According
to Head
Coach
Steve
Logan, the
trick play
run by
Batson and
Morris
Letcher
had becomeajokeamongtheplay-
ers, as they felt it would never be
called during a game.
Logan said he was extremely
pleased with the execution of the
play.
"It really felt good to see the
team set up that wall for Derek
he said. "It just proves the coach-
ing success we have had this sea-
son
However, the Mountaineers
soon exploded into a rushing
frenzy that never stopped.
Led by running backs Rodney
Morris Letcher
Woodard and Adrian Murrell,
W.Va. gained 389 yards on the
ground, mostly in the last three
quarters of play. Mountaineer
quarterback Darren Studstill
helped keep the Pirate defense
honest, connecting with Moun-
taineer receivers for 142yardsand
one touchdown. The Mountain-
eers led 17-7 at halftime, after the
Pirate offense stalled late in the
second quarter.
The Pirate offense, feeling
pressure to score quickly in the
third quarter, went "three downs
and out" with quarterback
Michael Anderson's passes fall-
ing incomplete. The Pirate defense
failed to stop Woodard and
Murrell as they marched deep into
Pirate territory. Darren Studstill's
6-yard scramble into the endzone
and the resulting extra point by
Mountaineer kicker Mike
Vanderjagt set the deficit at 24-7.
The Pi rate offense rebounded
with a much-needed drive and
resulting score by Charles Miles
for a touchdown. Miles put the
Pirates back into the game.
However, the Pirate defense
was once again unable to stop the
Mountaineers, with a 31-yard
touchdown run by Woodard, late
in the quarter.
The fourth quarter brought
back memories of last year's car-
diac comeback tradition, with
Ernie Lewis recovering a Moun-
taineer fumble at the Pirate goal
line, and returning the ball 99
yards for a touchdown.
The fired-up Pirate defense
held the Mountaineers to a field
goal, but Anderson wasonceagain
picked off by the W.Va. second-
ary.
The Pirates regained posses-
sion and drove 80 yards for a score,
putting a win in reach, but Deke
Owen's botched onside kick drove
the final nail in the Pirate coffin,
as the Mountaineers' resulting
score put their hopes of a win to
rest.
The Pirates must win their two
remaining games to achieve a win-
ning season.
Biomechanics a new realm in athletics
By Jason Tremblay
Staff Writer
Biomechanics. Uh, yeah. If you,
gentle reader, are like me � one of the
uneducated masses�you likely have no
idea what the word biomechmics means.
For some (myself included), the mention
of the word conjures up the image of Lee
Majors portraying the Six Million Dollar
Man, running in slow motion that was
somehowsupposed to convey incredible
speed. Uh no.
Trescienceofbbrnedianicshasnoth-
ing to do with super strong, artificial
limbs or catching bad guys every week
within a half hour period (minus ten
minutes for commercials).
Dr. John Stevenson, head of East
Carolina's bionedhanics department, of-
fered this explanation of the science: "Basi-
cally, what biewnechanics is about, is the
application of physics and engineering to
biological systems. What we do is take a
k�kathuniannx)tionconcernsandwedo
workacross three areas: (athletics),medi-
cine and ergonomics. In medicine we've
done some work with . . . the effects of
walker design on children with (cerebral
palsy)
Though the lab does some indus-
trial work, the main focus is on athletic
application.
"We do stuff with US. track and
field throwers and I went to theOlympic
games this summer on a project to inves-
tigate (the) shot putting technique of
Olympic throwers He said.
ECU's biomechanics staff will sort
out the information, then merge their
data with information collected by a
biomechanist from William & Mary
University, who has been concurrently
analyzing the men's throwers. The final
information package will then be pre-
sented to the Olympic Games Commit-
tee for further study.
Karen Mustian, a master's student,
as well as the only graduate assistant in
the lab, was also helpful in filling in the
enormous information gaps about bio-
mechanics.
Mustian does nearly all of the digi-
tizing work in the lab, a process that
boilsdowntoconvertingvideotaped
footage intocomputerdata.Through
the use of high grade video equip-
ment, plus an arsenal of expensive
twoand threedimensional software,
practically any physical action may
fall prey to analysis in the East Caro-
lina biomech lab.
The process by which Mustian
converts the action from real life
footage to usable computer data is
very time consuming and tedious.
The video image is transferred to a
powerful computer � two frames
ata time�wherea "frame grabber
board" holds these images until she
plots specific points on the image of
the body using a mouse.
The computer pictu res are then
encoded with a sequential number,
and played back in sequence, pro-
ducing the effect of a stick figure
animation, performing the action
that is being studied. Once the stick
figure image has been stored in the
computer, it can be studied from
virtually any angle, which opens
new realms of analysis.
"I designed the program (so)
that my calf and my shin is red and
my upper leg is purple, my feet are
yellow, some of the trunk segments
on the body are green and blue, and
the head is red�That way, I can tell
where everything is at Mustian
said. "It's just like looking at a stick
figure that you would draw your-
self on a piece of paper. It's pretty
easy to tell that you've drawn a
person
However, it is not quite as easy
to prepare the data that leads to the
animated image. Mustian has logged
in countless hours at the keyboard
just preparing the data so that it
could be studied.
E.en more frightening is the
prospect of digitizing film shotat 200
frames per second, such as the foot-
age taken in Ba rcelona. Higher speeds
are neasary for actions that take
place rapidly, which is why high
speed recordingis used frequently in
sporting events. Fast images recorded
at sixty frames per second often appear
choppy and may "warp" from one
point to the next when viewed in the
slow motion necessary for analysis.
Mustian also explained that the
simple collection of data is not always
simple. Problems with accuracy dur-
ing collection can be a problem, butthe
biomech crew has tools tohelpcombat
erroneous data.
"We havea force plate that's been
embedded over in the fkxir in Minges
that measures the anterior and
posterior motion and forces in walking
or ninning or anything that you could
do Mustian said. "I mean, you could
stand still and hita golf ball off that and
it would measure the torquing force
that occurs in your knee
The plate iscapableof interacting
with other systems, allowing an enor-
mousamountof data tobecollected on
one action.
There are also several methods of
spatial measurement available to the
biomech staff to aid in the proper pro-
portioning of compu ter images in rela-
tion to the real world. A large calibra-
tion frame resembling an atomic dia-
gram, as well as simple survey poles,
act as a scaling factor when the com-
puter data is entered into the system,
much in the same way that a key on a
map helps travellers gauge the dis-
tance from one point to another.
While there is no biomechanics
degreeprogramavailableatEastCaro-
lina, Mustian says that it is possible
to tailor a physical education ma-
jor to focus on biomechanics, which
is the route she took.
So, to all you physical educa-
tion majors, forget becominga gym
teacher or a trainer � biomechan-
ics is the wave of the future. Put on
your Computer Whiz hat, and join
a fast growing field that has limit-
less expansion potential. At any
rate, you'll be able to understand
the physics behind that parental
kick in the ass you'll likely receive
when report cards are mailed
home.
Driver
on cruise
control
By Jason Tremblay
Staff Writer
Clayton Driver, East Ca rolina's
premier wide receiver, has been the
recipientofa slew of well-deserved
media attention during the 1992
Pirateseason. Ina somewhat disap-
pointing football year, Driver has
left more than a mark in collegiate
football, he's left a dent.
The recipient of numerous ath-
letic awards, Driver has attracted
the attention of more than just le-
gions of loyal Pirate fans. Driver has
already been contacted by several
agents representing the National
Football League and has high aspi-
rations of someday playing profes-
sional football.
"I'm definitely going to make a
serious effort (to go pro) Driver
said. "1 mean, the game films will
speak for themselves, and what
they're tellingme rightnow isgame
wise, you're great. Good hands,
good game speed, make plays, but
rightnow, you 're a total reject in the
40 (yard dash). The way I think
about it, that if I run a four point
five I could go in the first three
rounds. That's the way I'm looking
at it
With Driver's statistics, his vi-
sion of the future doesn't seem too
unlikely. In fact, Driver has already
made up his mind what he will do
with his money if he gets drafted.
"When I get drafted, my first
acquisition will be a black Saab, trim
in gold, gold triangle rims and it'll
be a convertible said Driver ea-
gerly. "Hopefully, my insurance
won't be so high, because I have
been the victim of tickets. Three
While he is confident that he
will indeed be drafted, Driver is
unsure of where he will be playing
and does not seem to be very wor-
ried about it
"Itdoesn'tmatteraslongasthe
home stadium's not cold Driver
explained. "I don't like playing in
cold weather, and I don't like play-
ing on turf. But, most of the NFL is
turf now anyway, so maybe it
doesn't matter. I'll just put that out
of my mind. As long as it's not too
cold. I hate playing in cold weather,
because you don't want to hit no-
body and you don't want to be hit
Photo courtesy ot Clayton Driver
Clay and Qauy (Spring '92): 'That's my heart Vincentae Niquay
Driver will be in attendance for his father's final home game.
When asked about his indi-
vidual performance in comparison
to thatof the team as a whole, Driver
is modest about his own success,
and optimistic about Pirate football
in'93.
All things go in cycles, and
right now, it's like the year 1990,
when we were so close, yet so far
said Driver. "A lot of games we did
some things thatwe really shotour-
selves in the foot, kept ourselves
from winning the games. I think
next year, they're going to be good.
1 really thought we were going to a
bowl in my heart. I really wanted to,
and I thought we had the ability to
as a team to go to a bow! this year,
but we shot ourselves in the foot
one too many times
Aside from the football ma-
chine that is Clayton Driver,healso
has many other interests. Driver
enjoys cooking, listening to almost
any type of music, with the em-
phatic exception of country music,
and surprisingly, cites basket-
ball as his favorite sport. When
asked why he was not playing
basketball for ECU instead of
football, Dri vergrinssheepishly
and explains it like this.
"Because I'm not a little bit
taller than I am. I tell the guys all
the ti me tha t if I was 6-foot4, I'd
probably be somewhere play-
ing basketball right now, but it
turned out to be I'm 6-feet-l-
inch
Perhaps the most impor-
tant thing to happen thus far in
Driver's young life was the birth
of his son, Vicentae Niquay
Driver, who will turn three in
December. Vicentae was born
to Driver's high school sweet-
heart, who is no longerromanti-
cally involved with Driver.
However, both Driver and
Vicentae's motherwork together
See Driver page 8
Atkinson gives ECU tennis team European flavor
By Brent St. Pierre
Staff Writer
It is approximately 4,000 miles
from his hometown of Sheffield En-
gland to the campus of East Caro-
lina; yet somehow, sophomore ten-
nis star Ben Atkinson found Green-
ville.
For years the United States has
robbed Europeofherfinestathlet.es,
offering them scholarships coach-
ing and a better climate. Thousands
of European athletes havedone this.
Now Atkinson is ECU's.
"When I was a senior I was ap-
proached by a coach who recruited
European athletes for schools in the
United States Atkinson said. "In
England most quality athletes go to
the States if they want to improve. 1
was one of those who was willing to
make that commitment. I had to
choose between 30differentschools.
In the end I chose ECU
Atkinson chose ECU over the
other schools, he said, because of the
quality of the coaches and the com-
petition.
"The coaches seemed very in-
terested in making me a better
player he said. "But, it's the play-
ers on the team that make the deci-
sion I made easier to accept. Every-
one i s so nice and hospitable, it was a
pleasant surprise
Talented is a word that fits
Atkinson to a "T How many people
do you know that have played at
Wimbledon? While in High School
his team in Yorkshire County was a
finalistintheEnglandJuniorNational
Championships. The finals were
played at the famed Lawn and Tennis
Cluboutsideof London. Even though
his team fell short in their quest for a
Junior National Championship,
"the experience of playing at
Wimbledon is something that I
will have for the rest of my life
Atkinson said.
A Hanson hopes to travel the
world when he gets out of school
and wants his tennis ability to pay
the air-fare. "1 would like to move
to Australia and try to play on the
Professional circuit Atkinson
said, "if that does not work out I
would like to at least coach young
tennis players.
But my im-
mediate goal is
to make it as a
Professional
tennis player
First things
first, though.
Atkinson is
only a sopho-
more and,
counting this
year, has three
yearsof eligibil-
ity left at ECU.
"I expect to
improvea great
deal before I graduate, the compe-
tition here is so much better than in
England, it seems that everyone in
the states that I have played is very
good
This is the rationale tha t Euro-
peans give to explain for the exo-
dusof Europe's bestathletes to the
universities of the United States.
As for life in eastern North
Carolina, in comparison to north-
ern England, Atkinson admits
he did not want to stereotype
North Carolina. But, he could
only picture tobacco and farm-
land before he cane.
"IloveGreenvilleand North
Carolina. Everyone in the South
is sonice. Nobody has any preju-
dices towards me being from
England. I had visited the New
England area and (found) that
the people here are much more
pleasant Atkinson said.
The ECU tennis season
starts in early spring and they
play between 27 to 30 matches a
year. They are also expected to
be very good this year, vying for
a conference crown. As for
Atkinson, his im-
mediate goals are
modest.
"I just want
to remain on the
traveling squad
(the top seven
, . - . i travel), continue
SOmethltlg that I myrehabilitation
and hopefully
"the experience
of playing at
Wimbledon is
will have for the
rest of my life
graduate with
honors
Atkinson
Ben Atkinson, gives ECU more
ECU tennis tenm than just an ath-
lete with a
golden forehand. He is a repre-
sentative and a spokesman for
ECU in Europe.
Like it or not, ECU is still
not well received by most of
the United States, even in North
Carolina. As trivial as it may
sound for a European athlete
like Atkinson, who chooses
ECU over another school, it im-
proves the university's reputa-
tion as much as any football
victory.
It is people like Atkinson
that make a university re-
nowned.
W i' mtnimtwHm





8 The East Carolinian
NOVEMBER 10, 1992
Driver
to take good care of their son.
"That's my heart Driver said of his
son. "He's the reason why I do a lot of the
stuff I do, and the reason why I don't do
a lot of the stuff that I have the opportu-
nity to do.
"He'll be here for our last game.
There are one or two things in life that are
really important, all the rest are just step-
ping stones.
"Myson being born was oneof those
twothingsthatareimportantHavingthe
responsibility of taking care of another
individual really makes you think and
really makes you put all the B.S. aside that
you do in college, you kind of say, 'well,
later on, is this going to help me put food
on the table?
Vicentae spent a month with Driver
during the last summer school session,
and Clayton found that it was a challeng-
ing situation to care for a child on a
"twenty-fbur-seven" basis.
"It rea lly gave me a better respect
for single mothers, because they do
this a whole lot of time when the
fathers aren't there working he said.
"I just have a tremendous respect for
his mother and for all single mothers
out there, because they really do have
to struggle
With his son is expected toattend
the final home game, Driver rums to
the subject of the Pirate fans, and their
recently shifting attitudes toward the
team.
"That's what (the fans) are sup-
posed to do. They're supposed to be
there to get on you when you upand
cheer you when you do well.
"We play hard for 60 minutes
and I just wish the fans would stick
around for 60 minutes instead of jettin'
on us When you're in the third quar-
ter and you 're down and you look up
and you see the fans leaving, you're
DISCOVER
like 'Damn, they just really don't
care
Drivermightloveforusallto
showVicentaewhatPurplePride
. is all about and stay to cheer our
fighting Pirates on up until the verv
last second at our final home game
They have given their all for us this
sedsorvind the least vvecan do as fans
is stick around until the very end.
rMlXlQ fJXWtJ �"
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For Your Dining Pleasure Enjoy One of
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E. 10th St. & Greenville Blvd.
(Next to Winn Dixie)
ALFREDO'S
New York Pizza By The Slice
3UFFET
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The 'East Carotina
University
Madrigat 'Dinners
'DecemBer 3, 4,5 � 7:00 p.m.
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Qreat pom
The Lord and Lady of the Manor,
James andjranceine fyes,
invite you to join them for this
�wonderful evening of music, dunce,
and fellowship reminiscent of the
"Elizabethan Teriod.
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Dessert, 'Wassait IcedTea, and Coffee
�Premium Seating � SZS KsguCar Seating - $20
�ECU Studentyouth - SIS
Jor tickets, contact:
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Mendenhail Student Center
"East Carolina University
Qreenviile, 927858-4353
�Phone: 919-757-4 788 or,
toll free, l-800'ECUXRJS

218 E. 5th Sf.�752-0022
NOW DELIVERING
from V's Delivery
758-7857
alter 5 pm minimum $5 00 o'dei
In The Plaza Food Court
DOZEN
.00 extra per item per plate
Not good with any oilier coupons
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or specials. Beverage not Included-
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Sun, Mon & Tue SPECIAL I TAnC
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Read The
East Carolinian.
SLAM
U.S.A.
GRAND SLAM LTS.A.
Indoor BaseballSoftball Batting Range
Corner of Evans & 14th Streets 830-1 759Jilj
�Consessions �Pro Shop �Video Games �wjf
STUDENT TOKENS Full Court
Year Round $1.00 Basketball
with ECU I.D. with
20 Pitches On A Token Slam Goals
Bring Coupon In For $4.00 Off Slam Ball
Custom Crafting ?
t & Jewlery Repair:
? fair prices
? guaranteed work
? Come Check Out
? The Sterlins Jewlery
Les Jewlery
120 E. 5th Street
J 758-2127 10-5 TuesSat. i
�??????????�???�?????
The East Carolinian is currently
accepting applications for
SYSTEMS MANAGER
The candidate's responsibilities and
qualifications would include:
�Ensuring that computer hardware
and software are working correctly,
being responsible for troubleshooting minor software
problems, or resolve problems by calling the appropriate
service personnel
�Managing The Ea.st Carolinian's network server
�Developing training and orientation sessions about
computer software for new staff members
�Be enrolled as a student at East Carolina University
�Have and maintain a minimum of a 2.0 grade point average
while employed at The East Carolinian
�Be able to determine the newspaper's production needs and
keep an up-to-date inventory of
equipment, parts, and supplies
�Have extensive knowledge of
Apple Macintosh hardware (CPUs,
LaserWriters, modems, scanners,
monitors, wiring, etc.) and software (networking, desktop
publishing & word processing applications, graphic &
telecommunications software)
Applications are available at The East Carolinian office
located on the second floor of the Students Pubs building
THIS WEEK AT THE
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STUDENT UNION
HAPPENINGS
COFFEE HOUSE!
TONIGHT!
rod McDonald
musician
tues, nov 10, 8-pm
the underground
SI Admissfon with Sfudent I.D.
$2 Admission for General Public
t
'S

&
A Matter Of Life

s;
Or Death!
"SEX" Are there any boundaries?
?"MORALITY & VALUES" Is it a matter of preference
"FAMILY VALUES" Are they important?
You are invited to hear
Dennis Darville
Mr. Darville graduated from the University of Houston with a degree in Philosophy
and has traveled across the country lecturing on the importance of a individual
knowing his or her philosophical viewpoint of life.
DATE: Wednesday, November 11, 1992 at 7:00pm
PLACE: General Classroom Building in Room 1030
Sponsored by New I .ifc Christian Fellowship
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& FIRST CITIZENS CHARLES KURALT & LOONIS McGLOHON
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TICKETS ARE NOW ON SALE AT THE
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FRI, NOV 20, 8-1 1 PM
1 DJ-ALL REQUEST MUSIC
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For More Info Call The
University Unions Program Hotline
at 757-6004





Title
The East Carolinian, November 10, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 10, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.907
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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