The East Carolinian, November 5, 1992






Opinion
Thank God it's over
The elections are over and not a moment
too soon. Tired voters no longer have to
listen to politicians babble.
See story pg. 4
Lifestyle
Get down to the root
Fountain of Youth will perform at
O'Rocks Saturday night. For a taste of
Greenville's own Blend-O-Matic Groove
band, see story pg. 7
Sports
What, blame me?
The East Carolinian's loosely defined sports editor has
predicted a loss for the Pirates on Saturday. If ECU
looses to the Mountaineers of West Virginia, it will
once again be his fault.
See Story pg. 10
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 19
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Faculty Senate reviews
length of drop period
Thursday, November 5,1992
12 Pages
By Elizabeth Shimmel
Assistant News Editor
ECU's Faculty Senate decided
Tuesday to postpone a vote on a pro-
posed rewriting of some academic
regulations from Section 5 of the Un-
dergraduate Catalog.
One of the re-
writes calls for the
shortening of the
course drop period to
seven days and length-
ening the course add
period to seven days.
Members of the
Ad Hoc Committee
that created the pro-
posed rewrites said
students would benefit
from this change in the
drop-add period. This
is because more class
seats would be made
available to students
who need them, while
these students would
still able to add courses
to their schedules.
Chancellor Richard Eakin moved
to send the proposal back to the com-
mittee to give the students and faculty
more time to look over the proposal.
SGA President Courtney Jones re-
ceived speaking rights at the meeting
and asked the senate to reconsider the
proposed changes.
"I don't feel this is the answer to
the problems Jones said.
Jones suggested that the Faculty
Senate should consider revising the
role of students' academic advisors in
the registration process.
Jones said if advisors were to
take a more active role in the advis-
ing of students, students would
rarely sign-up for courses they did
not need.
Dr. Edwin Bell, of the depart-
ment of education, said he agreed
with Jones and
suggested re-
vising theadvis-
ing system to
lessen the num-
ber of students
who drop
classes each se-
mester.
"Half of
the drops (each
semester) are be-
cause of inad-
equate informa-
tion on the
courses the stu-
dents take Bell
said. "If stu-
dents had better
advising, they
wouldn't reduce
their course load after the begin-
ning of the semester, or they
wouldn't be taking classes that
were too advanced for them
The registrar's office distrib-
uted material to the senate listing
the reasons for students' dropping
classes. The top three reasons were;
not needed or required, too ad-
vanced or advised to drop and to
reduce course load. The faculty
senate will vote on the rewriting at
their Jan. 26 meeting.
fX0
Courtney Jones
downtown
By Jeff Becker
News Editor
In an on-going struggle
to open a nightclub down-
town, MMB Inc. will appeal
the dec i sion of the Green v i 1 le
Board of Adjustment that
prevented the company from
opening a club in the Blount-
Ha rvey build ing on the Evans
Street Mall.
On Oct. 22, the 10 mem-
ber board denied MMB's re-
quest to convert the Blount-
Harvey building to a night-
club from its original desig-
nation as a retai 1 store. The boa rd
voted against five of the 10 re-
quirements needed for the per-
mit to pass, mcludingconsider-
ation for the health and safety of
city workers and residence, fu-
ture plans for the city, problems
created fornearby property and
nuisance created by the club.
According to Luigi
Marchionne, a co-owner of
MMB, the company will file an
appeal with the Pitt County Su-
perior Court by the Nov. 29
deadline in an attempt to over-
turn the decision.
"We are definitely going
toappeal'Marchionnesaid. "We
have looked at other locations
for the club, but we have talked
to our lawyer, and we will get it
open one way or another
At the Oct. 22 meeting, sev-
eral downtown business owners
and concerned citizens said the
nightclub would lower the value
of downtown property and dis-
courage new business from open-
ing.
Steve Horn, a downtown
property owner, said existing
clubs already make the down-
town area a dangerous place and
the new club would make mat-
ters worse.
"I've had light fixtures
jerked off the wall, my win-
dows broken, 1' ve had my tele-
phone lines jerked out of the
wall, I've had people urinate
and defecate on my property,
I've have found a vial of crack
cocaine in my parking lot one
morning, 1 've been confronted
by drunks, verbally abused
and almost physically abused
Hom said. "It is a scary
process the way downtown
currently is
George Coffman, owner
See NiQhtclub paae 2
Blowin' in the wind
Smoking ban hits dorms
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
�twiaEss
gl - ���I carpeting on t
graduation news at Wright today
This past summer, ECU en-
acted a smoking policy prohibiting
smoking in poorly ventilated build-
ings on campus, handling all build-
ings on campus except residence
halls.
Carla Jones, director of Resi-
dent Education, along with RHA,
is currently working on a policy
that will specifically regulatesmok-
ing in the residence halls.
Jones has brought up the is-
sue because she feels that students
are concerned about smoking and
its effects.
"Smokers are interested in the
rights of non-smokers Jones said.
"Providing a choice to students is
important to us (Resident Educa-
tion), we want to give the students
a choice
Presently, Aycock Residence
Hall has instituted a non-smoking
floor on the fourth floor. ECU closed
the floor last year and renovated it
during the summer, installing new
carpeting on the hallway floors.
Jamie Roland, assistant co-
ordinator for Aycock, supported
the move and hopes for future
residence ha I Is to follow Aycock's
example.
"I think it's a better safety
precaution against fire, especially
since the carpeting was put in
Roland said. "I think that it's a
good idea, and I would like to see
more dorms like that
Each individual hall will
meet with their students, resi-
dence advisors and assistant co-
ordinators to discuss the policy.
Ten residence halls have already
met, and the remaining four will
meet by Nov. 13.
Students have shown an in-
terest in this issue, working with
residence advisors and their room-
mates to solve any problems.
"Students have basically
said to us that, 'As long as I can
agree on the smoking policy with
my roomma te they have no prob-
lem Jones said.
In talking with the residence
halls, five major areas have been
brought up in regards to smok-
ing: the students' rooms, the hall-
ways, the basements, the lobbies and
laundry rcx)ms in each residence hall.
"The student's room is where
they live Jones said. "That makes it
very important in considering this
issue
Students have suggested that
in the bigger areas � basements and
lobbies�a designated smoking area
could be set up to cater to smokers'
needs. The biggest problem that the
administration may encounter with
this new policy is changing the hous-
ing contracts in mid-year. A long with
the housing contract that students
sign when they arrive in the fall, they
also sign a community contract re-
garding relations with their possible
roommate.
"The cu rrent roommate agree-
ment forms were modeled after the
ones at Charlotte and USC Jones
said.
Other schools in North Caro-
lina and the United States have
implemented like contracts, even
going to the extent of having stu-
dents sign one that promises the stu-
dent will be substance-free.
By Kim Williams
Staff Writer
The ECU Commencement Commit-
tee is sponsoring Senior Information Day
today from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. in the lobby
of Wright Auditorium.
CC Rowe, chairman of the com-
mencement committee, said that Senior In-
formation Day is held during the fall semes-
ter of each year to provide graduating se-
niors with all the information they need to
know about graduation.
Variousuruversityofficeswillbeavail-
able to aid graduating seniors with their
questions. They will include traffic services,
thecashier'soffice,oTierlibrarv,thealumni
office, ECU grad uate school, the registrar's
office and the athletic department.
Representatives from the student
stores will also be on hand to aid students
with purchasing class rings, caps and
gowns.
"Every piece of information that a
graduate needs will be represented Rowe
said.
Drawings will be held to give away a
man'sandwoman'sclassring, refreshments
will be served and WDLX-FM will be on
campus doing a live remote broadcast.
This is the third annual Senior Infor-
mation Day, and originally the event was
held in Mendenhall Student Center. Rowe
said they moved it to the Wright building,
more in the center of campus, to facilitate
more students.
Rowe said he has been getting phone
calls every day from students and parents
filled withquestionsabout grad uation,and
Senior Information Day is a way for people
to have all their questions answered in one
place.
"It has always been well attended
Powe said. "Many students iearn things
that they did not already know"
All students who will graduate or
march in the December commencement
exercises are strongly encouraged to attend
Senior Information Day, but Rowe said any
student who will graduate this academic
year is also encouraged to attend.
Smoking reduces worker's
productivity, health
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
"
Smoking and its harmful effects on
the human body have been recognized
for many years now. But in the past 15
years,studies have also shown thatsmok-
ing can damage a person's personal and
work environment as well.
Businesses and employers that ha ve
instituted policies to control smoking are
growing in number each vear.
A national survey conducted in 1985
found that 27 percent of worksites that
had 50 or more employees on it had
adopted formal smoking policies. Two
years later, the survey yielded an esti-
mate of 54 percent; additionally, 63 per-
cent of companies
with 1,000 or
more employees
had also insti-
tuted a smoking
policy in the
workplace.
Research
has also shown
that the short-term losses to employers by
hiring smokers runs as much as $350 per
smoker annually. These losses include
See Smoking page 3
is;





2
NOVEMBER 5, 1992
� ��
� i
The East Carolinian
Witch performs ritual in dorms
A sophomore at the University of Southern Maine at Gorham
has obtained permission from university officials to perform a
witchcraft ceremony in her campus dormitory room. Rebecca
Hotaling promised to learn to handle a fire extinguisher, to use safe
candle holders and to have a student patrol the hallway in case of
fire. "There never was a religious question, just a fire code ques-
tion said Judy O'Malley of media relations. The ceremonial knife
Hotaling uses in the ritual had to be registered as a firearm. She
rejected an earlier proposal that she be watched by another person
because she performs the ceremony in the nude, or "sky clad
Hotaling says she is a member of the Wicca sect. "Her coven is in
New Jersey O'Malley said. "It's not like a Baptist Church where
you visit when you are out of town. You observe rituals with your
coven only. They are like your family
Ruling gives females equal status
A federal judge has ruled that Colgate University must pro-
vide female students with an equal opportunity to play field
hockey at the varsity level, because the school has a men's hockey
team. In July, an NCAA task force stated that gender equality
means that if a certain amount of money is spent on a men's team,
the women's team� or an equivalent sport � should receive the
same funding. Judge David N. Hard ruled that there is no require-
ment that the funding be equal, but the opportunity and benefits
must be the same.
Bones found under student's home
The FBI and local police are investigating a University of
Kansas student's discovery of human bones in a basement. Ron
Worley, a Wichita junior, discovered the bones as he was exploring
the basement of his apartment house. Worley, who has lived in the
house since Aug. 15, said he found the first bone on the surface of
a dirt floor. Other bones, he said, were buried beneath a bathtub.
The bones have been determined to be human and relatively fresh.
According to the current owner, the house has five tenants, al-
though it stood vacant from the summer of 1990 until August 1992.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Saddam
'Outlives'
rival Bush
Associated Press Wire Service
CAIRO � Arabs woke up
on Nov. 4 to a reversal of fortune
that comforts some and con-
founds others:
Iraqi President Saddam
Hussein has outlasted his num-
ber one nemesis, President
George Bush.
The man who likened
Saddam to Hitler, exhorted Ira-
qis to rise up and oust their "dic-
tator and vowed to maintain
United Nations trade sanctions
on Iraq until Saddam was out of
power is instead on his way out
of the White House, defeated by
what he called "the majesty of
the democratic system
This dramatic twist to a bit-
ter, almost obsessive, relation-
ship between women who never
met is too rich in symbolism to
ignore in the Middle East.
Here, power is viewed in
personal terms and fate is both
excuse and explanation for po-
litical upheavals that rarely issue
from democracy's "majesty
"You know the Arabs be-
lieve in destiny, and many people
would take it assign that a just
stand has outlasted an unjust
stand said Jordanian political
analyst Labib Khamhawi.
"Many people feel that Iraq
has been unjustly treated recently
by the United States and the
United Nations because of the
Bush Administration
Nightclub
Continued from page 1
of Coffman's menswear, said
the club would turn downtown
Greenville into an area domi-
nated by bars, such as Franklin
Street in Chapel Hill, and dis-
courage other businesses from
opening.
"If you approve this per-
mit, you may fill one building,
but run the extreme risk of emp-
tying three or four others that
now house retail and consumer
services Coffman said. "You
will emphatically change the
use direction of this street and
area
Because of increased en-
rollment at ECU, Marchionne
said the downtown clubs do
not have enough space to keep
the people from loitering out-
side the clubs.
He said his club would
take people off the streets and
provide a needed service in the
downtown area.
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'iV
v
" Wha t in the world can you
possibly put in that building, an-
other clothing store, another law-
office, it's ridiculous
Marchionne said. "It's too big for
a nightclub to useall three floors.
We plan on fixing it up and using
it only Thursday, Friday and Sat-
urday nights
Marchionne said MMB will
spend about $250,000 to remodel
the buildingand create 75-80 jobs,
thereby helping the Greenville
economy. He said MMB was will-
ing to take a chance with the per-
mit, which must be renewed an-
nually, to prove the nightclub
would benefit the city.
"We're the ones that are re-
ally taking the risk Marchionne
said. "I am willing to invest hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars on
a one-year shot and perhaps not
having the permit renewed
knowing the opposition that is
here
Fred Mattox, MMB's attor-
ney, said the nightclub owners
would limit the number of occu-
pants to 1,000, clean the area sur-
rounding area before 7 a.m. each
day and only use two of the
Blount-Harvey building's three
floors. He also said MMB would
donate the third floor to the ECU
theater arts department.
MMB's fight to open the
nightclub began with the Green-
ville City Council last April.
The council originally de-
nied MMB from opening the club
because of an ordinance that re-
stricted downtown nightclubs
form opening within 500 ft. of
existing bars.
The Blount-Harvey build-
ing is fewer than 500 feet from the
Fizz Bistro on Fourth Street.
However, the council over-
turned its decision and abolished
the 500 ft. requirement by a 3-2
vote in August.
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Bring to
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STUDENTS HELPING STUDENTS
BECOME A PEER HEALTH EDUCATOR
Be a part ot a campus organization that is concerned
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What do you have to gain by becoming a member
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COME TO AN INFORMAL MEETING ON:
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Both meetings will be held at the
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Questions??? Please call 757-6794.

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3
NOVEMBER 5, 1992
Anti- gay ballot comes up short
Los Angeles Times
A far-reaching anti-gay bal-
lot initiative in Oregon that at-
tracted nationwide attention was
losing in initial returns Tuesdav,
while a milder Colorado measure
barring the adoption of gay-rights
legislation in that state was win-
ning.
The measures have been
closely watched as flash points in
the battle over gay rights, with
both sides pred icting that passage
of either initiative would prompt
similar efforts elsewhere.
"If we're successful, we
could be used as a pattern for
other states said Will Perkins,
chairman of Colorado for Family
Values, thegroup that put tlieanti-
gay measure on Colorado's bal-
lot. With more than half of the
vote counted, the proposed con-
stitutional amendment was lead-
ing, 54 percent to 46 percent.
In Oregon, Measure 9 was
trailing, 56 percent to 44 percent,
Smoking
with about one-third of the vote
recorded.
The initiative was a bitterly
contested attempt to write into the
Oregon Constitution language that
would have condemned homo-
sexuality as "abnormal, wrong, un-
natural and per-
verse required
state and local gov-
ernment agencies
to discourage it
and prohibited the
adoption of any
laws to protect gay
men and lesbians
from discrimina-
tion.
The initial re-
turns caused Mea-
sure 9's foes to pre-
dict that they had
defeated it.
"We were able to bring to-
gether a coalition of people in Or-
egon who have never worked to-
gether before said Carolyn
Young, spokeswoman for the "No
on 9" campaign. "Oregon was
"We were able
to bring together
a coalition of
people in Oregon
who have never
worked together
before
-Carolyn Young,
spokeswoman for the
"Noon 9"campaign.
picked out as a target state by the
Christian Coalition and they lost. I
think this clearly shows this measure
was too extreme
The measure was fiercely op-
posed by a broad and well-financed
coalitionof political, religiousand busi-
ness groups representing
most of Oregon's estab-
lishment.
With more than $1.5
million in donations from
around the country, the
"Noon9" forces conducted
a well-orchestrated effort
to portray the proposed
amendment as an extrem-
ist edict that would foster
discrimination and censor-
ship, singl ing gays and les-
bians out for "special con-
demnation
"We did a lot of strat-
egy aimed at making (people) comfort-
able in voting no on 9 by making it a
bigger issue said Pacy Markman, a
Santa Monica, Calif political consult-
ant who oversaw the advertising cam-
paign against the measure.
Continued from page 1
fire, accidents, ventilation, clean-
ing and productivity-
Long-term costs could triple
or quadruple the amount of the
short-term costs. These costs in-
clude the increased rate of absen-
teeism, medical care costs, in-
creased insurance and other ind i-
rect expenses.
On a nation-wide basis,
smoking costs $25 billion in lost
productivity annually, with or-
ganizations bearing the cost di-
rectly. Another $16billion is spent
each year by businesses on non-
smoking-related medical costs.
Examples of costs that busi-
nesses may incur because of
smoking employees fall into three
major areas: insurance costs, ab-
senteeism and productivity-
Insurance costs vary from
business to business and from
policy to policy. Early retirement,
life insurance, accident coverage
and disability are just a few of the
areas that a company may insure
their employee under. In January
1980 dollars, the excess insurance
costs for an employee who smoked
was as high as $275.
Smokers are reported to be
absent 33 to 45 percent more often
than their non-smoking counter-
parts. If one working day is valued
at $40, it has been said that the
average smoker will cost his or her
employer $80 per year in absen-
teeism alone.
Productivity directly relates
to time lost due to smoking rituals,
extra cleanup costs, eye irritation,
measured lowerattentiveness and
lower cognitive functioning.
Assumingalossofeightmin-
utes per day for a 250 day working
year, the loss per average smoker
per year is estimated to be $165
(again in January 1980 dollars).
Examples of physical dete-
rioration outside of the human body
are given by ACLI, the AmericanCoun-
cil of Life Insurance.
� Cigarettesmokingcandamage
furniture, rugs, curtains, floors and
equipment. In work areas that have
no-smoking policies, employers may
save up to $500 per smoker per year in
replacement costs.
� Smoke also requires an office's
air conditioner to work harder than
usual. The air conditioning level re-
quired to clear a smoke-filled room
may be as high as six times that of a
smoke-free room.
By instituting policies limiting
or banning smoking from the work-
place, businesses can rea p many short-
and long-term benefits.
Among others, the cost of health
care for employees seems to decline.
Maintenancecosts for a business'equip-
ment will go down and the value of the
equipment will depreciate more slowly.
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All proceeds to benefit the Dream Factory of NC.
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-
iitii-iin�i i �1w
HMRimk-mmmMAhnm
77e forf Carolinian
November 5, 1992
Opinion
5?
Page 4CJ
DISCRIMINATION ADDRESSED
SGA starts task force to aid students
Racism and discrimination are volatile is-
sues, but through calm and reasonable actions
both can be addressed and hopefully resolved.
The Student Government Association and
Allied Blacks for Leadership and Equality are
leaders in defusing racial tensions on the ECU
campus.
Within the past week, the SGA passed a
resolution proposed by ABLE that denounced
any discrimination against ECU students by
downtown establishments. This resolution states
that 'no student, regardless of reason, should be
discriminated against (and) the East Carolina
Student Legislature goes on record denouncing
discrimination by any downtown Greenville
establishment
Discrimination exists in Greenville, but it
is hard for the white majority population to
notice because, like a homeless man eating out
of a garbage can, it is easier to look away. Solu-
tions must be tempered with understanding,
because victims of racism are angry, as they
have every right to be.
The first resolution was designed specifi-
cally for two downtown bars, but the revised
edition, born of compromise and understand-
THE BUCK STOPS HERE
ing, includes all downtown establishments. Two
bars, Bogies and the Elbo Room, are working to
curb further discrimination. The two bars also
plan fairer admission policies.
Along with the resolution comes a dis-
crimination task force to help students cope
with being discrimination. The SGA president
and vice-president will be on this task force
created to listen to students. Dr. Mary Ann Rose,
an assistant to the chancellor, will also be on the
task force. s
The resolution and the task force are ideas
whose time has come.
Discrimination is so broad that attempts to
destroy it are usually given up before they are
undertaken. The resolution that was passed in-
corporates a wider view of the situation. The
two bars' actions are encouraging.
The task force ices the cake. With this open
and visible organization, concrete steps can be
taken � even if they are small � to better the
microcosm of our society.
ECU can show all others the approach to
solving our society's main problem. These ac-
tions by the SGA and ABLE are the first step-
ping-stone in setting a precedent.
Quote of
the Day:
Racism is
man's greatest
threat to man
� the maxi-
mum of hatred
for a mini-
mum of rea-
son.
Abraliam cslwa Hcscliel
By Mike Joseph
fm fou im&u,
Politicians shoot it out at the U.S.A. Corral
I can imagine what it must
have been like when the James
gang finally rode out of town. I
can truly imagine that almost
dazed sense of relief, because I
enjoyed a similar euphoria for a
few hours recently.
Itstarted Tuesday morning.
As usual, I awoke and began my
day wi th a bowl of Lucky Charms,
coffee and the early news. When
I flicked on the TV, it was as if a
warm desert breeze wafted over
me. I could almost see tum-
bleweeds rolling gently over my
carpet. I was stunned.
1 had known this day was
coming, but even so, I was not
psychologically prepared for the
emotional trauma of having
months of revulsion, fear, confu-
sion, anger and dread suddenly
(as if with a greatsucking sound)
evaporate.
It was almost unbelievable
that Billy the Kid Clinton, Doc
Perot and Wild George Bush �
along with ail their squeaky-
voiced, dull-eyed, gun-slinging
minions�had stopped shooting
it out in my living room.
I no longer have to sit in the
CBS Saloon, anxiously wonder-
ing when slobber will finally drip
uncontrollably from Jim Hunt's
twisted, protruding lips; or when
anything even half as civil as slob-
ber will roll out of Jim Gardner's
mouth. There will be no more ge-
riatric verbal brawls between ar-
rogant, paunchy Pancho Sanford
and Lauch Faircloth (a man whose
face, character, voice, intellectand
substance are as dull as a Confed-
erate uniform). No more Deadeye
Tommy Pollard (a real shooter).
No more school marm Martin
Lancaster.
Yep, I'm glad they're gone,
because no ma rshal came to Dodge
City this year. We had a Texan,
but his white horse was lame and
he couldn't decide whether to
strap on his pistols (he had a wed-
ding to attend). The others just
whirled info town, leaving prom-
ises to satisfy their unpaid bills at
the general store; and the only
people looking forward to their
return are the ladies who live in
the rooms above the saloon.
They've all ridden off to the hills
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch' I, Assist ant Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Classified Advertising Tech.
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville. N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
where we can't see them � and
that, for me, is the thought that
blew the tumbleweeds out the
window.
They might not be in Dodge
City anymore,butthey'reout there
� watching the railways, riding
the roads, terrorizing the stage-
coach and Pony Express routes,
camping upstream on our only
river (always upstream). They
made a lot of promises before they
rodeoff,becaust hey need Dodge
City and because they know, if it
comes down to it, we've got them
out-gunned. But what will they
really do when they getup on the
hill? Dodge City is in too much
trouble to tolerate business as
usual. Will they keep pillaging and
blaming each other when empty
trains roll into the station?
I'm watchingclosely. I know
they'll come back. And I know
that when they do, if I have seen a
single bullet-ridden wagon with
an empty strongbox limp into
town, or one dead fish or one shel I
casing floating on the river, none
of the bastards will get outof town
alive.
-
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
ECU wiretapping compared to Watergate
To the Editor:
It is a dark day for East Caro-
lina University. Behind a
smokescreen and cover-up, top ad-
ministrators are making a mock-
ery of the law. These officials, re-
sponsible for enforcing state and
federal laws, claim to be ignorant
of the law itself. Are they merely
ignorant or are they dishonest?
For the taxpayers, it is a lose, lose
situation. If they are incompetent,
our tax money is being squan-
dered; if they are corrupt, we are
being defrauded.
The lessons learned from
Watergate should not be easily or
quickly forgotten. The words wire-
tap, cover-up and "I didn't know"
ring a bell that is all too haunting,
and the actions of those in charge
of ECU send absolutely the wrong
message to the youth of our state.
Is there perhaps a two-tiered
justice system that can only reach
those individuals without the
money and connections to remain
untouchable?
Let us hope that we have
learned from past mistakes and
now will take swift action when
power is abused. The laws are for
everyone. There are too many
honest and hardworking admin-
istrators, professors and students
at ECU to allow this mess to be
swept under the carpet.
For, if these few are allowed
to represent our university, all of
us as North Carolina citizens will
be cheated. 't
The jury in the recent wire-
tap case has sent a clear message
with their refusal to convict the
"little fish" in this scandal. Now it
is time for those who run the state
to show the people of North Caro-
lina that we will not tolerate cor-
ruption in our university systems
R. E. Holley S
r
'American Dream' and politicians don't mix
To the Editor:
Over the last few weeks
the East Carolinian has printed
many letters and editorials of a
political nature. It is a known fact
that the majority of people don't
know or even care about these
letters or editorials, but that fact
cannot prevent me from writing
this letter.
The authors of these re-
cent articles have no fear in dis-
playing their total ignorance. For
example, Bill Clinton is riot the
savior of, nor does he personify,
the "American Dream Clinton,
Bush and Perot are the destroyers
of the "American Dream Nei-
ther they nor the American public
understands this. The "American
Dream" is freedom, the freedom
to better oneself. You believe in
freedom, don't you? Freedom:
except in health care, housing,
employment, the economy �
that's the limited freedom that
these candidates support.
This country is based on
Natural Law and individual free-
dom. Since when did Americans
stoop so low as to ask Washing-
ton, D.C. for financial, moral and
educational guidance? Since
Americans lost sight of our found-
ing principles, we do not need a
politician forcing his "plan" on us.
Are we so dumb that we look to
someone else to organize,plan and
structure society for us? Clinton's
Bush's and Perot's plans are noth-
ing more than socialist crap. How
can these politicians and theif
plans generalize solutions thatwill
help individual problems when
each one is so diverse from the
other? Only free individuals can
solve problems.
Finally, as for all this talk
of leaders and lack of leadership;
remember that our Founding Fa-
thers believed "leader" to be syn-
onymous with "demagogue" and
also keep in mind that the German
word for "leader" is "Fuhrer
Richard Matthew Poteat .
Senior
History
Harris deemed qualified to speak on issue of AIDS
To the Editor:
In regards to the letter ques-
tioning the authority of John Har-
ris to speak on AIDS, allow me to
brief you on Mr. Harris' creden-
tials. Mr. Harris hasattended each
of the National AIDS Conferences
and has spoken at the last two. He
is currently a member of the steer-
ing committee directing the Na-
tional AIDS Conference next April.
Also currently in the role of a re-
search lecturer, he is scheduled to
speak at 60 universities this year
alone. He is also in daily contact
with the CDC and other groups,
updating his lecture with the most
current, verifiable information.
You are correct, Ms. Rider,
when you say, "AIDS should
be approached with facts and not
speculations Mr. Harris' lecture
is fully documented in a 300 plus
page research packet. I have the
packet and a taped copy of Mr.
Harris' lecture. Instead of sending
us back 10 years (as you say), the
information gives a realistic view
of the future if we continue with
archaicand uneducated views (i.e.
using condoms for safe sex).
I suggest you begin to make
accurate judgements on this issue
from reputable sources such as
medical journals, rather than "safe
sex" adson MTV. I encourage you,
and the rest of the university, fo
get the facts straight on how inef-
fective condoms really are. I wel-
come the opportunity for you to
review the documented evidence.
One other note. You asked,
"Does John Harris care?" He has
been lecturing to students in the
area of sexually transmitted dis-
eases for 19 years. Not only does
he care, but he has pretty much
devoted the length of your life-
time to help keep students in-
formed.
Shane A. Deike
Charles concert in Minges steams audience
To the Editor:
In response to the glowing
report by your writer about the
Ray Charles concert, I wish I had
his seats.
Mr. Dashiell's show was
completely ruined by the very,
very bright and very, very hot
lights that remained burning
throughout his set, the incessant
chattering of the yuppies around
me and the many latecomers who
were allowed to file in well after
curtain time.
1 left the concert knowing
that 1 had seen Ray Charles, but
I can't say that I really heard
him.
It looked like he was hav-
ing fun, and it appeared that the
things he was saying were witty
and clever but with the horren-
dous acoustics in our non-air-
conditioned gymnasium, I left
the concert soaking wet, emo-
tionally tired from bugging ev-
ery worker 1 saw to PLEASE turn
off the lights upstairs and again
frustrated with the ability of this
university to ruin a night with
Mr. Ray Charles, a living legend.
Get a brain, ECU! I must
say that I would have gladly
spent twice the price to hear Mr.
Charles in a more intimate set-
ting such as our auditorium.
Maybe then those people
who obviously weren't inter-
ested in the show would have
stayed home.
Margie O'Shea
Art
Senior
- . . .��.





iMMfr ��� . ii iam a
� The East Carolinian

November 5,1992
Classifieds
��i
Page 5
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS
:1 and 2 bedroom apartments.
Energy-efficient, several loca-
tions in town. Carpeted, kitchen
appliances, some water and
sewer paid, washerdryerhook-
ups. Call 752-8915.
APARTMENT FOR RENT:
One bedroom, $275 a month.
4 blocks from campus, energy
efficient, free basic cable,
washerdryer hook-ups. Avail-
able January 1 (nego.). Apt. 3
Captain's Quarter. Call 830-
6902.
ROOMMATE WANTED IMME-
DIATELY Tar River Apts.
$130.00month; 13 utilities.
Partially furnished; good loca-
tion. Call 830-1873 ask for
Jordan.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Fe-
male nonsmoking roommate to
share new 2 bedroom apart-
ment with graduate student,
beginning December or Janu-
ary. Low rent and utilities, good
area. Call 321 -0538.
TAR RIVER APT. for rent. 2
bedroom, 1 12 bath. Rent:
$450. Call 321-2132 ask for
Karen or Mike.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
share a 2 bedroom duplex. 1
block from campus. $170
month plus 12 utilities. Call
758-5845. Leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: $172.50month, 12
utilities, 1 bedroom apt. Call
752-3364.
NEED 3-4 PERSONS to as-
sume lease at Georgetown apt.
Call-830-9546 ask for Dave or
Brian.
FOR SALE
PAY IN-STATE TUITION?
Read Residency Status and
Tuition, the practical pamphlet
written by an attorney on the in-
state residency application pro-
cess. TorSale: Student Stores,
Wright Building.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
CONDO- One bedroom unit.
Children out of school, I want to
sell fast. Call (919) 847-1557
Raleigh. NC.
WORD PROCESSOR- 5x9
CRT display, 3.5 240k disk
drive, dictionary, thesaurus,
calender, address book, great
for research papers! No com-
puter lab hassles. Asking price
$400. Call Jack 758-3248.
SINGLE BED- mattress,
boxspring, and frame. &75.00
or best offer. Call 756-3235- if
no answe r please leave a mes-
sage on machine.
FOR SALE: IBM compatible
computer, 640k RAM, 3.5 DD,
High resolution color monitor,
20 Meg HD, software, and wide
carriage printer. Must sale, only
$525. Call 758-4135.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED
CARS.trucks, boats, 4 wheel-
ers, motorhomes, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available your area now.
Call 1-800-333-3737 ext. c-
5999.
FURNITURE FOR' SALE:
EXCELLENT condition, perfect
for college student or newly
married couple. Lamps, Brass
bed and 3 piece livingroom set.
Excellent prices- Call Angie at
830-0168.
SNOW SKIS: K2 skis with
poles and carry bag. BEST
FOR SALE
OFFER. Nicole or Cathy at
752-2968.
HELP WANTED
GUARANTEED WORK AVAIL-
ABLE. Excellent pay for EASY
home based work. Fullpart-time.
Rush self-addressed stamped
envelope: Publishers (G2) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham,
NC 27705
$360UP WEEKLY. Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull-time. Set own
hours! RUSH self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers
(G1) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham, NC 27705
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING -
Earn $2,000month world
travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the Car-
ibbean, etc.) Holiday, Summer
and Career employment avail-
able. No experience necessary.
For employment program call 1 -
206-634-0468 ext. C5362.
SAVE ON SPRING BREAK '93!
Jamaica, Cancun, and Florida
from119.00. Book earl and save
$$$! Organize group and travel
free! Sun Splash Tours 1-800-
426-7710.
YOUTH BASKETBALL
COACHES: The Greenville
Recreation and Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth basketball
coaches for the winter youth
basketball program. Applicants
must possess some knowledge
of the basketball skills and have
the ability and patience to work
with youth. Applicants must be
able to coach young people ages
9-18, in basketball fundamen-
tals. Hours are from 3:00 pm
until 7:00 pm with some night
and weekend coaching. This
program will run from December
to mid-February. Salary rates
start at $4.25 per hour, for more
information, please call Ben
James or Michael Daly at 830-
4550.
EASY WORK! Excellent Pay!
Assemble Products at Home.
Call Toll Free 1-800-467-5566
ext. 5920.
STUDENTS OR ORGANIZA-
TIONS. Promote our Florida
Spring Break packages. Earn
MONEY and FREE trips. Orga-
nize SMALL or LARGE groups.
Call Campus Marketing. 800-
423-5264
POSTAL JOBS available! Many
positions. Great benefits. CalM-
800-333-3737 ext.3712.
GREAT HOLIDAY JOB OP-
PORTUNITY: Going home for
the Holidays? Need a fun pert-
time job? The HONEY BAKED
HAM CO. is in search of sea-
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and production positions. We
have stores located in the follow-
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Wilmington, Raleigh, Greens-
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Fayetteville and other major cit-
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Please check the white pages or
information foe the store nearest
your home.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOY-
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month. Many provide room &
board other benefits! Finan-
cially & Culturally rewarding! For
International Employment pro-
gram and application, call the
International Employment
Group: (206) 632-1146 ext.
J5362
IMMEDIATE OPENING for typ-
istsecretarial person. Apply in
person between 9:00-5:00 Mon-
HELP WANTED
day thru Friday at SDF Comput-
ers, Inc 106 E. 5th St 752-
3694
NOW HIRING SPRING BREAK
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Beach: Greeks, Organizations,
Individuals earn cash, free trips
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EARN S1000WEEK at home-
stuffing envelops! For informa-
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Falls, OH 44222
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is
anticipating 3 advertising repre-
sentative vacancies forthespring
semester. We can offer you
valuable experience before you
graduate. For more details look
for our ad on page 8. Application
deadline is 111392. Please
submit an application and a re-
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Earn $500 - $1000 weekly
stuffing envelopes. For details
RUSH $1.00 with SASE to:
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57 Greentree Drve, Suite 307
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SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING: Error free, quick and
dependable at reasonable cost.
Excellent typing and proofread-
ing skills (grammar, punctua-
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Call Pauline at 757-3693.
STUDY ABROADIN AUSTRA-
LIA: Information on semester,
year, graduate, summerand in-
ternship programs in Australia.
We represent28 Australian Uni-
versities, call us toll free 1-800-
245-2575.
"SPRING BREAK : Baha-
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QUALITY WORD PROCESS-
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transcription term papers, the-
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needs to be typed. Dictaphone
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PERSONALS
DEAR STUDENTS, Sorry for
the confusion in my long ad on
Tuesday. I was trying to gain
attention for a service that I had
contemplated starting to help
men and women meet. I was
talking directly to you pointing
out problems that I know are
occuring for many students. I
have consulted with outside
sources and I have determined
due to time constraints I cannot
bring this service to you. I thank
the women that called. I thank
you for your comments. Who
am I? I'm 25 and like many
people busy with school, work
and papers. I don't have a lot of
time to be hanging out in bars,
and I am looking to meet
someone preferably 21 orolder,
outgoing, nonsmoker, secure,
independent, speaks her
mind,take no shit. Can get
along with all people. Can talk
about all subjects. Drop me a
photo and tell me about yourself
at PO Box 281. And for those
girls who called me, you know
who you are. Thursday rhyme.
Oh where, oh where, oh where
could he be, that one god only
one man who nicely will treat
me. But, I've heard before that
some are looingto score. So
the lines I learn, I learn so I won't
get burned. To hell with them all
I'm having a ball. I don't need
them today, cause they will
probably stray. I want them to
know I can act at any show and
they will never have a chance to
treat me so. Oh why, oh why do
some women think this way a
many a many ask that question
today. To you I must say. If you
are looking to score, to many
you will be a constant eyesore.
You must know that many distant
men so and some of us have
lostourglow. Some lay out their
map and set their trap. Wham!
Bam! Thank you Mam! Sorry! I
didn't mean to treat you like a
cheap can of spam. To be
continued. Jeff Jones
SOME MEN AND WOMEN
battle today, they have heard
before that there are people
around looking to score. When
what we need we want to heed
in us conflict is sure to breed.
What we think should be, is
usually not reality. What to do
we sometimes say, when inside
ourselves we sometimes pray.
But we are strong, and off we go
to the show to meet some people
we don't know. If only I knew
what I should do. I step aside to
decide what I should do not to
lose my pride. I contemplate my
immediate state and wonder
what will be my fate. I want to
meet someone nice, but I am
paying a heavy price. I read, I
reaa to see what I need. I want
to act to readily attract. I am
trying real hard to be who I am,
but some are looking to scam
and sham so I want to scram.
But I am here, so I throw on a
mask to labor the task. They
screw with oursenses, and what
do we do, we counterattack and
throw up defenses. Am I to
blame? Are other people doing
the same? The masks I wear
are beginning to tear. And
people may see the true real
me. Will I care?
WRITERPHILOSOPHERMU-
SICIAN and poetic soul seeks
friendship and correspondence
from like-minded lady. Photos
and letters to MV PO Box 8663,
Greenville, NC 27835.
KRISHANMURTI Study Group
being formed. Are you inter-
ested? Evenings, 756-0429 Ask
for 'J
TALL, GOOD -LOOKING
SWM runner in mid-30's look-
PERSONALS
ing to meet attractive SW "
runner, same age or younger,
to run with, go to running races
and maybe even date. Have
great sense of humor, other-
wise would not be running this
ad. Enjoy rock 'n' roll, going to
dinner, working out traveling
to races, big events, and stay-
ingyoung. Like to treat women
well. Send name and photo to
Runner, 1969-C Quail Ridge
Rd Greenville, NC 2785C.
BABY GIRL: Mary J. Blige is
on the money with those lyrics.
Why did you put those roots on
me, sweet thing?!?! Do you
think I might be your ice cream
dream? Big fat feet mean big
fat pockets. Maybe you should
just take a bite. Cool as Ice �
but then again, not quite. RST,
TGMA
HALLOWEEN NIGHT on 3rd
and Elm, where kegs and PJ
overwhelmed! In from the dark
came Christmas trees, "Rub-
ber trees reindeer, ninja'sand
even Catwoman! Thanks
RANDY and CHRISTINA fora
great time! �SOOZ
PI DELTA PLEDGES: You're
doing a great job so far! Hang
in there and keep up the good
work!
We love you! �The Sisters.
DELTA SIGS: Tailgating was
a blast! (even if the PHI's didn't
have it together at the game).
Hope to see you soon. Love,
The Sisters and Pledges of Pi
Delta.
DELTA CHI'S: Congratula-
tions on receiving your Char-
ter. We're behind you 100.
Hope we can get together
soon! Love, Pi Delta.
ANOREXIC ELVIS SPOTTED
with Klingon Friend "KERN
somewhere downtown FRI-
DAY. Great job guys! Watch
for that Fazer. �Cereal Killer
& Erkel Wannabe.
RUMMAGE SALE Saturday,
November 7 at the Delta Zeta
House. 7:00 am until? Come
get some great bargains.
WAY TO GO ECU Soccer
Team! You're doing great�
we're so proud! Love Delta
Zeta.
JULIE ALBERGOTTI: You
made it�congratulations on
sticking it out! We're so happy
to call you our sister! Love,
Delta Zeta.
ATTENTION MR. MAN:
please don't get lost again!
Love the Sisters and Pledges
of Delta Zeta.
CONGRATULATIONS Lori
Justis on your recent lavaliere!
It certainly caused a commo-
tion! Love, Delta Zeta Sisters
and Pledges.
CONGRATULATIONS Pam
Jones on your recent engage-
ment! We're so happy for you
! Love, the Sisters and Pledges
of Delta Zeta.
THANKS to Delta Chi for last
week's get-together! We had
a blast! Love, Delta Zeta
DELTA ZETA is sponsoring a
ticket sale�you could win
$500 tuition for the spring se-
mester! Drawing will be Nov.
11 at 3:00pm in front of the
student store. See any Delta
Zeta for tickets.
THETA CHI AND ALUMNI:
We really enjoyed ourselves
PERSONALS
Last Friday night. Hope we
can get together again soon.
Love, the Sisters and Pledges
of Pi Delta.
SIG TAU'S: We're looking
forward to tonight. It's going to
be interesting! Love, the sis-
ters and Pledges of Pi Delta.
ALPHA PHI: We had so much
fun Friday night, stranger was
a scary sight. The cat and bat
were such a cute pair, but
Morticha was the biggest
scare. Lara, Randy, and
Dablia's costume was really
weird but grim reaper was the
most feared. Plain and Pea-
nut, Spider Woman too, Laura
McCutcheon moo moo moo!
10 criss cross, 2 french maids,
let's play poker with the Queen
ofSpades. Stranger Mixer was
the best, this one by far tops
the rest.
TKE: Congratulations on your
home improvements, the door
looks awesome! Love, your
neighbors the Alpha Phi's!
TKE, See ya on Thursday!
Which ill it be, Heaven or
Hell?!? Maybe both! We'll be
there. Love, the Sigma's.
GAMMA SIG The sky was
dark, the moon was high, we
were together, you and I. With
all our might we did our best,
we tapped a few and partied
like the rest. When it was over
and all tapped out, we trooped
to the game to scream and
shout. Now it's over and the
past, so we look forward to
next time . . . and you can be
it'll be a blast Thanks, the
Brothers of PHI KAPPA PSI.
ALPHA DELTA PI: Thankyou
for your special care and your
help to get me home for Christ-
mas. I love you so much,
Monica.
ALPHA DELTA PI: Get ready
for Formal in Charleston this
weekend�it's gonna be great!
KAPPA SIG PLEDGES,
KAPPA ALPHA PLEDGES,
And Lamda Chi Alpha: Thank
you so much for your help in
our car wash. Sorry it's so
late. You are AWESOME
Love, ALPHA DELTA PHI.
ALPHA PHI: Lets begin the
weekend right. We'll see you
tonight. The Brothers and
Pledges of Delta Chi.
DELTA CHI: All the work has
finally paid off! Saturday night
CHARTER is in ourhands! Get
ready to raise some hell!
CHI OMEGA: We would like
to congratulate the fresh new
sisters of Chi Omega�Sally
Crocker, Joanne Shroeder,
Cara Forrest, & Julie Materra.
CHI OMEGAS: The White
Carnation is next weekend so
be ready to have the weekend
of your life.
CONGRATS to Junior
Panhellinic on raising $2700!
Great job! Love, Alpha Omi-
cron Pi.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Warm
up the grill! Can't wait until we
get together tonight! Love, Al-
pha Omicron Pi.
ALPHA OMICRON PI BETA
RHO'S: Keep up the GREAT
work, you guys are the BEST!
Rest up for the lock-in�who
knows, maybe Victoria will be
there! Love, your sisters.
COORS: Right back at you
babe. MO
Announcements
GREENVILLE AREA RU
SEXUAL-GAY-LESBIAN
GROUP
Group activities and discus-
sion of issues relating to same-
sex orientation. Meetings are
closed. Call 757-6766 11:00-
12:15 Tues. and Thurs. or 1:00-
4:00 pm Wed. for information.
ORIENTATION TO CAREER
SERVICES
The Career Services office in-
vites senoirs and graduate stu-
dents who will graduate in De-
cember, 1992 or MaySummer,
1993 to attend an orientation
meeting on Nov. 9 or Nov. 18 at
3:00 in the Bloxton House. The
staff will give an overview of ca-
reerservices and distribute forms
for students to register with Ca-
reer Services. They will also dis-
cuss procedures for establishing
a credentials file and participating
in employment interviews on
campus.
SPEECH-LANGUAGE &
AUDITORY PATHOLOGY
All General College students
who intend to major in Speech-
Language and Auditory Pathol-
ogy and have R. Muzzarelli or M.
Downes as their advisor are to
meet on Wednesday, November
11, 5:00 pm in General Class-
room 1026. Advising for early
registration will take place at that
time. Please prepare a tentative
class schedule before the meet-
ing.
ADULT CHILDREN OF
ALCOHOLICS
Meets every Tuesday at 4:00
pm in the Methodist Student Cen-
ter, 501 E. Holly Street.





Secret Agent V7
By Chris Kemple

ggt
Patronize our advertisers!
They pay a good deal of money for us to
tell you about them.
So do us both a favor and
give them a call.
The employees of
The East Carolinian,
their wallets and their creditors,
in addition to our advertisers,
appreciate your business.
Read The East Carolinian,
then tell a friend to do so as well.
If you don't have any friends,
advertise for some in our classifieds.
Rates for students are $2 for the first 25 words and five
cents for each addition word.
Crime doesn't pay, but we do.
The East Carolinian in now accepting
applications for the position of
Staff Writer,
especially the news department.
Any aspiring news-hounds
can apply at our offices
in the Publications Building
any time on Mondays through Fridays
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The Publications building is located
across from Joyner Library
on Central Campus, and we're
on the second floor.
G
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111 Red Banks Road
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,1.1 II III I ����'fc. '
The East Carolinian
November 5, 1992
Lifestyle
Page 7
Maritime program preserves
underwater history, understanding
By LeClair Harper
Staff Writer
Fountain of Youth
flows with optimism
ECU holds within its walls a great secret, a
secret that people know about and appreciate
throughout the country and around the world,
but which few people at ECU know about. That
secret is the Program for Maritime History and
Nautical Archaeology.
There are only two programs of its kind in the
United States; the other is at Texas A&M Univer-
sity. The Maritime History and Nautical Archae-
ology Program was established at ECU in 1981 as
part of the history graduate school by Dr. William
Still jr a historian concentrating in maritime his-
tory, and professor Gordon Watts, an underwater
archaeologist.
Its p "nose is to combine the study of history
and underwater archaeology to advance the un-
derstanding of maritime pac" Students enrolled
in the program complete 45 credit hours of work
and can concentrate in maritime historical re-
search, museum studies, underwater archaeol-
ogy, conservation or any combination of these
studies. Students can learn to find and date ship-
wrecks, interpret shipbuilding techniques and
study and preserve our submerged cultural re-
sources.
To an outsider, the work the students do may
seem glorious. They dive on shipwrecks through-
out the country and world to better understand
the shipbuilding techniques and lifestyles of the
wreck's time period. What they do not do is the
much-publicized business of treasure hunting. In
fact, if there ever was an enemy to the underwater
archaeologist, it is the treasure hunter. Wreck sites
are often destroyed along with valuable informa-
tion on ancient (and not so ancient) shipbuilding
techniques and thelivesofourancestors on the sea
and on land.
Thestudentsand faculty in the ECU Maritime
History and Nautical Archaeology program seek
out known and unknown wrecks to document
them, preserve them and excavate and conserve
artifacts.
"The more people learn the real treasureof the
shipwrecks is not the gold, but all the information
we get off them, the better off we'll be Matt
Russell, one of the graduate students, said.
An example of ECU's nationally recognized
research is its work on the USS Monitor site. ECU
was key in the discovery and study of the ship-
wreck of this Union ironclad warship. Watts was
Oneof the four scientists who located the wreck off
Cape Hatteras, and students and faculty have
flayed a key role in the research of this marine
sanctuary. Students even acted as technical advi-
Pnoto by Harry Pecorelli
Mike Krivor, a student in the Maritime History and Nautical Archaeology program at ECU, inspects
an iron fastener at a shipwreck site in Bermuda.
sors for the Turner Network Television produc-
tion of Ironclads, a movie about the Monitor and
the Virginia.
An important part of the program is the field
experience provided to students. Summer field
schixilsand field research semesters give students
the unique chance to learn the tools of their future
trade hands-on and also advances the study and
preservation of submerged cultural resources
throughout the world. Field schools have been
held in such places as North Carolina, Virginia,
Wisconsin, Michigan and Bermuda.
This summer students attended field school
in Jacksonville, Fl through an agreement with the
Saint John's Archaeological Expeditions, Inc and
began excavation of the Union transport Maple
Leaf. The Maple Leaf, transporting federal troops
and more than 400 tons of cargo, sank deep into the
mud of the Saint John's River in 1864 after hitting a
Confederate mine. The river's mud hd. preserved
the contents of the wreck, and, consequently, it is
one of the largest collections of Civil War artifacts
known to exist. ECU graduate student Frank
Cantelas is head of the Maple Leaf project, and at
See Maritime page 9
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
What do you get when
you take the bestofR&B, funk,
soul, thrash and reggae, throw
them into a high powered
"Blend-o-maticand pour the
mix all over the Greenville
music scene?
The answer is Fountain
of Youth, and droves of local
music fans are beginning to
drink this concoction when
the band performs in down-
town cl ubs. Troy Yarborough,
the singer of this up-and-com-
ing group, said he is as-
tounded by theincrediblesuc-
cess the band has achieved in
the year they have been to-
gether. He is hoping his band's
following will expand in the
months ahead, beginning
with this Saturday's show at
CCRocks.
"We've spent roughly a
year getting to where we are
now Yarborough said. "This
time lastyear we weregetting
ready to play our first show,
anopeningspotwith the Earth
Murchants
Yarborough said that
Fountain of Youth owes a
great deal to this band, and is
optimistic about the
Murchants' future success,
despite their location.
"If the Earth Murchants
had been anywhere else be-
sides Greenville, they would
already be signed to a major
label he said. "I know that
they will make it big, and wish
them the best
Yarborough said the ca-
maraderie his band shares
with the Earth Murchants is
characteristic of relationships
with other local bands.
Yarborough said he believes
that the atmosphere between
Greenville bands will prove
to be the ultimate success of
the music scene.
Yarborough went on to
say that his band is proud to
be part of Greenville's band
contingent, and that he feels
the music scenes from other
areas tend to produce a great
deal of bands who make it
largely from theprofileof their
surroundings.
"We'd rather be from Gre-
enville and make it, than from
a 'hot spot' where a few big
bands succeed and other
bands make it who aren't so
good Yarborough said that
Greenville's tolerance of a
wide variety of music was also
one its stronger points . "All
music is different, that's what
makes it better
Fountain of Youth exem-
plifies this difference's they
havecreated a sty leand sound
unique of other Greenville
bands. Instead of preaching
weighty messages, the group
iscontenttoentertainand sim-
ply try to "groove
Yarborough and his band rely
on a simple symbol to help
them spread their "groove"
philosophy around the area, a
daisy. According to
Yarborough, the flower repre-
sents a source of peace and
stability in troubled modern
times.
"No matter what trends
come and go he said "the
flower and the groove will al-
ways be there The band
prints the flower on its T-shirts
and passes out free stickers to
fans in attendance.
Fountain of Youth is en-
couraged by sales of "Day-
dream Music their first al-
bum, and look forward to re-
leasing a second album early
nextyear. Yarborough said he
is also encouraged about the
growth his band has achieved,
and this has been amplified at
rehearsals.
"Last year, when we
started, we practiced with the
door closed. We didn't want
anyone to hear; we really
didn't want to hear it our-
selves. Now we practice with
the door wide open.
"There are a lot of daisies
outside that door waiting to
be picked
Deception, little else basis
for 'Consenting Adults'

By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
In Consenting Adults, Kevin Spacey plays
the latest in a string of psychotics unleashed
at the box office.
So there has been a psychotic lover, a
psychotic friend, psychotic husbands, a psy-
chotic roommate and a psychotic cop. just
when Hollywood seemed to have exhausted
the psycho trade, along comes a psychotic
neighbor in Consenting Adults.
Nothing in this film could be deemed
interesting.
Consenting Adults begins with 20 minutes
of rapidly cut footage filled with desperation.
The filmmakers desperately want the audi-
ence to believe that the sce-
nario of this film is plausible.
They vainly try to squeeze an
hour's worth of set-up in only
20 minutes so they will have
more time for the "climactic"
finale.
The basic premise of Consenting Adults is
one of deception. Kevin Spacey befriends
Kevin Kline. Spacey moves in next door to
Kline (one may wonder if the move was
premeditated as the film unfolds) and in-
stantly takes a shine to him.
Spacey represents everything that Kline
is not. Spacey is ou tgoing, ad ven tu rous, h igh ly
successful and, above all else, fearless.
Kline is a milquetoast. He seems bored by
his existence. He writes jingles for advertise-
ments, but one senses that he feels he could
do more.
When Spacey suggests sneaking into each
others' bedrooms to make love to the others'
wife, Kline initially balks. Because of Kline's
reluctance to wife-swap, the friendship
quickly disintegrates which infuriates Kline's
wife, Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio, who is
enamored with Spacey.
Eventually Kline accepts the offer to
switch spouses. The swap, though, turns out
to be a set-up.
The next day Spacey's wife is found mur-
dered in her bedroom and Kline's prints are
not only over everything, but his semen is
inside her as well.
The film tries to lure the viewer into
believing that Spacey is really a nice guy but
to no avail. Spacey plays his role with such
seething sliminess that Kline's camaraderie
is completely unbelievable. Owen
Gleiberman, in Entertainment Weekly, aptly
expressed this credibility gap: "I didn't be-
lieve Kline would even want to have a beer
with him
So many of these thrillers, as they are
nominally called, rely on the same tired for-
mulas so much that the filmmakers inject not
an ounceof creativity or originality into them.
A huge mistake these filmmakers com-
mit is believing that the formula ever worked.
This new age of thrillers was ushered in
by Fatal Attraction, one
of the most over-rated,
over-blown, over-acted
and over-directed films
of the last 10 year. In all
the ads for these thrill-
ers, like Consenting
Adults, the phrase "not since Fatal Attraction
can be found.
Thisextremely manipulative and ineptly
crafted film opened the floodgates for movies
like Deceived, Si)igle White Female and Unlaw-
ful Entry. As if I needed any more reason to
hate Fatal Attraction, now I have it to blame
for this onslaught of trashy cinema parading
as grade-A cinema.
Consenting Adults twists through many
convolutions as the story winds toward its
cliched confrontation. Just once I would like
to see one of these films end without the
antagonist being killed.
What a cop-out! Instead of imaginatively
creatingasatisfyingending, thescreenwriters
have the antagonist eliminated in a manner
designed to bring the audience to its feet.
Perhaps a thriller will be made with a
complex antagonist who acts more ke a
person than a writer's psychotic puppet. I
would rather these type of films never be
made at all.
If many more thrillers are crafted as clum-
sily as Consenting Adults, that wish may just
come true.
Photo courtesy Warner Bros. Records
The sextet of Widespread Panic will bring their unique style of music to the Attic tonight to quench a thirsty crowd.
Athens band spreads 'Panic' widely
By Julie Totten
Staff Writer
The musical metropolis of Athens,Ga
has produced yet another prodigy.
Widespread Tanic, a six man band,
launched into the musical scene about six
years ago. They released Space Wrangler in
1988 under Landslide Records.
Almost immediately there wasenthu-
siastic praise regarding the debut, which
led Capricorn Records to sign this band.
This was a huge step for Widespread Panic
due to the fact that Capricorn has repre-
sented greats such as The Allman Brothers,
Wet Willie, Marshall Tucker and Elvin
Bishop.
Soon after signing Widespread Panic,
Capricorn Records reissued Space Wran-
gler with a bonus half hour of live tracks.
With this release the band began a nation-
wide tour which then opened the door for
a second album. In 1991, Widespread Panic,
the self titled album was released.
To pin down Widespread Panic's
musical style iscomplicated. Improvisa-
tion is the key word. Lengthy guitar riffs
and five minute nonvocal jams domi-
nate the self-titled album.
"We're expecting a hell
of a show in Greenville
� David Schools,
bassist
Tonight the Attic will showcase
Widespread Panic.
"We're expecting a hell of a show in
Greenville David Schools (bassist) said
inatelephonein rervie w. "We've a I ways
been shown a good time there
He went on to explain that the New
Deli was their stop in Greenville a few
years back and that they felt great about
coming back.
The sextet is composed of John Bell,
rhythm guitarvocals; Michael
House, lead guitarvocals; John
Herman, keyboard; Domingo S.
Ortiz, percussionvocals; Todd
Nance,drums;and David Schools,
bassvocals.
Widespread Panicparticipated
intheH.O.R.D.E (Horizonsof Rock
Development Everywhere) festival
in Atlanta and Charlotte.
The festival was composed-of
five bands including: Col. Bruce
Hampton and the Aquarium Res-
cue Unit, jazzblue-grass ensemble
Bela Fleck and the Flecktones, New
York'sSpin Doctorsand Blues Trav-
eler and Widespread Panic.
"I liked it a lot better than
Lollapolloza, I could relate to the
music better- it was a relaxed atmo-
sphere and I cameaway knowing it
was $10 well spent said Simon
Barth, an ECU sophomore who at-
tended both festival shows.
-
I





8 The East Carolinian
NOVEMBER 5, 1992
Shooter not so 'Valiant' anymore
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
Jim Shooter used to be the man
inchargeforthebiggestcomiccom-
pany in the nation, Marvel Comics
Group. But, when he signed on as
the head editor for Valiant Comics,
their line of comics underwent an
incredible metamorphosis. Shooter
has always been a big fan of super-
hero comics and that's what he
focused Valiant titles on.
Shooter brought established
creators into Valiant's fold to give
their comic books depth. His old
friend from Marvel, Bob Lavton,
joined the Valiant ship.
At Marvel Comics, Lavton
helped Iron Man through some of
his most successful years, as well
as helping form one of Man-el's
bestsellingcomic, X-Factor. Lavton
helped Shooter make a new mark
in the comic industry. Shooter also
recruited Barry Windsor-Smith,
who is best known for his work on
Connn comic, and the Weapon-X
story for Marvel in Maroel Comics
Presents.
Shooter, Layton and Windsor-
Smith had been friends for many
years, and they were destined to
work together again. This trio of
creators worked together to build
a foundation of quality characters
and intelligent stories to make Val-
iant a success.
Shooter wanted comic books
that had a strong story and quality
art instead of flashy art and poor
stories. He knew that it takes an
interesting story to keep the buy-
ers attention. Shooter also knew
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that this approach would create a
solid fan base from which word of
mouth would spread the news of
Valiant's quality.
Unfortunately, Shooter and
the managing staff of Valiant be-
gan to have creative differences
and, as a result, Shooter left from
Valiant's ranks. Layton and
Windsor-Smith filled Shooter's
position. They began to become
more involved with theentireline
of comics.
Windsor-Smith went from
drawing only one comic, to writ-
ing and drawing two comics a
month. Layton spread his talents
through creating new titles in the
Valiant line and writing as much
as he could. The duo in charge has
created new titles for Valiant and
brought in new creators to the
Valiant family.
Valiant's sales have grown
rapidly and the demand for back
issues (issues that have already
been published and are sold by
retail comic shops, they are usu-
ally unavailable elsewhere) of the
titles have begun to increase
steadily, as have their cost. Some
of the back issues are so rare that
they've jumped from $2.25 to $40
in value.
With a new line of comics,
including X O Manowar, Eternal
Warrior, Archer & Armstrong, So-
lar: Man of the Atom, Bloodshot,
HardC.O.R.P.S Harbinger,
Magnus: Robot Fighter, Rai and
Shadowman,and their creators be-
ginning to be household names in
comics stores, Valiant's journey to
the top is underway.
r
New additions to Valiant Comics
proves successful
NOVEMBER
Now Serving the Greenville and Eastern Carolina
Sanmina, vtdu
DESIGNS r
Contemporary Handcrafted Jewelry
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106 E. 4lli Street
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Campus Paperback Bestsellers
1. The Firm, by John Gnsham (Island Dell. $5.99.)
Young lawyer confronts the hidden workings of his firm
2. The Indispensable Calvin and Hotobes. Dy Bill Watlerson
lAndrews & McMeel. S1295.) Latest collected cartoons
3. Life s Little Instruction Book, by H Jackson Brown Jr
(Rutledge Hill. S5.95 j Advice tor attaining a full lite
4. A Time to Kill, by John Gnsham llsland Dell. S5 99.)
Racial tension run high during a trial
5. The Sum of All Fears, by Tom Clancy (Berkley. $6 991 Middle
Eastern terrorists bring about the threat of nuclear war
6. Seven Habits ot Highly Effective People, by Steven R Covey
(Fireside. $9.95I Guide to personal fulfillment
7. Saint Maybe, by Anne Tyler (Ivy, $5 99)
Struggles of a young man to come to terms with his past
8. The Road Less Traveled, by M Scott Peck (Touchstone. $10 951
Psychological and spiritual inspiration by a psychiatrist
9. Needful Things, by Stephen King (Signet $6.99.)
King delivers a twisted "Our Town with a vengeance
10. Daisy Fay and the Miracle Man, by Fannie Flagg (Warner. S7 991
Young girt s hillanous and touching coming of age m a Southern town
new & Recommended
Native American Testimony, by Peter Nabokov. Ed (Penguin. S1S.00.)
A chronicle of Indian-White relations from prophecy to the present. 1492-1992
The Portable Beat Reader, by Ann Charters. Ed (Penguin. $12.501
Collection of the most significant writing of a movement that swept
American letters with hurricane force
No Cure for Cancer, by Denis Lean (Anchor. $8.00.)
Brilliantly rendered work of acerbic humor and scathing social
commentary on modern life - and death
�SSOOATKW Of A1KRICM PUBUSHBS��TIO��L ASSOCIATION 0 COLLEGE STOWS

1
Breed 13 ,�� Euphoria, 1
��� ���
IBB -
turn ,22;
will open tor Fountain of Youth III!
this weekend
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A�m CUdOatOar (jreat detection Of
(ncenee, Potpourri, Decorativ-e Candeg and
Cfristmas tfoodieg
You want a Career.
Careers need leadership experience.
Experience fosters success.
Student Leadership Development Programs
offers you experience:
Success at "Sunrise"
Which would you rather do:
A. Have a free breakfast with an established, successful
leader; or
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Reserve your place at the breakfast table with:
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NOVEMBER 5, 1992
Evil ways, baby
Christmas comes early
WZMB celebrates in November J
The East Carolinian
9
By Marjorie McKinstry
Staff Writer
Photo by Daii Reed
Carlos Santana, along with the Dixie Dreggs, played Walnut Creek
Oct. 24. Longtime fans were disappointed with Santana's
performance and the general census was heard muttering, "It
wasn't what I expected
After a year of controversial limi-
tations on live remotes and other ba-
sic mnctionsofcollegemusicstations,
WZMB is relieved to be listening to
die soundsofjinglebel Is and the rings
of lucky callers instead of the hinder-
ing announcements of the ECU elite.
Christmas in No-
vember has arrived
and the general man-
ager, Tim Johnson, is
happy because "it's
great to becoming up
on a really good
time Johnson con-
siders this promotion
to be a festive way to
thank the listeners of
thestation and togar-
nersomeattention for
WZMB.
The promotion delivers an earl)'
holiday spirit to ECU by passing out
gifts to the students. In order to win,
callers need to listen for the sound of
jingle bells (which should ring about
once ever)' hour throughout the
month of November) and then be the
third listener to call 757-6913 (a good
number followed by a bad number).
Actual prizes will vary from WZMB
key-chains thatareguaranteed toopen
those pesky liquid containers to T-
shirts,bikersquirt bo ttles,music pack-
ages and, according to Johnson,
"much, much more
The packages may be a handful
erf CD singles from groups such as
Thelonius Monster, Daisy Chainsaw
and Curve, as well as a cassingle or
two from other college music station
bands like Immaculate Fools, Defini-
tion of Sound and Naked Soul. And
like last year, the
station is going to
reserve the bigger
presents togiveout
closer to December.
Such presents last
year included beer
signmirrors,
CrystalConnection
gift certificates and
a skateboard from
the Surf Report.
Anyone, other
thanemployeesofWZMB,isallowed
to win, and the station is expecting to
giveoutapproximatelyl2giftsaday.
Obvio usly Chris tmas in November is
oneofthebiggestpromotionsWZMB
sponsors, and according to Johnson,
it's a great way to "give something
back to the listeners � a form of
listener appreciation, for everyone
who supported us this last year
So remember to listen forthe jingle
bellsand be the third caller foranearly
Christmas surprise.
Maritime
"�a form of lis-
tener appreciation,
for everyone who
supported us this
last year
-Tim Johnson,
General Manager
WZMB
the field school, ECU students
helped to clear the wreck of mud
and debrisand mapped the vessel's
hull structure. Students have also
worked extensively in the sub tropi-
cal paradise of Bermuda with the
Bermuda Maritime Museum.
The program also conserves
artifacts from thesites that are stud-
ied by ECU students and faculty.
Staff archaeologist and chief con-
servator Brad Rodgers has helped
bring the ECU lab to national re-
nown in conserving materials from
underwater environments. ECU
keeps few of the items that are con-
serves; they are contributed to mu-
seums and state and federal agen-
cies.
Current students in the Mari-
time History and Nautical Archae-
ology program conduct research
throughout the country. Just this
summer, Jemison Beshears, Harry
Pecorelli and Mike Krivor worked
on what is known as the Monti
Cristi "Pipe Wreck" in the Domini-
can Republic. Patrick Cole and
Amyjo Know les helped in the exca-
vation of a 14th century ship in
Holland.
Ray Tubby helped tosurveyan
area of shipwrecks in Wisconsin
that will become that state's first
underwater shipwreck preserve,
and Thomas Stoltmann worked on
the mapping of a wreck in Lake
Continued from page 6
HEROES ARE HERE, TOO
116 E 5th Street
Greenville, NC 757-0948
3rd ANNIVERSARY SALE
3 Days Only November 9,10,11
Big
Savings
Michigan using Video Music Imag-
ing (VMI), a newly devised combi-
nation of video camera, computer
and graphics software to create a
detailed map of a wreck site.
Richard Manesto conducted a
survey of the Whitefish Point Un-
derwater Shipwreck Preserve on
Lake Superior.
While the ECU field schools
offer experience for the students, it
also entails great expenses for the
students. They must pay for trans-
portation, food, medical exams in
order to dive and the expensive
scuba equipment needed.
Students also have expenses
involved in the personal research
for their theses. They often must
travel tocompletehistorical research
and to conduct site studies of ship-
wrecks throughout the country.
Some students feel frustrated
that the ECU community knows so
little about their program. The ECU
administration wholeheartedlysup-
ports the program, but the students
and even faculty of ECU and the
Creenvilie community in general
don't even seem to realize that a
world-renown Maritime History
and Na utical Archaeology program
exists in their midst.
"I think people should know
something about the program be-
cause it seems like nobody knows
that we exist Russell said.
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f M
The East Carolinian
I
November5, 1992
Sports
Page 10
ECU v. West Vfrginia
West Virginia University
1991 record: 6-5-0
Primary offense: Multiple
Primary defense: Multiple
Offensive lettermen returning, lost: 17,9
Defensive starters returning, lost: 21,6
Special teams lettermen returning, lost: 2,0
Head Coach: Don Nehlen (Bowling Green, '58)
Record at School: 87-51-2 (12 seasons)
Career Record: 140-86-6 (21 seasons)
General Information
Location: Morgantown, W. Va.
Enrollment: 21,000
Colors: Old Gold and Blue
Nickname: Mountaineers
Conference: BIG EAST
Stadium: Mountaineer Field (63,500)
Surface: Omniturf
Rob's Pick
Scott still in
nirmingfor
Lombardi
Commentary from a loosely defined' sports writer
have beat.
On the flip side, I havea few good
things to say. My coaching theories
buddy, Cha rles Miles, has shown wha t
he is capable of doing. 112 yards on 10
carries is
coach Don Nehlen
Series Record (7-0)
WVa.ECU
1988 3010
1987 490
1980 2814
All games have been played at West Virginia
1992 Schedule (3-3-2)
Sept. 5 tied Miami, Ohio, 29-29T
Sept. 12 beat PITT, 44-6
Sept. 19 beat MARYLAND, 34-33
Sept. 26 beat VIRGINIA TECH, 16-7
Oct 3 tied Boston College, 24-24T
Oct 17 lost to Syracuse, 17-20'
Oct. 24 lost to Perm State, 26-40
Oct 31 lost to Miami, Fla, 23-30
Nov. 7 EAST CAROLINA
Nov. 14 at Rutgers
Nov. 21 Louisiana Tech
Adrian Murrell

By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
In the Nov. 3 edition of TlieEast
Carolinian, a "loosely" denned En-
glish major named Gregory M.
Sember blamed me, my staff and tlie
entire athletic department for the
football team's poor season.
Well, let's examine the situa-
tion.
I was in attendance at the Syra-
cuse, Bowling Green, Duke and
Southern Miss games. I picked ECU
to win them all. Greg, you are 100
percent correct Those loses are all
my fault. The team didn't give it
there best effort, yet somehow I feel
responsible.
It would seem that my crystal
ball is slightly cracked.I should have
called the Psychic Friends Network for
some help.
Before I take up any moreof my
reader's time with a rebuttal, I will
write a bit about our upcoming loss
to West Virginia � if that is all right
with you, Greg.
The Mountaineers haveowned
the Pirates in every meeting. And,
running back Adrian Murrell is go-
ing to destroy us. He is averaging
over 120 yards per game against
teams like Perm State, Miami (Fla.),
Syracuse and Pitt.
Oh, yeah. Speaking of Pitt �
WVa. beat them 44-6. We d id not do
quite as well.
The Mountaineers have
dropped three tough games in a row
and will not lose a fourth to a team
that got its ass kicked on national
television by a team they should
Charles Miles
amazing.
It is truly
unfortunate it
took Head
Coach Steve
Logan to this
late in the sea-
son to realize
how good
Milescouldbe.
He is averag-
ingl2.9yardsperrushand isoneof the
fastest men on the team. Miles also has
gained 18moreyards than Cedric Van
Buren with less than half the attempts.
What's up with that, coach?
Well, Greg, what do you think?
Am I right, or is this just another dis-
play of my ignorance?
Isincerely apologize to you,Greg.
I never intended to cause you such
mental anguish by raisingyour hopes,
only for them to fall to the ground and
shatter like glass. I also apologize for
any trauma this may have caused the
entire Sember family.
No. 1 take that back. I'm not sorry
� not sorry at all. Look, Greg, you
have a mind. Why don't you use it?
Tlie East Carolinian is not Big
Brother and I don't tell people what to
think. You should be old enough by
now to form yourownopinions. You're
a big boy�act like it.
Ifyou reallyaretryingto blame me
for this season, you sixuld seek pro-
fessional help. Predicting, as you put
it, "improbable wins" over na-
tionally ranked Syracuse is not a
crime. Ifyou believed what I wrote
and didn't try to evaluate things
for yourself, that is your fault �
not mine.
When you went to the Syra-
cuse game with your "purple wig
and big yellow horn" you were
overtaken, as was I, by the same
hopes and illusions that the sea-
son seemed to promise. Actually,
Greg, ifyou takea look at my Oct.
15 article, I shouldered a lot of
blame for raising everyone's ex-
pectations, so it seems you just
regurgitated (or is the word pla-
giarized) what I wrote weeks ago.
Icanhandlecriticism�ifitis
constructive. You offered no ex-
amples or proof along with your
vague accusations. Your letter to
the editor was poorly written and
didn't really make any sense.
Are you really an English
major? Your writing is "as clear
and concise as the economic plans
of Clinton or Bush
Was your letter serious? You,
almost, don't deserve a response.
No stones were thrown a t the
fans by any of my writers. I'm
beginning to wonder if you even
read Tlie East Carolinian. As far as
"No. 1 defense" in reference to
our "stop troop you are mis-
guided.Thatstatementwasnever
made. I assume you can read,but
your comprehension skills are
lacking. Go backand takea lookat
theOct. 13edition.Therewillbea
quiz at tlie end of class.
Crystal Balls
Sports Information
Department
The four finalists for the Ro-
tary Lombardi Award will bean-
nounced Wed Nov. 4 at 7 p.m.
EST during a national telecon-
ference sponsored by MCI. The
finalists will be announced and
interviewed initially by the tele-
conference moderator, followed
by an open media forum for indi-
vidual and
To partici-
pate in the
Rotary
Lombardi
Award Tele-
conference, call
MCI at 1-800-
475-4700.
group in-
terviews
during the
remainder
of the pro-
gram.
T o
pa r tici-
pate in the
Rotary
Lombardi Award Teleconfer-
ence, call MCI at 1-800-475-4700.
The MCI operator will ask for
your name, your media or publi-
cation and your desired level of
participation. You will then be
registered as a participant in the
press conference and will be
given your conference telephone
number and password. The
phone call is free. Full transcripts
will be available from MCI for
$10. This fee will bedonated with
the proceeds from the dinner to
the American Cancer Society.
The Rotary Lombard i Award
is given annually to the college
lineman � offense or defense �
who, in addition to outstanding
performance and ability, bestex-
See Scott page 11
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Ast. Sports Editor
ECU WVa.
28 34
42
Richard Eakin, Chancellor 21
Nancy Jenkins, Mayor of Greenville 28
Brian Bailey, TV 9 Sports Caster 24
Kevin Hall, WZMB Sports Director 38
Horace Etheridge, frosh, Ind. Tech. 32
avg: 30
38
20
28
31
35
18
29
"With no loose definitions, I believe we
will lose. I will take no blame, though. "
"After seven straight losses, I
think this time 'Air Logan' has
their number
"ECU squeaks by West Virginia
"East and West will meet in the
middle
"The key is in stopping Adrian
Murrell
"W. Va. defense is not as good as S.
Miss, so the Pirates will win in this
offensive slugfest
"Come on Pirates, kick those bitches
Chas' Pick
Nothing loose about this game
(Reminder: this for your entertainment only Do not take this too seriously. And, once again, no wagering. Thank you.)
The '92 Lady Pirate Swim team outstanding
By Brent St. Pierre
Staff Writer
In a world where apathy toward women's athletics is the norm rather than the exception we would
like to introduce you to the ECU women's swim team.
First the statistics. The women's swim team has the highest winning percentage of any female team
here at ECU (70). They have been nationally ranked twice in the past five years. Moreover, the Lady
Pirates are expected to win between 9 to 11 of their 12 dual meets this year and are expected to finish no
less than second or third at this years Colonial
Athletic Association championships.
This is some improvement considering that
the Lady Pirates have finished no better than lastor
next to last over die past three years. They havenot
finished better than third since the 1987-1988 sea-
son, but this year that is all about to change.
The Lady Pirates are led by their three cap-
tains: Tia Pardue, Dawn Comiso and Jacqueline
Siber. Lone senior Tia Pardue labeled this years
team as the best that she had ever been a part of.
Head coach Rick Kobe called this years team the
best ECU women's swim team ever.
"Last year we were somewhat weak � we
had only lOswimmersand werenotverycompeti-
ng
w
The Lady Pirate Swim Team
includes, from left to right, Tia
Pardue, Dawn Casimo and
Jacqueline Silber.
� �
tive Kobe said. "In theoff-season though we were
awarded more scholarship money and a budget
increase. Because of that we've been able to go out
and recruit more quality swimmers
That would explain this year's 14 freshmen,
perhaps thestrongestf reshmenclassever. In swim-
ming, though, there is a high attrition rate. Many
freshmen nil to stick it out for four years. This is
where the role of the team captain comes in, or in
this case captains. However, Kobe considers his
captains more as "player-coaches
"Our captains are great leaders and serve as
good role models and examples for our freshmen
in and out of the water Kobe said.
Tia Pardue feels that her job as captain is to
push the underclassmen in tlie pool. Pushing them
to break the pain barrier in practice everyday.
Jacqueline Siber though tries to encourage
them to be positive, work hard and most impor-
tantly to not get down ifyou havea bad practiceor
meet.
Dawn Comiso considers herself more of a
listening board to the woes of the freshmen. "Ifany
of the freshmen need to talk about anything I'm
there for them, if it be swimming, school or any-
thing else, I try to help
See Swim page 11
By Chas Mitchl
Assistant Sports Editor
Call me crazy, call me naive,
but I honestly believe that,onSarur-
day,ECU will whip West Virginia's
ass and my reasoning is simple.
There a re three phases in a foot-
ball game: offense,defense and spe-
cial teams. Nine times out of 10, if a
team wins two of the three phases,
then that team will have a greater
chance of winning the game.
PhaseOne: Offense. As strange
as it may sound, or as hard as it may
be to believe, we (yes, we) have had
the nation's No.
1 passing offense
since Sept. 5 of
this year.
Now allow
metoexplainthat
to a particular
English major
who may not
comprehend it
fully. Since week
one of the NCAA
Division I-A sea-
son, the Pirate passing attack has
been ranked No. 1 among all other
Division I-A schools. East Carolina
was ranked higher than N.C. State,
BostonCollege,FloridaState, Wash-
ington, Miami you get the picture
(I hope). Despite losing last week to
Southern Mississippi, the "Air
Logan" passingoffenseisnow third
in the nation.
With the ability toconsume the
football field faster thananycollege
football team in the country, the
Mountaineers are more worried
about their defense stopping
Michael Anderson and company
rather than hoping that our offense
comesoutcoldandstalls.Weshould
be able to put points up on the
board in a hurry, forour own worse
enemy on offense is our over confi-
dence. Tom Scott and his front line
associates must win the battle in the
trenches in order for Anderson, Jun-
iorSmithand Clayton "Sure Hands"
Driver to beable to pull off this mild
up-set in Morgantown.
Phase Two: Defense. I'll be as
direct as possible in saying that the
main threat behind West Virginia is
ninning back Adrian Murrell. Ber-
nard Carter, Jerry Dillon and Tony
Davis must put a quick end to tlie
1.1. . L
Mountaineer's running game. Our
defensive secondary has the raw
speed and quickness to keep quar-
terback Darren Studstill's receivers
in check. Between Greg "Enforcer"
Grandison, Greg Floyd and the re-
mainder of the secondary, timely
hits and big plays will swing the
pendulum in the direction of the
Pirates.
Phase Three: Special Teams.
From day one of the season, our
special teams have improved. I feel
that big performances from both
the kicking and punting units will
be a factor in the game. Our kick-off
coverage team has
at least seven hard
hitters who run a
4.440 and should
be able to cover the
distance and pro-
vide the needed
spark for both the
offensive and de-
- fensiveteams.With
deep and high
kicks or punts, we
should be able to
set a new NCAA record for most
fair catch calls in a game.
It seems that Deke Owens has
founded his mark and is now split-
ting the up-rights with confidence,
as well as booting kick-offs deep
inside the opponents 20. Punters
Garret Beasley and Michael Jacobs
must have a better-than-average
day if we are to entertain hopes of
containing the Mountaineers'
Murrell. With a punting average ot
36.4 yards a punt, precision and
accuracy will greatly assist the total
East Carolina football package.
Now to sum it all up for indi-
viduals who may not be able to
follow die patterns of "loosely de-
fined" sports writers.
ECU will scoreatleast42 points
against West Virginia, while the
special teams or the defensive unit
will grace tlie "promised land" fora
touchdown or a safety. With strong
hopes of our defensecontai ning the
Mountaineer's backfield, give or
take a bad call or a couple of good
plays, West Virginia will keep it
close. After losing their last three
games, their mental psyche will
probably be their worst fears.
PIRATES 42, MOUNTAIN-
EERS 38





11 The East Carolinian
NOVEMBER 5, 1992
Scott
Continued from page 10
emplifies the characteristics and dis-
cipline of Vince Lombardi. The 12
semifinalists announced earlier this
fall are:
TOM SCOTT,
OFFENSIVE
TACKLE, 6-7,
330, SENIOR,
EAST CARO-
LINA
Mike
Compton,
Center, 6-7,
289, Senior,
West Virginia. lomScott
Eric Curry, Defensive End,
6-6, 265, Senior, Alabama.
M i ke Devi in, Center, 6-3,281),
Senior, Iowa.
Marvin Jones, Inside Line-
backer, 6-2,230, Junior, Florida State.
Lincoln Kennedy, Offensive
Tackle, 6-7,325, Senior, Washington.
Rusty Medearis, Defensive
End, 6-3, 255, Junior, Miami (Fla.).
Coleman Rudolph, Defen-
sive Tackle, 6-4, 267, Senior, Georgia
Tech.
Will Shields, Offensive
Guard, 6-1, 305, Senior, Nebraska.
Chris Slade, Defensive End,
6-5, 235, Senior, Virginia.
Aaron Taylor, Offensive
Guard, 6-4,294, Junior, Notre Dame.
Jeff Zgonina, Nose Guard, 6-
2, 270, Senior, Purdue.
Equestrian club
announcement
The East Carolina University Equestrian Club provides
instruction and coaching for all levels of hunt seat riding, as
well as activities that can be enjoyed by riders and
non-riders. Club
members mav try out
for the ECU Eques-
trian Team, which is
affiliated with the
Intercollegiate Horse
Show Association
(IHSA) in the South
Eastern Region. The:
Club operates under
the auspices of the
Department of Rec-
reational Services
and is hosted by
Rock Springs Eques-
trian Center which is
located seven miles from campus. Rock Springs Equestrian
Center provides the horses and instructions that make the
activities possible.
Anyone interested in joining the Club or obtaining more
information is encouraged to contact Angela High at 931-8453
or Holy Andrews at 931-8762.
SWIM
Continued from page 10
Hey, Zero. Are you Shai? From the
acknickalous one. Shout out to Candy
on her 22nd from her Mr. Loverman,
Wayne (who always reads the sports
section of TEC). So
should you! Peace.
Weknow,weknow�whocares
it is still women's svvimming. Any-
one can jump into a pool, splash
around and meander through the
water. Are we right? Thought so.
Well foryourinformation most of
these womencan swim faster thanyou
can run. But,you would not know that
becauseyou would not beca ughtdead
ata women's swim meet. So, read on.
You might be surprised at what little
youknewaboutwomen'sswimming.
College svvimming has the long-
est season of any other college sport.
They start in August with their "pre-
season"andrunintolatespring.Their
pre-season consists of three to four
weeks of basic training. They run five
miles a day in the searing heat, do
aerobics threedaysa week, swim five
to six miles a day and lift weights in
between workouts. Once the season
starts they swim close to 20 miles a
week, or in other words from here to
little Washington.
Expectations are obviously high
but they are also realistic. This year's
team has only one senior and three
juniors, the rest are freshmen and
sophomores. If this team can stay in-
tact and avoid injuries ECU could
have one of the finest ladies' swim
programs in the United States. Kobe
agrees that the women's team has
beendownthelastcoupleofyearsbut
is proud to say, "One of the elite
conference teams is back
The shame of all this is that no-
m
Back on the block: the Lady Pirate swim team has a wealth of talent
that may go unnoticed by the student body.
body will see it. Both Kobe and the much.Tia Pardue states simply, "the
captains of the Lady Pirates know only thing we want is support
how good they areand only want the The Pirates' first home meet is
rest of the ECU family to see how Nov. 20th.
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12 The East Carolinian
NOVEMBER 5, 1992
Volleyball
team loses
final match
ByChasMitchl
Assistant Sports Editor
After starting the 1992 Co-
lonial Athletic Association
with an impressive 2-0 record,
the Lady Tirates d nop ped thei r
remaining three matches to
end their CAA regular season
at 2-3.
In their last conference
match of the year, ECU lost in
three straight games (3-15, 6-
15 and 8-15) to CAA competi-
tor UNC-Wilmington before a
ca paci ty crowd a t M i nges Col i-
seum. With the loss, the Pi-
rates now go into the CAA
tournament in fith place.
"We looked out of sync
and a step slow tonight Head
Coach Martha McCaskill said.
"The effort and desire was
there on our part we just
played poorly
It seemed as though the
ladies had a hard time getting
on track to create a flow or
streak. On offense, Wendy
Schultz and jenny Parson led
the Pirates with six kills and
15assists respectfully. Defen-
sively Parson and Schultz
managed eight digs each to
slow the pace of the UNC-W
buzz-saw.
According to McCaskill,
under different circum-
stances the last two confer-
ence losses could have eas-
ily been Pirate victories.
"Sickness has run through
the team and it took its toll,
Photo by Dail Reed
Wendy Schultz has been the heart and soul of a very talented Pirate
volleyball squad.
but you can't take anything away
from UNC-W; they played well
McCaskill said.
The '92CAA volleyball tourna-
ment will be held at Minges Coli-
seum on November 21-22 and coach
McCaskill had these comments:
"Tliis match had a big effect on the
seedingfor the tournament McCaskill
said. "We're now seeded fifth in the
tournament a win would have put us
seeded second. This is the best seeding
ECU has had since we joined the CAA
'92 CAA Volleyball Championship
East Carolina is the host school for the 1992 CAA Women's Volleyball Championship.
There is no cost for admission to students possessing a valid ECU student activity card.
For the first time since 1985, the Lady Pirates are in a position to achieve volleyball
greatness with a team that has worked hard throughout the entire year.
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 5, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 05, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.906
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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