The East Carolinian, November 3, 1992






Opinion
Where the polls are '92
Students who live on campus must go to the
Elm Street Gym to vote today. Those who
live between Fifth Street and the Tar River
must go to the Willis Building downtown.
Lifestyle
That'll be the day
On Friday The Buddy Holly
Story, a musical, will be at
Wright Auditorium. Call 757-
4788 for details.
About 33,500 fans filled Ficklen to
the top-as ESPN and Southern
I Mississippi came to town Thursday.
See pg. 9 for story.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. VI i?
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, November 3,1992
16 Pages
SGA passes resolution
against discrimination
By Elizabeth Shimmel
Assistant News Editor
The Student Government Asso-
ciation voted in favor of a new resolu-
tion Monday that denounces any dis-
crimination against ECU students by
down town Greenvilleestablishments.
Written by Demetrius Carter, the
resolution states that "no student, re-
gardless of reason, should be discrimi-
nated against (and) the East Carolina
Student Legislature goes on record de-
no uncingdiscrimination by any Down-
town Greenville establishment
Carter said he is happy the reso-
lution passed, but said he had hoped
the original resolution thatwasbrought
to floor Oct. 19 would have passed.
"You can never be happy when
you don't get what you want Carter
said. "We had hoped to get a little more
out of it, (but) we had to compromise
The original resolution was
tabled at the Oct. 19 SGA meeting
to give student leaders enough time
to make the necessary revisions in
the resolution.
"We worked with the ad min-
istration, we worked with Allied
Blacks for Leadership and Equal-
ity, and we worked out a new reso-
lution'Cartersaid. "It was revised
to include all bars downtown
Theoriginal resolution called
for boycotts of two specific down-
town bars that have had the high-
est number of reported cases of
discrimination.
Carter said he has worked
with both Bogies and the Elbo
Room with hopes of bringing a
peaceful end to this problem.
"TheyhavenotopenJysaid there
is discrimination Carter said. "That
leaves them open for a lawsuit
According to Carter, one bar
will advertise their membership
policies, and both bars will work
with their employees in an effort to
curb discrimination in their estab-
lishments.
"What we set out to do, we
accomplished Carter said. "We
want to make sure they keep an
eye on their employees and let ev-
eryone know how they can get a
membership
Carter said that in the past
getting into these bars has been
more difficult for some students
than for others.
"They didn't have a fair ad-
mission policy for everyone
Carter said.
The two bars that Carter has
been working with have agreed to
enforce an equal admission policy
See SGA page 4
Ham and cheese
Photo by Biff Ranson
Between 8,000 and 10,000 people converged on the downtown area Halloween night. About 100 police officers
were on duty to keep the crowd under control.
Downtown Halloween
party proves uneventful
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
ECU has a current enroll-
ment of more than 17,000 stu-
dents this year, and a little less
than two-thirds of them cel-
ebrated Halloween downtown.
"1 would
"I
7 hope every
year continues to
have the same
spirit, I hope they
don't change the
new tradition'
- Catherine Miller
guess that there
is roughly 8,000
to 10,000 people
out right now
said Greenville
Police Chief
Charles
Hinman at
about 11 p.m.
Saturday.
Police of-
ficers were out
in force, patrol-
ling the streets of downtown as
earlyas8:45p.m.Two-man teams
could be seen on each corner of
the Cotanche and Fifth streets,
and additional officers were sta-
tioned on business rooftops, ob-
serving the crowd through bin-
oculars and infrared cameras.
Vehicular traffic ran
through the downtown area un-
til about 11 or 11:30 p.m when
the streets were blocked off for
pedestrian and driver safety.
"The crowd got to the point
where downtown patrons were
unsafe walking in the area said
Officer William Harris of Public-
Relations.
Police placed sawhorses at
the intersections of Fifth and
Evans streets,
Fourth and
Cotanche
streets, Cotanche
Street and Reade
Circle and Fifth
Street and Reade
Circle.
Officers
and their cruis-
ers were sta-
tioned at each in-
tersection, with
additional offic-
ers patrolling the fringes of Fifth
Street inside the barricades.
Once the streets had been
blocked off, students and non-
students alike came out in force.
The intersection of Fifth and
Cotanche soon became jam-
packed with people drinking,
screaming and reveling in true
Halloween fashion.
Various students com-
mented on the fun atmosphere
and overall good time that was
going on.
"It's great, it's been a good
giggle Kris Williams said.
"No one from New York
has this much spirit said Deb
Cicogna, a transfer student.
"It's great
Student Johanna Fussell
summed up the night's activi-
ties.
"We're having a good
time Fussell said. "We'rehav-
ing a party
After 12:30 a.m the wait
to get in barsand clubs became
lengthy and lines stretched out
the doors of many establish-
ments.
Bars and clubs followed
the agreement that all alcohol
served would be in plastic cups,
not glass bottles or aluminum
cans.
Downtown establish-
ments shut down for the night
and stopped serving alcohol at
2 a.m. Police cleared the down-
town area around 3:30a.m ac-
cording to Hinman.
When asked about the
night as a whole, students and
police alike were grateful for
See Halloween page 2
Students head to polls
THE ECU VOTE
359 ECU STUDENTS WERE POLLED BETWEEN OCT. 19 & 21 AND
RESPONDED TO THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS:
VOTE?
O AREYOU
REGISTERED TO
trTco n.
5v
� NO
BYES


ARE YOU STILL
CONSIDERING OTHER
CANDIDATES FOR
PRESIDENT OR HAVE YOU
MADE UP YOUR MIND?
IF THE ELECTION WERE
HELD TODAY, WHICH
CANDIDATE FOR THE
PRESIDENT OF THE
UNITED STATES
WOULD YOU VOTE
FOR?
� BUSH: 30
QCLINTON: 46
BPEROT:15
UNDECIDED;
OTHER:0
:7

STILL CONSIDERING OTHER CANIDATES
65) 1" HAVE MMX- UP MY MIND
fjDON'T KNOW: 1
IF THE ELECTION WERE HELD TODAY, WHICH
CANDIDATE FOR THE GOVERNOR OF NORTH
CAROLINA WOULD YOU VOTE FOR? (DO NOT
TELL THE RESPONDENT THE NAMES OF THE
CANIDATES). ,� ��
"� 1JIM GARDNER: 16
ijlMHUNT:26
WILL NOT VOTE: 4
�WHAT 18 THE MOST IMPORTANT REASON UOONT KNOW: 50
FOR SUPPORTING YOUR CANDIDATE?"
ONLY ONE ANSWNER RECORDED)
BUSHCLINTONPEROT
THE ECONOMY OR THE DEFICIT121713
VOTING AGAINST OTHERSisVlbW �12
TRUSTCHARACTER27521
EDUCATION012V2
WOMENS RIGHTS OR ABORTION�8 .0
DONT KNOW!072
THE SURVEY RESEARCH LABORATORY CONDUCTED A SURVEY OF THE
ELECTION PREFERENCES OF A RANDOM SAMPLE OF ECU STUDENTS FOR
THE EAST CAROLINIAN. THE POTENTIAL SAMPLING ERROR IS - 5.3
PERCENT
GRAPHIC BY ADAM ROE
ECU students favor Clinton
By Jeff Becker
News Editor
College-age voters may be going to the
polls today at the highest rate in 20 years.
"If I'm not mistaken, there is a greater
show of interest this time than in any election
since the first one for 18-year-old voters said
Herbert Carlton, a professor of political science
at ECU.
In the last 20years, the turnout of college-
age voters has steadily declined. In 1972, the
first year 18-year-olds could vote, 49.6 percent
cast their ballots. By 1988, the percentage of
college-age voters dropped to 39 percent, more
than twice the decline of U.S. voters during the
same period. Only one in five college-age stu-
dents voted in state and local elections in 1990.
Carlton said a number of factors have
played a role in the increase in young voters
this year, including the recession, anti-incum-
bent sentiment, the desire for change, Gov. Bill
Clinton's and Sen. Al Gore's youth, the abor-
tion issue and environmental concerns.
"Thank God young people want change
more than older people do, otherwise we would
be so stagnant Carlton said. "Change isn't
always progress, but progress demands
change
According to Carlton, for the first time in
more than 40 years college-age voters will not
inherit a better standard of living from their
parents. He said the college-age students need
to vote.
"I'm very troubled � and this is coming
from someone who has been working in this
job a long time � this generation, the people I
am working with right now, are just not going
to have the opportunities when they get out of
college that generationsof college students that
I have worked with since the 1950s have had
Carlton said. "It just frightens me. What are
they going to do as the economy shrinks, and
shrinks and shrinks comparatively?"
Between Oct. 19-23, a class of sociology
students from ECU conducted a survey of stu-
dents' election preferences on campus. Of the
359 ECU students polled, 75 percent said they
were registered to vote.
Thirty percent said they would vote for
President George Bush, 46 percent said they
would cast their ballot for Clinton, and 15
percent said they would vote for Ross Perot.
Clinton won the female vote with 52 per-
cent, with Bush getting 31 percent and Perot 8
percent. Thirty-seven percent of the males
polled said they would vote for Clinton, 29
percent said they would vote for Bush and 27
percent said they would vote for Perot.
Clinton also won the African-American
vote with 78 percent. Perot placed second
among African-Americans with 8 percent and
Bush trailed with 5 percent. Forty-two percent
of whites said they would vote for Clinton, 34
percent said they would vote for Bush and 15
percent said they would vote for Perot.
Of those belonging to a fraternity of so-
rority, 44 percent said they would vote for
Bush, 34 percent said they would vote for
Clinton and 16 percent for Perot. Of those not
belonging to a fraternity or sorority, 49 percent
said they would vote forClinton, 28 percent for
Bush and 15 percent for Perot.
For the N.C. gubernatorial race, 30 per-
cent of in-state voters said they would vote for
Democratic candidatejim Huntand 18 percent
said they would vote for Republican Jim Mar-
tin.
However, 48 percent of in-state students
said they did not know who they would sup-
port for governor. The high number of unde-
cided voters may have resulted from the poll-
sters not giving the names of the candidates to
those being questioned.
Ryan Bohanan, a sophomore a t ECU, said
that unlike other years the candidates have
addressed a lot of the issues that students are
interested in.
"In the past, (candidates) didn't concen-
trate on the issues that students really cared
about Bohanan said. "Now you have issues
like the economy, and students are worried
about getting a job
Mark Jackson,a student from North Caro-
lina Central University, said the 6,(XK) students
at his school were leaning more toward the
ClintonGore ticket.
"1 think Clinton and Gore have made an
effort to get in touch with the younger genera-
tion because the Republican party had fallen
out of touch with us Jackson said. "Especially
on issues concerning college funding and col-
lege aid
Mark Lakey, who will begin his freshman
year at Western Carolina next May, compared
Clinton to former President Jimmy Carter.
"I wasn't very old then, but 1 can tell from
my father that 1976, was the worst time in
American history Lakey said f Bill Clinton
is elected president, it is going tobeeven worse
�W
"Wii"





2
NOVEMBER 3, 1992
The East Carolinian
Gunman threatens class
A man armed with a semi-automatic rifle walked into a
University of Nebraska classroom, pointed the weapon at students
and pulled the trigger, but the gun apparently jammed, campus
officials said. The 22 students in the class scrambled out of the room,
while the suspect ran to his car and was arrested 20 minutes later.
Arthur McElroy, 43, has been charged with attempted second-
degree murder, making terroristic threats, false imprisonment and
use of a firearm to commit a felony. "He is not talking. We don't
know what the motive is a university spokeswoman said.
Retired NYU official arrested
A former New York University administrator and her hus-
band were arrested and charged with stealing $4.1 million from the
school by falsifying at least 1,200 tuition refund checks, the FBI said.
Dora and Salvatore Malfrici were arrested in Fort Myers, Fla. and
charged with money laundering. The Malfricis allegedly wrote
checks to the names of people who never attended the university
and then used the money to pay for jewelry and Florida real estate.
UNC black center gets backing
Chancellor Paul Hard in of the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill has agreed that a proposed black cultural center should
be a separate building on the school's campus. Detractors have said
that if a black cultural center is separate from the student union, it
would perpetuate segregation, whilesupporters said a stand-alone
building would enhance black culture and studies. The chancellor
also said he favors an accelerated time table to plan, design and
build the facility.
Suspect arrested in UF rapes
A man suspected of sexually assaulting two female University
of Florida students in their dormitory room has been arrested and
was being held on a $500,000 bond. Elbert Jones Jr 34, was picked
up shortly after warrants were issued against hi m for sexual battery
with a deadly weapon and armed burglary.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Correction
The Oct. 22 edition wrongly reported the nameof Allied Blacks
for Leadership and Equality. The East Carolinian apologizes for any
confusion that may have arisen from this error.
ECONO LODGE
"HELPING STUDENTS TO SUPPORT THEMSELVES"
STARTING NOVEMBER 15TH THE ECONO LODGE WILL
WILL GIVE ALL ECU STUDENTS AN ADDITIONAL
10 OFF ALL ROOMS.
Enjoy the hospitality, clean rooms, and Free local calls.
Openning soon next door is Denny's.
(Parties or large groups will not be permitted in the rooms.)
I
I
I
I
I
I
If
ECONO LODGE
10 OFF ALL ROOMS
Coupon Valid from 111592 to 123092
'Student ID required
DNESDAY
NIGHT
00 DRAFT
$1.25 Tall Boys
AOOKamjkazes
100 ADMISSION
UNTIL 11:30 PM
FOR WEDNESDAY 11392
Present this coupon at the door
Halloween
Continued from page 1
the lack of violence, like that
occurred on the last Hallow-
een celebration in 1988.
"There have really been
no problems, except for indi-
viduals bringing in beer or
alcohol Chief Hinman said.
"Police officers are here to en-
sure the safety of property
"It's much better than
we expected said Christy
Angle, a communications stu-
dent at ECU. "We thought the
cops would keep us in the
bars, but they didn't. I'm
holding steady
"1 hope every year con-
tinues to have the same
spirit Catherine 'Tina'
Miller said. "I hope they don't
change the new tradition
Rumors circulated that
police had released smoke
bombs near an apartment
complex to disperse the
crowd gathered there, but
they were denied by Chief
Hinman and said to be "to-
tally false
Activities at ECU's
Mendenhali StudentCenteralso
drew large crowds with virtu-
ally no problems occurring.
"I would estimate that
I
Photo by Biff Rarwon
Studentis wore a variety of costumes to the downtown celebration Saturday night. About 3,000 students
attended Midnight Madness at the Mendenhali Student Center sponsored by the Student Union.
we had close to 3,000 people
come through our doors said
J. Marshall, Assistant Director
of University Unions and Stu-
dent Activities. "That's three
times what we had expected
Eventually closing their
doors at 4 a.m. as scheduled,
events at Mendenhali pro-
gressed smoothly with almost
no problems.
"We thought the breakfast
(running from 1 to 2:30 a.m.)
might be a problem Marshall
said. "But it went off without a
hitch
Marshall also said that
Mendenhali already has
planned to hold a similar event
next Halloween.
When asked about pos-
sible Halloween celebrations
being held downtown in the
future, Hinman refused to com-
ment.
WHO C0ULDNT
4
FROZEN, ASSORTED VARIETIES YOGURT OR
Sealtest
ice Cream
V2-cal.
$w
PEPPERONI OR
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Deluxe Pizzas
J16-OZ.
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"IN THE DELI-PASTRY SHOPPE"
Fresh
Glazed Donuts
22-OZ.
DOZ.
$99
MT. noilD
IN THE DAIRY CASE"
A Kroger Chilled
Orange Juice
Gal.
$J99
CAFFEINE FREE DIET PEPSI, DIET PEPSI,
idiet Mountain Dew or
'pepsi Pepsi Cola
3-Ltr.
$139
i
COPYRIGHT 1992 - THE KROGER CO. ITEMS AND
PRICES GOOD SUNDAY. NOV. ! THROUGH SATUR-
DAY. NOV. 7. 1992 IN GREENVILLE. WE RESERVE THE
RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES. NONE SOLD TO
DEALERS.
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY Each of these advertised items
is required to be readily available lor sale in each Kroger
Store, except as specifically noted in this ad If we do run
out of an advertised item, we will offer you your choice of
a comparable item, when available, reflecting the same
savings or a raincheck which will entitle you to purchase
the advertised item at the advertised price within 30 days
Only one vendor coupon will be accepted per item
purchased
X





J �� Mil �!�
i
3
NOVEMBER 3, 1S92
Post-cold-war military to reflect society
Los Angles Times
LANGLEY AIR
FORCE BASE, Va. �
Carly Faye McMullen
isn't even a yearold, but
the "Persian Gulf baby" already is
being groomed to follow her father
and her grandfather � both Air
Force fighter pilots�into the fam-
ily business.
Capt.JackMcMullen,Carly's
father, flies F-15 fighters. Hergrand-
father, retired Lt. Gen. Thomas
McMullen, flew F-104s. Jack
McMullen says he would like to
seeCarly, who has his blueeyes, fly
the Air Force's next-generation
fighter plane, the stealthy F-22. As-
suming, of course, that those blue
eyes have perfect vision.
The presence of women in
Air Force cockpits and in other
combat slots�may be among the
more visible changes in the future
armed forces. But if Carly joins the
U.S. military early in the next cen-
tury, she will likely see many oth-
ers.
Experts say that in the com-
ing decades, the cyclonic changes
that have reshaped the world over
thepastthree years will bring about
subtle but profound shifts in the
US. military and its relationship to
the rest of American society. To a
large extent, the changes are ex-
pected to chip away at the wall mat
traditionally has separa tad military
people and the civilian populace
they serve.
The possibilities for change
are numerous: Women may re-
ceive combat assignments. The
Pentagon may abandon its prohi-
bition against gays in the services.
Military personnel would face
fewer transfers. They and their
families can hope to be better inte-
grated into theirsurroundingcom-
munities. The needs of working
spouses are likely to be better ac-
commodated. And in many other
ways, experts say, military life will
look less distinct from civilian life.
NATIONAL
Someofthesepotential changes
face stiff resistance from many of the
military's senior leaders. They say
that Cold War or not, the unique
demands on service members �
most notably, that they should fight
and dieif called upon�can never be
relaxed. And maintaining those stan-
dards, they add, will always dictate
that military life looks different from
the work and play of civilians.
But more than a few military
leaders see the shifts as inevitable,
and welcome them as a way to "bui Id
bridges" between civilians and mili-
tary personnel. Those new relations,
in rum, will shore up support for the
military in communities across the
nation.
"I think, actually, we've seen a
military that's been changing in many
ways said Gen. John Galvin, who
retired in June after a 30-year Army
career, half spent outside the United
States. "Perhaps we've been too iso-
lated in our military lives; 1 don't
think that isolation is good for us.
The more we understand and par-
ticipate in the daily experience of
fellow Americans, the better
Already, the nation's military
organizations are feeling the rumble
as the wall between them and the
civilian world starts coming down:
With the urgency of the Cold War
threat gone, lawmakers on Capitol
Hill believe they can begin to reclaim
some control over military institu-
tions, which have long been granted
leeway in making their own rules.
As a result, lawmakers are
moving with new boldness to bring
several military policies�including
a prohibition against homosexuals
and a ban on women in combat �
into line with theirview of thevalues
of American civilian society.
Those moves are expected to
erode a long tradition of indepen-
dence for the armed
services. As themili-
tary faced down a
formidable Soviet
adversary during
the Cold War, the
nation's courts and political bod-
ies granted the armed services
the right to establish policies that
would foster "good order and
discipline" within their ranks.
In many cases, those poli-
cies curtailed the constitutional
rights of service members and
diverged from prevailing trends
in thecivilian sector�trends,for
instance, like greater toleranceof
alternative lifestyles. But when
service members challenged the
military's policies as being out-
of-step with civilian societydead-
ers in Congress and the civil
courts repeatedly refused to in-
tervene. The military's para-
mountmissionofwar-readiness,
they argued, made it essential to
give the armed services leeway
in making their own rules.
Today, that tolerance has
begun to wither, and many ex-
perts believe that this is only the
beginning of a long-term assault
on the military'sen trenched sepa-
rateness and independence.
Rep. Dave McCurdy, D-
Okla one of the House Armed
Services Committee's most in-
fluentialand moderate members,
says a new mood in Congress
will bring many of the military's
oldest customs �and many of
its most revered notions of "good
order and discipline" � under
fresh scrutiny.
With the Cold War gone,
McCurdy said, "1 think they're
going to have to define what
'good order and discipline'
means more now Congress
may be willing to accept some
departures from prevailing ci-
vilian norms, said McCurdy,
"but we're going to need to ex-
amine and justify them" as never
before.
IN THE ARMY,
NURSES AREN'T JUST IN DEMAND.
THEY'RE IN COMMAND.
Any nurse who just wants a job can
find one. But if you're a nur
ing student who wants to be in
command of your own career, consider
the Army Nurse Corps You'll be treated as
a competent professional, given your own
patients and responsibilities commensurate
with your level of experience As
n Army officer, you'll command the
respect you deserve. And with the added
benefits only the Army can offer-a $5000
signing bonus, housing allowances and 4
weeks paid vacation�you'll be well in com-
mand of your life. Call 1-800-USA ARMY
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
You want a Career.
Careers need leadership experience.
Experience fosters success.
Student Leadership Development Programs
offers you experience:
Success at "Sunrise"
Which would you rather do:
A. Have a free breakfast with an established, successful
leader; or
B. Read about them in the newspapers?
Reserve your place at the breakfast table with:
Mr. Bob Griffin. President. Pitt-Greenville Area Chamber of c�nTntm
Tuesday, November 10.1992,8:00 am, MSC Great Room 3
Dr. Richard Ealrtn Chancrtlm Fa�t Carolina University
Wednesday, November 11,1992,8:00 am, MSC Great Room 3
Mrs. Nancy Jenkins Mayor. Cltv of fl�Mdfc
Tuesday, November 17,1992,8:00 am, MSC Great Room 3
Space is limited.
Please phone in your reservation by November 5, 1992,
to Ms. Jackie Jackson, 757-4711.
You need to make a separate reservation for each date.
Free to ECU Students.
Young RepublicansDemocrats use
secret agents to gain upper hand
By Karen Hassell
SUff Writer
ECU'S College Republicans
and College Democrats will finally
square off for the final round on
this election day. Conflicts between
the two parties have been wide-
spread throughout the campaign
this year, and their student sup-
porters have been no exception.
Rumors of spies and pranks
abound between the two ECU or-
ganizations.
"The College Republicans
have a lot of bad things to say
abou t us said Thomas Bl ue, presi-
dent of the College Democrats. "1
don't hate them, I just want to ed u-
cate people on where Bill Clinton
stands.
"I've talked to Craig Jackson
(chairof College Republicans). I've
talked to their secretary, Steve.
They've got a lot of bad things to
say about us, but I don't have any
hard feelings against them. I just
want to inform people on where
the candidates stand on the issues
Blue said he received a phone
call from an individual interested
in becoming a member of the Col
R

,MW
lege Democrats.
"I just got this feeling that he
was pumping me for information
Blue said.
Blue said the caller identi-
fied himself as Craig Smith and
gave him a faulty phone number.
Blue called the number and asked
for Craig.
After learning that he no
longer lived at that number, Blue
said he verified Craig's last name
with thepersonwhoanswered the
phone as Jackson and not Smith.
"I have no idea what that is
aboutJacksonsaidIhaveheard
thatstory before, but I donot know
where it came from
"They talk about us sending
spies as deceitful Jackson said.
"They dismiss their own trickery.
"We had a spy at one of our
meetings. When I mentioned
something about spies someone
got up and bolted out the door.
They are the opposition; they are
the enemy. They try to undermine
us and we try to undermine them
The. College Democrats re-
cently re-chartered theirorganiza-
tion after a period of being de-
funct.
w
The new organization has
jumped into politics and has as-
sisted in rallies with Al Gore in
Greenville, Bill Clinton inKinston,
Martin Lancaster in Greenville and
Clinton in Wilson.
The College Republicans
have assisted with or attended
rallies forGeorge Bush in Raleigh,
Dan Quayle in Rocky Mount, Jim
Gardner (Governor), Tommy Pol-
lard (3rd district congress), Art
Pope (Lt. Governor), Ted Tyler
(1st district congress) and Tina
Little (superintendent for public
instruction).
Bill Gheen said the College
Democrats are going to keep their
organization active after the elec-
tion. He said they want to de-
velop goals within the group in
order to keep support up. Current
membershipis between 80 and 100.
The College Republicans are
hopingtohosttheN.C.statespring
convention for College Republi-
cans and are currently contacting
potential speakers such as Pat
Buchanan. Their membership ros-
ter contains 200 names, with be-
tween 50 and 100 active members.
BLUE PLANET CAFE
IS OPEN!
Serving Vegetarian Carry-out Meals, Sandwiches
Salads, and Assorted Goodies
11:30 - 2:00, Mon thru Fri
The Dream Factory
of NC
We Make dreams Come True
RED BARON PIZZA
AND
THE DREAM FACTORY OF NC
presents:
The Red BaronStearman Planes
On
November 6,1992
At 1:00 P.M.
At Dillon's Aviation Section
of the
Pitt Greenville Airport
Don't Miss the Auction
Two Rides in the Stearman Planes will be sold
to the highest bidder.
Red Baron Pizza and Soft Drinks will be Available
All proceeds to benefit the Dream Factory of NC.
Minimum Height, Weight, and Age required. The ride will he at 4:10 p.m. only.
X





I
4
NOVEMBER 3, 1992
Bosnians fleeing for life
SGA
Washington Post
TR AVNIK, Bosnia � It was
on the home stretch to safety that
the wrath of Serb gunners caught
up with housewife Nijaza Dizdar.
After a harrowing 35-mile
journey from the Serb-captured
city of Jajce, Dizdar and her Mus-
lim family were almost outside
the range of Serb militia forces
that had been firing at retreating
refugees. Then, a shell sheared
through the side of their tiny two-
door car and exploded when it
hit the pavement underneath.
Dizdar, who was sitting in the
front passenger seat, absorbed
most of the blast.
She lost both legs. Now, she
is lying in a coma in a hospital in
this front-line city, with a tube
through her nose and an intrave-
nous drip plugged into her arm.
It is not certain whether she will
survive.
Her husband, Seyid, who
was only slightly injured in the
Friday shelling, stood in the cor-
ridor outside his wife's room and
described how he brought the
blood-splashed car to a halt after
about 100 yards. He told of how a
second shell exploded nearby,
and how he carried his bleeding
wife to safety because the road
was too dangerous for ambu-
lances.
"It took more than an hour
because of the heavy shelling
he said, speaking with the list-
less, stunned tone heard often in
WQRLD NEWJ
Travnik's hospital these days.
"She was crying for help. She was
fighting for her life
Despite havingcaptured the
Muslim stronghold of Jajceafter a
brutal months-long siege, Bosnian
Serb militia forces continued to
launch attacks on the estimated
40,000 refugees who streamed out
of the burning city over the week-
end.
This ongoing violence high-
lights the unusual nature of the
Jajce exodus. The goal of Serb
bombings in Sarajevo and other
besieged cities has been to force
the Bosnians to surrender and
leave. The Jajce civilians have al-
ready given up their city and are
departing but they are still be-
ing killed.
The shell-shattered corpses
of seven Jajce refugees have been
brought to Travnik's general hos-
pital since Friday, and an addi-
tional two refugees died after ar-
rival, according to hospital direc-
tor Mirsad Granov. More than 60
others have been treated for inju-
ries from shellfire, he said.
In addition, Granov said, it
is not known how many corpses
might litter the mountain paths
trodden by Jajce's people as they
fled. And, with as many as 15,000
refugees still stranded between
Jajce and Travnik, the body count
seemed likely to rise.
One victim, witnesses said,
was a Croatian cameraman work-
ing for the British Broadcasting
Corp who was killed Sunday
morning after Serb gunners fired
at his armored car.
The men, women and chil-
dren who have been killed while
fleeing Jajce were not caught in
cross-fi re, accord ing to w i tnesses,
and no battles were reported along
the mountain escape route.
"It's intentional said
Granov. "It's a part of the Serbs'
tactics to kill civilians. They want
to kill our hopes and kill our will
to defend ourselves
The refugees are leaving be-
hind a Sarajevo-like ordeal. Serb
forces encircled Jajce more than
five months ago, and the city has
had little food or medicine for the
last month.
Because of the drug short-
age, Benjamin Markin, a Ghana-
born doctor who had worked in
Jajce for 20 years, said he sewed
up shrapnel wounds without an-
esthesia. Whenever possible he
used local anesthesia for major
surgery. One time, he said, he used
local anesthesia for brain surgery.
Continued from page 1
for anyone who wishes to enter
their establishment.
Carter has also estab-
lished a discrimination task
force to help students cope with
being discriminated against.
"We set up the task force
to address the issue of discrimi-
nation Carter said.
Carter, along with SGA
President Courtney Jones and
SGA Vice-President Keith
Dyer, created the task force to
give students someone to talk
to if they feel they have been
discriminated against.
"We are focused on try-
ing to find out any specific
cases of discrimination on
campus Dyer said.
Dr. Mary Ann Rose, as-
sistant to the chancellor, has
also helped to form the task
force.
"This could be a prece-
dent for other schools, that
ECU is dealing with dis-
crimination Dyer said.
"This is a visible stu-
dent organization that stu-
dents will feel they can come
to Carter said.
There will be a nezvs writers
meeting Thursday at 3:30 p.m.
Thanks,
-J.B.
Most College Graduates Enter the
Real World As A Sales Representative
After Graduation
1
?
W
You need the experience and
gain that experience before
we can help you �
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Qualifications:
A full-time student with no more I
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'At least a 2.0 grade point
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� Your own transportation
�An excellent work ethic and
a willingness to learn
�Available to work about 20
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through Friday
�Previous sales experience
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The East Carolinian is
currently accepting
applications for
Advertising
Representatives
1HE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
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Please submit resume and application
(available at The 1'asl Carolinian ofj'un)
to the Advertising Director.
4449 The East Carolinian is an equal opportunity em
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Stage Time 9:00pm ' OO-OZ O
5 Miles West or Greenville on 264 All.
(Behind John's Convenient Man)
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The East Carolina University
Student Union Special Concerts Committee
with
First Citizens Bank
proudly present
Live! In Concert!
Charles Kuralt and Loonis McGlohon
in
North Carolina
Is My Home
Wednesday, November 11, 1992
Wright Auditorium - 8 p.m.
Public12 ECU FacultyStaff $10 ECU StudentYouth $8
Group rates are available. All tickets $12 at the door.
For tickets contact:
The Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Phone: 919-757-4788 or, toll free, 1 -800-ECU-ARTS
DISCOVER
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Public $8 ECU FacultyStaff $6 ECU StudentYouth $5
Group rates are available. All tickets $8 at the door.
For tickets contact:
The Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Phone 919-757-4788 or, toll free, 1 -800-ECU-ARTS
The
East Carolina
University
Performing Arts
Series
proudly presents-
Friday,
November 6, 1992
Wright Auditorium
8 p.m.
Hear all of Buddy's hits
including: That'll Be the
Day, Peggy Sue, and Oh,
Boy!
For tickets contact:
The Central Ticket Office, Mendenhali Student Center
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Phone: 919-757-4788 or, toll free, 1-800-ECU-ARTS
X
y.BW'ipii'ii ��'�





The East Carolinian
� i
November 3, 1992
Opinion
Clinton and Gore will revive America
Page 5
The editorial board of The East Carolinian, by
majority vote, endorses Bill Clinton for president.
A vote for Clinton and Gore is a logic? I vote.
They promise to revive the failing economy of the
Bush administration, making it easier for college
students, as well as every other American, to
finally benefit from the American economy. They
propose a national college loan program, and
emphasize environmental protection.
Over the next four years, every ECU student
will graduate and search for a job. Clinton's eco-
nomic plan will give us a better chance of finding
good jobs in our chosen fields. Bush has aban-
doned the American worker by encouraging
American companies to move their factories and
plants to other countries with cheaper labor. Four
more years of his leadership will not provide
Americans with the necessary amount of job
growth to keep this country going.
Bush and Quayle offer little aid to Ameri-
cans who are not wealthy. Instead, Bush's theory
of trickle-down economics caters to the richest
part of our society. The theory says that the
money will then "trickle down" to the rest of
America. The theory is not working.
For the past four years, middle- and lower-
class America has received nothing but an empty
wallet from Bush's economic plan. It is time for
them to speak up against "trickle down" and vote
tor a change in the White House.
Clinton has developed a solid plan designed
to help those abandoned by trickle-down eco-
nomics. His plan includes stiffer taxes for the rich
and tax breaks for the not-so-rich.
Clinton also wants to make education acces-
sible to anjne, regardless of financial status.
Through a national college loan program, anyone
who qualifies could receive federal funding to
attend college. Upon graduation, these students
pay the government back. Currently, Bush has
no federal college loan plan.
Bush also does not have a sound environ-
mental protection plan. Under the leadership of
Clinton, tax incentives will be offered to all com-
A VIEW FROM ABOVE
panies that use environmentally safe measures.
Clinton also wanis to call for stricter regulations
on environmental destruction.
A vote for Clinton and Gore is a vote in favor
of the American people. Bush and Quayle offer
nothing to the American public, especially
America's youth.
To further reinforce the "liberal journalist"
stereotype, we also endorse Sen. Terry Sanford in
his re-election bid. Republican Lauch Faircloth
opposes Sanford, and was the first in that race to
sling mud. Sanford has had a fine record, so we
encourage his re-election.
In addition, Rep. Martin Lancaster, receives
our approval in the race for the re-formed 3rd
Congressional district. Lancaster's opponent,
Tommy Pollard, was convicted of felonious as-
sault when he shot a man in the leg in 1975.
Pollard and his victim are now friends, but with
Jesse Helms still in office, North Carolina can't
afford to have another embarrassment in Con-
gress.
In state office elections, we endorse former
Gov. Jim Hunt in his effort to return to Raleigh.
Hunt plans to concentrate on improving educa-
tion, a program that has taken back seat to
present Gov. Jim Martin's plan to pave the state
from the Appalachians to the Atlantic. Hunt's
opponent is Lt. Gov. Jim Gardener, who is sure to
continue Martin's dream of turning North Caro-
lina into a real Tobacco Road.
On the local front, ECU student Patrick Pitzer
is running for an at-large seat on the Greenville
City Council. At long last ECU students have a
chance to have a representative voice in the coun-
cil. Pitzer needs, and deserves, the vote of every
ECU student, regardless of party affiliation.
Only 28 percent of registered voters partici-
pated in the 1984 election. That is a lesson to us all.
If you don't vote, don't bitch.
If you are a registered voter and do not vote
today, then be prepared to keep your mouth shut
for four years. Maybe by then you'll have learned
your lesson.
By T. Scott Batchelor
Character issue ranks high on election list
Political commentator
Michael Kinsley appeared on
"Later with Bob Costas" recently
and made an interesting observa-
tion. He pointed out mat in the
second presidential debate be-
tween Bush, Clinton and Perot �
the one where the citizens asked
the quetfons � out of 209 per-
sons supposedly chosen at ran-
dom, no one asked a single ques-
tion about the candidates' charac-
ter. Indeed, one gentleman in the
audience at the debate stood up
and said, "Can we focus on the
issues and not the personalities
and the mud?" Kinsley implied
that tnis was a sure sign that char-
acter was no longer an issue with
the voters, if it ever had been.
If what Kinsley asserts is true,
mat the character of a presidential
candidate is inconsequential in de-
ciding who wins the election, then
we are in serious trouble in this
country. Fortunately, I don't think
he's right.
Character, as I am speaking
of it here, is defined as the moral
strength and ethical integrity of
an individual. How many deci-
sions will you make in your life
based on your appraisal of
another's character? Most of us
make the equality of a person's
character an implicit criterion in
deciding with whom we become
friends or conduct personal busi-
ness with. We take into consider-
ation the character of our personal
physician, or our legal and finan-
cial representative, and of those
who care for our children when
we're not around. Yet the ru n ior
persists that the American people
see character in this election as a
non-issue.
The characters of Bush,
Clinton and Perot aren't just an
issue in this election, they are ar-
guably the issue, and I am confi-
dent that a majority of Americans
feel likewise. Moral and ethical
integrity are the foundation on
which great presidencies are built,
therefore upstanding character is
a sine qua non in our search for a
person to fill the highest office in
the land. William Shakespeare un-
derstood the importance of char-
acter when he wrote, "The rose
looks fair, but fairer we it deem
For that sweet odour doth in it
live
You see, the unfortunately
liberal media is in league with Bill
Clinton. How do I know this?
Mainly because you can't read a
newspaper or watch television
without seeing it. But also because
Media Monitor, a media watch-
dog group, reported that of 54
political pieces appearing in The
New York Times during the month
of September, the articles ran 10 to
1 in favor of Bill Clinton. Of 19
editorials in the same newspaper,
18 were pro-Clinton while only
one marginally favorec Bush.
So the news media run inter-
ference for their man Clinton, who
they know couldn't withstand any
close scrutiny of characler.
Clinton's draft record (or lack
thereof) and his determination to
have it two or three ways at the
same time make him a juicy target
for questions of character. Not to
mention the governor's own
strange concept of the character
issue.
During a debate hesaid, "I'm
not interested in (Bush's) charac-
ter I'm interested in what we
can trust him to do, and what you
can trust me to do and what you
can trust Mr. Perot to do for the
next four years How cr.n a per-
son mention character and trust in
the same breath and yet deny the-
relationship of one to the other?
Baffling.
In the face of all this, the
media and Governor C. in ton con-
tinue to stroll along pooh-poohing
that silly notion of character play-
ing any real part in the election.
Clinton, who seems to have a pen-
chant for quoting Abraham Lin-
coln, would do well to remember
a pertinent saying from Honest
Abe: "It is true that you may fool
all of the people some of the time;
you can even fool some of the
people all of the time; but you
can'tfoolallofthepeopJeallofthe
time
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'1, Assistant Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Classified Advertising Tech.
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the Est Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian pu blishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, Tlie East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Quote of
the Day:
Economists
report that a
college educa-
tion adds many
thousands of
dollars to a
man's lifetime
income � which
he then spends
sending his son
to college.
Bill Vaughan
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Wiretapping raises question of university's knowledge
To the Editor:
Hear much about the wire-
tapping trials lately? University
administrators involved in the
wiretapping of phone lines of
employees here did not know what
they were doing was illegal. Yeah,
right! Hadn't someone involved
been trained in law enforcement?
Did they not know how to read?
Did thev have any sense, be it
howevc. small? What ever hap-
pened to the phrase, "Ignorance
of the law is no excuse?" I think
they all had knowledge that tap-
ping someone's phone line was
illegal, and I also think they had
enough sense to play dumb to this
fact. I loved the part about James
DePuy, director of Public Safety,
kicking in the door of the person
responsible for leaking the infor-
mation about the wiretapping to
the proper officials. His story is
that he heard water running in
thisperson'soffice, kicked thedoor
in and rushed in to stop this "phan-
tom water" from doing damage.
Okay, let's gain entrance to the
office. The only logical explana-
tion is that DePuy was trying to
intimidate this person for doing
his job correctly.
Now, I could kind of fall for
this story if DePuy had said he
thought he had smelled some
Krispy Kreme doughnuts in the
locked office and temporarily went
berserk, but the other story just
doesn't jibe.
Next comes the actions of my
favorite, "Mr. Get-your-facts-
straight-Ronald-Mercer Vice
Chancellor Richard Brown. It was
brought out in one of the recent
sessions of the wiretapping trial
that Brown had sent a memo to
personnel of Public Safety to de-
stroy some important documents
used in this scam.
Did he not know that it is ille-
gal to destroy evidence, and
shouldn't he have had enough
sense not to send a memo from his
office encouraging such unlawful
deeds? I guess he should have
taken his own advice and con-
tacted Public Safety to find out
whether or not his intentions were
legal, but I doubt anyone there
would know.
Could it be that ECU's finest
only knows three rules � B.E.G
Breaking the law, Eating Krispy
Kreme doughnuts, and Giving
tickets for the stupidest reasons
you could think of in a million
years. The two involved who ac-
tually carried out the wiretapping
were not prosecuted for their ac-
tions. Each were facing up to 23
years in prison, each admitted to
their actions and each were let off.
What gives? Did someone get paid
for letting these two slip through
the cracks of justice? Why weren't
they pressured with a sentence in
order to gain more information
about the wiretapping? They
could have turned state's evidence
for a lesser sentence, but they
didn't have to.
Why? Why do the taxpayers
have to pay nearly a quarter of
million dollars for these peoples'
stupidity? Why are these crooks
still in their positions at ECU? You
or I would be under the jail by
now, but they get special privi-
leges.
Ronald Mercer
Chemistry
Junior
Public Safety needs to re-evaluate their hierarchy
To the Editor:
After observing the Public
Safety Department of ECU for the
last year and a half, I have con-
cluded that there needs to be a
major turnover in that department.
Someone needs to have the back-
bone to step forward and accept
the responsibility for their actions.
I have already written one letter
concerning my dismay about
ECU's finest and their affinity for
listening to other's phone conver-
sations. Nothing has changed at
Public Safety since my earlier let-
ter in the Fall of 1991, except for
the ever-increasingamountof law-
suits settled out. of court by the
ECU administration. So far the
total amount of money paid to
victims of this scandal is well over
$200,000. According to The East
Carolinian, many more cases are
pending.
Where do people think this
money will come from? It will not
come from those phone voyeurs
at Telecommunications or Public
Safety. It will comeout of the pock-
ets of students at ECU. We are
forced to assume the consequences
of those privileged few in power
at ECU. I never thought my total
tuition and fees would be put to
good use and now my beliefs are
confirmed. Get ready for increased
school fees and tuition in the near
future.
Chancellor Eakin must as-
sume some of this crime because
of his support of those individual
"Deputy Dogs" at Public Safety.
He and those he supported be-
lieved the walls of this university
to be too thick for a federal inves-
tigation. What were tlie thoughts
of those involved to continue to
wiretap individual phones? The
accused claim that they did not
know it was against the l?w to
wiretap phones. Ignorance of the
law is not an adequate defense
and it makes matters worse when
you have law enforcement offic-
ers making such sheepish claims.
These individuals are here to pro-
tect us? 1 feel more secure already.
The grand jury trial against
two former ECU employees has
just started and I hate to pass judge-
ment until all the facts have been
brought to light. It seems obvious
that wrong-doing occurred, only
we are not sure about all the play-
ers involved. We may see many
influential university officials im-
plicated. If this is the case, then
resignations should be in order. It
is a shame that these reparations
paid to the phone-tapping victims
cannot be taken out of the pockets
ofthoseresponsibleinsteadofour
own.
DH. Man-
History Graduate
Disappointing football season lies with TEC's coverage
To the Editor:
This has been a disappoint-
ing football season. Before I am
"loosely" defined as a Pirate fan,
however, I would like to clearly
state that my disappointment
lies with the sports coverage
provided by The East Carolinian.
I used to think that a sports-
writer was supposed to have
sports knowledge. It has been
your performance (or lack
thereof) throughout the season
that makes it much more appro-
priate to "loosely" define sports-
writer.
The students of East Caro-
lina have become accustomed
to the sterling "Purple and
Gold" banner that the East Caro-
linian has attempted to put on a
"black and blue" season.
We have listened to the
usual claims of injuries or inex-
perience as the only excuses after
defeat. We have come to expect
game statistics as clear and consis-
tent as the economic plans of
Clinton or Bush.
Your fan criticism, however,
has lowered the "loosely" de-
fined sportswriter of The East
Carolinian to a new depth. As
my previous examples suggest,
you had better start looking at
your reflection in your own glass
houses before you throw rocks
at us.
Yes, there were boos in Fick-
len on Saturday, but doesn't the
athletic department and The East
Carolinian deserve some blame?
After all, we would not have
had such high expectations for a
young team if Student Pirate
Club Memberships, which grant
priority for bowl tickets, were
not so prevalent on this cam-
pus, or for that matter, if the
sportswriters (still loosely de-
fined) did not predict improb-
able wins over nationally ranked
Syracuse, or seriously mention
"No. 1 defense" in reference to
our stop troop (10-13-92 edition
of The East Carolinian). Armed
with this "knowledge it is a
wonder we only booed.
1 am a big Pirate fan with a
big purple wig and a big yellow
horn, and I go to games and
support ECU as much and as
loudly as anyone. I do not ex-
pect a Peach Bowl every year, or
a victory every week, but I do
expect effort all the time. The
football team has given that ef-
fort in all but one game.
Why can't you?
Gregory M. Sember
English
Junior
�MmMRMBK





fci
'��
77?e �to Carolinian
November 3, 1992
Classifieds
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS
:1 and 2 bedroom apartments.
Energy-efficient, several loca-
tions in town. Carpeted, kitchen
appliances, some water and
FOR SALE
Call Jack 758-3248.
SINGLE BED- Mattress,
boxspring, and frame. $75.00
or best offer. Call 756-3235- if
sewer paid, washerdryer no answer please leave a mes-
hookups. Call 752-8915.
APARTMENT FOR RENT:
One bedroom, $275 a month.
4 blocks from campus, energy
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washerdryer hook-ups. Avail-
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6902.
ROOMMATE WANTED IM-
MEDIATELY TarRiverApts.
$130.00month; 13 utilities.
Partially furnished; good loca-
tion. Call 830-1873 ask for
Jordan.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Fe-
male nonsmoking roommate
to share new 2 bedroom apart-
ment with graduate student,
beginning December or Janu-
ary. Low rentand utilities, good
area. Call 321-0538.
TAR RIVER APT. For rent. 2
bedroom, 1 12 bath. Rent:
$450. Call 321-2132 ask for
Karen or Mike.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
share a 2 bedroom duplex. 1
block from campus. $170
month plus 12 utilities. Call
758-5845. Leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: $172.50month, 1
2 utilities, 1 bedroom apt. Cail
752-3364.
FOR SALE
ARE YOU SCARED of walking
alone at night or in dangerous
areas because of fear of at-
tack? Then buy the Quorum
PAAL - Personal Attack Alarm.
Once activated the PAAL emits
an ear piercing 107 decibel
alarm that scares off attackers.
Call 758-6425 for more info.
PAY IN-STATE TUITION?
Read Residency Status and
Tuition, the practical pamphlet
written by an attorney on the in-
state residency application pro-
cess. For Sale: Student Stores,
Wright Building.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
CONDO- One bedroom unit.
Children out of school, I want to
sell fast. Call (919) 847-1557
Raleigh, NC.
1982 RED, CHEVY S-10 PU.
Needs some engine work. Blue
book $2300 asking $1300 o.b.o.
Call Rich at 752-3754.
WORD PROCESSOR- 5x9
CRT display, 3.5240k diskdrive,
dictionary, thesaurus, calender,
address book, great for research
papers! No computer lab
hassles. Asking price $400.
sage on machine.
FOR SALE: Washing machine,
4yrs. old. Paid $150, only $50.
Call 758-7531.
FOR SALE: IBM compatible
computer, 640k RAM, 3.5 DD,
High resolution color monitor,
20 Meg HD, software, and wide
carriage printer. Mustsale.only
$525. Call 758-4135.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED
CARS.trucks, boats, 4 wheel-
ers, motorhomes, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available your area now.
Call 1-800-333-3737 ext. c-
5999.
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NOJY1 USED CD'S
HELP WANTED
EMERGENCY! Expanding
company needs hardworking
reliable students to mail our
diet brochures from Home
Dorm! Earn up to $200 PT or
$1000 FT! Employees needed
immediately! For job applica-
tion send self-addressed stamp
envelope: Colossal Marketing,
Employee Processing, P.O.
Box 291140 Port Orange, FL
32129.
"HELP WANTED" EARN
$1,500 WEEKLY mailing our
circulars Begin now FREE
packet! SEYS, Dept. 164, Box
4000, Cordova, 38018-4000.
GUARANTEED WORK
AVAILABLE. Excellent pay for
EASY home based work. Full
part-time. Rush self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers
(G2) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham, NC 27705
$360UP WEEKLY. Mailing
brochures! Sparefull-time. Set
own hours! RUSH self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope:
Publishers (G1) 1821 Hillandale
Rd. 1B-295 Durham, NC 27705
WORK AT HOME: Assembly,
craft, typing and more! Up to
$500.00 a week possible. For
information write Source; 1840-
D Simonton Road, Dept. 9108,
Statesville, NC 28677.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING
- Earn $2,000month world
travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the Car-
HELP WANTED
ibbean, etc.) Holiday, Summer
and Career employment avail-
able. No experience necessary.
For employment program call
1 -206-634-0468 ext. C5362.
SAVE ON SPRING BREAK
'93! Jamaica, Cancun, and
Florida from $119.00. Book
early and save $$$! Organize
group and travel free! Sun
Splash Tours 1 -800-426-7710.
$$$$ FREE TRAVEL AND
RESUME EXPERIENCE In-
dividuals and student organi-
zations wanted to promote
SPRING BREAK, call the
Nation's leader. Inter-Campus
Programs 1-800-327-6013.
FREE SPRING BREAK VA-
CATION: Organize group,
earn commisions and Free
Trips! Call 800-826-9100.
YOUTH BASKETBALL
COACHES: The Greenville
Recreation and Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth basketball
coaches for the winter youth
basketbll program. Applicants
must possess some knowledge
of the basketball skills and have
the ability and patience to work
with youth. Applicants must be
able to coach young people
ages 9-18, in basketball funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3:00
pm until 7:00 pm with some
night and weekend coaching.
This program will run from De-
cember to mid-February. Sal-
ary rates start at $4.25 perhour.
For more information, please
call Ben James or Michael Daly
at 830-4550 or 830-4567.
NEED LOCAL EXPERI-
ENCED PERSON to care for
four children Mondays 2-6 pm
in my home. Call 752-3290.
EASY WORK! Excellent Pay!
Assemble Products at Home.
Call Toll Free 1 -800-467-5566
ext. 5920.
STUDENTS AND ORGANI-
ZATIONS. Promote our
Florida Spring Break pack-
ages. Earn MONEY and FREE
trips. Organize SMALL and
LARGE groups. Call Campus
Marketing. 800-423-5264
POSTAL JOBS available!
Many positions. Great ben-
efits. Call 1-800-333-3737 ext.
3712.
GREAT HOLIDAY JOB OP-
PORTUNITY: Going home for
the Holidays? Need a fun part-
time job? The HONEY BAKED
HAM CO. is in search of sea-
sonal help to fill our sales
counter and production posi-
tions. We have stores located
in the following markets: Char-
lotte, Wilmington, Raleigh,
Greensboro, Winston-Salem,
Durham, Fayetteville and other
major cities throughout the
southeast. Please check the
HELP WANTED
white pages or information for
the store nearest your home.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOY-
MENT- Make money teaching
English abroad. Japan and
Taiwan. Make $2000-$4000
permonth. Many provide room
and board other benefits!
Financially & Culturally reward-
ing! For International Employ-
ment program and application,
call the International Employ-
ment Group: (206) 632-1146
ext. J 5362.
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING: Error free, quick and
dependable at reasonable cost.
Excellent typing and proofread-
ing skills (grammar, punctua-
tion, sentence structure, etc.).
Call Pauline at 757-3693.
STUDY ABROAD IN AUSTRA-
LIA: Information on semester,
year, graduate, summer and
internship programs in Austra-
lia. We represent 28 Australian
Universities, call us toll free 1-
800-245-2575.
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VsaMC or COD
poopm, 800-351-0222
�llSIUiUaV in Calif. (213) -8226
Or, rush $2.00 to: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave J206-A. Los Angles. CA 90025
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
You also get a FREE
HEADPHONE RADIO
just for calling
1-800-932-0528, Ext. 65
PERSONALS-
PETES INVITATIONAL BAS-
KETBALL TOURNAMENT.
November 6-7. Single elimi-
nation- Deadline for entry is
Nov5. Entry tee $100. Tour-
nament site John Small School
(formally P.S. Jones). 1st and
2nd place trophies awarded.
For mote information, contact
Mr. Jerome Branch (919) 975-
6854 or Chas Mitch'l (919) 757-
0418.
LOOKING FOR A BETTER
WAY TO MEET PEOPLE with
similar social, health, religion.
Here I am looking for a mate,
heard downtown and partier
are where people congregate.
So, I'm going out tonight and it
is late, the action is packed,
only an ugly mist if loser
couldn't find a mate. I know
why I'm here, I do know why,
but these crazy scenes make
me want to cry. She looks
good, he looks fine. Damn! I
wish thatthey were mine. Here
I am, wondering around, hop-
ing silently I'll be found. I'm
walking here and I'm talking
PERSONALS
there, beer in hand, was that a
stare! Who is he to say this to
me. Cause I approach them
hard and very fast, but some-
times the conversation never
lasts. Why ask why, that's
what I say, cause people play
games and people love to lie.
He talked to me, could he be
mine or was he giving me a
thought line. Damn! She looks
fine, what will I have to do to
make her mine? Wine and
dine? But I'm broke like most
college folk. Could she still be
mine? I'm in this crowd and it
is loud. Some people I meet
are so discreet that I can't tell
who's looking for meat. But I
flaunt, not that I want a person
who will be wrong to me. I will
silently admit that sometimes
my whit turns to shit and I can't
tell who will make me well
Accept me for me. Should I
approach, I don't know, Re-
jection hurts the old ego. But
the beer is strong, the night is
long, the hurt I know left me
long ago. I feel great, I want to
date, it's getting late. There's
a man around I don't know
who's trying hard to steal the
show. Help me meet people I
don't know. His name is Jeff,
his number is below, I'll con-
tact him now to find out what it
is or say justno. 758-4635.
PHI MU ALPHA MEN: Thank
you for the beautiful serenade
on Monday night. You have
won our hearts! Feel free to
visit again anytime. Love, Zeta
Tau Alpha.
TO THE FOUNDING FA-
THERS OF PI LAMBDA PHI:
Congrats fellas, we have a lot
of work ahead of us. We're
going to take this campus by
storm.
CONGRATULATIONS: Way
to go! Charlie, we wish you
and Angelisa many years to-
gether. There is nothing pret-
tier than Spring and Fall. The
same goes for relationships.
Be fruitful and multiply. Re-
member! No Hanky Panky till
the Big Day. Your Brothers in
Fellowship.
BROOK DR5SJCALL, Con-
gratulations on being crowned
our 1992 Homecoming Queen.
Love, the Sigmas.
SIG EP, Thar:ks for coming
over and helping carve those
pumpkins. We had a great
time at the Fizz with you guys.
Let's do it again sometime
soon. Love, the Sigmas
MICHELLE K. AND
KATHRYN V. Thanks for
doing such and awesome job
with homecoming. You guys
are great. We all appreciate
everything you did to make
homecoming another big suc-
cess. Love, the sisters and
pledges of Sigma Sigma
Page 6
PERSONALS
Sigma.
THE WOMEN'S SOCCER
TEAM wants to wish Beth,
Kristine, and Kristie a full and
speedy recovery! We miss
you guys.
PI KAPPA PHI- A belated
THANKS for a great time at
Splash on Thurs Lets get
together again soon! Love,
Alpha Omicron Pi
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: We
had a great time parting with
you guys before (and after) the
game. Love, Alpha Delta Pi
KAPPA SIG: We had a blast
at the Brown-bag social and at
the Southern Miss game.
Thanks for a great time. Love,
Alpha Delta ?i.
PHI KAPPA TAU, We had an
awesome time tailgating with
you guys. Can't wait to do it
again. Let's get together some-
time soon. Love, the Sigmas.
CHI-O: We've had a great
time parting with you this se-
mester. Let's do it again real
soon! The brothers and
pledges of Delta Chi.
DELTA CHI: Charter Satur-
day, November 7th, here it
comes I said here it comes!
PHI PSI: It was a fairly warm
night when we all hiked around,
to find some Phi Psi brothers
doing keg stands upside down.
The music was pumping, the
beer was free. Who was that
guy serenading us on one
knee? the game was fun, even
though we were beat. At least
we had a great looking sheet!
Thanks for the tailgate, thanks
for the tunes. We had a lot of
fun, let's get together soon!
Love, the Gamma Sigs.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
ADVERTISING
REPRESENTATIVES
Curt Lewis
-Senior Business Administration
Kathryn Rickman
-SeniorBusiness Administration
Lisa Sykes
-SeniorCommunications
Lindsay Fernandez
-JuniorBusiness Administration
Matt Hege
-Junior Communications
CALL 919-757-6366
Today for more
advertising information
Announcements
SCHOOL OF NURSING
The school of nursing will
hold departmental meetings:
Freshmen and sophomores-
Tuesday November 11,5 pm-
NB101. Juniors and seniors-
Wednesday November 12, 5
pm-NB 101. All general col-
lege students who intend to
major in nursing should attend
the freshmansophomore
meeting. All majors are
STRONGLY ENCOURAGFD
to attend Early registration
and admission to clinical
courses will be discussed.
NEWS RELEASE
During the week of Novem-
ber 9-13, a survey of student
opinion of instruction will be
conducted at ECU. Question-
naires will be distributed in
classes with enrollments
greater than five. All students
will have opportunity to express
opinions on the teaching ef-
fectiveness of their instructors.
The survey will be conducted
during class time and will take
approximately 15 minutes to
complete. Student participa-
tion is voluntary and no identi-
ties are requested. Instructors
have been requested to leave
the classroom while the ques-
tionnaires are being com-
pleted. Results of the survey
will be distributed to instruc-
tors after final grades have
been posted. The teaching
effectiveness questionnaire
was created by the Faculty
Senate Committee for Teach-
ing Effectiveness and the Of-
fice of Planning and Institu-
tional Research. The results
of the survey, along with other
information and factors, are
used for administrative evalu-
ation of the instructor by the
supervising administrator
within the department or divi-
sion.
E.C.H.O.
E.C.H.O. meeting will be
Tuesday November 3,1992 in
Rm. 2017 in GCB at 5 pm.
Hope to see all of you Honor
Students and Teaching Fel-
lows there.
LITERARY AND ART COM-
PETITION
November 4, 1992 is the
deadline forentry in the REBEL
93 Competition. Winners re-
ceive cash prizes, and will be
published in the 1993 Rebel
Magazine. You must pick up
application forms from Art BIdg
Media Center, English Dept,
or Rebel offices in the Pubs
BIdg.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Attention to all of you
Gamma Beta Phi members,
we are having our third meet-
ing on November 10 at 4 pm in
MSC Room 244. See you
there!
P.U.S.H. THROUGH THE
BARRIERS
If you would like to work
toward reducing the architec-
tural, as well as the attitudinal
barriers that students with spe-
cial needs are faced with ev-
ery day, then come to the next
meeting of P.U.S.H. (People
United to Support the Handi-
capped). The meeting will be
5:00-6:00 on Thursday, No-
vember 5 in Cotten Hall Lobby.
Come join the fun
PHI ETA SIGMA
There will be a brief meet-
ing held in Flemming Dorm
lobby at 5 o'clock on Tuesday
November 3rd. Very impor-
tant. Please attend.
PERFORMING ARTS SE-
BJ�S
Buddy: The Buddy Holly
Story, scheduled for Friday,
November 6, 1992 at 8 pm,
chronicles the professional life
of Buddy Holly, a rock-and-roll
musician killed in a plane crash
that also killed the Big Bopper
and Richie Valens. The show
features performances of
Holly's greatest hits�among
them "That'll Be The Day" and
"Peggy Sue
COUNSELING CENTER
25 AND OLDER:
Undergrad ano grad student.
Family responsibilities (spouse
andor children). Join us for
brown bag lunches on
Wednesday from noon to 1:30
pm. Come for part or all of the
time. This rap group is an
informal gathering designed to
be supportive and help meet
the needs of students with fam-
ily responsibilities. Informal
discussions and presentations
are the format. Yes, there are
many students at ECU facing
the same concerns as you!
TIME: Wednesdays noon to
1:30 pm. PLACE: Counseling
Center (313 Wright Building).
For more information, phone
George Gressman at 757-
6661.
REGISTRATION FOR
GENERAL COLLEGE
STUDENTS
General College students
should contact their advisors
the week of November 9-13 to
make arrangements for aca-
demic advising for Spring Se-
mester 1993. Early registra-
tion will begin November 16
and end November 20.
RECREATIONAL SER-
VICES.
Recreational Services Bil-
liards Registration meeting will
be held on Tuesday, Novem-
ber 10 at 5:00 pm in Biology
103. You must be at the meet-
ing to participate. A small fee
is required! For further infor-
mation call 757-6387.
RECREATIONAL SER-
VICES:
Recreational services will
be sponsoring a Terrain Bik-
ing Workshop on November 7
at 10:30 am in Christenbury
117. So come on out and learn
how to ride. For further infor-
mation stop by 117
Christenbury Gym or call 757-
6387.





- -
&4i
The East Carolinian
November 3, 1992
Classifieds
Page 6
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS
:1 and 2 bedroom apartments.
Energy-efficient, several loca-
tions in town. Carpeted, kitchen
appliances, some water and
sewer paid, washerdryer
hookups. Call 752-8915.
APARTMENT FOR RENT:
One bedroom, $275 a month.
4 blocks from campus, energy
efficient, free basic cable,
washerdryer hook-ups. Avail-
able January 1 (nego.). Apt. 3
Captain's Quarter. Call 830-
6902.
ROOMMATE WANTED IM-
MEDIATELY TarRiverApts.
$130.00month; 13 utilities.
Partially furnished; good loca-
tion. Call 830-1873 ask for
Jordan.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Fe-
male nonsmoking roommate
to share new 2 bedroom apart-
ment with graduate student,
beginning December or Janu-
ary. Low rentand utilities, good
area. Call 321-0538.
TAR RIVER APT. For rent. 2
bedroom, 1 12 bath. Rent:
$450. Call 321-2132 ask for
Karen or Mike.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
share a 2 bedroom duplex. 1
block from campus. $170
month plus 12 utilities. Call
758-5845. Leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: $172.50month, 1
2 utilities, 1 bedroom apt. Call
752-3364.
FOR SALE
ARE YOU SCARED of walking
alone at night or in dangerous
areas because of fear of at-
tack? Then buy the Quorum
PAAL - Personal Attack Alarm.
Once activated the PAAL emits
an ear piercing 107 decibel
alarm that scares off attackers.
Call 758-6425 for more info.
PAY IN-STATE TUITION?
Read Residency Status and
Tuition, the practical pamphlet
written by an attorney on the in-
state residency application pro-
cess. For Sale: Student Stores,
Wright Building.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
CONDO- One bedroom unit.
Children out of school, I want to
sell fast. Call (919) 847-1557
Raleigh, NC.
1982 RED, CHEVY S-10 PU.
Needs some engine work. Blue
book $2300 asking $1300 o.b.o.
Call Rich at 752-3754.
WORD PROCESSOR- 5x9
CRT display, 3.5 240k disk drive,
dictionary, thesaurus, calender,
address book, great for research
papers! No computer lab
hassles. Asking price $400.
FOR SALE
Call Jack 758-3248.
SINGLE BED- Mattress,
boxspring, and frame. $75.00
or best offer. Call 756-3235- if
no answer please leave a mes-
sage on machine.
FOR SALE: Washing machine,
4yrs. old. Paid $150, only $50.
Call 758-7531.
FOR SALE: IBM compatible
computer, 640k RAM, 3.5 DD,
High resolution color monitor,
20 Meg HD, software, and wide
carriage printer. Mustsale.only
$525. Call 758-4135.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED
CARS.trucks, boats, 4 wheel-
ers, motorhomes, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available your area now.
Call 1-800-333-3737 ext. c-
5999.
13QOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NOW! USED CD'S
HELP WANTED
EMERGENCY! Expanding
company needs hardworking
reliable students to mail our
diet brochures from Home
Dorm! Earn up to $200 PT or
$1000 FT! Employees needed
immediately! For job applica-
tion send self-addressed stamp
envelope: Colossal Marketing,
Employee Processing, P.O.
Box 291140 Port Orange, FL
32129.
"HELP WANTED" EARN
$1,500 WEEKLY mailing our
circulars Begin nowFREE
packet! SEYS, Dept. 164, Box
4000, Cordova, 38018-4000.
GUARANTEED WORK
AVAILABLE. Excellent pay for
EASY home based work. Full
part-time. Rush self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers
(G2) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham, NC 27705
S360UP WEEKLY. Mailing
brochures! Sparefull-time. Set
own hours! RUSH self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope:
Publishers (G1) 1821 Hillandale
Rd. 1B-295 Durham, NC 27705
WORK AT HOME: Assembly,
craft, typing and more! Up to
$500.00 a week possible. For
information write Source; 1840-
D Simonton Road, Dept. 9108,
Statesville, NC 28677.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING
- Earn $2,000month world
travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the Car-
HELP WANTED
ibbean, etc.) Holiday, Summer
and Career employment avail-
able. No experience necessary.
For employment program call
1-206-634-0468 ext. C5362.
SAVE ON SPRING BREAK
'93! Jamaica, Cancun, and
Florida from $119.00. Book
early and save $$$! Organize
group and travel free! Sun
Splash Tours 1 -800-426-7710.
$$$$ FREE TRAVEL AND
RESUME EXPERIENCE In-
dividuals and student organi-
zations wanted to promote
SPRING BREAK, call the
Nation's leader. Inter-Campus
Programs 1-800-327-6013.
FREE SPRING BREAK VA-
CATION: Organize group,
earn commisions and Free
Trips! Call 800-826-9100.
YOUTH BASKETBALL
COACHES: The Greenville
Recreation and Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth basketball
coaches for the winter youth
basketbll program. Applicants
must possess some knowledge
of the basketball skills and have
the ability and patience to work
with youth. Applicants must be
able to coach young people
ages 9-18, in basketball funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3:00
pm until 7:00 pm with some
night and weekend coaching.
This program will run from De-
cember to mid-February. Sal-
ary rates start at $4.25 per hour.
For more information, please
call Ben James or Michael Daly
at 830-4550 or 830-4567.
NEED LOCAL EXPERI-
ENCED PERSON to care for
four children Mondays 2-6 pm
in my home. Call 752-3290.
EASY WORK! Excellent Pay!
Assemble Products at Home.
Call Toll Free 1 -800-467-5566
ext. 5920.
STUDENTS AND ORGANI-
ZATIONS. Promote our
Florida Spring Break pack-
ages. Earn MONEY and FREE
trips. Organize SMALL and
LARGE groups. Call Campus
Marketing. 800-423-5264
POSTAL JOBS available!
Many positions. Great ben-
efits. Call 1-800-333-3737 ext.
3712.
GREAT HOLIDAY JOB OP-
PORTUNITY: Going home for
the Holidays? Need a fun part-
time job? The HONEY BAKED
HAM CO. is in search of sea-
sonal help to fill our sales
counter and production posi-
tions. We have stores located
in the following markets: Char-
lotte, Wilmington, Raleigh,
Greensboro, Winston-Salem,
Durham, Fayetteville and other
major cities throughout the
southeast. Please check the
HELP WANTED
white pages or information for
the store nearest your home.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOY-
MENT- Make money teaching
English abroad. Japan and
Taiwan. Make $2000-$4000
permonth. Many provide room
and board other benefits!
Financially & Culturally reward-
ing! For International Employ-
ment program and application,
call the International Employ-
ment Group: (206) 632-1146
ext. J 5362.
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING: Error free, quick and
dependable at reasonable cost.
Excellent typing and proofread-
ing skills (grammar, punctua-
tion, sentence structure, etc.).
Call Pauline at 757-3693.
STUDY ABROAD IN AUSTRA-
LIA: Information on semester,
year, graduate, summer and
internship programs in Austra-
lia. We represent 28 Australian
Universities, call us toll free 1 -
800-245-2575.
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VtsaMC or COD
ra&rm 800-351-0222
�UllUiV m Call). (213)477-8226
Or, rush $2.00 to: Research Information
1132? Idaho Ave. �206-A, Los Angles, CA 90025
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
You also get a FREE
HEADPHONE RADIO
just for calling
1-800-932-0528, Ext. 65
PERSONALS
PETES INVITATIONAL BAS-
KETBALL TOURNAMENT.
November 6-7. Single elimi-
nation- Deadline for entry is
Nov 5. Entry fee $100. Tour-
nament site John Small School
(formally P.S. Jones). 1st and
2nd place trophies awarded.
For mote information, contact
Mr. Jerome Branch (919) 975-
6854 or Chas Mitch'l (919) 757-
0418.
LOOKING FOR A BETTER
WAY TO MEET PEOPLE with
similar social, health, religion.
Here I am looking for a mate,
heard downtown and partier
are where people congregate.
So, I'm going out tonight and it
is late, the action is packed,
only an ugly mist if loser
couldn't find a mate. I know
why I'm here, I do know why,
but these crazy scenes make
me want to cry. She looks
good, he looks fine. Damn! I
wish thatthey were mine. Here
I am, wondering around, hop-
ing silently I'll be found. I'm
walking here and I'm talking
PERSONALS
there, beer in hand, was that a
stare! Who is he to say this to
me. Cause I approach them
hard and very fast, but some-
times the conversation never
lasts. Why ask why, that's
what I say, cause people play
games and people love to lie.
He talked to me, could he be
mine or was he giving me a
thought line. Damn! She looks
fine, what will I have to do to
make her mine? Wine and
dine? But I'm broke like most
college folk. Could she still be
mine? I'm in this crowd and it
is loud. Some people I meet
are so discreet that I can't tell
who's looking for meat. But I
flaunt, not that I want a person
who will be wrong to me. I will
silently admit that sometimes
my whit turns to shit and I can't
tell who will make me well
Accept me for me. Should I
approach, I don't know, Re-
jection hurts the old ego. But
the beer is strong, the night is
long, the hurt I know left me
long ago. I feel great, I want to
date, it's getting late. There's
a man around I don't know
who's trying hard to steal the
show. Help me meet people I
don't know. His name is Jeff,
his number is below, I'll con-
tact him now to find out what it
is or say justno. 758-4635.
PHI MU ALPHA MEN: Thank
you for the beautiful serenade
on Monday night. You have
won our hearts! Feel free to
visit again anytime. L.ove.Zeta
Tau Alpha.
TO THE FOUNDING FA-
THERS OF PI LAMBDA PHI:
Congrats fellas, we have a lot
of work ahead of us. We're
going to take this campus by
storm.
CONGRATULATIONS: Way
to go! Charlie, we wish you
and Angeiisa many years to-
gether. There is nothing pret-
tier than Spring and Fall. The
same goes for relationships.
Be fruitful and multiply. Re-
member! No Hanky Panky till
the Big Day. Your Brothers in
Fellowship.
BROOK DRSSJXALL, Con-
gratulations on being crowned
ou r 1992 Homecoming Queen.
Love, the Sigmas.
SIG EP, Thar.ks for coming
over and helping carve those
pumpkins. We had a great
time at the Fizz with you guys.
Let's do it again sometime
soon. Love, the Sigmas
MICHELLE K. AND
KATHRYN V. Thar.ks for
doing such and awesome job
with homecoming. You guys
are great. We all appreciate
everything you did to make
homecoming another big suc-
cess. Love, the sisters and
pledges of Sigma Sigma
PERSONALS
Sigma.
THE WOMEN'S SOCCER
TEAM wants to wish Beth,
Kristine, and Kristie a full and
speedy recovery! We miss
you guys.
PI KAPPA PHI- A belated
THANKS for a great time at
Splash on Thurs Lets get
together again soon! Love,
Alpha Omicron Pi
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: We
had a great time parting with
you guys before (and after) the
game. Love, Alpha Delta Pi
KAPPA SIG: We had a blast
at the Brown-bag social and at
the Southern Miss game.
Thanks for a great time. Love,
Alpha Delta Pi.
PHI KAPPA TAU, We had an
awesome time tailgating with
you guys. Can't wait to do it
again. Let's get together some-
time soon. Love, the Sigmas.
CHI-O: We've had a great
time parting with you this se-
mester. Let's do it again real
soon! The brothers and
pledges of Delta Chi.
DELTA CHI: Charter Satur-
day, November 7th, here it
comes I said here it comes!
PHI PSI: It was a fairly warm
night when we all hiked around,
to find some Phi Psi brothers
doing keg stands upside down.
The music was pumping, the
beer was free. Who was that
guy serenading us on one
knee? the game was fun, even
though we were beat. At least
we had a great looking sheet!
Thanks for the tailgate, thanks
for the tunes. We had a lot of
fun, let's get together soon!
Love, the Gamma Sigs.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
ADVERTISING
REPRESENTATIVES
Curt Lewis
-SeniorBusiness Administration
Kathryn Rickman
-SeniorBusiness Administration
Lisa Sykes
-SeniorCommunications
Lindsay Fernandez
-JuniorBusiness Administration
Matt Hege
-JuniorCommunications
CALL 919-757-6366
Today for more
advertising information
Announcements
SCHOOL OF NURSING
The school of nursing will
hold departmental meetings:
Freshmen and sophomores-
Tuesday November 11,5 pm-
NB 101. Juniors and seniors-
Wednesday November 12, 5
pm-NB 101. All general col-
lege students who intend to
major in nursing should attend
the freshmansophomore
meeting. All majors are
STRONGLY ENCOURAGED
to attend Early registration
and admission to clinical
courses will be discussed.
NEWS RELEASE
During the week of Novem-
ber 9-13, a survey of student
opinion of instruction will be
conducted at ECU. Question-
naires will be distributed in
classes with enrollments
greater than five. All students
will have opportunity to express
opinions on the teaching ef-
fectiveness of their instructors.
The survey will be conducted
during class time and will take
approximately 15 minutes to
complete. Student participa-
tion is voluntary and no identi-
ties are requested. Instructors
have been requested to leave
the classroom while the ques-
tionnaires are being com-
pleted. Results of the survey
will be distributed to instruc-
tors after final grades have
been posted. The teaching
effectiveness questionnaire
was created by the Faculty
Senate Committee for Teach-
ing Effectiveness and the Of-
fice of Planning and Institu-
tional Research. The results
of the survey, along with other
information and factors, are
used for administrative evalu-
ation of the instructor by the
supervising administrator
within the department or divi-
sion.
E.C.H.O.
E.C.H.O. meeting will be
Tuesday November 3,1992 in
Rm. 2017 in GCB at 5 pm.
Hope to see all of you Honor
Students and Teaching Fel-
lows there.
LITERARY AND ART COM-
PETITION
November 4, 1992 is the
deadline forentry in the REBEL
93 Competition. Winners re-
ceive cash prizes, and will be
published in the 1993 Rebel
Magazine. You must pick up
application forms from Art BIdg
Media Center, English Dept,
or Rebel offices in the Pubs
BIdg.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Attention to all of you
Gamma Beta Phi members,
we are having our third meet-
ing on November 10 at 4 pm in
MSC Room 244. See you
there!
P.U.S.H. THROUGH THF
BARRIERS
If you would like to work
toward reducing the architec-
tural, as well as the attitudinal
barriers that students with spe-
cial needs are faced with ev-
ery day, then come to the next
meeting of P.U.S.H. (People
United to Support the Handi-
capped). The meeting will be
5:00-6:00 on Thursday, No-
vembers in Cotten Hall Lobby.
Come join the fun
PHI ETA SIGMA
There will be a brief meet-
ing held in Fiemming Dorm
lobby at 5 o'clock on Tuesday
November 3rd. Very impor-
tant. Please attend.
PERFORMING ARTS SE-
RIES
Buddy: The Buddy Holly
Story, scheduled for Friday,
November 6, 1992 at 8 pm,
chronicles the professional life
of Buddy Holly, a rock-and-roll
musician killed in a plane crash
that also killed the Big Bopper
and Richie Valens. The show
features performances of
Holly's greatest hits�among
them "That'll Be The Day" and
"Peggy Sue
COUNSELING CENTER
25 AND OLDER:
Undergrad and grad student.
Family responsibilities (spouse
andor children). Join us for
brown bag lunches on
Wednesday from noon to 1:30
pm. Come for part or all of the
time. This rap group is an
informal gathering designed to
be supportive and help meet
the needs of students with fam-
ily responsibilities. Informal
discussions and presentations
are the format. Yes, there are
many students at ECU facing
the same concerns as you!
TIME: Wednesdays noon to
1:30pm. PLACE: Counseling
Center (313 Wright Building).
For more information, phone
George Gressman at 757-
6661.
REGISTRATION FOR
GENERAL COLLEGE
STUDENTS
General College students
should contact their advisors
the week of November 9-13 to
make arrangements for aca-
demic advising for Spring Se-
mester 1993. Early registra-
tion will begin November 16
and end November 20.
RECREATIONAL SER-
VICES:
Recreational Services Bil-
liards Registration meeting will
be held on Tuesday, Novem-
ber 10 at 5:00 pm in Biology
103. You must be at the meet-
ing to participate. A small fee
is required! For further infor-
mation call 757-6387.
RECREATIONAL, SER-
VICES:
Recreational services will
be sponsoring a Terrain Bik-
ing Workshop on November 7
at 10:30 am in Christenbury
117. So come on out and learn
how to ride. For further infor-
mation stop by 117
Christenbury Gym or call 757-
6387.
H





� -
The East Carolinian
� i
November 3, 1992
Lifestyle
Page 7
L.A. band experiments in pure chaos
By Pam Revels
Staff Writer
The debut LP from Animal Bag is not
simply metal, acoustic or pop. It is an ex-
periment in pure chaos.
This hottest new Los Angeles club
band's sound incorporates all the above
and more. The songs move from thrashing
guitars to easy acoustics and back again
faster than you can say the word "diver-
sity
"We have stuff that sounds like
Creedence meets Black Sabbath and songs
that could be Culture Club meets Slayer
a group member said in a press release.
"When we jam, and we're bouncing shit all
over the room, there's something there. If
there wasn't, we might as well join
Amway
Animal Bag got their start in North
Carolina. Drummer Boo Duckworth and
guitarist Rich Parris met in Charlotte when
they were teenagers, while bassist Otis
Hughes was in a band on the other side of
town. Singer Luke Edwards was perform-
ing with a cover band in Shelby. After
being introduced by mutual friends, the
band Animal Bag was bom.
In 1989 the group moved to L.A. to
seek a record contract and escape the nar-
row-mindedness that repressed their indi-
viduality. "I was the freak in my town, and
one girl's mom had heard that each brace-
let I wore stood for a different Satanic
ritual Edwards said. "I was like the anti-
Christ walking down the mall or some-
thing
After the move, things began to look
up. The groupstarted playing in local clubs
and let their live performances speak for
themselves. Mercury Records soon dis-
covered them.
Animal Bag's self-titled debut consists
of 13 tracks that blend metal, blues, dcous-
tics, heavy alternative and pop to produce
a finished product of chaotic musical en-
joyment.
"Mirrored Shade an acousticblues-
like song, is one of the band's favorites. The
song embodies hypnotic elements intensi-
fied by the mandolin, guitars and cool
harmonies.
"It sort of deals with people that sit
there and complain and bitch about the
world Hughes said in an interview with
Rock Review. "But what they're bitchin'
about is something people have to face
Photo courtesy Stardog Records
From left, Rich Parris, Boo Duckworth, Luke Edwards and Otis Hughes comprise the
band Animal Bag. Their 13-track album is an eclectic blend.
every day
Followingsimilaracousticlines'Hello
Cosmo" involves folksy guitars and vocals
that insist, "Look at mewhat you see is
who I amand I'll be who I wanna' be
Moving to a metal persona, "Personal
Demons" relies on thrashing guitars,
headbanging drumbeats and screaming
vocals. "Demons" releases raw energy that
explains "These are my personal demons
on the island of my bedthese are my per-
sonal demonsthere's a circus in my
head
The rockin' track, "Everybody has a
traditional pop sensibility mixed with a
cutting-edge rhythm and powerful gui-
tars and vocals.
Animal Bag's debut has been com-
pared to Faith No More and Jane's Addic-
tion. "But our focus is to create, not to
imitate thegroup insists. "Music is magic-
it's just spelled differently
'90 M.P JHL' lets Texas
blues do the talking
By Joe Korst
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Feel the winti rushing through ycur
hair, the smell of pine and fir trees filling
your senses as the miles click away under
the wheels of mat smooth machine called
an automobile.
That's the image that 90 M.P.H The
Heaters' newest release, evokes when it's
listened to.
The Heaters originated inFayetteville,
N.C where Chuck Rnodes, lead vocals
and lead guitarist, put a band together in
1981. In '87, Robbie Reid started jamming
with Rhodes, eventually joining him on
vocals and guitar.
Present members Dave Knipher on
drums and Tip Iuliucci on bass joined
soon afterward tocomplete the Texasblues
sound that is The Heaters.
Citinginfluencesrangingfrom Albert
King and Elmore James to Stevie Ray
Vaughan and the Fabulous T-Birds, The
Heaters have carved a niche in bars and
clubs all over eastern North Carolina.
Their blues-playing attracts crowds
from -til over the musical spectrum and
leaves audiences singing and dancing in
their seats.
The Heaters play the blues the way it
was meant to be played � simple and
affecting. Knipher and Iuliucci pick up the
sound and let Reid carry it down to a
tearful ballad or up to a house-rockin
foot-stompin' roar.
"We're not a bunch of glamour boys
or anything Iuliucci said in a recent press
release. "We just gotta let the music do the
talking
That's all they need to do, because the
music is more than enough.
90 M.P.H. starts off on a high note
with the toe-tapping,drum-p!aying "Turn
ItUp Drummer Knipher provides oneof
the best back-beats ever, coupling with
Reid's voice to guaranteea good time with
this rocking melody. Thechorus says it all:
"Turn it upTurn up my radioTurn it all
the way upSo I can't hear you no more
"High Tim? Woman" follows with
the curse of repetitive lyrics, but success
despite that. Reid demonstrates his gui-
tar-playingabilities with a solo that saves
the song from a slow death. This one will
leave your head shaking in its rhythm
and your fingers itching to play that air
guitar.
"90 M.P.H follows as the third track
on this 10-track album. Arguably the best
song on theentire tape, "90M.P.H starts
at that speed and never lets up from its
"foot to the floor The Heaters show their
combined talent in this take, with a hard
drum beat mixing superbly with strong
electric guitars by Rhodes and Reid.
"You Ain't Fooling Me" ends the first
side and sets the listenerup for theslower,
less driving second side. A smooth, easy-
flowing ballad about a cheating woman,
"You Ain't Fooling Me" falls into the
tame repetitive lyric trap as "High Time
Woman" almost did. This time the instru-
ments barely cover up for it, sometimes
tailing into a tried-and-true basic rhythm
themselves.
"Backstreet Blues" starts the second
side with a hard edge, making up for
"You Ain't Fooling Me Iuliucci gets a
chance to shine in the spotlight with his
spirited bass playing. The lyrics are a nice
change from the first side, with a clip to
them not only when sung but by them-
selves. "Sex and drugs are taking their
tollNothing left to lose Backstreet
bluesBackstreet blues
"Tex-Mex Blues" shines as the gem of
the second side. I'm not talking lyrics or
drums here�I'm talking guitar. A slow-
moving, easy-listening ballad, Rhodes
lays the electric guitar like he was bom
to do it.
His solo, running a lmost tJ ree whole
minutes, is well worth the time it takes to
get to it. Backed up by Knipher's drums
once again, Rhodes ends the album with
the listener feeling as good as when he or
sne put the tape on.
The Heaters play Texas blues with
the best of them. On Nov. 8, the band will
be featured on the nationally syndicated
radio show "Blues Deluxe The show
will air theirhitsingle, "90 M.P.H oneof
the songs that has been playing on radio
stations up and down the state.
So stick that tape in, roll down that
window, put that "foot to the floor" and
enjoy.
Book store provides
alternative selection
By Chandra Speight
Staff Writer
Enter almost any book store
and you'll be bombarded by
cheesy book marks, copies of
"Geraldo's Tell All" and most
anything else you're not looking
for. However, Greenville's
Eponymous offers an appealing
alternative.
ihomas and Rebecca Ives,
owners of both Quicksilver
Records and Eponymous, created
the store to
specialize in
"progres-
sive reading
for the
unfettered
mind The
Ives had
previously
been selling
a small
number of
books in
Quicksilver.
With
the success of these sales, they
designed Eponymous to satisfy
Greenville's need for literature
that cannot be found in larger
bookstore chains. Located on East
Fifth Street, Eponymous opened
just one week before the fall se-
mester began. Already it has be-
come a haven for local and ob-
scure publications.
Eponymous stocks a wide va-
riety of books from the newest
avant-garde novels to cult writ-
ings to classical literature. They
also trade used science fiction,
horror and mystery novels. "We
special order weekly and will
carry most items; we are able to
confirm what is in print and
would like to emphasize that ev-
eryone should feel comfortable
ordering from us Rebecca Ives
"I wanted a name
that was unique
and didn't call to
mind any particu-
lar image
Thomas Ives, co-owner of
Eponymous, on how he
chose the store's name.
said.
Bothofrhelvesareoften asked
why the store is named Epony-
mous. Thomas Ives named the
store. He wanted a name that was
"unique and didn't call to mind
any particular image
This is the premise behind the
storeaswell. Eponymous was not
created to be known for any par-
ticular type of books. Rather, it
was created to be commended for
their variety and uniqueness. He
also said that REM's Eponymous
album influ-
enced hisde-
cision.
Cur-
rently
Eponymous
is preparing
to stock over
200 maga-
zine titles.
"We hope to
have the
broadest
range of title
selections in
thearea both Ives said. "We real-
ize that magazines are a very af-
fordable medium. Some that we
stockwillbeas lowasadollar.Our
title subjects will range fromhome
journals to altemativelifestylesub-
jects
Underground comicsarealso
a big seller at Eponymous. To top
it all off, they even carry a few
posters at more than reasonable
prices and great political, social
and environmental T-shirts.
The Ives seem to have thought
of everything in opening Epony-
mous. Best of all, they seem very
willing to work with the public to
satisfy the demandsof Greenville.
"Above all I want the public
to realize that we are constantly
changing, growing and redefin-
ing Mrs. Ives said.
Image upsets DC Comics in sales race
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
This past February many of
Marvel Comic's top artists left to
start theirowncomiccompany,Im-
age Comics. Since its inception, Im-
age has been consistently making
waves in the comic industry-
Rob Liefeld, who got his big
breakdrawing TheNewMutants for
Marvel Comics, was the first artist
to go independent.
Independent comic publishers
areconsidered any comicpublisher
other than Marvel and DC Comics.
Liefeld recruited Todd McFarlane
(who got his break while drawing
Spider-Man), Jim Lee (who gained
fame while working on the X-Men)
and Jim Valentino (who got recog-
nition while writing and drawing
GiiardhmsoftheGalaxy). Liefeld also
recruited Marc Silvestri (who
started on the X-Men, but gained
popularity while drawing Wolver-
ine),and ErikLarsen(vvhoedrneda
following while drawing Spider-
Man) for Marvel Comics.
The artists stated that they left
Marvel tocreatenew characters and
a new universe that would be theirs
to control. They wanted total con-
trol of the characters � something
they could never have at Man'el or
DC Comics.
The first Image comic came
out in May, and by August they
had four comic titles on the market.
The sales of these four comics out-
sold the ones DC Comics putoutin
August. Image had a larger per-
cent of sales than a company with
legends like Batman, Superman,
the Flash and Wonder Woman.
The following two months had
DC Comics (26 percent) retaking
their position from Image (21 per-
cent) at second in sales behind the
dominant Marvel Comics (49 per-
cent). The orders for November's
comics have put" Image back into
the second spot (24 percent) over
DC Comics (20 percent). Even
though November is the month
that Superman dies, Image's addi-
tional comics have kept them above
DC Comics.
Now that Image haseightti ties
currently in publication, with four
more promised soon, their reign at
number two could be permanent.
'Spawn excellent example of new
comic company.
Image Comics
Currently on sale:
'Spawn' � Todd McFarlane
'Shadowhawk' � Jim Valentino
'Savage Dragon' � Erik Ear son
'WildCA.T.S � Jim Lee
'Youngblood' � Rob Liefeld
'Cyberforce' � Marc Silvestri
'Brigade' � Rob Liefeld & Marat
Mychaels
: !

Courtesy Image Comics





8 The East Carolinian
NOVEMBER 3, 1992
Toastmasters aids
in communication
By Chandra Speight
Staff Writer
With the current recession,
job placement is harder to ob-
tain. In today's business world,
students need every skill pos-
sible to survive.
The Toastmasters Club of
Greenville may give you that
extra edge for success in the
business world.
Toastmasters is a non-
profit education club, with
160,000 members
worldwide, in- (
eluding the 18
Greenville mem-
bers.
The Green-
ville members
span from ECU
students, p les-
sors and doctors
from the medical
school to Pitt
Community Col-
lege students.
Studies have
shown public
speaking to be
people's number
one fear, with
death being second. As a Toast-
master, people will overcome
the nervousness they feel when
speaking to an audience. They
will also learn how to organize
their ideas and verbalize them
eloquently.
Toastmasters is not a for-
mal course in public speaking.
It is a workshop in which
people develop their commu-
nication skills among a group
of peers. As a Toastmaster
member, you will be provided
with a coachmentor to help
you with your first few projects.
The program begins with
an "Icebreaker" speech. This
speech gives people the oppor-
Meets every 2nd
and 4th Wednesday
atSheppard Library
at 7 p.m. Special
meeting Tuesday,
Nov. 10 for Veterans
Day. Contact.
Sammy Miils at
756-7819.
tunity to get a feel for public
speaking. Next, the impor-
tance of speaking with sin-
cerity and conviction is
stressed.
A third speech concen-
trates on the organization
of ideas into a clear, logical
outline. Effective body lan-
guage, vocal variety and
proper word usage are ex-
amined in the next three
speeches. The seventh
speech is to evaluate
progress and re-examine
goals.
Each
time a per-
son presents
a speech a
fellow club
member will
be assigned
to evaluate
it. This fur-
thers devel-
opment by
allowing in-
dividuals to
learn by
watching
and critiqu-
ing others.
In addi-
tion to prepared speeches,
Toastmasters participates
in Table Topics. These are
improvisational exercises
designed to develop a
person's ability to think on
their feet. This will aid
people in situations such as
interviews, seminars and
business meetings.
"As a businessman, I
feel that Toastmasters will
prepare young people for
the business world, said
Sammy Mills, president of
Greenville Toastmasters.
"Communication is a top
priority � if you don't do
well on an interview, you
can kiss the job goodbye
'Scene' transcends the trendy
By Pam Revels
Staff Writer
Although they are compared to
the Beatles and the Las by Bribsh
press, the band Ocean Colour Scene
has taken hold of their own pop-
alternative reins.
"Thecomparisonsare inevitable
because we've got guitars and har-
monies and we write real songs
said Simon Fowler, lead singer and
rhythm guitarist, in a press release.
"We may no t be perceived as trendy,
but we feel that if you are the flavor
of the year you can't be the flavor of
the following year
The four-man band is from a
town in the English midlands called
Solihull, where Fowler formed his
first group, the Fanatics. When the
venture failed they recruited guitar-
ist Stephen Craddock and formed
Ocean Colour Scene.
Manager-publisher John
Mostyn created a label specifically
for the band, and named it Phfft.
They attracted attention from ma-
jor record labels and eventually
signed with one of them.
Ocean ColourScene'sself-ti tied
debut LP contains 12 tracks domi-
nated by smooth, mellow waves of
harmony that sometimes crash into
piercing visions of reality.
Fowler's voice echoes haunt-
ingly over the provocative musical
mixes. In the track "Giving It All
Away (which features Alison
Moyet on background vocals) he
sings philosophically over exotic
guitars that "life can be so shaking
handed
Ocean Colour Scene even does
a cover of Stevie Wonder's "Do
Yourself a Favor which insists
"educate you're mind get yourself
togetherhey there ain't much
time
"The songs set the direction
Cradock said. "We let the songs
interpret themselves rather than try
to fit them into what we feel the
band should sound like
z-l
Photo courtesy Mercury Records
Ocean Colour Scene members (from left) Damon Minchella, Simon Fowler,
Oscar Harrison and Stephen Craddock create a multi-faceted LP.
Interested in a
Career
as a Paralegal?
Legal Assistants Program
� A certificate program open to qualified women
who have a baccalaureate degree
� Approved by the American Bar Association
� Intensive summer schedule May-August; part-time
evening schedules beginning January or September
� Placement service for graduates is without fee to
employer or graduate.
Applications Deadline for the 1993 Summer Program: March 1,1993. For details,
contact: Legal Assistants Program, Continuing Education, Meredith College,
3800 Hillsborough Street, Raleigh, NC 27607-5298 (919) 829-8353.
Meredith College admits women students without regard to race, creed, national or
ethnic origin, age or handicap. �a ��
merVcbthcok
Tht "Last Carolina

University Madrigal 'Dinners "December 3, 4, 5 � 7:00 p.m. MendenfudlStudent Center

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November 3,1992
3:30-5 pm
MSC Room 244
Network with fellow leaders in small discussion
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The East Carolinian
� i
November 3. 1992
Sports
PAGE 9
BOX SCORE
So. Mississippi 3 10 15 10 38
East Carolina 0 7 0 14 21
FIRST QUARTER
USM Lance Nasions 32-yard held goal (4 plays, 2
yards, S3)
Lights, cameras and no action
SECOND QUARTER
USM - Tommy Waters 12-yard pas to Myreon
McKinney Nations PAT Good)(6 plays. 66 yards.
122)
USM - Johnny Lomoro 50-yard field goal (6 plays, 13
y�ras, 2KB)
ECU � Michael Anderson 10-yard pass to Charles
Miles (Deke Owens PAT GoodXl 2 plays, 92 yards,
4:il)
THIRD QUARTER
USM - Kevin Bentley 5-yard pass to Marcus Pope
(Waters to Pope on 2-pt conversion)(7 plays, 56 yards
3-52)
USM - Mkhael Welch 50-yard run (Nations PAT
Good)(4 plays 61 yards, 2:49)
FOURTH QUARTER
USM - Nations33 yard field goal (4 plays, 3 yards,
:23)
BCU - Junior Smith 11-yard run (Anderson to Pete
Zophy an 2-pt conversion)(9 plays, 64 yards, 233)
USM - Chris Burkhalter 20-yard run (Nations PAT
Good)(6 plays, 44 yards, 2:16)
ECU - Anderson 5-yard pass to Carl ester Grumpier,
(2-pt conversion failed)(5 plays, 73 yards, 1:58)
TEAM STATISTICS
PiralixColder. Ui;1l-s
First Downs2117
Rushing1413
Passing63
Pmalry11
3rdEFFlof94 of 17
4th EFFlo(2lofl
Total Net Yards401376
Total Plavs7173
Average Gain5.645.15
Net Rushing245262
Rushes3255
Average Per Rush7.624.67
Net Yards Passing56114
Comp Attempts2339918
Yards Per Pass6.7812.6
Sacked: Yards-Lost112318
Interceptions00577
Average Per Punt36.0333
Return Yards093
Punt Returns00316
Kkkoft Returns6101332
Fumbles - Lost2211
Possession Time26:1633:44
PLAYER STATISTICS
TFLFR Pass Pass Pass
UL AI SB IDS YJ2S. kuX BdJp Sadsi
Beasley.G 11
Boothe, C 11
Carter, B. 77 l(-2)1(12)
Cooke, 12 3
Cooper, H.3 31
Cotton, D. 12 3
Crumbte, D.2 2
Cunmula), Z. 11 2
Davis, T. 64 10
Dillon, I 69 152
Floyd, G. 63 91
Foreman, M 24 6
Grand ison.G 22 4
Jones, T. 11 2
Libiano, M. 24 6
Lewis, E. 22 4
Render, T. 111
Taylor, D.1 1
Walker, F. 11
OTHER RECORDED TACKLES
BUke.C 11
Crumpler.C 11
Driver. C 11
Robinson. R 11
Photo by Dail Reed
Running Man Jr. Smith (being crushed above) was hard to stop. He ran for 150 on only 18 carries. Running
Man II, Charles Miles, tallied 112 yards on just 10 carries. Why has Logan been keeping Miles such a secret?
By Chas Mitch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
After comingoff an impressive
victory over Pittsburgh, the Pirates
had their sights set on accomplish-
ing their goal of a winning season.
However when thecamerasof ESPN
stopped rolling, the Bucs found
themselves with one less week to
achieve that elusive goal of a end of
season winning percentage.
Early in thecontest, thedefense
held their own in allowing only 13
points out of a possible score of 21.
Unfortunately the offense was un-
able to sustain any type of consis-
tency during the first half as the
Golden Eagles led 13-7.
"This is a strange football team
Head Coach Steve Logan said.
Cross Country men and
women finish seventh
at CAA tournament
Sports
Information Dept.
On Saturday, the East Caro-
lina men's and women's cross
country teams travelled to
Williamsburg, Va. to compete in
the Colonial Athletic Association
Cross Country Championships.
Overall, the Pirate women
finished seventh with 205 points,
with James Madison winning the
even; with a total of 26 points.
"Relative to the competition
the kids ran pretty well Head
Coach Choo Justice said. "We've
improved from last year but the
competition has gotten better
The
top fin-
isher for
ECU'S
women
was Stv.cy
Green
who fin-
ished 16
of 70 with
her time
of 18:53.
isher with a time of 27:44 and a 42
of 81 place. Tony Chadwick fin-
ished soon after Connolly with
his time of 28:14 and place of 45
of 81.
"We Ran well in finishing
seventh. I was glad to see our
kids run with consistency as they
had all year long Justice said.
The r-st of the ECU men's
team finished as follows:
53. Eric Adamski 28:53
57. MarkMathis 29:00
69. Mikejolley 30:15
74. Stacey Cochran 3050
76. Chris O'Shields 30:54
The East Carolina Uni-
versity
We ran well in finish- c r �s s
ing seventh. I was glad teams re-
. ii turns to
to see our kids run action on
Nov. 14 as
they will
be com-
peting in
t h e
NCAA
District III
Champi-
onships in Greenville, S.C.
with consistency as
they had all year long
Choo Justice
Head Coach
The
rest of the
ECU women's team finished as
follows:
36. Marianne Marini
19:50
46. Cathrine Norstrand
20:23
47. Jessica Montgomery
20:40
55. Susan Hu 21:22
58. Kelly Hanna 21:34
62. Gretchen Harley 22:16
63. Theresa Marini 22:42
"On this day we ran okay,
but everyone else ran better
Justice said. It's like playing a
game of pick-up basketball and
you haveagood team, then Magic
Johnson,Larry Bird and Michael
Jordan wants to play, your just
outmatched
For the ECU men's team,
Sean Connolly was the top fin-
PIRATE CHASE'92
The ECU Cross Country
teams will be holding Pirate
Chase '92 on Sunday, Novem-
ber 8 at 130 p.m. The 5K road
race and walk will help benefit
the cross country runners as
well as serve as an opportunity
for the campus and community
to meet with the '92 ECU run-
ners.
Registration will takeplace
at the Pirate Club building, lo-
cated adjacent to Ficklen Sta-
dium. Entry fee is $10 and T-
shirtsareguaranteed to the first
200registeres,whileawardswill
be given in six different catego-
ries. For more information con
tact Charlie "Choo" Justice at
7574611(d) or 830-3717(n)
"We're either winning
big or losing big
The defense du-
plicated last weeks
performance but"
seemed to have ran
ou t of gas after the of-
fense stalled in the
early minutes of the
second half.
"The key to the
game was when we
came out in the tliird
quarter and failed to
do anything with it
and gave the ball right
back to them Logan
said. "Ourdefenseplayed very well
uptothatpointandevenafterthat
The final nail in the Thursday
night coffin was the seven tum-
JERRY DILLON
6 Unassisted Tackles
9 Assisted Tackles
2 Pass Break Ups
2 QB Hurries
overs committed on
offense. Five inter-
ceptions and two
fumbles outweighed
the strong defensive
effort as the "run and
gun" offense could
not capitalize on the
few golden field op-
portunities that they
had.
"It's devastating
in a way free safety
GregGrandisonsaid.
"We really needed
this win right here.
They didn't do any-
thing we weren't prepared for -
that's for sure, everything they did,
we knew when it was coming at
us
Gallaher promises
to be one of ECU's
finest swimmers
By Brent St. Pierre
Staff Writer
Meet Jason Gallaher. He is a
member of the record setting 200-
yard medley relay, an All-Colo-
nial Athletic Association (CAA)
swimmer, a
Dean's List
student and
a leader of
the ECU
swim team
�inandout
of the water.
Sound to
good to be
true? Well,
there is one
more thing.
He is only a
sophomore.
" I n
swimming
like some
other sports
one reaches
a barrier ev-
eryday in
practice Head Coach Rick Kobe
said. "That barrier separates the
good swimmers from the great
swimmers. The great swimmers
reach that barrier and go through
it, ignoring the pain that their
bodies endure. Jason reaches that
barrier everyday and everyday
he goes through it
Kobe also labeled Gallaher
as one of the hardest workers on
the ECU swim team.
This is evident in Gallaher's
accomplishments and, more im-
portantly, his versatility. In 1991
CAA championships he finished
JASON GALLAHER
10th in the 500-yard free style,
fourth in the 200-yard butterfly
and third in the 100-yard butter-
fly, the last of which earned him
All-CAA honors.
This year, Jason's versatility
will be showcased. Gallaher is
expected to
swim in the
400-yard
Individual
Medley
(I.M.)�100
yards of
each stroke.
It is also
possible
that
Gallaher
will be
called upon
to swim a
different
stroke in the
200-yard
medley re-
lay. Last
year he
swam third
leg (butterfly)and there'nybroke
the ECU varsity and team record
for that event.
Thisyearwiththeinsurgence
of a good freshmen class Kobe
believes that, perhaps, the relay
could go faster if Gallaher swam
a different stroke.
"This says a lot about the
talent in this year's freshmen class
and the importance of Jason
Gallaher to the ECU swim team
Kobe said.
While recruiting Gallaher,
See Gallaher page 10
Defense rains on Van Pelt's
Homecoming parade
By Chas Mitch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
Prior to last weekend's match-
up with the Pitt Panthers, the de-
fensive unit of Coach Chris Thur-
mond had been the topic of many
early morning coffee and dough-
nut conversations.
Can they show up repeatedly?
Are they as good as they were last
year? Wi'l they be able to stop Alex
Van Pelt?
Not only did the swarming Pi-
rate defense show up, collectively
they shut down Van Pelt and the
high-powered offense of Pitts-
burgh. In the first half alone, Pitt
could onlv manace a 38-vard field
goal.
"We really don't get that much
respect on the defensive side of the
ball strong safety Morris Fore-
man said. "Almost no respect at all
in fact
Emmanuel McDaniel of spe-
cial teams started the defensive
party with a head-snapping tackle
which resulted in a fumble on the
opening kickoff. Foreman managed
to scoop up the ole pigski n and give
the Pirateofiense the ball inside the
red zone.
Four plays later, quarterback
Michael Anderson hit paydirt with
an eight yard TD toss to Morris
Letcher to light up the scoreboard
early in the first quarter. This
marked the debut of Anderson as
tire Pirates' starting quarterback.
From that moment on, the Pi-
rate defense manhandled and con-
trolled the
Panthers
in nearly
every as-
pect of
thegame.
'Trurmds
Thump-
ers" kept
the Pitt
offense
out of the
end zones in the first half and al-
lowed just 138 total yards on of-
fense. Of the first half yards, 121 of
those yards came on two plays.
"We're pleasedthe guys are
BOX SCORE
Pittsburgh 0 3 7 21-31
East Carolina 7 14 7 10-37
FIRST QUARTER
ECU - Michael Anderson 8 yard pass to Morris Letcher
(Deke Owen PAT Good) (4 plays, 23 yards, 137)
SECOND QUARTER
PITT Stan Connelly 38 yard field goal (8 plays, 47 yard s,
3:48)
ECU lunlor Smith 1 yard run (Owens PAT Cood)(9
plays, 78 yards, 341)
ECU - Interception return 55 yards by Gt? Floyd
THIRD QUARTER
PITT Lyron Brooks 2 yard run (Connelly PATGoodXIO
plays, 59 yards, 2:12)
ECU - Michael Anderson 29 yard pass to Derrek Batson
(Owens PAT GoodXl 1 plays, 59 yards, 2:12)
FOURTH QUARTER
ECU Owens 31 yard field goal (4 plays, 3 yards, 47)
PITT Alex Van Pelt 13 yard pass to Dietrich Jells
(Connelly PATGood)(ll plays, 78 yards,452)
ECU - Smith 55 yard run (Owens PAT Good )(2 plays. 55
yards. 49)
PITT Van Pell 13 yard pass to Bill Davis (Connelly PAT
Cood)(8 plays, 74 yards, 1:27
PITT Van Pelt 13 yard pass to Cliff Moncrlef (Connelly
PAT Good)(9 plays, 70 yards. 1.46)
TEAM STATISTICS
Photo by Rob Upton
Linebacker Tony Davis has taken coaching theories to heart and
shown flashes of brilliance. Next year, he may be an All-American.
i'lIlliS
First Downs18
Rushing6
Passing11
Penalty1
3rd EFF4 of 15
4th EFFlof3
Total Net Yards371
Total Plays71
Average Gain5.23
Net Rushing157
Rushes34
Average Per Rush4.61
Net Yards Passing214
CompAttempts2037
Yards Per Pass10.7
Sacked: Yards lost322
Interceptions255
Average Per Punt37.4
Return Yards75
Punt Returns223
Kickoff- Returns576
Fumbles: Lost30
Possession Time2612
29
11
17
1
7ofl5
1 of 2
565
86
637
198
39
5.07
367
2947
12.6
i:
io
425
10
310
794
63
33:48
BERNARD CARTER
playing with someconfidence now
and it shows Thurmond said.
"Until we went into the 'prevent
mode' in the fourth quarter, our
defense just did an outstanding
ju
The
aggres-
sive and
bruising
defense
led by se-
nior de-
fensive
end Jerry
Dillon
and new-
comer Mark Libiano provided the
much anticipated and expected
"Air Logan" offense with excellent
field position.
"Our main goal for the de-
3 Tackles
3 QB Hurries
2 Pass Sacks
2Tackles For Loss
fense was to come out early and hit
them hard and make a couple of
turnovers Foreman said. "Once
we establish our game, then we
could let our offense go to work
The defense, offense and spe-
cial teams played far beyond the
expectations of the, estimated, 200
screaming Pirate fans who were in
attendance.
"Coming to Pitt and beating
Pitt, were happy with tliat
Thurmond saidWeleta lot of our
guys play, which we wanted to do
and I'm just totally pleased with
their efforts
With an average starting field
position on the 40-yard line, it'seasy
to see how quarterbacks Anderson
and Sean McConnell could effort-
lessly rack up 30 points on a much-
riddled Pittsburgh defense.
PLAYER STATISTICS
Missed field goals
ECU 12
PITT 11
ECU Rushing: . Smith 14 93, C Van Buren 11-53, M
Foreman 1 9, C Miles 3 7, M. Letcher 1 5, D Wilson 1 1,
S McConnelll 1, M .Anderson 2- -8
ECU Passing: M. Anderson 37-20-214. S McConnell a
OO
ECU Receiv ing: P. Zophy 5 53,C Driver 3 -44, D Ba tson
2 38(1 TD), C Van Buren 4-30, D. Hkks 1 15, M. Letcher
2-14(1 TD), . Smith 2 8
DEFENSIVE STATISTICS
TFL FR Pass Pass Pass
LTT AI JCOI YJ� YL5 nlc BxJjp Sacks
Beasley.G. 112
Carter, B 303 2(15) 2(15)
Cooke. J. 011
Cooper, H. 404 1(0)
Cunmulaj. Z. 202 1(7) l(-7
Davis, T. 617 1(0)
Dillon, J 808 1( 20) 1(0) 1
Floyd, C 707 1C55YD)
Foreman, M. 112 1(3)
Freeman, M; 123
Graham, L. 011
GrandisorvG. 404
Hurley, R 101
Lewis, E. 437. K-l)
Libiano, M. 53B 1(2)
Mi-Bride. V 101
Render. T. 32;
Tate. 1
Walker. F 505
i





10 The East Carolinian
NOVEMBER 3, 1992
ECU Women's Club
Soccer continues to excel
The 1992 Women's Soccer club has slashed, jumped and kicked their way through yet another club sport
season. Currently with a 3-2-1 record, Club ECU has shown that they can compete and will be a force to be
reckoned with in future matches.

J
. Hr
JSFr � �
nn �
�.
m&UJ&L.SL.�jtt-ZlMRS
"
Members of the 1992
Women's Soccer Club are:
1st row from left to right. Amy
Warren, Joelle Pierce, Alison
Russell, Jaimeson Pierce Wende
Guerin, Peg Rustand, MistCone.
2nd Row: Asst Coach Dough
Silver, Kiki Anderson, Mandy
Parris, Lora Lapp, Toni DeRose, Jodi
Rittenhouse, Danielle Langlois,
Kirsten Harlan, Head Coach Chip
Hudson.
3rd Row: Shaw, Jennie Haines,
Eileen Moore, Julie, Mary Keenan,
Heather Howard, MargitSlyvestor,
Heather Seanor and Stephanie
Aicher.
Gallaher
Continued from page 9
coach Kobe was looking for a flyer.
Gallaher was all that he wanted
and more.
"Jason had very good times in
the 100and 200-yard butterfly. Dut,
what I really liked about Jason was
that he really had his act together
Kobe said. "He was a hard worker,
a good student, and most impor-
tantly he had made the sacrifice
and commitment to be a quality
swimmer
Making the sacrifice is an un-
derstatement. On Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays Gallaher
and the ECU swim team lifts
weights from 1:30 p.m2:30 p.m.
and swims from 3 p.m. -5 p.m. On
Tuesdays and Thursdays he is in
the water twice a day, from 6 a.m
730 a.m. and again from 2:30 p.m.
- 5:15 p.m. in the afternoon. During
the week, Gallaher and the ECU
team swim close to 50,000 yards.
For any of you that have taken
remedial swimming or gone to
Minges to swim a few laps and
were worn outafter 10 laps, 50,000
yards converts to 2,000 lapsa week,
2,(XX) hud laps a week � every
week.
Kobe senses that with this
years freshmen class and the con-
tinued improvements of swim-
mers like Gallaher the ECU team
will be able to raise yet another
CAA championship banner in
Minges Coliseum.
As for Gallaher, personally it
is important to remember that he
is only a sophomore. If he were
able to improve his times in the
100-yard butterfly by approxi-
mately two percent a year for the
next four years, his time would
qual ify him for die Olympic Trials
in 1996.
Two percent is around a one
White Hall reigns supreme
Recreational Services
Photos By Dail Reed
The kids of West Campus got
the opportunity to step back into
theirmemories of elementary school
years as they competed in the West
Campus Kickball Tournament. The
tournament, organized by West
Campus S.H.I.P. REC Susan Taylor
and Recreational Services, wasn't
quite as expected.
These students kicked up the
dust in a thrilling competition that
ended in a surprising 13-2 victory
for the girls of White Hall. They
escaped the West Campus Kickball
Tournament as champions barely
even ruffled. WhiteHall and Greene
Hall have been building up a his-
torical rivalry since the beginning
of the academic year. It all began
with the King of the Hill competi-
tion in which White Hall and Greene
Hall had a furious competition for
the "Queen of the Hill" crown. The
West Campus KickballToumament
simply added fuel to the fire in this
competition between these ex-
tremely competitive female
dorms. This Recreational Ser-
vices event for the females of
West Campus will hopefully be
followed by a similar event for
the guys planned for a later date.
The WestCampus Kickball
Tournament is yet another op-
portunity given by Recreational
Services to keep smiles on the
faces of the East Carolina stu-
dents. Recreational Services
provides events throughout the
year on every stretch of campus
to insure the happiness of the
East Carolina community. This
includes the well-being of the
students, faculty and staff. So
watch your calenders for fu-
ture events and go out there
and have some fun. If you have
any questions about future
events or just simply need to
know what is going on; get in
touch with your local S.H.I.P.
REC. They are there for your
use and service.
second improvementper year. Two
percent may not sound like much
but in swimming two percent is a
greatdeal. It'shard to say ifGallaher
has the physical or mental ability to
improve thatmuch thatsoon. How-
ever, it is not completely out of the
realm of possibility.
In 1988, Merideth Bridgers be-
came the last ECU swimmer to
qualify for the NCAA champion-
ships as an individual.Olympiccuts
may be slightly unrealistic and
somewhat unfair but an NCAA
championship qualifier is not. If
Gallaher were to improve slightly
less than one percent per year for
three years, around four to five
tenths of a second improvement a
year Jason Gallaher could be a CAA
champion and perhaps an NCAA
qualifier. With a little luck, and a lot
of hard work and sacrifice, Gallaher
could be that successful.
Schultz named
CAAP.O.TW.
Sports
Information Department
East Carolina senior Wendy
Schultz has been named as the Co-
lonial Athletic Association Volley-
ball Player of the Week.Schultz,a5-
10outsidehitterfromGibsonia,Pa
helped the Lady Pirates win their
first two conference matches of the
season as East Carolina defeated
CAA rivals George Mason and
American as well as non-confer-
ence opponent Pembroke State.
In the two CAA wins Schultz
recorded a total of 47 kills and 32
digs. Schultz currently ranks sec-
ond in the CAA in both kills (4.57)
and hitting percentage (.310). The
wins over GMU and American
marked ECU's first conference vic-
tories since the 1989 season and
wi th their 2-0 record ECU leads the
conference. Schultz is the first ECU
player to be named CAA Player of
the Week this season.
IWWWWtt
COLLEGE NIGHT
with the Best Mix of Music
with Dr. D0U3 at

?&
DOORS OPEN AT 9:00 PM
$1.75 Domestics
$1.75 Hiballs
BRING THIS COUPON AND i
RECEIVE FREE ADMISSION
i
j
-Y?I'�LlP5iday Onl
TRACK THE
PIRATES
TO MEMPHIS
If you're going to any out-of-town
game this season get to the
1 Memphis State game Nov. 21
f in Liberty Bowl Stadium. Make
your plans now. Swing in Friday
night and hang out at Overton
- Square. Eatin, milling, listening
and grazing. Crash late Saturday, beat your feet on
Mud Island, see the Pyramid, (iraceland, a little
milk and cookies, whatever. Then the game and
wind up on Beale Street, where red, hot and blues
are guaranteed. Crawl home Sunday with enough
stories to last your 5()th class reunion. Call today
for all the stuff you need, 1-800-873-6282, it's our
quarter. Make your reservations and all that jazz.
GET OUT OF TOWN
GET TO MEMPHIS
NURSE OPPORTUNITIES
NURSING AT
ITS FINEST.
You'll find pride
and professionalism
as a member of the
100 BSN Army
Nurse Corps-plus
the pay and benefits
of an Army officer and excellent oppor-
tunities for higher education.
Call your Army Recruiter now.
1-800-662-7473
ARMY. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
THE JOKER IS WILD
ABOUT CASINO NIGHT!
Tuesday, November 3
8:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room
Sponsored by the BCU Student Union
Productions Committee
I
I
I
I
I
I
I-
I
I
I
I
L.
ALFREDO'S
New York Pizza By The Slice
2!8E. 5th St.�752-0022
NOW DELIVERING
after 5 pm
758-7857
minimum5 00 order
Sun, Mon & Tue SPECIAL
� � � �ri.$-L�?-i � -
2 Large Pizzas
wfriTopping
$6�.99
with coupon
I
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I
"I
I
In The Plaza Food Court
MEXICAN
PLATTER
2 BURRITOS
RICE, BEANS,
NACHOS &
LARGE DRINK
I $3.99
BLACKJACK ROULETTE CRAPS
Admission is free and you get $2,000 play money.
At the end of the evening, use your
winnings to bid on an assortment of prizes-
including a VCR and
a compact disc player.
YOU'LL HAVE A ROYAL TIME.
v
SM
521 Cotanche Street
Greenville
757-1666
Try Our Delicious
Platter Combinaciones!
I El Gato Gordo
It may take nine lives to finish this one! A platter full
of a mini chicken chimichanga, one beef taco, and
one cheese enchilada which is garnished with
guacamole, sour cream, and black olives and
served with rice and beans. Finished off with Fried
Ice Cream. Only $7 95
F.I Toro Bravo
A platter full of a mini beef burrito, mini beef
chimichanga, and a beef enchilada which is cov-
ered with melted cheese and garnished with sour
cream, guacamole, and black olives. Served with
rice, beans, and Fried Ice Cream.
Tres Mosgueteros
A platter full of a beef taco, a chicken enchilada,
and a mini seafood flauta topped with cheese and
garnished with guacamole, sour cream, minced
tomatoes, and black olives. Served with rice,
beans, and Fried Ice Cream.
Ei Polio Flojo
A platter full of a mini chicken chimichanga, a mini
chicken flauta, and an enchilada Suisa which is
garnished with guacamole, sour cream, and black
olives. Served with rice, beans, and Fried Ice
95
OnlySJ 95
OnlyS y 95
cream.
FREE PARKING
Across the Street
Only "7
QMS





Title
The East Carolinian, November 3, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 03, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.905
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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