The East Carolinian, October 22, 1992






Opinion
1-900-dumbidea
Not-so-cheap phone sex makes it hard on
your wallet. Save your time and money ignore
those late-night TV ads.
See pg. 5 for story.
Lifestyle
Candyman five times
Without gon Barker's
latest'
Sports
Jones not Jonesin'
ECU linebacker Thomas Jones is hitting ball carriers
as hard as he is hitting the books.
Seepg. 12 for story.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 17
Circulation 12.000
(,
ret'ir
Thursday, October 22,1992
16 Pages
Congressman spends day on campus
By Karen Hassell
Staff Writer
Striving to become acquainted with
the new areas of his district, U.S. Rep.
Martin Lancaster visited ECU on Wednes-
day.
With about 60 percent of the 3rd
district new to Lancaster, this election
yearforced him to travel fmm Wilmington
to the Virginia border to reach his con-
stituents.
Lancaster's latest campaign adver-
tisements accuse his opponent, GOP can-
didate Tommy Follard, of falling behind
$2,300 on his child support payments.
Lancaster responded to questions about
the negative advertisement against Pol-
lard.
"I've been in politics for 14 years,
and this is the first time we've ever run a
negative ad Lancaster said. "It was the
most difficult decision I've ever made.
We have been running positive television
now for five weeks.
"We did not want to use negative
television. But what we found was after
an unremitting negative attack or attacks
bv mv opponent that it was having an
effect. We simply were not going to take
the chance that the trend would continue
until election day"
Lancaster, who won his congres-
sional seat in 1986, grew up on a tobacco
farm, served in the Navy during the Viet-
nam war and spent eight years in the
legislature.
Lancaster said that due to new areas
now included in the third district, com-
mercial fishing creates the largest adjust-
ment for him. Farming, military, educa-
tion, business and industry are all famil-
iar subjects. With only a few fishermen in
his old district, district three now holds
nearly all commercial fishermen in North
Carolina.
Redistricting added both ECU and
Elizabeth City State University to the 3rd
district. Lancaster said this was a differ-
ence in regards to the fact that he now has
two major universities, however, he has
always been concerned about education.
He said he supports an initiative
that former Gov. im Hunt headec
which would create a national certifi-
cation program for teachers.
"1 think you will seea federal role
in making that happen. This will give
teachers some professional credentials
similar to what doctors ha e. Teachers
would be board certified that shows
their true expertise
Lancaster said he sees 18-to-24-
year-olds as having the same concerns
as anv other age group, including edu-
cation, a strong economy, safety and
the environment.
"Students perhaps more so than
older generations are interested in the
environment he said. 'My interests
and the interests of students dovetail.
I'm not certain that is the case with my
opponent. He has an incredible envi-
ronmental record. He owns a sewage
treatment plant in a subdivision that he
built that was in violation of pollution
standards 24 out of 36 months
Lancaster said he is working to
make scholarships and grants non-tax-
able income for students He said stu-
dents should not be taxed on the inter-
est drawn by college loans but, instead,
interest on college should be eligible
for tax deductions.
Lancaster said he was striving for
college loans to be provided regardless
of income level. If parents' income is
less than $70,000, students would be
eligible for subsidies on the interest. If
their parents make less than 642,(XX),
they would be entitled to a Pell I .rant.
Lancaster also addressed issues
of the presidential election issue.
"1 think 50 cents on the gallon isa
bit extreme he said of Ross Perot's
idea to raise the tax on gasoline 10 cents
a year for the next five years. "1 think it
would have a regressive effect on the
economy
Lancastersaid Perot's plan would
build up tl country's infrastructure
while discouraging the use of foreign
oil. However, Lancaster suggested put
tinga tax on imported fuels, a measure
that would encourage dorrw
duction and discourage our depen-
dence on foreign oil.
Reusable
cups aid
recycling
project
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
US Rep.
the 3rd di:
ptKJiO By D .ii Heed
its on the mall. Lancaster, who is campaigning for
.pent Wednesday meeting students on campus.
ECU students are contrib-
uting to the recycling effort by
purchasing reusable cups that
are being offered through cam-
pus dining services.
David Bailey, marketing
manager for food services ac-
counts, said he heard about the
success of the reusablecup pro-
gram on other campuses
through ARA Services and be-
gan looking into the possibility
of bringing the program to ECU.
He considered several manu-
facturing companies before de-
ciding to use the Aladdin Com-
pany.
Bailey chose the Aladdin
cup because of its foam insula-
tion rather than the air insula-
tion of the other cups.
"It keeps hot drinks hot-
ter and cold drinks colder for a
longer period of time Bailey
said.
Once the cup was chosen,
all that was left was to decide
on a logo and a color.
"We wanted something
kind of classy Bailey said.
"Something that people would
not be ashamed to carry
around
Bailey tried white but de-
cided that it would get dirty too
fast. He decided on the purple
and gold with the ECU emblem
on one side. The other side car-
See Recycling page 2
SGA tables resolution to boycott clubs I University, Greenville
� prepare for Halloween
By Elizabeth Shimmel
Assistant News Editor
A new SCA resolution is
causing campus controversy, de-
spite the fact that SGA has not yet
voted on it.
David Tyre, president of Al-
lied Blacks for Leadership Excel-
lence (ABLE), said the resolution
calls for the support of SGA in
solving the problem of racial dis-
crimination in downtown bars.
One way supporters of the
resolution hope to overcome the
problem is by promoting a cam-
pus-wide boycott of the down-
town bars on Halloween night.
However, the resolution was
tabled at theSG A meetingon Mon-
day and will not be brought up
again until the next SGA meeting
on Nov. 2.
The resolution was tabled to
give the ABLE student leaders
enough time to work out the de-
tails of the resolution.
Students who went to the
meeting to show their support
were disappointed that they did
not get a response to the ABLE
resolution.
"Many of the minority stu-
dents came there expecting some
kind of answer to this dilemma
and were not given one Tyre
said. "Many of them wanted to
know if the SGA president was
willing to support and represent
the interests of all students
"(S( .A President) Courtney
Jones acknowledged that she
knew of a case i rf discrimination
Tyre said "When I asked her if
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
Vi
Allied Blacks for Leadership and Excellence cent a re:
of downtown bars on Halloween The resolution states th
we decided to picket, would
she hold a sign, and she an
swered 'yes
1 yresaid his organization
is happy with this support from
Jones even though she cannot
express upport for the resolu-
tion on behalt o( S( ,A.
"( ourtnev proved herself
to be a president wh i truly ha �
the interest of E I studei
mind and is willing to h t as an
individual it it will rigl
wrong, lyre s lid
id h
tion wants eve
support thi
supportofall
itie I; i
think that i
( ,nvn ille
effe ti
hopes ti � gain
After three years of down-
town Halloween drought, the
ghosts and goblins will onceagain
rule Greenville, as the celebra-
tion has been reinstated this year.
In order to protect these
demons the Student Govern-
ment Association has worked in
conjunction with the Downtown
Association of
Restaurants and
r a v e r n s
U), local
legislators and
law enforcement
officials to enact
standards to in-
sure the safety of
those enjoying
the night's fes-
tivities.
(urtney
ones,SGA presi-
dent, said she
wants students to be aware ol her
organization's involvement in
Halloween's return to down-
town.
"We have been trying to ap-
proach this situation in a respon-
sible way she said "Only by
kvorkii � ifficials,can
this year's Halloween be a suc-
( n u. lonesand other
student government representa-
pro al ol a pro
il drafted to Ireem illei hief
of Police Charles Hinman that
stated his department's position
on the handling of the celebration.
The proposal stated three objec-
tives that he said his officers and
everyone downtown should as-
pire to: normalcy, safety, and re-
sponsibility.
ECU Public Safety Lt. Keith
Knox said he feels it is important
for students to be responsible on
this night so that safety can be
achieved.
T iJi; Vif "I think,as
Kjniy uy a rule stUdents
working with 7"
police officials, Knox said
"Hopefully,stu-
dents will ap-
proach Hallow-
een with a per-
spective of ma-
turity"
Knox said
he understood
that many of the
problems that occurred during
past Halloweens were direct!)
caused bv influences outside of
the student population. He said
he hoped that ECU students would
attempt to monitor unlawful ac-
tivities bv outsiders this year.
he downtown Halloween
celebration, an ECU tradition that
dates back to the early 70s, grew
to be legendary in the region and
attracted hordes of outsiders to
can this year's
Halloween be a
success'
Courtney Jones
SGA President

See Halloween page 7





2
OCTOBER 22. 1992
The East Carolinian
crimhSENE
Oct. 18,1992
Ninth and Cotanche Street parking lot
A student reported the attempted larceny of her vehicle.
An officer found the door of the vehicle had been unlocked
without a key, and the ignition was tampered with in an effort to
straight wire the vehicle.
White Hall-first floor
Three male non-students were caught in White Hall and
approached outside of the building. They said they had been
invited into the dorm by an unnamed female where they called a
taxi cab to take mem home. All three of them were charged with
first-degree trespassing.
College Hill Drive
A non-student was pulled over by an officer because he
was exceeding the speed limit. The officer smelled alcohol on the
suspect's breath. The suspect was given a breathalyzer test and
was then arrested for a DWI.
Oct. 17,1992
Campus
A 13-year-old male suspect was riding a bicycle with an
ECU registration sticker on it when he was recognized by an
officer as being previously banned from campus. The bicycle had
been reported as stolen from a student, and the suspect was
arrested.
Ficklen Stadium
A female was standing in line waiting for the women's
restroom when a female suspect cut in front of her. She ap-
proached the suspect, and the suspect punched her in the mouth.
She did not sustain any serious injuries and declined medical
treatment.
Ficklen Stadium
An officer on duty in the football ticket window saw a
suspec ut a gun inside of his shirt. Upon contacting the suspect,
a BB gun was found on his person. The gun was loaded and the
suspect was banned from campus.
Ficklen Stadium
A student seated in the stands of Ficklen Stadium was
observed throwing up. When approached, the student was not
cooperative and was escorted out of the game. He was charge
with being intoxicated and disruptive.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmef.
Taken from ECU Public Safety crime reports.
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Recycling
Continued from page 1
ries the logo "East Carolina Uni-
versity Recycles
Students can purchase the
cups for $2.99 each. The cups
come with a coupon for a free
mug of fountain drink or coffee
and refills on each subsequent
visit are only 59 cents.
The reusable cups replace
the wax-coated paper cups that
are currently used. Because of
their wax coating, the cups can-
not be recycled.
The campus dining services
introduced the cups during fresh-
man orientation over the summer.
"They have been really suc-
cessful Bailey said. "We have
sold over 5,000 cups so far
According to Bailey, cam-
pus dining services is thinking of
changing the design on the reus-
able cups each year. The cups
would be introduced each sum-
mer during freshman orientation.
The reusable cups are not
theonly recycling efforts on cam-
pus. According to George
Armistead, hazardous waste
manager, cardboard, plastic, alu-
minum and all types of paper
products are also recycled.
By law, ECU is required to
recycle plastics, even though re-
cycling centers do not currently
purchase plastic products. Paper,
cardboard and aluminum are
purchased either by the pound
or by hundreds of pounds.
Because ECU hauls its own
garbage to the recycling center,
the money made from recycling
is used for the maintenance of
vehicles within the department
of environmental health and
safety.
"We recycle' anything we
can get easily Armistead said.
A special recycling effort is
going on during the month of
October. ECU is recycling all old
phone books, bound journals,
magazines, hard-back and paper-
back books.
The department of environ-
mental health and safety also re-
cycles hazardous waste on cam-
pus such as used oil and mercury.
These hazardous materi-
als are shipped off for treatment
under specifications of the Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency
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and rendered non-hazardous so
they will not leak in concrete
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SGA
Continued from page 1
dents, and he feels it is time to
take action.
"Many people look at this
and ask why minorities don't stop
going to the bars to party Tyre
said. "I answer that by saying
our argument is not for the right
to party, it is for the freedom to
go where every other student can
go and to be treated with the
same respect
According to Tyre, ABLE is
hoping for a smooth solution to
the problem but will wait to see
what will happen.
"If the problem is not re-
solved, we are definitely going
to take some kind of action Tyre
said. "But at this time, we are
trying to avoid that
Due to
circumstances
beyond my
control, there
will be no
news writers
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3
OCTOBER 22, 1992
Alcohol drug of choice on college campuses
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Alcohol is the drug of choice
on college campuses, and prob-
lem drinking is a major concern
with college students.
Surveys throughout the na-
tion have estimated that 75 per-
cent to 95 percent of college stu-
dents have drank during the past
year, compared to the estimated
65 percent in the general popula-
tion.
Campus statistics have also
revealed that alcohol is involved
in almost two-thirds of all violent
behavior and almost half of all
physical injuries. Alcohol alsocon-
tributes to roughly one-third of all
emotional difficulties and almost
30 percent of academic problems.
Of the total college popula-
tion, an estimated 20 percent are
identified as problem drinkers.
Problem drinkers are people who
consume five or more drinks in
one sitting at least once a week.
College students can gauge
their dependence on alcohol by
studying the four phases of drink-
ing by E.M. Jellinek, "The Father
of Alcoholism.
� First or prealcoholic phase
� The person's drinking is so-
cially motivated and develops into
a means of handling stress.
� Second orpredromal phase
� Blackouts frequently occur and
the individual starts "sneaking"
drinks before or during the party.
Alcohol is now a "need
� Third or crucial phase �
Loss of control becomes more ob-
vious, the drinker begins to ratio-
nalize his or her drinking and so-
cial relationships begin to deterio-
rate. The drinker is likelv to be
hospitalized for alcohol-related
problems and morning drinking
may occur during this phase.
� Fourth or chronic phase �
Drinking has become a dav-long
activity, making social interaction
more difficult. Also, the fourth
phase is marked physical changes
and rationalization becomes un-
successful.
If a person thinks that some-
one they know has a drin ki ng prob-
lem, other signs exist that may help
them tell:
� Drinking to the point of
intoxication.
� Trouble with the law as a
result of drinking.
� Denies the possibility of a
drinking problem.
� Going to class while un-
der the influence.
Note: These signs do not
"diagnose" a problem but are
merely warning signs.
Alcohol not only affects the
user but also the people around
that person.
Various resources around
campus and Greenville are avail-
able to offer assistance in any alco-
hol-related problems. On campus,
the counseling center, the campus
ministry and the office of health
promotion and well-being all pro-
vide assistance to students.
Alcohol Drinking Patterns Quiz
1. Which sex, males or females, are more likely to
be nondriukers?
2. Which race has the highest consumption rate?
3. Alcohol use increases with more or less educa
tion?
4. What percentage of Americans drink?
5. What percentage of adolescents (14-17 yrs.) has
a serious drinking problem?
6. An alcoholic's life expectancy is shortened by
how many years?
7. In general, alcohol consumption in the U.S. is
increasing or decreasing?
8. What percentage of college students have a
drinking problem?
9. What is the leading cause of death and spinal
cord injury for young Americans?
10. About what percentage of the total adult
population are problem drinkers?
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�-
4
OCTOBER 22, 1992
Professor spends summer in Greenland
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
An ECU biology professor
spent his summer in northeast
Greenland researching the food
chain in the Arctic Ocean.
Dr. William Ambrose Jr. re-
searched the food chain within a
polynya, an area of open water
that is surrounded by 100 percent
ice cover. During the summer
months, from early April until late
August, portions of the ice melt to
form a large body of water, or a
polynya.
Polynyas occur in about the
same location each year and are
scattered throughout the Arctic.
Because they provide a means of
survival for the plant and animal
life within this frigid area, polyn-
yas have attracted the attention of
scientists all over the world.
Ambrose describes polynyas as
"hot spots of productivity
In late August and early Sep-
tember, the polynyas begin to
freeze over for the winter. Ac-
cording to Ambrose, it does not
really matter that the polynyas
are frozen during the winter
months because there is no sun-
light during this time. In summer
months, however, the sun shines
24 hours a day.
Polynyas have existed for so
long mat Eskimos once colonized
around these life-giving bodies of
water.
Ambrose said he has been
fascinated by polynyas for a num-
ber of years and came up with
some interesting questions about
them. He said he heard about an
international effort being
launched to send researchers to
Greenland and began writing let-
ters to the proper officials. He was
invited to join a grou p of oceanog-
raphers that would be doing re-
search aboard the Polar Sea, a U.S.
Coast Guard ice breaker.
Ambrose was part of a team
of about32 scientists that included
principle investigators, graduate
students and technicians.
According to Ambrose, the
cruise left in mid-July and ended
five weeks later. Its mission was to
look at the polynya on the north-
east continental shelf of
Greenland.
Ambrose said there are two
important reasons that polynyas
are important. The first reason is
because they are models of global
warming. If global warming actu-
allv takes place as predicted, the
ice on the continental shelves of
the Arctic Ocean will melt.
"It is a chance to see what the
shelves will look like before the ice
melts Ambrose said.
The second reason Ambrose
said he finds the polynyas inter-
esting is because they may play
an important role in gas exchange
between the atmosphere and the
water.
Water takes carbon dioxide
out of the atmosphere, and some
of the water comes from under the
polar ice caps and combines with
the water in the polynya. Scien-
tists are studying how this par-
ticular gas exchange could affect
the earth's atmosphere.
Ambrose, a biological ocean-
ographer and benthic ecologist,
said he was interested in studying
the organisms on the bottom of
the polynya and the animals that
feed on them.
He said when the ice melts
in May, the system opens up and
plant growth begins. It starts with
a small plant form called phyto-
plankton, which drifts to the bot-
tom of the polynya.
While a lot of the phyto-
plankton are consumed by animal
life called zooplankton, much of
them fall to the bottom. There the
phytoplankton are consumed by
organisms at the bottom of Ihe
system.
The organisms are con-
sumed, in turn, by larger organ-
isms throughout the polynya.
Ambrose said he is also in-
terested in the distribution within
the polynya and the abundance of
the animals within the food chain.
He said he wants to see how the
distribution relates to the produc-
tivity of the water community and
the structure and function it plays.
Ambrose also wants to re-
search the carbon distribution.
Once carbon is taken out of the
atmosphere, how does it affect the
plant and animal life? How far
does it exist within the food chain?
Ambrose wants to help find the
answers to these questions.
"It's exhausting work
Ambrose said. "But you do it be-
cause you like the science
Scientists used a variety of
instruments to measure the atmo-
sphere, water currents, tempera-
ture of both the water and the
atmosphere and to collect samples
of organisms and their environ-
ments. The scientists will share
the data the collect to help other
scientists with their research.
Ambrose said the work only
begins with the research in
Greenland.
"It's exciting being on a big
ship Ambrose said. "But there
is more work to be done when you
get back home
In order to continue doing
research, Ambrose will continue
to study the samples he collected
and report his results. He said
this is where the hard work and
long hours come in.
"A lot of people don't real-
ize the hard work that goes into
the work back home he said.
The work Ambrose did over
the summer also carries over into
theclassroom. He said theprojects
he works on have a lot ot impact
on his classes. In turn, his classes
help generate future research
ideas.
Ambrose said many people
think that research and teaching
are not compatible, but that is not
true.
"I take my experiences and
what I learn out (in the Arctic)
back to the classroom Ambrose
said.
A scientist or a teacher can-
not keep current in his field with-
out doing research in the field, he
said. It takes a lot of lab experience
and a lot of project experience.
DIR PRODUCTIONS PRESENT
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Prices Effective Through October 27, 1992
Prices In The Ad Effective Wednesday, October 2 1 Through Tuesday, October 2, 1992 � .ville Store
Only. We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None SoldTo Dealers. We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps.
t





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in MM iiwi4i ���
�MraHMWWM
77ig ffasf Carolinian
October 22, 1992
Opinion
Page 5
Halloween comes back to Greenville
For the first time in three years, down-
town bars and restaurants will open their
doors this upcoming Halloween night.
In the past, Greenville has been widely
known � in and out of the state � as a
party school. Halloween night was the
prime example behind this image. High
school students would see it sometimes
on MTV and would base their decision to
come here on that party, all-the-fun-you-
could-ever-want perception.
When the city of Greenville closed the
downtown area in the school year of 1989-
90 because of violence, the party atmo-
sphere just moved to a different setting.
That year, students gathered at the Tar
River Apartments to continue this annual
tradition.
Greenville Police officers showed up
with riot gear and tear-gas, arresting
roughly 150 people under charges such
as failure to disperse and public drunk-
enness.
For the next two years, Halloween
faded into the background, living under-
ground with very little attention or press
given to it. Now that the Downtown As-
sociation of Restaurants and Taverns
(DART) has decided to be open for the
Halloween season, talk has erupted once
again about the safety of students and
non-students alike.
DART has agreed that there will be no
glass containers during Halloween week.
Bars will serve their drinks and bever-
ages in plastic cups or aluminum cans.
Also, there will be no "live entertain-
ment" advertisements or drink specials
offered until Nov. 1.
DART has proposed that this upcom-
ing Halloween will be a "normal week-
CAMgjjS SPECTRUM Courtesy the city of GreenvilleECUDart
Celebrate safely this Halloween
Halloween is a festive time.
Young children are excited about
their costumesand trick-or-treat-
ing. The university is looking
forward to its first nationally tele-
vised football game. Halloween
is fun. Unfortunately, some past
Halloweens in Greenville have
not been fun. Parrying led to vio-
lence. The Greenville Police De-
partment has an obligation to
insure that everyone in the com-
munity is safe. The university
has an obligation to insure ev-
eryone on campus is safe. We
also have an obligation to avoid
disruption of the community, to
include downtown Greenville.
The past three years have been
peaceful. Our sincere hope is mat
this year will be the same.
The primary concern is the
safety of everyone. Halloween
is a normal day downtown. The
bars will be open and 1 iquor laws
will be enforce the same as nor-
mal . The streets will be open and
traffic will be flowing as normal.
Consumption of alcohol on the
streets and sidewalks will be pro-
hibited as normal. There are no
special exemptions from the law
because it is Halloween. TheGre-
enville Police Department and
supporting agencies w ill enforce
the law as normal. But as is nor-
mal, the law will be enforced
with common sense.
Normalcy: Oct. 31st will be a
normal Saturday night in Gre-
enville. The crowd may be larger,
but the rules are the same. The
streets are open. Traffic will be
flowing. Have fun, but be safe
and be careful.
Safety: Halloween is a time
of celebration. But celebrate
safely and with restraint. Safety
is of paramount concern. Drive
carefully because children will
be out in large numbers. Many
children may not see traffic and
dart across the street. Be careful.
Protect our children.
Young adults and adults
must also be protected on Hal-
loween. Driving under the influ-
ence will be an area of special
enforcement emphasis to pro-
tect everyone on the streets and
highways. Assaultive behavior
will be another area of special
enforcement emphasis to pro-
tect everyoneon the streets. Since
alcohol makes people vulnerable
as victims or causes others to be
out of control, enforcement of
alcohol laws will also be an area
of special enforcement empha-
sis. Drugs will also receive spe-
cial emphasis. All necessary ac-
tions to protect life and property
will be taken. The goal is to have
a safe and pleasant Halloween.
Responsibility: There must
be a balance between fun and
responsibility. The Greenville
Police Department, the City of
Greenville, East Carolina Uni-
versity,the Downtown Area Res-
taurant and Tavern owners as-
sociation, Student Government
and many other groups are
working closely together to de-
velop a climate ot cooperation to
insure a safe Halloween. The
Downtown bars are seeking re-
sponsibility from their patrons
in the consumption of alcohol.
The university is planning alter-
native activities on campus.
Good lines of communica-
tion have been established be-
tween students and the police.
Both are working together to
develop a spirit of pride and co-
operation. Everyone must use
common sense to insure a safe
weekend.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmei, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'1, Assistant Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the ECU since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU students. The East
Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion
of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should be limited to
250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed To the Editor. The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU Greenville N C
27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
end just like any other that might occur
in Greenville.
Along with the downtown area, the
Mendenhall Student Center will keep its
doors open until 4 a.m. to hold various
activities designed to provide an alterna-
tive for students going downtown.
Movies, ranging from In Cold Blood to
Evil Dead, Part 2, will run from 8 p.m. to 2
a.m. and various bands will play through
the night. Other events, like "A Night at
the Races" and "Blizzard for Bucks will
be held at various locations inside Men-
denhall. Door-prizes, raffles and costume
contests will round out the night's festivi-
ties.
Organizations around campus are
majorly supporting this alternative Hal-
loween event. Campus Dining (ARA), Uni-
versity Housing, Student Health Services
and the Dean of Students office are just a
few of the groups devoting their time and
resources in order to promote the event.
The university is trying to provide some-
thing for the students � alcohol-free �
that will give them a good time without
the risks of going downtown.
The potential for danger and harm this
upcoming Halloween is great. With the
vast amount of people who go downtown
' regularly, coupled with the new students
who have heard all the outrageous stories
of past Halloweens, downtown will be a
potential powder keg ready to explode at
the slightest spark.
Moderation and common sense are the
two keys to surviving this upcoming Hal-
loween. Have a designated driver if you're
going out drinking, don't walk alone late
at night and have a good time without
hurting yourself.
JOE OF ALL TRADES
Quote of
the Day:
The circumstances of
the world are
continually
changing, and the
opinions of men
change also; and as
Government is for
living, and not for
the dead, it is the
living only that have
any right in it.
Thomas.
Paine,
The
Rights of
Man
By Joe Horst
976 numbers waste viewers' time
(The following should be
heard in the reader's mind as a
soft and seductive female voice.)
"Feeling lonely?
"Need a friend?
"Then we're right here for you.
976-NEED. Wondrous, friendly
women just waiting to hear from
some manly, macho stud like your-
self. Ready and willing to fulfill
your greatest desire, our girls will
make you feel needed, loved and
� best of all � sexually frus-
trated
The camera pans to some in-
credibly sexy woman laughing
and having a great time on the
telephone. As she smiles broadly
and sways in a way that no human
could ever hope to accomplish (or
would want to), the sultry
announcer's voice comes back to
haunt the voyeur oh, sorry, the
watcher.
"976-NEED. When you're
feeling down or just want to hear
a friendly voice. Call us and we'll
brighten your day. $1.95 a minute,
minimum of 10 minutes, please
And to cap it off, they throw
in that wonderful (and always so
effective) warning � "Over 18
only, please
� Reality check
Now that's what you see if
you're watching TV around mid-
night or one in the morning.
But, in reality, (that wondrous
world that we live in) what's she
really look like?
Youseea middle-aged house-
wife with a bandanna on her head,
a sizzling skillet in one hand and a
cigarette in the other. Her three-
year-old daughter pulls inces-
santly on her apron hem, loudly
demanding a cookie in that stri-
dent, ear-piercing tone that only
three-year-olds can achieve.
The phone rings, eliciting a
hoarse grunt from the housewife
mat could be loosely interpreted
as the clearing of a throat.
"Hello The silky voice com-
ing from that nicotine-ridden
mouth would make the jaw drop
on any man in a hundred-mile
radius.
She takes a drag on the ciga-
rette and rolls her eyes, pushing
her child away so she can fulfill
some pervert's wild fantasy once
again.
"Oh yeah, I'msohotforyou
I'm tingling all over I can't get
enough
� Round and round she goes,
where she stops
The big question that comes
to my mind when I see these ad-
vertisements (and I use mat term
loosely) is this: Why?
Better yet, who's stupid
enough to spend $20 (or more) on
a phone call that is designed to get
a person off over a long-distance
line?
If you watch some of the cable
channels or late-night TV with any
regularity, you can't help but see
these hilarious and ridiculous
things. Does anyone actually be-
lieve that these gorgeous women
are just sitting by the phone wait-
ing for someone on the phone to
them?
"We'rewaiting thecommer-
cial breathes seductively. Yeah,
right. The only thing they're wait-
ing for is the fulfillment of P. T.
Bamum's infamous statement �
"There's a sucker born every
minute He must be right, though,
because more and more of these
idiotic ads are showing up.
Look, I've got nothing against
freedom of expression or freedom
of speech. Hell, would I really be
working at mis newspaper if I did?
You're entitled to your opinion
and your business just like I am.
But vhen it hits a country-wide
scale like it does with TV, I think
we're pushing that envelope just a
wee bit, laddies.
� So much to do, so little time.
Let me put this really simple
for those lip-movers when you
read out there: Get it off the TV
Find someplace else to advertise
for some free (or not so free) ex-
citement. Mind you, I'm not say-
ingoutlawitentirety�what's the
point? Everybody knows that the
more you say something is bad or
dirty, the more people who've
never heard of it will want to ex-
perience it So put it where it be-
longs.
If I remember correctly, you
can get a hell of a lot more of these
numbers from a magazine like
Playboy or Penthouse if you really
have to have them. So spend $4 on
the latest one and get this stuff off
the airwaves.
C'mon people, lef s get those
housewives doing something
more productive than titillating
some insecure pervert. Hey, I
know, what about buying items
over the phone to replace this
phone sex?
Nah, you're right, it'd never
work.
LETTERS TO THE EDITORS
Housing renovates Garrett workout room
To the Editor:
Over the pastcoupleof years,
several articles have appeared in
The East Carolinian regardingour
residence hall fitness centers, but
not once has the Department of
University Housing been men-
tioned in these feature articles. I
feel obligated to give credit where
it is due regarding the renova-
tions the Garrett Hall fitness cen-
ter featured in your Oct. 15th edi-
tion. RHA is a worthy organiza-
tion, but had nothing to do with
the renovations to Garrett's Pipe-
line Pumphouse. The renovations
and new equipment purchases
for this facility were a joint ven-
ture of the Departments of Uni-
versity Housing and Recre-
ational Services, and reflect stu-
dent rent fees and activity fees at
work.
University Housing made
the decision to invest over
$12,000 in physical renovation
costs, and split over $21,000 in
fitness equipment costs with Rec-
reational Services. The Univer-
sity Housing Maintenance Team
and student paint crew knocked
out walls, repaired and painted
the entire facility, while housing
staff coordinated the installation
of carpet and gym tile. The Rec-
reational Services staff provided
expertise and assistance with all
equipment purchases and instal-
lation. In addition to Garrett, the
Aycock Pipeline Pumphouse was
created and equipped last year
at a cost of $36,000 and there are
no plans to renovate this new
facility in the near future. Both
facilities are some of the finest
on campus, and both depart-
ments are very proud of the co-
operative spirit thathas resulted
in such popular facilities that
support wellness on our cam-
pus.
Inez Fridley
Associate Director
University Housing
SGA encourages safe Halloween this year
To the Editor:
The SGA hopes everyone is
having a terrific fall semester. Not
since 1988 have the students had
the privilege of attending the tra-
ditional Halloween party in down-
town Greenville. After a year of
meetings with city and university
officials, weareconvinced that Hal-
loween deserves another chance.
SGA, Panhellenic and 1FC rep-
resentatives have worked very
hard trying to show that the ECU
students are not the problem. The
city officials understand that most
of the problems in downtown Gre-
enville on Halloween night are
related to visitors such as Marines,
high school students and visiting
college students.
The message from the city and
the ECU student body is that we
want to work together � not
against each other. So far, this

message has been embraced and
as a result we have gotten our
tradition back.
Let's show the city that not
only are we not the problem, but
we are a part of the solution. All
that we have to do is keep things
under control. That doesn't mean
don'tdrinkor party, itmeans drink
and party responsibly.
A. Keith Dyer
SGA vice president

v 3





m
- urn�h innjwt1
' " , i� in i 11 m
fii In ' i i mil
OCTOBER 22, 1992
FOR RENT
FOR SALE
The East Carolinian
�ABaaaarMMMMHl
ii-mi in
Classifieds
HELP WANTED
LOST AND FOUND
PERSONALS
PERSONALS
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS: 1 and 2 bedroom
apartments. Energy-efficient,
several locations in town. Car-
peted, kitchen appliances,
some water and sewer paid,
washerdryer hookups. Call
752-8915.
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Roommate needed to share a
two-bedroom town house
apartment. Rent is $160 a
month and half electricity.
Contact: Stacy Peterson - Car-
riage House Aprs Apt 60 -
321-1532 (leave a message)
APARTMENT FOR RENT.
One bedroom, $275 a month. 4
blocks from campus, energy
efficient, free basic cable,
washerdryer hookups. Avail-
able January 1 (nego.) Apt 3
Captain's Quarter. Call 830-
6902.
ROOMMATE WANTED:
Roommate needed to take over
lease in January in house. 1
block form campus. Own room
$145.00 month, 15 utilities.
Call 'She' for details. (919) 758-
2590.
LOOKING FOR ROOM-
MATE. Wistful Vista. One
block from campus. Spacious
apartment, large kitchen, hard-
wood floors, partially fur-
nished. Rent $175month & 1
2 utilities. Need by November
1st. Call Karen or Mary at 830-
9450.
ROOMMATE WANTED IM-
MEDIATELY" Tar River ApLs,
$130.00month; 13 utilities,
partially furnished; good loca-
tion. Call 830-1873, ask for Jor-
dan.
FOR SALE
GOVERNMENT SEIZED
CARS, trucks, boats, 4wheel-
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DEA. Available in your area
now. Call 1-800-333-3737 ext.
C-5999.
ARE YOU SCARED of walk-
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attack? Then buy the quorum
PAAL: Personal Attack Alarm.
Once activated the PAAL emits
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alarm that scares off attackers.
Call 758-6425 for more info.
SUBARU 1989 GL 4 door, au-
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and locks. Excellent condition.
Qneowner. $4,150.00.756-2723.
PAY IN-STATE TUITION?
Read Residency Status and
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written by an attorney on the
in-state residency application
process. For Sale: Student
Stores, Wright Building.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
CONDO: one bedroom un t.
Children out of school, 1 want
to sell fast. Call (919) 847-1557
Raleigh, NC.
FOR SALE: Microwave for
sale. Great for dorms. Great
shape. 830-9442. $25.00.
'82 BUICK REGAL, V-6, Auto.
Trans. AMFM Cas power
steering, power brakes, power
windows, air conditioning, in
good condition. $1500.00 obo.
(919) 735-2567 (Goldsboro).
PASSES FOR SALE: Up to 8
grass passes. Good for any
concert at Walnut Creek $20
each (neg) 758-6180. Also good
for bad Compny concert. 758-
6180
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For free information, contact:
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703 Ninth Street. Suite 233. Durham.
NC 27705-4802. (919) 493-0343.
HELP WANTED
STUDENTS OR ORGANI-
ZATIONS. Promote our
Florida Spring Break packages.
Earn money and free trips. Or-
ganize small or large groups.
Call Campus Marketing. 1-
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$$ $, FREE TRAVEL AND
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Many positions. Great ben-
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WORK AT HOME; Assem-
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CALL FOR ENTRIES
ECU Literary and Art Competition
Sponsored by REBEL '93 Magazine
CASH PRIZES GUARANTEED PUBLICATION IN REBEL 93
CATEGORIES: �Poetry � Prose �Fine Arts � Applied Arts
Entry Deadline: November 4,1992, 5:00 p.m.
Addrtional Information available at the Rebel office in the Purtcatton BuRcing
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LOST KITTY: White calico with
patch on one eye; no collar. Last
seen 1017 near Cotten on cam-
pus. Please Help! Call 757-0511
or 830-0552.
PERSONALS
LADIES: Let's Transcend the
meaningless and trivial, life can
be so mystical. Let me shine some
love and light in your life. Write.
HAWK, PO Box 8663, Green-
ville, NC 27835.
SINCE YOU SINGLE AND
LIKE TO MINGLE; come to a
FREE Bowling Party at East
Carolina Bowl, 700 Red Banks
Road. RSVPwithSheri. 355-5510.
WRITERPHILOSOPHER
MUSICIAN AND POETIC
SOUL seeks friendship and cor-
respondence from like-minded
lady. Photos and letters to MV,
PO Box 8663, Greenville, NC
27835.
ATTN: UNDERGRADUATE
AND GRADUATE STU-
DENTS: This advertisement is a
survey to ask for your individual
or group response to a service
that would be made available
for you if there is sufficient inter-
est. The service would be named
Collegiate Introductions and
would be designed for people
who would like to meet some-
one with common interest and
who are looking for more than
one night stands or casual sex. If
you would benefit from this ser-
vice send you r written comments
to Jeffrey T. Jones P.O. Box 281
Greenville NC 27853. mark your
response male, female, sorority,
fraternity or student organiza-
tion.
PETE'S INVITATIONAL BAS-
KETBALL TOURNAMENT.
November 6-8. Single Elimina-
tion�Deadline for entry is Nov
5. Entry fee$100.00. Tournament
site John Small School (formerly
P.S. Jones) 1st and 2nd place tro-
phies awarded. For more infor-
mation, contact Mr. Jerome
Branch (919) 975-6854 or Chas
Mitch'l (919) 757-0418.
CONGRATULATIONS
BROOKE DRISKELL�ECU
Homecoming Queen! We're so
happy for you! Love, Your Al-
pha Delta Pi Sisters.
KAPPA ALPHA: We hada great
time at our Pre-downtown last
Thursday! Let's get together
again soon. Love, ALPHA
DELTA PI.
CONGRATULATIONS TO
REN A S ALAMEH�1 st runner-
up and to TRISTIN JONES�
Homecoming Court. We're so
proud of you! Love, your Alpha
Delta Pi Sisters.
ALPHA DELTA PI wishes ev-
eryone a safe and happy Fall
Break!
KARA KOWALSKI. Happy
20th Birthday. I hope you have
an awesome B-Day. I'm going to
do everything I can to make it a
day you'll never forget. I love
you. MARK.
Ave formosissma, gemma
pretiosa, ave mundi luminar, ave
mundi rosa. Chum, geselle min,
in enbite harte din, Suzer
rosenvarwer munt. Chum unde
mache mich gesunt. Suzer
rosenvarwer munt.
THETA CHI�Whether it was
making trashbag footballs, stuf f-
ingchickenwireortryingtofind
the Pi�we still manage to have
a great time. Thanks for all of
the helpwork on our FIRST
PLACE homecoming float!
Love, Alpha Omicron Pi.
ALPHA OMICRON PI�It all
began on a warm Fri. night. It
was off the 4th Stno one put up
a fight. Between the 2 "cakes"
we were guaranteed to have fun
and fortunately at 9:00 the buses
made there run. It was off to
Kinston we were destined to
go, exactly what happened to
Bonnie no one seemed to know.
But, the ride was short and the
party continued on, I think we
could have done the line dance
until dawn. It seemed Beth and
Don were happy, need I say
more and we couldn't keep
Stacy off of the floor. And when
the music stopped it was time to
find Toretch's date. I guess the
'Cincinnati bus was destined to
be his fate! So Kate, all we can
say.is THANKS for making
cocktail ahit, proving once again
Alpha Omicron Pi formals are
definitely the shit!
NICOLE FEDERINKO�
Thanks for organizing a great
field day. We love you�Jr.
Panhellenic.
TO ALL OF THE SORORI-
TIES�Thanks for coming out
for field day. we had a great
time. Hope to see you all again
soon. Jr. Panhellenic.
LORI JUSTIS. Our one year
anniversary is today, and I hope
to have many more of them in
the future. I Love You! Bryan.
DELTA ZETA: We would like
to thank you for informing us of
the Lavaliere given by a brother
to Lori Justis. We hope you en-
joyed the visit form us and
"Pumpkin Head Love Delta
Sig.
DELTA SIG: Get ready for to-
night! Stranger Mixer will be a
blast!
PHI MU ALPHA: Thanks for
the serenade on Monday night.
Come back at Christmas for a
carol or two and maybe we'll
even sing to you Love, the Sis-
ters of Alpha Phi.
ALPHA PHI'S: Camille set the
mood inviting the bus drivers
for food but no. . .they weren't
rude. As we were riding along,
just sing our songs we all got a
kick out of Cathy getting sick.
Meanwhile Lara almost cried
when the cop thought she lied
(by the way where was your
I.D.?) Parker don't fear you can
wear that dress next year, home-
coming was great for the '92
year. Get ready Phi's cause
Stranger is near.
CONGRATULATIONS Lori
Oates for 2nd runner up on
HomecomingCourt. Love, your
Sisters in Alpha Phi.
E.S.P.N. YOUR FACE with the
Announcements
newstudentPirateClub!�come
out and help make banners and
signs! Free Pizza and
B.Y.O.Beverage! 8:00 pm Wecj-
Oct. 28 at the Pirate Club Social
Room.
R�Although we're 21 now, ypji
know they'll find another wiay
to get us. But for now, we'll for-
get about them and have a good
time. Happy Birthday!�C ;j�
, D
ROBYN SMOLEN, you did a
great job representing us,in
Homecoming. We're all very
proud of you! We Love You! The
Sigmas.
CONGRATULATIONS to tijye
Pirates. You did a great job this
weekend! Keep up the good
work. Love, the Sigmas.
KAPPA SIGMAS: We had �
blast at the roller boogie! Wfc
made it without any brokejn
bones! Love, the Delta Zetas. f

TO THE PLEDGES OF DELT�
ZETA: You did a great job on th�
house decorations for homeconj-
ing! Congrats on 2ndplace! Love,
the Sisters. ' "
J
ZETA SISTERS: We're looking
forward to tonight's Big Sister
Hunt! Love, the Pledges.
PHI KAPPA PSI mid-semester
Rush Wednesday Oct.28 arid
Thursday Oct.29. See us in froflt
of the Student Stores for detaits.
I
ATTN ALPHA DELTA PI: Get
ready for tonight! Don't forget
the Boone's Farm. Love trje
Brothers and Pledges of Kappa
Sigma.
ATTN: Kappa Sigma. It was Sat-
urday morning atl 1 am. All wete
hungover and ready to begin.
The pigs were roastin and drinks
did flow, with pints in our pants
to Ficklen we did go. The Pirates
against the Bearcats, we knefv
we would win, 42-21 was almofct
a sin. Brooke was crownad
Homecoming Queen and Shel
made sure that he was seen. Bafk
to the house the Kappa Sig's arfld
their date did flee, to jam with
Roily Gray till way past threSe.
The Red Stripe was plenty ancta
high time was had by all J
Rockin Reggae Homecomiifg
was definitely a ball.
I
CONGRATULATIONS fo
Brooke Driskill on beirjg
crowned the 1992-93 Homecom-
ing Queen. Thanks for represerft-
ing us! Love the Brothers art!
Pledges of Kappa Sigma.
CONGRATULATIONS to t�e
New Sisters of Alpha Delta IJL
Brothers and Pledges of SigrrSa
Phi Epsilon.
CONGRATULATIONS: Sig E
on your championships in A-
team tennis B-team tennis and
A-team football. We're well on
our way to another Chancellors
Cup. Brothers and Pledges jf
Sigma Phi Epsilon.
REGAN: You know you're"
redneck when you're talking j
about a stiff one and you mean
the dead duck you just shot.
j
MO: Three years does not a �
personal make.
:
GREENVILLE AREA BI-
SEXUAL-GAY-LESBIAN
GROUP
Group activities and discus-
sion of issues relating to same-
sex orientation. Meeting are
closed. Call 757-6766 11:00-
12:15 Tues and Thurs or 1-4:00
pm Wed for information.
PHYSICAL THERAPY OPEN
HOUSE
Curious about Physical
Therapy? Bring yourquestions
to the Open House at the Physi-
cal Therapy School Thursday
Oct. 22 7:00-9:00 p.m We are
with giving a tour of our clini-
cal and lab areas with booths
set up to demonstrate fre-
quently used techniques. We
are located on the first floor of
the Belk Building on the corner
of Charles Blvd & Greenville
Blvd. Everyone is welcome.
ECU EQUESTRIAN CLUB
ECU
Equestrian ClubTeam
meeting for all those interested
in the equestrian club or team
on Thursday October 22 in
Mendenhall Rm 14 (basement)
at 5:00 p.m No riding experi-
ence necessary-Everyone wel-
come! For info call Angela 931-
8453 or Holly 931-8752.
HONORS PROGRAM
GRADUATES
All December 1992 gradu-
ating seniors who also expect
to graduate form the Honors
Program (24 s.h. in Honors
courses with grade of B. or
better and 3.4 overall g.p.a.)
should call Dr. Sanders at the
Honors Office (757-6373,
GCB 2026) by the end of Oc-
tober to arrange an exit in-
terview. You will also need
to submit a list of the Honors
courses you have taken.
-
EASTERN CAROLINA
SCHOLARSHIP ASSOCIA-
TION PAGEANT
The Eastern Carolina
Scholarship Association is ac-
cepting applications for the
Miss GreenvillePitt County
Pageant to be held in Janu-
ary. The pageant is an official
Miss America preliminary
and is open to young women
ages 18-24. For further infor-
mation and application
forms, please contact Contes-
tant Co-ordinator Kim Dale
at 746-3171.
THEORY COLLOQUIUM
LECTURE
Modhumita Roy will speak
on Thursday, October 22,1992
at 4:00 p.m. in GCB 2014. The
lecture is called "Englishing
India: The Beginning of English
Education Professor Roy cur-
rently teaches postcolonial lit-
erature at Tufts University. Her
search deals primarily with In-
dian and African writers and
how the English colonial pres-
ence has affected indigenous
culture in India and Africa. She
has published work in Com-
parative Literature, minnisota re-
view, and elsewhere. This lec-
ture is sponsored by the Der
partment of English as part ojf
the Colloquium for Literary
and Critical Theory. It aims .i)
present and inter-disciplinary
group of speakers on current
topics in literary and critical
theory and to foster dialogue
on those topics. Each lecture
will be followed by a short quesr
tion-and-answer period, and
thereafter we will adjourn to
the English faculty lounge foj-
more discussion and refresh
ments. All are welcome to at-
tend. For more information,
please contact Professor Jeff
Williams 757-6388.





iKfi.
OCTOBER 22, 1�U2
1 lit: l.UJ( KtXI UHIHUl
New telecommunication
network ready by '95
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
On Oct. 16, the Board of
Trustees passed a $14 million pro-
posal for a new campus-wide tele-
communications network that
will expand world of communi-
cations on campus.
Director of Telecommunica-
tions Jim Crain said the new sys-
tem will solve ECU's current tele-
communications problems.
This plan will triple the ca-
pabilities of our present system
Crain said.
By 1995, all switches will be
pulled to a main switch and ex-
pand the number of lines from 65
to 150.
A recent tragic study con-
ducted by Crain showed that four
of 100 phone calls can now be
' completed on campus compared
to eight calls out of 100.
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
I
i
L
Crain said he hopes the new
sys tern wil 1 red u ce the n u mber o f
busy signals to one call out of 100.
Currently, four of 100 calls re-
ceive a busy signal, forcing the
caller to dial again.
"The problem with getting
busy signals when dialing in or
out is now cut in half Crain said.
The campus telephone sys-
tem has a switch that is tied to
local network.
"Between us and the out-
side world we can have 121 con-
versations at any one time
Crain said.
Presently there are 16 re-
mote switches in Allied Health,
Sports Medicine, and 15 in
Mendenhall. Only 15 conversa-
tions can go on at one time in the
Allied Health building. Whereas,
the main switch on campus ac-
companies 60 different lines.
Halloween

Continued from page 1
the city. In 1988, violence plagued
the celebration, with numerous ar-
rests and injuries.
Analysis of videotapes and
arrest reports showed that many
offenders at the 1988 celebration
were not ECU students, but Green-
villeauthoritiesstill decided to sus-
pend the event. The following year,
nearly 150 arrests were made at Tar
River estates at a massive party.
Hopes of contin uing thedowntown
celebration were dimmed until a
peaceful 1991 holiday helped to re-
ignite thoughtsofbringingHallow-
een back to downtown.
As the this year's holiday falls
onaweekend,down town merchants
began refusing the city's request to
close their businesses because of the
money they would loose. However,
DART members worked with the
city to make the holiday safe. The
partnership has brought optimism
about this year celebration.
While Knox is optimistic
about this year's celebration, he said
his department would be ready for
any situation that might arise.
"We'll hope for the best, and
prepare for the worst Knox said.
Knox said he agreed with
Hinman's decision to use military
police forces to help control the
downtown crowd. He said he felt
the forces could keep potential
troublemakers from local military
bases under control. The military
officers, along with a full contin-
gent of Greenville and ECU police,
have been instructed to treat the
celebration like any other Saturday
night in Greenville.
DART members have also
done their part to restore normalcy
to the downtown area. The mer-
chants have made resolutions to
keep glass bottles, a source of inju-
ries in the past, off the streets. All
beverages on Halloween will be
served in plastic cups.
DART members have also
suspended advertising for live en-
tertainmentand drink specials dur-
ing the week of the celebration and
will not allow downtown costume
parties or contests.
Asdefined by state liquor laws,
no alcoholic beverages will be al-
lowed in the streets. The president of
mis association, Elbo manager Kirby
Bryson, wrote in a letter to other
downtown members of the associa-
tion askingif DART could doits part
to promote normalcy and safety.
"We will never have to close
ourbusinessesand lose valuable rev-
enue again Bryson wrote.
Greenville Mayor Nancy
Jenkins said she feels the problems
of Halloweens past can be remedied
and this year's celebration will be a
success.
"My primary concern is
safety Jenkins said. "I feel that
with responsiblebehavior there will
be no problem. We don't ever want
to face the mass confusion of the
past
Jenkins said she feels the bad
reputation of ECU students is un-
justified.
"All it takes is one little inci-
dent, one person out of many to ruin
things she said. "This year there
are so many students who have said
they are willing to take the responsi-
bility to watch out for trouble. For
this reason,I feel thecelebration will
go tremendously
Joyce Etheridge
Contemporary Styles of the '90s
at Contemporary Prices
X
10 OFF ALL SERVICES
Shear Hair Design, Inc.
514 14th Street
752-9706 - .
752-9707 Joyce
I
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1
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1


I
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ALFREDO'S
New York Pizza By The Slice
218 E. 5th St.�752-0022
Sun, Men & Tue SPECIAL
Pitchers $1.50
Lunch Special 11-4
Large Cheese Pizza
JmJ� jT jT w' coupon
2 Large Pizzas
with 7 Topping
$.99
with coupon
In The Plaza Food Court
I BURRITO
�CHEESBlIRGER,
! NACHOS&
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& LARGE
DRINK
13.00
with coupon ,

Roving AdverfS .
EAST
CAROLINIAN
919-757-6366
MID-ATLANTIC
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6 To 20 Points
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GREENVILLE S NATURAL FOODS SOURCE
Check our natifral, cruelty-free health and beauty supplies!
� BQPY HAIR CARE
by Mill Creek, Nature's Gate, Kiss My Face,
Aubrey Organics, Rainbow Henna, and Dr. Bronners
COSMETICS
by Beauty Without Cruelty
M
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BLUE PLANETLjfeFoods
ESSENTIAL OILS
by Frontier Herbs
405 EVANS STREET MALL
Hours 10-6,M-Sat
758-0850
Noyv serving Greenville and East Carolina Residents!
KEPLER'S
"YOUR PET SUPPLY DEALER"
HALLOWEEN SPECIAL
For Students
30 MICE for $25.00
-purchase a Mouse Credit Card today!
We carry a full line of Pet Supplies!
KEPLER'S ANIMAL WORLD
RT. 6 BOX 321-E
GREENVILLE, NC 27834
(919) 758-9359 Call Bob or Sue for directions!
DAPPER
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w
Make A
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This
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Halloween
New selection
of masks &
accessories.
"J
417 bans St. Mall
IVmitttnra
752-1750
BUY � SELL � TRADE
Most College Graduates Enter the
Real World As A Sales Representative
After Graduation
You need the experience and we can help you
gain that experience before you graduate.
Qualifications:
�A full-time student with no more
than 15 semester hours of classes
�At least a 2.0 grade point
average
�Your own transportation
�An excellent work ethic and
a willingness to learn
�Available to work about 20
hours per week, Monday
through Friday
�Previous sales experience
is not required
�?????????
The East Carolinian is
currently accepting
applications for
Advertising
Representatives
Please submit resume and application
(iwii'ihihle ill 11f Iift Ciiniiiiiiiit ujfkvs)
to the Advertising Director.
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ATTIC
758-7303
.5th St.
Every
Wednesday
The
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Undefeated, Undisputed!
Thanks For Voting Us
The "Best Place To Hear
Live Music"
19871988�198919901991� 1992
GREENVILLE TIMES READERS' POLL
Thursday, October 22
990 32oz Draft
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The secret of great-looking Skin?
Find the "Perfect Solutions" in your latest Clinique Bonus.
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2 SHOWSDOORS OPEN 7PM & 10PM
Wednesday
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CARROT TOP
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MTV
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Sunday Comics
Comic Strip Live
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October 31
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yS:fSiiiSSi'xSit
-I





Fred's Corner
by Ben Moore
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i miii r � I'M m
KWOCiVBMHNfcrNWKM
A
� The East Carolinian
October 22, 1992
Lifestyle
Page 9
Midnight sneak
preview chills
'Candyman' audience
Movie weaves tale of love and murder
By Bobbi Perfetti
Staff Writer
To utter his name five times
would summon the spirit of a man
with a bloody hook for a right hand.
Is this a true statement? Or is it
another one of Clive Barker's un-
usual horror films mat blasts the
imagination?
Barker has come out with an-
other film to make you cringe in
your seat, Candyman, based on his
book "The Forbidden
Virginia Madsen,asHelen Lyle,
portrays a graduate student who
gets herself involved in Candyman's
world through research for her the-
sis on urban folklore. The legend of
Candyman becomes so much a part
of Helen's life that she begins to
endanger her life to find out more
about the man. Helen and her part-
ner, Bernadette Walsh (Kasi
Lemmons), turn up evidence that
links a murder to the mythical fig-
ure of Candyman.
This murder was committed in
Cabrini Green, a slum area of Chi-
cago. The killer was never found,
but those living in the projects at-
tribute the death to Candyman.
Candyman, played by Tony Todd,
has left these people living in fear.
To mention his name invokes fear
in the residents of Cabrini Green.
Candyman feeds off of this fear,
which keeps him 'alive Helen and
Bernadette begin poking around
Cabrini Green to see what the people
had to say about Candyman �
nothing.
Helen finds herself in a jam
when she becomes the leading sus-
pect in a murder that she didn't
commit. The rest of the story spins
a web of suspense, leaving you on
the edge of the seat while gripping
a friend's hand.
"Candyman is a horror film in
the real sense of the word said
Bernard Rose, the film's writer and
director, in a press release. "It deals
with the elements of dread and
death, not just a man with a big
knife
This is not your typical Clive
Barker film. Candyman is not filled
with blood and guts as was his
Hellraiser series. The success of this
flick will Debased on the story itself,
not on how many pints of blood are
spilt or how strange the monsters
are. It is also more believable than
Photo courtesy Tri Star Pictures
Graduate student Helen Lyle (Virginia Madsen) enters Candy man's lair as she investigates
See Candyman page 11 a gruesome urban myth in "Candyman
Stradlin
breaks from
G-N-R with
solo album
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
Izzy Stradlin had a lot of weight on his shoul-
ders when he went into the studio to record a solo
self-titled album following his Veak from Guns-N-
Roses.
Stradlin organized a band and quickly recorded
an album and already has a video in MTV's rotation.
The question is, does the band sound likeGuns-
N-Roses? No.
Is that a bad thing? No.
The band has some of the same sounds that
were used on Use Your Illusion, but the majority of
the album sounds like if s influenced by the Rolling
Stones, especially Keith Richards.
Stradlin went in a different direction. Though
his guitar playing is talented enough, his voice
doesn't fit into the same category as Axl Rose. That
is not to say that Stradlin's voice is weak�quite the
opposite. Stradlin's voice is surprisingly strong, but
he uses it in a way to make himself sound good.
The songs on the album are catered to his capa-
bilities. Stradlin is a good songwriter, and it is the
sign of a good writer who writes songs that show off
his or her strengths. He moves from rock to ballad
with ease. Though there is range on the album, it's
notnear therange thatGuns-N-Roses achieves. One
noticeabledifferencebetweenStradlinand his former
band is that every song on his album can be played
on the radio.
For someone with something to prove to the
music industry, Stradlin proves that he has the
talent. All of his career as a recording artist, he will
most likely have to live in the shadow of Guns-N-
Roses,butStradlinhas taken thefirststep to getfrom
underneath them.
Mendenhall to divert downtown crowd
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
Mendenhall Student Center will offer stu
dents an alternative to going downtown on Hal
loween this year.
At 830 p.m. the center
will beclosed for half an hour L j "�
tosetupforthenight'sevents. "AtiyOfie OH dmgS OT dlCO-
The center will re-open at 9 fool wj n0t be allowed ill
p.m. and begin admitting stu- , . w
the building. We are
2 will begin at 2 a.m.
Door prizes will be given away at 11:30
p.m. and at 1:30 a.m. Students must be present
to win.
Hee bowling will be offered all night, ex-
cept from fcO p.m. until midnight. During this
time, there will be a bowling competition be-
tween the residence
photo courtesy Kramer Entertainment
The "Blizzard of Bucks" contest will be just one of many attractions in the
une-up for Mendenhall's Halloween spectacle.
dents. Six entrances will be
open.
Student IDs must be pre-
sented at the door and one
guest per student will be ad-
mitted. Everyone is required
to sign in. They will be given a
hand-stamp and a ticket for
door prize drawings.
According to J. Marshall, assistant program
director at Mendenhall, everything offered on
Halloween will be free to students. However,
there will be one pre-requisite to being able to
participate in the activities.
"Anyone on drugs or alcohol will not be al-
lowed in the building Marshall said. "We are
trying to work with the city to offer a safe alterna-
tive to downtown
At 8 p.m In Cold Blood will be shown in
Hendrix Theater. Movies will run all night. Friday
the 13th will begin at 10 p.m. Soon after midnight,
Friday the 13th, Part 2 will be shown. Evil Dead, Part
trying to work with the
city to offer a safe alter-
native to downtown
f. Marshall
Assistant Program Director
halls.
Also at 10 p.m
the bands will begin
entertaining and will
play until 1 a.m.
WZMB will
sponsor a rave in the
Multi-purpose Room.
ABLE will sponsor
dance and rap music
in the Social Room.
Room 244 will house
ECGrass,alocalbluegrassband. Another band,
which will be announced at a later time, will be
playing in the Great Room.
"A Night at the Races" will be shown in the
large TV viewing area downstairs at
Mendenhall. Video tapes of 12 horse races will
be shown, beginning at 10 p.m. Everyone will
receivea program. Participants will pick which
horse they think will win. After each race, those
who picked the winning horse will receive a
raffle ticket.
A drawing and a prize will be held for each
race. At the end of the 12 races, the person who
picked the most winning horses will re-
ceive the grand prize, a beach-style bicycle.
In the case of a tie, a drawing will be held for
the grand prize.
Registration for the costume contest
will begin at 11:30 p.m. in Hendrix Theater.
Atmidnight,participantswill parade across
the stage. Prizes will be awarded in three
categories: bestall-around, scariest and fun-
niest. After the contest, the third movie will
begin.
The contest for "Blizzard for Bucks"
will begin in the Multi-Purpose at 1 a.m.
and run until 3 a.m. Teams will compete for
the chance of one of their team members to
enter a glass booth. Once the person is in the
booth, $500 worth of dollar bills will begin
blowing around. The person from the win-
ning team will have 30 seconds to grab as
much money as possible for his or her
teammates.
Afreebreakfastwillbeoffered by ARA,
Dining Services and the cafeteria from 1
a.m. until 2:30 a.m.
Marshall said that the university is
working with the transportation depart-
ment to try to get the buses running from
midnight until 4 a.m. They would run on
campus and to all the major apartment
complexes.
"We will be offering a lot of different
things Marshall saidSo there should be
something for everyone
Excellence awards honor School of Art faculty
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
Awards for instructors at
J's School of Art are given out
very year. Three awards are pre-
sented to the instructor who best
represented excellence in the past
school year.
Theawardsaregiven in recog-
nition of teaching excellence, ser-
vice to the school and research in
creative activity. This year's win-
f ners areCharles Chamberlain, Paul
Hartley and Michael Voors.
School of Art Dean Michael
Dorsey makes the final selection as
to who receives theawards, though
he is given information by every-
one in the department. Each in-
structor turns in a written explana-
�tion of their activities over the past
year and then candidates are cho-
. "sen. Ultimately, Dorsey chooses
who he thinks best fulfilled the
aspects of each area.
Chamberlain, winner of the
Teaching Excellence Award, is the
director of the ceramics depart-
ment. He's grateful thathis 25 years
of work at ECU is appreciated and
feels honored by the award. But he
believes that what he did to win the
award was, "Just my job. That's
what they pay me to do
Chamberlain said that the
award lets him know that his work
is not going unseen. Since an inte-
gral part of the award is also based
on student evaluations that are
taken at the end of each semester, it
means that much more for Cham-
berlain to know that he is getting to
the students.
Hartley, the painting coordi-
nator, has taught at ECU for 15
years and is the recipient of the
Service Award. Hartley said the
award cameasa complete surprise
to him. Echoing Chamberlain, he
also said that he saw his work as
what the school was paying him
for. The bulk of the award was due
in large part to his work with the
National Association for Schools of
Art and Design (NASAD). Every
10 years a report is due. The report
is responsible for bringing in funds
to the school in recognition of its
progression and its effectiveness.
Hartley was offered the chance
to work on the project and tried to
gather the information necessary
for the school to give an accurate
account of its work.
Though he spent many long
hours in his quest for the informa-
tion, he stated that there was still a
way to go. Once he has the informa-
tion he will write the report to try to
get reaccredited. East Carolina is
theonly NASAD school in the state.
Voors won the award for re-
search in creative activity. The
award is given to the faculty mem-
ber whom best excelled in this area.
The criterion by which the award is
judged is based upon the work the
instructor did in visual art.
Voors was presented theaward
because of his excellence in exhibi-
tions and shows. In an internation-
ally judged show, the Dakotas In-
ternational Exhibition of Artwork
on or of Paper, he won a purchase
award, an award gh en out by
judges determining which pieces
are worthyof purchase. Voors'piece
was bought by the University of
South Dakota.
In a nationally judged show,
the Boston Printmakers 43rd. orth
American Print Exhibition, a dry-
point piece of Voors was bought by
the Fogg Art Museum of Harvard
University, Cambridge, Mass.
Though he feels honored to
havedone well in the shows, Voors
admits that all the awards are sim-
plv tools that tell him that he is
working towards the right place
for him.
Voors said hedoesn'tdwell on
the awards; when questioned on
the subject he withdrew and ap-
peared embarrassed.
Along with the forementioned
shows, Voors was also included
in oneother internationally judged
show, eight more nationally
judged shows, nine other shows,
and a solo exhibition.
He received three other
awards from the judged shows,
also.
Poetry forum meets tonight
By Bobbi Perfetti
Staff Writer
Sitting at a long table and
discussing your own creative
verses is the perfect way to de-
scribe the Poetry Forum. The fo-
rum is a great way to get imme-
diate feedback on poems that you
have wrenched from your brain
and scribbled down on paper.
The forum is not a beatnik
convention or an audience of the
spiritually deep, but a group of
fel low poets helping one another
in order to perfect their poetry.
The Forum meets every first and
third Thursday of the month.
Check it out!
Call Peter Makuck at 757-
6580 for details on tonight's
Poetry Forum in Mendenhall.
The poetry forum is spon-
sored by the SGA and the En-
glish Department loans Dr. Peter
Makuck, who heads the meet-
ings. He is a self-taught poet who
feels that he "reads too much
poetry, more than is healthful or
normal The forum has been
meeting since the late '60s when
Vernon Ward founded it. The
forum also sponsors public po-
etry readings by nationally rec-
ognized poets. The readings are
followed by an open poetry
workshop with the speaker.
This is a great way for new
poets and for those who are more
advanced to 'workshop" their
poems.
The last
meeting for
the semester
is Nov. 19th.
For more in-
formation,
contact
Makuck at
757-6580.





10 The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 22, 1992
'Rebel' showcases creative energy
Who's There?
By John Bullard
Staff Writer
Every Fall semestera small cor-
ner office of the Publications Build-
ing becomes active � frantically
active. What's all the commotion
about? One word: Rebel � ECU's
student literary and arts journal
dedicated to being solely for the
students.
From its first publication in
1958, RebelstaH members have ac-
tively worked to ensure that the
journal reflects the students' ideas.
Once these are collected, the staff
rums them over to judges for the
literary and art competitions. All
works which place in the contests
are guaranteed to be published.
Composed entirely of a stu-
dent staff with only student works
published, the Rebel prides itself on
being the only college journal of its
kind.
Theeditingstaff of the Rebel '93
strives to assure quality and fair-
ness. Begun as a student literary
magazine in 1958 by Ovid Pierce
and two students, the Rebel's for-
mat has evolved only slightly since
its beginning.Fromaliterary maga-
zine, it has grown to include works
of art, which have been displayed
in "The Gallery" section of the
magazine since 1976.
Many of the contributors to the
Rebel often use it as a catapult to
success. Rick Atkinson,nowajour-
nalist for The Washington Post, first
published in the Rebel in 1973. Luke
Whisnant,anECU professor of writ-
ing who recently released his sec-
ond novel, served as the editor in
1978 and 79. With results like this,
it's surprising that Rebel staffs have
to work hard to get student submis-
sions.
'Tmhoping that more students
will submit work this year said
Margie O'Shea, managing editor.
"The Rebel consistently winsawards
and presents ECU students with
the opportunity to be seen and
heard
The bulk of work in the fall
comes from the need to solicit stu-
dents to submit works to be pub-
lished. Even with prize money
given for winning submissions, the
Rebel lacks the amount of entries
which the staff believes the stu-
dents to be capable of producing.
O'Shea thinks there are many rea-
sons that participation is limited.
This year, the staff believes it
has solved these problems by do-
ing three things: making the entries
anonymous to the judges, guaran-
teeing publication to the winners
and assuring the safety of the art
entries.
"Without the students, the Rebel
doesn'texist said Valerie Anthony,
the assistant editor and past prose
winner. "Wewantto do everything
possible to get as many students
involved as we can Anthony be-
lieves the students should want to
contribute, regardless of whether
thev place in the contests, because
thev will be read and seen by some
prominent literary and artistic per-
sonalities.
Two judges of this year's issue
include Joseph Bruchaca poet who
recently held a reading on campus,
and Susan Sturgill, an Ohio artist
and author of three books. Other
judges for the Rebel are currently
being solicited.
The journal will be published
in the spring and a show of art will
be held at the Greenville Museum
of Art the first week in March. The
show will include all works of art,
depending on the amount submit-
ted,and readings of winning prose
and poetry.
All of these plans are in the
early stages and O'Shea and her
staff are eager for outside help.
"1 would like this to showcase
all creative energy by the student
body, so if there is anyone inter-
ested we would welcome the in-
put O'Shea said.
Those wishing toenterthecom-
petition must submit their works
by 5 p.m Nov. 4. Ali literary par-
ticipants will receive a receipt, by
mail, for their submissions.
Art contestants willalso receive
receipts. Art works must be deliv-
ered to Room 1327 on Nov. 4, only
�this will assure the safety of each
art piece.
Attic
Friday 1023
Hardline with Neil Schon
Saturday 1024
Cold Sweat
Wednesday 1028
Carrottop
Thursday 1029
Rare Daze
Friday 1030
Stegmonds
Halloween
Purple School Bus
Corrigans
Saturday 1024
The Heaters
O'Rocks
Closed this weekend for
fall break.
Friday 1030
Earth Murchants
Halloween
Skullbuckle,Killkids,
Spawn
For those of you who
are planning to wear
costumes down-
town, be warned! If
you are not identifi-
able (wearing masks
or excess face paint),
most bars will not let
you in the door.
New Deli
Friday 1023
Mind Over Matter
Thursday 1029
BS&M
Friday 1030
The Usuals
Fizz
Saturday 1024
Nikki Meets the Hibachi
Halloween
Old Habits
Lifestyle Writers:
A MANDITORY meeting will
be held Thursday at 5:45
p.m. If you are unable to
attend, call Dana to plan a
conference. If I don't hear
from you, I'll assume you are
no longer interested in
writing.
AU0WEt
COSTUME SUPPLIES
NOW OPEN
at 608 Arlington Blvd.
Arlington Village Suite E
FEATURING:
Costumes, Wigs, Make-up. Hats; Ears,
Masks, Whips, Spray-On Hair Colors,
" plus Much, Much More
CALL 355-3752
FOR MORE INFORM A TION
A Division Of AT BARRE, LTD.
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Greenville Times Readers' Poll
Seafood House St Oyster Bar
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1 $1.00 OFF Any Meal �xcept Specials
coupon good thru 103192 with Student I.D.
Shrimp Plate $3.95
Trout & Shrimp Plotc $4.95
Occon Perch $4.95
Offer Good Mon-Thurs
Washington Highuuou
(NC33�xt) (10th St. Ext)
Greenville, NC
flSC Permits
Take-outs Welcome
752-3172,
Daily lunch Specials
$3.90
includes Sandwich, Chips 6 Drink
Thursday. October 29
BS&M
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Saturday. October 31
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HOURS
Mon&Tues 11am-2:30pm
Wed
513 Cotanche St.
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Thurs & Fn Ham-lam �� �.�
758-0080
Sat 9pm-1am
STEVE BRILEY'S
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE CENTER
Estimates Given First
3140-H Moseiy Drive
behind Parker's Barbecue on Greenville Blvd
752-5043
if.
I
10 Point Inspection
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with coupon offer expires 11-12-92
I Tune-Up Special
1.1 Replace Spark Plugs �oe fE
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Oil change up to 5 quarts �q AC
Replace oil filter p5J.57
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Check belts & hoses Castrol GTX 20W50
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Check belts
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Inspect radiator
with coupon
offerexpires 11-12-92





t
HHBlBHHHwiMMH
CD Alley caters to students
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
Walk into mostany music store
and you'll find stacks and stacks of
cassettes and compact discs of art-
ists that reign supreme on the top-
40 charts. Hammer, C & C Music
Factory and En Vogue are names
you'll have a hard time finding at
CD Alley.
CD Alley stocks names like Nir-
vana, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Toad
the Wet Sprocket, Spin Doctors and
Nine Inch Nails. Sure, most other
stores may carry one or two of these
artists .butCD Alley thriveson them,
something larger chain stores could
never do.
Opened in 1991, CD Alley has
made a place for itself for students.
Owner Sean McCrossin stays in
business by knowing what the stu-
dents want and having it in stock,
no matter how obscure. CD Alley's
business relies heavily on special
orders. While most stores offer spe-
cial orders, CD Alley usually has

theorder in thestore within a week.
Other stores are pressed to have it
within one or two months.
Another important quality of
CD Alley is its ability to carry, and
find, obscure music. This consti-
tutesdoseto 15 percent of business.
Imports make up about 20 to 25
percent of the stock. In stock cur-
rently are U2, R.E.M Guns-N-
Roses and Red Hot Chili Peppers
imports. The store is also well-
stocked with used compact discs.
McCrossin admits that when
he decided to move the store to
Greenville from Kill Devil Hills, he
saw a need in Greenville for a place
that caters to students and their
tastes. With thatinmind,heopened
CD Alley.
As a special for the students,
McCrossin offers the College Top
10 at $12.95 all the time. He knows
that without the students coming
into his store, he would already be
out of business. He is dedicated to
bringing college music to college
students at prices they can afford.
Candyman
Continued from page 1
Barker's Nightbreed, which describes
death as another kind of life. After
seeing Candyman, I would never take
thedareofsayingthemythical man's
name into the mirror while the lights
are out.
Thesettingofthemoviechanges
from the safe world of a grad
studen t's to that of the projects, fore-
shadowing theimmensechange that
will take place in Helen's life.
Not only does she become the
main suspect of a murder case, but
her husband, played by Xander Ber-
keley, will not believe in her tale of
the Candyman's reality.
Candyman is well worth thecost
of the ticket and worth the sleepless
night after viewing the film.
The film is a story of a man who
tries to reclaim his love, a love that
spans a century. It is a tale of the
battle between good versus evil and
of those innocents caught in the
struggle.
Candyman is, plainly put, an
excellent movie.
OCTOBER 22, 1992
The East Carolinian
11
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r?zzz �
The East Carolinian

October 22. 1992
Sports
Page 12
ECU V.Pitt
Pittsburgh
1991 record: 6-5-0
Primary offense: Multiple Pro
Primary defense: Multiple, 3-4 Base
Offensive lettermen returning, lost 18,14
Defensive starters returning, lost 19,13
Special teams lettermen returning, lost 2,1
Head Coach: Paul Hackett (California-Davis, '69)
Record at School: 10-12-1 (2 seasons)
Career Record: 10-12-1 (2 seasons)
General Information
Location: Pittsburgh, Pa.
Enrollment: 13,500
Colors: Blue and Gold
Nickname: Panthers
Conference: BIG EAST
Stadium: Pitt (56,500)
Surface: Astro Turf
Coach
Paul Hackett
Series Record (2-1)
ECU Pittsburgh
1991 24 23
1989 42 47
1984 10 17
played at Pittsburg
1992 Schedule (3-4)
Rob's Pick
By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
Alex van Pelt
Sept. 5beat KENT, 51-10
Sept. 12lost to WEST VTRGNIA, 44-6
Sept. 17lost to Rutgers, 21-16
Sept. 26beat MINNESOTA, 41-33
Oct3lost to Maryland, 47-34
OctlOlost to NOTRE DAME, 52-21
Octl7beat Temple, 27-20
Oct24EAST CAROLINA
Oct31at Syracuse
Nov. 14LOUISVILLE
Nov. 21at Perm State
Dec. 5at Hawaii
Wow. Whata show ECU put on last week
� My hopes and prayers were answered. 1
stuck with my team (like I have all season) and
they came through for me. That is why it is all
the more difficult for me to write much further.
Pitt will win�please, forgive me, Lord!
My heart broke with those words, but I
must face reality. My decision is based and a
few, very simple factors.
Who'soffenseisbetter?Bothare explosive
but Pitt has Van Pelt and an offensive line that
will make holes big enough for Fat Albert to
run through.
Who's defense is better? They both stink
but ours smells a little worse.
Who will win? See above.
Both teams a strikingly similar, yetPitt has
a slight edge in almost every category�and
they're at home.
Quarterback AJexVanPeltis too much for
FjCUtohandle.And,Pitt'soffenseisaveraging
over 470 yards of total offense per game. The
scary part is, they've done it against teams like
Notre Dame, Maryland and Minnesota. The
Panthers may break a few records against our
defense. If Van Pelt tries hard enough, and the
defense doesn't play the way the did against
Qncinnati,heis likely to ringupthescoreboard
for 60 or 70 points.
Pitt also features a pounding ground at-
Crystal Balls
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Ast. Sports Editor
Brian Bailey, Channel 9
Kevin Hall, WZMB
Jeff Stallings, comm. major
ECUPitt
3851
4542
35
44
21
tack that I guarantee will gain over 200 yards
oo the cold Pennsylvania turf.
I would low to be wrong about all of
this, but 1 doubt that I am.
I would also love for the football team to
read this and takeitasapersonal challenge to
whip Pitt's ass. But I thought they would do
that against Duke and we all now what
happened over there.
I'm not trying to say we don't stand a
chance.
It will take a very serious and deter-
mineddefenseandan incredible fourthquar-
ter to win. Pirate fourth quarters are becom-
ing famous and Pitt has been out-scored 82-
54 in the last period. It could happen. Quar-
terback Michael Anderson, "Running Man"
Junior Smith and, as always, senior receiver,
and IFA offensive player of the week Clay-
ton Driver must be on call.
On the other side of the ball, they better
guard their grills and knuckle up.
From what I know of line backer Tony
Davis,heisa very serious competitor. He will
be ready for the challenge. Safety GregGran-
dison has been ready all year, but coaches
seem to be thinking more about next season
and getting time for the freshman�it's not
fair to Greg or the team.
I can only hope the rest of the defense is
focused. They will have to be. They will have
to play the game of their collective lives to
pull this one off.
Good luck
"Guard your grill, knuckle up
"A strong offense, aggressive
defense, no turnovers (maybe
one) can equal a Pirate win
"Pirates haven't proven they
can show up week-in and
week-out on defense
"The key for ECU will be
shutting down Van Pelt
"We'll definitely lose to a school
that produced (Dan) Marino
Chas'
Pick
By Chas Mitch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
38
38
17
avg: 37 37
(Reminder: this for your entertainment only. Please, no wagering. CYa.)
Photo by DaMRMd
When the entire ECU defensive unit takes
the field, there are only a few teams in the
country that can completely dominate the Pi-
rates. The one-armed bandits Jerry Dillon and
Tony Davis were there. Zaim Cunmulaj and
Greg Grandison were present and even new-
comer Hank Cooper contributed to the com-
plete defensive package in last week's game.
Michael Anderson and Sean McConnell,
the field generals of last week's onslaught, were
notof complete percision,butmanaged to do an
effective job against the Bearcats of Cincinnati.
Running back Junior Smith continues to shine
while Clayton Driver and Cedric Van Buren
provide leadership through their on-field ex-
amples of blocking, ball carrying and receiving.
There really isn't a whole lot left to say,
except the obvious. Pitt has a effective offense
and a questionable defense. With Alex Van Pelt
at the helm, the Panthers will put their share of
points on the board. Wecannotcompletely stop
Pitt on offense, but we can sustain their attacks.
The Panther defense is as questionable as the
Pirates. However, ECU has a much more qual-
ity defensive team and should manage to keep
our offense in the game throughout the contest.
The key to victory for ECU will be deter-
mined in the area of turnovers and time of
possession. The longer the Pirate defense is on
the field, the greater opportunity Van Pelt and
his offense will have to exploit them. On the
other hand, the longer Anderson and McConnell
can maintain possession and stay in control of
the ball and the clock, the longer Pitt's suspect
defense will remain on the fieid and possibly
expose the holes in their defense.
I see Saturday's matchup as one of the best
games of the season. With Pitt looking to re-
venge last year's lost, pride is not the only
objective for wining this game, but respect! .
Deciding who
are the wcrid' s
athletes
tuv: w
By Bob Owens
Staff Writer
Sorry Reebok, it wasn't settled in
Barcelona. Dan and Dave need not apply. So
who is the world's greatest athlete? Good
question. Like that unspeakable part of the
anatomy, everybody has an opinion. An-
swering the question, however, is about as
easy as deciding if water sinks or floats.
To have some sort of semi-objective re-
porting, we need to set up a few criteria, the
first of which specifies that there can be no
large moving mechanical objects involved.
This effectively weeds out motorcycle,
boat, car and (Thank God!) monster truck
racing So what if a NASCAR driver can read
a record's label at 78 rpm? I want to see how
fast an athlete can run a quarter mile without
the aid of a car, motorcycle, llama, mon-
goose, etc.
Another thing we need to do is keep it
general. If we start talking about players
position-by-position, we'll talk forever with-
out getting anywhere. That is fine for presi-
dential candidates but gets us nowhere, fast.
So now that we have all athletes lumped
together by sports, it's time to get to work
Strength is important for any athlete.
Not the power to move mountains or Oprah,
but pound-for-pound muscle power. If we
went with sheer muscle, it would effectively
weed out many male and most female ath-
letes, which is not politically incorrect We
just love these little journalistic buzzwords
but it is simply not fair. Many sports don't
rely on bulk, but how effectively you manage
what you have.
Speed is another important consider-
ation. Simply put no slugs allowed. Like
speed, coordination speaks for itself. It is
relative, but some sports rely on it more than
others. Endurance rounds out the list.
So here we go.
Ill probably be stoned for this, but the
Jones exemplifies the true student - athlete
By Jason Tremblay
Staff Writer
See WGA page 13
At first sight of Thomas Jones, one of
F�stCarolina'soutsidelinebackers,itiseasy
to see why he has been so successful on the
athletic field. Hailing from Newark, New
Jersey, Jones lettered four years in football
and basketball at Lumberton High School
and was voted the school's best all-around
athlete his senior year.
However, Jones' successes are not lim-
ited to me realm of athletics. He is attending
ECU an and academic scholarship.
A transfer student from Campbell Uni-
versity, where he was majoring in pre-phar-
macy, Jones was slightly overwhelmed
when he first arrived at ECU. a
"(ECU) is like New York City com-
pared to Campbell Jones said.
"Everything's kind of fast. Youhave to learn
to adjust
Jones was quick to cite East Carolina's
size, atmosphere and the opportunity to
change his intended major from pre-phar-
macy to pre-med as factors in deciding to
transfer. As well as high hopes of entering
ECU's medical school.
"I just applied to medical school here at
East Carolina, Chapel Hill, a coupleof places,
with intentions of, hopefully, (getting) into
medical school somewhere and go on to
become a good doctor someday
Although still uncertain, Jones has con-
sidered the fields of cardiology and emer-
gency medicine as his primary focuses.
Jones maintains hishighacademic stan-
dards by studying three to four and a half
hours per day�quite a feat after the rigor-
ous football training schedule that requires
an average of five hours daily. In addition,
he often tutors students in organic and gen-
eral chemistry, as well as statistics. Occa-
sionally, he acts as an academic role model
for other plavers on the team.
Although he is an excellent student,
Jones is frequently upset by the common
myth that all football players are
unintelligent.
Photo by Dail Raid
Student-athlete Thomas Jones hits the books as hard as he hits the oppostion on game day. Jones, who hails from Newark,
N.J. is a member of the '92 Pirates football team and also a pre-med major.
"Sometimes (football) gets to be a
hindrance, because,
when someone finds
out you're a football
player, they automati-
cally consider you a
stereotype, be dumb,
don't get your work,
messaround Wegot
a lot of guys on the
team that care about
academics also, "
Jones explained.
When his sched-
ule permits, Jonesalso
does a lot of volunteer
work in the area. He
has helped organiza-
tions such as the
homeless shelter and
the boys club, and is
now preparing to volunteer at hospice.
"Sometimes (foot-
ball) gets to be a hin-
drance, because, when
someone finds out
you're a football
player, they automati-
cally consider you a
stereotype, be dumb,
don't get your work,
mess around
Thomas Jones
ECU outside linebacker
said.
I try to keep involved in the commu-
nity,because,youknow,
other people aren't as
fortunate, and it's good
thattheyseeyou around
and have a pep talk or
something like that he
said. "If there's anything
you can do to help them,
it's pretty good
On the subject of
football, Jones admits
that sometimes it can be
a burden, but also be-
lieves that it has been a
very positive force in his
life.
"If I wasn't playing
football, I think my
grades would be a
whole lot better Jones
And I think without football, I'd feel
like I was missing something I'm just out
there having fun, doing something that's
really exciting to me. "
Jones' face turns into a mask of deter-
mination that belies true dedication to his
sport, when as ked a bout the success, or lack
of, the team this season.
"I think the team knows now what it
has to do in order to win I think we should
win the rest of them he said. "Eight and
three's not bad
To the legions of loyal Pirate fans who
continue to support the team, Jones, scholar
as well as athlete, delivers this simple heart-
felt message:
"I'd like to thank the fans for coming
down to Duke and watching us play. We
lost, but you know, we apologize for the
loss; the true fan will come back to the next
game. As long as they do that, well be
okay
� �





� � � ��� h
13 The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 22, 1992
Driver named IF A ofensive
player of the week
Courtesy of IFA Sports Information Department
this weekend. In Hattiesburg the Golden Eagles
will host Cincinnati, while Tulsa Memphis State
will battle the Golden Hurricane. USM and �CU
are the only undefeated teams remaining in the
IFA. A win by Southern would set up the Thurs-
day night ESPN game against East Carolina.
Tough "D MSU senior nose guard Chris
Hobbs recorded 10 tackles and 3 sacks totalling
-20 yards for the Tiger defense that remains one
of the top defenses in the country.
1992 IFA INDIVIDUAL FOOTBALL STATS
RUSHING
Player G
AYG IP. YDS-PG
Courtesy Rob Upton
PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
Offensive: ECU wide receiver Clayton I It j"�-
Driver, a senior from College Park, Ga. had a Clayton Driver
big day in ECUs win over Cincinnati with 10 receptions for
155 yards and a touchdown. These marks are career highs
for Driver.
Small, D. - UC
6 4.4 8
Porter, L. -MSU
6 6.1 3
Smith, JECU
6 5.1 4
Jackson, R. - Tulsa
6 3.4 2
Welch, M. - USM
7 3.4 2
106.8
78.7
68.0
60.5
60.0
Defensive: UC junior safety Alan Fletcher intercepted
two passes and set up a pair of UC scores in the East
Carolina game. Fletcher also recorded 11 tackles, six solos
in the contest. Both are career highs.
Special Teams: MSU placekicker Joe Allison, who is
the number one ranked kicker in the nation, had his fourth
three night in field goals made. Allison booted field goals
of 27,30 and 44 yards. He is 14 of 15 in field goals made this
season.
IFA NOTES
Next IFA Matchup: There are two key IFA matchups
�A
568
PASSING
Player, Team
Anderson, ECU
Matthews, SMSU .585
Frerotte, GTulsa .431
Harp, LUC .500
YDS
1750
947
763
727
ID.
15
6
3
3
See IFA page 14
Greenville
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SUPPORTING ECU
STUDENT DISCOUNT
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Tlie East Carolinian
is now accepting
applications for the
following positions:
Assistant Lifestyle
Editor,
Staff Writer
and Classified Ad
Technician.
Please apply at
Vie East Carolinian
otfice on
weekdays from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Prop 42 remains controversial
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
A heated controversy has
been sparked in recent years over
the enforcement of proposition
42 in NCAA sports.
Theamendment requires in-
coming freshman who receive
athletic scholarships to attain a C
average in 11 core academic
courses, and at least 700 on the
SAT.
In the past, students who
filled a'her of these requirements
were eligible for athletic scholar-
ships. The old rule is known as
proposition 48.
Many people think that this
ruling is unfair. Arguing thaat
the SAT unfairly discriminates
against minorities.
In January of 1989,
Georgetown University's bas-
ketball coach John Thompson
walked off the court to show his
opposition to the NCAA's adopt-
ing Proposition number 42.
Manyathletes underthisruling
find it impossible financially to at-
tend college. Many of them come
from poor backgrounds, and the
financial aid which was offered if
the individual remained eligible,
wouldn't cover the majority of col-
lege costs.
Temple University coach John
Chaney reported to the U.S. News
and World Report that: "The new
rale is an insane, inhuman piece of
legislation that will fill the streets
with more of the disadvantaged
Sti 11, su pporters of the rule con-
tend that it will increase academic
standards, and better reassure stu-
dents that they're academically
qualified to succeed in college level
classes. College recruiters can no
longer tell athletes to ignore SAT
requirements, since they could sur-
vive with a C average overall.
However, others argue the rule
was not adopted for the good of the
athletes.
In 1986, the University of
Georgia was found guilty of main-
taining eligibility of athletes who
were unqualified bykeepingthem
in remedial programs that didn't
lead to their degree. Georgia's
president ordered the athletic de-
partment to adopt what is now
proposition 42.
But in an attempt to equalize
the "athletic pool" of recruits,
Georgia urged the rest of the SEC
to adopt their policy. In 1987 they
did.
The SEC now feared they
were at a disadvantage to other
conferences and teams across the
country, so they pushed for it to
become an NCAA proposition,
and now it is.
What most people don't
know is that Proposition 42 could
have been adopted to equalize
the SEC's "athletic pool" across
the nation, not to increase aca-
demic standards for athletes.
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ill 11 - i�-
14 The East Carolinian
OCOTBER22, 1992
WGA
world's greatest athlete, now to be
known as the WGA, is nota football
player. Sure they score heavily on
the strength scale and can kick my
butt merrily down the hall, but that
alone doesn't cut it The boys on the
gridiron also grade well on speed.
There are simply too many guys
playing wide receiver in the NFL
with Olympic gold medals on their
walls to say otherwise.
So what hurts football players?
Onethingfootballplayerswillnever
grade-out well on is endurance.
Sure a football game last for three
hours, but the average play lasts
less than six seconds from start to
finish with about a half-minute be-
tween plays. Show me an offensive
lineman that can run two miles
withoutcollapsingon thetrack,and
I might raise the sport's endurance
grade from an "F" but don't count
on it.
Michael "Air" Jordan can run
five miles, score 40 points a game
and is able to leap tall buildings in
a single bound. So why doesn't
basketball have the WGA? Bill
Laimbeer. Next.
Soccer, be it men's or women's,
grades-out high in all areas but one.
An average college midfielder will
run five to eight miles a match. Co-
ordination? Has anyone ever heard
of Pele, or watched Tony Meola'a
diving savein the World Cup match
against Italy? As, a group, soccer
jocks grade-out here. Speed, on av-
erage, is good for most soccer play-
ers.
The weak spot for soccer is the
old stereotype of a little European
guy with great moves and a long
last name but no power. Leg
strength in soccer players is good,
but don't ask any to do chin-ups.
The same thing tends to ring true
for most track types.
Baseball. It is hard to hita round
ball with a round bat, and I have
seen some great divingcatches. Itis
America's gameljusthatetogiveto
much credit to a game where you
dedicate most of your time to chew-
ing tobaccoand scratchingyourself
while waiting for something to hap-
pen.
As for softball, it is generally
like baseball, just with less scratch-
ing. Notto take anythingaway from
the game, but I'll give them the
same two-milechallengelgave foot-
ball.
So what do we have left?
Swimming. Swimmers are
fairly strong. Anyone who has ever
tried a mile knows swimmers have
endurance. Speed, though differ-
ent from how we are use to viewing
it when is also good. Swimmers
grade-out well in all areas; they
simply do not grade out greatly in
any area.
Now we have little to work
with. Wrestling? Probably not.
Golf? Tennis, anyone? Sorry, it just
doesn't fit the bill. Skiing? Surfing?
Sorry dude.
Stop. I'm having a flashback
Back to the Olympics. Not Dan
and Dave, but those tiny gymnastic
people. Pound for pound, those 80
pound girls and short little guys are
among the strongest people I've
ever seen. Can you name anyone in
the NFL, NBA or Major League
Continued form page 12
Baseball thatcandohandstandson
rings suspended from the ceiling
by a rope? Not. That is power,
friends and neighbors. Did you see
them come off the high bar, bounce
off their stomachs on the low bar,
and catch the high bar again on the
uptake?
SurebasebaU'sOzzieSmithcan
do a flip. So can a few guys in
football, though I don't know any
in basketball. But they can only do
one or two at the most. Olympic
gymnasts, both male and female,
will fly off and do, a series of flips
and twists that would turn Bruce
Lee into "Not Me
Speed? Go back up to the sec-
tion of flips. I can't see anythingbut
a blur. How about you?
I guess to be fair, I should let
Dan and Dave have their shot.
Decatheletes have an argument for
being the WGA. They got power,
speed, endurance and coordina-
tion. The only gripe I have with
them is that they are not world
class athletes unless you lump all
their events together. Enough said.
Pirates lose to JMU
in 3-0 heartbreaker

By Bob Owens
Staff Writer
The song is getting old, b't
the men's soccer team had to lis-
ten to another verse as they
dropped 3-0 to national ly ranked
Colonial Athletic Association foe
James Madison. It was the fourth
consecutive CAA loss for the Pi-
rates, w ho are now 2-9 overall, 0-
4 in the conference.
The band started warming
up early as Madison's Ivan
Sampson beat ECU goalkeeper
Bryan DeWeese in the penalty
box, 19:47 into the match. JMU's
David Villareal came in off the
bench and scored the team's sec-
ond goal when he drilled a re-
bounding ball into the back of the
Pirate net 39 minutes into the
half.
Down 2-0 after the first half,
the Pirates still had a chance of
pulling out a win, or a least a tie.
The chance seemed to evaporate
after the first five minutes of the
second half, when JMU's Kaario
Kankunen scored the team's third
goal on a shot from 25 yards out.
Down three scores and with only
40 minutes remaining, East Caro-
lina would need an offensive
miracle to salvage a win. There
were no heavenly trumpet blasts,
no great floods and no offense.
ECU had only six shots on the
day and absorbed their ninth loss
of the season to the 17th-ranked
Dukes.
The Pirates return to action
Oct. 21 in a home match against
defending CAA champion Old
Dominion. The Monarchs have
tied 13th-ranked George Mason,
1-1, and a week earlier beat 12th-
ranked Boston College, 1-0. The
match is scheduled for a 3p.m.
start.
It doesn't talce an "A" student to realize the
importance of a good education. So stay in
school. Otherwise, you could be setting your-
self up for failure for the rest of your life.
ITC
�IITV
It's More Than A Bank.
It's An Attitude1:
Sincel872
Member FD1C
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IT
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Thursday, October 22
FALL BREAK SPECIAL
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Make a positive
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Join the
Student Union
for
i!iia
Wednesday the 28th
The Love Shack
4:30 pm-7:00 pm at Jones
Cafeteria
HIV Education and information.
Sponsored by the Peer Health Educators.
Alpha Phi All Greek Drink Out
4:00 pm-6:00 pm at the bottom
of College Hill
Support drinking responsibly with ECU
Greeks. Mocktails and fun for all!
Friday the 30th
The Great Purple Pirate Pickup
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Adopt a tailgate area and clean up the
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Contact the Office of Health Promotion
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Thanksgiving
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FA
OCTOBER 22, 1992
mtmmmammmimiH
The East Carolinian 15
Continued from page 2
INDEPENDENT
FOOTBALL ALLIANCE
Weekly Statistical Update
Week 7 Date-1019
1992IFA STANDINGS
School
IFA RS PTT
SO. Miss 2-0 4-3 .572
Memphis St. 1-1 3-3 .500
ECU 1-0 3-3 .500
Tulsa 0-1 2-5 .285
Cincinnati 0-2 1-5 .166
RESULTSWEEKLY
SCHEDULE
Schwl Site Time
So. Miss (3-3) beat Tulsa 17-7 will
hostCincinnati atHattiesburg 1.00
ECU (2-3) beat Cincinnati 42-21
visits Pittsburg at Pittsburg 1:30
Tulsa (2-4) lost to Louisville 32-27
RETURN YARDAGE
Player. Team
KORYD-AVG �R YD-AVG
Foreman, MECU
8-217-27.1 1-0-0-0-000
Jenkins, BUC
11-267-243 5-38-7.6
Ulmer,TUSM
13-299-23.2 1-44.
Letcher, MECU
17-375-22.111-72-6.5
ALL PURPOSE YARDS
Player. Team
GRURECPRKORYTy;
YPSPG
Letcher, MECU
6-25-306-72-375-778-129.7
Porter, LMSU
472-116-0-96-684-114.0
Small, DUC
6-641-25-0-0-666-111.0
Copeland, RMSU
6-0-276-24349-568-94.7
Driver, CECU
6-12460O-0472-78.7
INDIVIDUAL DEFENSIVE
STATS
Interceptions
Flayer. Team
� M2 IDS IE long
Grandison, ECU
6 4 45 0
Ulmer, USM
7 4
Bratcher, Tulsa
7 3
Hetcher, UC
6 3
Norton, Tulsa
7 2 5
Williams, MSU
6 2 6
Barto, MSU
6 2 5
Carter, USM
7 4 2
90 0
31 0
23 0
0
0
0
1
36
64
8
9
5
3
5
42
77;e East Carolinian
is now accepting
applications for the
following positions:
Assistant Lifestyle
Editor,
Staff Writer
and Classified Ad
Technician.
Please apply at
Tlie East Carolinian
office on
weekdays from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
With senior Marianne Marini,
running cross-country is a family
Marini's
Theresa
family
affair,
sister
also runs
Lady Pi-
for the
rates,
Marianne
seem
fortable
along-
doesn't
uncom- J'
running
side her sister
"I've always ran with my sis-
ter Marini said. "Even when I was
in elementary school we ran to-
gether. She motivates me, and I do
my best to motivate her
Marini's drawn a large degree
of her motivation from her family.
Shecomesfroma family's of 11, and
much of the family activities revolve
around running. Her father Dante
ran Cross Country and Track at the
University of Delaware.
The only time Marini ran wi th-
ou t the compan ionship of one of her
family members was atCatholic Uni-
versity of America in Washington.
That was a short stint and she
transfered to ECU her sophomore
year.
In 1991, Marini consistently fin-
ished in the top five but she was red-
shirted last season due to a stress
fracture. Her sister was also forced
to sit -out last season because of
injuries.
Marini is currently going into
nursing which is a field she feels
can be directly compared to cross-
country.
"It's a competitive job as is
cross-country Marini said. "I also
feel both activities are very team
oriented. Nursing appeals to me
because it's a very help-oriented
profession
She doesn't let the fact that
cross-country runners generally
don't get much credit bother her.
"That's the reason I enjoy run-
ning, and I like to help other
people she said. "I don't like to be
the center of attention � it makes
me feel uncomfortable. Thaf s why
TEAM TOTALS
Total Offense
Ieam GpYDSm
ECU 6471-1215-23
MSU 6410-1926-15
Tulsa 7-507-2086-14
UC 6-392-1784-14
USM 7-446-17S4
Total Defense
j�am�PLXDSjr2Y�Srii
MSU 6-380-1215- 9-202.5
USM 7475-2127-11-303.8
UC 6419-2098-20-349.0
Tulsa 7475-2626-22-375.1
ECU 6460-2667-25444.5
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Includes a comprehensive eye
exam by our doctor, value line
frame and our best plastic
CR-39 single vision lenses.
Add $3fl for ST bifocal lenses.
Choose from our large value
line frame collection or get
$40 off hundreds of other
frames in inventory with a
retail value greater than $100.
This offer includes most
prescriptions.
No-Line Progressive
Bifocal Lenses
Our highest quality no-line
plastic CR-39 bifocal lenses.
I(10 satisfaction guaranteed.
Also, receive $20 off the frame
of your choice with a no-line
bifocal purchase.

M OPIOMCTWC
�Y�CAR�G�KT�R
Supempltr Service In One Hour!
PA
Eye Exam, Fitting
& Contact Lenses
Includes a comprehensive
eye exam by our doctor,
then you will be fitted with
your choice of spherical
daily wear contact lenses
or a three (.1) month
supply of disposable
lenses. Professional fees
for extended wear are
slightly more.
Dr. David I- Fitzgerald, Optometrist
Gary M. Harris, Optician
703 E. Crrenville Blvd.
I f.� Tw rUm M.a)
Open Mori. Fri. 9 6, Sat 91 Phone 756-420
STUDENTS & FACULTY
INSURANCE
with LOW RATES &
MONTHLY PAYMENTS
Specialists for:
DWI's -Youthful Drivers
Drivers with Points
& Motorcycles
GENE B. WATERS
FIDELITY INSURANCE
105 Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, NC
Formerly
Arlington Insurance
756-4488
,o Other Discnunla Apply � lirand Names You Trml � Walk ins Welcome � Offer Fur A limleil Time
5 OFF FOR
STUDENTS AND FACULTY
�Hardware �Academic SoftwareAccessories
FREE INSTALLATION
riAhi ,Trr . . AND INSTRUCTON
SKANTEC H (uP to 3 hours)
Individualized Computer Sales & Support
EDUCATIONAL DISCOUNTS
ON COMPUTER SOFTWARE
608 Arlington Blvd. Suite B, Arlington Village" Greenville, NC 27858
(919) SKANTECH (752-6832)
RetailConsultingProgrammingUpgradingMaintainanceRepa i r
GRAND SLAM U.S.A.
Indoor BaseballSoftball Batting Range
Corner of Evans & 14th Streets 830-1759J,p
�Consessions �Pro Shop -Video Games y$
SLAM
U.S.A.
STUDENT TOKENS
Year Round $1.00
with ECU I.D.
20 Pitches On A Token
Full Court
Basketball
with
Slam Coals
Bring Coupon In For $4.00 Off Slam Ball
G
iiiii
STUDENT I.D. REQUIRED
LUCK
PIRATES!
Overtoil's
5�
THE WORLD'S LARGEST WATER SPORTS DEALER
Water skis
Knee boards
Water toys
Snow skis
Snow ski rentals
Russell sweats
Champion apparel
NC Wildlife agent
Sporting goods
equipment
Fishing tackle
Hunting clothes
Tennis shoes for
every activity
Boating supplies
Marine electronics
i
ijV Mon-Fri 8-7
111 Red Banks Road
Greenville, NC
355-5783





s
HALLOWEEN "92
Nothing HALLOWED about this offer.
Everything's
FREEwithan
ECU LD.H
Sponsored by the Staffs of:
Tbe Department of University Unions
Recreational Services � Campus Dining ServicesARA � Resident Education � University Housing � Career Services � Student
Development � Special Populations � Student Health Services � Financial Aid � Counseling Center � Dean of Students Office
8:00pm"In Cold Blood"Hendrix Theatre 1� 1 i
: 9:00pm-4:00amMidnight Madness Begins with: FREE Bowling, Billiards, Table Tennis1i 1
& Refreshments on the Ground Floor1 �
10:00pm"Friday the 13th, Part One"Hendrix Theatre 11
Prize Drawing follows (must be present to win)
10:00pm-l :00amINSCAPE & BREED-13Great Room 1�
ABLE sponsors Top Spinning HitsSocial Room 1
WZMB dejays The RAVEMulti-Purpose Rm 1
ECU GrassRoom 244 1
"A Night at the Races" -bet on a winner!Big Screen TV Rm 1
11:30pm- MidnightCostume Contest RegistrationHendrix Theatre 1
Midnight-12:30amCostume Contest for Best All AroundHendrix Theatre I1 1
Scariest & Funniest guy and ghoul!1 1
12:30am-2:00am"Friday the 13th, Part Two"Hendrix Theatre 1I �
Prize Drawing follows (must he present to win)i 11 �
l:00am-2:30amFREE Breakfast provided by ARA &MSC Cafeteria 1
Campus Dining ServicesI�
l:00am-2:30am"Blizzard of Bucks"Multi-Purpose Rm 1B
2:15am"Evil Dead, Part Two "Hendrix Theatre IK
3:45amGrand Prize DrawingHendrix Theatre�
(must be present to win)�
4:00amTHE MADNESS ENDS
Please comewe have a PRIZE for YOU
?
p a
Uj
����
si ;
1;B:�
ifN
� wwvwr
of VCR or CD Player far Best All Around Costume
froth Western Auto for Grand Prize during "A Night at the Races1
Door Pi32se�inctttdt:
Tickets to "Buddy Holly"
Tickets to "North Carolina Is My Home"
Tickets to ECU Madrigal Dinners
Additional Prizes include:
� ECU Sweatshirts � Basket from Basquettes � East Coast Miisie Gift Certificates
� Knapsacks � Coffee Maker � Umbrellas � Ghouldie baskets and more!
hv valid i (I IP. One guest allowed per person. Each admission receives a ticket for the Door Prizes. NO RI ADMISSION upon departure
OONI I DI R (III INI III C E Wll I IU ADMITTED. SGA Transit will provide shuttle service to and from major apartment complexes
trom 12:00am-4:00am every 30 minutes. MSC Snack Bar will he open for cashdining card hasis.
Fi �� !�� "& - r �. �ij .
�i minim 11 ji mnmmsmmmmmmmmmmmsmfmKmm
.





Title
The East Carolinian, October 22, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 22, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.904
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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