The East Carolinian, October 15, 1992






Opinion
Double-standard
University policy toward alcohol singles out
WZMB's downtown functions.
See pg. 5 for story.
Lifestyle
Death to man of steel
After more than 50 years of keeping the world
safe, Superman will meet his maker.
See pg. 10 for story.
Sports
Diving and crying
Jhe swimming and diving team holds its
annual Purple and Gold meet today in
Minges colisum at 3 p.m.
See pg. 14 for story.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 15
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, October 15,1992
16 Pages
Jury acquits
former ECU
employees of
wiretapping
By Jeff Becker
News Editor
After three hours of deliberation, the jury dismissed all
charges Tuesday against the two former ECU employees on trial
for federal wiretapping violations.
The defendants, John Burrus, former captain of investiga-
tions for Public Safety, and Teddy Roberson, former director of
Telecommunications, each faced a maximum of 23 in prison for
tapping the phone lines of ECU employees Brooks Mills and
Patricia Hair Bullock in May and June 1990.
Roberson and Burrus were acquitted of conspiracy, inten-
tionally intercepting a wire communication, intentionally dis-
closing contents of wire communication and use of contents of
a wire communication. Each charge carries a maximum five-
year sentence. They were also found innocent of having knowl-
edge of a crime and not reporting it, a crime that carries a
maximum three-year sentence.
Burrus said he feit relieved the trial was over and was
planning to return with his family to his hometown of Ocracoke
Island. Burrus worked 10 years for the ECU Public Safety
Department before the university forced him to resign March 8,
1991.
"I put my life on the line for a lot of years Burrus said. "I
was very dedicated, 10 years on the force, then all of a sudden,
bam, the university dumped on me
After leaving ECU, Burrus worked as a deputy sheriff in
Green County for several months but lost the job when he was
indicted for wiretapping in May 1992.
"It has been two years of pure hell It has been hard on
me and my family. I always felt I had a good reputation, and now
I feel like my reputation is destroyed. There is no way to get it
back
Roberson said he has been under emotional and economic
strain since he resigned from ECU in March 1991. He said he has
been unemployed for seven months, has sold his house and his
two vehicles and has became dependent on welfare an food
stamps. Roberson hugged his attorney Mike Howell as the court
See Wiretap, page 4
Jamming
Photo by Dafl RMd � TEC
Students passing by Mendenhall Student Center stop to listen to an afternoon jam session courtesy of Hump Day Toons. The
lunchtime concert was sponsored by the Student Union concert committee.
Homecoming celebration kicks off Friday
By Karen Hassell
Staff Writer
Homecoming celebration will
begin Friday afternoon on the Mall
with the Piratefest celebration.
Organized by the Homecoming
committee, Piratefest, chaired by
Kendra Curtis, will begin at 530 Fri-
day.
The Piratefest celebration will
include a pep rally hosted by the
ECU band, cheerleaders, Purple
and Gold dancers and Dance Ex-
pression.
"The biggest thing that we are
having new this year is we're hav-
ing a treasure chest Curtis said.
"The chest is on display this weekat
the Student Store
Thechestcontainsvariousdo-
natedprizessuchasafootball signed
by the team, coupons for food and the
choice between a Sony Discman, a data
processor or a 13-inch color television.
To win the treasurechest, Curtis
said that individuals must first state
the slogan for this years homecoming;
"Purple and Gold, nothing finer in
Carolina
Winners will then receive a key
that may open the chest. Later, every
person witha key willhavethe chance
to try to open the chest The person
with the correct key will win the
prizes.
Eightcandidates for Homecom-
ing court will be announced during
Piratefest.
"A spirit award will be pre-
sented to the organization participat-
inginPiratefest with themostpoints
Curtis said.
See Piratefest, page 3
Condom Crazy
Media Board may extend seat
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Photo by Jason Bosche � TEC
Students receive free condoms at a Sex Week '92 rally on Tyler Beach. Health
Services has been sponsoring weekly events in honor of AIDS Awareness Month.
The National Pan-Hellenic Coun-
cilNPHC) has petitioned the Media
Board to add another seat on the Board
to properly reflect the Greek society at
ECU.
NPHC is a Greek organization
that represents eight fraternities and
sororities which are not included in the
Inter-Fraternity Council or the
Panhellenic Council. The fraternities
and sororities include Alpha Phi Al-
pha, Kappa Alpha Psi, Omega Psi Phi,
Phi Beta Sigma, Alpha Kappa Alpha,
Delta Sigma Theta, Sigma Gamma Rho
and Zeta Phi Beta.
Susan Stewart,Student Union rep-
resentative, proposed the amendment
to the Media Board's constitution at the
Sept. 24 meeting. Stewart said she felt it
necessary to propose the additional seat
because the brotherhoods and sister-
Black fraternitiessororities lobby
for representation
hoods in the NPHC are "an integral part
of our campus and community ac-
cording to the amendment.
"A representative from NPHC was
not on the Board Stewart said. "I
thought the situation was unfair
Members of the Media Board posed
the question of equal representation of
students in the' Media Board.
Terry Avery, Media Board chair-
person, stressed the need to look at the
amount of representatives per organi-
zation that the Media Board has.
"I think that it's a good idea to add
a seat on the Board Avery said. "But
we need to re-eval uate how many repre-
sentatives we the Board has for each
organization. This would make it com-
parable to the number of students we
have on campus represented by these
seats
Tommy Spaulding, IFC president,
echoed Avery's support.
"I'm definitely in favor of it
Spaulding said. "I never understood why
they didn't have a seat, and I think it's a
tremendous step forward. I welcome
them fully to the Board
Board member and SGA president
Courtney Jones voiced a concern about
possible integration between the NPHC
and the IFC.
"I think they should merge together
because they would both be an asset to
each other Jones said. "It's a shame in
the '90s that we have white governing
See NPHC, page 7
Slay residence hall to remain open
Pyramid sex proves risky
By Tracy Ford
Staff Writer
Slay and Umstead residence halls,origi-
nally scheduled to be closed this year for
renovations, had to be opened to house the
overflow from increa sed demand for on cam-
pus housing.
Slay will now remain open through
May, 1993.
"We opened up Slay and Umstead ini-
tially justforoverflow so that wedidn'thave to
triple anybody said Manny Amaro, director
of student services. "Butin theprocessof doing
that, we tal ked to the archi tects who are remod -
eling the buildings and we found that really in
the worse case scenaiio we could keep one of
those buildings open for the entire year
Students placed in Umstead fortempo-
rary housing were all placed successfully
with no triple rooms. "I hate triples Amaro
said. "I think students hate triples
The construction, which will update
and renovate Slay and Umstead, is scheduled
to begin in March or April and be completed
in August 1994.1he renovation will includea
three-story lounge area for dorm residents
that will include a laundry area, computer
room and a weight room. Air conditioning
and carpeting will also be added.
According to Amaro, with the loss of
twodorms or 500 beds,it is expected to be tight
next year as well. "I think we can manage that
a li trie better than whatsbeendone in thepast
Amaro encourages students living in
the dorms who wish to continue to do so next
vear to take advantage of the early March
sign-upbecause,after March, priority will go
to new students.
"Because we've always had space, it's
never been needed Amaro saidTjustthink
it will be tight for one year until Slay and
Umstead open back up
Enrollment is expected to increase
through the year 2000, according to Amaro,
but not in the drastic numbers seen over the
past years.
"In the future, we're hoping that we
don't have to triple because the growth rates
will be slower Amaro said.
One-hundred and seventy-onestudents
dropped out of campus housing this year
after classes began. According to Amaro, this
gives the student services department some
room for tripling.
"If we do triple, we do have some lee-
way because we know there are a number
of students who come to school and then
decide, before tuition deadline, to drop
out Amaro said.
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
"Pyramid sex or having
sexual intercourse with everyone
your partner has had sex with, con-
tinues to be a misunderstood and
understated problem in today's soci-
ety.
For example, Johnny had inter-
course with Sue a year ago. At that
time, Sue was infected with a sexu-
ally transmitted disease (STD) and
innocently gave it to Johnny.
Today, Johnny is having sexual
intercourse with Christy, unknow-
ingly putting Christy at risk for an
STD. If Christy becomes infected, then
all future sexual partners are put at
risk. The list stretches from the past to
the present to the future, with no end
in sight.
The appearance of STDs domi-
nate in people ages 15 to 35. A little-
known fact about the nature of STDs
is that they are asymptomatic. This
means that although a person may be
infected, there are no signs or symp-
toms of infection .present.
A good example of a STD is
Chlamydia, a very common bacterial
infection that affects 10 to 15 percent
of the college population. Yet 75 per-
cent of those infected with Chlamy-
dia show no outward signs or symp-
toms of disease. Untreated, Chlamy-
dia can cause damage to the repro-
ductive tract and cause infertility.
See Sex, page 7
m





2 The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 15, 1992
Campaigns prepare for second debates
Students demonstrate against cuts
Thousands of California State University students walked out
of classes recently in a statewide protest of education cuts and fee
hikes that resulted in at least two arrests. The incident occurred
during two days of speeches and workshops about education cut-
backs. Some protestors charged that they were beaten by police when
a demonstration near San Diego State University turned violent
"Unfortunately, things got a little ugly said Merek Findling, 21, one
of the protest organizers. "There were 34 patrol cars and motorcycle
cops there and one helicopter. There were a number of students who
were hit with nightsticks. Nothing like this has ever happened
before Other campuses in the 20-campus CSU system heid similar
rallies protesting a 40 percent fee hike and 8.8 percent budget cut.
Student insurance covers abortion
Women at Ohio State University who are covered by the
school's student insurance plan can have off-campus abortions under
the policy, school officials said. They must pay a $200 deductible and
20 percent of the remaining expenses. Since abortions are covered
under the university's comprehensive major medical services, the
annual deductible applies to all services rendered under the category,
the Ohio Lantern Reported. If a student has met the deductible, she is
responsible for 20 percent of the abortion costs. Ohio State does not
have an abortion clinic, and students must make their own arrange-
ments.
Former athletes sue university
Four former University of Southern Louisiana female volley-
ball players are suing the university for damages. The four women
charged mat volleyball coach Cheryl Lambert made slanderous
comments to the L'Acadien yearbook staff about them, violated the
NCAA rules by favoring certain players, and falsely accused a player
of lying. The last accusation, the suit charges, resulted in a player's
arrest The story in the student publication described how Lambert
suspended the four players from the Lady Cajun volleyball team after
she suspected they brought liquor with them on a road trip. The suit
also charged that players were sexually discriminated against by the
university because men's sports receive more funding than women's
activities.
ACLU intervenes in Citadel case
The American Qvil Liberties Union has petitioned a federal
court to stop The Citadel from closing a program to avoid admitting
women veterans into the school. The state-run military institution
closed its day school program for male veterans rather than admit
women who have sued to gain access to day classes.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel.
Taken from CPS and other newspapers.
Washington Post Wire Service
On the morning after their
fierce Tuesday night debate, Vice
President Quayle bragged that
his opponent, Sen. Albert Gore
Jr Tenn could not defend the
integrity of Democratic presiden-
tial nominee Bill Clinton.
Gore said Quayle's charges
were part of a "big lie technique"
that deserved no rebuttal. But
later in the day, the Clinton camp
unloaded a ton of documenta-
tion against the Quayle attack.
The vice presidential can-
didates left Atlanta Wednesday,
bloodied butre-energized by
their Georgia Tech debate and
clearly intending to continue
their grudge by other means.
Both sides claimed victory,
with the Republicans dramatiz-
ing their boast at a Rose Garden
welcome for Quayle led by Presi-
dent Bush, who grabbed his run-
ning-mate for an Oval Office tac-
tical discussion of Thursday
night's second presidential de-
bate in Richmond.
In a round of morning tele-
vision interviews and at a short
pep-rally at Auburn University
in Alabama, Quayle boasted that
Gore "never once defended"
Clinton against the Quayle accu-
sations that Clinton "changes his
mind all the time" and "just has
trouble telling the truth
"For 90 minutes Al Gore re-
fused to defend the character and
integrity of his running-mate
Quayle said in a CNN interview.
"I will tell you right now that
George Bush is one of the most
honest people I've ever met. Al
Gore cannot make that statement
about Bill Clinton.
"Al Gore did a good job of
defending himself Quayle said,
"but he did not defend Bill
Clinton The character issue is
clearly on the table
For his part, Gore said he
was "very pleased" with his per-
formance and condemned
Quayle for focusing on a "per-
sonal smear campaign" against
Clinton because "they have noth-
ing to say about the most impor-
tant issues of the day
Gore told interviewers that
he did not directly respond to
Quayle's attacks against Clinton
because they were "so shrill they
collapsed of their own weight
Clinton, he added, "isbyallodds
the most qualified person to run
for president in my lifetime
On NBC's "Today" show,
Gore said that no response was
necessary or desirable to Bush
and Quayle's "Johnny one-note"
campaign trying to impugn
Clinton's character. This, he
added, is part of a "big lie tech-
nique but "just because they
repeat it again and again doesn't
mean it's true
But as it turned out, the
Clinton campaign did not want
to leave it at that. In
Williamsburg, Va where Clinton
was preparing for Thursday
night's debate, reporters were
handed a 14-page document de-
tailing alleged distortions by
Quayle.
It was the latest example of
how the development of data
bases and modern computer tech-
nology has enabled both cam-
paigns to locate, retrieve and dis-
tribute a dizzying array of infor-
mation to back up its claims and
rebut the assertions of the oppo-
sition. Put together overnight, the
document assailed virtually ev-
erything Quayle said during the
debate, with more than 75 cita-
tions of counter-information that
were culled from 36 separate
sources, including newspapers,
magazines, wire service reports,
television broadcasts, books and
government documents.
"Dan Quayle lobbed gre-
nades all night but none hit the
document declared. "So Dan
Quayle resorted to old Republi-
can tactics he lied
Briefing reporters in
Williamsburg, George
Stephanopoulos, the Clinton
campaign's communications di-
rector, said the thoroughness of
the response was not an indica-
tion that the campaign was dis-
satisfied with Gore's debate per-
formance or a reaction to the per-
ception that Gore failed to con-
front head-on Quayle's repeated
charge that Clinton "has trouble
telling the truth
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The Student Union Travel Committee is offer-
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the Hotel Edison.
You are free to plan your own itinerary. See a
show. Do some early Christmas shopping.
See the big Macy's Thanksgiving day parade.
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Prices include hotel and transportation:
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'
OCTOBER 15. 1992
The East Carolinian 3
Management society wins awards Piratefest
Continued from page 1
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
In September, ECU's Soci-
ety of Advancement of Manage-
ment (SAM) won national honors
at a convention in Charlottesville,
Va.
John Washko won out-
standing student paper award
and received a $200 check. He
also won third in a management
case competition. In the case com-
petitions, students find problems
and solutions in a situation.
Three ECU students won
outstanding SAM student re-
gional awards. Rick Calloway,
p?st president of SAM, Stewart
Estosito and John Washko.
In addition to students win-
ning awards, faculty advisor Dr.
Rick Aebert won outstanding
chapter advisor.
"Dr. Aebert is by no ques-
tion an excellent advisor who
gives his own time, which helps
make the chapter work said Ex-
ecutive Director of SAM Joe Bush.
SAM gives members a per-
sonal introduction to the practic-
ing managers in the local commu-
nity and exposes the most suc-
cessful management techniques
in current use.
SAM transforms textbook
theories into practical application
to bring together students who
share the same interests, prob-
lems and career objectives.
"In SAM, we're bridging the
gap between classroom theory
Friday. October 16
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and real life management said
Jon Matthews, ECU's president of
SAM. "One of our purposes in
SAM is to bring together student,
faculty and local businessmen
In Spring of 1993, the Na-
tional Conference will be held in
Orlando, Fla. Between three and
five students and a faculty mem-
ber will attend the conference and
compete for the national honors
once again.
Points will be awarded in sev-
eral areas; 20 points for float deco-
ration, 10 points for a candidate for
Homecoming queen and five
points for each person who brings
a canned food product.
The celebration benefits the
Salvation Army through the
canned food drive.
"The winner of the spirit
award will receive a Loving Cup
and a $200 cash prize Curtis said.
Thereare31 floats participat-
ing in Homecoming this year, and
the judging to pick the best float
will be done Friday evening.
The Homecomingparade will
be held on Saturday at 10 a.m. The
parade will begin at the bottom of
College Hill, turning left on Fifth
street, and continuing around
campus.The floats will be parked
around Central Campus Mall on
Friday. The area will be blocked
off to traffic at 7 a.m.
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While there you can register for
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5:30-6:30pm at (l,
Christenbury Pool V
A free aquarobics dass
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Refreshments and prize
drawings at the
completion of class. No
registration required.
Please bring ECU ID.
OCTOBER 21
All events
co-sponsored by ECU
Recreational Services
21 Minute Triathlon
3-6pm in the
Christenbury facilities
A unique twist to the triathlon
arena with competition open
to all men and women as
follows:
� 10 minutes lap swimming-
CG Pool
� 10 minutes stationary
bicyde - CG Weight Room
� 1 minute push ups - CG
Assessment Center
Participants may complete
each event in any order but
need to check in with event
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male and female finisher
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Fitness Class
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All scheduled fitness dasses at
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Hfc





4 The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 15. 1992
Wiretap
Continued from page 1
clerk announced his dismissal.
"I am overwhelmed with
joy Roberson said after the ver-
dict. "Better than two years of an
emotional roller coaster just came
to an end
Roberson said Richard
Brown, vice chancellor of Busi-
ness Affairs, told him he was sorry
when the university forced him
to resign March 8,1991.
"Brown told me I was
young, I could start over Rober-
son said. "Well, now 1 can start
over
Roberson said he was still
confused as to what happened
between May 1990 when he first
tapped Mills' phone and March
1991 when he resigned.
"1 never really new what the
people above me were doing he
said. "I worked mostly with John
Burrus. I considered myself
the lowest man on the totem pole
that came through here. I feel
vindicated. 1 think the university
needs to look inside itself now
U.S. Attorney David Folmar
said he was disappointed with
the verdict and blamed Public
Safety Director James DePuy for
playing hampering his case.
"I think the decision was
partly due to confusion he said.
"I think we had a lot of trouble
with fingerpointing at DePuy. A
lotof people pointed the blame at
DePuy. The biggest problem was
him trying to contact (Ernest)
Suggs at the end of the trial
Suggs, Public Safety captain
for investigations, testified Mon-
day that DePuy harassed him af-
ter he testified earlier in the week.
Suggs testified Oct. 7 that DePuy
ordered the wiretapping of
Bullock's phone line.
Jury members said they
agreed wi th the defense a ttorneys
that Burrus and Roberson acted
on the orders of their superiors.
"I felt all along they were
being used juror Ellen Morton
said. "1 felt they were being used,
and they fel t they were being used.
The jury felt a lot was being hid,
all the jurors, and we felt that
more needed to be checked out
When asked about the pos-
sibility of future legal action
against other ECU employees,
Folmar said the federal
prosecutor's office was "not clos-
ing their options to anything; any-
thing could happen
Jurors seemed inattentive
and bored throughout the trial,
sometimes nodding asleep or dis-
cussing pictures on thecourtroom
walls. Several jury members said
there was much confusion during
the trial.
"The testimony was confus-
ing, the facts were confusing, but
our decision seemed to be, all and
all, easy to make said jury mem-
ber TrulaTurnstall. "Theevidence
that was given did not prove be-
yond a reasonable doubt these
men were guilty
Witnesses made conflicting
statements throughout the five-
day trial. Roberson testified that
Burrus suggested he tap Mills'
phone after he informed Burrus
that Mills may have been carry-
ing a gun on campus. Burrus said
he had not met Roberson until
two tapes of Mills' conversations
had already been made.
Burrus and Suggs both testi-
fied that DePuy ordered the tap
on Bullock's phone because
DePuy suspected Bullock of in-
forming Mills that he was being
watched by a Public Safety un-
dercover agent. DePuy denied
ordering the tap.
Stanlev Kittrell, the Public
Safety captain who informed the
FBI of the wi retapping, said Suggs
told him that knowledge of the
wiretapping went as high as
Brown. Brown testified that he
was not aware of the wiretapping
and did not authorize it.
Kittrell also said Suggs told
him Chancellor Richard Eakin
possibly knew about the wiretap-
ping. Eakin did not testify and
declined to comment.
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CALL TODAY
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News writers need. If interested, stop by the
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Specialists for:
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A FORUM ADDRESSING CURRENT TOPICS
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THE DEFINING ISSUE
YOUR LIFE MAY DEPEND ON IT!
October 20, 1992 8 PM MSC Great Room
Presented By STUDENT UNION FORUM COMMITTEE
For More Information Call The Student Union Hotline At 757-6004
� . thic �
ATTIC
SOCIETY
PANTRY
PANTRY
PRICE
BUSTERS!
races
good
through
NOV 1
IS
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Bs ms�w Wa
CAFE& GRILLE
w��k�trtidl &ffitimti�iBir!im�mQ to &i?��swBII�m
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featuring Will Bridges on sax
Contemporary Jazz
Friday, October 16th 10:00-1:00
�MARK JOHNSON
featured MCA Nashville Staff Songwriter
"Acoustic Rock"
Saturday, October 17th 10:00-1:00
Full ABC Permits
Over 50 Selections of Imported & Domestic Beers
European-Style Outside Dinning
Weekend Live Entertainment (10:00-1:00 a.m.)
Take-outBox Lunches Available
M-W: 11:00 a.m10:00 p.m.
TH-S: 11:00 a.m1:00 a.m.
Sun: Closed (Available For Private Parties)
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Major
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ij
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Located Between Jefferson's Florist & Coffman s Men Shop
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BUD, COORS,
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When you run out - run out to
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Same at all locations except kegs
THE
PANTRY
.i





- .
� - �I I
October 15, 1992
The East Carolinian
Opinion
Page 5
WZMB � double-standard victim
The campus radio station, WZMB, has
been effectively cut off from its media sta-
tus pending a resolution made by the Me-
dia Board on Oct. 8.
The radio station�and its employees
� have been told that they are not allowed
to associate with bars in the downtown
area because of liability concerns. The uni-
versity attorneys' office has said that any
sponsoring of events held downtown may
leave the university open to FCC and civil
litigation.
The most visible example of this so-
called "sponsorship" was the Weird Zom-
bie Music Buffet held at O'Rockefellers in
mid-September. Private individuals, who
also happened to work at WZMB, worked
with the O'Rockefellers staff to produce
this two-weekend event.
The intended result of the Buffet was
the production of compact discs that would
highlight Greenville progressive bands.
These CDs would then be distributed to
radio stations up and down the Eastern
seaboard with hopes that the stations would
play the music and give the bands exposure
outside of Greenville.
Though there is a recognized trend in
litigation becoming more and more wide-
spread within its limits, the university has
put blinders on to any other events�on or
off campus�that may also put the univer-
sity at risk.
Currently, campus organizations, such
as the American Marketing Association and
the National Women's Studies Alliance,
regularly hold meetings and events at bars
and restaurants in the downtown area. On
campus, tailgating before football games is
condoned by the university, wine-and-
cheese parries are regularly held and even
the Chancellor's house has had events
where alcohol has been available.
If the university is so worried about
the possible risks of association with alco-
hol, then why point the finger at WZMB
alone? Being one of the most visible organi-
zations on campus does not mean that they
are different than others. This tunnel vision
leaves our questions unanswered and seems
to be a personal attack on the members
involved.
One of the biggest questions left to wave
in the breeze after the Oct. 8 Media Board
meeting was that of liability insurance. On
its face value and with nospecialized knowl-
edge on the subject, the proposal seems to be
the best solution for the situation. Having
tavern owners sign this insurance policy or
a contract strictly limiting liability to the
taverns would solve the problem. But the
university attorneys don't want to answer
any questions on what good the insurance
would do. Do they just not know or is it that
they don't want to take the trouble to find
out?
Also, the university attorneys need to
clarify their memo that they released to the
Media Board. Too many terms are left with
the assumption that the reader automati-
cally understands them.
A person who has never taken a law
class or studied law at all will give up after
the second page. In this case, assuming that
the average reader is clueless is the
administration's key to solving this prob-
lem. They need to define everything, and
leave no question as to the definition that it
is being used. Only then can these issues be
cleared up.
Another Media Board meeting will be
held Oct. 22 in the Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter. Anyone interested in voicing their opin-
ions or just hearing the case is welcome to
attend.
Don't let the university single out
WZMB's employees for a practice made
across the ECU campus.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
WZMB employees' jobs threatened
to NOT CoMpiy
as pe�i2NateP xs
WON -WftT vNdftoot.
To the Editor:
Once again, WZMB finds it-
self caught in the middle of an-
other controversy. I will try to
explain what occurred without be-
ing too repetiti v e and with as little
confusion as possible.
Sometime back in May of this
year, I was approached by the
manager of O'Rockefeller's with
the idea of producing a compila-
tion recording of Greenville bands.
I thought it was a great idea and
immediately began to think of
people who would be beneficial at
making it a success. I also thought
that this would be a great chance
to involve WZMB in a project of
which ECU and the Greenville
community would be proud.
With that in mind, I asked
several people on the WZMB staff,
who had specific talents to offer
the project, for their help. I then
took the proposal to the Media
Board and they approved the
project pending a talk with the
university attorney. I explained
to the Media Board and the attor-
ney that O'Rockefeller's would
sponsor two showcases which
would raise the money to pay for
the project.
As WZMB employees, we
only wanted permission to use our
logo on the cover of the recording.
The attorney felt that since the
eventwasgoingtobeheldatabar,
involving WZMB in any way, in-
cluding the use of the logo, would
open the school to liability for al-
cohol. The attorney recommended
mat we do the project on our own,
separately from the university.
With that, Joy Ash, Paul
"Beef" Meador, Kevin Brelsford
and I (all employees of WZMB),
along with the manager of
O'Rockefeller's decided to go
ahead with the project. However,
we went ahead with the project
making sure WZMB was not in-
volved.
Through a misunderstand-
ing stemming from the name of
the event (the Weird Zombie Mu-
sic Buffet) and an article in the
Sept. 15 East Carolinian, thoseof us
who were involved were threat-
ened with disciplinary action by
the vice-chancellor's office. As a
result of a split vote by the Media
Board, it was decided that WZMB
was not involved in the
O'Rockefeller's event.
The truth of the matter is
WZMB in no way sponsored the
event. In fact, the individuals in-
volved went to great lengths to
make sure our involvement as in-
dividuals, nor anything else im-
plied such. By the way, to correct
the caption under the picture on
the front page of the East Carolin-
ian, Oct. 13: WZMB didn't post
any signs, Howdie Dapper and I
did, as concerned individuals.
Yet, we still find ourselves in
a precarious situation. The Media
Board passed a resolution, at the
advice of the university attorney,
which prevents WZMB from par-
ticipating at events which take
place at a bar or even reporting on
events which take place at a bar or
anywhere alcohol is sold.
Please understand what this
means. This means that the WZMB
staff cannot even enter a tavern as
a member of the media.
This means that the univer-
sity has temporarily restricted our
First Amendment rights. The re-
striction will remain in place until
a permanent policy concerning
WZMB's involvementwith places
where alcohol is sold has been
drawn by the attorney and the
Media Board chairperson.
I would like to thank the stu-
dent members of the Media Board
for their support, especially that
of Chairperson Terry Avery, who
expressed her disapproval of
implementing an alcohol risk
policy which would only apply to
WZMB and not to all organiza-
tions on campus.
I should hope mat our fel-
low students will give us their full
support while we attempt to get
this issue of alcohol risk settled
and our rights as a medium fully
restored.
Please let the administration
know how you feel about this by
writing them through the ECU
Media Board or by attending next
Thursday's Media Board meeting.
For meeting time and place, please
call the ECU Media Board at 757-
6009. Let us at WZMB know as
well. Feel free to write or call us at
Mendenhall StudentCenter at757-
6913 or 757-4751.
Tim Johnson
Senior
Communications
Students in Guard lose in-state tuition waivers
To the Editor:
On Sept. 1, 1992, many ECU
students, including myself, re-
ceived a letter from the associate
vice chancellor for business affairs.
The letter concerned a change
of ruling on eligibility for in-state
tuition military waivers, written
by the University of Norm Caro-
lina General Administration.
The new ruling states that a
member of the military has to be
on active duty with orders to a
U.S. military installation located
in North Carolina in order to re-
ceive an in-state tuition waiver.
The General Administration
Office states that "People assigned
in a drill status to North Carolina
National Guard or Reserve Units
are not considered active military
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Matthew B. Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. SutoritlS, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'1, Assistant Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Billiard, Circulation Manager
M. Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Cori Daniels, Classified Advertising Technician
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The fast Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial m each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, i ne East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bid ECU
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more inf- nation, call (919) 757-6366
duty
With thenewrulinghundreds
of soldiers and sailors here at ECU
and throughout the state will be
burdened with out-of-state tuition
fees along with the dedication
needed to serve the state.
Many out-of-state students
have decided to join the National
Guard of Reserves to benefit form
the military waiver and now after
their time and dedication their
miliiary waivers have been de-
nied.
Many may not realize it but
the individuals that are affected
by this waiver serve and have
served before for the state of North
Carolina. During both Hurricanes
Diana and Hugo, many National
Guardsmen and Reservists served
throughout the state providing
direct support for disaster relief.
Many of these same soldiers
served time in the Persian Gulf for
a North Carolina unit, not for a
unit from their home state.
One of our most important
missions as soldiers of the North
Carolina National Guard and Re-
serves is to serve the people of this
state.
Granting us in-state tuition
waivers will enable us to serve in
North Carolina and also further
our education.
Mr. Jorge A. Benitez
N.C National Guard
213th Military Police Co.
Columnist's view of racism questioned
To the Editor:
So Mr. Dubliablo doesn't
believe racism began with sla-
very? It is amazing that although
Dubliablo is slightly misinformed
than most, he still walks under a
vast cloud of ignorance. It would
seem to me that someone that is a
so-called journalist, would re-
search an issue before expound-
ing on it blindly. You see,
Dubliablo is like many people,
black and white, that have ideas
about racism that have been mis-
construed by society.
Although slavery's begin-
nings may not have been solely
due to racism, it was still a major
part of the system. Slavery was a
segment of Europeans' imperial-
istic ideas, to spread their "supe-
rior" society around the world.
These ideas looked upon every-
one else as being "inferior How
can anyone say that racism didn't
exist at this time when slaves were
packed into ships like sardines,
shackled together and shipped
amongst death, disease, and def-
ecation? That's only the tip of the
iceberg when it comes to the treat-
ment of slaves. And the question
still stands, if Europeans felt that
Africans were their equal, how
could any of this have occurred?
Dubliablo asks why African
Americans are angry at the white
Americans for things their ances-
tors did?
It is because white Ameri-
cans are still benefiting from the
institution of slavery, and African
Americans are still being hurt.
Statistics show and I know as an
African-American male, thatwhite
Americans have a better opportu-
nity to achieve the threep's, power,
prestige, and privilege, than Afri-
can Americans.
Finally, Mr. Dubliablo's
opinion about Malcolm X is to-
tally wrong. Malcolm X never
promoted violence. He taught
African Americans to be proud of
their culture and to be proud of
themselves. He fought for the
masses of African Americans to
be respected as human beings, not
treated as animals. And if that
included one defending himself,
so be it. To quote Malcolm X, "Self
defense is not violence. It is called
Intelligence
So, next time Mr. Dubliablo,
research a topic before expound-
ing on it, because you ended up
alienating more people than you
enlightened.
Demetrius Carter
Sophomore
Biology





- m -��� r ii.Ii - � �
� �mi � ���i
"i
77te �to Carolinian
October 15, 1992
Classifieds
page 6
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS :1 and 2 bedroom
apartments. Energy-efficient,
several locations in town. Car-
peted, kitchen appliances, some
water and sewer paid, washer
dryer hookups. Call 752-8915.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To
share two bedroom fully fur-
nished apartment. ECU bus ac-
cess near by. call Tim at 758-
5207.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share a two bed-
room apartment. Rent &170.00
a month, 12 utilities nd
$175.00 deposit. 201 F
Eastbrook Apartments. Call
Stephanie at 758-7664.
TIRED OF YOUR PRESENT
LIVING ARRANGEMENTS?
Need a roommate to share apt.
at 807 College View Apts.
$125.00 mo 12 utilities
(Lowest rent ir. Greenville) 2
BR, Large den, ECU bus. For
more information call 758-9865.
LOOKING FOR ROOM-
MATE. Wistful Vista. One
block from campus. Spacious
apartment, large kitchen, bal-
cony, hardwood floors, par-
tially furnished. Rent $175
month 12 utilities. Need by
November 1. Call Karen or
Mary at 830-9450.
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Roommate needed to share a
two-bedroom town house
apartment. Rent is $160.00 a
month and half electricity.
Contact: Stacy Feterson-Car-
riage House Apts Apt. 60.
Phone 321-1532 (leave a mes-
sage).
ROOM FOR RENT: Sheraton
Village, behind Ramada. The
room is in a 2 bedroom
townhouse, includes washer
and dryer, electricity, water,
andbasicphone. $275monthly,
355-6534.
APARTMENT FOR RENT:
One bedroom, $275 a month. 4
blocks from campus, energy
efficient, free basic cable,
washerdryer hook-ups.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
ADVERTISING
REPRESENTATIVES
Curt Lewis
-SeniorBusiness Administration
Kathryn Rickman
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Lisa Sykes
-SeniorCommunications
Lindsay Fernandez
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Matt Hege
-JuniorCommunications
CALL 757-6366
Today for more
advertising information
FOR RENT
Available January 1 (nego.).
Apt. 3 Captain's Quarter. Call
830-6902.
TWO FEMALE
HOUSEMATES NEEDED;
Non-smokers. Pref. grads. 2
12blocks from campus. $175
rent plus $175 deposit and 1 3
utilities. House has finished
hardwood floors, central air
and heat, large kitchen, bath.
Quiet family area. Phone: 757-
6665, 8-5 pm. Leave message
for Phyllis.
F( )R SALE
GOVERNMENT SIEZED
CARS, trucks, boats, 4wheel-
ers, motorhomes, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available your area now.
call 1-800-333-3737 ext. C-5999.
FREE KITTEN: Male, 8 weeks
old, supplies included. Needs
good home. Call anytime: 321-
0809.
CAR STEREO CD PLAYER:
Alpine 5905 pullout, $180. Am
amplifier ADS PH 12 6 chan-
nels 20 by 6(200)An portable
Sony CD player $150 with AC
adapter. Call 752-2596.
TWIN BED: Mattress,
boxspring, and frame. Good
condition. $75.00 or best offer.
FREE CAT! Friendly, fixed, 1
yr. old. Call 752-5076.
FREE TO GOOD HOME: 8
week old kittens need home.
Call 758-8420.
ARE YOU SCARED of walk-
ing alone at night or in danger-
ous areas because of fear of at-
tack? Then buy the Quorum
PAAL - Personal Attack Alarm.
Once activated the PAAL emits
an ear piercing 107 decibel
alarm that scares off attackers.
Call 758-6425 for more info.
WILLOUGHBY PARK
CONDO 2BR 2BA "Super II"
upstairs end unit 1300 sq ft.
Jacuzzi tub, gas fireplace. As-
sumable 8.5 FHA mortgage,
$498mo. 757-6644
BLACK LEATHER skirt size 5,
and jacket, size small. Brand
new, still with tags. $49 each, or
best offer. 757-6644
PASSES FOR SALE: Have up
to 8 grass passes for sale. Good
for any concert at Walnut Creek.
$20 each(neg.). (This includes
the Bad Company concert.)
HELP WANTED
EMERGENCY! Expanding
company needs hardworking
reliable students to mail our
diet brochures from Home
Dorm! Earn up to $200 FT of
$1000 FT! Employees needed
immediately! For job applica-
tion send self-addressed stamp
envelope: Colossal Marketing,
Employee Processing, P.O. Box
291140 Port Orange, FL 32129.
"HELP WANTED" EARN
$1,500 WEEKLY mailing our
circulars Begin now FREE
packet! SEYS, Dept. 164, Box
4000, Cordova, 380181000.
GUARANTEED WORK
Announcements
HELP WANTED
AVAILABLE, txcellent pay
for EASY home based work.
Full part-time. Rush self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope:
Publishers (G2) 1821
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Durham, NC 27705
S360UP WEEKLY. Mailing
brochures! Sparefull-time. Set
own hours! RUSH self-ad-
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Publishers (Gl) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
WORK AT HOME: Assem-
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Up to $500.00 a week pos-
sible. For information write
Source; 1840-D Simonton
Road, Dept. 9108, Statesville,
NC 28677.
ATTENTION! EARN $2500
Free Trip! Students, Greeks,
Clubs earn free Spring Break
trip after selling only 8 trips at
your school! Spring Break 1-
800-678-6336.
CAMPUS REPS WANTED!
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tinations! Sell Spring Break
packages to Jamaica, Cancun,
Bahamas, Florida. Fastest way
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Call Sun Splash Tours 1-800-
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Call toll free. 1-800-467-5566
Ext. 5920.
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT:
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program call 1-206-634-0468
ext. C5362.
MODELS: Susan's needs you
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dividuals and student organi-
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SPRING BREAK, call the
Nation's leader. Inter-Campus
Programs 1-800-327-6013.
STUDENTS OR ORGANI-
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Call Campus Marketing - 1-
HEP WANTED
80023-5264.
WANTED: PART TIME VAN
DRIVER for local paratransit
agency. Perfect for college stu-
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time work. Some early morn-
ing and afternoon hours as well
a midday. Duties include op-
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tance of elderly, handicapped
and disadvantaged passengers.
Expect positive attitude and
good working history and good
driving record. If. interested
apply in person at CTS Man-
agement Company, 901 Staton
Blvd Greenville, NC 27858
(EOA) call 830-1939
SERVICES (1FFERED
TYPING: Error free, quick and
dependable at reasonable cost.
Excellent typing and proof-
reading skills (grammar, punc-
tuation, sentence structure,
etc.). Call Pauline at 757-3693.
STUDY ABROAD IN AUS-
TRALIA: Information on se-
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mer and internship programs
in Australia. We represent 28
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toll free 1-800-245-2575.
UPDATE YOUR IMAGE. Call
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makeover. Michelle Lanier
BeautiControl Image Consult-
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GREEKS! Have the hot MU-
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PERSONALS
SINCE YOU'RE SINGLE
AND LIKE TO MINGLE;
Come to a Free bowling party
at East Carolina Bowl, 700 Red
Banks Road. RSVP with Sheri.
355-5510.
LOOKING FOR 3rd ROOM-
MATE to live with two gradu-
ate students in 3 bdrm. house.
Rent $160 per month per per-
son and utilities. Call Jason
756-6614 or 757-6318.
CONGRATULATIONS to the
Fall '92 officers of ALPHA PHI
OMEGA: PresLisa Lovett, VP
service-Marc Hodge,
VPmembership- Wes Martin,
Sgt @ Arms-Marcy Krause,
TreasCindy Shepard, Sec-
Michele Kennedy, Fellowship-
Laura Sharar, Publicity- Vickie
PERSONALS
Woolridge, Scouting Rep
Marty Tschetter, Historian-
Heather Roberts, Alumni Sec-
Laura Schulist, Intramural
Rep Wyatt Phipps and
CONGRATS to the Lambda
Alpha MV pledge class offic-
ers: Pres Mike McPherson,
VP- Amy Godwin, Sec- Jodi
Barr, Treas Dan Cupo.
MELANIE OAKLEY (aka-
oinker, whipped cream girl,
and monk) CONGRATS on
getting into the nursing
school I knew you could do
it You do realize that nursing
uniforms don't come with
rhinestones don't you?? Love,
Your really cool Big.
SWIRLING VORTICES of
PURE ENERGY come to, and
pass thru me, RADIATING in
ALL DIRECTIONS. A pebble
in A COSMIC POOL reflect-
ing a seismic vibration. EN-
JOY IT IN YOUR LIFE.
THANKS TO THE RUGBY
TEAM for last Thursday night!
The hu rt feels good Love, the
sisters and pledges of Delta
Zeta. CONGRATULATIONS
to the Delta Zeta flag football
team! You had a grat season -
we're so proud! Love, the sis-
ters and pledges. THANKS to
Douglas for all your help! We
couldn't have done it without
you! Love, the sisters and
pledges of Delta Zeta.
LADIES: Just five more days
till the 2nd annual Gamma
Sigma Sigma male auction!
Come see these men on Octo-
ber 20th in General College
building, room 1028, from 8-
9:30 pm. A i don't forget your
cash
PI DELTA: Had a great time
last week! Hope to be ship-
wrecked with you again! Love,
Delta Sig
LAMBDA CHI: The buses
came early, but Bryce made us
late. When he stepped on the
bus he was the one we did
hate. We headed for Duke with
a drink in our hand. But after
the game few of us could stand.
Though the game was a loss,
we still had some fun. The
next game we go to maybe the
Pirates will have have won.
P.S. Mike Olsen- sorry about
your BIG problem on the bus.
Love, Alpha Delta Pi.
LYNN DAVIS AND JOHN
ROSS: Congratulations on
your engagement! We love
you Lynn. Love- the sisters of
Alpha Delta Pi.
PI KAPPS: Get ready to build
PERSONALS
the winning float. See you on
Thursday. We're looking for-
ward to seeing you guys again.
Love, the Sigmas
DELTA SIG'S: Just sit right
back and you'll hear a tale, a
tale of a social trip. That started
last Thursday night, at the Delta
Sig's! We had a great time be-
ing shipwrecked with you guys.
The pledges did a wonderful
singing job; only we had never
"lost that loving feeling Hope
we can get together again soon.
Love, the sisters and pledges of
Pi Delta.
LADIES:Let's transcend the
meaningless and trivial, life can
be so mystical. Let me shine
some love and light in your life
Write: HAWK, PO Box 8663,
Greenville, NC 27853
PI DELTA PLEDGES: WE hope
you were as surprised as we
were last Thursday! We love
our little sisters; even those who
aren't roller skating profession-
als! Can't wait for our next
activity! Love, Your Big Sisters
ALPHA OMICRON PI: Get
ready to shag! Cocktail is only
one day away

GO PIRATES! Good luck
against Cincinnati! Love, the
sisters and pledges of Alpha
Omicron Pi.
GOOD LUCK to the Pirate foot-
ball team on Saturday. Every-
one have a spectacular Home-
coming '92! Chi Omega
PI KAPPSA; We had a great
time Saturday night at 102 Elm.
Can't wait to do it again. The
Chi Omegas.
DELTA CHI'S: Our float is
going to be awesome thanks to
you guys. Thanks also for a fun
time at the Elbo Monday night.
Love, the Chi Omegas.
ALL GREEKS: The annual Al-
pha Phi Drink Out will be held
Wed Oct. 21 at the bottom of
the hill. Contact Kim Parker for
details 758-1880
ALPHA PHI'S: Everyone get
ready for cocktail tomorrow
night! It will be a night to re-
member.
ALPHA ZETA DELTA, CHI-
O, AND KAPPA SIG: Glad we
could get together Monday
night ! Who won the game
anyway? The brothers and
pledges of Delta Chi.
CALL FOR E N T t E S
ECU Literary and Art Competition
Sponsored by REBEL '93 Magazine
CASH PRIZES GUARANTEED PUBLICATION IN REBEL 93
CATEGORIES: �Poetry -Prose -Fine Arts -Applied Arts
1
Entry Deadline: November 4,1992, 5:00 p.m.
Iditional Information available at 1
English Department Main office
�I �J T
Additional Information available at the Rebel office in the Publication Buiiaina.
English Department Main office, and the School of Art Medtq Center.
BISEXUAL. GAY-I FS-
BIAN SUPPORT GROUP
Social support and activi-
ties. Meetings are closed. Call
757-676611:00 -12:15 Tues. and
Thurs. or 1:00 - 2:30 Wed. for
information on meeting time
and place.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray,
study God's word, be involved
in social and service projects?
Need a refuge from time to
time? Campus Christian Fel-
lowship may be what you are
looking for. Our weekly meet-
ings are at 7pm Wednesdays at
our Campus House located at
200 E. 8th St directly across
from Cotanche St. from Men-
denhall Student Center. Ev-
eryone is welcome. For more
information, Call Tim Turner,
Campus Minister at 752-7199.
STUDENT HEALTH
SERVICE
Flu vaccine will be available
at Student Health Service this
Fall If you would like to re-
ceive the vaccine this Fall come
by the Student Health Center
(8am - 5pm) to sign up and pay
for the vaccine. The cost is $3.00.
October 16th is the last day to
sign up and to receive the vac-
cine. Vaccines will be adminis-
tered October 19 through Octo-
ber 30.
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAIL-
ABLE
Approximately $17,600 will
be awarded in scholarships to
School of Business majors (those
students already i the School of
Business). Students interested
in making application for these
scholarships should secure
forms from on of the following
department offices: accounting
-GCB 308; Decisions Sciences -
3418; Finance - 3420; Manage-
ment - 3106; Marketing - 3414.
All applications must be sub-
mitted to Ruth Jones (GCB
3210), Chairman of School of
Business Scholarship Commit-
tee, by October 16, 1992. Stu-
dents may apply for one or
more of the scholarships.
ECU CERAMICS GUILD
Annual mug sale. The sale
will be Oct. 16 from 8-5 in the
from entrance of Jenkins Fine
A rts Center. All mugs are hand
made by student and profes-
sors of ceramics. The mugs
range in price from $5-$10.
ORDER OF OMFGA
Attention all members and
perspective members. Order of
Omega meeting will be held
Thurs. Oct. 15,1992 at 5:00pm.
Mendenhall Multipurpose
room on first floor.
PERFORMING ART SE-
RIES
Performing on Friday, Oct
16,1992 at 8:00pm, Ray Charles,
the Raelettes, and the Ray
Charles Orchestra will perform
a variety of music ranging from
gospel to blues to jazz to R&B.
The Carroll Dashiell Jazz En-
semble will serve as the open-
inc act.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS
THUR OCT. 15 � Faculty
Recital fearuringSelmaGokcen,
cello; John B. O'Brien, piano
with guest lecturers Bodo
Nischanand McKay Sundwall:
Beethoven and the Romantic
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00pm,
Free). SUN OCT. 18 � Faculty
Recital featuring Charles Bath,
piano (Fletcher Recital Hall,
3:00pm, Free). MON OCT 19
� Dawn Batts Hill, composi-
tion, Graduate Recital (Fletcher
Recital Hal),7:00pm, Free);and
David Farrior, tuba and Cedric
Hairston, tuba, Senior Recital
(Fletcher Recital hall, :00pm,





1
OCTOBER 15, 1992
The East Carolinian 7
Continued from page 1
NPHC
Continued from page 1
Two ways to prevent a STD
is to abstain from sexual inter-
course or, more likely, to have
intercourse with a "mutually
faithful" partner that is also not
infected. The rule is easy to fol-
low: the more sexual partners �
the more risk of infection.
If a person decides to en-
gage in sexual intercourse, the
most effective method of preven-
tion is to use latex condoms that
have non-oxonol-9. When
condoms are used incorrectly or
break, the risk is only greater to
the couple.
The addition of alcohol to a
sexual relationship only creates
even more risks. When alcohol is
present, people often feel less in-
hibited and lack good judgement
when making behavioral choices.
Drunk sex is rarely, if ever, "safe
sex
With alcohol into the sce-
nario, a person's mental capacity
may be hindered to such an ex-
tent that condoms are used in-
correctly or not at all.
Student Health Services has
current information for inter-
ested persons about HIV and
STDs.
systems for white fraternities and
sororities and a separate black gov-
erning system for black fraterni-
ties and sororities
Stewart, who initially pro-
posed the amendment, had no
comment on possible integration.
After two consecutive unani-
mous votes in favor of the amend-
ment, the Media Board has passed
it on the Chancellor's office for
final approval.
CRESCENT
STEAM CLEANING
We Cater To
ECU Students � Faculty
Reduced Rates For
Fraternities St Sororities
1992 STUDENT SPECIAL
$11.00 Per Room
�Upholstery -Spot Cleaning 'Deodorizing
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Open Daily
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316 E. 10th St
758-0000
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ON COMPUTER SOFTWARE
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Individualized Computer Sales & Support
608 Arlington Blvd.
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Greenville, NC 27858
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ask for Tamara or Ann






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Welcome
Arlington Village 55-
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BUFFALO WING SPECIAL
from 4:00 til 7:00 Daily
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WORLD SERIES SPECIALS
Free Pop Corn � 250 Wings
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The East Carolinian
�i
October 15. 1992
Lifestyle
Page 9
Music works
Songwriter Fred Koller to conduct workshop
By Julie Totten
Staff Writer
Check it out!
Get ready ECU! Adoubledoseof
Fred Koller is preparing to grace
Greenville.
OnThursday,Oct.l5,thissinger
songwriter will perform at the Upper
CrustBakery downtown. Alongwith
this performance, Koller will also di-
rect a workshop for ambitious
songwriters of any level, and all musical
styles.
So who is Fred Koller? Many of you
may be searching through you r head at this
point trying to put a song title under his
name. Most of you who can place the name
are probably thinking aboutcoun try music.
Although Koller has lived in Nashville,
Term, for over 18 years he critically disowns
the country-music image. "I sound a lot
more like Howlin' Wolf than Hank Wil-
liams Koller said. "There's no twang in
my voice
A partial list of his songwriting credits
includes: "Angel Eyes by the Jeff Healey
Band (a top ten single); "She Came From
Fort Worth" and "Life As We Knew It by
Kathy Mattea (both 1 singles); "Where
The Fast Lane Ends by the Oak Ridge
Boys; "Circumstantial Evidence by Jerry
Lee Lewis; and "Juanita by Burl Ives.
In the last few years Koller has also
released three albums of his own. Night of
the Living Fred and Songs From the Night
Before were his first two releases. In 1990,
Alcazar Records promoted his third album,
Where the Fast Lane Ends.
With over 200 songs recorded, anyone
may stop and wonder where the ideas gen-
erate from � what inspires so many
thoughts? In a recent interview with Song
Talk magazine, Koller said, "A visual image
will turn me on. Before 1 got seriously in-
volved in songwriting, I wanted to be a
painter, and when I'm looking at a song, I
wantittobelikeapainrJng�that is, a single
On Saturday Oct. 17, from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m a songwriters workshop will be
held by Fred Koller. The cost of the
workshop is $40 per person and will be
held in the Baptist Student Center on
511 East 10th Street (next to Wendy's).
frame, or a clear picture of what is happen-
ing there. Once 1 have an image in my mind,
it's a lot easier to write the song
Besides evolving into one of Nashville's
most unusual songwriters Koller has also
written a book, How to Pinch and Promote
Your Songs, which was published in 1988 by
Readers Digest Books. In the book, the ele-
ments of good songwriting are explored.
Many songwriters have a hard time
finding their own voice in the writing pro-
cess and the end result is a song that repli-
cates famous musicians rather than reflect-
ing originality.The basis for Koller's
songwriting workshops isanextension from
his book. On Saturday Oct. 17, from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m a songwriters workshop will be
held by Fred Koller.
The cost of the workshop is $40 per
person and will be held in the Baptist Stu-
dent Center on 511 East 10th Street (next to
Wendy's).
A performance will precede the work-
shop at the Upper Crust Bakery on Oct. 15,
at 8 p.m. Early registrants to the workshop
will be admitted to the concert freeof charge.
For more information on registration con-
tact Mike Hamer at 830-0349. The concert
and workshops are jointly sponsored by the
Folkarts Society of Greenville and the
Greenville Songwriters Association.
Fred Koller's musical talent will shine
on Greenville this weekend. Any artist com-
pared to Tom Waits and Chicago all in the
same breath is definantiy worth checking
out!
Photo courtesy In Tunas
Fred Koller will bring his singing and songwriting talent to the Upper
Crust Bakery tonight. He will also conduct a workshop Saturday.
ECU Playhouse
'Cosmic
burlesque'
opens season
By Joe Horst
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Celebrating its golden anniversary, Thorton
Wilder's "Skin of Our Teeth" will open up the East
Carolina's Playhouse 1992-93 season with a "cosmic
burlesque" play.
Director John Shearin describes the play's theme
as one of inner conflict throughout human history.
"Man is constantly beset, almost simultaneously, with
two urges�one to build, and one to destroy he said.
"Skin of Our Teeth" is a play that looks at the
human race with a smell of vaudeville in the air.
Centering on the Antrobus family of Excelsior, N.J the
play progresses through its handsprings through his-
tory, the Ice Age wipes out Hartford, the Deluge en-
gulfs Atlantic City and the Final Conflict threatens little
old Excelsior.
This comical play follows the progress of the "typi-
cal" Antrobus family from the invention of the wheel
through the last great war, with a pet dinosaur and
wooly mammoth thrown in for kicks.
As in Wilder's other works, like "Our Town" and
"The Matchmaker Wilder drives home the point that,
while mankind may forever be obsessed with destruc-
tion, it is also filled with the irrepressibledesire to build
and improve.
"For every optimistic moment there is a contrast-
ing one�the 'skull beneath the skin so to speak�of
the urge to destroy Shearin said.
Performances will begin Oct. 15 and run through
the 20th. Night performances will begin at the new
curtain time of 8 p.m. and the Sunday matinee will
begin at 2 p.m.
Ticket prices are $7.50 for adults and $4.50 for
students with a valid ECU ID. Tickets can be
purchased ai the box office in the lobby of
McGinnis Theatre or charged by phone (VISA
or MasterCard) at (919) 757-6829.
Urban folktales stretch imagination
Photo courtesy Capitol Records
Christopher Thorn, Glen Graham, Shannon Hoon, Rogers Stevens (standing) and Brad Smith (seated) of
Blind Melon have delivered a musical vacuum debut LP reminiscent of ages past.
Blind Melon needs guiding hand
By Bobbi Perfetti
Staff Writer
Have you heard the one about
the fat lady buying groceries with
food-stamps? Howabout the Mexi-
can Chihuahua that was really a
Mexican sewer rat? These are just
an example of the stories Jan
Brunvard told Thursday, Oct. 8, in
ECU's General Classroom build-
ing.
These stories can be labeled as
modern folktales. Brunvard de-
scribes them as "true stories too
good to be true
He told many tales and talked
about the different variations of
some of the them.
"The characters are ordinary
people Brunvard said. "But the
happenings are extraordinary
These tales are told as if they were
true and happened to a friend of a
friend, or as Brunvard says a 'fof
but it is obvious that the stories are
false.
Brunvard told wild tales of baby
lizards being flushed down the toi-
lets and then turning to alligators.
These reptiles supposidly live in
the sewer systems of New York
City and in Miami.
He talked about awoman who
was driving alone one night and
being tailed by a truck. Thedriver of
the truck kept flashing his
highbeams at her and followed her
to her home. It turned out that a
man was hiding in the back seat of
her car, carrying a knife. Every time
the man in the back reached to stab
oie female driver, the driver would
flash his highbeams and the man
wou Id hide, once again, behind the
driver seat.
Brunvard told many tales
Thursday night; some were humor-
ous, while others left chills on my
arms. Other legends were plain dis-
gusting. Each story left me thinking
of tales that I had heard which were
similar to those coming from
Brunvard's mind.
Some folktales can be found in
the tabloids while others can be
read in Brunvard's books: "The
Vanishing Hitchhiker: American
Urban Legends and Their Mean-
ings "TheChokingDobermanand
Other Tew' Urban Legends "The
Mexican Pet: More 'New' Urban
Legends and "Curses! Broiled
AgainHereceives many folktales
from his book-buying audience,
through correspondence, as well as
from his colleagues and students.
Brunvard is a visiting profes-
sor from the University of Utah and
is known as the "nation's leading
expert on folk legends He has ap-
peared on David Letterman's late
night show as well as been the edi-
tor for the journal of American Folk-
lore, c
By Layton Croft
Staff Writer
Blind Melon's self-titled debut
LP is a musical vacuum. Blander
than a tofu Thanksgiving and in
chronic need of artistic identity and
holistic musicality, the record is a
generic amalgam of ages past, of
dusty eight-track classic rock nau-
sea.
Better than a Hoover Deluxe,
Blind Melon really sucks.
The mystery to this limp
quintet's unfortunate emergence in
an American pop cu 1 ture more than
ever "hipped" by the dollar, how-
ever,isits breadth of corporate back-
ing-
Blind Melon's story � fiv?
dudes equipped with long hair,
"Feel like makinToveclassic rock
star fever, Ramen noodle diets and
a combined modicum of musical
talent, met one day in Los Angeles.
In weeks, Capitol Records signed
Blind Melon with only a handful of
performances and a meager demo
tape to its name.
Alas, a nothing band is made
"good" with major label approval
and the enigmatic corporate
overlords once again make flippy
floppy (i.e. Nirvanaism) with silly
putty, turning waterintdrhine wine.
Six months before their album
is released, Blind Melon gets a call
from MTV and tours with Public
Image Limited and Big Audio Dy-
namite II on the 120 Minutes (Dave
Kendall's tour de force of "cutting
edge alternative music" VJ-ed in a
handi-wrap British accent) Tour.
Now touring with Alice In Chains
and Ozzy Osboume, and with the
help of bubbling media acclaim (ie:
Rolling Stone), the Melon heads seem
destined for glory days.
But their record is regurgitated
rock 'n' roll ad nauseam � five me-
diocre psychedelic misfits clanking
out AOR piracy for 40 minutes.
Singer and Black Crowe blueprint
Shannon Hoon sprinkles B-rate
rambling atop recycled riffs and an
uninspired rhythm section. Blend
and you get milky musical mud.
In 13 songs, Blind Melon mim-
ics dozens of bands, past and
present, major- and indie-labeled,
good and bad. Tribute or treason?
You be the judge.
Hoon'svocalsalludetothelikes
of Roger Daltrey (The Who), Peter
Searcy (Big Wheel), Geddy Lee
(Rush, circa Caress of Steel). Jon
Anderson (yes, circa Big Generator),
Sebastian Bach (Skid Row) and with
most prolific homage, in both tonal-
ity and integrity, Hoon sounds just
like Rik Emmett, the guy from Tri-
umph.
Lyrically, Hoon's a shot in the
dark. "The writing is kind of am-
biguous he says, a quote thrice
printed in Capitol's two-pound
press kit Anybody can read it and
find something that they need in
one line and then find something
else in the next line. It's mental re-
cess
Guitarists Roger Stevens and
Christopher Thorn add to Blind
Melon's melting pot of predictabil-
ity. They make their band sound
like Led Zeppelin, Drivin'n'Cryin
Foghat, Triumph, Molly Hatchet,
The Rolling Stones, Yes, Spin Die-
tors and Uriah Heep,all at the same
time.
Drummer Glen Graham,
See Melon, page 12
Toxic Popsicle
seduces crowd
By Stacy Peterson
Staff Writer
Just maybe it all started from a cooking show.
Imagine Bootsy Collins, the Santana rhythm
section, and Larry LaLonde from Primus getting
together to mix their ingredients and form some-
thing new. After arguing on whether to make a
casserole or a dessert they eventually agreed on the
latter. As this newdessertcreationcongealed, George
Clinton came in and added a toxic dose of hardcore.
The result, a Toxic Popsicle.
This Greensboro-based band treated O'Rocks to
a tribal groove-spanking Saturday night, and the
crowd left with more than a sore rear end.
Toxic Popsicle was formed in 1990 and is com-
prised of Robert Sleege, vocals and bass; Steve Muir,
guitar; Tracy Thornton, percussion; and Jerry Crue,
drums.
The band sites as influences everything from
obscure hardcore to classic rock to the West African
drum music of Alatungee. In just two years the band
has opened for Suicidal Tendencies, performed at
the New York rock club C.B.G.Bs and played at the
North Carolina Music Showcase. Most recently the
band played the side stage at Lollapalooza '92, and
has recorded a single to be released on the Greens-
boro D-tox record label.
See Toxic, page 12
Comic Convention �Event will be held at the
Ramada Inn in Greenville on Sunday, Oct. 8. Run-
ning from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m area and ECU cartoonists
will talk to interested people. Admission is free and
books can be bought, sold or traded. For more
information, contact the Nostalgia News Stand at
758-6909 or Charles Lawrence at 752-6389.
Greenville-Pitt County
Beethoven and His Time: A loumey into His
World � The ECU School of Music will present its
third program, highlighting Ludwig van Beethoven
and his romantic music. The event will be held at the
AJ Fletcher Music Hall at ECU, Oct. 15, starting at 8
p.m. Contact: (919) 757-6851.
Ray Charles � Ray Charles, the Raylettes and
the Ray Charles orchestra will perform a variety of
music ranging from gospel to blues to jazz toR&Bon
Oct. 16. The Carroll Dashiell Jazz Ensemble will
serve as the opening act. The concert will start at 8
p.m. at Minges Coliseium. Prices are 525 for the
public and 512 for students and youth. Contact:
(919) 757-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS.
Fred Koller�Singersongwriter will perform
Oct. 16 for the FolkArts Society of Greenville. Event
will be held at the Upper Crust Bakery on Fifth Street
in Greenville. Prices are 55 and the show will start at
8 p.m. Contact (919) 756-1311.
Thalian Hall, Wilmington, N.C.
H.M.S. Pinafore � Co-presented with the
Durham Savoyards and WHQR Public Radio, "Pin-
afore" is Gilbert and Sullivan's fourth operetta. A
tale of sailors, romance in the moonlight, love gone
awry and clear sailing through the murky waters of
romance, "Pinafore" is a classic, with its full orches-
tra and beloved characters. PerformancesareOct. 17
at 8 p.m. and Oct. 18 at 3 p.m. Prices range from S10
to 514. Contact: (919) 343-3664 or 1-800-523-2820.
KSI
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The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 15, 1992
The Delight of Flight
Bimgee jumping highlights Fair
Workout facility gets facelift
Garrett gives new reason to shape up
By T. Carter & P. Revels
Staff Writers
Everyone was looking up at
the Pitt County Hair thi- ear. Ev-
eryone wanted to see who would
be next to jump from 150 feet in the
air
Tie Outer Banks Bungee Com-
pany was the main attraction at the
only fair in North Carolina that
brought bungee jumping to its mid-
vvav.
"It was like total no-gravity
Kevin, a junior from ECU, said.
The general consensus of all
the jumpers was that bungee jump-
ing has an awesome rush.
We could not resist any longer.
We were suited up in all the proper
safety gear while we waited to take
the plunge.
When the time came, we each
took our turn jumping. The cord
was attached to the ankles and the
bungee cage began its ascent.
At the top, we could see the
enure fair. After supping out on to
the platform, the countdown be-
gan. 5-4-3-2-1-BUNGEE
Aslight hesitation precedes the
leap of faith The rush of passing
lights and a feeling of weightless-
ness accompanies the 127-foot drop,
U hen thebungeecord stretches
to its full capacity, it bounces up-
ward about Si feet and drops again.
After four or five bounces, the
,vers the bungee cage to the
gro nda sense oi
laces the re-
crari
sate
relit
vent
1 felt like I . ingtothrow
up Leigh i tother ECU stu-
dent, said. ' But it was great
"I didn't think I wasgoingtodo
it at first Bill Benfield, an ECU
graduates tudent, said. "But I'mglad
I did because it was a great rush
Then it was off to see the other
attractions.
We started bv sampling some
sa usagecheeseck tgsand french fries
before we headed down the mid-
way.
A variety of games, rides and
side shows beckoned fair-goers. We
tried our luck at darts, the milk-can
toss and pool shooting along with
various others. Win or lose, we had
fun trying.
The music and lights of all the
ricies added to the excitement.
The livestock barns werealsoan
attraction that housed prize horses,
cows, pigs, sheep and other animals.
Another building contained attrac-
tive agriculture and commercial dis-
plays.
The Bob Jones petting zoo fea-
tured zebras, llamas and goats that
fair-goers could feed by hand.
After a brain-rattling ride ad-
venture, it was time to sample the
elephant ears and caramel apples to
wrap up our evening.
Looking back on the evening,
we agreed that it was a pretty awe-
some fair, the highlight of which
was the bungee. If vou haven't tried
it, vou should.
By Joe Horst
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
The Residence Hall Associa-
tionand Recreational Serviceshave
combined to spruce up the work-
out roomin Garrett Residence Ha II
and give west-campus fitness buffs
a new reason to stay healthy.
Repairs began with RH A tear-
ingoutawalltoopenuptworooms
in Garrett and performing routine
maintenance on the rooms, such as
patching, repairing and painting
the walls. New carpet, with pad-
ding, was also installed.
The free-weight nxim has been
treated with special paint and mir-
rors across one wall of the room.
"The room is similar to a
health-club look said Gray
Hodges, coordinator of facilities
and equipment at Christenbury
Gym.
"Ithasa clean atmosphereand
is a brand-new room
Garrett Hall's workout room
now sports varied equipment to fit
any exercise concern.
Recreational Services has
added two stair-machines, two ad -
Photo by Jason Bosch � TEC
Garrett Hall is the first of several ECU workout facilities fit for renovation.
justable benches, a seated low-row
machine and a vertical pec-deck.
These new additit insaside,( larrett's
workout room carries a mixed as-
sortment of equipment.
Free weights include a militan
press, ,) pi it' rack and an incline
decline bench. Dumbbell weights
range from five to tfl) pounds.
A lat pull and an inverted leg
press round out the workout room
with thesix stair-machines and four
bicycle-machines.
After this endeavor, Recre-
ational Services plans to renoate
Minges and Aycock weight rooms
in the tcir future.
"We hope to improve theover-
all fitness qualities that we have
here at ECU Hodges said.
Comic book fans mourn the death of Superman
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
When the minds of Joe Shuster and Jerry
Siegal got together and invented the first real
super hero, it is likelv thev didn't know that it
would become the success it has. Superman
remains the most recognizable hero in the world.
Action Comics debuted the man of steel and
the big "S" has been on a high ever since.
Through failed TV shows, slumping popular-
ity, poor movies, middle ages and death, Su-
perman has remained a hero for all ages
His adherence to morals and living life by
the letter of the law has been a gtxxi example to
children reading his adventures. Today these
morals are still a big part of who Superman is.
As with any pers ma, the supporting char-
acters play a large part of who Superman is.
With support from Lois Lane, Lana Lang, Jimmy
Olsen and Perry White, the supporting cast for
Superman was varied and intriguing.
Without villains, though, what use is there
for a hero? An adversary can make a storv
riveting or laughable. Superman's foes include
the legendary Lex Luther. Superman's rogue's
gallerv include villains like Mr. Mxyzptlk,
Bizzaro, and Brainiac. The villains were some-
times more interesting than Superman.
Mxyzptlk's hi-jinxes were hilarious and
Luther's plans ingenious.
Eventually, the man of steel got put into a
box � a TV box. George Reeves acted out the
role of Clark Kent and Superman admirably.
The stories were the same as the comic, no real
surprises. From black and white to color, Reeves
acted out Superman's adventures, until Reeves'
life came to an end. The show ended also.
The hardship didn't stop Superman
though, hegothisowncarbxin. Superman flew
into living rooms every Saturday morning as
kids watched Superman get beat up by a no-
body. The carttxin life was short lived.
Superman stayed in a recession for a few
Action Comics debuted the man of steel and the big "S" has been on a
high ever since. Through failed TV shows, slumping popularity, poor
moznes, middle age and death, Superman lias remained a hero for all.
nation sold out of the issue. There was such
a demand for it that DC Comics published
a second printing of the issue. Superman
was back on a high.
vears, even though he made regular ap-
pearances with Gleek and the Wonder
Twins on Saturday morning s Super
Friends. Then Alexander Sal kind produced
Superman, the movie. Starring Christopher
Reeve (no relation to George Reeves), the
mi v ie was a big success. The movie pushed
Superman back into the height of popular-
ity. Superman lunch boxes (a sure sign of
popularity) were everywhere.
Superman II followed and its success
matched the first film's. Superman 111,
though, was carried bv Richard Pryor. The
story wasn't as strong and viewers weren't
fooled by Pryor's humor.
Superman's next spotlight came when
he turned 50. Several tilings led up to the
big occasion. DC Comics hired one of
comic's best and most sought after creator,
at the time, John Byrne. Bvme was to com-
pletely revamp the history of the man of
steel. The Superman titles (Superman and
Action Comics) were placed on a hiatus and
a limited series debuting the new origin of
Superman. A new Superman book was
created as part of the 50th birthday celebra-
tion. The new book was simply called Su-
perman.
The old Superman title changed to Ad-
ventures ofSuperman and Action Comics re-
mained the same. Pretty soon Superman
was put back into the vault (he went back to
the attention of comic buyers only). Like a
pheonix, though, he rose out of the ashes
and got publicity' because he was getting
engaged. CNN, Entertainment Today, and
USA Today ran stories of Clark Kent telling
Lois Lane that he is Superman and asking
her to marry him. Comic stores across the
As usual, things didn't last. Batman
nearly stomped the big "S" ou t of sight and
mind. Batmania swarmed the country and
Superman was left holding Lois' hand
without any attention in the back of the I ine
to get into the Batman movie.
DC released word that the biggest
Superman storv would be told in Novem-
ber in issue 75 of Siaierman. Superman is
going to die.
Yes, you read that right. Superman is
goingtodie. No hoax, no,Lois won't wake
up from a dream and find Clark in the
shower; he's going to be dead and buried.
DC has plans to put the Superman titles
back on hiatus for a while, then bring them
back with Supergirl trying to take
Superman's place as protector of Metropo-
lis.
Already, "Superman is gonna die?" is
being whispered around comic shops. Fans
are asking comic retailers, "Is he really
gonna die?" DCs answer is, "Yes
Avid fans are contemplating
Superman's return and he's not officially
dead yet. Theories abound of how DC will
bring him back. He had a skin sample
takenafew months back and there is specu-
lation that a new Superman will be cloned
from the sample. Also, the theory tnat the
Earth will act like a cocoon for Superman
and bring him back after the Earth has
healed him has spread. Nonetheless, DC
stays adamant about the fact that Super-
man will stay dead.
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�Hi. ��
���
- - - i �
OCTOBER 15, 1992
The East Carolinian
11
MN's latest platinum material
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
Trent Reznor is Nine Inch Nails
and he performs, writes and pro-
duces everything on the album.
Reznor's first album, Pretty Hate
Machine, is platinum and his new
EP, Broken, is likely to follow suit
since it is more of the same.
Power is the most applicable
adjective that could be applied to
Nine Inch Nails' (NIN) music.
Reznor screams his vocals while the
music continually pounds. The an-
ger in his music is expressed even
more so by his cutting lyrics, "Slave
screams he's being beaten into sub-
mission
Pretty Hate Machine studied
Reznor's relationship with God and
the aspects of that relationship. He
studied it in from many view points
and every one of them was explo-
sive. His anger overshadowed the
message in the words. His frustra-
tion overwhelmed his investigation
into his feelings.
Though the subject matter is
different on Broken, the way it is
exp ressed is the same. He sings with
hatred in his voice and poison in his
words, "My lips may promise but
my heart is a whore
"Wish" explores the demise of
a relationship � a bitter relation-
ship. Reznor sings about having a
hole blown into him where his soul
used to be, "I put my faith in God
and my trust in you Now there's
nothing more f�ed up I could do
He moves from blaming himself to
blaming his partner, "I wish there
was something real in this world
full of you
Other songs, "Last" and "Hap-
piness Is Slavery re-enforce what
"Wish" started by putting down
relationships, "Slave screams but
he's glad to be chained to the wall
Don'topenyoureyesyouwon'tlike
what you see from "Happiness Is
Slavery
"Gave Up" ends the EP. It is the
straw-that-broke-his-back song. He
sings about being crushed psycho-
logically and physically. The song
winds up all the thoughts brought
up in the album. It's ironic that
Reznor publishes his music under
the name Leaving Hope since he
leaves little room for hope in his
lyrics.
Included with the compact disc
EP is a three-inch disc that includes
two songs not on Broken. One song
is a remake of an Adam Ant song
from 1980called "Physical and the
other is from a compilation called
Pigface, which came out in 1991.
The songs exhibit the same traits
that are uniquely NIN. They show
angerand passion. Itisagiftto listen
to two more songs from NIN even if
they don't fit into the EP package.
Reznor sings with power. Even
through the dismal lyrics, his voice
is strong. He has a rough voice, but
it carries very well. Broken is a much
harder effort, musically, than Pretty
Hate Machine.
The music is relentless on this
album, unlike the moodiness of the
previous album. While there were
hints of this strength on the first
effort, the new release never lets up
through all six songs.
Who's There
r-m
i � .
.
Attic
Friday
Johnny Quest
Saturday
Amateurs
Corrigans
Saturday
t
Bad Bob & Rockin'
Horses
Pasta
Works
Thursday
Jon Teague
Friday, Saturday
Victor Hudson
(yRocks
Friday
Boy Oh Boy
New Deli
Friday
Roily Gray &
Sunfire
Fizz
Friday
KleeLiles
Saturday
Carroll DaShiell
;
Lifestyle Writers: Thursday's
meeting is cancelled. If you had
stories that ran this month, stop by
and see Debora to sign your
payroll sheet
GRAND SLAM U.S.A.
Indoor BaseballSoftball Batting Range
Corner of Evans & 14th Streets 830-175
�Consessions �Pro Shop 'Video Games
STUDENT TOKENS Full Court
Year Round $1.00 Basketball
with ECU I.D. with
20 Pitches On A Token Slam Coals
Bring Coupon In For $4.00 Off Slam Ball
SLAM
U.S.A.
THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATION FOR
THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS:
Copy Editor
Layout Manager
Assistant Entertainment Editor
Classified Ad Technician
The East Carolinian is located on the second floor of the Student Pubs building
CENTRAL
tBOOK&NEWS
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Located at Greenville Square Shopping Center
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72 The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 15, 1992
Hueh drives 'road to freedom' "
V-J i�1H1WMII ililllli BMM though thought
Continued from page 9
By Andy Sugg
Staff Writer
There's a new voice in the mu-
sic business and it belongs to singer,
songwriter and keyboardist
Gravson Hugh.
With his newest album, Road to
Freedom, Gravson Hugh creates a
recipe for his own sty le�a pinch of
blues, a dash of rock, mix well with
heartfelt emotion.
Road to Freedom brings to mind
music greats of the past such as Bob
Dvlan, Etta James, Otis Redding and
Marvin Gaye � some of Hugh's
influences. His talent comes natu-
rally fromhis father, a classical music
announcer, and a mother who per-
formed in various bands in the '50s.
By the age of five, Grayson
Hughhad learned to play the piano
and later the saxophone. He had
been writing poetry since age 13
and at 15 he decided to put the two
together. A chance meeting with
producer Michael Baker launched
his debut album, Blind to Reason, as
well as his career.
The band for Road to Freedom
consists of Grayson on keyboards
and vocals; Al
Berry on bass; Jeff
Golub on guitar,
dobro, mando-
lin, and baritone
guitar; and Larry
Aberman on
drums.
"Itwasatrue
band effort,
which is the way
I always wanted
it to be Grayson
said.
Equipped
withanewband,
new producer
Bernard
Edwards, and a
new, more natu-
ral sound than
his first album,
Grayson has cre-
ated music that
preserves the
spirit of soulful
rock and roll.
though thoughtful and articulate in
a recent interview, emulates the
percussive sounds of Widespread
Panic, The Allman Brothers and
Drivin'n'Cryin' all too well. Any-
body a patent lawyer?
Bassist Brad Smith sadly adds
to Blind Melon's unoriginality with
unheard, kick-drum led bass lines.
Worth scant consideration in
the third-round bargain bin, Blind
Melon sports two good songs.
It's no coincidence "No Rain"
and "Sleepyhouse" are the band's
most originally titled tunes, present
cohesive lyrics, manage fresh gui-
tar licks, soar masterfully effected
harmonies and stand out on the
record as semi-impassioned music.
Hoon's message on "No Rain"
reflects a generational apathy,
matched on the big screen in the
film Slacker.
They say girls swoon when
Hoon croons: "And 1 don't under-
stand why 1 sleep all dayAnd I
start to complain that there's no
rain And all 1 can do is read a book
to stay awakeIt rips my life away,
but it's a great escape
Who knows if pop culture is
ready for the great corporate music
sequel to a scam: "Nirvana II�The
Blind Melon Years
Toxic
Thorn thinks not. "The band
won't become a parody of itself" he
said in a recent interview.
In explaining Blind Melon's
"sound Graham played elusive
artiste, keeping hands-off with
humble self-(un)crihcism.
"I mean, we do what we do he
said. "What we 'are' categorically is
for other people to decide
Well, Glenn, here goes. Blind
Melon is a hapless consortium of
hollow musical imagery wrapped
in major label magna-hype to dupe
listening America into slapping
down some green for "the next big
thing
Continued from page 9
Blues, rock and
Grayson Hugh's
"There's a fine line between a
lot of country and a lot of soul from
downSouth'saidGraysonTfyou
listen to Otis Redding or Joe Tex,
1
Photo J. Katz � MCA words
emotion all combine tastefully in
latest album, "Road to Freedom
there's some country elements in
there.
"And Hank Williams is singing
the blues. 1 love that fine line
The show Saturday night be-
gan with a tight and impressive set
from the Greenville-based band,
Tribal Lullabies. This band offers a
fresh alternative to the "Greatle
funk-fest" that seems to be promi-
nent in the local scene.
Toxic Popsicle then took the
stage with enough energy to upset
Richard Simmons. The band per-
formed songs from their latest cas-
sette, Friends OZH, as well as some
cover songs spanning all the way
back to Parliament.
The best way to describe the
sound of Toxic Popsicle is to com-
pare the sounds of West-African
drumming to a hardcore power
groove sliding off the sharp edge of
an afro. This massive sound will
gyrate your spleen like a Jello jack-
hammer.
According to guitarist Steve
Muir, the band is hoping that the
success of their new single on D-tox
records will land thema record deal
with a good independent record
company.
As for plans for the future, the
band is presently trying to get gigs
for Tribal Lullabies in Greensboro,
as well as preparing to tour the en-
tire east coast.
The most important long-term
goal of the band is to beat Pearl Jam
in a game of basketball.
CUISINE
presents
MCA SingerSongwriter
MARK JOHNSON
Friday, October 16th, 9:30pm
for a homecoming celebration!
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sponsored by:
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Recreational Services � Campus Dining ServicesARA �
Resident Education � University Housing � Career
Services � Siudenl Development - Special I'opuUuons
� Student Health Services � financial Aid � Office ot
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1987�1988198919901991 1992
GREENVILLE" TIMES READERS' POLL
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Time
Event
8:00pm
9:00pm-4:00am
10:00pm
10:00pm-l :00am
Location
Hendrix Theatre
"In Cold Blood"
Midnight Madness Begins with:
FREE Bowling, Billiards, Table Tennis &
Refreshments on the Ground Floor
"Friday the 13th, Part One" Hendrix Theatre
Booogie Live Music & Dejays in the:
MSC Great Room, Social Room,
Multi-Purpose Room and Room 244
"A Night at the Races" -bet on a winner! Big Screen TV Rm
ll-30pm- Midnight Costume Contest Registration 1 Jendrix Theatre
Midmght-12:30am Costume Contest for Best All Around, Hendrix Theatre
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FREE Breakfast provided by ARA &
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"Blizzard of Bucks"
Door Prize Drawings
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"Evil Dead, Part Two"
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THE MADNESS ENDS
12:30am-2:00am
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1
The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 15, 1992
Sports
Page 13
ECU v. Cinncinati
Cincinnati
1991 record: 4-7-0
Primary offense: Multiple
Primary defense: Multiple 50
Offensive lettermen returning, lost: 18,7
Defensive starters returning, lost: 22,7
Special teams lettermen returning, lost: 2,1
Head Coach: Tim Murphy (Springfield, 78)
Record at School: 6-26-1 (3 seasons)
Career Record: 21-34-1 (5 seasons)
General Information
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Enrollment: 36,000
Colors: Black and Red
Nickname: Bearcats
Conference: Independent
Stadium: Nippert (35,000)
Surface: Artificial
Series Record (6-0)
Expectations set too high
'i
C S
Jt
Tim Murphy
ECU Cincinnati
199130 19
199056 32
198921 14
198849 14
198756 28
198637 19
playedat Cincinnati
1992 Schedule (1-3)
Sept. 5lost to PENN STATE, 20-24
Sept. 19lost to Miami (OH), 14-17
Sept. 26lost to Tennessee, 040
Oct. 3beat KENT, 31-0
Oct. 10at Memphis State, 14-34
Oct. 17at East Carolina
Oct. 24at Southern Mississippi
Oct. 31LOUISVILLE
Nov. 7RUTGERS
Nov. 14KENTUCKY (HQ
Nov. 21AKRON
Ronnie Dixon
c
By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
We've got problems � and I
use the word 'we' due to the strong
attachment this school has with its
football team.
I'm still not exactly sure what
happened to us last week, but I was
embarrassed in my home town. I
talked sooooo much smack to
friends of mine at Duke and we
were dominated by the Blue Devils.
What am I to think? Where should
the blame tall? It won't be on me. I
didn't make us lose. Heads will roll!
The coaches. It's their fault!
Maybe they don't prepare enough.
Maybe they've made some bad de-
cisions.
No. I don't think mat's it.
The players. It's their fault!
Maybe they don't give 100 percent
Maybe they don't take this too seri-
ously.
I know that's not it. It's not their
fault (They do showboat too much,
though).
We've got to fire somebody.
Wait. Maybe I'm being a little
hasty. Should we really have ex-
pected to beat Syracuse? No, prob-
ably not They were in the top 10.
Should we have beaten Bowl-
ing Green? Yeah, I think so. Injuries
hurt during that game, but that's
history.
Duke? I guess not�they went
to the hickory tree, came back and
whipped our ass.
Hell, we probably should con-
sider ourselves lucky for the two
wins we do have. We probably
shouldn't have beaten them either.
The problem lies with writers,
like me, and the people who think
we should get another bowl bid just
because we won in Atlanta lastyear.
It just doesn't happen that way. We
aren't, and probably never were,
good enough to finish 9-2 this year.
And, we can bend over and kiss our
bowl goodbye.
Often, perhaps too often, un-
due blame is cast on coaches and
athletes because of the unrealistic
expectations of sports writers and
fans.
Let's use an example from bas-
ketball:
Dean Smith has never said his
recruiting classes were the best in
the nation. Some writer with his
screws loose implies it every year,
though. So, instead of blaming him-
self, the writer blames the coach.
"With all the talent the Tarheels
have, they should go to the Final
Four he will say. "Dean isn't a
great coach. I could have won a
national championship with Wor-
thy, Perkins and Jordan
WRONG.
Well, the truth of the matter is:
the writer just can't admit he was
wrong about the quality of the play-
ers. He's just not as smart as he
thinks.
I truly "believed" weweregood
enough to go 8-3 or 7-4 this season.
I also thought we had a serious
chance to go to another bowl.
It is beginning to look like I was
wrong. It appears we will be in a
See Rob's Pick.page 15
Grumpier Jr. trying to
fill big shoes at ECU
Crystal Balls
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Ast. Sports Editor
Richard Eakin, Chancelor
Nancy Jenkins, Mayor of Greenville
Kevin Hall, WZMB Sports Director
Courtney Jones, SGA President
Tara White, Sophomore, Bus.
NCAA Div. I Computer Rankings
2824
2024
2820
3124
3533
2118
2816
44.09
Cincinnati
"We better win this game or I'll stop believing
"Cincinnati has been consistently bad � this time they'll win
"The Pirates regroup
"At Homecoming, the home team has to win
"At least we got decent punting against Duke
"It can't be as bad as last week. Let's get cocky
"The Bearcats will be declawed. They suck
ECU is ranked 89th, Cincinatti 92nd
avg: 27 23 (Reminder: this for your entertainment onlyPlease ,Please No
wagering. Thank you. Thank you very, very much. Peace, I'm Audi.)
By Waiien Sumner
Staff Writer
The father-son legacy. It's a
proud, timeless American tradition.
John F. Kennedy and George Bush
inherited their political careers from
their fathers. David Shula followed
his father's lead into NFL coaching.
Even the sons of singer Rick Nelson,
well, that's a bad example.
East Carolina University, how-
ever, has a proud sports tradition in
its football program. A tradition of
two tremendous players, one past,
one present. They both share the
name of Carlester Crumpler.
With a 2,889 career rushing
yards, Carlester Crumpler Sr. holds
the record at East Carolina. A Pirate
from 1971-73, Crumpler wasa domi-
nant force on the team, representing
a major ground threat in the Pirates'
attack. Crumpler said the change in
offensive philosophy is only one dif-
ferenceinEastCarolinafootball since
his playing days.
"When I played most of our
strength came out of the running
game Crumpler Sr. said. "Now
they are going to their strength in the
passing game. Any program's ob-
jective is to have a balance between
the passing and running, I feel East
Carolina is starting toestablish that
Crumpler is proud of the im-
pact his son, Carlester Crumpler Jr
is making on the Pirate offense this
year.
Crumpler Jr as ECU's starting
tight end this year, has beena pivotal
receiver in the Pirate passingoffense.
Despite problems holding on to
passes in the opening game against
Syracuse, Crumpler Jr. has 21 recep-
tions for 322 yards so far this season,
and is beginning to prove his viabil-
ity as a replacement for former star
Luke Fisher.
Carlester Jrs father wants fans
to understand there are more as-
pects to his son's performance in that
game than the dropped passes most
obvious to those watching.
'Teople don t realize how many
blocks he madein thatgame'Crum-
plerSr. said. "All they key in on is the
passes he dropped
He said he advised his son to
Carlester
Crumpler Sr.
4.
Carlester
Crumpler, Jr.
"just hang
in there"
that the
game was
"justoneof
those
nights
Crum-
plerSr.said
that work-
ing as an
academic
advisor at
East Caro-
lina hac
given hirr.
an oppor-
tunity to
monitor
the aca-
demic and
personal
progress
of his son
and other
Pirate players.
"It's a great way to get to know
the kids as people he said. "A lot of
times when I talk with a player we
don't talk football. I try to be some-
one they can talk to. They know I've
travelled down the same road they
aregotogdownTalkkigaboutthings
not related to football is a great way
tofind outwhat is in a player'sheart"
Crumpler Sr. said another as-
pect of East Carolina he enjoys is
working with Jeff Charles, broad-
casting ECU football games. Crum-
pler said at times he has to watch
himself while broadcasting, in order
to keep from saying something that
may be interpreted as deference to
his son.
"I give Carlester the same en-
thusiasm as any other player, I
wouldn't want to short him, but
sometimes it'sdifficultto praise him.
I'm afraid of seeming to favor him
Crumpler Sr. said that he be-
lieves East Carolina is "on the right
track for establishing a first class
football power,andhavemademany
positive steps since his days as a
player. He said he feels expanding
Ficklen stadium and concentrating
on recruiting defensive players will
helpestablish the Pirate football team
as contenders in the future.
Commentary
i
Lack of experience costly to Bucs
By Chas Mitch'l
Assitant Sports Editor
Will the real ECU Pirates please stand up!
Hey, hey E-C, you look so good to me. Ya
damn right!
I am a firm believer in the old purple and
gold. Through the good times (11-1, Peach Bowl)
and the bad (2-3, current season), I believe.
I believe that this year's team (on paper) is
better than 1991's team. I also believed that this
years team (man for man) was capableof surpass-
ing 1991's record breaking season. Not only do I
believe, but I support whole heartedly the 1992-
'93 ECU Pirates.
No matter how much I believe, the fact of the
matter is that big time game experience is some-
thing that this years team lacks verses a year ago.
In all phases of the game, the lack of experience in
clutch situations has managed to show through
in just the first five games of the season.
The offensive attack is outstanding and the
defensive schemes are simply brilliant How-
ever, it's not just the talent of a Tony Davis on
defense or a Tom Scott on offense, it's the ability
and experience which makes such players great
in their own right.
I picked ECU to finish no worse than 9-2 prior
to the start of the season. I also felt that Syracuse
should have been first on our hit list But die more
I watch and listen to players during die games,
the more I realize that, for the most part, the team
is young and should be allotted ample time to
grow.
No matter how good a team is, you just
cannot show up and expec c theopposition to give
you the game-Evident in the loss to Bowling
Green and Duke. You've gotta want it in order to
win it.
In this team as a whole, I do not see the fire
and intensi ty as wi th teams before. I fail to see that
spiritofcompetitiononaconsistentbasic in order
to be successful.
Finally,Ihavenotseena trueoffensiveleader
whocan take this team up and down thegridiron
with poise and confidence into the endzones.
The Bearcats of Cincinnati are a proud 1-3
and will bring their simplistic brand of football to
Ficklen Stadium. They have played some of the
best football programs in the nation and have
continued to play consistently throughout.
Unless the real East Carolina football team
that I know shows up, expect the unexpected on
Homecoming.
ECU 20 CINCINNATI 24
Bucs versus Bearcats
Last-second goal nets soccer win
Photo by Dail Heed � TEC
ECU will try to bring down the Bearcats Saturday in Ficklen. In 1991 the Pirates pulled out the victory, but this
year it may be a different story.
By Chip Hudson
Staff Writer
The Women's Soccer Team tried to ease the
pain of the loss in football this past weekend by
topping Duke in the final seconds of overtime.
ECU started strongly as the Pirates put
continous pressure on the Blue Devil's goal. At
the 16-minute mark, halfback Jennie Haines
headed in a corner kick to put ECU up, 1-0.
Despite continuing attacks on goal, the 1-0 lead
was all the Pirates would take into halftime.
With just four minutes gone in the second
half, winger Amy Warren kept her scoring streak
alive as she netted in her fou rth straight game. For
the rest of the half, however, the Pirates tried to
give the game away.
Duke scored two quick goals to tie the game.
The Pirate defense buckled down, but ECU was
unable to kick-start the offense again. The over-
time period began as the game had ended, with
Duke threatening the goal. Then, with less than
one minute left in overtime, Pirate forward Alison
Russell took a clearing pass and charged the goal.
She met the Blue Devil goalie 15 yards out, and
pushed the ball past her for a Pirate victory.
The team's record is now even at 2-2-1 and
the Pirates havea rematch with Virginia Tech this
Friday at 4 p.m. on the men's varsity field. Tech
beat ECU earlier in the year.
Home away from home
Like most major college football programs across the country, ACC and Carolinas schools house players in hotels the Friday
night before a home game. Following are results of an Observer survey of the nine ACC school plus East Carolina and South
Carolina, with estimates provided by officials at each institution:
ProximityPlayersTotal
SchoolHotel Siteto campushousedrooms
ClemsonAnderson, S.C.17 miles76-8043
DukeDurham2 miles6434
ECUWilliamston32 miles6536
Florida St.Thomasville, Ga.40 miles6037
Ga. TechDunwoody, Ga.18 miles7040
MarylandCollege Park5 miles60-6532
UNCMorrisville12 miles6835
NC StateHas athletic dormitorvnear campusPI avers sleep there
S. CarolinaColumbia7 miles70-7539
VirginaCharlottesville5 miles6234
Wake ForestWinston-Salem3 miles75-8040
1992 Total
source: The CharlMe ObserverI
Cost
night
$1,850
$1,500
$1,350
51,725
Sl,865
$1,411
$1,997
Cost
1222.
$11,100
$9,000
$6,750
$10,350
$11,190
$8,467
$11,982
$1,670$10,020
$1,50059,000
$1,400$7,000
$94,859

3
i A'
� I �





14 The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 15, 1992
Swimming and diving
teams rise to new heights
By Chas Mitch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
In 1953, ECU adopted men's
swimming to their constantly grow-
ing athletic program. Later in 1977, a
women's swimming program was
bom.
Since their inception, the swim-
ming program at East Carolina has
leaped to new heights. 1991 marked
the beginning of an era according to
Head Coach Rick Kobe.
"Wehad a lot of success for both
the guys and the girls Kobe said.
"While losingthree seniors to gradu-
ation, this year's team has the talent
and capabilities of matching last
year's success and far exceeding
them"
Kobe, who came to ECU in 1980,
has hit the recruiting trails hard. With
the majority of his recruited swim-
mers coming from the Washington,
DC. metropolitan area and Florida,
Kobe has just one thing on his mind.
"I have hopes of strengthening
and continuing the swimming and
divingsuccessand traditionatECU
Kobe said. "By far the best team of
swimmers and divers that I have
ever coached at one time. Collec-
tively, the men's and women's team
should excel beyond all expectations.
"In '80 while I wason staff teach-
ing, I was chosen as assistant coach
and began to actively recruit swim-
mers and divers for our program to
build on. As of now, we have not had
a walk-on swimmer to our program
but that doesn't mean that it can't
happen
According to Kobe, this year's
crop of swimmers will be led by
example as set forth by senior co-
captains Derek Nelson (Free Style)
and Brad Hemdon (Sprinter) for the
men. While co-captains Tia Pardue
(Sprinter) and Jacqueline Silber
(lamer Distance) will lead the ladies.
"We have a lot of good young
swimmers this year, for both the men
and women Kobe said. "With an
outstanding freshman class com-
prised of 14 women and nine men
swimmers, and one junior transfer.
By far, our most talented and largest
swim team ever
Under Kobe'scoachingand lead-
ership, the men's swim team fin-
ished first in the Colonial Athletic
Association in 1986 with a 9-3 overall
record, going 4-1 in the CAA. Since
then, the men have finished with one
fourth-place finish, three third-place
finishes and two second-place fin-
ishes. While the women have racked
up two seventh-place finishes, one
fifth-place and one fourth-place fin-
ishes and three second place finishes
in the CAA.
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OCTOBER 15, 1992
The East Carolinian
15
Rob's Pick
Continued from page 13
struggle to finish over .500 this year.
The only team on the schedule
we should beat, without any ques-
tion, is Arkansas State. If we lose to
them 1 will run naked through
Ficklen and impale myself on a rush'
fork.
If we beat West Virginia, I may
find religion.
I haven't picked against the
Bucs all year. So, one last time, I'm
going to extend myself in a true
display of loyalty and faith.
We will beat Cincinnati. Yeah,
the same team that almostbeat Perm
State. It's gonna be close.
Unfortunately for us, CU has a
tailback averaging over 100 rushing
yards per game. David Small, at a
petite 5-feet-9-inches, is sure to get
his average � and then some. It
should be painfully obvious to ev-
eryone; we cannot stop the run.
However, the Bearcats have se-
rious problems in their secondary.
To date, the have allowed thpir op-
ponents to complete passes at a 56
percent clip and safety Greg
Grandison has more interceptions
than CU's entire team. Quarterback
Michael Anderson should have a
career-tvpe day (at least until we
play Arkansas State).
So, should we lose�let me re-
emphasize � no blame should fall
on the players or the coaches or
anyone else. Injuries have cost us, at
most, one game, so I can't put the
blame on the unknowing fourth
party. We have an enormous
amount of talent, but little experi-
ence.
The potential for a great team
exists, but, should we lose, it will be
proof we are simply not that good
and I take the blame for raising
everybody's hopes.
Sorry.
The East Carolinian is accepting
applications for layout manager,
copy editor and opinion page editor-
Call 757-6366 for further details.
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16 The East Carolinian
INDEPENDENT FOOTBALL ALLIANCE
WEEKLY STATISTICAL UPDATE
Week 6
1992IFA STANDINGS
School IFAALLFTSOPPPCT
Southern Miss2-03-3100114
Memphis St 1-12-310879.400
ECU 0023119176400
Tulsa 0-124104155333
Cincinnati 0-11479115250
RESULTSWEEKLY SCHEDULE
School Site Time
Southern Miss(3-3) lost to NIU 23-10
visits Tulane on Thurs. New Orleans
ECU(2-3) lost to Duke 45-1
500
6:30
OCTOBER 15, 1992
PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
Offensive Memphis State junior tailback Larry Porter rushed for 174 yards and scored rvvoTOs in leading MSU toa34-
14 win over Cincinnati. Porter had TO runs of 35-51 yards. Healso caught three passes for 14 yards and returned one kkkoff.
Defensive: Tulsa DE Aaron Tallman was credited vith nine tackles, including seven solos, as well as adding two QB
sacks for minus 10 yards and one tackle for a loss of one vard.
Special Teams: MSU junior punt returner Russell Copeland, who was ranked 8th in the nation last week, had 6 returns
for 86 yards against the Bearcats. Copeland had a 65 yard return for a touchdown called back on a holding penalty.
Hie East
Carolinian
strongly
encourages all
students to have a
voice in the
media.
Journalism is
just like the vote.
Be Heard!
JEROME RAMEY
ATTORNEY AT LAW
�Bankruptcy
�Personal InjuryAuto Accidents
�Worker's Compensation
�Traffic ViolationsDWI
�General Civil Matters
FREE CONSULTATION IN MOST MATTERS
401 W. First Street - Suite 1-G - Greenville, NC 27834
752-9959
REENVILLES NATURAL F
�fflMM'JM
Check our natural, cruelty-free health and beauty supplies!
BODY & HAIR CARE
by Mill Creek, Nature's Gcte, Kiss My Face,
Aubrey Organics, Rainbow Henna, and Dr. Bronners
COSMETICS
by Beauty Without Cruelty
M. jft
BLUE PLANET LtfeFoods)
ESSENTIAL OILS
by Frontier Herbs
405 EVANS STREET MALL
Hours 10-6,M-Sat
758-0850 A

d&
VE.PE rCTS Af.WYto
� � � Full Line of Pot Supplies
756.7202
�fc

�ft-
mi v
Marine & Tropical Fish
Reptiles & Small Animals
Pond Fish & Supplies
Birds ?� Supplies
Live & Frczen Food
Hills Science Diet
Aquatic Plonts &
Tank Decorations
w
FREE FREE FREE FREE $3.00
OFF
Fish
up to S2 99
value'
Buy one fish
get one fish
FREE of
equal or
lesser value
up to $2.99
'Either fish.
One i
Pound1.
Bulk
Food
With
purchase of
same at
regular price.1
Comet
Goldfish or.
Tropical
Fish
Flakes
12
I
Dozen I
Feeders I
With pur- I
chase of one
dozen at
No purchase,
�i ll
e�pres 10-30-92 I expires 10-30-92
Power
Head or
Power
Filter
Good on
regular price
only.
FIND A
BETTER PRICE
WELL BEAT IT!
GUARANTEED!
See Store for Details.
'1992 Lowe's Co Inc. 2814
PRICES
GUARANTEED
THRU
THURSDAY
October 22
BUILD YOUR OWN HOME THEATER!
Make A Home Theater
Purchase Of $2000 Or More
And Get Special Financing
For Just One Dollar Down!
Purchase must be made through the
Lowe's Low Payment Plan and
applicants must be qualified
Offer good from October 1 through
November 30, 1992
All contracts of 52000 or more qualify for
12 APR. (Monthly payments include
finance charges and 5 sales tax. See
jre for complete details.)
ALL IT TAKES IS A LITTLE
IMAGINATION AND THE
RIGHT COMPONENTS.
Panasonic 4-Head Remote
Control VHS VCR With Hi-Fi
Stereo Sound System
� 181-channel capability 'Automatic head
cleaner "One month4 event programming
�Digital auto tracking 54955
I
LOWE S HOME THEATER COMPONENT DIAGRAM
iSL
Left Front
Channel
Speaker
J Center Channel
j SpeakerfPro Logic)
Left Surround
Speaker
27" Or Larger
Stereo TV
Right Front
Channel Speaker
Match the numbers shown in the diagram with the
numbers of the components shown below.
Replace your old components with these
�components one at a time. Before you know it,
you II have your own home theater! It's that easy.
Right
Surround
Speaker
CO PIOIMCER
I
OMAGNAVOX
I Smart.Vferv smart!
II
31 SUED
STEREO
Pioneer 100-Watt
Stereo Rack System
With Surround Sound
And 6-Disc CD Player
�Dolby surround sound �12" 3-way
speakers 'Full-function remote
control 'Audio video input jacks
54273
Magnavox 31"
Remote Control
Stereo Color TV
With Hi-Fi Sound
� 178-channel capability 'Audiovideo
jack panel 'On-screen displays 'Sleep
timer �2 detachable speakers 'Universal
remote
Pioneer Remote Control
100-Watt AudioVideo Receiver
With Dolby Surround Sound
�7-band graphic equalizer �30 AMFM
presets 'Custom memory tuning �2 video
inputs3 audio inputs 54106
i PIONEER
Pioneer
3-Way
Speaker
System
With 100-Watt
Capacity
Eye Exam,
Frame & Lenses
Include4- a comprehensive eye
exam by our doctor, value lint
ii best pl.isiic
Add S:t
frames
retail val run $100.
This offer include! most
prescriptions
No-Line Progressive
Bifocal Lenses
Our highest quality no-line
plastic CR 39bifocal lenses
lO'i��� satisfaction guaranti - d
I � 120 off the frame
1 no-line
bifocal purchase.
e
OnOMCTRIC
�Y�CAREC�HTCR
PA
Includes a comprehensive
eye exam by our doctor,
be fitted will
- f spherical
Jaii � tact Mises
or i thra 31 month
1 fees
for extended wear are
slightly more.
. David I FitrgrralH. Oplometfwl
(,�r M HairV. (�� i�n
70) t (.OTm.M'BKri
Picture-ln-Picture Capability
�Color picture-in-picture with video
input 'High resolution 'Surround
sound 'Audiovideo jacks "54761
Sanyo 4-Head
Remote Control Hi-Fi Stereo
VHS VCR With Auto Head Cleaner
�181-channel capability 'On-screen
programming 'Unified remote controls
this VCR and Sanyo color TV's �54430
RCA System
Link Multi-
Brand Remote
Control
�54784
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities
�In Ontflm
9f, Sai
li
iVo Othtr Discounts Apply � Hrand Kames You Trust � Walk-ins Wrlrome � flfler For A l.hnQcd Time.
STUDENT I.D. REQUIRED
lOSS SW Greenville Blvd
Greenville, NC
7Sfr-6S60
Hours:
Mon - Sat 7-9
Sun 1-6
Louie's

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Lowe's Low Payment Plan - Terms of Repayment-Yc
cred.t must be satisfactory $1 down payment required
The monthly payment includes sales tax of �o and
finance charges The APR is 18 OX)0 for 36 30 and 24
months The monthly payment price also includes
optional credit life disability and property insurance m a'l
states except Maryland and Pennsylvania credit life and
property only
HELPING ADD VALUE TO YOUR HOME





Title
The East Carolinian, October 15, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 15, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.902
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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