The East Carolinian, October 13, 1992






J
Opinion
Darwin not Deity
Evolution is responsible for differences
in skin color among races.
See pg. 5 for story.
Lifestyle
Unrefreshing Waters
Roger Waters' new album, Amused to
Death, ventures into the horrors of war.
Seepg. 7 for story.
Sports
The Ganksters
Junior Smith and the Pirate
football team got ganked by the
Blue Devils Saturday.
See pg. 11 for story.
;
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 14
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, October 13,1992
14 Pages
Wiretapping case goes to jury
By Jeff Becker
News Editor
The jury in the federal wire-
tapping trial of the two former ECU
employees began deliberation late
Monday afternoon and is expected
to reach a verdict today.
John Burrus, former Public
Safety captain, and Teddy
Roberson, former director of Tele-
communications, are accused ot
tapping two ECU phone lines in
1990. The trial began last Tuesday
in U.S. District Court in New Bern.
Roberson and Burrus face
four counts each of federal wire-
tapping violations and one count
of not reporting a crime. They both
could serve a maximum of 23 years
in prison if convicted on all counts.
In closing arguments Mon-
day, federal prosecutor David
Folmer told the jury to ignore temp-
tation to blame higher administra-
tors at ECU for ordering the tap and
study the evidence that indicates
Burrus and Roberson acted alone.
Roberson's attorney, Mike
Howell, told the jury thatRoberson
should be found innocent because
Burrus suggested he make the taps.
Burrus testified Monday that
he had not met Roberson until two
tapes had already been made and,
therefore, could not have autho-
rized the tap. Burrus said he first
learned about wiretapping at a
meeting with Roberson, Evan
Midgette, assistant director of hu-
man relations, and James DePuy,
director of public safety.
Burrus said that at the meet-
ing he learned Roberson had taped
the phone conversations of tele-
communications employee Brooks
Mills. He said DePuy told him the
tapes indicated Mills was dealing
drugs and instructed him to start
an undercover investigation of
Mills.
Roberson testified that he
started having trouble with Mills
in July 1989. Roberson said he sus-
pected Mills, a convicted drug
felon, of using illegal drugs and
had heard rumors that Mills had
threatened him.
In the spring of 1990,Roberson
said he met with Burrus and
Midgette to discuss the possibility
of Mills carrying a pistol. During
the meeting, Roberson said Burrus
suggested he place a tap on Mills'
phone.
"1 don't remember how it
came up, but Capt. Burrus asked
me a few questions about record-
ing Mr. Mills phone conversations,
like can you record his conversa-
tions, would he know they were
being recorded, how hard would it
be to do that Roberson said. "The
fact he was a policeman led me to
believe it would be OK
A few days after the meeting,
Roberson said he placed a micro-
phone on Mi ll's telephone and con-
nected the microphone to a mini-
cassette recorder hidden in hi s desk.
Roberson said he made three tapes
of Mills' conversations.
The first tape took about a
week to make, and another meeting
was set up between himself,
Midgette and Burrus to discuss what
he had recorded, Roberson said.
According to Roberson, no
one at the meeting authorized him
to make more tapes, but no one
told him to stop the recordings.
"After I made the first tape,
my impression was to make an-
other tape Roberson said. "After I
had already turned the first tape
over to them, I was not discouraged
to make a second tape
Roberson said he finished
makinga second tape of Mills' con-
versations in early June 1990, and
he turned over both tapes to Burrus
for transcription.
Burrus testified that he took
the tapes and gave them to his
secretary for transcription.
"I made a copy of the tran-
scripts and gave it to Jim DePuy
Burrus said. "The original went in
my desk
The transcripts of Mills' con-
versations contain several suspi-
cious discussions but do not spe-
cifically mention drug activity.
DePuy testif;ed that the in-
formation on the tapes prompted
him to begin an undercover inves-
tigation of Mills.
"With the knowledge of that
information, we initiated an inde-
pendent investigation DePuy
said. "I could notignore it. Morally
and ethically, I thought it was my
duty to pursue a suspected drug
dealer on campus
Michael Swinson testified
Monday that DePuy recruited him
as a part-time undercover agent in
1989. Swinson, who goes by the
nickname "Peanut said Burrus
assigned him to investigate Mills in
early June of 1990.
Swinson said he posed as an
ECU student assigned to the tele-
communications department for
community service and worked
with Mills for a two- to three-week
period.
During the undercover opera-
See Wiretap, page 2
Photo by J�ff Backer � TEC
Former Captan for investigations John Burrus (middle) leaves the U.S.
Federal courthouse in New Bern Monday.
Radio station opens legal can of worms
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
WZMB has opened up a le-
gal can of worms, rivaling the wire-
tapping scandal and threatening
to upset one end of the campus to
the other.
On the weekends of Sept. 18
and 25, members of the WZMB,
with the help of the bar
O'Rockefellers, sponsored an
eventtitled the Weird ZombieMu-
sic Buffet (W.Z.M.B.). The issue
was then raised whether or not the
radio station had disregarded the
Media Board's advice for not as-
sociating with any bars down-
town.
InFebruary, the Media Board
� via a memorandum�advised
Tim Johnson, general manager of
WZMB, that their proposed ben-
efit at O'Rockefellers would leave
them and the university open to
liability suits. The university
attorney's office advised the Board
tha t the event should not take place
with any involvement by any rep-
resentative of the university.
The attorneys based their
advice on the conclusion that
WZMB was a co-sponsor of the
event. That conclusion was based
on the information that WZMB
selected the bands, set the ticket
price, had promoted the event on
the air and would receive the gate
receipts.
At the Media Board meeting
on July 14, Johnson proposed to
sponsor the WZMB Greenville
Showcase. The showcases' pur-
pose would be to raise money to
pay production costs for release of
recorded products, to provide edu-
cational experiences for broadcast-
ing and communication majors by
applying hands-on knowledge
and to allow WZMB to take on a
project that would give ECU na-
tional recognition and exposure.
Johnson planned to have
O'Rockefellers sponsor the event
and then donate the door receipts
to WZMB to provide the music in
an audio medium (tape, compact
disc, etc.). The tapes would then
Photo by Dail RMd � TEC
WZMB posted a sign outside of O'Rocks informing patrons that the Weird Zombie Music Buffet was not a
WZMB sponsored event. The Media Board has instructed WZMB to cease any involvement with downtown bars.
be used as promotional giveaway
items.
Johnson also stipulated in his
proposal that the opportunity was
presented to him with no solicita-
tion on his part. Contracts were
also discussed to defray the risk of
liability. Courtney Jones, SGA
president, made a motion to ap-
prove the showcase proposal
pending further information from
the university attorney's office.
The Media Board approved the
motion.
In July of 1992, the univer-
sity attorney's office advised Greg
Brown, media advisor, to issue an
updated version of the February
memo in reference to a planned
WZMB Summer Concert at the
Attic. The memo stated that any
liability will rest "entirely with
the tavern owner(s) and th indi-
viduals comprising the station
management Brown went on to
tell the attorneys that a written
policy must be reviewed by the
Board before an official policy can
be enacted. "WZMB has been told
they shouldn't have anything to
do with the bars downtown
Brown said.
Johnson said attorneys had
no legal precedence for their ad-
vice and the relationship with the
bars downtown was extremely
beneficial to the radio station. John-
son also professed that funds
would not be received from the
sales of alcohol, but from the ad-
mission proceeds.
On Sept. 15, a story about the
Weird Zombie Music Buffet
(W.Z.M.B.) ran in The East Carolin-
ian. Two days later, Alfred
Matthews, vice-chancellor for stu-
dent affairs, sent Johnson a letter
in reference to the story.
Matthews stated that if the
W.Z.M.B. event took place, then
the radio station could be charged
with insubordination by the Me-
dia Board and that Johnson and
involved staff members could be
open to disciplinary action pursu-
an t to the Uni versi ty Code of Con-
duct.
Matthews stated that the
only way to have the event with-
out going against the Media Board
decision was:
That there must not be
any use of materials or equipment
owned by WZMB, the Media
Board or the university. Further-
more, the call letters of WZMB
may not be used in any way, nor
can any statements or implied ref-
erences be made to WZMB, the
Media Board, or the university,
and WZMB cannot use any items,
services or funds derived from this
event
On Sept. 24, the university
attorney's office released a memo-
randum defining the criteria for
their decision, stating that "such
activity places the university at
risk of FCC sanctions and tort li-
ability The university attorney's
office, in outlining FCC regula-
tions and WZMB's violation of
See WZMB, page 3
ARA holds
mock elections
By Elizabeth Shimmel
Assistant News Editor
A mock presidential election will be held on campus
Wednesday to enable students to cast their ballots for the
presidential candidate of their choice.
The mock election is being sponsored by ARA Campus
Dining Services. ARA has sponsored mock elections since the
1980 Carter Ford race and always has the same outcome as the
real election.
"Our employ-
ees and customers
look forward to the
ARA preview elec-
tion said Joseph
Neubauer, chair-
man of ARA Ser-
vices.
"This year,
with poll data vary-
ing so widely on an
almost daily basis, it
should be especially
interesting
The purpose of
the non-partisan
election is to encourage more Americans to exercise their right
to vote and to replace voter apathy with enthusiasm.
"We chose to do this because we had a vice-presidential
candidate on campus, and we thought there was a big interest
in politics on campus said David Bailey, marketing manager
for ARA at ECU.
ARA Services is the world's largest foodservice company
with operations in all 50 states. Their diverse customer base
ranges from executive dining rooms to colleges and universities
nationwide. They have been ECU's foodservice contractor for
three years.
This is the first mock election ARA has sponsored at ECU,
but over 50,000 people nationwide have participated in past
preview elections.
"(The elections) let ARA know a wide-scope of their
customers and helps elections by promoting students' voices
and opinion Bailey said.
Both the Democratic and Republican representatives on
campus will bring literature to distribute to students at the
voting booths.
The booths will be located at Mendenhall Student Center
next to the snack bar and in the lobby ot The Wright Place. They
will be open from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
The ballots will not contain Ross Perot's name because
they were printed before he re-entered the presidential race.
However, there will be a space for voters to write in the names
of candidates other than Bill Clinton and George Bush.
ARA needs volunteers to supervise the voting booths
throughout the day.
To volunteer, call David Bailey at 757-4801.
"(The elections) let
ARA know a wide scope
of their customers and
helps elections by
promoting students'
voices and opinion
�David Bailey, marketing
manager for ARA





2 The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 13. 1992
Wiretap
Continued from page 1
tion, Swinson received several park-
ing tickets. Mills testified Wednes-
day thathe tookSwinson to fteTraf-
ficSemcesOffice,locatedinthePub-
lic Safety Building, to get Swinson's
tickets erased from the computer.
Patricia Hair Bullock, a clerk in the
Traffic Services office, testified that
she had dated Mills and would void
parking violations for Mills at his
request
Bullock said she entered
Swinson's name into the computer
and the records showed Swinson
was not registered as a student Bul-
lock said she looked up from her
computer and asked Swinson why
he was not registered. Bullock said
Swinson told her he was having
trouble getting regL red in school,
but his father was helpu .g him to get
enrolled.
Roberson said he began mak-
ing a third tape of Mills' conversa-
nces about the same tin� the under-
coverinvesttionhadstarted.VVhile
listening to the tape, he said he came
across the voice of an unidentified
female whomhebelieved was trying
towamMillsoftheundercoveragent
According to testimony, the female
told Mills: "Be careful. The person
you are with is not what he appears
to be
Roberson said he informed
Public Safety mat Swinson's cover
might be in jeopardy and DePuy
immediately stopped the investiga-
tion.
Mills said Ron Avery, former
ECU chief of police, and Burrus
picked him up on June 29,1990, and
took him to the Public Safety office.
Mills said Avery,Burrus,DePuy and
Richard Farris, director of Human
Resources,attendWthemeeting,arri
they discussed his sale of marijuana
to Swinson.
"(DePuy) told me at that time
the chancellor and everybody knew
about (my drug involvement), and I
would either have to resign or be
fired Mills said.
Mills, who resigned June
29,1990,tesrifiedmathesokiSwinson
a quarter-ounce of marijuana at his
trailer 15 miles from ECU.
Captan for investigations
Ernest Suggs testified Wednesday
mat DePuy suspected Bullock of be-
ing the unidentified female who had
warned Mills of the undercover
agent Both Suggs said Burrus testi-
fied that DePuy ordered a tap on
Bullock's phone.
"I understood that Mr. DePuy
instructed Johnny (Burrus) to get in
touch with Ted (Roberson) to see if
he can not monitor Patricia Hair
(Bullock's) line the way it was done
with Brooks Mills Suggs said.
DePuy testified Thursday that
he never ordered any wiretapping.
"I have never authorized any-
one(totapeaphoneconversation)in
26 years DePuy said, referring to
his law enforcement career.
Roberson said Burrus ap-
proached him about tapping
Bullock's line, and he told Burrus
that he did not have enough equip-
ment to tap bom Mills' and Bullock's
phone at the same time.
However, Roberson said he
placed a tap on Bullocks' phone after
Mills resigned. He said mat whenhe
gave the tape of Bullock's conversa-
tions to Burrus, Burrus told him not
to mention the tape to anyone.
Burrus testified thathe did not
authorize Roberson to tap Bullock's
line and Roberson took it upon him-
self to make the tape.
"I was surprised because the
last I knew, Roberson said he didn't
have the equipment to make (the
tap) Burrus said. "1 was surprised
he had done it because the operation
was over at that point and there was
no use for it in my opinion
In other testimony, Public
Safety Capt Stanley Kittrell said
Suggs told him Midgette, Richard
Brown, vice chancellor for Business
Affairs and possibly Chancellor Ri-
chard Eakin had knowledge of me
wiretapping. Midgette testified
ThursdaythatFarrisalsoknewabout
the taps.
Both Farris and Brown testi-
fied Thursday that they were not
aware of the illegal wiretapping and
did not authorize it
At the time the FBI started its
wiretappinginvestigationinlateOc-
tober, Roberson said he met with
Burrus and DePuy at a local dough-
nut shop.
"Up until this time, I thought
everything was all right Roberson
said. "I didn't know I had done any-
thing wrong until that time
DePuy testified that he held
the meeting to make sure everyone
cooperated with the FBI.
"We wanted to make sure ev-
eryoneonehonest,open,cooperated,
so we could get this thing cleared
up DePuy said.
However, Midgette said
DePuy held the meeting to get their
stories straight
"Mr. DePuy tried to set
everybody's mind thattherewasone
tape and thathe hadn't ordered any
thing Midgette said. "I personally
took the tape to the top cop (DePuy)
and he was denying knowing any-
thing about a wiretap I realized
Mr. DePuy was trying to put dis-
tance in this operation
Both Roberson and Burrus re-
signed from their jobs at ECU on
March 8,1991.
Suggs was recalled to the wit-
ness stand on Monday. He testified
that Avery harassed him when he
returned to work after he testified
Wednesday.
Suggs said Avery told him
DePuy became upset after he read
portions of Suggs' testimony in the
newspaper. Suggs said Avery came
into his office suggested that he take
a few days vacation.
"DePuy was mad about my
account that indicated he was in-
volved in the tap of (Patricia Hair
Bullock's phone) Suggs said.
Brenda Mills, director of Inter-
nal Auditor's department, testified
that Suggs was convinced he had
been harassed.
"Avery told Suggs that he
should stay out of DePus way be-
cause DePuywasangry and he didn't
need any more flare-ups in the de-
partment Mills said.
Mrs. Mills said she also inves-
tigated a harassment complaint
against DePuy in November of 1990
filed by Kittrell. Kittrell, who in-
formed the FBI of the illegal wiretap-
ping,filedthecomplaintafter DePuy
kicked in his office door in apparent
retaliation forblowingthewhistleon
the illegal recordings.
"My finding was that Mr.
DePuy had used very poor judg-
ment in entering Kittrell's office
Mrs. Mills said. "My corrective ac-
tion was that Vice Chancellor Rich-
ard Brownshould council Mr. DePuy
in the way he treats his employees'
pFFMil IFS NATURAL FOODS SOURCE
Check our natural, cruelty-free health and beauty supplies!
nnnYAHAlR
by Mill Creek, Nature sGc
UVIV1I1� 1TCr , Jate, Kiss My Face,
Aubrey Organics, Rainbow Henna, and Dr. Bronners
QQSMEIIQS
by Beauty Without Cruelty
by Frontier Herbs
Yj -wE 405 EVANS STREET MALL
fBLUE PLANET LjfeFoods) Hours 10-6, M-Sat
f 758-0850
Celebrate Homecoming with a New Look
Visit:
Jennifer Foy
"a cut in the right direction"
Students, Staff and Alumni will receive
20 OFF all Hair Services just for
mentioning this AD!
Heads Up Hair Salon
2800 E. 10th St Eastgate Plaza
Tel. 757-0143
STEVE BRILEY'S
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE CENTER
Estimates Given First
�E 3140-H Mosely Drive
behind Parker's Barbecue
on Greenville Blvd.
752-5043
T
presents
MCA SingerSongwriter
i
L
Steve Briley's ! Steve Briley's
Automotive Service Center i Automotive Service Center
Rotate and Computer jLube & Oil & Filter
I Oil change up to 5 quarts
Balance 4 TireS Replace Oil Biter S9.95
I Check all fluid levels �
IQQC Check belts i hoses Reg. 517.58
1 f-f D j Lube chassjs Castrol GTX 2OW50
Check air filter
with coupon offer expires 11 -12-92 i
Reg. $24.13
with coupon offer expires 11 -12-92
JOHNSON
J.
Friday, October 16th, 9:30pm
for a homecoming celebration!
�St 355-9500 �j
patents tor information "�
$1.00 Cover (Dinner guests excluded)
115 Red Banks Road
&
in concert
Ray Charles
with
The Raelettes
and the
Ray Charles Orchestra
Homecoming Friday - October 16, 1992
Minges Coliseum - 8 p.m.
Good seats are still available!
Ticket prices are: Public: $25
ECU FacultyStaff: $20
ECU StudentYouth: $12
All tickets at the door are $25
This program is sponsored in part by a grant from the
Pepsi-Cola Bottling Company of Greenville.
Contact:
The Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Phone: 919-757-4788 or, toll free, 1-800-ECU-ARTS
I
J





-mm��� �
dCo.
�?�,
-L-u.
OCTOBER 13, 1992
The East Carolinian 3
WZMB
mem, stated that "it is undisputed
that WZMB constitutes a 'spon-
sor' at such activities
In outlining tort liability, the
university attorney's office went
on to state that "there is a national
trend emerging which makes it
more likely that liability will ex-
tend to those who provide alcohol
to persons who subsequently in-
jure someone
In citing cases that illustrate
this "trend the university
attorney's office cited:
� The Supreme Court of
North Carolina held that a social
host who provides alcohol to
guests can be held liable for inju-
ries caused by intoxicated guest's
negligence if host knew or should
have known that guest was intoxi-
cated and "known to be driving
� North Carolina has a Dram
Shop Act that recognizes actions
against tavern owners and em-
ployees who knowingly sell or give
alcoholic beverages to any person
who is intoxicated.
� An Alabama court has held
mat action could be brought un-
der that state's Dram Shop Act
against sponsor of event at which
alcohol is provided. (Martin v.
Watts, 508 So. 2d, 1136)
Theuniversityattorneysalso
stated that the university could
argue that there was no liability
attached to itself�via WZMB �
as the station merely caused "a
condition providing an opportu-
nity for other causal agencies to
act
The attorney's office con-
cluded that since neither WZMB
nor the Media Board were insured,
the university becomes the prime
target as "deep pocket" under the
Tort Claims Act.
On Sept. 24, the Media Board
convened to discuss, among other
things, the WZMB situation. Terry
Avery, Media Board chair, said
the biggest problem with the
O'Rockefellers Buffet event was
the relation of the acronym
(W.Z.M.B.) to the caJl letters of the
radio station.
Johnson defended the Buf-
fet, stating that the people who
worked on the event did so as
private individuals, not as mem-
bers of WZMB. Johnson also said
that the suggestion for the event's
title came from the manager of
O'Rockefellers and also apolo-
gized if his personal participation
was misconstrued, but that he
couldn't cancel the Buffet because
of its nature as an O'Rockefellers
event.
Avery said the Board had two
important issues to decide at the
next meeting. The first was
whether or not a policy should be
enacted based on the information
received from the university attor-
neys. They must also decide if
WZMB, as the radio station, did
have a part in the Buffet held at
O'Rockefellers.
The main issue in this lengthy
set of events is whether or not the
members of the WZMB manage-
ment staff acted as representatives
of WZMB or as private individu-
als when promoting the Buffet.
Johnson argued that the
O'Rockefellers event was not a
WZMB-sponsored event; that he
and the other persons involved
were acting in a private capacity
and therefore solving the liability
question.
Johnson also demonstrated
steps (i.e. flyers, disclaimernotices)
that were taken to totally disasso-
ciate the radio station from the
Buffet.
The Media Board voted Oct.
8 as to the question of WZMB's
involvement with the Buffet in
September. The vote, taken twice,
ended in a tie both times and can
be brought up by any board mem-
ber in the future until it is resolved.
The Board must also decide
if a policy should be drafted and
established banning WZMB from
the downtown bars pending the
information received from the at-
torneys.
Arguments in defense of
WZMB included situations where
campus organizations, such as the
American Marketing Association
and the National Women's Stud-
ies Alliance, have held meetings at
various downtown establish-
ments. Tailgating, wine-and-
cheese parties and events where
alcohol has been brought on cam-
pus were also brought up.
Avery stated that the univer-
sity would need to look at this
problem on a campus-wide level,
not just restricted to the media and
its inherent visibility.
"If university officials look
at the Media Board and WZMB,
then they also should question
possible liability other campus or-
ganizations may incur Avery
said.
The Board took a vote Oct. 8
to instruct WZMB to cease any
involvement with downtown bars
until a final decision was reached
with the university attorneys. The
vote was passed, restricting
WZMB from association with lo-
cal taverns, even as reporting as a
medium.
Liability and its definition is
also an important point needing to
be answered. Along with liability's
definition, the definition of "com-
mercial radio "co-sponsorship"
and "promote" warrants further
clarification. The question of li-
ability insurance was brought up
three times at the Oct. 8 Media
Board meeting, but no concrete
answers were forthcoming from
the attorneys.
Continued from page 1
The Board will discuss the
matter further in their meeting on
Oct. 22. .
Any persons interested or
who have pertinent information
on liability, university policies or
information that may help clarify
matters should contact the Media
Board at 757-6009.
News
writers
meeting
Thurs. 3:30.
in concert
CRESCENT
STEAM CLEANING
We Cater To
ECU Students Qc Faculty
Reduced Rates For
Fraternities & Sororities
1992 STUDENT SPECIAL
$11.00 Per Room!
�Upholstery -Spot Cleaning -Deodorizing
2 room minimum 758-9128
PI LAMBDA PHI
is returning to East Carolina
Ray Charles
with
HAPPY HOMECOMING
to
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
FROM THE
Econo Lodge
WE SUPPORT PIRATE FOOTBALL
AND WISH THE STUDENTS, STAFF AND
ALUMNI A SAFE AND FUN WEEKEND!
Coming soon! DENNY'S RESTAURANT
next door to the Econo Lodge for customer convenience.
Operated by the Furci Group.
'VISIT THE NEW MANAGEMENT, ESTABLISHED SINCE 1991!
The Raelettes
and the
Ray Charles Orchestra
ALFREDO'S
New York Pizza By The Slice
218 E. 5th St.�752-0022
Sun, Mon & Toe SPECIAL
Pitchers $1.50
Lunch Special 11-4
Large Cheese Pizza
$3.99
I
I
-In The Plaza Food Court
I BURRITO
with
coupon
2 Large Pizzas
wifi 1 Topping
$6.99
coupon
I
J
I
I
I
I
I
CHEESBURGER,
NACHOS &
CHEESE
& LARGE
DRINK
13.00
with coupon
� III!
LUCK
PIRATES!
�Vert0
THE WORLD'S LARGEST WATER SPORTS DEALER
Homecoming Friday
October 16, 1992
Minges Coliseum - 8 p.m.
Good seats are still available!
This program it sponsored �i part by a grant from th�
Papai-Cota Sotting Company of Graanvile
Contact:
The Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Phone: 919-757-4788 or,
toll free, 1-800-ECU-ARTS
s
ATTENTION
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
TRANSIT PASSENGERS
Water skis
Knee boards
Water toys
Snow skis
Snow ski rentals
Russell sweats
Champion apparel
NC Wildlife agent
Sporting goods
equipment
Fishing tackle
Hunting clothes
Tennis shoes for
every activity
Boating supplies
Marine electronics
IMIIlTTE?
m
ROUTE CHANGE
ECU Transit will be changing its BROWN ROUTE
on Wednesday, October 14th in order to serve the
Wesley Commons Apartments and the city bus stop
at 4th and Evans.
We will no longer be serving Elizabeth Street or
Willow Street due to low ridership.
See Map below for route redirection.
ijlf Mon-Fri 8-7
111 Red Banks Road
Greenville, NC
355-5783
MAP KEY
-f� BROWN ROUTE
O BUS STOPS
ppmJT at the Stop a few "inutes early!
Officiai:timerCHCOnditi0nS are N�T IN OUR CONTROL!
urricial times of departure win be posted.
Revised schedules will be distributed this week.

M





4 The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 13. 1992
New development courses offered
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
The ECU Division of Con-
tinuing Education and Summer
School offers a variety of courses
for personal and professional de-
velopment.
According to Elizabeth
Moore, secretary for the non-credit
division, the classes that are of-
fered appeal to businesses and in-
dividuals with personal or profes-
sional interests.
"The classes are for anybody
who wants to enhance their per-
sonal or professional develop-
ment Moore said.
While some courses are
taught in one day, others meet up
to 10 times per semester. If some-
one wants to simply brush up on
theircomputer skills, learn how to
draw or even work on self-image,
the classes offered by the Division
of Continuing Education is a good
way to start
Classes offered this fall and
their beginning dates are "Begin-
ning Conversational German" Oct.
6, "Developing Your Image as a
Successful Woman" Oct. 8, "Basic
Sailing" and "How to Get the Most
Out of Your Home Video
Camcorder" Oct. 15, "Family Re-
search" and "Figure Drawing
Several computer courses
will also be offered. They are "In-
termediate Lotus 1-2-3" Oct. 24,
"Desktop Publishing With
WordPerfect" Oct. 31, "Lotus
Functions and formulas" Nov. 7
and "DOS and Hard Drive Basics"
Nov. 21. The cost of these classes
range from $40-115 each.
Students who find they have
extra time on their hands are wel-
come to register for any of the
classes offered. While classes do
not count towards regular aca-
demic credit, students can com-
plete special forms to have them
added to their transcripts.
Some career fields require
continuing education unit hours
in order to maintain their posi-
tions. Teachers and various na-
tional organizations are among
these fields.
Businesses can request that
special programs and workshops
be offered if there is an interest
within that company. The Divi-
sion of Continuing Education will
then set up the requested course.
Anyone interested in taking
one of these courses can contact
Elizabeth Moore at 757-6143 or 1-
800-757-9111. Brochures will then
be sent and the person can register
by completing the form and re-
turning it to the Division of Con-
tinuing Education. Brochures are
automatically sent to previous reg-
istrants, people who are on main-
frame as having special interests
and to schools for teachers who
need renewal courses.
Clinton, Perot assail Bush in debate
Los Angeles Times
(ST. LOUIS)�President Bush
pressed his attack on Democratic
rival Bill Clinton's anti-war activi-
ties as a college student, but the first
presidential debate of the 1992 cam-
paign was dominated Sunday night
by assaultson Bush 'sown economic
record by Clinton and independent
Ross Perot.
In defending himself, Bush
declared his own "revival" plan
would provideasufficientboostfor
the nation, announced that if re
elected he would name White House
Chief of Staff James A. Baker III
"economic coordinator and
pledged to "protect the American
taxpayer against the spend and tax
Congress
"This country is not coming
apart at the seams, for heaven's
sakes Bush said.
Clinton and Perot repeatedly
dismissed such statements as tradi-
tional GOP rhetoric and suggested
the president does not recognize the
magnitudeofthenation's problems.
"We've created a mess, don't have
much to show for it and we have got
to fix it Perot said.
Yetthedebate'smostdramatic
exchange came not over the core
issueoftheeconomy,butover Bush's
assault on Clinton's anti-war activi-
ties: When Bush charged that
Clinton's conduct rendered him
unfit to be commander-in-chief,
Clinton accused the president of
"McCarthyism" and invoked the
memory of Bush's late father, a Con-
necticut senator who played a
prominent role inopposing the 1950s
red-baiting tactics of Republican Sen.
Joseph McCarthy of Wisconsin.
"When Joe McCarthy went
around this country attacking
people's patriotism he was wrong.
He was wrong Clinton declared,
gesturing with both hands.
"AndasenatorfromConnecti-
cut stood up to him named Prescott
Bush. Your father was right to stand
up to JoeMcCarthy;you were wrong
to attack my patriotism. I was op-
posed to the war but I loved my
country and we need a president
who willbringthiscoun try together,
not divide it
Bush insisted that he was not
questioninftClinton'spatriotismfor
taking part in anti-war protests in
London while studying as a Rhodes
Scholar at Oxford University, but
rather his "character and judgment"
matters thatBush hassoughtto make
central themes of his bid for re-elec-
tion. "I just think it's wrong Bush
said.
Sunday's nationally televised
debate, held in the Washington Uni-
versity Field House in St. Louis, was
the first of three among the presi-
dential contenders scheduled within
eight days. It was also the first to
include a candidate other than the
Republican and Democratic nomi-
nees, and Perot proved to be both a
formidable debater and a thorn in
the president's side.
jl
a
0 Jj
ocau
DISCOVER
FOSDICK'S
I89Q SEAFOOD
OSDICKV
1890 SEAFOOD
3003 S. EVANS STREET
756-2011
2 REGULAR 1
COMBINATION PLATTERS
D,neoffiyKT$9.95 (res- 15.90)
Choose from Any 2 Seafoods
For Each Platter-
Shrimp, Trout, Clams, Deviled Crab,
Crab Cakes, Baby flounder. Perch, j
Oysters, or Scallops �
$ 1.00 extra per item per plate
Mot good with any other coupons jffl
or specials. Beverage not Included
Expires 103192 "�
Vlth this coupon onlv
mum
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub
Adult
Entertainment
rf Center
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female
"Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers
CASH PRIZE
Contestants need to be there by 8:00. Competition is from 9 to 11:00.
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
- - -SJJyejBLJHej'S.FemajeJ'BrotjcIJtenceTS,
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Open Tuesday-SaturdayDoors Open 7:30pm
Bum Stage Time 9;00pm
E3F Call 756-6278
Sattutuf
Straight out of CZrm&tiviH
iil&9 to E-mrl'm 2�tor&
L,
Valid N.C. I.D. Required
Make a positive
choice this week
�TMK OUt 0 UMt T
l�M OU' 'OH "Af
Tuesday the 13th
WILL BRIDGES
QUARTET
8pm Student Union
Coffeehouse
Jazz music sponsored
by the Student Union
Coffeehouse Committee.
$1 coverECU ID & $2
covergeneral public.
Wednesday the 14th
MOCKTOBERFEST
2-4pm at the Croatan
Enjoy FREE "Mocktails"
and giveaways from
SGAandARA.
HOMECOMING
ALCOHOL
AWARENESS
BANNER CONTEST
Judge all the campus
organization banners at
the ECU vs. University
of Cincinnati football
game. Contest
sponsored by RHA.
This week's October Awareness
advertisement sponsored by:
Student Health Services. October 5 ad
sponsored by the Office of Health
Promotion & Well-Being.
Monday the 19th
THE WALL
10am-2pm Student
Store Area
How has substance
abuse affected your life?
Tell all on the wall. A
compelling program for
all East Carolinians.
Sponsored by Alpha Phi
Omega.

SIUDENT UNION
HAPPENINGS
MOVIES 8 PM HENDRIX THEATRE
fThe Graduate
WED & SUN, OCT 14 8c 18
THUNDERHEART
THUR, FRI, SAT,OCT15, 16&17
COFFEE HOUSE THE WILL BRIDGES QUARTET
OCT13, 8-10PM
THE UNDERGROUND
$1 ADMISSIONSTUDENT I.D.
$2 ADMISSIONGENERAL PUBLIC
SPECIAL HUMP DAY 'TOONS
CONCERTS LUNCHTIME CONCERT
CONCtK QCT 14, 11:30 AM-1 PM
IN FRONT OF MENDENHALL

;v q
THE PDISEfi BF POIITIVI CHOICES
NORTH CAROLINA IS MY HOME
LIVE PERFORMANCE FEATURING
CHARLES KURALT & LOONIS McGLOHON
NOV 11, 8 PM HENDRIX THEATRE
TICKETS ARE NOW ON SALE AT THE
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE IN MSC 757-4788
FCRUM THE ATTIC SOCIETY REVISITED
f- ATT rr-1 OCT 20, 8 PM �
SO C IETYl MENDENHALL GREAT ROOM
TRAVEL GO TO NEW YORK
PICK UP AN APPLICATION AT THE MSC
TICKET OFFICE OR CALL 757-4715 FOR
MORE INFORMATION
LOOK FOR THE BIGGEST EY5NT PN OCTOBER!
COMING OCTOBER 31
For More Info Call The
University Unions Program Hotline
at 757-6004
S -





neam
jae�i Tii
ttmmmammmmmmmmmmmiimm
The East Carolinian
October 13, 1992
Opinion
Page 5
Listen to Ross Perot � this time
Pollsters and voters alike are naming over the age of 50 with these comments,
Ross Perot the victor of the first presidential therefore widening the generation gap to
debate Monday night � but did he really the size of his "home" state of Texas,
say anything? He spoke in soundbytes and What's worse�someone who utilized
made us listen and laugh with quips like, his right to protest and to travel when he
"I'm not playing Lawrence Welk music to- was in his early 20s, or someone who has
night" and "I'm all ears but as usual, there allegedly made moral judgments much
wasn't much substance to what he said. more critical than these, like his involve-
Perot did make one important point, ment in the Iran-Contra scandal, for in-
though, when he spoke about moral charac-
ter and its relevance to the election. Perot
suggested that perhaps Washington peren-
nials such as President Bush are more seri-
stance.
Bush has professed to merely dipping
his fingertips in the Iran-Contra coup, say-
ing he simply was advised about it, when
ously guilty of moral turpitude than Clinton, actually he was probably up to his neck in
who took part in questioned activities in his it�he was vice president at the time of the
"formative years incident?
Time and time again, both politicians So listen to Perot. Laugh at his jokes
and the press have criticized Arkansas Gov. and jabs, and even his lack of a concrete
Bill Clinton's trip to Moscow, calling him a stance on basically any issue. But, most
spy and a traitor, and his anti-war activities importantly, listen to him when he ques-
while he was studying in England during tions the dealings of our representatives
the Vietnam War. and candidates.
First of all, just because Clinton went to Perot was accurate in pointing out that
Moscow, ate some red herring and drank when a person is a "senior official in the
some vodka, doesn't make him a Commu- federal government spending billions of
rust. Bush does the country a great disservice dollars of taxpayers' money" and a "ma-
in trying to whip up Red Scare emotions of ture individual a wrong judgment or
the 1950s and insert them into present day mistake made is by far more severe than
politics. activities, based on moral stances and
In fact, Bush is actually shooting himself rights, by a 20-year-old, before that person
in the foot by appealing mostly to people is even close to becoming a public figure.
HOW THE LEOPARD GOT HIS SPOTS By Robert S. Todd
Blind from the facts of who you are
Race has always meant very
l;ttle to me. A beautiful woman is
something I admire, whatever color
she is. It never seemed awkward to
me. It always felt very natural �
until others would go out of their
way to make me feel uncomfort-
able.
This is not another bleeding-
heart-racism-is-not-right column.
I'm going to fill you in as to
why we are of diferent colors. God
did not break out his Crayolas and
color us. (There happens to be a
wealth of knowledge coming your
way, so be ready).
People with pale, milky col-
ored skin and the black skins of
central Africa are unique adapta-
tions to the environment. Most
people on Earth are neither.
Tne dominance of the earth
with people who are a light brown
with a yellow or olive tint (the
people of Asia, the Middle East
and northern Africa) make the
black and white problems of this
country almost trivial. Such a fuss
over so few? America and South
. Africaarethelastbastionsofwhite-
black racism.
A substance called melanin
gives skin its color. Its most impor-
tant function is to ensure the upper
levels of the skin will be protected
from ultraviolet light, which can
cause sunburn, rashes, infection,
skin cancer and malignant mela-
noma (a dark, deadly tumor). If
; everyone was covered with thick
hair, there would be no need for
skin color.
The more melanin, the darker
; the skin and the lower the risk of
� damage from the sun. The sun is
not all bad, though. Sunlight is in-
tegral in the conversion of a fatty
substance in the skin into vitamin
D. The darker the skin the longer it
takes.
Vitamin D is a necessity and is
found in very few foods. The intes-
tines would not be effective in ab-
sorbing calcium without it. Mis-
shaped birth canals, which can be
fatal for mother and child,
osteomalacia and rickets can result
without the necessary calcium for
the strengthening of bones.
The oils and livers of marine
fish are primary sources of vitamin
D. Skin must be dark enough to
protect the person who does not
have access to the ocean from harm
so he or she can endure the ultra-
violet radiation of the sun long
enough to produce vitamin D.
Skin color is a tradeoff. People
with access to the ocean, in cold
climates do not need to be dark
skinned. The cold weather does
not permit the exposure of their
skin and they have vitamin D
readily available.
The fact of the matter is: blacks
and whites may have shared a com-
mon ancestor as early as 10,000
years ago.
So, you see, people are truly
human before they are black,
white, plaid, checkered or green.
There is nothing wrong with
dating African-Americans (what-
ever that means). I am Irish-Hun-
garian-French-CzechosIovakian-
American. Get the idea?
Pigment does not determine
social values, athleticism or the
size of your Johnson�. Believe it
or not, all African-Americans can't
dunk and dance. In fact, there are
white people who can a lmos t touch
the rim and shake their rump.
There are orientals who are
tall and stupid. Not all of them
know karate.
You've heard it before but it's
still true. See people for who they
are, not their skin color.
"She looks good for a black
girl or "He's phat for a white
boy only magnify thedif f erences
thespeaker sees between theraces.
A person is attractive - or they are
not.
It is no coincidence interracial
couples tend tohavebeautiful chil-
dren - no matter how ugly the
parents are. It's a hint. People
should learn to appreciate other
culters.
Inter-racial relationships do
not deserve the amount of atten-
tion they receive. If a black man
dates a white woman, he is seen as
just using her as a status symbol.
Seeing an African-American
woman date a white man is not
only more rare, but harder for both
people to cope with - she's a sell-
out and he's a wannabe wether or
not they are trying to assimilate
into another culture or not.
There is no question some of
the accusations of status symbol
and curiosity (a.k.a. Jungle Fever)
are true, but it is the exception
rather than the rule. Humanity
and love have ways of shining
through.
There is only one way to end
racism. Children are taught rac-
ism. Think aboutit. Noone is born
a bigot.
Cliche, but true.
"The black man must love
the white man and the white man
must love the black man because
we are all tied together in a single
garment of destiny Martin
Luther King, Jr. said. "We must
learn to live together as brothers
or we will perish together as
fools
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Jennifer A. Wardrep, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch i, Assistant Sports Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
M. Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Cori Daniels, Classified Advertising Technician
J. William Walker, Opinion Page Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolin ian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
A SIDEWARDS GLANCE
By David J. Jones
Smoking ban protects non-smokers
"It's my body and they're my
lungs, what right do you have to
tell me I can't smoke in a public
area?"
Sound familiar? There still
seems to be a big controversy re-
garding the issue of the smoking
ban. If you are a smoker you may
as well put the paper down or
move on to another article, be-
cause this is probably going to tick
you off a little.
Why is this a problem? I'm
not even going to address the fact
that it has been proven over and
over again that cigarette smoking
is the second or third worst thing
you can do to your body. Neither
am I going to address the fact that
it has also been proven that sec-
ond-hand smoke is very danger-
ous to non smokers.
Folks, it's just a matter of com-
mon courtesy. Smoker's rights are
not being violated. Nonsmokers
rights are being protected. I know
it sounds like a play on words but
it is not.
A famous politician was asked
once todefine just whatindividual
rights were and how far they ex-
tended. Instead of giving a whole
lot of technical jargon and a long
drawn out report he gave a hypo-
thetical case. The case was of one
man who was in the process of
hitting another man because of an
argument they were having. For
the purposes of this example let's
call the man doing the hitting, man
"A" and the man being hit, man
"B A is perfectly within his rights
to hit B up to and only up to the
split second before A's fist con-
nects with B's face. The instant
thata connection is madeB's rights
have been violated.
Obviously this is a crude il-
lustration, but it will serve the
purposes of my argument. A
smoker has all the rights in the
world to smoke up until I have to
breathe his or her smoke. Smoke
has been proven to present a clear
danger to my body (not to men-
tion the fact that cigarette smoke
smells terrible).
Many people say that non-
smokers are being to fanatical
about the smoking issue. To a cer-
tain extent I will agree with them.
SGA president Courtney Jones
brought out the point that during
night classes women were now
forced to go outside to smoke.
Jones pointed out that going out-
side classroom buildings at night
is notexactly the safest thing to do
here in Greenville and I am in-
clined to agree with her.
However, how complicated is
it to negotiate a designated smok-
ing area for these people? The an-
swer is that it's notThat is the
whole point behind the concept of
compromise and it is exactly how
the situation should be resolved
but the ban must stand except in
situations like the one just de-
scribed.
In my family, my father is a
smoker and my mother is a non-
smoker. My father understands
that his smoking bothers mom in
the house. The cigarette smoke
usually travels over to mom and
she is forced to breathe it (at which
point a lot of hacking and cough-
ing and complaining ensues).
Rather than get fanatical about the
issue and start screaming about
smoker's rights my father now
goes outside (usually on the front
porch) when a nicotine fit besets
him.
Maybe the fact that a ban had
to be enacted says something about
the state of affairs in our society. If
smokers became more courteous
about when and where they light
up and if nonsmokers weren't al-
ways in a uproar, when a smoker
happens to make a mistake and
light up in the wrong place or
situation, there would be no need
for such a ban. But, alas such is the
state our society is in. So until the
current status quo is changed (a
change that I am all in favor of) the
ban must stand.
It must stand if for no other
reason to show us all how much
like children we act even though
we are supposed to be adults.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Clinton personifies 'American Dream'
To the Editor:
This elections year is different
because there is a feeling of ur-
gency about the future of America.
This serse of alarm has grown
into a gnawing fear; fear that the
middle class is an endangered spe-
cies and the American Dream is
dying. Something is definitely out
of whack when the richest 1 per-
cent of the population has more
money than the other 90 percent.
It is time for a change to protect
the forgotten middle class. The
only way we will achieve this is by
electing Gov. Bill Clinton presi-
dent.
The assumption that when
rich people and corporations are
given tax breaks the money will
trickle down to the rest of us has
led toourcurrentdismaleconomic
state. This has left the middle class
to fend for themselves with little
help from Washington, D.C.
The poor have little money
with which to pay taxes with. The
rich have a multitude of loopholes
to avoid paying their fair share.
The middle class is stuck with tne
bill.
This is why Clinton favors
eliminating tax deductions for
outrageous executive pay and fa-
vors increasing the tax rate for
J tose earning over $200,000 a year
to pay for a middle class tax cut.
Those who can afford to pay more
should take the burden off work-
ing families struggling to make
ends meet.
College graduates currently
face one of the worst job markets
ever and very bleak future unless
growth and industrial expansion
take place.
We must reverse the trend of
the past four years in which we
suffered a devastating decline in
private sector employment after
being promised thi. ty-million new
jobs. Clinton will end tax breaks
for companies that ship American
jobs overseas.
The cost of higher education
and adequate health care is grow-
ing out of reach for middle class
Americans. This is why we need
Clinton's education plan that
makes it possible for all qualified
students to get a college education
or go to a vocational school upon
completion of high school.
Clinton's proposals to alleviate the
health care crisis would bring a
virtual revolution to the industry
and bring costs back down to a
reasonable level.
Clinton grew up in a middle
class family in rural Arkansas. He
realizes the problems that we face
and can identify with the middle
class. Clinton truly personifies the
American Dream and will do
whatever it takes to keep it alive
for all Americans.
Scarlette Gardner
Dining services should change its ways
To the Editor:
In a time when everyone, in-
cluding more and more busi-
nesses are becoming environmen-
tally conscious, we were shocked
to realize that our own university
wasn't doing all it could to pro-
mote "saving the environment
Even other prominent univer-
sities, such as the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
are making it easier for their stu-
dents and faculty to aid the envi-
ronment. There, they have a new
residence hall recycling program
with dorm-room recycling bins
for every room and more recy-
cling centers throughout the cam-
pus.
Here at ECU, Styrofoam
plates and containers are being
used for the packaging of foods
in several of our dining facilities.
These Styrofoam containers,
which could have easily been sub-
stituted for by paper products,
are causing large amounts of non-
biodegradable material to accu-
mulate.
Our university should make
the campus more accessible for
recycling.
There should be separate con-
tainers in the dining facilities
where students can divide their
waste convenient into recyclable
and non-recyclable materials. If
recycling is convenient, then it
will be likely that more people
will participate. It is time for the
Campus Dining Services to
change its ways.
Tricia Jenkins
Audra Cooper
�M






n
TTie Eos Carolinian
October 13, 1992
Classifieds
Page 6
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS :1 and 2 bedroom
apartments. Energy-efficient,
several locations in town. Car-
peted, kitchen appliances, some
water and sewer paid, washer
dryer hookups. Call 752-8915.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To
share two bedroom fully fur-
nished apartment. ECU bus
access near by. call Tim at 758-
5207.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share a two bed-
room apartment. Rent: 170.00 a
month, 1 2 utilitiesand $175.00
deposit. 201F Eastbrook Apart-
ments. Call Stephanie at 758-
7664.
ROOM FOR RENT. Female
non-smoker preferred. Own
room and bath. Washerdryer
in quiet 3 bedroom house.
$225 month. Utilities included.
Call 758-1471 anytime.
TIRED OF YOUR PRESENT
LIVING ARRANGEMENTS?
Need a roommate to share apt.
at 807 College View Apts.
$125.00 mo 12 utilities
(Lowest rent in Greenville) 2
BR, Large den, ECU bus. For
more information call 758-9865.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: To share 2 bedroom
in Wilson Acres. Will have own
room. $158.66mo 13 utili-
ties. Call 830-9213.
LOOKING FOR ROOM-
MATE. Wistful Vista. One
block from campus. Spacious
apartment, large kitchen, bal-
cony, hardwood floors, par-
tially furnished. Rent $175
month 12 utilities. Need by
November 1. Call Karen or
Mary at 830-9450.
FOR SALE
GOVERNMENT SIEZED
CARS, trucks, boats, 4wheel-
ers, motorhomes, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available your area now.
call 1-800-333-3737 ext. C-5999.
FREE KITTEN: Male, 8 weeks
old, supplies included. Needs
good home. Call anytime: 321-
0809.
2CERWINVEGA 380 loud-
speakers. 15" Woofers. Will
sacrifice for $500. Call Josh at
830-6893.
FOR SALE
CAR STEREO CD PLAYER:
Alpine 5905 pullout, $180. Am
amplifier ADS PH 12 6 chan-
nels 20 by 6(200)An portable
Sony CD player $150 with AC
adapter.
FERRET FOR SALE: 6 months
old, supplies included, female,
has shots, spayed and
descanted. Price negotiable to
GOOD HOME. Call Ashleigh:
321-0809.
TWIN BED: Mattress,
boxspring, and frame. Good
condition. $75.00 or best offer.
HELP WANTED
FOR SALE
Pumpkins, Gourds,
Indian Corn, Wheat Straw,
New Crop Apples,
Fresh Cider and more are
now available at the
Green Market
14th St. & Greenville Blvd
757-3311
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NOWL USED CD'S
HELP WANTED
EMERGENCY! Expanding
company needs hardworking
reliable students to mail our
diet brochures from Home
Dorm! Earn up to $200 PT or
$1000 FT! Employees needed
immediately! For job applica-
tion send self-addressed stamp
envelope: Colossal Marketing,
Employee Processing, P.O. Box
291140 Port Orange, FL 32129.
"HELP WANTED" EARN
$1,500 WEEKLY mailing our
circulars Begin now FREE
packet! SEYS, Dept. 164, Box
4000, Cordova, 38018-4000.
GUARANTEED WORK
AVAILABLE. Excellent pay for
EASY home based work. Full
part-time. Rush self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers
(G2) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham, NC 27705
$360UP WEEKLY. Mailing
brochures! Sparefull-time. Set
own hours! RUSH self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope:
Publishers (Gl) 1821 Hillandale
Rd. 1B-295 Durham, NC 27705
WORK AT HOME: Assembly
, craft, typing and more! Up to
$500.00 a week possible. For
information write Source; 1840-
D Simonton Road, Dept. 9108,
StatesviUe, NC 28677.
ATTENTION! EARN $2500
Free Trip! Students, Greeks,
Clubs earn free Spring Break
trip after selling only 8 trips at
your school! Spring Break 1-
800-678-6386.
CAMPUS REPS WANTED!
Quality vacations to exotic des-
tinations! Sell Spring Break
packages to Jamaica, Cancun,
Bahamas, Florida. Fastest way
to free travel and extra $$$$.
Call Sun Splash Tours 1-800-
426-7710.
EASY WORK! Excellent pay!
Assemble products at home.
Call toll free. 1-800-467-5566
Ext. 5920.
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT:
Earn $300 - $400 weekly. Day
and night shift available. No
experience necessary. Must be
at least 18 years old. Call day or
night 746-6762.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE!
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call l-800-333-3737ext. P-3712.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIR-
ING - Earn $2,000month
world travel (Hawaii, Mexico,
the Caribbean, etc.) Holiday,
Summer and Career employ-
ment available. No experience
necessary. For employment
program call 1-206-634-0468
ext. C5362.
MODELS: Susan's needs you
now! 809-A Red Banks Rd Gre-
enville. New TV commercials
in production. Requirements:
Height 5'7' and up, Size 6-8,
some previous modeling or
pageant experience.
SAVE ON SPRING BREAK
'93! Jamaica, Cancun, and
Florida from $119.00. Book earl
and save $$$! Organize group
and travel free! Sun Splash
HELP WANTED
Tours 1-800-426-7710.
$$$$ FREE TRAVEL AND
RESUME EXPERIENCE In-
dividuals and student organi-
zations wanted to promote
SPRING BREAK, call the
Nation's leader. Inter-Campus
Programs 1-800-327-6013.
STUDENTS OR ORGANI-
ZATIONS: Promote our
Florida Spring Break packages.
Earn money and free trips. Or-
ganize small or large groups.
Call Campus Marketing - 1-
80023-5264.
PERSONALS
SERIVCES ()FFERED
TYPING: Error free, quick and
dependable at reasonable cost.
Excellent typing and proof-
reading skills (grammar, punc-
tuation, sentence structure,
etc.). Call Pauline at 757-3693.
STUDY ABROAD IN AUS-
TRALIA: Information on se-
mester, year, graduate, sum-
mer and internship programs
in Australia. We represent 28
Australian Universities, call us
toll free 1-800-245-2575.
YOUR CAREER IS AT STAKE!
Are you applying to graduate school
or medical school? We are academic
scientists with extensive experience
as members of graduate and medical
school admissions committees. We
will work with you on your application
and strengthen your personal essay to
give you that competitive edge.
For free information, contact:
AIKENDAiL Academic Consultants,
703 Ninth Street, Suite 233, Durham,
NC 27705-4802, (919) 493-0343.
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
You also get a FREE
HEADPHONE RADIO
just for calling
1-800-932-0528, Ext. 65
RESEARCH INFORMATION)
Largest Library of Information In US.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VteaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
in CalK. (213) 477-8226
Or, rush $2.00 to: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave. gQ6-A, Los Angles, CA 9002S
QUIMECUM SUNT, non me
intellexerant. Qui juxta me est,
juxta ingnem est. Qui longe est
a me, longe ingnem est. Copula
Mei.
CALLING ALL LADIES
The 2nd annual Gamma Sigma
Sigma Male Auction is coming
soonso mark your calenders
for October 20th.
STAR YARBORO - TO MY
"LITTLETEAPOT you were
sucha good sport. WERE YOU
SURPRISED? May the parties
be plentiful! Your big
sisterSusan Rives.
MID SEMESTER RUSH: Miss
out on Fall rush? We are look-
ing for motivated guys search-
ing for membership in a long
established fraternity on the
ECU campus. For more info
call Scott 758-8469.
KAPPA SIG PLEDGES:
AWESOME time at cook out!
Can't wait to do it again. Our
flag football game was great
and so were our escorts. Love,
The Alpha Phi Pledges.
ALPHA PHI FOOTBALL
PLAYERS: Congrats on an
undefeated season and thank
you Drew and Tim for coach-
ing us through it! Love, the
Alpha Phi's.
SIGMA PI: We had a great
time at the pre-down town
Thur Thanks to Doug, Steve,
Sean, Brian, Chris and John for
playing co-rec volleyball with
us! Love, the Alpha Phi's.
ALPHA OMICRON PI BETA
ROH'S - It all began on a warm
Thurs. night, with the sisters
in charge we knew it would
turn out right! 9:30 was the
time, and you guys had
reached your prime! You got
your 1st clue and you knew
what to do, an evening full of
singing, dancing, and even a
little barking too! House after
house you performed like
pro's, how you ate that Jello
nobody knows! And when the
hurt ended the party wasn't
done, These Alpha Omicron
Pi's were determined to have
fun! Carrie and Beth were
happy it was easy to see unfor-
tunately their stomach's didn't
agree. But, all in all we hope
PERSONALS
you guys had fun because to
your big sisters you're all 1!
JENNY KULA - Barking like a
dog, "you are my sunshine
farm animal impressions, a
little jello, a lot of gel, and a
whole lot of FUN! You are the
shit! Love,YBS.
SINCE YOU'RE SINGLE
AND LIKE TO MINGLE;
Come to a Free bowling party
at East Carolina Bowl, 700 Red
Banks Road. RSVP with Sheri.
355-5510.
DLETA CHI: Look what the
Brotherhood of a lifetime has
done in one year.
AZD: I looked out the win-
dow, seen the Eggman. Yelling
for Maalox I knew it must be !
Dan. We had Chinese eyes and j
Cowboy boots, drinkin' much
Killian's and getting all loose.
Thumper is a game we'll never
forget, screaming, hollarin' and
grabbin' their @! Wednes-
day night was great! P.S. How
was the water Robin? The �;
brothers and pledges of Delta :
Chi. '
ZETA: A.L.E. tried to rain on �
our parade. Richard drank on, j
he wasn't afraid. Out the door, ;
he was tossed on his a. We :
moved the party so the drink- '
ing would last. Over to the '�
Works and the coast was clear.
We gathered around the guitar
player so we could all hear. We
had a blast! The Brothers and J
Pledges of Delta Chi.
THETACHI: We danced the j
night away in our sombreros j
and bahas. What an awesome
time we had! You guys are
great! Can't wait to do it again.
Love, the Sigmas.
KEVIN McMANARA, j
Thanks so much for all you've j
done for us You're and awe- ;
some coach and friend. We .
appreciate all the time you've :
given to help us out. Love, the
Sigmas.
I HAVE THE BEST roommates
ever! Thanks for all of the rides :
last week, you three are won- !
derful! Lots of love, your fa-
vorite Assistant News Editor!
REGAN: Wigidy,wigidy,wak!
Announcements
BISEXUAI -fiAY-LES-
BIAN SUPPORT GROUP
Social support and activities.
Meetings are closed. Call 757-
6766 11:00 - 12:15 Tues. and
Thurs. or 1:00 - 2:30 Wed. for
information on meeting time
and place.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray,
study God's word, be involved
in social and service projects?
Need a refuge from time to
time? Campus Christian Fel-
lowship may be what you are
looking for. Our weekly meet-
ings are at 7pm Wednesdays at
our Campus House located at
200 E. 8th St directly across
from Cotanche St. from Men-
denhall Student Center. Ev-
eryone is welcome. For more
information. Call Tim Turner,
Campus Minister at 752-7199.
PHI ETA SIGMA
A general meeting will be
held on October 8 at 6:00pm for
all Phi Eta Sigma members. The
meeting place will be at
Fleming in the basement. Re-
freshments will be served. If
you have any questions, please
contact the Vice-President at
752-5792.
STUDENT HFAITH
SERVICE
Flu vaccine will be available
at Student Health Service this
Fall If you would like to re-
ceive the vaccine this Fall come
by the Student Health Center
(8am - 5pm) to sign up and pay
for the vaccine. The cost is $3.00.
October 16th is the last day to
signup and to receive the vac-
cine. Vaccines will be adminis-
tered October 19 through Oc-
tober 30.
STRESS MANAGEMENT
October 13 in 329 Wright
Building at the Counseling
Center from 2-3pm. Call 757-
6661 for more information.
"WHERE THERE'S A WILL,
THERE'S AN A"
Part I Tuesday October 13.
3-5pm and Part II Thursday,
October 15, ?-5pm. Both ses-
sions will be in 313 Wright
Building at the Counseling
Center.
25 OR OLDER
Undergrad or grad student.
Join us for brown bag lunches
on Wednesday from noon to
1:30pm. Come for part or all of
the time. This rap group is an
informal gathering designed to
be supportive and help meet
the needs of students with fam-
ily responsibilities. This will be
in 313 Wright Building. For
more information, phone
George Gressman at 757-6661
(Counseling Center).
BE ON TOP
Recreational Services will be
offering a Climbing II work-
shop on Thursday Oct. 15 at
3:00pm at the Climb Tower. A
small tee is required - all equip-
ment will be supplied. For more
information, call 757-6387.
PERFORMING ARTS
SERIES.
The National Orchestra of
Spain will perform on Wed
Oct. 14, 1992 at 8:00pm. The
Orchestra, in its fifty years, has
performed all over Europe, The
United States, and South
America. Its repertoire includes
major works from the 18th
through the 20th centuries and
focuses on Spanish composers.
r.AMMA BETA PHI
Attention all members!
There will be a general meeting
held on Tuesday, October 13 in
Mendenhall Room 244 at
4:00pm. We look forward to
seeing everyone there.
SCHOOT OF BUSINESS
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAIL-
ABLE
Approximately $17,600 will
be awarded in scholarships to
School of Business majors
(those students already i the
School of Business). Students
interested in making applica-
tion for these scholarships
should secure forms from on of
the following department of-
fices: accounting -GCB 308; De-
cisions Sciences-3418; Finance
- 3420; Management - 3106;
Marketing - 3414. All applica-
tions must be submitted to Ruth
Jones (GCB 3210), Chairman of
School of Business Scholarship
Committee, by October 16,
1992. Students may apply for
one or more of the scholarships.
ORIENATION TO CAREER
SERVICES
The Career Services office
invites seniors and graduate
students who will graduate in
December, 1992 or MaySum-
mer, 1993 who have not at-
tended an Orientation to Ca-
reer Services meeting to attend
on October 14 at 3:00 in the
Bloxton House. The staff will
give an overview of career ser-
vices and distribute registra-
tion forms. They will discuss
procedures for establishing a
credentials file and participat-
ing in employment interviews
on campus.
VOLLEYBALL CLUB
Anyone interested in the de-
velopment of a Volleyball Club
are welcome to attend the first
organizational meeting for the
Fall semester. This is a return-
ing club with expectations of
providing opportunities for
men, women and Co-rec com-
petition . The meeting will be
Tues. Oct. 13 at 5:30pm in Tm
10 Christenbury Memorial
Gymnasium.
MINORITY ARTS COM-
MJXEEE
The Student Union Minor-
ity Arts Committee will meet
today, October 13 at 5:15pm in
Room 242 of the Mendenhall
Student Center. All students
are welcome.
PHI SIGMA PI
Phi Sigma Pi National
Honor Fraternity will be hav-
ing a dinner meeting at
Szechuan Gardens Wed. Oct.
13. The dinner will begin at
5:30 and the meeting will begin
at 6:30.
ECU CERAMICS GUILD
Annual mug sale. The sale
will be Oct. 16 from 8-5 in the
from entrance of Jenkins Fine
Arts Center. All mugs are hand
made by student and profes-
sors of ceramics. The mugs
range in price from $5-$10.
ORDER OF OMEGA
Attention all members and
perspective members. Order of
Omega meeting will be held
Thurs. Oct. 15,1992 at 5:00pm.
Mendenhall Multipurpose
room on first floor.
PERFORMING ART SE-
BIES
Performing on Friday, Oct
16,1992at 8:00pm, RayCharles,
the Raelettes, and the Ray
Charles Orchestra will perform
a variety of music ranging from ;
gospel to blues to jazz to R&B.
The Carroll Dashieli Jazz En- j
semble will serve as the open- '
ing act. ;
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS
THUR OCT. 15 � Faculty
Recital featuring Selma
Gokcen, cello; John B. O'Brien,
piano with guest lecturers Bodo
Nischan and McKay Sundwall:
Beethoven and the Romantic
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00pm,
Free). SUN OCT. 18�Facutly
Recital featuring Charles Bath,
piano (Fletcher Recital Hall,
3:00pm, Free). MON OCT 19 (
� Dawn Batts Hill, composi-
tion, Graduate Recital (Fletcher
Recital Hall, 7:00pm, Free); and
David Farrior, tuba and Cedric
Hairston, tuba, Senior Recital,
(Fletcher Recital hall, 9:00pm,
Free).
INTERVIEW SKILLS ,
WORKSHOP
Seniors, graduate students
and cooperative education stu-
dents who need help in devel-
oping or refining their inter-
view skills are invited to a
workshop sponsoredby Career
Services. Come and leam spe-
cial techniques that will help
you prepare for the job search!
The interview workshop will
be held on Oct. 15 at 3:00, Oct.
20 at 5:30 and Oct. 28 at 3:00 in
t�o Rlovfon Hrnco





The East Carolinian
October 13, 1992
Lifestyle
Page 7
Two of North Carolina's exemplary "pop" bands,
Jennyanykind and Dillon Fence, played to an amoeba-like sweat mob
Saturday at a packed Attic.
Mojazz, Brown combination
dynamites with new album
Photo cc rtesy Jennyanykind
Clockwise from left, Tom Royal, Mark Holland and Michael Holland comprise the band Jennyanykind. They
and Dillon Fence joined together to rock "pop music" fans at the Attic.
'Pop music' slams at Attic
By Layton Croft
Staff Writer
With a decade-long deluge of
categorical offshoots, "pop music"
has had a lot to deal with.
Alternative, industrial, grunge
and techno are words construed by
the press, contrived by the music
industry and thrived on by the
masses.
Such words label bands and
earmark the newest, "coolest"
sound. But more importantly, such
labels serve to carve the ever-diver-
si fying pop music smorgasbord into
bite-size chunks.
Two of North Carol ina's exem-
plary "pop" bands, Jennyanykind
and Dillon Fence, played to an
amoeba-like sweat mob Saturday
at a packed Attic.
The music zealots who flocked
to the venue, though unnecessarily
restrained by goofy barriers and
goofier bouncers, proved the pop
equation. That is: Vel 1-wri tten, aes-
thetically pleasing muskfans who
pay to see and hear that music
Pop music.
Jennvanvkind, a seven-month-
old trio,attracted a dozen-plus pro-
Dillon Fencers away from the bar
and up to the stage for the last half
of their 40-minute set.
Sans popular music,
Jennyanykind fosters a pop appeal
not unlike that of Jan Morrison,
Screaming Trees and Buffalo Tom.
The band � Michael Holland (gui-
tar, vocals), Mark Holland (drums)
and Tom Royal (bass) � creates a
kinetic flux of music that broods,
revsand tripsover itself while ham-
'Fence Jennyanykind deliver
crowd-pleasing performances
mering out a catchy,
three- or four-chord
riff.
Michael
Holland's impassive
vocal delivery un-
derstates his clipped,
often biting, lyrics:
"And it's summer in
the cityYou know I
pity for people,
people in the street
Ulin' for a piece of
cold meatReal cool
real sour with fire
on the insideLook
out, white manI'm
gonna beatyou silly,
yeahI'm gonna
beatyou silly,yeah
These are troubled
years (from "The
Way It Is").
But also with
lennvam kind's bnl -
liant muskad potar-
itv th.it comes
wrapped in es-
teemed composure
live, Holland occasionally shifts
gears wailing and screeching a la
Black Francis or Jani Joplin. The
band's formula works amazingly
well, hence pop appeal.
Fop-music fans in Greenville
love Dillon Fence, and it's no won-
der. The irresistibility of their guitar
hook-based, sugar melody-filled,
upbeat, three-and-a-half minute
packaged gems seems endless.
Dillon Fence jammed at the Attic Saturday night.
But in talking with guitarist,
singersongwriter Greg
Humphreys before his band's
meaty, hour-and-a-half set, it be-
came apparent Dillon Fence wants
more.
Alter five years of hard work,
Humphreys sounded a tad un-
happy with the band's current di-
See Dillon, page 8
By Andy Sugg
Staff Writer
With the release of
Norman Brown's album, Just
Between Us, Motown Records
introduces its new Mojazz la-
bel.
Motown's press release de-
fines Mojazz as a "vehicle for
experimentation in music with-
out the handcuffs and restric-
tions of the past
If future releases under the
Mojazz label possess the dy-
namics of Just Betzveen Us,
Motown will become a major
force in the jazz arena.
Norman Brown is truly in-
credible � his fingers run up
and down the fretboard like
excited ants. Stevie Wonder
said of Brown, "He sounds like
he was bom playing Listen-
ers may make a comparison
between Brown and Gairge
Benson, but the style is defi-
nitely pure Norman Brown.
The first track on jiist Between Us, "Stormin
is an aptly titled track � the thumping bass and
Brown's blistering licks kick up a storm. On the
line notes, the word "jam" is beside every track,
and that's the way it is. This whole album smokes.
"MoonlightTonight the slowestnumberon Jitst
Photo courtesy Motown Entertainment
Norman Brown's album, Just Between Us,
should delight jazz lovers.
Betzveen Us, is almost
mellow, but Brown's
guitarwork is phenom-
enal.
"Sweet Taste" jux-
taposes Brown's guitar
with a heavy bass riff
and what wouid seem
to be an awkward back-
ground riff, but they all
fit together to form a
sweet taste for the ear.
Included on Just Be-
tioeen Us is a delicious
cover of Stevie
Wonder's "Too High
with Wonder singing
and playing the har-
monica. Other guests
include Boyz II Men,
Gerald Albright,
Ronnie Laws and Kirk
Whalum. The Earth,
Wind and Fire Horns
reunite with guitarist Al
McKay and bassist
Verdine White on
Brown's cover of EW&F's classic, "Love Holiday
Add the singing Ferri sisters and the result is a debut
album that is beautiful.
I cou Id go on and on about the tracks and Brown's
enormous depth but instead I'll just say, "Buy the
album If you like jazz, you need Just Between Us. If
you don't like jazz, buy it anyway.
ain
Pnoto by Dail Heed � TEC
By Lisa Williams
Staff Writer
The National Orchestra of Spain
has been performing for 50 years
and has quite a history.
The National Spanish Orches-
tra will be performing on Oct. 14 in
Wright Auditorium on the ECU
campus.
The two coexisting orchestras
of Spain were united with financial
help from the government to form
the National Orchestra of Spain.
The widely proclaimed Span-
ish Orchestra was presented in
Barcelona in 1942.
Conductors of the Orchestra
have included Bartolome Perez
Casas, Ataulfo Argenta, Antonio
Ros Marba, Jesus Lopez Cobos and in 1991,
Milanese Aldo Ceccato became the first non-Span-
ish maestro.
The present director is Spanish-born Rafael
Fruhbeck DeBurgos.
Maestro Fruhbeck made his North American
debut with the Philadelphia Orchestra and con-
ducted most of the major orchestras in the United
States and Canada.
The National Orchestraof Spa in has performed
all over the world. Some of their performances
have been in Germany, France, Italy, Hong Kong
and the United States.
Special guest soloist for the National Orches-
tra of Spain's fall tour is guitarist Narciso Yepes
Flavor!
Photo courtesy Mercedes Cuervo � Arango Pulin
Guitarist Narciso Yepes will perform for the National Orchestra of
Spain at Wright Auditorium.
Yepes is regarded as one of the greatest musicians of
our day. He has developed an unique method, new
resources and possibilities for the guitarfromhishard
work and stud v oi the instrument. His technique has
opened new horizons for the instrument which has
inspired manycomposerstodedicatehimnew works.
Yepes is general ly seen and welcomed on concert and
recital stages in North and South America, Europe,
the Near and Far East and Australia. Yepes also
devotes a considerable amount of his time to music
research and fine-tuning his craft.
The National Spanish Orchestra not only per-
forms Spanish music of our present times; they also
include major works for symphonic orch astras of the
18th and 20th centuries.
Southern Pizza debuts
with unique taste
Waters 'amused' with new album
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
What does it take for a musician to be noticed? Roger
Waters knows but has decided to avoid it.
Even with a new album, Amused to Death, he avoids
attention. He doesn't like to do publicity shots and he
doesn't give many interviews. In the few videos he has
done, he barely appeared in them. He's written several
platinum-selling albums yet people still do not know who
he is.
He has written rock radio staples such as "Money
"Welcome to the Machine "Wish You Were Here" and
probably the most recognizable song, "Another Brick In
The WallStillheispractically unknown.lt took the Berlin
"Wall" show for him to get any recognition.
After guiding Pink Floyd through their five best sell-
ing albums (Dark Side of the Moon still holds Billboards'
record for most weeks on the top lOOsellingalbumsatover
175 months.) Waters left the band to pursue a solo career.
Since 1984 he has released threesoloalbums,includinghis
newest, Amused to Death.
Amused to Death has Jeff Beck wielding the ax for
Waters and it makes a remarkable difference.
Waters is able to mix strong guitar work with melody-
driven songs.
Sometimes the mood overpowers the musk and ice
versa. The mixture of the separate entities merge to give
Waters his strongest effort to date.
Since Waters revolutionized the idea of a concept
aibum,itis predictable that Amused to Dnjfi would also fall
under the same category. The unifying theme in all four-
teen songs is the cost of war and the mass reaction to it: "I
saw the frontline boys popping their pil IsSick of the mess
they findOn their stage And the bravery of being out of
range
Waters has never been known for his peppy lyrics and
this venture keeps that trend in tact Amused is dedicated
to a soldier that died in World War I, William Hubbard.
The first release from the album is "What God Wants,
Part 1 The song is full of juxtaposed thoughts and the
music reflects this mood also.
With tongue in cheek, Waters sings about "Perfect
Sense" in wars. The chorus, which he calls the global
anthem, is, "Can't you seeIt all makes perfect sense
Expressed in dollars and cents, Pounds, shillings and
pence
He has sports announcer Marv Albert call a play-by-
play of a naval attack, making light of the situation.
Thecontradiction between muskand lyrics on Amused
tricks the listener into thinking that a song might be
uplifting and optimistic, but Waters never let up.
See Waters, page 8
By Joe Horst
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Pizza hasbeendeveloped in the Midwest and
the North since time immemorial. With the ad-
vent of Papa Oliver's on 10th Street, the concept of
a "southern pizza" is an idea whose time has
come.
Located at 316C East 10th St next to Hank's
Ice Cream and The Pantry, Papa Oliver's replaces
the old establishment of Oli verio's. Owners Todd
and Maureen McGregor have revamped the en-
tire store's operation to bring this unique idea to
the South.
Papa Oliver's has brought in renowned Chef
Robert of R.J. Consultants out of San Diego, Cal if.
to present the tastiest pizza and subs that com-
bines both health and the southern market.
With a degree in baking science and technol-
ogy, Robert has designed a formula specifically
for the South. His crusts, toppings and sauces are
one of a kind and reflect the unique flavor of
southern cooking.
"I've made more than five million pizzas
said Robert. "There's no pizza like this in the
country
Current ideas for pizzas include a hot and
spicy pizza, country ham (designed to be low in
fat), hickory smoked and Italian chicken, jusl to
name a few. Also ottered are Papa Pita fries, Olfie
bread stk ks and a special Pirate Piza.
The Pirate Pizza will be decided b ballot in
Greenville neighborhoods. Residents will vote as to
the pizza's toppings and if the Pirates win their foot-
ball game, the community will share in the win with
a special-priced pizza.
Papa Oliver's hot and spicy pizza is just that �
hot and spicy. If your stomach can't handle the heat,
then stay out of the kitchen. Make sure you've got
plenty of liquid near you after eating even one slice�
that heat stays in your mouth for a full five minutes
after eating it. Weak stomachs are not for this one.
Their regular pizza � mine was loaded with
extra cheese � fills you up without feeling like you
can't move out ot your chair. Thecrust on either pizza
is one of the best in Greenville. It's light and tasty and
will spoil the eater to any other pizza. Taste Papa's
crust and bread and then taste the competition's �
there's no contest.
Theonlythingagainst Papa's pizza is their grease.
After opening the box from delivery, 1 discovered the
bottom to be saturated with grease.
Though the great taste offsets this problem, it can
get to beahale trying to hold on to oneslice after the
other. Napkins are a must � Papa's is nothing if not
a messy meal.
"We make pizza the way people li ke it � not the
way we like it Papa's pizza emphasizes this owner's
quote in the bet way possible, by living up to its
reputation and letting the pizza-lover decide for him-
self.
As one vendor had been heard to comment,
"Pizza i more than pepperoni � it's .1 meal
'?.





iTgjf� �
8 The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 13, 1992
Dillon
rection. The major-label produc-
tion of Dillon Fence's debut LP on
Mammoth Records and mammoth
seller across the South, Rosemary,
isn't going to happen again,
Humphreys said.
Indeed, thealmostoverwhelm-
ing predictability of songs such as
"Something For You" and "Day-
light" inhibits Rosemary's staying
power, and therefore its worm as a
classic pop album, which is what it
sets out to be.
Dillon Fence began recording
material for their hext album Mon-
day, and peppered their energetic
Continued from page 7
Waters
Even on a song called "It's A
Miracle" he's sarcastic. "They had
sex in PennsylvaniaA Brazilian
grew a treeA doctor in Manhat-
tanSave a dying man for freeIt's
a miracle
The final song on the album is
the title track, "Amused to Death
The bulk of the song is an ex-
planation of how this world's soci-
ety is falling apart Waters ends the
story with the death of the human
set Saturday with six new songs.
Humphreys said the new album
should be recorded in several
months, and won't be produced by
Ron St Germain, Rosemary's pro-
ducer. But where Humphreys
claims "thenew album won'tsound
anything like the last one the
band's new songs sound like Rose-
mary outtakes.
Where the song "Sugarcane"
(released on the five-song CD EP
Daylight) departs from the rubber-
arm jangle rhythm pop Dillon Fence
has mastered, all six new tunes
played Saturday sounded like stale
Continued from page 7
race.
Though itcould hardily becon-
sidered an album full of positivity,
Amused to Death is definitely an
enlightening experience. For Pink
Floyd fans there is little room for
disappointment.
bread tastes.
The members of Jennyanykind
moved to Chapel Hill because of.
bands like Dillon Fence, one of the
pioneers of Chapel Hill's near de-
cade-long emergence as the premier
new music capital in the South-
east.
Saturday's show quietly fea-
tured two potential big-hitters that
could makebignoise in thebigpop'
music world real soon.
PI LAMBDA PHI
is returning to East Carolina
M5.I91SO SNC TK.MO S&Egft;9WMG�Lo�3FkJ.AM .
A4 MAPU SI .0. NY - IIW.WUS4H HMI
W5(rojlWCWlOG.CAU fOt QUANTITY DISCOUNTS i
ci�2 wjimatm woouenoNS cro jaRoT
DUMPE JJJST
QUAYL &YE
IB
nnauTMNoto!
-UNfflONmO
COUMf RMO
-WHAT A WASH IT fl
rS TO tOSf ONE'S
FRESH FRUIT fi VEGETABLES
GOURDS, INDIAN CORN, HAY
NEW CROP APPLES
FRESH PRESS CIDER:
1534 E. 14TH ST.
(919)757-3311
EasLXaijoIina
laynouse
19924993
presents �eaSOfl
THORNTON WILDER'S PULITZER
PRIZE-WINNING
TOi �(KHK1 �?
"�M TTIITO
"A True American Comedy Classic"
October 15, 16,17, 19 and 20 at 8:00 p.m.
October 18 at 2:00 p.m.
Live Theatre For Less Than A Movie So Bring A Date
ECU Students: $4.50
Call � 757-6829
BEST OF TRAVEL
HOMECOMING SPECIAL
All ECU Students, Staff, and Alumni
Receive An Additional 5 Off
All HotelMotel Room Bookings
OFFER GOOD THROUGH NOVEMBER 30TH
Tour Packages
Spring Break Specials
Sporting Events
Nation Wide Service
Hotel and Motel Bookings for Local,
National, and International Services.
Best of Travel will handle all your travel needs.
Best of Travel
1801 S. Charles Blvd. Suite 3
Greenville, NC 27858 (919)355-8984
1-800-841-0666
MID-ATLANTIC
INSURANCE
SERVICES, INC
6 To 20 Points
DWI
Lowest Rates Available
Low Monthly Payments
Call For A Quote
756-7723
3004 S. Memorial Dr.
Greenville. N.C. 27834
� i' .v7 � � ' �$. '� r q4� 'V�UJ
HOMECOMINq
FLOfT SUPPLIES
Skirting
Streamers
Festooning
Posterboard
Banner Paper
Stencils
Colored Tissue
Colored Mylar
Large Markers
loons
and more
A
Anything
Paper
Bells Fork Square
fefri3v.y fZ�& aMiCft gjfigj&
Nickolodeon's Smash
Offbeat Cartoon Comes to Comics.
THE COMIC BOOK STORE
919 DICKINSON AVENUE
GREENVILLE. NC 27834
(919)758-6909
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
MON-SAT 9:30am-6pm
SUN 2:00pm-6:00pm
A
rMJ
Book
&C199? Vtecom
TUem?lter�lErKttnn�KaR��klnc. M nm r.
MILAWOS
PIZZA EXPRESS
for
HOMECOMING WEEKEND
Come see whut we have to offers
-Lour prices
-Beer on Tap
-Outdoor Patio
-Buffet specials
-Student menu discount
-Free delivery for ECU students
who spend 5.00 or more
Homecoming Specials
Oct. IS to Oct SO
Mob. thru Prl. from 11x00 - SlOO
and
Sua. mad Mod. from SsOO - SlOO
All you can eat Pizza and Salad Buffet
only 0��99
Come to where the people never sleep
and something is always happening!
�Formely known as Bunny's
Our Clientele Wear
Many Different Hats
and we are capable of
meeting their many
varied printing needs.
For anything from
quick copies to custom
designed 4-color
process printing
come to us.
m GRAPHIC DESIGN
W&. TYPESETTING
m COLOR PRINTING
g MORGAN
� PRINTERS Inc.
3001 S.F.vansS(.POBox2l26Fax756-2559Toll Free 1800 962 1972
Greenville, North Carolina 27834 � 919-355-5588
mSmm
COLLEGE NIGHT
wjth the Best Mix of Music
with Dr. Doug at

-ftp
DOORS OPEN AT 9:00 PM
$1.75 Domestics
$1.75Hills
RIO!
BRING THIS COUPON AND
RECEIVE FREE ADMISSION
VaHcnuesday. On ly
Eye Exam,
Frame & Lenses
Includes a comprehensive eye
exam by our doctor, value line
(rame and our best plastic
CR-39 single vision lenses.
Add $30 for ST bifocal lenses.
Choose from mr large value
line frame collection or Ret
$40 off hundreds of other
frames in inventory with a
retail value greater than $100.
This offer includes most
prescriptions.
No-Lme Progressive
Bifocal Lenses
Our highest quality no-line
plastic CR-39 bifocal lenses.
100 satisfaction guaranteed.
Also, receive $20 off the frame
of your choice with a no-line
bifocal purchase.
Eye Exam, Fitting
& Contact Lenses
Includes a comprehensive
eye exam by our doctor,
then you will be fitled with
your choice of spherical
daily wear contact lenses
or a three (3) month
supply of disposable
lenses. Professional fees
for extended wear are
slightly more.
@
OPTOMCTWC
�Y�CAReC�NT�R
Superoplic Service In One Hour.
PA
Dr. David I. Fil7gerald, Optometrart
Gary M. Harris, Optician
70S E. Cic-rmiltr Blvd.
� -� i -�� tw n� u.i,
Iprn Man. Fri. 9 6, S�i. 9 1 Phanr 756-1204
,o Other Discounts Apply . Ilranci Names )bu Trvst . Walk-ins Welcome � Offer For A l.tmSed Tim
STUDENT I.D. REQUIRED
fc






i !� mm -r r rr �
mmmmmmmmmmmmtmmmm
1992 Homecoming Queen Candidates
Rhonda Sawyer
Middle Grades
Hope Surratt
Slay Hall
Mandy Waters
GarrettHall
Jennifer Davis
Ay cock Hall
Deborah Atkinson
Pi Omega Pi
Christy Green
Clement Hall
Rhonda Harrison
ECU Gospel Choir
Laura McMillan
Chi Omega
Laura Sharar
Alpha Phi Omega
Rena Salameh
Sigtna Phi Episilon
Amy Roberson
S.LA.P.
Angela Nix
Freshman Class
Lori Woodard
Jones Hall Council
Angela Brown
Crew Club
Lori Oates
Alpha Phi
Tracy Plyler
Occupational Therapy
Dawn Trout
Hospitality Management
Connie Hardee
Lambda Chi Alpha
Amy Pittard
Ambassadors
Regina Duncan
P.U.SM.
Katie Hardison
Greene Hall
Karen Combs
BelkHall
Tonyia Stogner
CJSWAlliance
La Tisha Barnes
ECU Dance Team
Cydia Williams
Gotten Hall
Natalie Richards
Sigma Nu
Traci Dinwiddie
Tyler Hall Council
Dazvn Frank
Pre P.T Club
Kafhy Rouse
Gamma Sigma Sigtna
Edith Burroughs
Delta Zeta
Jean McAleese
Alpha Xi Delta
Christa Catlette
American Marketing
Assoc.
Candidate Elections:
Mendenhall 8-6
Student Stores 8-5
Allied Health 8-5
College Hill 8-5
PURPLE & GOLD
Nothing finer in north Carolina
Pictures published courtesy of The East Carolinian
All Photos by Dail Reed
Brooke Driskill
Kappa Sigma
Robyn Smolen
Sigma Sigma Sigtna
Tiffany Brunson
White Hall
Stephanie Geiger
Peer Health Educators
Christin Wagner
Cheerleaders
Heather Hunt
Visual Arts Forum
Amy Barker
Zeta Tau Alpha
Bethany Orwin
Pirate Crew
Tristan Jones
Alpha Delta Pi
Candy Hudspeth
Flemming Hall
Megan Schubring
Sign Lang. Club
Angela Underhill
Fletcher Hall
Tammy Wiutley
Residence Hall Assoc.
Tricia Chappell
Scott Hall
Susan Rives
Pi Delta
Leigh Ann Stewart
Panhellic Council
Kara Pertnisohn
Jarvis Hall
Susan Temtille
Alpha Omicron Pi
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmwm
�mmmi �






mi � 'ii r.
1
HOMECOMING '92 HAS OFFICIALLY BEGUN
CHECK YOUR CALENDAR TO SEE IF YOU HAVE
INCLUDED THE FOLLOWING EVENTS IN YOUR
HOMECOMING CELEBRATIONS.
PURPLE & GOLD
NOTHMO FINCH M NORTH CAROLINA
PURPLE & GOLD
NOTHMtt PINCNIN NORTH CAnOUNA
tiytfe f

PIRATE STOMPFESTPARTY
Minges Coliseum
October 17,1992
9pm-2am
featuring
Alpha Phi Alpha Omega Psi Phi
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sigma Gamma Rho
Kappa Alpha Psi Phi Beta Sigma
Delta Sigma Theta Zeta Phi Beta
Intermission Performance by Dance Expressions
Tickets: Advance $5.00 At Door $6.00 National Pan Hellenic Greeks with Paraphanalia-FREE
OCTOBER DATES
SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
11
12
13
MEET THE
CANDIDATES
12:30 PM
MALL
14
CANDIDATE
ELECTIONS
Mendenhall 8-6
Allied Health 8-5
Bottom of
College Hill 8-5
15
16
PIRATEFEST
5:30 PM
MALL
RAY CHARLES
IN CONCERT
8:00 PM
MINGES
17
10:00 AM
PARADE
DOWNTOWN
2:00 PM
GAME
FICKLEN
STOMPFEST
8:00 PM
MINGES
FLOAT JUDGING, SPIRIT AWARD AND THE TOP 8 CANDIDATES WILL BE REVEALED AT PIRATEFEST.
FOR THE EXTRA SMART SHOPPER, WE ARE GIVING FREE PRIZES TO THOSE WHO ATTEND PIRATEFEST
LOOK FOR THE TREASURE CHEST DISPLAY AT PIRATEFEST AND THE STUDENT STORE.
COME AND SHOW YOUR PURPLE AND GOLD PRIDE.
REMEMBER, FOR EACH CANNED FOOD ITEM BROUGHT IN BY A MEMBER OF YOUR ORGANIZATION,
5 POINTS GOES TOWARD THE SPIRIT AWARD.
HOWEVER EACH PERSON IS LIMITED TO ONLY ONE 5 POINTS GOING TOWARD THE SPIRIT AWARD.
SPIRIT AWARD WINNER RECEIVES A LOVING CUP AND A CASH PRIZE.





The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 13, 1992
Sports
Page 11
Blue Devils dominate ECU
Pirates devastated, 45-14
By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
ECU was.shocked Saturday as they failed to
score at least 20 points for the first time in almost two
years. Running back Randy Cuthbert and the Duke
Blue Devils destroyed the Pirates, 45-14, in front of
an estimated 15,000 ECU fans who travelled to
Durham, N.C.
"Its devastating strong safety Greg Grandi-
son said. "We didn't want
to loose to no damn ACC
team
Cuthbert plowed
through ECU's defensive
line re 126 yards, 12 less
man the Bucs' team effort
of 138 yards on the ground.
He took full advantage of
the holes created by his of-
fensive line, breaking away for 53 yards on one rush.
ECU was never in the game, the closest score
being 35-14. The Pirates might have gone into the
locker room at halftime down 31-0 if not for corner
back Greg Floyd. Floyd blocked a field goal attempt
with K)2 left in the half.
In the second half, the Pirates never seemed to
gain much momentum.
"When you turn the ball over like we did Head
Coach Steve Logan said, "it takes all the rhythm
outofya
Quarterback Michael Anderson threw four
interceptions and fumbled two snaps while de-
fensive back Garrett Beasley, replacing punter
Michael Jacobs, fumbled his first snap on offense.
Turnovers led to 24 Duke points.
ECU's strong point this season has been their
ability to put points on the board. However, the
Bucs' offense only managed one touchdown �
the other coming on a
36-yard fumble return
by line backer Ernie
Lewis.
The Pirates' 305
yards of total offense is
well below their sea-
son average and 79 of
those yards came on a
late run by seldom-
used running back Charles Miles. Miles is now
tied with Willie Hawkins for the eighth longest
run in ECU history. The run was also the longest
since 1979.
Next weekend is homecoming against the
Bearcats of Cincinnati. The Pirates are 29-8 in
homecoming games since 1955, their last loss at
the hand of West Virginia in 1988,10-30. Kick-
off is scheduled for 2 p.m.
"It'sdevastating. Wedidn'twant
to loose to no damn ACC team
�Strong safety Greg Grandison
-r��
m Ear. safefc

"? fvV7vi j& i
1 t
'ttfcj
i I" K 'fmf Br
. tW-
H0���00-
' fW" � r'A
Photo by Dail Rssd � TEC
The Blue Devil's Randy Cuthbert (not pictured) rushed for
126 yards while the entire Pirate team rushed for 138.
East Carolina
Duke
0 0 14 0- 14
21 7 7 10- 45
msTQUMrm
DUKE � Stanley Dorsey 4 yard TD pass Iran Spense Fudver (Gardner PAT rood) (7
plays, M yards, 2 44 TOP)
DUKE - RobertBaldwin 1 yard TO run (Gardner PAT good) (7plmn, 71 yards. 201 TOP)
DUKE - Randy Cuthbert 20 yard TD pass from Fischer (Gardner? AT good) 0 play. 20
yards, 07TOP)
SECOND QUARTER
DUKE - ID Lewis 2 yard TD run (Gardner PAT good) (10 plays. 68 yards. 422 TOP)
THIRD QUARTER
DUKE - Sean Thomas 84 yard interception return for a TD (Gardner PAT good)
ECU - Morris Letcher 9 yard TD pass from Michael Andersen (Owens PAT good) (a
plays, 47 yards. 223 TOP)
ECU � Ernie Lewis 34 yard fumble recovery renamed for a TD (Owens PAT good)
FOURTH QUARTER
DUKE Randy Gardner 39 yard field goal (4 plays, 5 yards, M7TOP)
DUKE � Dan Clark 8 yard TD pas. from Rachel (Gardner PAT good) (� plays, 53yard
3 50 TOP)
TEAM STATISTICS
ECU DUKE
FIRST DOWNS 14 21
Rushing 5 is
Passing 9 9
Penally 0 2
3RDEFF 2-15 6.15
4THEFF M 11
TOT YARDS 305 461
Total plays 71 76
Average gain 429 606
NET RUSHING 138 239
Rushes 34 47
Avg per rash 4j05 506
NET PASSING 1(7 222
Comp-alt 2237 2029
Yards per pass 7.5 HI
Sacked-yards lost 15 3is
Had intercepted 21 485
PUNT AVG 37.8 36.7
RETURN YARDS 54 110
Punta-retums 213 425
KkJcoffs- returns 6142 23S
Interceptions 21 485
PENALTIESYRDS 565 565
FUMBLES-LOST 32 32
Time of possession 2909 3051
PLAYER STATISTICS
Missed field goals: ECU 00.
DUKE 12
ECU rushing C Miles 2-82,) Smith 12-47, C Van Buren 6-20, M. Anderson 10
C Driver 112. M Ulrhrr 1-5 M Foreman 1-2, G Beasley M-ID
ECU passing S McConneU 5-2-11, M Anderson 32-20-156,
ECU receiving C. Clumpier 3-36, M Lefcher 3-33, C Van Buren 3-24. D. luck. 3-22.
D Balson 3-18, Zophy 2 15,) Smith 3-15, C Driver 1-7. Wilson 1-3
Tackles; UT-AT-TOT
Grandison 6-2-8, Render 3-2-5, Walker n-i. 1. Floyd 0-3-3. Cunmulaj 1-5-t Davl.09,
Oillan4-7,Srof.l�l.Tavlar2 2-4, U-�is 17-8, Cooper 3-6-� UKher&l-l,Tete2-3-
5 McBr 1e0-4 I Hurley 2-1-3, LuphertO-1-1. Robin son CM I Carter 2 JA Lsbiano I-
0-1, Quilei0-1-1, Booth. 144, Crumble 1-1-2, Foreman 0-t-l, Blake 1-0-1 Cotton 0-21
Graham 1-0-1
Pirates can't compete with big dawgs
By Chas Mitch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
During my road trip to
Durham, I saw a bumper sticker
that said it all. "If you can't run
with the big dawgs, better stay on
the porch Not that the Blue
Devils of Duke are considered one
of the big dawgs in NCAA
football, but after Saturday's
match-up one may want to think
twice.
Duke used both the finesse
and a smashmouth approach in
dismantling the ECU attack On
offense, neither Sean McConneU
nor Michael Anderson could
manage to generate the offensive
unit in a consistent manner.
Sporadic passing and ques-
tionable calls only quicken the
demise for the Pirates
"I give Duke a lot of credit
Head Coach Steve Logan said.
"That's the best football game
they've played that I've seen.
They were mistake free for the
most part"
On the other side of the ball,
defensive coordinator Chris
Thurmond could only watch in
disbelief and shock as his defense
struggled to stop the Blue Devil
offense.
Not just on the board, but on
the field did the Pirates go down
in flames. On numerous occasions
the ECU defense missed the initial
tackle which enabled the Duke
ball carriers to pile up the yards
and the first downs.
"They played a little better on
defense than we did nose guard
Zaim Cunmulaj said. "They out-
played us. It shows by the score
Coaching great Vince Lom-
bardi once said, "a No. 1 defense
CAASt,andinj5s
Soccer Standings
Team CAATotalStreak
1. William & Mary3-0-1.8759-3-2.714Wonl
2. Oid Dominion2-0-1.8337-2-3.708Won 2
George Mason2-0-1.8336-3-3.625Lostl
4. James Madison2-1-0.66710-2-0.833Won 2
5. Richmond1-2-0.3336-5-1.542Lostl
6. UkC Wilmington 7. American1-3-0.2502-6-0.250Lost 2
0-2-1.1675-7-1.423Lostl
8. East Carolina0-3-0.0002-7-0.222Lost 2
Volleyball Standings
TeamCAATotalStreak
1. George Mason0-0-0.00010-3.769Won 4
2. American0-0-0.00015-7.682Won 5
3. William & Mary0-0-0.00011-6.647Lost 2
4. James Madison0-0-0.0008-10.444Lostl
5. UNC Wilmington0-0-0.0009-12.429Lost 2
6. East Carolina0-0-0.0007-13.350Lost 2
Volleyball leaders
Hitting GAvgKill AvgG
1. Schultz, ECU73.3131. Smith, GMU40
2Smith,GMU40.3082. Schultz, ECU73
3. Plentiovich, UNCW75.2883. Chilausky, UNCW70
4. Callman, CMU34.2784. Sylvain, AU77
5. Chilausky, UNCW70.2655. Knauss, UNCW64
Assist AvgGAvgTeam AsAvgGW-L
l.Rentovich,UNCW7511.521. UNCW7536-39
2 Arnold, GMU4410.772. ECU7332-41
3. Parsons, ECU7110343.W&M6135-26
4. Schimke, WfcM619.444. GMU4430-14
5. Wutznick, AU677.665.AU8050-30
will stop a No. 1 offense How-
ever, when your defense is thrust
on the field due to fumbies and
interceptions, then eventually
even a No. 20 offense can beat a
No. 1 defense on the field.
"We were training the ball
over and never sustaining
anything Logan said. "When
you don't sustain, you never have
a chance to get in any rhythm
Tony Davis, Ernie Lewis and
Cunmulaj along with the entire
defensive unit should be com-
mended for their efforts on the
gridiron. Their never-say-die
attitude, plus their heart and
desire can only offer a mere
glimmer of hope for the future.
After it was all said and
done, the ECU kicking team rose
from the scorn of the fans and
media.
Garrett Beaslev replaced
redshirt freshman Michael Jacobs
for the punting duties. Aside
from an early miscue, the junior
from Hot-lanta, Ga punted for a
respectable average of 37.8 yards
on five punts.
As for his first punt attempt,
which resulted into a fumble,
Beasley had these comments:
"You see, what happened
was I was still hyped from the
kickoff. The game was just
getting started and I forgot t.
take my gloves off � from the
sweat and stuff on my gloves, it
just slipped right through my
hands
Now with two unexplainable
and unexpected losses within the
past three weeks, it appears that
the Pirates will be returning back
to the chalkboard to reassess the
offensive woes and defensive
break-downs.
Avg
5.40
4.63
4.31
3.25
3.03
Avg
12.07
11.82
11.79
11.77
9.06
Fitness Week offers well-
being for busy students
Rec Services
Fitness Week is an effort to
improve the exercise habits of
college students. EastCarolina is
one of 250 colleges in the United
States participating in this event.
The activities will take place the
week of October 19-23.
This is the third year that
ECU has participated with Rec-
reational Sen' tees organizing this
campus event. Once again, a va-
riety of exciting events are
planned for the week with many
special prizes to be featured as
part of each activity.
Prizes include: watches,
Reebok shoecertificates, T-shirts,
restaurant dinner certificates,
plenty of juice and much more.
Schedule some time during your
week to participate in these free
fun and "fizzical" activities. For
more information contact Kathy
Hill at 757-6387 and look for the
event poster for details.
Monday, Oct 19
Fitness Fizzicals presentsGet
flexed!
Grip strength and flexibility
assessments at 107-A
Christenbuty Gym 3-5:30 p.m.
Tie-in to Fitness!
Beginningclimbinginstruc-
tion at the Hard ROC Tower
from 3-6 p.m. Open to the
first 12 participants - sign up
at 117 Christenbury
Gym October 12-19.
See Fitness, page 12
Owens finds first year difficult
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
Deke Owens, East Carolina's
placekicker, has faced many difficult situa-
tions in his first year starting as a Pirate. He
has faced difficult kicks, the heartbreaking
losses of his team, as well as contending
with the academic pressure of a Criminal
Justice degree.
However, nothing is more trying than
the intense hounding of Pirate fans, upset
with Owens' performance this season
Owens, weary of the harshness of these
fickle football fans, is ready to relieve him-
self of some of that pressure.
"I'm not going to say what the fans are
saying is completely unjust Owens said.
"But I feel people in general just don't un-
derstand kicking. Owens said that he feels
the Pirate's kicking game has been unfairly
blamed formuchof the Pirate football team's
problems mis year.
Owens said his performance and the
performance of punter Michael
Jacobs had been somewhat
"used as an excuse" this year
by critics of the Pirate football
team. Owens said that Pirate
Head Coach Steve Logan's
comments, critical of the kick-
ing game during media inter-
views, had been misinter-
preted by Pirate fans.
"Coach's comments were
dramatized and taken out of
context Owens said. "A lot of that misun-
derstanding has caused what Michael and
I have faced this year Owens, however,
readily admits that his game does need vast
improvement and will approach solving
his problems mentally.
"I'm going to try to look at this season
in two parts he said. "The first part is
behind me, now I have to try to fix my
problems in the second part Owens had a
relatively uneventful game Saturday against
Duke. No field goals were attempted in the
Pirate's losing effort against the
Blue Devils, but he connected
on both of his attempted extra
points.
Owens, hoping to enter law
school next fall, is unsure
whether he will return to the
Pirates next year and exchange
his kicking shoes for law books.
Should Owens make a re-
turn to the Pirate roster, he will
face the pressure of competing
with last year's place kicker, Anthony
Brenner, who was ruled academically ineli-
gible this season. Owens said he is not
concerned with that proposition and is
solely concentrating on this year.
Owens is optimistic about making the
improvement necessary to develop into a
reliable kicker for the Pirates and end the
"roller coaster" inconsistency he has pro-
vided so far.
"I know I'll kick to my potential, it's just
a matter of when
The Owner's Golden Rule: He who has the gold, makes the rules
Wire Service
Higher Authority doesn'tunder-
stand why thesefootball and baseball
people are always arguing. She said,
"Why don't you do a column ex-
plaining it?" But mow the yard first.
It looks like your haircut.
Edward Bennett Williams was a
great lawyer who owned the Balti-
more Orioles.
He once said, "I believe in the
golden rule. He who has the gold,
rules
Which explains how rich folks
come down with dictator lust,
whether they're Ross Perot or George
Steinbrenner or Jack Kent Cooke. So
all arguments, dear HA, are caused
by conflicts of these natural impulses:
The owners wannabe dictators and
the players wannabe free men.
In Minneapolis, the National
Football League owners lost yet an-
other lawsuit trying to keep players
under their considerable thumbs.
And in St. Louis, baseball own-
ers made noises as if they want to
wage war against the players, who
have been invincible for 20 years.
The yard can wait. Let's try to
understand this foolishness.
Starting with football: First with
Joe Kapp, Cullen Bryant and John
Mackey, followed by Yazoo Smith
and now Freeman McNeil et al the
NFL has made a habit of losing law-
suits to rebellious players. They are 0
for forever.
They also lost an antitrust suit
broughtby the United States Football
League in 1989. Though the damage
award was one silly dollar�the jury
believed the UFCT would have failed
on its own � tne verdict against the
NFL gave Howard Cosell the chance
to say time and again that the league
was, is and remains "a duly-adjudi-
cated illegal monopoly Right as al-
ways.
Unembarrassed, even eager,
NFL lawyers will appeal the defeat.
The NFL says going to court is the
only way it can deal with its players'
union. No sale here.
Moving to baseball: Consider, if
you will, two key elements of a pro-
posal made by baseball club owners
to contain the rising cost of player
salaries.
1. A salary cap. 2. Classification
of players fromQass A through Class
E, with ratings and salaries set by the
league president.
The club owners blamed play-
ers' greed for baseball's money crisis.
One sportswriter said, "A more un-
grateful set of people than the major-
ity of professional ballplayersitwould
be hard to find Another described
players as "a few porcine profession-
als who, in their selfishness and love
of gold, tried to destroy the reserve
rule
A little Providence catcher
named Gilligan had the brass to ask
for $3,200.
Asportswri ter leaped tohis type-
writer: "That's $40 a game. Twenty
dollars an hour. He's no hog but he
wants the club to pay him more than
it can make. Why, they offered Paul
Hines $9 an hour to stand in center
field and catch a fly occasionally
These caterwaulings came 103
years ago. In 1889, the great player
John Montgomery Ward created the
first players' union and said: "There
was a time when the League stood for
integrity and fair dealing. Today it
stands fordollarsand cents Players
have been bought, sold and ex-
changed as though they were sheep
instead of American citizens
That last sentence spoke of the
reserve clause in contracts. A player
was club property and had to accept
slavery or get out of baseball.
That was 103 years ago. Casey
Stengel was born that summer.
See Owners, page 13
I






72 The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 13, 1992
Fitness
Tuesday, Oct. 20
Aqua Spray Party
Get in the pod for a refreshing
aquarobks class - 530-630 p.m.
in the Christenbur' Tool. Refresh-
ments and prize drawing at the
completion of class. No registration
required, please show ECU ID.
Wednesday, Oct. 21
21 Minute Triathlon
A unique event featuring 10
minutes of bicycling, 10 minutes of
swimming,andoneminuteof push-
ups. Activities may be sequentially
performed in any order at
Christenbury Facilities from3-6p.m.
Awards go to the top male and
female finisher overall in each
event.
Thursday, Oct. 22
Fitness Class Extra aganza
All fitness classes are free of
charge so try something new (reg-
istered participants receivea "free-
bie" coupon).
Prizes will be awarded at the
end of each class at Christenbury
and Pipeline Pumphouse.
Continued from page 11
Other Self-Directed Week-
long Events
Star Wars Step-Off - Pledge to
climb the stairs, not ride the "v ator"
during Fitness Week. All pledge
participants will receive recogni-
tion and are eligible for a major
prize.
Just Do It! Cross Training
Challenge
This is a multi-element, self-
directed activity to keep you
active throughout the week. Each
day participate in a different activ-
ity for at least twenty minutes then
turn in your log sheet before Oc-
tober 23 to be eligible for a major
prize.
Activity selections include:
walking, running, bicycling,
stair master, swimming and
weight training.
The overall purpose of Fitness
Week is to show students how to
integrate exercise into their busy
class schedule. If you would like
more information on Fitness Week,
stop by 204 Christenbury Gym.
Instant replay has hardly caused ripple
Wire Service
So far, despite an occasional
cynic popping off, the absence of
instant replay has hardly caused a
ripple.
There has been some noise
about fumbles and interceptions.
But in those instances, it al-
most was a certainty that under
instant replay those plays wouldn't
have been overturned because of a
quick whistle or an inconclusive
review. So far, so good.
It shows that NFL Commis-
sioner raul Tagliabue was wise not
to wage the traditional war at the
owners meeting last March in Phoe-
nix, where instant replay was abol-
ished after six years of con troversy.
We needed a year to review the
system.
Now comes "The
Commissioner's View" in the lat-
est "NFL Report the league's quar-
terly publication.
Tagliabue writes: "One conse-
quence of this instant replay dei i-
sion is that it will help restore a
sense of proportion to the role of
officiating to our game. Both sides
in this debate agree on at least one
thing � that instant replay contrib-
uted to distorting the significance
of officiating. Theofficials are not
the attraction of our game. Fans
follow the NFL to see quarterbacks
and linebackers in action � not
referees and line judges, they root
for two teams �not three� on the
field.
"Replay often focused too
much emphasis on theofficialsand
created a new platform for un-
founded criticism of their perfor-
mance. Too often, replay inter-
rupted momentumof the gameand
invited long, repeated discussions
of split-second officiatingdecisions.
Wecanexpectafaster-pacedgame
without these interruptions in 1992
Was Tagliabue simply selling a
return to the old system or did he
truly see the perils of instant replay.
Stay tuned next spring when it
getsanother vote. Then see what the
commish has to say.
The East
Carolinian: If s a
great place to
start. Apply today
for one of the
many positions
now open with
TEC. Apply on
2nd floor of the
publications
building across
from Joyner.
Homecoming Service Specials
Vie East Carolinian is now accepting
applications for Managing Editor.
Apply at TEC office in publications
building.
COUPON!
Your Choice ol
Used Tires 11
$0.00 and up
11 with this coupon
r- � (BOBSi
Fnmt-Kncl Alignment .i
I and4 Wheel Rotate �
iter Balance l
COUPON
Oil Filter
and Lube
Reg. $24.95
$19.95.
10W30Pennzoil
1 .mvijmi .incl DkvhI Shylilly
�COUPON
Front Disc
Brake Reline
i lin Inilim- Machining Jioior.s)
" $49.88
11 �iryti:n iikI Dk-�-I Mifhlly HifiiT
II with this t-ojipon
11MlHiMI1
i. Winterized
Service
11 Includes Bells. 1 lows &
, 11 Radiator
1 RATED VEGGIE SANDWICH
Greenville Times Readers Poll
Doily lunch Specials 1
3 3 yQ includes Sandwich, Chips & Drink
COGGIIUS CAR CARE 1 E
20 W. Greenville Blvd. Greenville. NC own
Phone 756-5244
H) Days
Same
I lours:Xam-5. Wpm Moiulay-lriiiay Sam-1 :(X)pm SaiurdayJ As Cash
Seafood House & Oyster Bar
OTEKtffSKOAL
1 $1.00 OFF Any Meal �xcept specials
coupon good thru 103192 with Student I.D.
Shrimp Plate $3.95
Trout & Shrimp Plate $4.95
Ocean Perch $4.95
Offer Good Mon-Thurs
flflC Permits
Washington Highway Take-outs Welcome
(NC33�xt)(iothst.�it) 752-3172
Greenville, NC
fci'flffjullf
M.tWIBilWA1Hlm,�lllHWJi.1ffWl�!l
VApHnPsriay, October 14
4 for Wednesday
$4 At The Door For
All The Draft You Can Drink
9 pm - 1 am
Thursday. October 15
FINGER
$1.00 LONGNECKS
HOURS
Mon&Tues 11am-2:30pm 53 Cotanche St.
11 am-2:30pm & 9pm-1 am ocated across from UBE
1am-1am 7RQ nDRD
Wed
Sat 9pm-1am
Build Your Own Fraternity
Pi Lambda Phi Fraternity
TONIGHT!
Informational Meeting
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room
7:30PM - 9PM
FREE FOOD
For further information, contact Chris Graham at 355-5000.
jssas
&SW�tilNESDAY
NIGHT
t&m&&mmwmwv
Greenville Toyota
Welcomes Back All ECU Students
We service all makes and models of automobiles.
Make Greenville Toyota your home for automotive parts
and service needs. Present your Student I.D. and receive a
10 Discount on all parts and service purchases.
THISMONJHMSSPECIAL
I" "toyota quality
I LUBE, OIL & FILTER
i
00 DRAFT
$1.25 Tall Boys
$A-0P.K�nuKes
00 ADMISSION
UNTIL 1 1:30 PM
FOR WEDNESDAY 101492
Present this coupon at the door
�Includes up to 5 quarts of Genuine Toyota oil.
�Install Genuine Toyota double-filtering oil filter.
�Check all fluid levels.
$12.95
v
W
I
I
I Turbos. 4x4s and diesels nia he slightly higher.
� Mum Present Coupon At Time Repair (fcder Written. 1 xpircs 10-30-92
Greenville Toyota
" love what you do for me.
�TOYOTA
a
3615 South Memorial Drive
Located Across From Carolina East Mall
321-3000





���
OCTOBER 13, 1992
The East Carolinian
13
Owners
Baseball's reserve clause, clearly ille-
gal in any other business, would be
changed in time. Like brick masons
and sportswriters,ballplayerswould
become free agents able to work any-
where. By the time this change hap-
pened, Casey Stengel was dead. It
was then 1976.
Small wonder that players have
neverliked,trusted,or believed own-
ers. In 1889, owners cried ruin just as
Bowie Kuhn 87 years later would say
free agency might bankrupt one en-
tire league.
The game has enjoyed 20 years
of unprecedented revenueand popu-
larity.
Maybe experts studying
baseball's finances will tell owners
and players the business is suicidal.
Until such announcement, players
have no reason to believe the
doomsaying. It has gone on for 103
years.
Which is why if push comes to
shove in this winter's labor negotia-
tions, theplayers,aninvincibleunion
for 20 years, will win another one.
Back to football: What happened
in the Freeman McNeil case isso cyni-
Continued from page 11
cal thatevenasportscolumnistwould
think the tactic is beneath rich folks.
But there's a frustrated dictator's
logic toitFightingMcNeiletal.served
the owners' purposes financially if
not morally. It delayed free agency
five more years. So owners kept
money rather than pay free agents.
Football owners abused the
American legal system. The court be-
came an NFL business tool. It's
cheaper to hire lawyers than free-
agent quarterbacks. It's cheaper to go
to court than to be law-abiding citi-
zens. Slick.
The East Carolinian's sports page is searching for writers who
want to write! Anybody interested should attend the writers
meeting on Thursday at 5:30 p.m. in the Student Pubs building.
SLAM
U.S.A.
GRAND SLAM U.S.A.
Indoor BaseballSoftball Batting Range
Corner of Evans & 14th Streets 830-175�L
�Consessions �Pro Shop �Video Games
STUDENT TOKENS Full Court
Year Round $1.00 Basketball
with ECU I.D. with
20 Pitches On A Token Slam Coals
Bring Coupon In For $4.00 Off Slam Ball
locfividuRfaed Computer
dole Support
5 OFF FOR
STUDENTS AND FACULTY
EDUCATIONAL DISCOUNTS
ON COMPUTER SOFTWARE
�Hardware
�Academic Software
�Accessories
FREE INSTALLATION
AND INSTRUCTON
(Up to 3 hours)
SKANTECH
Individualized Computer Sales & Support
608 Arlington Blvd.
Suite B, Arlington Village
Greenville, NIC 27858
(919) SKANTECH (752-6832)
RetailConsultingProgrammingUpgradingMaintainanceRepair
"0" C�NT DftnfT
CLASSICS NIGHT
$1.00 NIGHT
I I II I I �! �
RUSH HOUR
"O" CENT DRAFT
$2.50 Teas & Bahama Mamas
504 Jello Shots � 754 Kamikazes
$1.00 Domestics � $2.50 Pitchers
50C Jello Shots � 75 Kamikazes
$2.50 Teas, Bahama Mamas & Pitchers
50c Jello Shots � 750 Kamakazes
DAY
COUNIRTNITE
"0" CENT DRAFT "Ue Best in Country
$1.25 Domestics AllNite"
georges hair designs
�Full Service Unisex Salon
�Tanning
�Skin and Nail Care
�Walk-Ins Welcome
�European Trained Stylists
�Latest in Facial.& Body Wax
�Professional Hair Products
THE PLAZA MALL
Greenville Blvd.
Open Mon. - Sat 9:30am - 9pm
Sunday 1pm - 6prh
756-6200
STANTON SQUARE
On Stantonsburg Rd.
Open Mon. - Fri. 10am - 8pm
Saturday 9pm - 6pm
757-0076
Homecoming Special
The Only Salon In Greenville Where You Can Get
george's hair designs
$2.00 Off
ALL HAIRCUTS
george's hair designs
$5.00 OFF
PERMS or
TANNING PACKAGE
expires Nov. 15, 1992 ! expires Nov j5 1992
Petey The Pirate" Painted On Your Nails
3026-A East Tenth Street
Greenville, NC
830-6152
4c 1fmi "piHmtifui. autfum
?�tl Set 4 TUtt $33.00
"TKtuUeunea, $10.50
"pta-ln $16.00
coupon good only with Student I.D.
ask for Tamara or Ann
Mtet?
SURF SHOP
THE PLAZA 355-6680
EMS
Cologne
Spray
Legend
cologne
Spray
OFF
UAHUFACTUPCIK SUCCCSTCO ttTAH
Navy Cologne
6 0Z. 1.7 OZ.
incognito Cologne
5 OZ. � 1 7 OZ
COtY
Alrspun
Powder
Fahrenheit edt
Spray 1.7-oz. or
Poison EOT spray
1.0-oz.
'OFF
UAUUrACTUHEK SUCGISTED PfTAIl
New Aimay Teen
Skincare and cosmetics
COty U
Upstkt
Suave
Moisturizers
aM Face
wash
30
Bonnie Bell
Skin Fragrances
Cailente
Cologne
Spray
unforgettable $Q99
EDC Spray ? if
BS-or
Suave Cleansing
Creams and
Toners
Low Prices. And More.
I
Mb-





V ' ' '

J. �!��
PURPLE AND GOLD
NOTHING FINER IN CAROUNA
r F I e SSj S&oftfuKfy at t6e �&& o� &tnfiub
Student Stores
ALUMNI SPECIAL
Wear your class ring and
receive a discount on
supplies and wearing
apparel the year you
graduated from 3 to 30.
CLASS RINGS
Save $10 on class
rings. Place your
order Saturday,
October 17 at the
Student Store to
receive your discount.
RUSSELL
SWEATSHIRT
Purchase any of our
Pro-Cotton or High
Cotton sweatshirts at
regular price and get
a "Russell Athletic"
Pro-Cotton
sweatshirt for $19.95
($49.95 VALUE)
REGISTER FOR A FREE CAMERA
Use this Kodak Star 835 Auto Focus
camera to record this year's Homecoming
memories. Comes complete with film and
batteries.
STORE HOURS:
Monday - Thursday 8 am - 8 pm
Friday 8 am - 5 pm
Saturday 11 am - 5 pm
Telephone: 757-6731
EXTENDED HOURS:
Both Evenings and Saturdays
MORE CONVENIENT WAYS TO PAY:
New Pirate Points. Discover, MasterCard, Visa, Personal Check and Cash
ECU Student Stores: More than just books-your dollars support student scholars!
LOCATED IN THE WRIGHT BUILDING �OWNED AND OPERATED BY EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY





Title
The East Carolinian, October 13, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 13, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.901
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy