The East Carolinian, October 8, 1992






Opinion
The power of the vote
The "motor voter" bill could help raise the number of
registration by as much as 90 percent.
So why did Bush override it?
See pg. 5 for story.
Lifestyle
Staying 'Single'
The new movie 'Singles' has debuted
across the country.
Does it live up to the
'twentysomething' image of single life
in the '90s?
See story pg. 7.
i
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 13
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, October 8,1992
12 Pages
�X .
Witness says
director of Public
Safety ordered tap
By Jeff Becker
News Editor
Witnesses testifying in the
federal grand jury trial for the
two former ECU employees
charged with wiretapping vio-
lations said administrators
knew about the illegal record-
ings.
John Burrus, former cap-
tain of investigations for Public
Safety, and Teddy Roberson,
former director of Telecommu-
nications, tapped ECU phone
lines in 1990 to investigate an
employee suspected of illegal
drug involvement. The trial be-
gan Tuesday in U.S. District
Court in New Bern.
On Wednesday, Captain
for Investigations Ernest Suggs
testified that James DeTuy, di-
rector of Public Safety, ordered
Burrus to place a tap on the
phone of Public Safety secre-
tary Patricia Hair Bullock.
"(DePuy) instructed
Burrus to do what he did to the
phone in the Telecommunica-
tions Department Suggs said.
In May of 1991), Roberson
and Burrus taped the phone of
Telecommunication employee
Brooks Mill.
Public Safety Capt. Stanley
Kittrell informed the FBI of the
wiretaps on Nov.4,1990. Kittrell
testified Tuesday that before he
went to the FBI, he discussed
the matter with Suggs. He said
Suggs told him he should re-
main quiet about the taps.
"I asked him why, and he
said because John Burrus, Teddy
Roberson, (Evan) Midgette, (as-
sistant director of Human Re-
sources), Jim DePuy, Richard
Brown, (vice chancellor for
Business Affairs) and possibly
Chancellor Richard Eakin had
knowledge of the wiretapping
Kittrell said. " He told me it
was something 1 couldn't
handle
The tap on Mills' phone led
to an undercover operation in-
volving Public Safety agent
Michael Swinson. Posing as a
student assigned to perform
community service, Swinson
tailed Mills for several weeks.
On the witness stand, Mills
denied charges that he gave pre-
scription drugs to Swinson, but
did admit he sold one quarter of
an ounce of marijuana to him at
his trailer 30 miles from ECU.
Mills, who was convicted of
See Tap, page 2
Fair Time
Photo by Biff Ranson � TEC
Fairgoers enjoy the rides at this year's Pitt County Fair. The Fair opened Monday and will run through Sat. Oct. 10. College students get
in for $1.50 tonight with their student ID.
Doctor who transmitted AIDS applies at ECU
By Tracy Ford
Staff Writer
A physician from Virginia is
still being considered for a faculty
position at ECU Medical School
after being reprimanded by Vir-
ginia medical review panel for
possibly infecting a patient with
the HIV virus through artificial
insemination.
Dr. Robert J. Fierro was rep-
rimanded and fined $5,000 by the
Virginia panel for acting "contrary
to sound medical judgment" when
he artificially inseminated a pa-
tient with her HlV-infected
husband's sperm.
The artificial insemination
failed and the woman contracted
the AIDS virus from her hemo-
philiac husband who had con-
tracted the virus earlier from a
blood transfusion.
"He would have to be li-
censed in the state of North Caro-
lina to practice medicine before
any kind of discussion would con-
tinue said Tom Fortner of the
information and publications of-
fice at ECU's medical school.
The Virginia panel also re-
served the right to restrict Fierro's
license in Virginia should he re-
turn. His employment at ECU
medical school is contingent upon
receiving a North Carolina license
to practice medicine.
Brian Paris of the North
Carolina Medical Examiners
Board said thatalthough he could
not comment on this particular
case, the application approval
could take as little as a week if the
applicant does not have to appear
in front of the review board.
"Any applicant may be re-
quired to be interviewed by the
full board Davis said. "We issue
over 1,000 licences in a year. Not
all of those physiciansare required
to meet with the full board
Dr. Darnell Jones, chair of
the ECU Department of Obstet-
rics and Gynecology said that he
doesn't think Fierro understood
the consequences of his actions
and that he didn't mean to mis-
lead ECU officials at the medical
school.
"I would not recommend to
anyone to try this Fierro told the
Virginia panel. "There are limits
to what we should do to try to help
patient. In retrospect, I got carried
away
He also told the panel that
he regretted being so eager to help
the couple who desperately
wanted a baby.
"I don't think hedeliberately
pulled the wool over our eyes
Jones said. "1 think he's had a
deeper understanding of the situ-
ation over the last six months that
we've been discussing it
Construction of rec
center on schedule
By Kim Williams
Staff Writer
Plans for the new recreation
center to be built beside
Mendenhall Student Center are
still under way, and the construc-
tion is expected to begin by the fall
of 1993.
Nance Mize, director of rec-
reational services, said the plans
are on schedule as of now.
"Based on a plan that began
five years ago, we are on sched-
ule she said. "We are now in the
design development phase
The design development
phase involves the finalizing of
the exterior of the building and
deciding what rooms will be adja-
cent to each other inside the facil-
ity, Mize said.
The next step is the construc-
tion document phase, which will
involve the drawing up of the ac-
tual blueprints for the new facil-
ity. The student recreation center
committee has been working with
the architectural firms of Hakan
and Corley out of Chapel Hill and
See Rec, page 3
Fire it
Myths about AIDS still flourish
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
TEC File Photo
The Greenville
Building today
Fire Department conducts a practice drill A fire safety booth will be set up in the Brody Medical
in honor of National Fire Prevention Week
Theacquired immunodeficiency syndrome
(AIDS) epidemic has now entered its second
decade. However, a good part of the population
still does not know all the facts about this disease,
particularly in relation to testing procedures.
Jennifer Phillips, a health educator of Stu-
dent Health Services, said students have shown
an interest in AIDS testing.
"I have had a lot of phone calls from people
interested in where they can get tested Phillips
said. "1 think that it's a major concern today
The "test for AIDS" is actually a test for the
HIV antibody, Phillips said. Antibodies are built
bv the body's defense system when it is infected
with a virus. After being diagnosed as HI V posi-
tive (which means the HI V antibodies are present),
a person mav or may not get AIDS. For example,
Magic Johnson is currently HIV positive, but
does not have AIDS.
Currently, no test is available that can de-
termine who will achieve full-blown AIDS status
after being diagnosed as HIV positive. The aver-
age incubation period, after initial infection to
full-blown AIDS symptoms, is about 9.6 years.
Of those thatare diagnosed with full-blown AIDS,
three out of four will die within two years.
HIV infection has been documented
through several route?. Three of the most com-
mon are: contact ith semen, vaginal fluids and
blood; anal or vaginal intercourse; and transfer
from mother to child, including breast milk. Oral-
genital sex is also a possible means of transmis-
sion, but the degree of risk is still unknown
because of other high-risk behaviors that may
be practiced along with it.
A major misconception about transmis-
sion is that latex condoms are 100 percent pro-
tection against the AIDS virus. On the contrary,
condoms may lessen the risk of HIV transmis-
sion, but do not eliminate the chance of trans-
mitting the virus.
Current HIV testing yields one of two
results:
� Negative � means person was not in-
fected or antibodies were too low to be detected.
This result could also mean that antibodies are
not yet produced. Though antibodies usually
take from three to six months to develop, it may
take up to one year.
� Confirmed positive � means person is
infected with HI V and that person may transmit
HIV to others.
Though a person may test negative for
HIV antibodies, the only way to be sure that he
or she is uninfected is to have another blood test
three months, six months and maybe 12 months
after possible exposure. One instance of unpro-
tected sex or needle sharing would mean that
the person must start the testing cycle over.
The Pitt County Health Department of-
fers free and anonymous testing in Greenville
at 752-4141. Though ECU's Student Health
Services does not offer HIV testing, further
information and material on AIDS is avail-
able.
's
i
l
�i HMIH






2 The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 8, 1992
1
CR!MS)ENE
Tap
Continued from page 1

September 23
Clement Hall-seventh floor
Anonymous information was given to two officers regard-
ing the use of illegal substances. Three grams of marijuana were
taken, along with one small gray pipe. Upon gaining permission
to search the room, beer was found and the resident had to pour
it out. The marijuana was destroyed by the officers.
September 28
Belk Hall-first floor
A male entered a room claiming he had car trouble and
asked the resident for a flashlight. The suspect ran away with the
flashlight estimated at $75. When the suspect was found, the
flashlight was found in his backpack along with other stolen
goods. The suspect was arrested and charged with two counts of
breaking and entering and larceny, one count of larceny, posses-
sion of stolen goods, resisting arrest, common law forgery and
tampering with a motor vehicle.
Wright Soda Shop
A student reported the theft of her wallet from her backpack.
She was wearing the backpack when the wallet was stolen as she
was walking through the store.
September 29
Ropes course-Allied Health building
A Recreational Services employee reported that the door to
the climbing tower was ripped off of the hinges and the metal door
to the ropes course shed was knocked open. Entry was gained by
driving the lock through the door.
Fifth and Reade Streets
A blue Nissan was broken into between the driver's side
window and the rubber seal, probably with a slim jim. A compact
disk player was stolen, and fingerprints were taken from the car.
September 30
Scott Hall-fourth floor
A wallet was taken from the victim's desk drawer while he
was not there. The victim's roommate said the exterminator came
in the during the hours it was stolen and asked him to leave the
room while he was spraying.
October 2
Freshman parking lot-south of Willis Building
A truck parked in the lot was broken into. A slim jim or a key
was used. The perpetrator then tried to hotwire the ignition, but
was not successful.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel.
Taken from public safety crime reports.
manufacturing marijuana in
1983 in Pitt County, said he sold
the pot to Swinson because "he
kept badgering me
Mills said Burrus and Ron
Avery, chief of police, picked
him up on June 29 and took him
to the Public Safety building.
"They said we were going
to reach a compromise he said.
"Either I would be honest with
them, or they would take me
downtown. They said they had
enough information on me to
convict me
Mills said DePuy, Avery,
Burrus and Richard Farris, di-
rector of Human Resources,
were at the meeting.
He said DePuy told him ev-
eryone up to the chancellor knew
he was involved in drugs and
that he must resign. Mills re-
signed July 2, 1990.
The attorneys for Roberson
and Burrus are attempting to
prove their clients acted on the
orders of their superiors.
Both Roberson and Burrus
resigned from their jobs at ECU
on March 8, 1991.
They are each charged with
four counts of federal wiretap-
ping violations including con-
spiracy, intentionally intercept-
ing a wire communication, in-
tentionally disclosing contents
of wire communication,the use
of contents of wire communica-
tion and one count of not report-
ing a crime.
Both could serve a maxi-
mum of 23 years in prison if con-
victed on all counts.
The university has
awarded $213,687 in wiretap-
ping settlements to 16 employ-
ees who unknowingly had their
voice recorded.
Read next
week's
East Carolinian
to find out who
goes to jail.
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OCTOBER 8, 1992
The East Carolinian 3
Cable regulation
shifts to FCC, courts
Los Angeles Times
With the controversial cable
TV bill soon to be signed into law
now that Congress has overturned
President Bush's veto, the battle-
ground has shifted to the Federal
Communications Commission
and the courts.
Within hours of the final vote
in the House, lawyers for Turner
Broadcasting filed a federal law-
suit in Washington, D.C challeng-
ing key provisions of the bill.
In addition, lobbyists on both
sides of the issue were expected to
flood the FCC with suggestions on
implementing the regulatory
guideline The FCC has consider-
able leeway in deciding which rate
regulations are adopted.
The cable industry has re-
peatedlvsaid thatthebill will cause
rates to rise because it burdens
them with extra costs. Nonethe-
less, consumer advocates praised
the bill and said that many cable
TV subscribers might actually see
lower rates as soon as six months
from now.
Turner's lawsuit challenges
the must-carry provisions in the
legislation, which require cable TV
systems to carry most major local
over-the-air TV stations at the re-
quest of the broadcaster. A broad-
caster would have to chose be-
tween must-carry and so-called
"re-transmission consent which
allow the local TV station to nego-
tiate a license fee to be carried by
the cable system.
"Must-carry" regulations
have twice been found unconsti-
tutional by the courts.
Cable TV systems currently
carry the heavily-watched local TV
stations for free, while sometimes
paying hefty fees to carry the less-
watched cable channels. Cable
channels such as Turner, owner of
CNN, fear that if cable systems
must pay to carry local TV stations
then that may force cable channels
off the dial or reduce their fees.
"The four Turner networks
(CNN, Headline News, TNT and
TheCartoon Network) collectively
spend $700 million on program-
ming, about one-third what each
network spends said Bert Carp,
Rec
vice president of government rela-
tions for Turner. "It is not a level
playing field
Although Turner won a 1985
court decision stri king down must-
carry provisions adopted by the
FCC, cable bill supporters none-
theless said that it will be much
more difficult to overrule this time
because the Congressional statutes
provide an "adequate rationale
But it is not even clear how
manv broadcasters will seek re-
transmission consent and try to
negotiate some kind of payment
from cable systems.
"I plan to talk about it with
my lawyer next week promised
John Conte, owner of KMIR-TV in
Palm Springs, Calif. � the highest
cable TV penetration market in the
country.
Todd Holmes, vice president
of KSEE-TV in Fresno, Calif said
that he's begun informal discus-
sions with local cable operators,
but does not know what he'll do,
either.
Until the court decides on
the Turner suit, which was ex-
pected to be joined in the ccming
days and weeks by others, the cable
companies are scrambling to se-
cure their ground.
The cable industry says that
me new legislation will increase
rates, despite rate-control language
in the bill, because it also allows
cable operators to recover their
higher expenses.
"The bill states we get to re-
cover 'actual costs' in rate-making
proceedings, and to the extent a
local broadcaster can extract a dol-
lar, that's actual cost said Bob
Thomson, vice president of gov-
ernment affairs for Denver-based
cable giant Tele-Communications
Inc. "To the extent it requires us to
install additional equipment like
converter boxes, that too is actual
costs
TCI, which serves one-fifth
of the country's cable subscribers,
has said it will not pay re-trans-
mission fees.
The FCC has six months to
implement the guidelines of the
cable TV bill and must determine
what are "reasonable" rates for
basic cable service.
Continued from page 1
with Hastings and Chivetta out
of St. Louis, MO. The latter has
constructed over 70 recreation
centers at other colleges and uni-
versities across the country.
The new building, which is
estimated to be an $18 million
project, will take up about two
acres of land. Mize said they have
designated the area beside
Mendenhall StudentCenter from
Ninth Street to Seventh Street,
and from Mendenhall to
Ringgold Towers for the center.
She said 250 parking spaces
will be removed for the project.
Mize said the facility, which
will encompass 150,000 square
feet, will include a multi-sports
forum with six basketball courts,
11,000 square feet of free and
fixed weight facilities, three aero-
bic multi-purpose rooms, an in-
door track that will encircle the
multi-sports forum, an indoor
pool with a "raindrop" fountain,
an outdoor pool with large
sundeck, an indoor climbing
wall, seven racquetball courts
and a squash court.
Mize said that the new rec-
reation center will replace much
of the activity that now occurs at
Christenbury gymnasium and
Minges coliseum.
As it is now, many students
have trouble using recreation fa-
cilities before 3 p.m. because of
physical education classes.
Two years ago, $26 was
added to the recreational services
fees that students pay to help
finance the new center. Mize said
that since then, no additional fees
have been added.
"This facility will be a tre-
mendous asset to the university,
which has not had any new rec-
reation facilities since 1951 Mize
said.
"It is going to be really im-
pressive
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fM
4 The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 8, 1992
down'
The Washington Post
Wielding a pointer and an
array of charts, Ross Perot
launched his advertising campaign
Tuesday night with a broad attack
on "trickle-down economics" that
made no mention of the painful
fiscal measures he advocates.
In a 30-minute commercial
on CBS that he described as "our
first town hall the independent
presidential candidate offered a
grim assessment of America's de-
clining competitiveness and
"staggering" debt, mixed with
such homilies as "It's pretty
simple" and "Let's raise the hood
and go to work
The tone of the 30-minute
program, which cost the billion-
ai re Texan $380,000, was a marked
contrast to the 30-second attack
ads that President Bush and
Democratic nominee Bill Clinton
have been airing. It was the first
of several "infomercials" the in
dependent candidate plans to
broadcast; the second, costing
$620,000, is scheduled to air Fri-
day night on ABC
Perot made no direct appeal
for votes, closing his lecture by
saying, "Pick the president that
you believe has the ability to get
the job done for you and your
children
He cited a 20 percent pov-
erty rate among children as "the
reason I'm willing to put my fam-
ily through all of this. Not a single
minute of this is pleasant. There's
not a single second of this that
anyone would do for fun
The ad's austere quality was
evident as Perot, seated behind a
desk, used chart after chart to il-
lustrate the nation's economic
decline.
Without naming names, he
assailed the Reagan and Bush ad-
ministrations for policies that al-
lowed the rich to get richer while
the federal government ran up a
$4 trillion debt.
"We were just like little boys
playing with money said Perot,
who wrote the script. "It was 'The
Bonfire of the Vanities It was
'The Predators' Ball Guess who
picks up the tab He also man-
aged to mention bank robber Wil-
lie Sutton and Marie Antoinette.
Perot promised "solutions"
in future programs, but avoided
them last night. He spoke of the
rising gasoline prices but did not
mention his proposed 50-cent in-
crease in the gas tax.
He illustrated the growth of
entitlement programs but steered
clear of his proposal to trim cost-
of-living increases for Social Se-
curity and Medicare.
Perot castigated the Bush
administration on several points.
He charged that the administra-
tion is planning "a $60 billion sur-
prise" after the election to finance
the continuing bailout of ailing
savings and loan associations.
(The Resolution Trust Corp
which is dealing with failing S&Ls,
recently asked for an additional
$43 billion.)
Perot said the Republican
administrations were filled with
dozens of officials who left to be-
come lobbyists for foreign coun-
tries, which he called "economic
treason
In an apparent reference
to the Bush campaign, he said
some foreign lobbyists, whom
he likened to "Russian spies
are now working for presiden-
tial campaigns.
Thecomputermagnatecom-
plained that the United States was
spending $100 billion a year to
defend Europe and Asia. "We're
broke and they're rich. Think
about it he said.
Perot also got in some popu-
list digs, saying Washington was
a place of "perks and privileges"
where top officials had indoor ten-
nis courts, reserved parking
spaces and official barbers.
Although the ad, with its
simple editing and lack of visu-
als, broke all the conventional
rules for holding viewers' atten-
tion, that may have enhanced
Perot's "plain talk" appeal. Politi-
cal analysts said they were im-
pressed.
"What's unusual and fright-
eningly seductive about a diatribe
like this is that for most Americans
this is the first economics lesson
they've ever had said Republi-
can consultant Jay Severin. "It
could be devastatingly effective.
It was broadcast rabble-
rousing, Li'l Abner Live
Democratic consultant Rob-
ert Shrum called the program "a
devastating indictment of Reagan
and Bush, and in that sense very
helpful to Clinton.
It had low production val-
ues and high content � you're
not sure whether you're watch-
ing him or a (comedian-impres-
sionist) Dana Carvey skit � but
the way he did it may have worked
to his advantage. It focuses you
very heavily on the content
The ads were made by
Murphy Martin, a former Dallas
anchorman who has worked with
Perot since the late 1960s, when he
helped Perot organize an airlift for
prisoners of war in Vietnam.
Martin said he has also pre-
pared 30-and 60-second and five-
minute spots, some biographical
and some issue-oriented.
In July, during Perot's ear-
lier presidential campaign, the bil-
lionaire dismissed prominent ad-
vertising consultant Hal Riney,
saying his commercials were too
slick and expensive.
Days before announcing he
would not run for president, Perot
asked Martin to shoot some
cheaper ads. Martin continued
taping commercials throughout
the summer, despite Perot's July
16 announcement.
U.N. resolution could lead to war crimes trials
The Washington Post
UNITED NATIONS � The
,U.N. Security Council, in a further
effort to halt atrocities in the former
Yugoslav republics, unanimously
adopted a resolution Tuesday
night that diplomats said might
" ultimately lead to the creation of a
war-crimes tribunal.
It stops short of making an
� explicit recommendation for a
Nuremberg-style mechanism. In-
stead, it calls for creation of a "com-
missionofexperts" toexamineand
analyze evidence of war crimes
"with a view" to providing its con-
, elusions to U.N. Secretary General
Boutros Boutros-Ghali, who could
then recommend "further appro-
priate steps
French Ambassador Jean
Bernard Merimee told the Secu-
rity Council it was "important to
send a clear warning to the perpe-
trators of these violations
"This is not the most robust
thing possible a Western official
said, adding, however, that "it's
more than existed before, it's a
step forward. It's a lot more hard-
hitting than anything done since
Nuremberg
The resolution is the second
dealing with atrocities in the
former Yugoslav republics. On
Aug. 13, the Security Council
adopted resolution 771, which
called on countries and interna-
tional humanitarianorganizations
to collate information on human
rights abuses. Boutros-Ghali was
invited to recommend additional
measures.
So far, it appears that only
the United States has responded,
with a report of more than 50 inci-
dents, most of them committed by
Bosnian Serbs, including allega-
tions of torture and mass execu-
tions.
No U.N. agencies or person-
nel appear to have volunteered
data even though previously re-
leased documents indicate the or-
ganization is aware of a variety of
reported incidents. U.N. spokes-
men refused to say how many
countries have responded.
Diplomats say the United
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come involved in passing judg-
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involved because it fears being ac-
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The Western diplomat said
the intent of the Council's action in
adopting the resolu tion was to sig-
nal its seriousness in stopping
abuses linked to "ethnic cleans-
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removing non-Serbs from territo-
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earlier resolution had failed to stop
the abuses.
"This time, we're saying that
we really mean it he said. "We're
setting up the information on the
basis of which these (alleged war
criminals), wherever they go, can
be nabbed
He noted that most of the
nations subscribe to the 1949
Fourth Geneva Convention on the
treatment of civilians in wartime.
The resolution adopted today
is also intended to remind coun-
tries to be more responsive and
provide information on breaches
of the Geneva Convention. It calls
on states and U.N. bodies to submit
information within 30 days and "as
appropriate thereafter
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The East Carolinian
October 8, 1992
Opinion
Page 5
Congress fails test of power
The congressional power to override the Many Republicans said the president has
president's veto of any bill has once again valid reasons for his veto, such as fraud in the
been tested, and failed. In all of their congres- registration process. Fraud, such as voters
sional omnipotence, our mighty lawmakers registering more than once, is one example of
recently decided not to override President what many fear will happen. This appears to
Bush's veto of the motor-voter bill. be an irrational fear, since only one driver's
The motor-voter bill was designed to in- license is issued to each driver in our country,
crease voter registration by a projected 90 Another irrational Republican fear lies in
percent across the country. It allows all United the fact that the Democratic party would
States citizens to register to vote whenever benefit from the increased number of voters
they step into their local Department of Mo- in the 1992 presidential election. President
tor Vehicles to renew their driver's license. Bush must have failed to read the fine print
The bill also specifies that voter registration stating that the motor-voter bill would not go
be made available in state agencies, such as into effect until after this year's election �
welfare agencies, nationwide. Mail-in regis- this means that neither party could reap the
tration would also have been a convenient benefits of increased voter turnout until the
requirement in all states if the president's 1996 election,
veto had been overridden. It is an unfortunate fact that the majority
The three methods of registering indi- of Americans are not registered to vote. And,
cated in the bill targeted many diverse groups by not registering, most of these people choose
of our society, giving politicians more of the to ignore the tangled web of political mud-
votes they are looking for. Low income fami-
lies, the 18-25 age group and anyone else who
has not taken the time to register to vote are
all being targeted in voter registration drives
across the country.
Funny that President Bush would not
slinging known as a democracy. Perhaps a
simplified system of registering to vote, such
as the one outlined in the motor-voter bill,
would help to increase the political knowl-
edge of the general American society. How-
ever, until Congress decides to put a little
want to take advantage of these potential pressure on our fearless leader, Mr. Bush,
votes when given the chance to pass the bill, voter apathy will continue
JOE OF ALL TRADES
By Joe Horst
Rec center creates, not solves problems
The room is softly lit, with
cigar smoke rising into a hazy
cloud above the board members'
heads as they discuss the impor-
tant issues concerning ECU.
"Well, what's next on the
agenda?" rasps the white-haired,
: bespectacled man sitting at the
I head of the table. "Campus beau-
j tification? More tapping of phone
: lines? Hmm, anyone? Anyone?"
"Well, sir Howaboutanew
j recreational center that will re-
; move 250 parking spaces from
; campus? We don't really need it,
. but hey, has that ever stopped us
before?" The small voice pipes up
from somewhere down the long
mahogany table that glows with a
light of its own.
"Excellent proposal. We can
raise the students' fees once again
and make up some excuse about it
being desperately needed A
smile lights up his face, making
him resemble some predator about
to pounce on a poor defenseless
animal.
"Well, let's get to work on mis
grand idea. I want a team effort
here � everybody contributing
and pullinghisown weight. Heck,
we can even say it was the stu-
dents' idea � it's great He leans
back in his rich leather chair and
chuckles deeply, echoing through-
out the entire campus.
And thus the new recreation
center was born.
� "Boohahahaha now we
have them where we want
mem
OK, maybe 1 exaggerated a
little.
All right, a lot.
But, who knows? I could be
closer to the truth than anybody
knows or the university would
like me to be.
Stories have run stating that
95 to 99 percent of students polled
were in favor of the new center
being located by Mendenhall. (See
The East Carolinian, 71791, page
1) But did the university poll the
students as to whether or not they
wanted the damn thing first? We
know where they want it to be, but
couldn't that be because they
thought it was going to be built no
matter what?
One of the major arguments
for the recreational center being
built was that students had com-
plained that they were not able to
get into the existing centers before
3 p.m. because of regular classes.
Now in my experience, a person
can walk into Christenbury to ex-
ercise starting from 6 a.m.
The pool is also open some-
time in the morning and the gym
is open around noon, I think.
(Yeah, I know, vague as hell) Now
if Minges is worse than
Christenbury, there's some point
to the argument.
But does it justify spending
$18 million on this new center?
That's a hell of a lot of zeros being
spent to ease one center's prob-
lems.
� "Shhhh, if we're really
quiet, they won't hear us
And now�di um roll, please
� the big event.
"Ladies and gentlemen, un-
der the big top, we have the MAIN
ATTRACTION! For your enjoy-
ment and entertainment, we have
� in this ring, superfluous and
unneeded details to the new cen-
ter
"In the second ring, we have
the loss of 250 parking spaces to
ease problems of commuters on
campus
"And to round out our three-
ring circus � two acres of land
that could be put to better use are
going to be wasted
The crowd cheers (or is it
jeers?) wildly and jumps to their
feet. The Greatest Farce on Earth is
about to start.
� "Uh, oh�you've gone and
done it now
Let us bow our heads and
think deeply about these concepts.
First off, looking at the list of
planned rooms and ideas for mis
center makes me realize that the
only thing missing is a partridge
in a pear tree. 11,000 square feet of
weight room space? An indoor
pool with a "raindrop" fountain?
Best of all, an indoor climbing
wall? Did the university think that
Christmas came early? Food for
thought.
Second on the list, parking
could possibly be considered the
worst problem this campus has
facing it right now. So, to solve
this massive task, the university
decides to remove 250 spaces with
the promise to replace them in the
future. Is it just me, or does this
seem back-asswards to anybody
else?
To pound that last nail on this
rotting coffin, two acres that could
bedistributed better are being lost
to this monster endeavor. Plus,
the other land that will be clut-
tered up with heavy construction
machinery hasn't even been ad-
dressed yet.
This may be old rhetoric and
hashed and rehashed, but those
construction dates are getting
closer and closer. Students are re-
signed to this thing happening
anyway, so what does a little bit
more matter?
Ah, apathy is a wonderful
thing. Give me more of that.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Jennifer A. Wardrep, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Assistant Sports Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Cori Daniels, Classified Advertising Technician
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
itior. is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
shdridte limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject lfetiersfor publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville, 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
r
A VIEW FROM ABOVE
By Scott Batchelor
Limbaugh rhetoric enlightens everyone
The book begins with an "Ad-
visory a sort of" ride at your own
risk" warning: "For those of you
among the Liberal Elite who take a
stab at reading this book, be fore-
warned. Everything in this book is
right and you must be prepared to
confront that reality. You can no
longer be an honest liberal after
reading this entire masterpiece.
Throughout the book you will be
challenged, because you will actu-
ally be persuaded to the conserva-
tive point of view. Whether you
can admit this in the end will be a
true test of your mettle as a human
being
The book is The Way Things
Ought To Be and the author is Rush
Limbaugh III, and he is to the cause
of conservatism what the late Abbie
Hoffman was to liberalism, only
much more effective.
Limbaugh has got the most-
listened-to radio talk show in the
nation, drawing almost 12 million
listeners each week. Limbaugh has
got a book on the New York Times
best seller list (see above) that has
been there for going on th ree weeks.
And starting a couple of weeks
ago, Limbaugh has his own televi-
sion show seen on TV stations
across thecountry. Limbaugh, sim-
ply and plainly, is a hit. This is no
fluke.
We conservatives have long
CAMPUS SPECTRUM
beenawarethatbeingblessed with
right-mindedness has its down-
side. Nowhere are we safe from the
perverting barrage of the liberal
media. Jesse Jackson has his own
talk show called Both Sides, (a mis-
nomer if ever there was one); Dan
Rather propagates his subtle yet
insidious brand of liberal news re-
porting every weeknight at 6:30;
and even C-SPAN, with its live
coverage of the Democratically con:
trolled Congress, has become a
participantinspreadingliberal ide-
ology across the country.
Finally, someone comes along
who realizes that conservatism and
truth are usua lly one and the same.
"And says Ted Koppel, "you ig-
nore him at your peril
Limbaugh comes outwith bom
barrels blazing in his book, on his
TV show and on the radio. He's
smart, (takingon the liberals "with
one-half his brain tied behind his
back"), funny and insightful.
Limbaugh tells us the way things
ought to be in the United States
and the world, and he does it with
a witty cynicism that takes the edge
off of wha t can sometj mes be sharp
realities.
Limbaugh pulls no punches in
his assault on the assault on the
inanities of activist liberals, mili-
tant feminists and "femi-Nazis
Animal rights activists, gay-rights
activists and liberal do-gooders are
whathecalls "compassion fascists
And Rush skewers Ted Kennedy
so frequently and so well that I
sometimes feel sorry for the sena-
tor myself.
In one section of his book,
Limbaugh suggests that a movie
be made of the Anita Hill-Clarence
Thomas hearings.
Some possible titles for the film
include My Left Foot In My Mouth;
Driving Miss Sleazy; I Wish I Had
Three Men and A Baby A Pack of Lies
�Now; Desperately SeekingClarence;
and From Smear to Eternity.
Now you see why stations that
carry his TV show run a disclaimer
at the beginning.
Limbaugh is definitely a phe-
nomenon. I think most of his ap-
peal is that he says what needs to
be said � what a lot of us would
like to say if we could � and he
says it well. Political commentator
Jeff Greenfield sums up
Limbaugh's appeal succinctly. "His
reach is to a new segment of con-
servatives � working class,
younger, humorous. They love sat-
ire; they like rock'n'roll music. And
Rush Limbaugh, among other
things, is really funny
Catch Limbaugh if you can.
You'll be enlightened and enter-
tained, conservatives and liberals
alike.
Columnist should identify racism cases
(This letter is in referetice to Joe
Horst's column in the Oct. 1 issue.)
To the Editor:
Thanks ever so much for the
conscience-stirringdiatribeyou put
forward in the Oct. 1 East Carolin-
ian alerting me to the dark biases
and prejudices that so cloud my
thoughts and deeds. Heaven
knows, I needed it. Why, it had
been a full 15 minutes or so since
some media crusader had re-
minded me that everybody who's
not female, black, Chinese or Jew-
ish is basically a narrow-minded
pig (if we truly and honestlyexam-
ine ourselves, that is.)
Specifically, yourgut-wrench-
ing examples of prejudicial think-
ing would most likely emanate
from a white male who probably
professes to be a Christian. There-
fore, due to the fact that you omit-
ted other examples of prejudice,
I'm curious to know if it's okay to
assume that:
�An Italian-American man is
probably in the Mafia?
�An Irish-American is a likely
candidate for Alcoholic Rehab?
�White Anglo-Saxon Protes-
tants hate everybody and live to
impose their values on everyone?
�Any white, male, manual la-
borer who wears a dirty baseball
cap (bill forward) is an ignorant
redneck?
�Non-feminist women are
prudes?
�African-American conserva-
tives are self-serving traitors to their
race?
Also:
�While you were busy count-
ing black faces in bars predomi-
nantly patronized by whites, did
you bother going to any predomi-
nantly black-patronized bars to
count white faces? Did you see any
signs advising "shirt, shoes and
white skin required?"
�Since you defined the south
as "infamous for being the hotbed
for racial tension and prejudice
should I explain to my little south-
ern offspring that Detroit (43 killed
in 1967 race riots), Newark, N.J.(26
killed during five days of race riots
in 1967), Los Angeles, Wounded
Knee Creek, and the Little Big Horn
are just places Southerners moved
to before all the trouble started? Do
I just pass of as flukes a black gov-
ernor of Virginia, a female gover-
nor of Texas and a black mayor of
Atlanta?
�Do you think stereotypes
against African-Americans are the
most visible because they get the
most press? Do you think equal
visibility is deserved by African-
Americans like Shelby Steele, a
professor of English at San Jose
State University who has said "vic-
tim-focused black identity makes
you more passive, it makes you
more demoralized, it robs you of
individual initiative We're so
busy seeing ourselves as victims,
seeing racists everywhere, that
we're unable to see opportunity
and simply unable to take advan-
tage of it?" If you say the Shelby
Steeles of this world don't deserve
more press because there are so
few of them, then why do you sup-
pose Concerned Women for
America (a conservative,anti-femi-
nistorganization)gets so much less
press than the much smaller Na-
tional Organization for Women
(NOW)? Do you think people who
write articles like yours might be
reacting to voices that are scream-
ing at them rather than listening to
the quieter voices that attempt to
communicate through concerned
reason?
I'm just curious, Joe; just curi-
ous. Because you know, I see a lot
of compassion and cooperation in
myneckof the woods. You seem to
say that our society is dominated
by prejudices and stereotypes, but
in saying so you imply that white
men are the principle source of all
this hatred. Isn't that a stereotype,
too, Joe? If there is any value to
what Steele says, could you be hurt-
ing more than just white men?
It seems to me that a blanket
accusation of widespread prejudice
only makes people suspicious of
each. But we know that prejudice
andstereotypesexist,don'twe,Joe?
I've got an idea! Instead of
waving a pontifical hand over us
ignorant masses, why don't you
use that powerful pen of yours and
go ou t and identify specific cases of
prejudice and racism? Name
names. Give us something we can
really chew on! That would be a
novel approach through which you
could really earn the title "watch-
dog of society Do it, Joe; and while
you are, don't restrict yourself to
looking for white racists and male
chauvinists. Investigate the remote
possibility that persons of other
nationalities, races and gender
might harbor unjustified hatred. If
you do this, Joe, then we can work
together on correcting this prob-
lem � one misguided human be-
ing at a time.
Wouldn't that be something?
Wouldn't it be amazing to see that
somebody at The East Carolinian
could writesomethingsubstanrive
and courageous instead of just re-
gurgitate fashionable rhetoric?
Michael J. McClanahan





r
The East Carolinian
October 8, 1992
Classifieds
Page &
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS :1 and 2 bedroom
apartments. Energy-efficient,
several locations in town. Car-
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some water and sewer paid,
washerdryer hookups. Call
752-8915.
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Roommate needed to share a
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apartment. Rent is $160.00 a
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Contact: Stacy Peterson- Car-
riage House Apartments, Apt.
60 - 321-1532 (Leave a mes-
sage.)
ROOMMATE WANTED: To
share two bedroom fully fur-
nished apartment. ECU bus
access near by. call Tim at 758-
5207.
TIRED OF YOUR PRESENT
LIVING ARRANGE-
MENTS? We need a room-
mate to share a large house
two blocks from campus.
Large bedroom available in a
big house. Lots of living space.
$144 month plus utilities, call
830-3882 for more information.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share a two bed-
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a month, 12 utilities and
$175.00 deposit. 201 F
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ROOM FOR RENT. Female
non-smoker preferred. Own
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FOR SALE
FOR SALE
PASSES for sale! Good for
ANY concert at Walnut Creek.
$20 each (neg) (This includes
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tinations! Sell Spring Break
packages to Jamaica, Cancun,
Bahamas, Florida. Fastest way
to free travel and extra $$$$.
Call Sun Splash Tours 1-800-
426-7710.
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED for the Recreation
andParksDept.andCreenville
Aquatics & Fitness Center. Ex-
perience preferred. Afternoon,
evenings, and weekend hours.
For more information call
Kathleen Shank 758-6892.
EASY WORK! Excellent pay!
Assemble products at home.
Call toll free. 1-800-467-5566
Ext. 5920.
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT:
Earn $300 - $400 weekly. Day
and night shift available. No
experience necessary. Must be
at least 18 years old. Call day or
night 746-6762.
NEWNEWNEW Fairfield
Vacation Club, It's new and
exciting! We are selling vaca-
tions, it does not require a NC
Real Estate License. Commis-
sions are Fantastic! Full ben-
efits PLUS $800.00 per month
draw. Only good�No, only
GREAT salespeople apply. Sell-
ing vacations. Send references
to Cliff Hawk, Vice President
of Sales Fairfield Harbor 750
Broad Creek New Bern, NC
Proven sales background and
Positive attitude required. For
more information call 638-8011
ext. 225.
HELP WANTED
good driving record along with
reliable transportation. Inter-
ested applications should send
their resume or make applica-
tion at Pitt Surgical, P.A. 905
Johns Hopkins Drive,
Greenville, NC 27834.
WANTED: PART TIME VAN
DRIVER. For local paratransit
agency. Perfect for college stu-
dents and anyone desiring part
time work. Some early morn-
ing and afternoon hou rs as well
as mid day. Duties include op-
eration of vehicle and assis-
tance of elderly, handicapped
and disadvantaged passengers.
Expect positive attitude and
good working history and good
driving record. If interested
apply in person, at CTS Man-
agement Company, 901
Stanton Blvd Greenville, NC
27858. (EAO) Call 830-1939.
CHICK-FIL-A at Carolina East
Mall is looking for enthusias-
tic, hardworking people. We
offer flexible hours and good
benefits. Stop by Chik-Fil-A at
Carolina East Mall M-F or call
for appointment at 756-1838.
Ask for Abbott.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIR-
ING - Earn $2,000month
world travel (Hawaii, Mexico,
the Caribbean, etc.) Holiday,
Summer and Career employ-
ment available. No experience
necessary. For employment
program call 1-206-634-0468
ext. C5362.
SER V ICES)FFERED
RESEARCH INFORMATION
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YOUR CAREER IS AT STAKE!
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school admissions committees. We
will work with you on your application
and strengthen your personal essay to
give you that competitive edge.
For free information, contact:
AIKENDAIL Academic Consultants,
703 Ninth Street, Suite 233, Durham,
NC 27705-4802, (919) 493-0343
You may now be a part of the
travel industry even if you have
no experience. If you like people
and like making people happy -
this may be what you have been
looking for! As an outside sales
rep, you will be able to offer cruis-
es, spring break packages,
hotelmotel bookings, car rental
reservations, tours and domestic
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Call today:(919)355-8984 (Mr.Lee)
PERSONALS
WRITERPHILOSOPHER
MUSICIAN and poetic soul
seeks friendship and corre-
spondence from like-minded
lady. Photos and letters to MV,
P.O. Box 8663, Greenville, NC
27835.
GO TO PITTSBURG with
the pirates! Student Pirate
Club is sponsoring a trip to
Pittsburgh to see ECU play for
as little as $99! Trip includes
luxury bus ride, night at the
Marriott, Ticket to game. So-
cial, taxes and tips. Best deal
in town. Call 757-4540 for more
details. Seats are going fast so
act soon. GO PIRATES!
PI KAPPA- Friday night
started off with a note , that
lead us to that damned boat.
Once we found what we were
looking for , the "fun and
games" started with a roar.
The first game started with a
stare, next came suck and blow
if you dare. Pledges at
whipcream and cherries un-
aware, while Andy saw Julie's
thong underware. Saturday
Zeta pledges kidnapped 3 Pi
Kappa men and Sunday it all
came to an end. Had a great
time, let's do it again. Better
watch out for the late night
PERSONALS
swims. Quack! Quack! Love
Zeta.
SATURDAY'S THE DAY! To
see the Pirates kick some ass in
Durham - tickets still available
for only $16, so be there - every-
one else will be! Sorry Duke,
but this ain't basketball! Go Pi-
rates! Student Pirate Club.
THANKS FOR THE HELP
Abby and Michelle. We all love
you.
TO THE GIRLS WHO CAME
OVER to the house Monday -
Thanks for coming by. See you
tonight, bring friends. We'll
have a blast.
THETA CHI: Get ready for a
night full of fun. We can't wait!
See ya soon! Love the Sigmas.
SIGMA PI: We can't wait until
the pre-downtown tonight!
Love, the Alpha Phi's.
KAPPA DELTA RHO: Get
psyched guys! It's now or
never. Brotherhood yeah broth-
erhood. B
SUZANNE PATRICK: It's
been a whoie year, can you be -
lieve? Neither can I! I just want
to thank you for bringing joy
and happiness into my life, and
for standing by me through all
the rough times.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA: We
can't wait 'til the Duke game
this Saturday. We're going to
have a great time! Love, AL-
PHA DELTA PI.
CONGRAULATIONS Alpha
Delta Pi flag football team on a
great season! love, your sisters.
LISA STINE: Tonight's the
night get psyched for big sister
hunt. Love you Big Sis.
QUI MECUM SUNT, non me
intellexerant. Qui juxta me est,
juxta ingnemfest. Qui longe est
a me, longe ingnem est. Copula
Mei.
GUARANTEED WORK
AVAILABLE. Excellent pay
for EASY home based work.
Full part-time. Rush self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope:
Publishers (G2) 1821
Hillandale Rd.lB-295 Durham,
NC 27705
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE!
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call 1-800-333-3737 ext. P-3712.
COURIER TO WORK PART-
TIME for busy medical prac-
tice. Make deliveries, run er-
rands, do filing, applicants
must be able to work l-3pm
Monday-Friday and have a
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING: Error free, quick and
dependable at reasonable cost.
Excellent typing and proof-
reading ski 11s (grammar, punc-
tuation, sentence structure,
etc.). Call Pauline at 757-3693.
CALL FOR ENTRIES
ECU Literary and Art Competition
Sponsored by REBEL '93 Magazine
CASH PRIZES GUARANTEED PUBLICATION IN REBEL 93
CATEGORIES: � Poetry Prose �Fine Arts � Applied Arts
Entry Deadline: November 4,1992, 5:00 p.m.
Additional Information available at the Rebel office in the Publication Building.
Enalish Department Main office, and the School of Art Media Center.
. ��TT
��ft
�t
�p
Announcements
BISEXUAL - GAY -LESBIAN
SUPPORT GROUP
Social support and activities.
Meetings are closed. Call 757-
6766 11:00 - 12:15 Tues. and
Thurs. or 1:00 - 2:30 Wed. for
information on meeting time
and place.
PHI FTA SIGMA
A general meeting will be
held on October 8 at 6:00pm for
all Phi Eta Sigma members. The
meeting place will be at Fleming
in the basement. Refreshments
will be served. If you have any
questions, please contact the
Vice-President at 752-5792.
STUDENT HEALTH
SERVICE
Flu vaccine will be available
at Student Health Service this
Fall If you would like to re-
ceive the vaccine this Fall come
by the Student Health Center
(8am - 5pm) to sign up and pay
for the vaccine. The cost is $3.00.
October 16th is the last day to
sign up and to receive the vac-
cine. Vaccines will be adminis-
tered October 19 through Octo-
ber 30.
COPING WITH LOSS
Wed. from 2-3pm in 329
Wright Building. Call counsel-
ing Center at 757-6661.
P.U.S.H. THROUGH THE
BARRIERS
If you would like to work
towards reducing the architec-
tural, as well as the attitudinal
barriers that students with spe-
cial needs are faced with every
day, them come to the next
meeting of P.U.S.H. (People
United to Support the Handi-
capped). The meeting will be
5:00-6:00 on Thurs. Oct. 8 in
Cotten Hall Lobby. We will be
working on our plans for
Homecoming. Come join the
fun. Call 757-6180 for more info.
GROWING BEYOND
SFXUAI. ASSULT
For women only: The grovip
will meet on Thursday from
2:00 - 3:00 pm at the counseling
Center. Please call 757-6661 for
more information.
HEY YOU SOCCER PLAY-
ERS
Don't forget soccer registra-
tion on Tuesday, Oct. 13 at
5:00pm in Biology 103! There is
a minimum of 8 people per
team. A team representative
must attend the meeting. For
more informationcall 757-6387.
OUTDOOR LIVING
SKILLS
Recreational Services will be
offering a outdoor living skills
workshop on Thursday, Oct. 8
at 5:00pm, Christenbury 117.
For more info call 757-6380.
FRFF CAR WASH
Phi Sigma Pi Pledge Class
of Oct. 11 from 8:30-4:00pm at
the Fuel Doc on 10th and
Greenville.
FCU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS
Thur Oct. 8 �Faculty Re-
cital featuring Selma Grokcen,
cello; John B. O'Brien, piano
with guest lecturers Bodo
Nischan and McKay Sundwall:
Beethoven and the Heroic
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00pm,
Free); ECU Guest Organist,
Colin Andrews (First Presby-
terian Church, Greenville,
8:00pm, Free) Mon Oct. 12 �
Faculty Recital featuring
Britton Theurer, trumpet
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm,
Free).
STRESS MANAGEMENT
October 13 in 329 Wright Build-
ing at the Counseling Center
from 2-3pm. Call 757-6661 for
more information.
"WHERE THFRF'S A WILL.
THERE'S AN A"
Part 1 Tuesday October 13.
3-5pm and Part II Thursday,
October 15, 3-5pm. Both ses-
sions will be in 313 Wright
Building at the Counseling
Center.
25 OR OLDER
Undergrad or grad student.
Join us for brown bag lunches
on Wednesday from noon to
1:30pm. Come for part or all of
the time. This rap group is an
informal gathering designed to
be supportive and help meet
the needs of stu dents with fam-
ily responsibilities. This will be
in 313 Wright Building. For
more information, phone
George Gressman at 757-6661
(Counseling Center).
BE ON TOP
Recreational Services will be
offering a Climbing II work-
shop on Thursday Oct. 15 at
3:00pm at the C imb Tower. A
small tee is required -all equip-
ment will be supplied. For more
information, call 757-6387.
PERFORMING ARTS
SERJ��
The National Orchestra of
Spain will perform on Wed
Oct. 14, 1992 at 8:00pm. The
Orchestra, in its fifty years, has
performed all over Europe, The
United States, and South
America. Its repertoire includes
major works from the 18th
through the 20th centuries and
focuses on Spanish composers.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Attention all members!
There will be a general meeting
held on Tuesday, October 13 in
Mendenhall Room 244 at
4:00pm. We look forward to
seeing everyone there.
FCU EQUESTRIAN CLUB
ECU Equestrian Club will
meet at 5:00pm in Mendenhall
room 14 (Basement). If your
interested in horses- be there!
Call Angela 931-8453 or Holly
931-8762 with questions.
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAIL-
ABLE
Approximately $17,600 will
be awarded in scholarships to
School of Business majors
(those students already i the
School of Business). Students
interested in making applica-
tion for these scholarships
should secure forms from on of
the following department of-
fices: accounting -GCB 308; De-
cisions Sciences - 3418; Finance
- 3420; Management - 3106;
Marketing - 3414. All applica-
tions must be submitted to Ruth
Jones (GCB 3210), Chairman of
School of Business Scholarship
Committee, by October 16,
1992. Students may apply for
one or more of the scholarships.





if in i iMiiiiTliiiBlfcwiitff'
�-&JWJLJ�gMWWi
77e Isosf Carolinian
�.
October 8, 1992
Lifestyle
Page 7
Flower festival
planned with color
By Pamela Revels
Staff Writer
The 1992 Chrysanthemum Fes-
tival will take place at Tryon Palace
in New Bern from Oct. 9 through
Oct. 11, and the event features thou-
sands of flowers in the Palace gar-
dens.
In addition to admission to the
gardens, visitors may travel into the
past by touring historic sites and
seeing the special shows and events
in the area.
The festival kicks off Friday
with "Seniors Day All senior citi-
zens will receive a "Senior's Dis-
count" on interior tours of Tryon
Palace and historic buildings. At 11
a.m 1 p.m. and 3 p.m the horticul-
tural staff of Tryon Palace will lead
free tours of the palace gardens. In
addition, a free cello and violin con-
cert will beheld in Latham Gardens
at 2 p.m.
Also on Friday, the 23rd Regi-
ment of Foot Royal Welch Fusiliers,
an 18th-century British army re-en-
actment regiment, will arrive and
set up camp on the south lawn of
the Palace. Visitors can see how
18th century military life was lead.
Garden enthusiasts can learn
how to successfully grow mums in
a free lecture that will be held in
Tryon Palace auditorium at 10 a.m.
and noon.
On Saturday, music and enter-
tainment will be performed at his-
toric sites in New Bern. At 11 a.m.
and 2 p.m a 19th century medicine
show will feature a variety of unique
individuals on the grounds of the
New Bern Academy Museum.
A "seller" of patent medicines
will display his merchandise dur-
ing the show.
A traveling dentist, a wire
walker and a troupe of puppets will
also perform. In addition, a tem-
perance lecture will be given dur-
ing the show.
Throughout the day, down-
town New Bern will celebrate the
festival with crafts entertainment, a
boatshow,rides,games and dances.
The crowd at Localpalooza in Raleigh Saturday moshed to the tunes of
their favorite bands. The Lubricators, the Usuals, Follow For Now,
Photo by BIH Hanson � TEC
Johnny Quest, Dillon Fence and the Sex Police all jammed in a fashion
not unlike the annual Lollapalooza festival.
Localpalooza rocks Raleigh
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
Localpalooza, a nine-hour
showcase of six bands popular in
the Raleigh area, treated an esti-
mated crowd of 4,000 to an outdoor
celebration of rock and roll music,
chased with a bit of Democratic
political philosophy.
Performing at the event were
the Lubricators, the Usuals, Follow
For Now, Johnny Quest, Dillon
Fence and the Sex Police. Blessed
with clear skies and peaceful fans,
the show, produced by WZZU ra-
dio, Ultimate Entertainment and J&J
Productions and held at Raleigh's
Trinity Farms,started in typical rock
and roll fashion � 30 minutes late.
With the help of the Raleigh
sunshine, the Lubricators warmed
the crowd, as they kicked the show
off with their brand of straight-
ahead rock.
Using the Seattle-type guitar
sound, popularized by northwest-
em bands such as Pearl Jam and
Soundgarden, the local Raleigh
band brought people to their feet,
not an easy task for an opening act.
Even moreimpressive than diehard
driving songs of the band was the
ability of Lubricators frontman
Kenny Roby to entertain the crowd
during the breaks in the music.
Roby, after belting out the vo-
cals to the Lubricator's "Rust Along
With You informed the crowd,
that given his affinity for punk
music, he would rather live in the
Old West, a place he considered
"thepunkestofall
Bassist Jack Cain, not to be out-
done, told the listeners that K-Y
jelly (no doubt a principal influence
in the name of his band) did exist in
this time and therefore gave the
band respect for this period in his-
tory.
The Lubricators maintained
both energy and humor through-
out their 45-minute set, and kept
fans primed for the Usuals, who
were next in the show's impressive
lineup.
The Usuals covered some of
the greatest classic rock songs of all
time to make the attentive fanscheer,
and still provided them with origi-
nal tunes to listen to. Singer Greg
Woods and GuitaristPat Dickenson
led the stage show while bassist
Tracy Cain and drummer Doug
Crumpler laid down a pumping
groove that had fans moving on the
grass.
The highlight of the Usuals
show was their cover of
Steppenwolf's "Magic Carpet Ride"
which brought roars of approval
from the fans.
Next up were Atlanta's Follow
For Now, who have played two
exciting shows in Greenville's own
New Deli. Providing the fans with
the fi rst sounds of funk for the after-
noon, Follow For Now played a 45-
minute set promoting racial unity
and speaking out for civil justice.
The band, with a video and a
debut album on Chrysalis records,
was previously scheduled to per-
form at a fraternity in Raleigh later
in the evening, but did not short the
fans on an energetic performance.
After this band finished, the first of
tine evening's "heavy hitters" was
due to perform.
When Johnny Quest took the
stageat twilight, a tremendous roar
erupted from the excited audience.
The band immediately began their
rap-and funk-influenced show with
fansslam-dancingand stagediving
throughout. Security guards al-
lowed the fans to jump off the stage
throughout Quest's 75-minute set,
and ejected no one from the show, a
rarity in live performances.
Singer Joe Farmer, at the end of
each song, would command fans
See Localpalooza, page 8
Beethoven explored
by performing duo
By Chandra Speight
Staff Writer
Cellist Selma Gokcen and pianist John O'Brien have travelled the
globe as a musical duo performing the works of Beethoven. Now the two
artistshaveconcurred to bring North Carolinians a thorough examination
of the life, works and times of Beethoven.
"Beethoven and His Time: A Journey Into His World" will be pre-
sented by Gokcen, OBrien, Dr. Bodo Nischan of the ECU history depart-
ment and Dr. McKay Sundwall of the ECU English department.
Gokcen and O'Brien will explore the music of Beethoven through
three concerts. The concerts will be supplemented by poetry readings and
history lee tu res given by Sundwall and Nischan. Dr. John Tilley,aIso of the
history department, will exhibit photographs relevant to Beethoven's time
and works.
The concept of "Beethoven and His Time" is to join history, literature
and music in order to give the audience a more thorough understanding
of the mentality behind Beethoven's compositions. The office of the Vice
Chancellor for Academic Affairs at ECU supported this project through a
grant which has been designed to further interdisciplinary collaborations.
The performances premiered in Raleigh Sept. 30 in Meredi th College's
Carswell Auditorium. In Greenville, the performances began Oct. 1 and
run three consecutive Thursdays in ECU's Hetcher Music Center Recital
Hall at 8 p.m.
'Singles' relies on cliched love
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Commentary
)
Reality check:
By Dana Danielson
Lifestyle Editor
Driving down the road with the win-
dows down, a full tank of gas and favorite
tunes singing away the miles.
Welcome to your road trip.
It's a feeling everyone has, almost like
an impatience. Some cover it up with daily
routine, but some thrive off this feeling of
possibilities.
A new set of roads, a new bag of good-
ies, a new weekend � destination un-
known, but friends who dream as much as
you.
It could be a siesta with a border flair,
New Mexico or Arizona; maybe a camping
trip to Linville Gorge, the Croatan or
Hatteras Island; or maybe just a tour of
Road trippin' to happiness at
the end of the highway
country scenery.
Getting back to basics, enjoying what
many are too busy to see.
Each time I hear the word, "roadtrip" I
can see without closing my eyes the road
signs shaving down the remaining miles
and thesunsmiling with full radianceupon
our happy trip. I feel the flutters that could
only mean the pure joy of experiencing life.
Have you ever driven just to drive?
Have you ever jumped in the car just to
see the sunrise?
Have you ever stopped at a "Bob's Gas
'n' Go" just to chat with Bob?
Peace of mind a reality check a time
to breathe.
The next time you rearrange a few
hours, get in the car and drive. And make
sure to let me know where we're going.
Singles, the newest film from the writer
of Fast Times at Ridgemont High, could be
described as a "Little" Chill, a St. Elmo's Fire
for the nineties or as "hventysomething
Unfortunately not one of these descriptions
could be construed as complimentary.
Sadly, this tale of love among the post-
adolescent set fails miserably as a film.
Singles ostensibly advertised itself as
an ensemble piece. The story really revolves
around a central couple, Steve and Linda
(played by Campbell Scott and Kyra
Sedgwick,respecnvely).Therestofthechar-
acters inhabit many scenes of the film but
they never become a presence.
Steve works as an engineer in Seattle
working on a proposal for a supertrain to
alleviate the traffic gridlock that plagues
thecity. He desperately wants to fall in love
but fears continued rejection, so he applies
himself diligently to his job.
Linda works tirelessly for an environ-
mental organization trying to make the
world a little cleaner and a little saner. She
too devotes herself to her job so that she will
not have to think about a relationship.
When Steve and Linda meet in a club
one night their eventual love becomes im-
mediately obvious to the audience�but
not to them. For ninety minutes the audi-
encesuffers through the tried and trite tribu-
lations of this couple.
WhenSteveand Linda experience rocky
times in their relationship theeventual con-
clusion remainsapparent. Singles telegraphs
all its plot lines well in advance. The viewer
feels helplessly bored as thecharacters play
out their histrionics only to realize that, like
all cliched Hollywood couples, they must
eventually realize their burning passion in
the final reel.
Janet (Bridget Fonda) and Cliff (Matt Dillon)
trials and tribulations of living the single life.
Regrettably, Steve and Linda's rela-
tionship is only one of several in the film to
follow this boring Hollywood formula.
Janet (Bridget Fonda) loves Cliff (Matt
Dillon), a member of a local group, Citizen
Dick, struggling to win an audience. Of
course, Cliff takes Janet for granted which
causes Janet undue anxiety. Only when
Janet leaves Cliff does he realize his passion
for her.
The romance between Janet and Cli ff is
more nauseatingly cliched than the one
between Steve and Linda. Linda finally
realizes that Cliff loves her when he says
"bless you" in the elevator. Earlier Janet
broke up with Cliff because he ignored her
when she sneezed. Is the audience sup-
posed to relate to people who use criteria
like this to forge a relationship?
Photo court�sy Warner Bros.
in Warner Brothers' latest film about the
A minor plot line involves Debbie
(Sheila Kelley)strugglingthrough romance
only to find a rich, older man to make all her
dreams come true. Though the story only
occupies a small fraction of the film, its
condescending triviality accentuates the
painful banality of this film.
To exacerbate the pitiful situation of
this film Cameron Crowe, the writer and
director, interspersesconversationsdirectly
with the camera. Cliff talks of love while
delivering flowers. Steve tells the audience
of his past loves. Janet swoons over the
wonders of Cliff.
In Singles, the effect is jarringly intru-
sive. The asides these characters have are
briefand intermittent. The techniqueisused
See Singles, page 8





8 The Hast Carolinian
Localpalooza
OCTOBER 8, 1992
Continued from page 7
still on the stage to "freeze" and
propel themselves into the await-
ing arms of the fans only when the
next song began. "Johnny Quest
runs a musical stage Farmer said.
This band was the first to begin
"Bush-bashing" in their on-stage
speeches to the fans. Farmer, who
handled most of the talking to the
fans, asked the awaiting audience
to vote in the upcoming November
election, but onlv if they were Demo-
crats. Farmer told attending Repub-
licans to "stayhomeanddrinkbeer
Johnny Quest, anchored by
drummer Steve "Dr. Quest" Hill,
and bassist Jack Campbell, ripped
tli rough their set with their popular
songs "Skinnv and Fatty" and " The
Heisman" as high points. Guitarist
Bill Ladd complemented the rhythm
section with intense rhythm guitar.
After the tumultuous finale ol
Johnny Quest, the fans were treated
to what is probably the biggest
drawing band in the Raleigh area,
Dillon Fence.
Entertaining their fans with
soulful vocaU and catchv melodies,
Dillon Fence proved to be the stars
of the evening, playing nearly ,m
hour and a half to a crowd that
adored them. Singer Greg
Humphreys said that the show
made the band extremely happy
and felt it did much to prom te his
group to vounger fans from local
high schools.
Dillon Fence treated the crowd
to their most popular songs, "Sad
Inheritance "Hev Mockingbird
and "Something For You "and ro-
videdtheevening's highest point of
irony when it performed, as its en-
core,thehard rock-standard "Rain-
bow in the Dark" by Dio.
According to Saint Mary's stu-
dent Nena Cavallona, Dillon Fence
is likelv to continue it s success on a
national level. "1 just know 1 Hllon
Fence will make it big she said.
With fans young and old cheering
Dillon Fence's performance, the
stage was set for the evening's head-
Singles
lining band, the Se.x Police.
Anchored bv a two-man horn
section, the Sex Police performed
an hour-long set of "melodic funk"
that gave fans something to think
about as they made their journey
home. The fanatic crowd showed
their tremendous support for the
group as thev plowed their way
through.
Capitalizing on the success of
"To the Bone" and "Amanda Falls
singerand bassist Norwood Cheek
riled the crowd into a frenzy. Fin-
ishing off with "Elevator their
most popular composition, the
group ended an exciting day for
Raleigh music fans.
According to chief promoter
Chris Johnson ol l&l Productions,
Localpalooza came off as a com-
plete success, with absolutely no
violence at all. Johnson said to ex-
pect more festivals such as this in
the near future. Music fans should
look out for Localpalooza II, com-
ing to a field near you.
Continued from page 7
almost as an afterthought.
The interruptions annoy the
sensibilities of the viewer and fur-
toertrivializeanalready-trivialfilm.
A colleague swooned over the
soundtrack to this film when it was
released a month ago.
Songs by Pearl Jam,
Soundgarden and Alice in Chains
can be heard in the film.
Crowe wanted to shoot a film
a midst the Sea ttle sound of a 11 these
fierv, inspired bands. The club
scenes plav like bad soap opera
scenes though the music provides a
pleasurable diversion.
Because the music provides
only a backdrop for the events of
the story it can, in no way, rescue
this film.
Singles mav appeal to adoles-
cents whose views of relationships
are already skewed by the media.
Forevervoneelse who has been
around for eighteen years or more
thisfilmoffersonly hackneyed ideas
and trivial situations.
HELP WANTED
The East Carolinian is now
accepting applications for the
following positions:
Opinion Page Editor
Layout Manager
Copy Editor
Typesetter
Apply at TEC office, Publications Building.
DEAR DAD,
FOR SCHOOL
SUPPLIES
Snuth.field hh tory Ston i andina Pottery Outlet G nter,
Exit 95 or 97,1-95, Smith field, Xl . (919) 989-6100. MonSat. 9-9, Sun. 1-6.
Discontinuedialmost perfet l sports and fihwss stuff.
Harris Teefer
ANNIVERSARY SALE
SAVE 70 PER LB.
TYSON-HOLLY FARMS
SPLIT FRYER
BREAST
129
LB. I
GROUND FRESH SEVERAL TIMES
DAILY - 70 LEAN
GROUND
BEEf
LIMIT 5 LBS. WITH
ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE
DELI-BAKERY
VIRGINIA BAKED
SLICED TO
ORDER
llJl
HARRIS TEETER LOW PRICES ALL DAY, EVERY DAY
STUDENT'S
WE INVITE YOU TO APPLY
FOR YOUR HARRIS TEETER
COURTESY CARD.
Hatrisffeerer
YOUR, NAME
YOUR ADDRESS
YOUR CITY. STATE 111 11
XX 010101
mini
IT ALLOWS YOU TO
CASH PERSONAL
CHECKS AT OVER 134
HARRIS TEETER
LOCATIONS IN
GEORGIA, SOUTH
CAROLINA, NORTH
CAROLINA, VIRGINIA
AND TENNESSEE
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS $1.00
COUPON AND SAVE.
IN THE DELI-BAKERY A
ALL VARIETIES Q Q
FRIED PIES 4 a ��
GRAIN A A
BREAD 224 oi loaf ww
PRESIDENT'S CHOICE �
COLA �0
157.5 SQ. FT m
ANGEL SOFT JkQ
BATH TISSUE molls iV7
VALUABLE 40 COUPON
SELECTED VARIETIES � 30 � 30.5 OZ. JAR OF
RAGU SPAGHETTI
SAUCE
This Coupon May
Not Be Reproduced
Limit One Coupon
Per Family, per Vint
With Minimum
Purchase of 510 00
Offer Good October
7 Thru October 13,
1992
COUPON
VALUE
40
I
m
�5

I
I
VALUABLE $1.00 COUPON
$ 1.00 OFF
ANY $3.00 OR MORE I
PURCHASE IN OUR s
FLORAL DEPARTMENT I
THIS COUPON MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED. I
LIMIT ONE COUPON PER FAMILY PER VISIT j
I
OFFER GOOD OCT. 7 THRU OCT. 13. 1992
FLORAL
COUPON
VALUE
$1.00
Haiusfeeter
PLU 2068
01
J
VALUABLE 70 COUPON
FRESH GROWN - 3 LB. BAG OF
YELLOW
ONIONS
This Coupon May
Not Be Reproduced
Limit One Coupon
Per Family, Per Visit
With Minimum
Purchase ol S10 00
Offer Good Ucorber
7 Thru October 13,
1993
COUPON
VALUf ;
zo
Prices Effective Through October 13, 1992
Prices In The Ad Effocfive Wednesday, October 7 Through Tuesday, October 1 3 1992 In Greenville Store
Only. We Reserve The Riyht To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept Federal Food 5tamps.





OCTOBER 8, 1992
The East Carolinian
11
INDEPENDENT FOOTBALL ALLIANCE
Weekly Statistical Update
Week 5
1992IFA Standings
School1EAALLPTSOPPPCT
Southern Miss2-03-25767.600
East Carolina0-02-2103131500
Cincinnati0-01-36581333
Memphis State0-11-37465333
Tulsa0-1M87141.250
ResultsWeekly Schedule
School Site Time
Southern Miss (3-2) beat Tulsa
at Northern Illinois DeKalb 1KB
East Carolina (2-2) was idle
at Duke Durham 1:30
Tulsa (14) lost to USM 33-24
hosts SW Missouri St. Tulsa 1:30
Memphis State (1-3) was idle
hosts Cincinnati Memphis 730
Gncinnati (1-3) beat Kent St. 31-0
at Memphis St. Memphis 730
1992 IFA INDIVIDUAL FOOTBALL STATS
Rushing
Flayer. Team Q
Small, DUC 4
Welch, MUSM 5
Smith, JECU 4
Jackson, RTulsa 4
Porter, LMSU 4
Martin, JMSU 4
Passing
Player. Team Q
Anderson, MECU 4
Matthews, SMSU 4
Ticioue, GTulsa 3
Harp, L-UC 4
McConnell, SECU 4
Received
Player. Team �
Zophy,PECU 4
Driver, C-ECU 4
Grumpier, C-ECU 4
Letcher, MECU 4
Brown, GTulsa 5
Copeland, RMSU 4
CARR YDS
461
AVG ID
82
54
83
42
37
ATT
186
108
136
82
46
322
269
264
218
155
4.8
3.9
5.0
3.2
5.2
4.2
COMP ,
101 543
61
57
40
23
RECP YDS
29 340
16
18
21
17
20
298
285
241
268
212
565
.419
.488
500
m
2
5
1
1
2
2
7
1
3
1
0
0
YDS
1280
649
624
424
279
YSAPG
1153
805
673
66.0
545
51.7
Lady's club wins, ties over weekend
By Chip Hudson
Staff Writer
The ECU Women's Soccer Club rolled
over Georgia Southern on Saturday by a
score of 2-0. The Pirates opened the scor-
ing midway through the first half when
freshman Kiki Anderson put a free kick
from 20 yards out into the Eagles' net. Up
to that point, the Pirates had just missed
on scoring opportunities by Alison Russell
and Joelle Pierce.
The defense, led by Stephanie Aicher
and Jodi Rittenhouse, was impregnable,
as GSU only managed four shots on goal
all day. Winger Amy Warren dribbled
past two defenders at the 26 minute
mark in the second half and her shot put
the Pirates ahead 2-0.
GSU tried to mount a late attack,
but outside fullbacks Courtney Buck
and Missy Cone slammed the door on
the GSU offense to huckle on for the
win.
On Sunday, the clubs from ECU
and UNC-Wilmington braved the wind
and rain as they played to a 1-1 tie. Just
two minutes into the game, right wing
Golf
Amy Warren scored on an assist from
Alison Russell. After that, the two teams
bogged down in the mud. Goal keeper
Jaime Pierce held the UNC-W forwards at
bay with a succession of saves, but, mid-
way through the second half, an unmarked
Seahawk in the goal mouth received a
cross-pass and put it away for the tie.
ECU finished strongly, but were unable
to capitalize on some late opportunities to
win the game. The tie moved the Pirates to
a 1-2-1 record on the year. This Sunday, the
Women will look to make it a double victory
at Duke.
Continued from page 9
INT
7
6

4
1
ID
10
4
3
0
1
YPSPG
85.0
745
715
603
53.6
53.0
control. If you ever hear anyone yell "Co-
bra on thecourse, don't call Animal Con-
trol. Someone just collected a free disk
because someone else had more power
than control.
Before you start to think this is totally
a finesse game, you better get to know the
course. The first 10 holes are inside the
small patch of woods behind Harrington
Field.
The course designer cut down enough
trees and underbrush to create a good
course, but left enough wood in the way to
turn an errant throw into a game of tree-
tag. If you don't believe that, look at the
scarred trees along the course fairways.
The first 10 holes are inside the trees,
and each is a par three. Most of these holes
are fairly straight, with a slight break at the
end. It is on these holes most holes-in-one
are scored. Hole eight, a short hole that
breaks to the right, is the most popular
place to score a hole-in-one.
From 11-15, the holes are all outside in
the open air, and those frustrated by the
short holes and the accuracy needed on
the inside can vent their anger into a
power game. Throws of 70-100 yards are
not uncommon out here, and accuracy
isn't important if you takea dozen throws
to cover the distance.
"Lucky 13" is the most agonizing of
the firstoutside holes. Itcombinesa need
for power (the hole is over 100 yards
long) wi th a need for accuracy (the hole is
as straight as an arrow, and flanked by
pines on either side).
Hole 16 is the monster of the course.
Over500 feet long, it is the only par four.
It starts beside Charles Street and winds
up in the woods behind the Lady Pirate
Softball field.
A good tee throw is necessary here, if
it is short or wide, your score is going to
run up.
Holes 17 and 18 finish up the course
back inside the woods. Like 1-10, these
holes are flanked with trees, and seem
harder when coming in from the relative
freedom of 11-16.
For the $9 cost of a disk, you can get
yourself into the game, one that can get
very addictive,as many ECU students have
found out. It doesn't even need to cost
anything.
You have a right toa disk. If you cannot
afford the disk, one will be appointed to
you (sounds similar to something else,
doesn't it?) by Im-Rec Services in
Christenbury Gym. It'll cost you your ID,
but you'll get it back when you bring the
disk in.
Try it. It's cheap, fun and it won't give
you something there isn't a cure for. The
course is open to anyone every day of the
week, though there are tournaments Tues-
dayafternoonsand occasionally other times.
These tournaments are usually open to the
public, for a small fee. All in all, it's one of
the few things you can do cheap that you
can talk to your friends about the nextday.
Give it a shot.
Hey! The East Carolinian is looking for a few good people to fill the
following positions: Layout Manager, Opinion Page Editor, Copy Editor,
Typesetter. Please apply at TEC office, in the Student Publications Bldg.
m
in concert
Ray Charles
with
The Raelettes
and the
Ray Charles Orchestra

Homecoming Friday
October 16, 1992
Minges Coliseum - 8 p.m.
Good seats are still available!
Thit program rs sponsored in part by a grant tram the
Papti-Cola Bottling Company of Gnwnvrte
Contact:
The Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Phone: 919-757-4788 or,
toll free, 1-800-ECU-ARTS
re-�
�fe.)
&kSl ' �J
ritt
THURSDAY
STUDENT
SHI
LLAI
NIGHT
Domestics
Imports
Pitchers
LADIES
ALL NIGHT
&1
A Comical Approach To:
Chemical Dependency
Racism
WARS
Sexism
DR. BERTICE BERRY
1992 Campus Entertainer of the Year
Friday, October 9, 1992 8 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
FREE - Admission - FREE
For additional information call the
Student Union Program Hotline at 757-6004
Sponsored by the Student Vnion-Minoritv Arts Committee
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY PERFORMING ARTS SERIES
presents
in celebration of the quincentenary of Columbus' discovery of America
THE NATIONAL ORCHESTRA OF SPAIN
with special guest guitar soloist
Angel Romero
Wednesday, October 14, 1992
8:00 p.m.
Wright Auditorium
Public - $35.00 ECU FacultyStaff - $30.00 ECU StudentYouth - $10.00
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR - $35.00
The program for the evening will include:
Danzas Fantasticas by Joaquin Turina
Concierto de Aranjuez by Joaquin Rodrigo
El Amor Brujo (orchestral version) by Manuel de Falla
El Sombrero de Tres Picos, Suite II by Manuel de Falla
For more information, call the Central Ticket Office, 757-4788,
or, toll free, 1-800-ECU-ARTS, Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
This program is sponsored in part by a grant from the ECU Student Stores.


J
M
ake this fall break an adven-
ture with Recreational
Services. BACK-
PACK with us
along the Appa-
lachian Trail in
the Jefferson
National For-
MOUNT
ROGERS NA-
TIONAL RECRE-
ATION AREA in the
southwestern section
this 5
Virginia is the setting for
day excursion. You'll enjoy breathtaking
alpine scenery and the panarama of valleys below. A variety of
wildlife roam the forests. Interested individuals must REGISTER
through the RECREATIONAL OUTDOOR CENTER LOCATED IN 117
CHRISTENBURY GYM BEFORE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16. A pre-trip
meeting will be held Monday, October 19 for all registered partici-
pants. The COST of this BACKPACKING ADVENTURE IS $65 FOR
STUDENTS & $75 FOR FACULTYSTAFF. Cost Includes: transporta
tion, equipment, food and all camping fees. For more details, call
the ROC at 757-6911.





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Title
The East Carolinian, October 8, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 08, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.900
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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