The East Carolinian, October 6, 1992






Opinion
The dating game
A little advice about dating from a
man who has done it all.
See pg. 5 for story.
lifestyle
Culture shock
ECU English professor Luke Whisnant publishes
his first novel Watching TV with the Red Chinese.
See story pg. 7.
Sports
Rumbling ahead
ECU'S rugby team stays undefeated in
Conference; play N.C. State Next Week
See pg. 9 for story.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 12
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, October 6,1992
Clinton campaigns in Kinston
10 Pages
Democratic presidential candidate
tells crowd 'trickle down' has to go
By Jeff Becker
News Editor
Democratic presidential candidate
Bill Clinton forged the rain in Kinston
Sunday night and told supporters that
President George Bush's trickle-down
economic policies are not like the rain,
the benefits do not trickle down.
"I'm sorry it is raining, but we've
had 12 years of trickle-down Clinton
said. "If you give me 12 minutes, we can
turn this country around
Clinton gave a 12 minute speech to
a crowd of about 4,000 at Grainger Sta-
dium, home of Kinston's minor league
baseball team the Indians. The crowd
braved the continuous rain and a two-
hour delay to hear Clinton speak.
The Arkansas governor spoke at
N.C. State University earlier in the day
about the North American Free Trade
Agreement.
Clinton's speech echoed the state-
ments given by Democratic vice presi-
dential candidate Al Gore who cam-
paigned at ECU on Sept. 28
Clinton blamed President George
Bush for the first decline in private sector
jobs in 50 years, a reduction in manufac-
turing, and for two-thirds of Americans
working harder for less money.
"One in 10 Americans is on food
stamps, and 100,000 Americans are los-
ing their health insurance each month
Clinton said. We want four more years'
sounds more like a threat than a prom-
ise
Clinton said the wealthiest 10 per-
cent of Americans should pay more taxes
instead of getting across-the-board tax
cut? they receive under the Bush admin-
istration. He said although the richest
Americans should pay more, they should
also receive tax incentives for spending
their money on modernizing America's
factories and farms.
Clinton said the United States is the
only advanced country that does not en-
sure that each high school graduate gets
at least two years of additional training.
He said the United Statescan solve many
of its problems by investing in educa-
tion for more Americans.
"I have proposed to set up a na-
tional trust fund outof which any Ameri-
can can borrow money to go to college
and then pay it back out of a small per-
centage of their income or by giving two
years to their country here at home in a
domestic Peace Corps to rebuild
America he said.
Clinton said both Democrats and
Republicans say his health care plan will
allow more people access to care at a
lower cost.
"My health care plan will save the
average family $1,200 a year by the end
of the decade and hundreds of billions
of dollars a year in the private sector
The Bush plan will leave 27 million
people without health insurance and
the cost will keep on going up, up
Clinton also attacked Bush's
double veto of the Fa mily Leave bi 11. He
said 72 nations have found it possible to
give people time off from work when a
baby is bom or a family member be-
comes sick.
The rain was not theonlv surprise.
A heckler briefly interrupted Clinton,
who responded by asking the crowd to
be polite.
"If George Bush comes here, I hope
you go to his rally and not interrupt
him Clinton said. "Be polite and listen,
and then vote for me
Clinton warned the crowed to ig-
nore negative campaigning from the Re-
publican Party in the next 30 days. He
said since Republicans hate to talk about
their record and have no plans for the
future, they will concentrate on mud-
slinging.
"We voters lost four years ago
Clinton said. "Then it was their fault. If
we going to sympathize with them, it
will beour fault, and I don't think we are
going to do it
Clinton flew out of Kinston Sun-
day night for a two-day campaign stop
in Florida.
Photo by Dan ROM � Ik
Democratic presidential candidate Bill Clinton greets a wet crowd in Kinston on Sunday. More than 4,000 people waited two hours
in tho rain tn kaor Olir��r� cnnL.
in the rain to hear Clinton speak
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
BravingSundaynight'srainand freez-
ing winds, an enthusiastic crowd of about
4,000 attended a rally at Kinston's Grainger
stadium to hear Democratic presidential
candidate Bill Clinton speak about his cur-
rent campaign.
Despite the foul weather, spirits were
high for the event as Democrats of every
age, gender and color were electrified to see
the presidential front runner in person.
While waiting for Clinton to arrive, ECU
mixture of people
student Gentry Barnett sampled the free
cuisine, provided by Kinston'sown King's
Barbecue, and talked about why she was
part of the crowd.
"I want to know more about
(Clinton) she said. "You can tell a lot
about what a person says by watching
him talk, by his gestures Barnett said
she was still undecided on who she would
support in November's election, but she
was looking at Clinton as her most likely
choice.
However, Mike and Deborah
Hamill, a middle-class couple from Lenoir
County,had noreservationsaboutchoos-
ingClintonas theircandidate. Mr. Hamill,
a private investigator, said he believed in
Clinton's policies and would definitely
cast a Democratic vote. He said he was
most impressed with Clinton's promise
to change U.S. economic policies.
"Trickle down economics just
doesn't work he said. "Clinton will stop
Bush's catering to the rich and start look-
ing after the middle class Hamill said
due to Bush's economic performance he
See Clinton, page 3
Wiretapping trial begins
By Jeff Becker
News Editor
The two former ECU em-
ployees indicted for illegal wire-
tapping at the university in 1990
pleaded innocent Monday to five
counts each of federal wiretap-
ping violations.
Thedefendantsjohn Burrus,
former captain of investigations
for Public Safety, and Teddy
Roberson, former director of Tele-
communications, are accused of
tapping the phone of an EC U em-
ployee whom they suspected of
illegal drug involvement.
Burrus and Roberson were
arraigned on Monday in the Fed-
eral District courthouse in New
Bern. According to the Federal
Clerks Office, the jury will be se-
lected today and the trial will start
either this afternoon or Wednes-
day morning.
The trial comes almost two
and one half years after the taps
were placed on the ECU phone lines.
The Tap
In May 1990, Burrus and
Roberson tapped the phone of
ECU employee Brooks Mills.
About six months after the
wiretap, Public Safety Capt.
Stanley Kittrell found transcripts
of the recorded conversations on a
computer floppy disk in the Pub-
Truth about
scandal finally at hand
lie Safety offices. Kittrell turned
the transcripts over to the FBI on
Nov. 6,1990.
The university, the FBI and
the State Auditor began separate
investigations of the wiretapping
incidents in November 1990. Of
the three investigations, only the
State Auditor's office has released
its findings.
The Auditor's report stated
that Roberson said he met with
Burrus and Evan Midgette, assis-
tantdirector of Human Resources,
to discuss the possibility of re-
cording Mills' phone conversa-
tions. Roberson said Burrus asked
him: "One � Can you tap the
employee's line? Two � How
hard would it be? Three �Would
the employee know that his phone
was tapped?"
Both Burrus and Midgette
said they did not remember the
conversation.
According to the Auditor's
report, Roberson installed a mi-
crophone on Mill's telephone and
concealed the recorder in his desk
drawer. After Roberson made the
first tape, he gave the tape to
Midgette. Midgette then txk the
recording to Public Safety Direc-
tor James DePuy.
Midgette said DePuy told
him the information on the tape
could be used in certain circum-
stances.
"I told (Midgette) that the
information could not be used in
a court of law, but did tell him
that wiretapping was illegal
DePuy said in the State Auditor's
interview.
The number of tapes made
after DePuy's notification is un-
clear. However, employees have
indicated as many as three other
tapes were made after DePuy was
notified. The Federal Grand Jury
indictmentcharged that Roberson
made three tapes of Mills' con-
versations between May and June
of 1990.
About the same time the in-
vestigations began, Roberson,
Burrus, Midgette and DePuy held
a meeting at an undisclosed
doughnut shop. DePuy said the
meeting was for them to get their
"ducks in a row
During the course of the in-
vestigations, key pieces of infor-
mation turned up missing. Burrus
See Wiretap, page 2
THE TRAIL OF THE WIRETAPPERS


��A.
BROOKS MIUS
RON AVERY
RICHARD BROWN
JOHN BURRUS
JAMES D.PUY
RICHARO EAKIN
STANLEY KmREU
EVAN MIDGETTE
TEDDY ROBERSON
JOHNNY ROSE
PATRICIA HAIR BULLOCK
FORMER TELECOMMUNICATIONS EMPLOYEE
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF PUBUC SAFETY
VICE CHANCELLOR OF BUISNESS AFFAIRS
FORMER CAPTAIN OF INVESTIGATIONS FOR PUBLIC SAFETY
DIRECTOR OF PUBUC SAFETY
CHANCELLOR
CAPTAIN FOR PUBUC SAFETY
DIRECTOR Of HUMAN RESOUCES FOR EMPLOYEE RELATIONS
FORMER DIRECTOR OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS
FORMER CHEIF OF POUCE FOR PUBLIC SAFETY
PUBLIC SAFETY SECRETARY
Wi
Z
w
mfis1





2 The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 6. 1992
Wiretap
Continued from page 1
said he threw away his record-
ings of the wiretapped conversa-
tions and the transcripts of the
tapes were missing. Notes taken
by Midgette involving meetings
with others were not where he
said they were.
The Auditor's report stated
thatRoberson, Burrus, Midgette,
and DePuy, Richard Brown, vice
chancellor for Business Affairs,
and Richard Farris, director of
Human Resources, were in-
volved or had knowledge of the
wiretapping.
"The officials referred to
have stated that they were not
aware that tapping employee's
telephone conversations without
the employee's knowledge was
potentially illegal the report
stated.
According to University At-
torney Ben Irons, ECU's internal
investigation found that "no em-
ployee of the university acted with
actual knowledge that he or she
was violating the law
According to sources, other
ECU employees are expected to
be indicted for federal wiretap-
ping violations.
Both Roberson and Burrus
resigned from their jobs at ECU on
March 8, 1991. They each could
serve a maximum of 23 years in
prison if convicted on all five
counts of wiretapping.
Whistleblower
In September of 1991, Capt.
Stanley Kittrell, the Public Safety
officer who informed the FBI of
the wiretapping, filed a lawsuit
against the university alleging
mistreatment.
After contacting the FBI of
the wiretapping, university offi-
cials stripped Kittrell of his 42-
officer staff, moved his office to a
remote building across campus
and demoted him from a plain-
clothed officer to a uniformed one.
Public Safety Director James
DePuy and Chancellor Richard
Eakin said the changes in Kittrell's
duties resulted from a reorganiza-
tion of Public Safety and his relo-
cation stemmed from over-
crowded conditions in the Public
Safety offices.
North Carolina state law pro-
hibits state agencies and employ-
ees from retaliating against state
employees who report violations
of laws to appropriate authorities.
Kittrell also said he was
threatened by DePuy and Assis-
tant Director of Public Safety Ron
Avery.
After turning over the tran-
scripts to the FBI, Kittrell took an
administrative leave from work.
When he returned, he discovered
that DePuy had kicked in his office
door. DePuy said he forcibly en-
tered Kittrell's office because he
heard water running.
At a Public Safety meeting,
Kittrell said DePuy stared at him
and said: "There are some people
in this department at command
level that are not real cops. They
areliars,andIwillhuntthemdown
and take care of them
Kittrell said Avery told him
he should go to Pitt Memorial
Hospital and apply for a job, sug-
gesting he might be fired. Kittrell
also said Avery told him "I plan on
being here a long time, and, when
I get you, it will stick
On Nov. 4, 1991, The Pitt
County court issued an injunction
order to protect Kittrell from addi-
tional retaliation. In a sworn affi-
davit to the court, Joseph Calder,
the director of Public Safety before
DePuy, said DePuy told him
"when this is over, Stan Kittrell
will never be allowed to be a police
officer in North Carolina again
On campus, the Student
Government Association passed
a resolution in support of Kittrell
on Jan. 13. The resolution, which
passed 7-1, was a slightly watered-
down version of a similar resolu-
tion that unanimously failed in
October of 1991.
The passed resolution stated,
"The SGA goes on the record in
support of Captain Kittrell and
questions the soundness of any
retaliation, if such has occurred
against Captain Kittrell for his
stand against unethical and illegal
acts at out university
The university awarded
$27,000 to Kittrell inanout-of court
settlement in July of 1992. Chan-
cellor Eakin maintained that deci-
sions concerning Kittrell's employ-
ment resulted from "legitimate
administrative reasons
"Despite our personal confi-
dence in the university's defense,
the uncertainties of litigation and
the threat of treble damages led
the university to agree to settle its
differences with Mr. Kittrell out of
court Eakin said.
Settlements
Under federal law, any per-
son whose oral communication is
intercepted over a phone line with-
out consent is entitled to $10,000 in
punitive damages.
Former Public Safety Chief
Johnny Rose filed a lawsuit against
Midgette and Roberson in June
1991 for the illegal recording of his
phone conversations. On behalf of
the two ECU employees, the uni-
versity reached an out-of-court
settlement with Rose for $13,270
on Aug. 26,1991.
Since the Rose settlement, the
university has doled out an addi-
tional $200,417 in wiretapping
settlements to 15 other employees
who unknowingly had their voice
recorded. As many as 50civil suits
are still pending.
Settlements preventlitigants
from filing additional claims
against the university concerning
wiretapping and admit no liabili-
ties on the part of the university or
its employees.
University Attorney Ben
Irons said the administration de-
cided to avoid trial and settle out-
of-court to avoid expenses and end
the disputes. He also said the uni-
versity settled disputes against
individuals because "no employee
of the university acted with actual
knowledge that he of she was vio-
lating the law
At the request of Chancellor
Eakin, thestate Attorney General's
Office has handled all civil suits
brought against the university and
its employees. However, the state
will neither represent Roberson or
Burrus in the federal trial nor in
any further civil suits.
When asked why the Attor-
ney General's Office was no
longer representing the former
employees, Deputy State Attor-
ney Tom Ziko said, "We decided
not to defend them and would
not elaborate.
In the trial, the Federal Pubic
Defender's office will represent
Roberson, and Greenville attorney
Myron Hill will defend Burrus.
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE'S
NATURAL FOODS SOURCE
Offering
NaturalOrganic Groceries
Wholesome Snacks & Treats
NaturalCruelty-Free Beauty Aids & Cosmetics
Body Building Supplements
byTwinLab
Y'J �& 405 EVANS STREET MALL
blue planetLjfeFoods Hours 10-6, M-Sat
758-0850
More Taps
When the federal grand jury
indicted Roberson and Burrus in
May 1992, it released evidence of a
second set of wiretaps.
The indictment stated that
Burrus and Roberson placed a tap
on the phone of Public Safety sec-
retary Patricia Hair Bullock and
recorded her conversations for a
period of two weeks.
Bullock filed a $350,000 law-
suit against Roberson and Burrus
in late May of 1992. Sources esti-
mate as many as 50 people could
have called on Bullock's phone line
in the two-week period.
ALFREDO'S
New York Pizza By The Slice
218 E. 5th Sf.�752-0022
Sun, Mon & Tue SPECIAL
Pitchers $1.50
Lunch Special 11-4
Large Cheese Pizza
5299 wirfi coupon
TACO
CASA
In The Plaza Food Court
I BURRITO
ICHEESBURGER,
I
2 Large Pizzas
with 1 Topping
$�,99
with coupon
NACHOS &
CHEESE
& LARGE
DRINK
$3.00
with coupon
DISCOVER
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
ECU'S Natural Food Source
FOSDICK'
1890 SEAFOOD
3003 S. EVANS STREET
756-2011
2 REGULAR �
COMBINATION PLATTERS
Dine In or Take Out Q AC , . . nn.
QoodAnyTIme ?S?�S9& (reg. $15.90) .
Choose From Any 2 Seafoods
For Each Platter-
Shrimp, Trout, Clams, Deviled Crab,
Crab Cakes, Baby Flounder, Perch, '
Oysters, or Scallops M&
$ 1.00 extra per item per plate J
Mot good with any other coupons 4
or specials. Beverage not lncludecL�U
Expires 103192
With this coupon onlv
Make a
positive
choice this
week
�M
THE POUItR OF POSITIVE CHOICES
ALL THIS WEEK
THE RIBBON
PROJECT
Show compassion for those
living with AIDS and support for
people and service
organizations who assist with
people with AIDS. Display your
red ribbon throughout the
week. Pick up yours at a Student
Organization booth on campus.
TUESDAY THE 6TH
MIKE
HAMER
Student Union
Coffeehouse, 8pm,
Folk & Blues Music
$1 cover wECl! ID $2
for general public
THURSDAY THE 9TH
DR. BERTICE
BERRY
Voted "1991-92 Campus
Comedian of the Year" &
"1992 Campus Entertainer
of the Year"
8pm, Hendrix Theatre
MONDAY THE 12TH
THE LOVE
SHACK
10am 2pm
Student Store Area
HIV Education and
information provided by
Peer Health Educators.
Prizes will be available.
This week's October Awareness activities sponsored by:
Office of Health Promotion & Well Being, Student Health Services, Panhcllcnic
Council, and the Dean of Students office.
mm �mm ov VHM T
Sf STUDENT UNION
HAPPENINGS
MOVIES I 8 PM HENDRIX THEATRE
Ramblin' Rose
:Mm T WED & $UN OCT 7 & 1 1
K&m
ON THE WATER FRONT
THUR, OCT 8
Citizen Kane
SAT, OCT 10
BE PREPARED TO EXPERIENCE
"LOUSY MOVIE LOCK-IN
SEE IF YOU CAN STAND THE PAIN AND AGONY.
COMING OCTOBER 30.
COFFEE HOUSE I TONIGHT
MUSICIAN
MIKE HAMER
OCT 6, 8 PM
THE UNDERGROUND
$1 ADMISSIONSTUDENT I.D.
MINORITY ARTS COMICAL LECTURE
DR. BERTICE BERRY
OCT 9, 8 PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
FREE
SPECIAL HUMP DAY TOONS
CONCERTS LUNCHT1ME CONCERT
OCT 7, 11:30 AM-1 PM
INFRONTOFMENDENHALL
NORTH CAROLINA IS MY HOME
NOV 11, 8 PM
HENDRIX THEATRE -
For More Info Call The
University Unions Program Hotline
at 757-6004
mm-mm cm o�k
-





OCTOBER 6. 1992
The East Carolinian 3
Fire safety promoted
By Shay Pierce
Staff Writer
The Environmental Health
and Safety Department is promot-
ing National Fire Prevention this
week on campus.
Today and Wednesday there
will be a booth in Wright student
store lobby. Thursday the booth
will be in the hallway of Brody's
Medical Building.
The Great Chicago Fire in-
spired Fire Prevention Week. In
1892, President Warren Harding
proclaimed the week and the Na-
tional Fire Prevention Association
adopted the idea.
Today, people across the
country hold demonstrations and
presentations to promote fire
awareness.
This educational effort to in-
form students on fire prevention
includes pamphlets, a video, a
chart on the history of ECU fires
and another charted example of
preventable tragedies that have
occurred.
With the help of Greenville
fire fighter Bobby Jackson, students
can receive education on fire ex-
tinguishers and detectors. They
are also giving away a smoke de-
tector.
Tom PohJman, the staff de-
velopment specialist of the envi-
ronmental health and safety de-
partment, said the effort is to "try
and provide an educational ser-
vice because it is probably the first
time students are having to worry
about these kinds of things Jack-
son said the presentation is for
people to "learn not to burn
As far as ECU's effort to pre-
vent fires, their are more than 1,700
extinguishers on campus and wa-
ter extinguishers are being re-
placed because of the danger of
electric shock.
The Environmental Health
and Safety Director, Herbert
Oxendine, said any fu ture excava-
tions or renovations must include
a extinguisher in every room be-
cause of new fire codes.
With this year's fire preven-
tion theme being "Test your detec-
tor sponsors hope to enforce fire
safety in dormitories as well as
homes. PohJman calls the advice
good sense because "fires won't
wake you, a detector will
Clinton
Continued from page 1
felt the race "won't even be close"
despite the recent entrance of Ross
Perot. "Perot's a nit-wit he said.
"He won't even matter
Hamill's wife, Deborah, a
school teacher at Kinston's Falkland
Elementary school, said she is ex-
cited about the changes Clinton will
make to her profession.
"Clinton will take better care
of children she said. "He's going
to improve America's educational
system and provide child care for
working mothers
Clinton's 12-minute speech,
an exciting oration about change
and energizing the young to vote,
caused several college students in
attendance to be hopeful of his
election.
Melissa Coughlin, another
ECU student, said she was "trying
to support a change She said she
agreed with Clinton's pro-choice
stand on abortion and felt the
ClintonGore ticket was more in
touch with her generation.
Coughlin said she hoped that, if
elected, Clinton and Gore would
bring about "some sort of radical
change
Not all of the students in at-
tendance were particularly politi-
cally conscious, however. Greg
Tirrell, a student employee of
WZMB radio, said he was in atten-
dance not for Clinton's speech but
for the free food.
SAM'S LOCK &
KEY SHOPPE
�Custom Design Alarm
Systems
�AAA Lock-out Service
�Install Dead Bolts
1804 Dickinson Ave.
757-0075
Student Leaders
Council of Student Organization
Leaders9 Meeting
October 6,1992
3:30-5 pm
MSC Multipurpose Room
Discuss a responsible Halloween with Mayor Jenkins
Learn how to share the Ribbon Project with your group
Network with student leaders in small discussion groups
Share your organization's upcoming programs
Receive feedback on issues facing your organization
Sponsored by StudentLeadershipDevelopmentPrograms, 757-4711
EAST COAST MUSIC & VIDEO'S
iROCKTOBER
TRIVIA CONTEST
o
s I
K U CO u
4
FREE MUSIC
FREE VIDEOS
When: Look for the Trivia Question in The East
Carolinian every Tuesday and Thurday
How. Choose the multiple choice answer of the
music and video questions. Circle the correct
answer, fill in your name, address and telephone
number, and bring the the Trivia question to East
Coast Music and Video.
Prizes: Out of the correct responses one will be
chosen before the next issue of The East
Carolinian to win a FREE CD or cassette (up to
$15.98 value) or 3 FREE video rentals.
Why: Because East Coast Music & Video wants to
be your complete music and video source.
OPEN 'TIL MIDNIGHT
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
ttiHHaj
�11121
Linsi
758-4251
r Wj
2 for 1 Video Rentals!
Rent one video at regular price and get the second for free
COUPON GOOD TODAY, OCTOBER 6, 1992 ONLY
L FREE MEMBERSHIPS
j
IN THE ARMY,
NURSES AREN'T JUST IN DEMAND.
THEY'RE IN COMMAND.
Any nurse who just wants a job can
find one. But if you're a nurs-
ing student who wants to be in
command of your own career, consider
the Army Nurse Corps. You'll be treated as
a competent professional, given your own
patients and responsibilities commensurate
with your level of experience. As
an Army officer, you'll command the
respect you deserve. And with the added
benefits only the Army can offer�a $5000
signing bonus, housing allowances and 4
weeks paid vacation�you'll be well in com-
mand of your life. Call l-800-USA ARMY
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
THIS WEEK AT THE
RoveiH
� �AH
0" C�NT DRAFT
WEDNESDAY
CLASSICS NIGHT
H I I I I�
$1.00 NIGHT
RUSH HOUR
"0" CENT DRAFT
$2.50 Teas & Bahama Mamas
504 Jello Shots � 754 Kamikazes
$1.00 Domestics � $2.50 Pitchers
50C Jello Shots � 75f Kamikazes
$2.50 Teas, Bahama Mamas & Pitchers
50c Jello Shots � 75c Kamakazes
NDAY
COUNTRTNTTE
"0" CENT DRAFT "The Best in Country
$1.25 Domestics � AllNite"
t;





4 The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 6, 1992
Cows threaten environment
By Karen Hassell
Staff Writer
The Second Annual Eastern
Carolina Environmental Confer-
ence educated local public and
private officials on recent environ-
mental regulations with guidelines
for compliance.
The conference, held Oct.1-2
at the Greenville Hilton Inn, in-
structed representatives from the
private and public sectors on the
regulations governing air, ground
water, wetlands, solid and haz-
ardous wastes and the penalties
for violating regulations.
Fed by the Beyond Beef
movement, accusations that the
cattle industry threatens the envi-
ronment, huPMn health and the
world food suph are becoming
widespread.
"Cows have replaced Com-
munism as the greatest disaster
to humans today said Janice
Faulkner, director of the ECU Re-
gional Development Institute.
"What we have is an udder di-
saster
Faulkner spoke to about 125
people during the luncheon ses-
sion onThursday.
Researchers at Washington
State University have been granted
$30,000 to study the amount of
methane gas emitted into the air
by cows, Faulkner said.
"Cows are the point source
of nearly 20 percent of methane
emissions into the atmosphere,
third after rice paddies and the
second ranking natural wetlands
Faulkner said. "Why are we trying
to save the wetlands, which are
the second ranking offender, while
we are trying to get rid of the cows,
which are only a poor third. I re-
ally like cows
Faulkner discussed the poli-
tics of the sharking business in the
United States.
In 1985, the government
urged commercial fishermen to
spend up to $250,000 to acquire
and outfit vessels suitable to catch
sharks.
After seven years of contro-
versy over the practice of sharking,
the federal government is now
urging those same fishermen to
get out of the business. However,
the government does not have
adequate scientific evidence to
confirm the practice causes harm
to the species.
On Friday, ECU geologist
Stan Riggs addressed the luncheon
session. He directed his attention
toward North Carolina's estuar-
ies.
An estuary is the mouth of a
river that is subject to tides. It is
formed because of the tendency of
most major rivers to cut their val-
leys to sea level. Estuaries contain
a mixture of fresh water from the
river and saltwater fromtheocean.
"The very nature of the eco-
nomic growth in our society ad-
versely impacts the system in
which we live Riggs said.
We must discover how we
can continue to grow economically
and maintain a resource that is
very important to our economies,
he said.
Estuaries are not the fragile
systems the public is led to be-
lieve.
"They have been here for
thousands of years and they are
characterized by change Riggs
said. "Organisms have to be tough.
"This is really not a fragile
system at all, its a damn tough
system. It's one of the toughest
ecosystems on the face of the
earth
Eastern North Carolina has
around 4,000 miles of estuarine
shoreline. Due to the rising sea
level, the shoreline is eroding at a
Sam's Trophies
COMPUTERIZED
ENGRAVING
�TROPHIES
�RIBBONS
�PLAQUES
�NAME TAGS
�PLASTIC SIGNS
�DESK NAME PLATES
�LOGOS
1804 Dickinson Ave.
I
757-13KX
FAXrSYOlHOKDKK
in concert
Ray Charles
with
rate of 3 to 5 feet per year.
"Erosion is a fact of life
Riggs said.
The conference, sponsored by
ECU center for Applied Technol-
ogy and the Pitt-Greenville Cham-
ber of Commerce, was designed to
help participants understand envi-
ronmental management rules and
to avoid costly violations.
Mayor Nancy Jenkins and
ECU Chancellor Richard Eakin
gave welcoming remarks at 9 a.m.
on Thursday.
Help Wanted
The East Carolinian is now accepting
applications for Opinion Page Editor.
Interested persons should have editorial
experience, writing samples and knowledge
of Macintosh computers. Apply at TEC
office, 2nd floor publications building.
The Raelettes
and the
Ray Charles Orchestra
Homecoming Friday
October 16, 1992
Minges Coliseum - 8 p.m.
Good seats are still available!
This program is sponsored in part by a grant from the
Pepsi-Cola Bottling Company of Greenvi�e
Contact:
The Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Phone: 919-757-4788 or,
toll free, 1-800-ECU-ARTS
ITHEl
SHEOyTUT
Corner of 9th and Washington Street
Walking Distance from Campus (3 blocks)
Men & Women's
Dress and Casual Shoes
Name Brand Athletic Shoes in All Sizes
Bass, Sperry, Topsider (Leather & Canvas)
Timberland (Hiking Boots)
Duck Shoes and Many Others (Factory Returns)
DISCOUNT SHOES SOLD
BELOW WHOLESALE
Ties From
$5.99 to $11.99
Seafood House & Oyster Bar
1 $1.00 OFF Any Meal �xcept Specials!
coupon good thru 103192uuith Student I.D.
Shrimp Plate $3.95
Trout & Shrimp Plate $4.95
Ocean Perch $4.95
Offer Good Morj-Thurs
ABC Permits
Washington Highway Take-outs Welcome
(NC33�rf)(10thSt.�xt) 7pa 9170
Greenville, NC WJI4
t. vi
4,
THE WEEK OF
OCTOBER 5 - OCTOBER 9
S.E.X.
WMEIEK
Sex EducATiON XChArviqE
Sponsored
by
USE
CONDOM
SENSE

Educate
Vourself
Ek

East Carolina University
Rape and Relationships
A Role Play & Discussion
Self Defense Workshop
with Keith Knox
S.E.X. On The Beach
with KISS 102 &
& Rec Services
Monday, Oct. 5
4:00pm MSG Social Room
Tuesday, Oct. 6
4-5:00pm MSC Room 244
Wednesday, Oct. 7
7-10:00pm Tyler Beach
Games, Music, Fun & Giveaways
RHA Representatives will be handing
out red ribbons at the Student
OrganizationBooth to show their
support for Aid Awareness.
Wear These Ribbons The Week Of Oct. 5-9
�e"





The East Carolinian

October 6, 1992
Opinion
Page 5
Perot back on the attack of voters
He's back. Yes, the man without a plan
or a platform has thrown his proverbial hat
back into the ring. Ross Perot has re-entered
the presidential election. And not a moment
too soon.
Perot's re-entry occurs at a very oppor-
tune time for him. Because he has stepped back
into the spotlight and the race within 30 work-
ing days of election day, Perot will not have to
declare how much he is spending on his cam-
paign. How convenient!
It is convenient since billionaire Perot
has numerous TV spots ready to roll, at a cost
of who-knows-what. Perot can spend what-
ever he likes to try and get elected and no one
except his accountant need ever know how
much he spends.
But beyond Perot's extravagant spend-
ing habits, there is another issue that is more
important for the American voter. In an inter-
view with Barbara Walters Friday night, Perot
said his economic plan includes an increase in
gas taxes and other "various taxes" that will
help decrease the national deficit. When Walters
asked him if he thought the American people
would mind the tax hike, Perot smiled and
said, "No, absolutely not With a raise of her
eyebrows, Walters asked him to explain his
thinking.
"I know the American voters Perot
said. "And they've said to me, 'Ross, we're
willing to sacrifice to get this country out of
JOE OF ALL TRADES
debt And they will go along with this in-
crease. We all have to suffer a little if we want
this country to get back on its feet
Perot must have some far-reaching ears
to have heard every American voter. To be
sure, there are many American voters who
don't want a billionaire like Ross Perot taking
the economic reigns of this country and raising
their taxes at will. Perot's campaign spending
will probably be through the roof (we'll never
know) so why should the American people
trust such a spendthrift with their money?
Perot wants you to believe that he is the
lesser of the three evils in the presidential race.
In fact, he wants you to believe that he's not an
evil at all, but rather the best man for the job.
But how can he be the best man when
he seemingly can't even make up his mind
whether or not he really wants to run? What if
the American people elected Ross Perot, then
suddenly in about mid-1994, he decided he'd
rather notbe president? Then the country would
be left to whoever Perot has chosen as a run-
ning mate.
Perot wants to be everyone's favorite.
He thinks he is a viable alternative to Bill Clinton
and George Bush. He thinks he can run this
country, and make it better. He also thought he
wanted to run for president, then changed his
mind, then changed it back again. What makes
the American voter think he won't change his
mind again?
By Joe tlorst
Dating game filled with lies and deceit
Yes, you, Mr. Smith, you have
won an all-expense paid trip to
that exciting land and world that
is called dating.
You will have the unequaled
pleasure and privilege of opening
yourself up to rejection, laughter,
pain, sorrow and that all-know-
ing phrase, "I just want to be
friends
You and the lady of your
choice will bedriven as ourguests
totheeatingestablishmentofyour
choice (good luck in trying to find
one with good atmosphere that's
inexpensive also). We will also
provide you with a list of estab-
lishments mat you can take your
date to after dinner, not knowing
whether or not she will think your
choice is weird and off-the-wall,
or course. But wait, there's more.
If you call now, at our toll-free
number, 1-800-WHY-DATE, you
will receive the free set of Ginzu
knives. They slice, they dice, but
do they cut? With this wonderful
partinggift, you can impress dates
that you might actually take back
to your not-so-humble abode.
Don Pardo, tell him how to
enter.
� Romance, how bitter thy
taste be.
Yeah, yeah, I know � "An-
: other column from some sexually
frustrated nerd who can't get a
date Ah ha, mink again. Now
I'm not saying that I'm the best-
iooking guy in the world, but I
think I'm above average. And I
j even go out on dates with some
regularity (Imagine mat). But my
beef is with this inane way that
I dating happens and the vast
; amount of bullshit that goes along
with it.
Where is it written (or is it
written anywhere?) that men and
women have to lie to each other in
order to impress the other one? I
mean, whenever you hear a friend
bitch about there not being any
decent guys (or girls, for that mat-
ter) anywhere, doesn't the phrase
"Honesty's the best policy" always
pop up somewhere in mat con-
versation? If that's the truth, then
why do people always get caught
in lies so often? And why do people
continue to lie even after they get
caught? Ah, the mind works in
mysterious ways.
Another gripe I have (being a
male) is the mass mind-reading
thatwomen think men are capable
of. It seems like a game that is
played (maybe Blind Man's Bluff?
or Pin the Tail on the Donkey?)
and the winner is the guy who
comes the closest to figuring out
what the woman wants or doesn't
want. But if the guy is wrong by
evena millimeter, than watch out.
There's truth to that old saying of
"Hell hath no fury like a woman
scorned
On the flip side (or female
side), guys can look you straight
in the eye and lie like a dog. Even
when caught, some of them may
still cop an innocent, puppy-eyed
look and say "Who me?" And the
ratio of lines to truth can some-
times be staggering. Ladies, if you
think mat a man is giving you a
line, chances are (and sometimes
it isn't one, mind you) that he is.
Hell, he may not even know he is
� he may actually believe it him-
self.
� Just some food for thought.
� All men are not after one
thing when they ask a girl out. Sex
may be an object at times, but it's
not always the top one on their
minds.
� Women can also have a
brain along with a body. Good
looksdoesnotautomaticallymean
that the person is mindless. As-
suming only makes an ass out of
you and me.
�If two people are supposed
to start out as friends before they
get serious together, then why do
you always hear "I just want to be
friends" when the subject of sex or
something more serious comes
up?
� How is it that women have
the power to decide whether or
not sex will happen, but if they do
men they're considered "sluts?"
� Finish the beast off.
Some sage words of advice
for the person trying to start dat-
ing either after a bad relationship
orjust anew. Don't take your frus-
trations and anger out on a person
that doesn't deserve it. If you've
got a beef with your ex-significant
other, than call them up and bitch
them out. Trust me, it'll make you
feel a whole lot better.
Don't be so worried about
what someone will think of you if
you ask them out. Cliche as it
sounds, the worst thing that can
happen is that the other person
says "no Move on and ask some-
one else. Hey, if nothing else, the
law of averages will have to catch
up with you sooner or later.
Well, this is Ann Landers, Dr.
Ruth and your friendly neighbor-
hood Spider-man all rolled up into
one signing off.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Jennifer A. Wardrep, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'I, Assistant Sports Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Deborah
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
M. Chan Lai Weedman, Layout Manager
Cori Daniels, Classified Advertising Technician
J. William Walker, Opinion Page Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
BU&U MEETS TREE
A SIDEWARDS GLANCE
By David J. Jones
Involvement is key to success in college
Get involved.
Scares the hell out of you
doesn't it? Ask someone to get
involved and they will almost al-
ways hedge or beat around the
bush, but never give you a solid
answer.
Now that I have said this, let
me tell you why I said it. Those of
you that read the paper with any
degree of regularity will remem-
ber a few weeks ago when I wrote
an article entitled We need a New
SGA President. That article got a
grand total of two written re-
sponses. No, I'm not kidding. I
write an article calling for new
SGA elections, something that will
change the whole makeup of stu-
dent government at ECU, and I
get two responses.
One of the letters wasn't even
from a student at this college. You
remember last Thursday's letter
from Mr. Patrick S. Wooden, don't
you? Even though Wooden was
obviously biased towards one of
the people that I was speaking out
against (Mark Bibbs) and privy to
information that wasn't available
to me at the time (because I had
already graduated), at least he
wrote in with his opinion. Never
mind the fact that the Chapel Hill
story had nothing to do with what
the main point of my article was
about, at least he wrote in.
The only other letter came
from Lisa Berting, SGA secretary.
When I read her letter, I still did
not feel that the actual thrust of
my article was being addressed,
but that's okay. At least she wrote
in and expressed her opinion.
Based on Wooden's and
Berting's input I decided that my
article may have been written in
such a manner that my points were
easily confused. This, of course,
makes it as much my fault as the
reader's fault.
In an effort to solve this prob-
lem, I took Berting's advice. First,
I went to the SGA's offices and
signed on. I figured I'll get to make
my voice heard in student gov-
ernment and I'll have an inside
line on what is going on here at
ECU. The second thing I did was
go to Courtney Jones' office and
speak to her concerning my ar-
ticle. At first, the meeting was an
awkward one. However, very
shortly we soon broke the ice and
discussed all sorts of current top-
ics.
The point here is that I would
have never done any of these
things if not for the input of others
concerning this article. Yes, people,
I really do read what you write
and take it to heart. If you disagree
with me, the more the better. There
is no way in this whole world that
everyone could possibly agree
with everything that I have to say.
There are at least two sides to ev-
ery story. I can only express one of
them (usually) so I need others to
write in and express the other sides
(this is what makes people mink,
get it?)
Now then, before I end this
little sermon on getting involved
and making your voice heard, I
have one other thing to say.
Did you know that there are
over 70 positions available on the
SGA? But that's nothing. Did you
know that only about 20 of those
70 positions have been filled for
this year?
No I'm not kidding, Nor am I
exaggerating, 50 (plus or minus
two or three) positions are cur-
rently available on this year's SGA
council.
Folks, this is a ridiculous state
of affairs. ECU has a record atten-
dance year (17,400) and we can't
fill all 70 positions in the SGA. Get
your collective butts out of your
rooms, march them down to
Mendenhall, upstairs to the SGA
offices and get involved. Sign your
name down and make your voice
heard.
And for crying out loud, write
me here at the paper let me know
how you feel.
For that matter, write all of us
here; we want to know what our
readers think.
Later.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Bill Clinton: savior of the American way
To the Editor:
Next month, Americans will
go to the polls to cast their ballots
for president.
However, voters should have
the knowledge necessary to make
the best informed decision. Most
Americans know George Bush's
proposals, because they are ,the
same recommendations he made
in 1988.
To make an informed deci-
sion, Americans should also know
Governor Bill Clinton's plans.
First, Clinton wants to put
millions back to work through re-
building the country's transporta-
tion system.
Also, Clinton will guarantee
health insurance to every Ameri-
can while continuing to let them
decide who their individual doc-
tor is.
Clinton plans to look for alter-
native sources of energy, particu-
larly solar energy, to preserve our
nations resources. As president,
Clinton would insure a strong
economy while not neglecting the
environment.
To pay for these programs, he
wants to raise taxes on those who
make over $200,000 a year and
force foreign companies to pay
their fair share of taxes by closing
loopholes.
Then, he will allow every col-
lege student to borrow the money
needed for college. The money can
be paid back as a small percentage
of income after the student finds a
job or chooses to work in their
community at a reduced salary as
a teacher, policeman, nurse, etc.
Finally, Clinton will guaran-
tee a woman's right to choose
whether or not to have an abor-
tion.
In 1991, Clinton's fellow gov-
ernors, Republicans and Demo-
crats alike, named him "the most
effective Governor in the nation
I know Clinton's impressive
record in Arkansas and trust him
completely to make America a
truly great nation again.
Jeff Odom
Condoms are vital in the fight against AIDS
To the Editor:
Who is this John Harris and
what are his credentials for being
a leading authority on AIDS? In
the article "AIDS Myths Create
Problems (Oct. 1) your paper
quoted this man as saying "I be-
lieve condoms are the biggest hoax
with AIDS Whata load of bull
It's that kind of irresponsible state-
ment that hurts the fight against
AIDS.
Granted, the AIDS virus is a
very serious subjectand should be
approached with facts and not
speculations! With the statement
Mr. Harris made, he pushed back
the fight against AIDS 10 years. If
students are his targeted group on
his lecture tour, then he should
get his facts straight. A majority of
students are not abstaining from
sex. This is a fact. Also a majority
are not using condoms, another
fact. Hence, the increase in the
number if students infected with
the AIDS virus. (Mr. Harris are
you paying attention?) fact: The
number of gay males using
condoms has increased. Fact: The
number of gay males infected with
the AIDS virus has decreased! (Mr.
Harris, Do you notice any correla-
tion?) He should be promoting
the use of condoms, not condemn-
ing them. Does Mr. Harris really
have any regard for the health of
today's student?
I don't think so.
L. Paige Rider
Pre-Med





�!
�in -I
� The East Carolinian
��
October 6, 1992
Page 6
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS :1 and 2 bedroom
apartments. Energy-efficient,
several locations in town. Car-
peted, kitchenappliances, some
water and sewer paid, washer
dryer hookups. Call 752-8915.
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
707C 2nd St 2bedroom Apt. 3
blocks from campus. Off Jarvis
St. Past City Market on Rt. Call
Howard 752-8114.
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Roommate needed to share a
two-bedroom town house
apartment. Rent is $160.00 a
month and 1 2 electricity. Con-
tact: Stacy Peterson- Carriage
House Apartments, Apt. 60 -
321-1532 (Leave a message.)
ROOMMATE WANTED: To
share two bedroom fully fur-
nished apartment. ECU bus
access near by. call Tim at 758-
5207.
TIRED OF YOUR PRESENT
LIVING ARRANGEMENTS?
We need a roommate to share a
large house two blocks from
campus. Large bedroom avail-
able in a big house. Lots of liv-
ing space. $144 month plus
utilities, call 830-3882 for more
information.
F( )R SALE
FOR SALE
$50.00. Call 757-3393 after
5:00pm.
FOR SALE: 50 Watt Onkyo
receiver bought this year and is
still under warranty. Will take
best offer. Call 830-9301.
HELP WANTED
BOOKTRAPER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVEN
50,000 Trims
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
! USED CD'S
HELP WANTED
DORM REFRIGERATORS
used, very good condition.
$50.00. Warsaw Pawn, War-
saw, NC (919) 293-4040.
GOVERNMENT SIEZED
CARS, trucks, boats, 4wheel-
ers, motorhomes, by FBI, IRS,
DE A. Available your area now.
call 1-800-333-3737 ext. C-5999.
1989 CAVALIER white, excel-
lent condition, 33,000 mile
$4800 756-9394 after 6pm.
KING SIZE WATERBED for
sale $125.00! Contact 758-8006
ask for Joe!
TWIN BED: mattress,
boxspring and frame. $100.00.
Call 756-3235.
HAVE UP TO 8 GRASS
PASSES for sale! Good for
ANY concert at Walnut Creek.
$20 each (neg) (This includes
the Bad Company Con-
cert).758-6180.
TICKETS Hardee's Walnut
Creek, grass passes. Guaran-
teed admittance to any show.
Must sell, price negotiable, call
758-7940.
6FT 6IN SINGLE FIN Hawai-
ian Expressions Surfboard.
$100 Call 757-3393 after
5:00pm.
DORM REFRIGERATORS:
By Sanyo. Excellent condition.
EMERGENCY! Expanding
company needs hardworking
reliable students to mail our
diet brochures from Home
Dorm! Earn up to $200 FT or
$1000 FT! Employees needed
immediately! For job applica-
tion send self-addressed stamp
envelope: Colossal Marketing,
Employee Processing, P.O. Box
291140 Port Orange, FL 32129.
"HELP WANTED" EARN
$1,500 WEEKLY mailing our
circulars Begin now FREE
packet! SEYS, Dept. 164, Box
4000, Cordova, 38018-4000.
GUARANTEED WORK
AVAILABLE Excellent pay for
EASY home based work. Full
part-time. Rush self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers
(G2) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham, NC 27705
$360UP WEEKLY. Mailing
brochures! Sparefull-time. Set
own hours! RUSH self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope:
Publishers (Gl) 1821 Hillandale
Rd. 1B-295 Durham, NC 27705
WORK AT HOME: Assembly
, craft, typing and more! Up to
$500.00 a week possible. For
information write Source; 1840-
D Simonton Road, Dept. 9108,
Statesville, NC 28677.
ATTENTION! EARN $2500
Free Trip! Students, Greeks,
Clubs earn free Spring Break
trip after selling only 8 trips at
your school! Spring Break 1-
800-678-6386.
CAMPUS REPS WANTED!
Quality vacations to exotic des-
tinations! Sell Spring Break
packages to Jamaica, Cancun,
Bahamas, Florida. Fastest way
to free travel and extra $$$$.
Call Sun Splash Tours 1-800-
426-7710.
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED for the Recreation
and Parks Dept. and Greenville
Aquatics & Fitness Center. Ex-
perience preferred. Afternoon,
evenings, and weekend hours.
For more information call
Kathleen Shank 758-6892.
EASY WORK! Excellent pay!
Assemble products at home.
Call toll free. 1-800-467-5566
Ext. 5920.
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT:
Earn $300 - $400 weekly. Day
and night shift available. No
experience necessary. Must be
at least 18 years old. Call day or
night 746-6762.
NEWNEWNEW Fairfield
Vacation Club, It's new and
exciting! We are selling vaca-
tions, it does not require a NC
Real Estate License. Commis-
sions are Fantastic! Full ben-
efits PLUS $800.00 per month
draw. Only good�No, only
GREAT salespeople apply. Sell-
ing vacations. Send references
to Cliff Hawk, Vice President
of Sales Fairfield Harbor 750
Broad Creek New Bern, NC
Proven sales background and
Positive attitude required. For
more information call 638-8011
ext. 225.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE!
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call i-800-333-3737ext. P-3712.
COURIER TO WORK PART-
TIME for busy medical prac-
tice. Make deliveries, run er-
rands, do filing, applicants
must be able to work l-5pm
Monday-Friday and have a
good driving record along with
reliable transportation. Inter-
ested applications should send
their resume or make applica-
tion at Pitt Surgical, P.A. 905
Johns Hopkins Drive, Green-
ville, NC 27834.
TUPPERWARE CONSULT-
ANT: BONUS for joining be-
tween Sept. 21 and Oct. 17.
Work your own hours! Con-
tact Joanie 752-0307 for details!
WANTED: PART TIME VAN
DRIVER. For local paratransit
agency. Perfect for college stu-
dents and anyone desiring part
time work. Seme early morn-
ing and afternoon hours as well
as mid day. Duties include op-
eration of vehicle and assis-
tance of elderly, handicapped
and disad vantaged passengers.
Expect positive attitude and
good working history and good
driving record. If interested
apply in person, at CTS Man-
agement Company, 901
Stanton Blvd Greenville, NC
27858. (EAO) Call 830-1939.
HELP WANTED
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIR-
ING - Earn $2,000month
world travel (Hawaii, Mexico,
the Caribbean, etc.) Holiday,
Summer and Career employ-
ment available. No experience
necessary. For employment
program call 1-206-634-0468
ext. C5362.
OCCUPATIONAL THERA-
PIST, Pitt County Schools.
State of North Carolina benefit
package. Choice of 10 months
or 11 months of employment.
NC License to practice OT re-
quired. Salary $2477.50
month. Contact Pitt County
Schools by Oct. 16 1717 West
Fifth Street, Greenville, NC
27834, (919) 830-4242. A A
EOE.
PERSONALS
LOST ANDFOUND
PRECIOUS LONG HAIRED
black cat lost in Hospital area.
Named "Maggie REWARD.
Call 752-9930.
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING: Error free, quick and
dependable at reasonable cost.
Excellent typing and proof-
reading skills (grammar, punc-
tuation, sentence structure,
etc.). Call Pauline at 757-3693.
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
You also get a FREE
HEADPHONE RADIO
just for calling
1-800-932-0528, Ext. 65
CHICK-FIL-A at Carolina East
Mall is looking for enthusias-
tic, hardworking people. We
offer flexible hours and good
benefits. Stop by Chik-Fil-A at
Carolina East Mall M-F or call
for appointment at 756-1838.
Ask for Abbott.
Mike Albuquerque:
It's amazing how the per-
son who sets up an event
is one of the people who
doesn't even show up to
it. How are you gonna �
explain this one, Dark
Knight?
TEC volleyball
RESEARCH INFORMATION!
Largest Library ot Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VisaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
in CaM. (213) 477-8226
Or, rush $2.00 to: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave. �206-A, Los Angles, CA 90025
PERSONALS
CONGRATULAIONS to the
Gamma Pledge class of Gamma
Sigma Sigma, Fall 1992: Missy
Bahnick, Darcy Beasly, Cindy
Briley, Amy Byrd, Jenni
Campbell, Peggy Chandler,
Kristie Daly, Candy Faircloth,
Alyssa Fountian, Katie Gaddy,
Randi Gibbons, Kimberly
Goodin, Amy Howell, Mary
Hubley, Cindy Hutchinson,
Diane Jinkens, Cherie Mont-
gomery, Julie Moore, Bryth
Paintor, Gina Pickens, Melissa
Readling, Jenny Robbins, Kelly
Scheele, Martie Smith,
Charlene Stanley, Angela
Stevenson, Beth Sullivan, Stacy
Sutton, Ann Westerfield, Kara
Williamson, Stacey Woods. We
Love you! The Sisters of
Gamma Sig.
DRIVING FROM
GREENVILLE TO
DURHAMCHAPEL HILL on
weekends: I need transporta-
tion for my son to and from
Chapel Hill. Will pay $20.00
roundtrip. 942-6509.
KAREN - We suspected you
had no fear, and now you're
Miss Belk of the year! You have
so much fun with the opposite
sex, it must be your wonderful
FLEX! Happy Birthday! Love
ya - Your Suitemates.
BONNIE HISER: Just want to
tell you to keep hanging on.
The BIG SIS Hunt will be lots of
fun! a few more days and then
you will know- who YS is as
the clues all unfold.
JULIE FISHER: I'm so excited
to have you as my little sister.
Big Sis Hunt is going to be a
blast. Guess, guess all you can,
but you'll never guess who I
am.
JENNY KULA - Only 2 more
days AAHH! Rest up! Love,
YBS.
RUSH DELTA DAN! For more
info, call Dan or Richard at 757-
1082!
BINGO to Lisa, Spiro, Heavy,
Christine, Jill and all of the other
Alpha Omicron Pi's who took
Boli's by storm Thurs. Night,
stampers and all. By the way,
who has the proverbial dollar?
Also, special thanks to Joyce
for all of her Bingo advice! Can-
dida - You made us proud!
RON, Happy 8 months, I'm so
glad we made it. Maybe now
Lynn will get the hint, Frankie
and Johnny is over. It was never
a secret, and neither is our love
and trust (get the hint!) I love
you!
TCOWENMEANY" Reveal
yourself The card was flatter-
ing and intriguing. Perhaps we
can get aquainted�or should I
say reaquainted�sometime
soon.
CONGRATULATIONS TO
Tres Allen, Charlie Ashford,
Kevin Brown, Keith Cambell,
David Eckberg, Travis Fore,
Darby Frank, Scott Freud, Brent
Hair, Scott Hair, Rich Hill, Troy
Jenson, Ryan Joyner, Ken
Kreitsell, Richie Kroboth,
Michael McGonigle, Darin Par-
PERSONALS
ish, Josh Potenza, Eric
Robinson, Mark Sipple, Adami
Steinhaver, David Warren, Ben
Weathers, Chris White and
Doug Whitlock on becoming
the Beta Omicron Pledge Class
of Kappa Sigma. The Brothers.
WE KNOW IT'S LATE but
thanks Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha
Xi Delta and Chi Omega fo.
you help during rush! The
brothers of Kappa Sigma.
ATTENTION: Alpha Xi Delta;
Ox Box, Mother Nature and
Celebrating our awesome
pledge class was a night to re-
member. Thanks for a great Pref
night. Love the Brothers and
Pledges of Kappa Sigma.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI
PLEDGES: Congrats to Marty
Eide, Mike Noland, Brian
Bums, Brad Hecox, Sam Cham-
bers, Peter Zehr, David
Burnette, Ben Spear, Scott
Agnew, Joe Givia, Reid Tingle
and Wes Craft. Stick with it.
DELTA ZETA FLAG FOOT-
BALL TEAM- You are doing
Awesome! Keep it up! Love the
sisters and pledges.
ALPHA SIG- Thanks for the
hoedown Thursday night! It's
always fun to put our boots oh
for you! Looking forward to 3
next year! Love, Delta Zeta.
HOPE EVERYONE hadablast
at the DZ Stranger Mixer! It
certainly was interesting!
THEATCHLLookingforward
to seeing you Thursday night!
Don't forget your Sombrero
Love, Tri Sigma.
KAPPA SIGMA, The scaven
ger hunt was a blast, but now
what do we do with all this
stuff You guys are one of a
kind. Thanks again, Love the.
Sigmas. I
GOTOPITTSBURG with the
pirates! Student Pirate Club is
sponsoring a trip to Pittsburgh
to see ECU play for as little as
$99! Trip includes luxury bus
ride, night at the Marriott,
Ticket to game, Social, taxes
and tips. Best deal in town. Call
757-4540 for more details. Seats
are going fast so act soon. GO
PIRATES!
FLUSH DOOKIE! See ECU kill
Duke thisSaturday! Plenty tick-j
ets still available. So call ECU
ticket office - Durham is only
an hour and a half away so BE
THERE! GO PIRATES - Stu-
dent Pirate Club.
ALBIE, Since when does Tenr
nis take precedence over Vol
leyball? Just remember
Payback is hell and what goe$
around, comes around.
TEC Volleyball Staff.
Announcements
BISEXUAL-GAY-LES-
BIAN SUPPORT GROUP
Social support and activities.
Meetings are closed. Call 757-
6766 11:00 - 12:15 Tues. and
Thurs. or 1:00 - 2:30 Wed. for
information on meeting time
and place.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray,
study God's word, be involved
in social and service projects?
Need a refuge from time to
time? Campus Christian Fel-
lowship may be what you are
looking for. Our weekly meet-
ings are at 7pm Wednesdays at
our Campus House located at
200 E. 8th St directly across
from Cotanche St. from
Mendenhall Student Center.
Everyone is welcome. For more
information, Call Tim Turner,
Campus Minister at 752-7199.
CAT I FOR ENTRIES
Deadline for Art, Poetry,
Prose Competition for the
Rebel '93 is November 4,1992.
Rules and regulations can be
picked up in the Art Building
Media Center, English Dept.
Main Desk and Rebel Offices
in the Publications Building .
All students are eligible. Cash
prizes.
RECREATIONAL SER-
VICES
A "Disc"et, A basket. Rec-
reational services will be of-
fering a Disc Golf Accuracy-
contest on Tues Oct. 6, at
3:00pm at the Frisbee Disc
course- So shine up those
frisbees and don't miss the fun!
For more informationCall 757-
6387.
UNIVERSITY STUDENT
. MARSHAL
Any student interested in
serving as a University
Marshall for the 1992-93 com-
mencement exercises may ob-
tain an application from A-12
Minges. Student must be clas-
sified as a Junior by the end of
Spring Semester 1992 and have
a 3.0 academic average to be
eligible. Return completed ap-
plication to A-12 Minges by
October 15.
ATTENTION IEWISH
STUDENTS
Yom Kippur services Tues.
Oct. 6:30pm Wed. 9:00am and
5:30pm. At Bayt Shalom - New
locations Hwy 33 E 3 miles to-
ward Grimesland.
SOCIETY FOR ADVANCE-
MENT OF MANAGMENT
On Tues. Oct. 7, there will be
a speaker. Meeting inGC 1028
at 4pm. Mr. Joe Gantz, Presi-
dent of Empire Brush will be
the guest speaker. All business
majors are invited to attend.
AFP MEMBERS
Our next meeting will be
Tues. Oct. 6,1992 at 7:00pm in
Flanagan 302. Those pledging
AED will need to meet at
6:30pm. The pledge meeting is
mandatory! Our speaker will
be Mrs. Ethel Mason, Adminis-
trator of Volunteer Services.
Our Chapter hopes to do vol-
unteer projects. So everyone
needs to attend.
P.U.S.H. THROUGH THE
BARRIERS
If you would like to work
towards reducing the architec-
tural, as well as the attitudinal
barriers that students with spe-
cial needs are faced with every
day, them come to the next
meeting of P.U.S.H. (People
United to Support the Handi-
capped). The meeting will be
5:00-6:00 on Thurs. Oct. 8 in
Cotten Hall Lobby. We will be
working on our plans for
Homecoming. Come join the
fun. Call 757-6180 for more info.
GET READY
ECU Recreational Services
is offering a Beach Horseback
Riding trip. A pre-trip meeting
will be held Wed October 7, at
5:00pm Brewster D-109. Take a
break from studying and come
out for the ride of your life! For
more info call 757-6387.
ISA
The International Associa-
tion will meet today in
Mendenhall room 212 at 5pm.
Elections to select President,
Vice-president, Treasurer and
Secretary will be held. All who
are interested are invited.
PHI FTA SIGMA
A general meeting will be
held on October 8 at 6:00pm for
all Phi Eta Sigma members. Th$
meeting place will be at
Fleming in the basement. Rer
freshments will be served. IF
you have any questions, please
contact the Vice-President at
752-5792.
STUDENT HEALTH
SERVICE
Flu vac ine will be available
at Student Health Service this
Fall If you would like to
recieve the vaccine this Fall
come by the Student" Health
Center (8am - 5pm) to sign up
and pay for the vaccine. The
cost is $3.00. October 16th is
the last day to sign up and tb
recieve the vaccine. Vaccines
will be administered October
19 through October 30.
rnPTNin wtth LOSS
Wed. from 2-3pm in 329
Wright Building. Call counsel-
ing Center at 757-6661.
1 "





The East Carolinian
October 6, 1992
Lifestyle
Watching TV with Luke Whisnant
By M. Chantal Weedman
Staff Writer
Luke Whisnant loves writing. He loves
teaching. With the publication of his first
novel, Watching TV with the Red Chinese, he
has proven tha t he can do both effectively. No
wonder he's smiling.
And he is smiling, sitting in his office,
reading D. H. Lawrence. He smiles when he
talksabouthis novel. "It's a quirky book, isn't
it?" Whisnant says. Watching 7V is a story
about Dexter "Dex" Mitchell and the three
Chinese students who live across the hall
from him in a run-down Cleveland apart-
ment building.
The characters (Chen, Tzu, Wa and Dex)
were born in Whisnant's mind in 1979, when
he lived in an apartment building in St. Louis
next to three Chinese students. Whisnant
started writing the story during the winter of
1979. "Halfway through the first draft, I be-
gan to understand that the story was trying to
be about communication and culture
InMayl982,Whisnantpublishedashort
story version of the work in Esquire. Later, a
writing teacher suggested to him that the
characters in his story could be worthy of
greater detail. Whisnant filed the thought
away, and about four years ago began revis-
ing the story and putting it into the form of a
novel.
"I felt that the characters had grown up
in my mind, and I wanted to tell the rest of
their story says Whisnant.
The maturation of the characters was 10
years in coming, and Whisnant can't really
explain why. "I wish I had a great story of
love and heartbreak or deep dark tragedy or
memanuscriptburntupinthehousefireafter
thedrugdealers shot my dog, but the truth is,
I'm not sure what happened, really
During that time, Whisnant was busy
teaching, and working on other projects, in-
cluding two other novels. "I kept coming
back to the Chinese he says, remarking that
he was pondering the changes and the trans-
formation in American society.
"The more I thought about that transfor-
mation, the more I found myself wondering
whatitwould beliketoseeitthrough the eyes
of foreigners.Chenand Tzu were those eyes
Although the story is told from Dexter's
point of view, Whisnant is quick to point out
that "the book really isn't about Dex, it's
aboutChen. Dex is what I call 'the hot charac-
ter He is a means through which I tell the
story of Chen
Chen's story is one of amalgamation to
the American way of life. As Chen discovers
the wonders of America
(mostly through American
TV), Dex discovers some of
himself through the amazed
eyes of his Chinese friends.
The story of Luke
Whisnant is, at times, as inter-
esting as the story of his novel.
After completing his
Bachelor's degree from ECU
in 1979, Whisnant went on to Washington Uni-
versity in St Louis, Mo. where he graduated
with an M.F. A. in 1982.
With two degrees in hand, Whisnant lis-
tened as the Emerald City beckoned him to
return. Heanswered thecall,joiningthe English
faculty in 1983.
Whisnant admits his first year back at ECU
was a huge adjustment. "It was very weird that
first year. I came back and I could call all the
professors by their first names
Making the adjustment from student to
faculty member had many thrills for Whisnant
"The biggest thrill when I began teaching was
going to the bookstore and seeing LUKE
WHISNANT � my name � on the textbook
tags says Whisnant with a laugh.
In the nine years since men, Whisnant has
completely adjusted to life on faculty. "It's not
weird anymore � I like where I am now
Whisnant says of teaching.
His students seem to like where he is, too.
His unique blend of conversation, commentary
and critique make his writing classes popular.
"His classes haveaveryfriendlyapproach
said a student in Whisnant's fiction writing
class. "Every class is a tight-knit group. Writing
is so personal that you need that kind of atmo-
sphere
And the personal approach is what stu-
dents get when they take one of Whisnant's
classes. The first day of class each semester,
Whisnant walks into the room and immedi-
ately gets on a first-name basis with his stu-
dents. "Hi folks. My name is Luke Whisnant.
Please call me Luke. If anyone has a problem
with that please speak up now. (no pause) OK
too late. YouTi call me Luke
The reviews of his Whisnant's book have
been very favorable. Publisher's Weekly says
Watching TV xoith the Red Chinese "introduces
Whisnant as a sort of Ford Maddox Ford of the
MTV generation and calls his work "a prom-
isingdebut" The Myrtle Beach Sun Newssays, "It
mirrors much of the rich texture of our society,
our patchwork of ethnic diversity, our light-
hearted antics, our quirks, our glories, our sor-
rows, our empathy and our lack of empathy
Whisnant is happy with the reviews, but
doesn't dwell on the success of his book. He has
Check it out
Luke Whisnant will read excerpts from
Watching TV with the Red Chinese at The Upper
Crust Bakery, Wednesday, OcL 7 at 8 p.m.
Whisnant will be joined by fellow faculty
member Pat Bizzaro, who will read poetry.
Photo by Kip Sloan
Luke Whisnant
already begun work on another novel and he
stays busy teaching.
Andasifwritinga novel and teaching was
not enough, Whisnant enjoys an occasional
downtown performance with the band MJ &
Frenz.
He plays guitar with Mark Johnson and,
well, other "frenz Whisnant even treats the
audience to an occasional vocal or two. But he
has no wish to go beyond the downtown
Greenville crowd. He smiles when he talks
about his life.
"One of the guys in the band once said to
me, 'God, Luke, wouldn't it be great to play
with the band all the time? We could be fa-
mous
I told him I really don't want to be famous.
I like my life just the way it is
(Watching TV with the Red Chinese is
available at Student Stores. It is published by
Algonquin Books and sells for $17.95.)
Page 7
ECU professor
explores black
women writers
By Bobbi Perf etti
Staff Writer
In her new book, Binding Cidtures: Black Women Writers in Africa
and the Diaspora,Gay Wilentz writes critical essays on six black women
writers.
Included in her book are
aspects of how culture is passed
and the connection between Af-
rican and American culture.
Of the six writers in this
book, three are from Africa
(Flora Nwapa; Nigeria, Efua
Sutherland; Ghana, Ama Ata
Aidoo; Ghana). The remaining
three are from the United States
(Alice Walker, Toni Morrison,
Paule Marshall).
By lookingatall six literary
works Wilentz points out that
women are the ones who pass
on culture and traditions.
"Women, in the homes,
have been the ones who have
"Women, in the homes,
havebeen theories whohave
basically imparted the cul-
ture. Women tell folk tales
to teach children how to
behave, basically, as a child
growing up
� Gay Wilentz, on her book,
Binding Cultures: Black
Women Writers in Africa
and the Diaspora
basically imparted the culture. Women tell folk tales to teach children
how-to behave, basically, as a child growing up.
"I started to notice a lot of connections between West Africa,
where I had been a Peace Corps volunteer, and parts of the South
Wilentz brings out this "connection" in her book by comparing
the three African writers to the three African-American writers. She
feels that it is important for everyone to know his or her heritage.
"The only thing they the enslaved Africans could carry with
them was their culture
Theseculturalaspectsof Africans were influenced into the Ameri-
can culture and often slave women were theones who told thestories.
This has formed the Diaspora, which can be defined as "a forced
dispersion; people who were forced out of their homeland for many
different reasons and forced into exile This includes all the cultural
retention from their home land.
There are several things that Wilentz wants people to get out of
her book. She feels it is very important for all Americans to look at the
African heritage and realize that it is partof Americanheritage as well.
She wants "people who are reading these books (such as The Color
Purple and Song of Solomon) to realize it's coming out of a tradition that
has an African base
Finally, Wilentz wants people to begin reading the African writ-
ers. She feels that there is much talent comingfrom Africa that is being
overlooked.
"It seemed like a good idea at the time is how Gay Wilentz, a
native of New York, felt about the Peace Corps. It was here that she
taught at one of the colleges in Sierra Leone, West Africa and where
her interest in African writers and culture developed.
Shecame back to theStates to get her doctorate in English and has
been teaching at ECU for six years.
Wilentz teaches a variety of undergraduate and graduate litera-
ture courses such as Women in Lit World Lit. in English and Black
Lit. She is also involved in Ethnic and Women's Studies and graduate
courses.
Whd the Chicken pose for the picture?
Wynonna shines in solo spotlight
By Elizabeth Shimmel
Staff Writer
Wynonna Judd proved to her fans
Saturday night at Walnut Creek mat she
doesn't need her mother on stage with
her to have a successful musical career.
Rivaled by her opening acts, Steve
Wariner and McBride and the Ride,
Wynonna had to prove herself as a tal-
ented musician.
It was rumored that Wariner and
McBride would steal the show, but
Wynonna performed with the same
classy flamboyance that made the Judds
famous in 1984.
Her one-encore, hour-and-a-half
show consisted of a professional show-
manship you would expect to see only a t
a rockconcert. But, somehow showman-
ship works for her.
Handing microphones to fans and
pullingthemoutoftheaudiencetodance
with her gave the show a twist � but
gave the audience thedown-to-earth feel-
ing that country music has long been
associated with.
Close to half of her show consisted
of music she once performed with her
mother, Naomi, but iier mother wasn't
necessary on Wynonna's first solo tour
to make the songs sound good.
Wynonna's raw voice with its gritty
tones made up for the absence of her
mother, who had to quit the music busi-
ness lastyear becauseof a serious illness.
Wynonna sang The Judds' firstnum-
ber one record, "Mama He'sCrazy and
then thanked the audience for making
The Judds' career a success.
The rest of her show contained ev-
ery song from her new album, entitled
"Wynonna and proved that talent can
be hereditary.
Her solo album is an excellent mix of
country music that sounds as if it's been
mixed with rock and blues music prov-
ing that talent can be hereditary.
The end of her concert gave her
back-up singers a chance to show off
while singing "Live With Jesus The
three singers who had been standing
above Wynonna throughout the concert
descended from their perch on a gold
staircase.
Their voices resembled Aretha
Franklin's as the gospel sound of the
music was enhanced by solos from all
See Judd, page 8
Comedian Don Reese performs at Coffeehouse
Courtesy Catherine Walker
Visiting artist Catherine Walker has several prints and drawings currently on
exhibit at the Sumner School Museum & Archives in Washington, D.C The East
Carolinian apologizes to Walker for the inadvertant printing in the Oct 1 issue
of a picture doneby Julie Mitchell.
By Pamela Revels
Staff Writer
Comedian Don Reese's performance
at The Coffeehouse Sept. 29 illustrated a
twisted senseofhumorthatexplored the
funnier aspects of reality.
Reese, who is both tall and bald,
sported a jean jacket, black biker boots
and an earring. He opened with a joke
about his intimidating appearance, sug-
gesting that he nad just made bail and
was related to The Addams Family's
Uncle Fester.
When he asked the audience if any-
one drank, he got thundering applause.
His next question was if anyone had ever
had a really bad drinking experience �
one where a whole weekend gets lost.
Still moreapplauseThat'slikeaskingif
you people breathe he responded.
Reese continued with topics such as
bad airplane trips, a visit to the urologist
and bus journeys with "who's-who in
mental illness For the bus trips he
suggested thatall that is needed to keep
the crazies away is a copy of Helter
Skelter and a highlighter. His perverse,
but honest humor kept the audience
rolling.
Reese then used his creative wit to
addcomicdimensiontoeverythingfrom
the mammoth size of bugs in the South
to the annoyance of traffic cops with
eight-battery flashlights.
When asked how he got his start in
comedy, Reese revealed that his interest
was sparked by various comedians,
Robert Klein being his favorite. Reese's
first performance took place at an open-
mike night, where he admits that he
cheated a little. "I got about 15 of my
friends to come and sit in theaudience
he said.
After thathe began opening forother
comedians, and was soon landing his
own performances. Since then, this co-
median from Iowa has performed on
MTV's "Half Hour Comedy Hour" and
A&E's "Comedy on the Road as well
as at various clubs and colleges.
Mostof Reese's material comes from
personal observations and experiences,
and he tries to avoid offensive jokes. "I
don't do anything sexist or racist
Inevitably, peoplesometimesdoget
offended. Reese admits that he has had
hisshareof problems withhecklers. "The
worst ones are the ones that are so drunk
that they can't even form words. They
don't even know what they're saying
Other than that, he admits that he
has good nights and bad nights. "I don't
consider myself naturally funny. Com-
edy is something you have to work at,
just like everything else





ii
8 The East Carolinian
Comedy show to
deliver message
OCTOBER 6, 1992
By David Jones
Staff Writer
What do you get when you
cross a Ph.D. in Sociology with a
comedian? Well, if you are Bertice
Berry you get a comedy show that
delivers a message that everyone
will remember. Berry will appearat
ECU on Oct. 9.
While teaching at Kent State
University, Berry's lectures became
so popular that larger classroom
facilities were soon needed to con-
tain all the attending students.
She would still be teaching to-
day if it were not for the words of
comedian Mike Veneman. He was
pursuing a Ph.D. also and had the
opportunity to take one of Berry's
classes. Veneman told Berry that
she should change careers and go
into comedy. Berry's initial reply to
this idea was that she was a scholar
and not a comedian.
That idea changed when she
won $50 at a local comedy contest.
Word soon spread and Berry sud-
denly found herself on the receiv-
ing end of offers from all over the
country. Berry's fellow professors
criticized her for doing stand-up
comedy, but she decided comedy
reached more people who under-
stood her message.
"Sociology looks at the every-
day mundane and points out the
obvious Berry said. "Comedians
do the same thing, only they make
light of it Once Berry realized that
she had the gift of comedy, the rest
was just a matter of getting material
together and hitting the road.
While taking her job very seri-
ously, Berry always shows the
lighter side of a situation. In de-
scribing her own life Berry says,
"My name is Bertice Berry, and I
recently earned a Ph.D. degree. Now
I'm Dr. Bertice Berry. Ten years and
$1(X),CXX) later, I'm doing stand up
corned v. Mv mother's real proud of
me
Berry says that she purposely
stays away from any form of pro-
fanity in her shows. She believes
that this makes her shows more
acceptable to the general publ ic and
the whole point of going on tour is
to reach peopleand not beexclusive
to segments of society.
Along with her comedy tour-
ing, Berry enjoys a variety of "off
duty" activities. She enjoysaerobics,
dancing and vegetarian restaurants.
For more information, contact
Sandra Garcia of the Minority Arts
Committee.
TH� N�W D�U
1 ROT�D
V�GGI� SANDWICH
GA�NVIU� TIMES RCflDCRS' POll
Doily Lunch Specials
� mmmi pi� �-w�pw
$3.90
includes Sandwich, Chips & Drink
Mon - Thur
11 - 2:30
Friday
11 - 6:00
5i3COTCH�STR��T
758-0080
Judd
Continued from page 7
three of the singers. Wynonna asked
for an Amen from the crowd when
the revival-type song was over.
She started her encore with her
current hit off the new album, "No
One Else On Earth" and ended it
with "It's Never Easy to Say Good-
bye also from her solo album.
Wynonna thanked the crowd
for making her feel welcome on her
first solo stop in North Carolina,
and made references to stopping
here again before she and her band
left the stage.
We are sorry to Inform our readership that WZMB has
kicked The East Carolinian's azz In the annual volleyball
game. Though a massive struggle ensued, efforts were In
vain. Special thanks to Andy, Rob, Bob, Joe, Matt, Mike and
Claudette for showing up. A special TECovatlon to Michael
Albuquerque for his undying support to his workplace.
DNESDAY
NIGHT
00 DRAFT
$1.25 Tall Boys
$1.00 Kamikazes
$1.00
ADMISSION
FOR WEDNESDAY 10792
Prespntjhisjcouponqt Ih� door
M
ake this fall break an advert
hire with Recreational
Services. BACK-
PACK with us A
along the Appa-
lachian Trail In
the Jefferson j
National For-
MOUNT
ROGERS NA-
TIONAL RECRE-
ATION AREA In the
southwestern section
Virginia Is the setting for
day excursion. You'll enjoy breathtaking
atpine scenery and the panarama of valleys below. A variety of
wildlife roam the forests. Interested Individuals must REGISTER
through the RECREATIONAL OtrtTJOoR CENTER I.OCATEft tN 11?
CHRlSTENBtJRY GYM ReEORE FRIDAY, OcToRER 16. A pre trip
meeting will be held Monday, October 19 for all registered partlcl
pants. The COST of this BACKPACKING ADVfeNTtrRE tS $65 FOR
STtDENTS A $7$ FOR FACfjtTYsTAFF. Cost Include: transports
lion, equipment, food and all camping fees. For more details, call
the ROC at 757 6911.
Tonight Come Celebrate
PPT
Pizza, Pasta & Tacos from 8-9:30
Greenville
4l
Tuesday Night
$1.75
HIBALLS & DOMESTICS
Best Mix of Top 40, Dance & Rock'N'Roll
No Cover Prior to 9:30 pm
Doors Open at 8:00
OCT.
5th
thru
OCT.
10th
1992
ncssac
p-ALL THIS WEEK 5� sduTH!
1992 EXHIBITS
s
S
s
s
MAIN EXHIBIT BUILDING: Agricultural and Commercial. Eastern Carolina
shows off its regional pride by displaying its bountiful AGRICULTURE,
flourishing INDUSTRY, quality EDUCATION and SCIENCEI
SWINE BUILDING: Pitt and surrounding counties will show off their hogs
and other small farm animals.
Plus: Mon Oct. 5,7:00 P.M. - Market Hog Show
THE NEW SHEEP AND LAMB EXHIBIT BUILDINGI
Wed Oct. 7,7:00 P.M. � Pitt County Lamb Show
Sat Oct. 10,12 Noon - Open Lamb Show - Includes all
EASTERN CAROLINA
CATTLE BUILDING � See our NEWLY CONSTRUCTED 50' x 150'
CATTLE and HORSE exhibit building. Housing the area's finest CATTLE
STEERS &H0RSESI
OPEN HEIFER SHOW
Saturday, Oct. 10 3:00 p.m.
FARM MUSEUM: The finest exhibit of its kind in the South! Twenty
buildings filled with nostalgia, including a 500 horsepower, 1915 industrial
steam engine. A Must Seel
THE 1992 MIDWAY:
AMUSEMENTS OF AMERICA will again bring to GREENVILLE a thrilling,
mighty, Midway of 35-40 rides and shows. BIGGEST MIDWAY EAST OF
RALEIGH for 9 years! MOTION, MIRTH, MUSIC and MEMORIES!
BUNGEE JUMPING EVERY NIGHT
1992 FREE ATTRACTIONS
CHILDREN OF ALL AGES will enjoy the Bob Jones Petting Zoo and
Circus Menagerie sponsored by Domlnos Pizza of Greenville. A grand
collection of animals to see, touch and feed! This great family hit is back by
popular demand! ALL WEEKIFREEI Main Midway. (There will be a small
charge tor pony and camel rides.)
THE BEARS ARE BACKI Remember those lovable monster bears from
the 1989 & 1990 fairs? Well, they're back! TEN POLAR, BROWN and
EUROPEAN BLACK BEARS � THE RIX BEAR SHOW is here again.
Largest traveling Bear Show in the world. Tuesday thru Saturday - 3 shows
nightly � INDEPENDENT MIDWAY. Brought to you by GARRIS EVANS
LUMBER CO.
STUNT THRILLS scream your way when Hollywooo oijnt World brings
all New 1992 Toyotas to Delight and Excite you! Brought to you this year
by GREENVILLE� TOYOTA and WASHINGTON� TOYOTA love
what you do for me. This is the ninth consecutive year for this stand
packed thriller. Plus the MAD MONSTER CAR CRUSHER concludes
each show roaring away - crushing cars flat! FREE SHOWS Thurs. and
Sat. at 7:00 P.M. at the Grandstand.
First time at a North Carolina Fair is the new BARNYARD FOLLIES!
Watch "MILKY PEARL the cow; "DONKEY GRITS the donkey and
"SERGEANT SAUSAGE" the pig sing, dance and talk to you through
ANIMALTRONICS. FAMILY ORIENTED and HILLARIOUS! All Week.
INDEPENDENT MIDWAY, brought to you by COCA COLA BOTTLING
CO. of Greenville.
ALL SMILES: Folk Festival featuring the Buck Swamp Cloggers
returning for their 5th Consecutive year! We had hundreds of requests for
this great show and thank Hooker & Buchanan and Turnage Insurance
Agency for the sponsorship. Mon. and Fri. 7:30 P.M. FREE on the Main
Midway!
WEDNESDAY NIGHT IS WRESTLING NIGHT at the Fair! 1 Hour of
wrestling featuring CHIEF WAHOO MCDANIEL, a top notch girl match and
others. 4 matches in all. A fun filled time at the GRANDSTAND.
Wednesday only, 7 p.m.
The old 1910 CAROUSEL ORGAN will belt out Midway Music on the Main
Midway all night every night again this year, as well as the GIANT
GERMAN FAIRGROUND ORGAN, built in Germany in 1900! Sponsored
by HOME BUILDERS SUPPLY CO of Greenville.
GENERAL ADMISSIONS
Adults $3.00 � Kids free with school pass until 6:00 p.m. - Kids $2.00
at night & Saturday.
Mon Oct. 5 through Thurs Oct. 8. These are OPTION NIGHTS.
Wristbands are for sale Inside the gate for $8.00 or you may purchase
straight ride tickets.
Tues Oct. 6 Only�This is Coca-Cola or Domlnos Pizza day and night.
Get a coupon from any store where Coca Cola is sold or from a Domlnos
Pizza delivery and get1,00 off gate admission!
Sat Oct. 10�Wristbands on sale Inside gate until 4:00 p.m. honored
"mm HWY 264 EAST

S
College Night - Thursday, Oct. 8�ECU &
Pitt Community College Students
Admitted for $1.50 with Student IDI
Senior Citizens Day - Wed Oct. 7 � All
senior citizens free 1-3 P.M.
PIH COUNTY FAIR
Eastern Carolines Greatest REGIONAL Exposition!
Sponsored by the American Legion Posts of Greenville, Farmville Aydtn
pjgm ma �MMfmagp �





OCTOBER 6. 1992
The East Carolinian

Sports
Page 9
Tribe upends Pirates, 3-1
By Bob Owens
Staff Writer
The East Carolina soccer team
suffered from the "rainy day blues"
Sunday, Oct. 4, in a 3-1 loss to Colo-
nial Athletic Association foe Wil-
liam and Mary.
With this lost, the Pirates are
now facing a 2-6 overall and 0-3
CAA overall record.
The Tribe, ranked 23rd in the
nation, seemed impotent through
the first 25 minutes of the contest,
managing only a few ineffective
runs of the goal that the Pirates
easily turned away.
At the same time, ECU
mounted several attacks on Wil-
liam and Mary's goal that led to
, shots that narrowly missed their
mark.
William and Mary finally
scored when an ECU defender com-
mitted a foul inside the box, en-
abling Eric Dumbleton to drill a
penalty kick into the net with 29
minutes gone by.
Bill Owens put the Tribe up 2-
0 when he found himself open in
frontof the ECUgoal and connected
on the shot 41 minutes into the
match.
Despite the steady rain which
had turned the field into a shallow
lake, the Pirates pressed the attack.
Kelly England fired a shot into the
Tribe box that rebounded to Pirate
Justin Finck. Finck fed the ball to
charging Marc Mullin, who sank
the shot past William and Mary
goalkeeper Scott Budnick to put the
score at 2-1 with two minutes re-
maining in the half.
Only five minutes into the sec-
ond half, William and Mary's Jon
Kamera found an open route be-
tween Pirate defenders, and put the
ball in thenetpastECUgoalieBryan
DeWeese to put the Tribe up 3-1.
ECU never gave up hope, and
atone point the Pirate attack stayed
in the William and Mary half of the
field for five minutes.
A wet ball and extensive
puddles that had formed around
the Tribe goal hampered Piratepass-
ing, cutting down scoring opportu-
nities for ECU. The shots taken by
the Pirates were quickly cleared by
a stingy Williamand Mary defense.
The contest see-sawed for the
remainder of the match, but the
wet, windy weather and a much
more experienced Tri be tea m even-
tually wore down the Pirates, who
suffered their third CAA confer-
ence loss of the season.
East Carolina will return to ac-
tion Oct. 10 against Charleston
Southern in Charleston, S.C. The
next CAA match for East Carolina
will be Oct. 14, when ECU travels to
Fairfax, Va to play George Mason
University.
Men's basketball
�SI
schedule released
Sports Information Department
Eight games against squads
involved in post-season competi-
tionhighlightthel992-93EastCaro-
lina University men's basketball
schedule, released Thursday by
school officials.
ThePirates will host UNC Char-
lotte in Minges Coliseum on Dec. 8
and travel to Alabama on Feb. 1.
The 49ers won the Metro Confer-
ence Tournament title and played
in the NCAA Tournament last sea-
son. UNCC will make its first visit
to Minges since Jan. 2,1984, when it
defeated the Pirates, 67-57.
The Crimson Tide lost to Ken-
tucky in the finals of the Southeast-
em Conference Tournament last
season and advanced to the second
round of the NCAA Tournament.
The Tide and the Pirates have met
on the hardwood just once, with
Alabama winning, 99-86, on Dec. 7,
1974 in Tuscaloosa, Ala.
ECU's six remaining games
against teams in post-season com-
petition are versus Colonial Ath-
letic Association opponents. The
Pirates have home-and-home
games with CAA champion and
NCAA participant Old Dominion
and NITand participantsRichmond
and James Madison.
The Pirates open their season
on Dec.l against St. Andrews in
Minges Coliseum. The CAA opener
is on Jan. 9 in Harrisonburg, Va.
against James Madison.
EastCarolina will also play Vir-
ginia Tech and Tennessee Tech on
a home-and-home basis this sea-
son. ECU will play in Blacksburg,
Va. on Jan. 2 with the Hokies mak-
ing a return trip on Feb. 18. ECU
hosts TennesseeTech on Dec.l2with
the Golden Eagles hosting the Pi-
rates on Dec. 30.
The Pirates will also compete
in the Toledo MVP Classic on Dec.
18-19. ECU playsSoutheastem Loui-
siana in the first round while host
Toledo plays Texas-Pan American.
East Carolina will also be on
the CAA-Home Team Sports tele-
vision package in two regular sea-
son games. The Jan. 30 game at
UNC Wilmington and the Feb. 15
game at American will be televised
on Home Team Sports.
This season, ECU will play two
exhibition games in Minges Coli-
seum. The Pirates will host the Cu-
ban Junior Nationals on Nov. 23
and the Kentucky Crusaders on Dec.
5.
All home games in Minges
Coliseum are scheduled to start at 7
p.m. unless changed for television.
Ruggers yet to
lose in conference
By Richard J. Hooton III
Staff Writer
On Saturday, East Carolina continued its unbeaten season by
defeating the Duke Blue Devils 22-8 in conference rugby action.
The Pirates started quickly with Sean Miller blasting up the right
sideof thepitchand passingto Michael Culligan who trotted 15meters
for the first try of the day. Richard "Opie" Moss missed the kick after,
makingit5-0.Then the Blue Devils came back and converted a penalty
kick which put them down by only two points, 5-3.
The rest of the half was controlled by each team's defense.
Leading the Pirates aggressive defense was Ross Marshall and Jason
Webb as they continuously prevented the ball from being cleanly
giventothe scrum and flyhalf.ThePiratesgotanoverloadon the wing,
and it was Culligan's turn again as he scored on a scamper down the
right side. This, combined with a Moss kick, made the score 12-3 at
halftime.
See Ruggers, page 10
1992-93 EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
MEN'S BASKETBALL SCHEDULE
DAU
(Mon) Nov.23
(Tue) Dec. 1
(Sat) Dec. 5
(Tue) Dec. 8
(Sat) Dec. 12
(Fri-Sit) Dec. 18-19
Dec. 18
Dec. 19
(Tue) Dec. 22
(Wed) Dec. 30
(Sat) Jan. 2
(Mon) Jan. 4
(Sat) Jan. 9
(Mon) Jan. 11
(Sat) Jan. 16
(Mon) Jan. 18
(Thu)Jan.21
(Mon) Jan. 25
(Wed) Jan. 27
(Sat) Jan. 30
(Mon) Feb. 1
(Sat) Feb. 6
(Mon) Feb. 8
(Sat) Feb. 13
(Mon) Feb. 15
(Thu)Feb.l8
(Sat) Feb. 20
(Wed) Feb. 24
(Sat) Feb. 27
(Sat-Mon)
March 6-8
QEEQNEM
CUBAN JUNIOR NATIONALS( Exh.)
ST. ANDREWS
KENTUCKY CRUSADERS (Exh.)
UNC CHARLOTTE
TENNESSEETECH
at Toledo MVP Classic (at Toledo)
East Carolina vs. Southeastern Louisiana
Toledo vs. Texas-Pan American
Consolation Game
Championship Came
at Colorado State
at Tennessee Tech
at Virginia Tech
at Appalachian State
at James Madison
at Richmond
AMERICAN
GEORGE MADISON
FLORIDA ATLANTIC
at Old Dominion
WILLIAM U MARY
at UNC Wilmington (HTS)
at Alabama
JAMES MADISON
RICHMOND
at George Madison
at American (HTS)
VIRGINIA TECH
OLD DOMINION
at William & Mary
UNC WILMINGTON
Richfood-CAA Tournament
(at Richmond, Va.)
Cross country
splits, Connolly
leads Pirates
Sports Information Department
Photo by Dall Ro.d � TEC
Hands above the rest. The 199293 Pirate Hoopsters will be tipping
their way through the CAA. Read The East Carolinian for all the scores.
HOME GAMES ALL IN CAPS
Times are Eastern and Subject to Change
��Colonial Athletic Association Came
The ECU cross country team completed Saturday's race
with an even split in a three-team race. Both the men and
women beat Towson State but lost to Richmond in overall
scoring.
ECU sophomore Sean Connolly continued his streak of
leading the team's scoring with 2150, good for second place
overall. Senior Tony Chadwick placed second for ECU and
sixth overall at 2235.
Connolly's time tied the old course record, but
Richmond's Justin Geisal, the meet's top scorer, set a new
course record with 21:20.
"Richmond really ran great today Assistant Coach
Charles JusrJcesaidWedid not havean outstanding perfor-
mance, and that is what we needed to beat them on their
home course
Stacy Green led the Lady Pirates at 19:30 as the second-
place scorerdespitenursinga twisted ankle. She also twisted
it again prior to the race. In spite of that, she went out and ran
a solid race but was unable to run aggressively on the hills
Justice said the hilly course was a factor which affected
the Pirates' performance on Saturday.
"The course was hard for us to prepare for he said.
"There is just no where around here (in Greenville) for us to
simulate those kind of conditions
Despite what he believes was a disappointing showing
for the Pirates, Justice does not want a race like this to
overshadow the team's season.
"The bottom line is what we do at the conference he
said. "That's ultimately how we will judge out season
MEN'S RACE (4.1 miles)
Top Individuals
1. Justin Geisal, UR 21:20
2. Sean Connolly, ECU 21:50
3. Keith Owen, UR 21:56
4. RichSciara, UR 22:13
5. Keith Scott, UR 22:56
Ladies win one
of f our at Furman
University
Sports Inform.it' in Department
See Cross Country, page 10
On the first day of the Furman Invitational, the Lady Pirates
took on the College of Charleston and Furman University.
The College of Charleston beat ECU in four games�15-10,
3-15,12-15,6-15. As a team, ECU finished the match with51 kills,
67 assists and 47 digs.
Senior Wendy Schul tz led the Pirate of fense wi th 23 kills ou t
of 40 attempts. Schultz also led the team with 17 digs. Jenny
Parsons, ECU's top setter, had 55 assists.
Against Furman, the Pirates lost in five�15-11,3-i5,15-13,
12-15,9-15.
"We played the best we've played all year Head Coach
Martha McCaskill said. "We deserved to win but we just had
some bad breaks. We've got to make those breaks work for us,
not against us
Schultz had 20 kills while freshman Melanie Richards
added 15. Parsons racked up 58 assists. Defensively, Schultz
had 18 digs.
After the first day of the Furman Invitational, ECU's tour-
nament record stands at 0-2 while their overall record moves to
4-9.
"We're hanging in there McCaskill said. "We're sad that
we couldn't be on the winr.ing side of things but the girls will be
ready tomorrow
Day two of the Furman Invitational saw ECU slipped their
two games. Against UNC-C the Pirates lost in three straight �
8-15,2-15,0-15. As a team, ECU finished the match with 27 kills,
23 assists and 30 digs. Individually, Parsons led with 19 assists,
Schultz and Richards racked up seven kills each and Schultz
also led the defense with 12 digs.
ECU was able to come back from their loss and claim a win
against Mercer in three straight �15-8,15-3,15-8. ECU's team
totals weremuch improved. The teamhad45 kills, 43assists and
45 digs. Schultz had 16 kills and Parsons had 35 assists. Defen-
sively, Leigh Wilrox came up with 11 digs.
At the completion of the Furman Invitational, ECU's tour-
nament record stood at 1-3 and their overall record moved to 5-
10.
After a three game road stint, the Lady Pirates bring their
play back home tonight when they take on UNC-Creensboro,H
7 p.m.
UME
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
9 p.m.
7 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
1p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
730 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7p.m.
7:35 p.m.
7 p.m.
2 p.m.
830 p.m
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7.30 pm.
730 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
730 p.m.
7 p.m.
TBA
Photo by Dall HMd � TEC
ECU
IT
All eyes were on the Lady Pirates this past weekend at the Furman Invitational
salvaged one victory during the two dav, four match competition.





r'�tV.
10 The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 6, 1992
Ruggers
Continued from page 9
Cross Country
Continued from page 9
After halftime, East Carolina
mounted an attack that the Blue
Devils could not repel. The ruggers
were relentless as they forced the
ball up the field and settled for three
points as Moss made a penalty kick
from 25 meters out.
The Duke team had several op-
portunities toscore,but werequickly
denied by the hard hitting of K.G.
Moore and Casey Craig. The com-
bined efforts of Moore and Casey
caused the Blue Devils several times
tocommiterrorsbymishandlingthe
ball, and turning it over to the
unstoppable Pirate pack.
The Pirates' most exciting play
of the day began 10 meters away
from the Duke try zone. They de-
cided to forget the finesse of their
wing, the speed of their wing-for-
wards and simply let the pack drive
the Duke pack back into their own
try zone with brute force.
The drive was led by locks Bob
"Homer" Thomas and Jay KeUer.
When the 'jail crossed the try line,
Chris Carney simply fell on the ball
for the Pirates' last score of the day.
Moss' attempt-after was dead cen-
tered the score stood at 22-3. Duke
came back in theclosingfiveminutes
and scored the first try against East
Carolina in three matches.
East Carolina's "B" side had
some difficulty in their match with a
strong Duke team. The match will
not count due to shortage of players
on the Duke team which were filled
by tiie substitutes from the Pirates'
bench.
East Carolina is favored in the
state tournament again this year,
boasting an average 30 plus points a
match while giving up a slim four.
ThePiratesareoff this weekend,
but will resume play next week
against North Carolina State.
Other ECU MenFinisrlersECU Women Finishers (3.1)
(4.1 miles)2. Stacy Green 19:30
6. Tony Chadwick22:357. Marianne Marini 20.02
9. Mark Ma this23:010. Cathnne Norstrand 20:25
11. Rod. Williams23:1313. Jessica Montgomery 20:50
16. Eric Adamski23:4414. Susan Hu 21:12
22. Mikejolley24:0118. Kelly Hanna 22:10
25. Chris O'Shields24:4019. Theresa Marini 22:21
26. Stacey Cochran24:5827. Gretchen Harley 23:19
Men's Scores
1. Richmond 20 (1,3,5,7)
2. ECU 38 (2,6,9,10,11)
1. ECU 18 (1,2,3,5,7)
2. Towson State 37 (4,6,8,9,10)
Women's Scores
1. Richmond 20 (1,3,4,6,9,10)
2. ECU 33 (2,6,8,10,11)
1. ECU24 (1,3,4,7,8)
2. Tomon State 31 (2,4,6,9,10)
oj
� ��
UDZllH
JEROME RAMEY
ATTORNEY AT LAW
�Bankruptcy
�Personal InjuryAuto Accidents
�Worker's Compensation
�Traffic ViolationsDWI
�General Civil Matters
FREE CONSULTATION IN MOST MATTERS
401 W. First Street - Suite 1-G - Greenville, NC 27834
752-9959
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
Adult
Entertainment
Center
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female
"Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers
CASH PRIZE
Contestants need to be there by 8:00. Competition is from 9 to 11:00.
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
gMyerBullgt's. FemaJeJ'ExQtJs'lDsrKK
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
I
I $2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Open Tuesday-SaturdayDoors Open 7:30pm
! EBSMi Stage Time 9:00pm
I ESE23p Call 756-6278
I
3P
5m
SlWiHCf
Plotdngon Av.
Strmtout out at SSSSiSSS 5 mi� n I nrlm .��;� ISE
Valid N.C. I.D. Required
WHO C0ULDNT
USE SOME
THORN APPLE VALLEY (4-6-LB. AVC.)
Whole Boneless
Turkey Ham
lb.
m
"IN THE DELI-PASTRY SHOPPE
Single Topping
Deli Pizza
� 11-irF
Mm M-02.W
70 SHEETS PER ROLL 2 PLY
viva
Paper rowels
SinglM x
RolilmwW
LIGHT ICE MILK OR
Breyers
ice Cream
2 s5
Mm V2-GalMB
WITH PRICES LIKE THIS . . . WHY SHOP ANYWHERE ELSE!
Colgate
Shave cream
13.2-OZ
Bonus
Can
TV
VIET
CAFFEINE FREE DIET PEPSI, MTN. DEW,
Diet Pepsi or
Pepsi Cola
2-ltrJmW
COPYRIGHT 1992 - THE KROGER CO ITEMS AND
PRICES GOOD SUNDAY, OCT 4 THROUGH SATUR-
DAY, OCT 10, 1992 IN GREENVILLE WE RESERVE THE
RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES NONE SOLD TO
DEALERS.
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY Each of these advertised items
is required to be readily available for sale in each Kroger
Store, except as specifically noted in this ad. If we do run
out of an advertised item, we will offer you your choice of
a comparable item, when available, reflecting the same
savings or a raincheck which will entitle you to purchase
the advertised item at the advertised price within 30 days.
Only one vendor coupon will be accepted per item
purchased
f�it�r.�
. HISTORIC NEW BERN, NC
STREET FESTIVAL ArtiCrafts, Foods, Live entertainment, children's games Saturday
TRYON PALACE GARDENSlOpen free to the public Friday, Saturday and Sunday
QUILT SHOW hidav, Saturday and Sunday
OKTOBERFESTlLittie German Band, German Food. Friday Evening
POOLSIDE OANCE "Chairman of the Board" Live at the Sheraton. Saturday Evening.
NEW BERN FALL BOAT SHOW ll'owr and Sail Friday, Saturday ;ind Sunday
l-�'
I U.S. (OAST GUARD I Vessel open for tour - Saturday and Sunday
1 TWIN RIVERS YMCAl Exhibitions, Gymnastics and Volleyball Tournament
IATTMORE OLIVER HOUSE MUSEUM pRIsaturdav only
585 J
Sponsored by SWISS BEAR DOWNTOWN REDEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
in cooperation with TRYON PALACE HISTORIC SITES & GARDENS,
and other local organizations. For more information, call 919.638.5781

Wednesday. October 7
4 For Wednesday
$4 At The Door For
All The Draff You Can Drink
9 pm - 1 am
Thursday. October 8
Rear Window
Recently Opened For Hootie & The Blowfish
HOURS
Mon&Tues 11am-3pm 51 3 Cotanche St
Wed 11am-3pm &9pm-1am located across from UBE
Thurs&Fri 11am-1am -7 rr o cCQfy
Sat 9pm-1am OO-UUbU
SPECIALS
MONDAY
12 Price Pitchers
95Draft
TUESDAY
$1.25Sansrias
WEDNESDAY
$1.25 Mexican Imports
THURSDAY
$2.50 Margaritas
12
521 COTANCHE ST
757-1666
SunWed
PRICE
APPETIZERS 9:00 PM -12:3� m
CATCH ALL THE GAMES WITH US!





Title
The East Carolinian, October 6, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 06, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.899
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy