The East Carolinian, October 1, 1992






SK3
jEj
Opinion
Lose or Choose
The real promise for change in this
country's stagnant political era lies
within the American voter.
Seepg. 4 for story.
The Hard Rock
Tower
Can you conquer your fears?
See pg. 9 for story.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 11
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, October 1,1992
10 Pages
Weapons incidents
on campus increase
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
The campus police have en-
countered an increasing number
of incidents involving weapons
over the last two years.
Last year, an ECU student
was shot by another student in
Garrett Hall when one of the stu-
dents was showing off his 9 mm
pistol. Also, non-students have
been stopped on campus and dis-
covered with weapons in their
possession.
"Weapons of any sort are
illegal on college or university
property said Ronald Speier,
dean of student life.
Along with a university
policy forbidding the possession
or use-of firearms, a North Caro-
lina General Statute exists that
also makes possession unlawful.
According to N.C.G.S. 14-
269.2, "it shall be unlawful for
any person to possess, carry,
whether openly or concealed, any
gun or any other weapon of
like kind" on property controlled
or owned by a university.
Weapons listed in the stat-
ute include BB and pellet guns,
nitroglycerine, springloaded pro-
jectile knives, detonators and
fuses for explosion of TNT, leaded
canes, brass knuckles and mar-
rial-arts related weaponry.
Students enrolled inarchery
classes may possess arrows, but
they must inform their residence
hall advisor prior to storing them
in their room.
Campus property includes
all of ECU's main campus, the
medical school, hospital grounds
and other buildings in Greenville,
such as the Chancellor's house,
that are ECU-controlled.
The Department of Public
Safety has jurisdiction over the
ECU campus as well as 10th and
Fifth streets in Greenville,
"We have joint jurisdiction
with other law enforcement agen-
cies over any streets that are ad-
joining campus said Chief Ron
Avery of Public Safety.
Any individual stopped on
campus and found in possession
of a weapon can be subject to
disciplinary actions including,
but not limited to, a fine, commu-
nity service andor suspension
See Weapons, page 3
Brits, Americans square off
for Quiz Bowl championship
By Chas Mitch'l
Staff Writer
No controversy, no heated
discussion and no upset competi-
tors. This time.
On Saturday, the Student
Union Committee held it's an-
nual All-Campus College Bowl
at Mendenhall Student Center.
This year's field of teams con-
sisted of a myriad of students.
With nine teams competing for
top honors, the championship
matched featured No. 1 Pick-Up
verses Eureka.
Last semester, heated de-
bates and bellowingshouts of pro-
test overshadowed the event.
However, this year's participants
seemed to have had a more re-
laxed competitive approach.
"Competition wise, this was
a pretty good tournament said
Jamey Tisdale, a member of the
Phi Sigma Pi entry.
No. 2 Pick-Up, comprised
of Luong Ngo, Robert Joyner,
Curtis Griffin and Dana Monson,
finished the double-elimination
tournament in third place.
"It was fun there were a
lot of good teams" said Joyner, a
member of the 1992 ECU Quiz
Bowl All-Stars.
The championship match
pitted Eureka (a Great Britain ex-
change student team) against No.
1 Pick-up (a Student Union Com-
mittee entry). Eureka, surfacing
from the losers bracket, ran
against a buzz saw in the form of
No. 1 Pick-Up.
"Those guys were good, they
had pretty good chemistry says
one competitor of No. 1 Pick-Up.
See Quiz, page 2
Photo by Biff Ran�on - TEC
John Harris cautioned students about myths regarding the increasing AIDS epidemic. Harris has spoken
to more than 1 million students around the world about the disease.
AIDS myths create problems
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
The world is losing the
battle against AIDS, said a lead-
ing authority on the disease Tues-
day night. John Harris, who has
spoken to more than 1 million
students world-wideabout AIDS,
conducted a seminar titled "Inti-
macy in the age of AIDS" in
Jenkins auditorium.
"The biggest myth of this
disease is when people say that
? it's someone else's disease
Harris said.
The epidemic is increasing
rapidly. Harris said there werean
estimated 3 million cases of AIDS in
the United States in 1986. He now
estimates that at least 10 million
U.S. residence carry the AIDS virus
and the number is increasing.
The number of high school
and college students who have
the AIDS virushasalso increased.
In 1989, one out of every 1,000
students were infected. In 1992,
anestimatedoneoutof every 100
students carry the virus.
"I believe condoms are the
biggest hoax with AIDS Harris
said.
Harris said the virus can
seep through the condoms and
infect a person. He also said oral
sex is no longer safe sex because
the virus can be transmitted
through mucus membranes.
Women and men have dif-
ferent survival rates. Men have
about eight years to live after in-
fection, whereas women have an
average five years to live. It is
also estimated that in the near
future 62 percent of AIDS cases
will be women.
"I believe there will never
be a cure for AIDS, but there will
be a treatment Harris said.
Harris has become one of
the top communicators to stu-
dents in the area of AIDSHIV.
Jim Hunt visits Greenville
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
The world is losing the
battle against AIDS, said a lead-
ingauthority on thedisease Tues-
day night.
John Harris, who has spo-
ken to more than 1 million stu-
dents world-wide about AIDS,
conducted a seminar titled "Inti-
macy in the age of AIDS" in
Jenkins auditorium.
"The biggest myth of this
disease is when people say that
it's someone else's disease
Harris said.
The epidemic is increasing
rapidly. Harris said there were an
estimated 3 million cases of AIDS in
the United States in 1986. He now
estimates that at least 10 million
U.S. residence carry the AIDS virus
and the number is increasing.
The number of high school
and college students who have
the AIDS virus has also increased.
In 1989, one out of every 1,000
students were infected. In 1992,
an estimated one out of every 100
students carry the virus.
"I believe condoms are the
biggest hoax with AIDS Harris
said.
Harris said the virus can
seep through the condoms and
infect a person. He also said oral
sex is no longer safe sex because
the virus can be transmitted
through mucus membranes.
Women and men have dif-
ferent survival rates. Men have
about eight years to live after in-
fection, whereas women have an
average five years to live. It is
also estimated that in the near
future 62 percent of AIDS cases
will be women.
"I believe there will never
be a cure for AIDS, but there will
be a treatment Harris said.
Harris has become one of
the top communicators to stu-
dents in the area of AIDSHIV.
Photo by Biff Hanson � TEC
ECU fraternities had exceptionally high turn-out for rush this fall. The number of men in campus
fraternities is up 20 percent from 1991-92.
Fraternities enjoy large rush
Police arrest three in drug sting
By Chas Mitch'l
Staff Writer
State-wide operation yields 26 warrants
By Shay Pitrce
Staff Writer
The Inter-Fraternity Coun-
cil congratulated all East Carolina
campus fraternities for an excep-
tionally good rush last week.
Fraternity numbers are up
20 percent from last year. There
are presently 280 men who ac-
cepted bids and are pledging.
"I've been here five years
and these are the highest num-
bers I've seen said IFC presi-
dent Tommy Spaulding.
Spaulding attributes this accom-
plishment to a group effort by the
Inter-fraternity council.
iFC contains 41 members
including five executives, the
president of each of the 18 frater-
nities and one representative from
each as well. The group is similar
to the Panhellenic Council that
oversees campus sororities.
Up until two years ago, the
council served mostly as a "judi-
cial review" for fraternities with
few inter-fraternal relations.
Spaulding and the council have
worked to change this image.
Spaulding said, "When I was first
elected, I wanted to do more to
make the Greek system strong in-
stead of just using IFC as a judicial
body over all the fraternities
Although IFC enforces such
rules as those against fraternity
hazing and supporting alcohol
policies, its efforts go further. To
overcome the segmentation within
the Greek system, the council is
working hard to increase relations
among fraternities and sororities.
Spaulding's first goal was "for all
fraternity presidents to become
friends He said he is also work-
ing toward establishing a work-
ing relationship with Panhellenic.
See IFC, page 3
The Greenville Police Depart-
ment Tuesday arrested three men for
possession of $94,200 in illegal drugs.
The arrests were part of a state-
widestingoperation in which 26 war-
rants in North Carolina were issued
including 10 in Pitt County.
According to Greenville Police
Detective Roger Brown, die goal of
the sting operation was to break an
illegal lottery and numbers racket.
Brown said 7 ounces of co-
caine, 25 ounces of heroin and 4
ounces of an unidentified substance
was recovered at the residence of
1111-AW. Fourth St.
A 32 caliber hand gun, fax
machines, $1,020 in cash, measuring
scales and otherdrug paraphernalia
were also seized.
Benjamin Jerome Stephens, 49,
and Charlie Frank Doward, 52, both
of 1111-A Fourth St were each
charged with four counts of traffick-
ing cocaine and heroine, onecount of
maintainingadwellingandonecount
of possession of drug paraphernalia.
WalterGilmore,56,of430Tyson
St was charged with four counts of
trafficking cocaine and heroin and
one count of possession of drug para-
phernalia.
Bail was set at $104,000 for
Stephens and Doward and $102,000
for Gilmore.
Assisting the Greenville Police
were the U.S. Secret Service, the U.S
Treasury Department, the State Bu-
reauof Investigation, the Alcohol Law
Enforcement agency and the Alco-
hol, Tobacco and Firearms agency.
"We were working in conjunc-
tion with the state and federal au-
thorities ina multi-jurisdictional fed-
eral task force in the operation
Brown said.
"We acted on a tip of possible
drugtrafficking said Lt. C J. Hardee
of the Greenville Police Department
"Once we were in position and
gained entry into the house, we came
across the three suspects with the
goodies.
'This is possibly one the big-
gest bust we've had in the city of
Greenville in quite some time.
"All this merchandise was
headed for the streets. I'm just glad
we apprehended it when we did





gftr i
2 The East Carolinian
OCTOBER 1, 1992
Beer giveaway goes down the drain
A University of Florida student government plan to pass out
cards for free beer was nixed by university officials. The plan
would have allowed students to get a card for one free beer a night
at local bars after signing a pledge card promising that he or she
would not drink and drive. Pledge cards were to have been
distributed to about 9,000 students of legal drinking age. "At first
we thought it was done as a spoof said Art Sandeen, the
university's student affairs vice president. "We thought it was a
terrible idea
ISU professor sues school
An Iowa State University professor is suing several school
administrators and the Iowa Board of Regents after he was barred
from using a book he wrote as a required text in a class. John
Strong, an associate professor in human development and family
studies, claimed his First Amendment rights were violated be-
cause he couldn't use his book, "Unlocking the Communication
Puzzle as a primary text in his course. A student complaint in
1991 brought the matter to the attention of school administrators,
and a department committee later voted that the book should not
be used as primary text. It was also determined the book con-
tained no bibliography or cited scholars. "(The professor) feels
strongly that the university is interfering with his rights to select
his own materials said Anthony Renzo, Strong's attorney.
Half-tuition students stay in school
A program that offers local high school students a 50 percent
discount on tuition at the University of Hartford is boasting a 91
percent retention rate, officials said. The program, which started
in 1990, offers talented graduates of Hartford city high schools a
half-tuition plan for each year they attend the university. Officials
credit the program's mentoring system, in which faculty and staff
members are assigned certain students to counsel and advise, to
keep the students in college.
Study tracks student success
A University of Michigan study has found that community
college students are no less likely to succeed when they transfer to
a four-year college than students who began their academic career
at a four-year institution. The report contradicts previous find-
ings that found students who attended a community college area
at a "definite disadvantage" in earning a degree or going to
graduate school. Valerie Lee, an associate professor of education
who conducted the study, tracked 422 students who entered
community college and then transferred to a four-year institution.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel.
Taken from CPS and other newspapers.
Quiz
Continued from page 1
The second-place Eureka
team was composed of Matthew
Blair, Daniel Wild, David
McGreevy and Brian Collins.
The winning, and
undefeated, team consisted of
Elise Hafiz, Bess Clyburn, Jer-
emy Mills and Brian Hall.
"Even though we had fewer
teams than last year, the quality
of the players were better Lynn
Jobes, the assistant program di-
rector said.
"With the continued suc-
cess of the College Bowl, mis will
be an on going thing
The No. 1 Pick-Up Team
now is the reigning ECU Quiz
Bowl All-Star Team, and each of
its members received a check for
$25 for their efforts. In addition,
the team will automatically be
named to the 1992 ECU College
Bowl Varsity Squad.
The Varsity Squad will be
comprised of 12-15 outstanding
players from this year's competi-
tion, to be announced within the
next few days.
The squad, coached by
Ralph Scott, will represent ECU
at other College Bowl matches
held in the area.
In February, a team of five
will travel to the Association of
College Unions International Re-
gional College Bowl competition.
The tournament will be held in
Knoxville, Term.
AMERICA'S
FAVORITE
OIL CHANGE
At Jiffy Lube, your car receives the finest, most
complete, preventive maintenance possible,
performed by a highly-trained team of specialists
Drive into Jiffy Lube and drive out in minutes
knowing your car is ready for that long road trip.
1. We change your oil with a major brand!
2. We install a new oil filter!
3. We lubricate the whole chassis!
4. We Check and till transmission fluid!
5. We Check and fill differential fluid!
6. We Check and fitl brake fluid!
7. We check and fill power steering fluid!
6. We Check and fill window washer fluid!
9. We check and fill battery!
10. We Check the air filter!
11. We Check the wiper blades!
12. We inflate the tires to proper pressure!
13. We vacuum the interior!
14. We even wash your windows!
We'll Have You Ready in Minutes
With No Appointment.
NC OFFICIAL SAFETY INSPECTION STATION
126 SE Greenville Blvd.756-2579M-F 8-6 Sat 8-5
r'
i
i
i
i
L,
SAVE $3
oo
ON OUR FUU 14pt SERVICE
Not good with any other coupon otter. Cash value of 120th of on oent.
Limit on coupon per person par visit. Good only in Greenvile or Jacksonville.
Expires t0V21B2
I
I
I
I
J
The East Carolinian:
We must be doing our job because you
are reading this ad.
LOSE WEIGHT
FEEL GREAT
and have
ENERGY TO BURN!
Shape-Fast-Herbal Capsules
Available Now
Call for your FREE Sample!
Shaperite Concepts, Ltd.
93 lo74'4' Lei Your Dreams Take Flight With Shaperite
Friday. October 2
CREAM OF
SOUL
Saturday. October 3
MR. POTATO HEAD
HOURS
Mon & Tues 11 am-3pm
Wed 11 am-3pm & 9pm-1 am
Thurs & Fri 11 am-1 am
Sat 9pm-1am
513 Cotanche St
located across from UBE
758-0080
J
The Macintosh
Student Aid Packase,
Apple Macintosh PowerBook' 145 440
Apple Macintosh Classic II
�xyj, ; g31isaa Qij-kd,
.mmrnmmabtmmMmmmmmmmmim mttmH iitrnl aww lam

Apple Macintosh LCII
Apple Macintosh Ilsi
Get over '400 worth of preloaded software when you buy one of the
Apple� Macintosh� computers shown above at our best prices ever.
And if you are interested in financing options, be sure to ask for
details about the Apple Computer Loan. But hurry, because student
aid like this is only available through October 15,1992 - and only
at your authorized Apple campus reseller.
Offer ends soon!
ECU Student Stores: More than just books - your dollars support student scholars!
Wright Building Telephone: 757-6731
Store Hours: Monday - Thursday, 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
� 1992 Apple Computer. Inc Apple, ihe Apple logo and ItataaMh are registered trademarks of .Apple Computer Im Chafe is a registered trademark licensed to Apple Computer, Inc PowerBook is a iradcmark of Apple Computer. Int The Random House Enrw lopedia is a trademark of Random House. Inc. .American Heritage Electronu I)n nonary Electronic Thesaurus, and
ConwText devekped by Houghton Milflin Companv publisher of The Amentan HentageDittiurury and Rogets II The New Thesaurus ComaText underlying technology developed bv Language Systems, Inc Calendar Creator is a trademark of Power I pSoftam Corporation RcsumeVl'riier is a trademark of Bmtwaa- Software Company. Im All product names are the trademark
of their respective holders Offer gixxl on theMacim'ish PowerBook ltS4 iOionfigurationonh .All qualifying computers tome preloaded with software and electronic versions of instructions Disks and printed manuals are noi int luded in this offer
ir





a&a,
OCTOBER 1, 1992
The East Carolinian 3
IFC
Weapons
Continued from page 1
Continued from page 1
To achieve these goals, there
- first had to be interest with par-
ticipation in IFC. Spaulding said
he began with inviting a different
speaker into each weekly meet-
ing.
All fraternity presidents
meet once a month for dinner.
They also have president meet-
ings once every month for
Panhellenic and Inter-Fraternity
Council members.
One other goal IFC and
Panhellenic hope to achieve is
showingnon-Greeks what Greeks
are about. Spaulding said the IFC's
hard work will create a positive
image for all fraternal organiza-
tions.
or expulsion. Non-students, as
well as students, are also subject
to state law actions that could in-
clude imprisonment of up to six
months, a fine of up to $500 or
both.
"If they're (students) living
in the residence hall � they're
out of the residence hall Speier
said.
"If they're brandishing (a
weapon), we're going to recom-
mend suspension
As an option to persons who
lawfully own a weapon, Public
Safety offers free storage of fire-
arms, bows and arrows or other
related equipment used for hunt-
ing or sport.
Students may bring their
weapons to the university police
office for registration. Weapons
will be logged, stored and then
returned to the owner upon his or
her departure from campus.
Look for The East Carolinian homecoming
issue coming to newsstands October 13.
Attention all TEC news writers:
There will be a mandatory meeting today at
3:30 p.m. Be there!
Sam's Trophies
COMPUTERIZED
ENGRAVING
�TROPHIES
�RIBBONS
�PLAQUES
�NAME TAGS
�PLASTIC SIGNS
�DESK NAME PLATES
�LOGOS
1804 Dickinson Ave.
Acros frocn Pep4
757-1388
FAXIASYOI HORDKK
757-2476
STUDENTS & FACULTY
INSURANCE
with LOW RATES &'
MONTHLY PAYMENTS
Specialists for:
DWI's 'Youthful Drivers
Drivers with Points
& Motorcycles
GENE B. WATERS
FIDELITY INSURANCE
105 Arlington Blvd.
Greenville, NC
Formerly
Arlington Insurance
756-4488
THE WEEK OF
OCTOBER 5 - OCTOBER 9
WMEIEK
Sex EducATioi X-ChAiqE
USE
CONDOM
SENSE
Educate
Vour$elf
Sponsored
by
1
East Carolina University

Rape and Relationships
A Role Play & Discussion
Self Defense Workshop
with Keith Knox
S.E.X. On The Beach
with KISS 102 &
& Rec Services
Monday, Oct. 5
4:00pm MSC Social Room
Tuesday, Oct. 6
4-5:00pm MSC Room 244
Wednesday, Oct. 7
7-10:00pm Tyler Beach
Games, Music, Fun & Giveaways
RHA Representatives will be handing
out red ribbons at the Student
OrganizationBooth to show their
support for Aid Awareness.
Wear These Ribbons The Week Of Oct. 5-9
Viddiii'iUliiv-�t.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH OCTOBER 3,1992
FRESH
FRYER
LEG
QUARTERS
NO PIRATE FOOTBALL GAME
NO CONCERTS
IT'S STUDY TIME
SO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE
STUDY BREAK SPECIALS
�.
&�&?�
MILLER,
MILLER LITE or
GENUINE DRAFT
$6
79
12 PACK
12 OZ CANS
SCHLITZor
SCHLITZ LIGHT
$099
tJ 12 PACK
12 OZ CANS
FRESH
GROUND
WISE "KRUNCHERS"
POTATO CHIPS
ALL 6.5 OZ VARIETIES
99
HEINZ
KETCHUP
� !�
0
32 OZ
STOKELY CANNED
VEGETABLES
WHOLE KERNEL OR CREAM CORN,
CUT OR FRENCH STYLE GREEN BEANS
MIX OR MATCH
3AoNRS$-00
TONY'S
ITALIAN PASTRY
PIZZAS
ASSORTED VARIETIES
15 OR 16 OZ
2H
50
MINUTE MAID
CHILLED
ORANGE
JUICE
$149
1�CAL
FRESH GREEN
BROCCOLI
HEAD
SNO WHITE
CAULIFLOWER
j BUNCH

: '90-
� � ��.���-





� in mii nil' " "�
m -mar �i.
7 - i �'� -m
The East Carolinian
October 1. 1992
Opinion
Page 4
Weapons policy protects students
Reports where students and non-stu-
dents are in possession of weapons on cam-
pus have increased substantially in the past
few years. Stricter enforcement and better
options for legal weapon owners are sorely
needed to combat this serious problem.
Last year, a student was accidentally
shot in Garrett Hall when his friend was
showing off his gun. There have also been
incidents where non-students have been
stopped by the campus police and discov-
ered with weapons on their persons.
Presently, a North Carolina General Stat-
ute exists that strictly prohibits weapons on
any state-owned property. In part, the stat-
ute states: . it shall be unlawful for any
person to possess, carry, whether openly or
concealed, any gun or any other weapon
of like kind in any public or private
school campus or other property owned
For ECU, this encompasses all of central
campus, the medical school and hospital
grounds and other related campus houses
in Greenville. If someone is stopped in one
of these areas, and is in possession of a
weapon, heshe would be subject to not
only sanctions on the university level, but
also on the state level.
The only exception to this university
policy is the owning of mace by individuals.
A SIDEWARDS GLANCE
All other weapons�including knives, TNT,
ni troglycerine and other martial-arts related
materials � are forbidden on campus and
penalties start at possible expulsion from
the residence halls for residential students.
The Department of University Police
offers an alternative for hunters. They are
allowed to check in their rifles and guns at
no cost and can check them out again for
private use. Weapons will be logged, stored
and given out to the owners when they
leave campus.
Campus crime is an important issue in
today's college societies and the possession
of weapons only compounds the existing
problems.
The potential for harm is greatly magni-
fied when a weapon is introduced into a
situation and most introductions end in
bloodshed. Strict policies and even stricter
enforcement are a necessity to stay in pace
with the ever-increasing threat of violence.
Ignorance of the law can now not be
used as an excuse. Though the right to pro-
tect yourself is an integral part of our society
today, the monumental abuse of this right
dictates some regulations.
These statutes � both state and univer-
sity based � don't take the right away, only
protect against misuse.
JOE Of ALL TRADES
Horst
Stereotypes are the root of racist problems
By David J. Jones
The "power" of change is in the voters
I recently had the opportu-
nity to work with the Young
Democrats in setting up for the
political rally at which vice presi-
dential candidate Al Gore spoke
at Monday.
Part of that work included
handingout flyers to make people
aware of the fact that Gore was
coming and trying to get students
to go and show their support
When you are in a position of deal-
ing with the public so directly,
you expect to have to deal with all
kinds of radicals, both right and
left. With this knowledge as our
armor we went out to face the
masses and to distribute our fly-
ers.
What we met was not an on-
slaught of people ready to tell us
how wrong we were or how much
better their ideas were than ours.
We met lots of people who had no
opinion. They did not care who
was running in the election. They
certainly did not care to hear what
Gore had to say. We met a few
people who were not even sure
who Al Gore was much less what
his and Clinton's platform was.
Many people claimed to be
Republican but had no idea what
the Republican platform was.
These same people had no more
brains man to tell us mat the Demo-
crats were nothing but a bunch of
"liberals thathad been on the loose
too long and needed to be shut
down
Believe it or not folks, these
are the people that made me
happy. Why, you aslc? Because,
friends, at least these people had
something to say to us. As 1 said
earlier, most people greeted us
with blank stares. I began to feel
that all of our work to raise inter-
est was a futile gesture because
even if we could get people to go
to the rally, what good would
they do us on election day? The
answer is none. Have smear cam-
paigns and government inaction
turned so many people away from
politics?
Apathy is- not the answer to
solving problems within the land
thatyou live. If it were, there would
be no good in the world There
would be no care societies and
nobody willing to help fellow in-
dividuals. Most importantly ,there
would be no change. Change is
what makes this world work. Con-
stant change is an excepted part of
life.
No, this is not a pro Clinton
article. Even though I am a regis-
tered Democrat, lean see that the
concept of change for change's
sake is an idiotic one. What 1 am
saying is if you are not registered
to vote, get registered. You, as
voter do make a difference.
Yeah, 1 know the electoral sys-
temhasa few shortcomings. Many
people feel it is worthless because
it is such an indirect process of
voting on a president. That is not
an excuse to keep your voice si-
lent. If you don't like the system,
do something about it. You have
to put up with enough things in
life that you can't control. Why
put up with things thatyou can, to
a certain extent, control? The an-
swer again is that you should not.
Personally I see some real
faults with both candidates. 1 don't
care much for Perot either, but I
am still going to vote. Even if I
wind up writing in a candidate of
my choice,atleastlcansaylvoted.
I can say that I am unhappy
with the current system and that 1
voted against it. You would be
amazed at how much better that
can make you feel. Rather than
feeling the reluctance of realizing
that you could have made a differ-
ence, you feel the security of know-
ing that at least you tried.
This concept does not ju st ap-
ply to the presidential race. Within
the next couple of years there will
be an estimated 100 seats being
turned over in Congress.
You remember Congress,
don't you? They're the people that
change your life every time they
pass a law. I sound a bit sarcastic
here, but I'm doing it for a reason.
Go ask your best friend or your
roommate who is up for congres-
sional reelection in the next;few
years. Somebody out there write
me. I'd like to know what the per-
centages are on who did know
and who did not know. I'd be
willing to bet that the vast major-
ity did not know.
Why is this? Why don't we
care? Apathy will do no good.
You were given a mind, why
not use it? No, I 'm not saying agree
with me. I'm saying form your
own opinions, research things,
find out just what the heck is go-
ing on out there in our world.
If you disagree with things try
to change them for the better. Even
if you don't get what you want
done you will have started some-
thing. Voting is just a small part of
this process of changing things. If
you don't agree with what Bush
stands for thenJon't vote for him.
If you don't like Clinton's ideas
don'tvoteforhim.Butpleasevote;
voice your opinion.
The suspicious-looking, car-
stealing, illiterate, uneducated
black man you see stand ing on the
street corner.
The studious, all A's, no so-
cial life, can't speak a word of
recognizable English Asian guy
who sits behind you in Astronomy
class.
The Star of David-wearing,
penny-pinching, always been
good at math Jewish boss that you
work for.
The emotional, ready-to-cry -
at-an-instant, terrible at sports,
should be barefoot and pregnant
woman you see walking to class in
the afternoon.
� Keep reading, it gets bet-
ter.
Got your attention, now?
Good.
Put aside your righteous in-
dignation for just one second,your
cries of "Who does this guy think
he is?" and let me tell you what all
of these people have in common
with each other.
Stereotypes.
Anyone who tells you that
they don't have a prejudiced bone
in their body is not really trying to
convince you � they're also try-
ing to convince themselves. In this
day and age, it's damn-near im-
possible to subscribe to some (if
not all) of these generalizations. A
person may get them from their
parents, their grandpa rents�hell,
even their great-grandparents. No
one can really trace exactly where
bias and prejudice begins, but this
is as good a place as any to start.
The South is infamous for
being the hotbed for racial tension
and prejudice. Don't let the people
tell you that blacks are on an equal
fooringhere in the lovely Emerald
Qty�just go down to any one of
the local bars downtown and you
can count the number of African-
Americans on both hands.
How many people, when
walking down the street, have
crossed to the other side when
they saw a black person coming
towards them? That's not the only
area where African-Americans
have been stereotyped. From the
size of a black man's sexual organ
to his (supposed) superhuman
ability to play any sport, preju-
dices abound for anyone with dark
skin.
Mind you, African-Ameri-
cans aren't the only people stereo-
typed �just the most visibleones.
Today, you can be stuffed into a
nice, neat cubby-hole based on
your sex alone. Allow me to paint
youasweetlittlepicru re and you'll
soon see.
� "Ward, 1 think you need
to talk to the Beaver
"Hi, honey, I'm home The
tired, hard-working man throws
his suit coat on to the easy chair
and tosses his suitcase on the cof-
fee table, mindless of the new
waxing that his wife has given it.
"How was your day at work,
dear?" His wife, clad in a check-
ered apron with a spot of flour on
her nose, leans forward and kisses
him chastely on the cheek. She
hands him the daily newspaper
and stands ready to perform any
feat of derring-do that her man
might ask of her.
"Oh, you know, the same
old 9 to 5 routine, nothing spe-
cial he answers, knowing that of;
course his wife would never be
capable of understanding what
real work is. He reclines back in
his La-Z-Boy, opens the newspa-
per with an official-sounding
rustle and asks the inevitable ques
tion, "So, what's for dinner?"
� Put the weapon down and
hear me out.
Now that I've fully offended
half of this paper's readership with
my sarcastic segue, let me wrap
this up and make my point. It
doesn't matter what your sex is or
what your religious beliefs are �
we're all in the same boat here,
people. This tired old stubborn-
ness to adhere to outdated beliefs
only makes one look stupid and
idiotic. There is no master race, no
Jewish (or Japanese, or whoever it
is now) plot to overthrow the
world � we're all just trying to
live our lives and get through one
dayata time. Giving any credence
to the drivel that is spouted by
these hate groups and religious
sects only promotes more of it
Give mem an audience and they'll
go on forever.
Diverseness and differences
are what has made America what
it is today. A nation that recog-
nizes that not one single belief is
the right and only one. So when
you find yourself subscribing to
some prejudicial and biased opin-r
ion and you don't even remember
where you got it from, take a
minute and think about it.
Are they any different from
you;
I don't think so.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
ECU beauracracy slows students
The
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Jennifer A. Wardrep, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Assistant Sports Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
M. Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Cori Daniels, Classified Advertising Technician
J. William Walker, Opinion Page Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Dai I Ref 1, Photo Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing mformanon that affects
ECU students The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editor.al in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all pomts of v,cw. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, The East Carolinian reserves the r.ght to edit
or reject letters for publication. Utters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Pubhcat.ons Bldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
To the Editor:
Is this a great university or
what? I go to the library to kill 30
minutes or so. I ask to see The
Journal. The lady says, "what?" I
say You know, The Wall Street
journal. She says, "Do you have
any I.D.?" I show her my student
cardand driver's license. She takes
my driver's license and writes on
a sheet of paper. She hands me the
journal. I wait for her to return my
license. She says, "We keep the
license until you return the pa-
per I sit down in one of the
overstuffs�thinking, I must have
the Dead Sea Scrolls grasped in
my sweating palms instead of a
Chapel Hill Alu
While in Greenville this past
weekend for a friend's wedding
(Sept. 19), we picked up our first-
ever copy of The East Carolinian.
As students of The University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, we
were both impressed and disap-
pointed with your paper. We
found the layout and news com-
mendable for a campus paper. We
did, however, find one particular
column disturbing.
In David Jones' "A Bit
O'Thought" column (Sept. 17) we
found just that; only a Jit. Mr.
Jones described an "election" a
few years ago at Chapel Hill for
Student Body President. We don't
know which Chapel Hill Mr. Jones
was in mat year or what election
he was describing. Knowing most
daily rag � read a little, and then
I return the paper and get my li-
cense back. And, you guessed it,
she writes again.
1 try to get my schedule
changed. After walking endless
miles and being told no, no, no,
no; I go to the Chancellor's office.
The secratary spots my bookbag
� a critical mistake on my part �
and she tells me, "the Chancellor
doesn't meet with students (On
campus, the book bag is equiva-
lent to the yellow star of david in
Nazi Germany: a definite sign of
mental weakness, moral deprav-
ity and social inferiority to most of
the beauracracy and the profes-
sors.) I hear a voice. Does he exist?
I think he's in his lair, shoulct I
chance it � a shout, a bold en-
trance?
No. I make a few more feeble
attempts to get my schedule
changed, but my heart isn't in it. 1
give it up � failure.
Now this is a great cumber-
some beauracracy or what? Where
no one has any authority except to
enforce the rules and regulations
of the beauracracy except the
Chancellor, and he is unavailable.
This letter is funny, isn't it?
Albert A. Joseph
Junior
mni remember SGA election
of the past decade's SBPs, it cer-
tainly wasn't the election I think
he wanted to describe or any re-
cent elections.
To borrow Mr. Jones' phrase,
"in a nutshell" he's wrong. Re-
membering the election and hav-
ing checked the documents, it can
be summarized as follows. There
really was a candidate named
Mark and one named Bill. So
much for anonymity! Mark, a
black student and friend of ours,
and Bill were runningagainst three
other students. To our knowledge
party affiliation was not, as Mr.
Jones suggests, a factor in the race.
One candidate lost who wanted to
fill The Tit with water and a foun-
tain, another friend John (Bill, re-
member him) lost after a strong
bid, and Jonathan just plain lost.
Mark and the real Bill did get into
a runoff. Bill was elected Presi-
dent, not anyone else, brought up
onchargesofdefacingjohn's signs
and was eventually acquitted by
the student court. There was never
anyone replaced. Nor was Mark
ever charged or rumored to have
funnelled money to his campaign
from campus funds. Your memory
isn't very good Mr. Jones.
To our friends at ECU, we
hope the rest of the article was not
flawed as its beginning. Other-
wise, we enjoyed the paper and
look forward to our next visit to
Pirate county.
Patrick S. Wooden
Ted Teague
UNC-CH '93





i-rea s corner
Corner Vuuc
&P.E -Some vRTW-
OFFEREE. B "THE
Poetic Htftxw
SERVICES "��
By Sean Parnell
fcf?:
�T1
Secret Agent V7
By Chris Kemple
WANG TV
By Ferguson and Manning
Tnezei f am ejjccosb) ��
WANG TV
HFOLKS PU& roee
TECHAJICAL OFRCULTIgS .
�me FM COMIC STRIP
UUHlCH UJOULD B6 5��AJ
H�2S UMPil? FORMAL
OP�RATifJQ CODlT)0K)5l
U)UL k)OTAPPEAR. bu�
DohPOL(Xi?e Foe me
nJcoM&oiAKce this ms
CkOSE-0 YOU IO AaJV WAV.
I'M S0flfr�&C.
DiAeeneric livestock
MAf�M� ILL.
By Manning and Ferguson
�i
Rich's Nuthouse
by Haselrig
I
Tregony
!tisthe
DkWIUG OFlflSIDRY
AN ERAOF SPELL
WETORS i DRAGONS
FIRE IT ISAV�RLD
BUILT FROM THE
ASHES OF MYTH ?
MAGIC IT IS THE
TWEOF
by Davy Apis
The Scare Bears
by Mark Brett
ACUVUE DISPOSABLE
CONTACT LENS
PACKAGE $99
Includes exam, fitting, 30 days follow up
and trial lonsos. Student 10 required.
OD
PA
Doctors VisionCenter
mum
r. Peter W. Hollis & Dr. R. Ted Watson
499 E. Greenville Blvd 756-9404
What to do about those long meetings
that go nowhere:
MEETINGS:
ALL RIGHT OR AWRY
A SATELLITE TELECONFERENCE
THURSDAY,
OCTOBER , 1992
3:30 - 5:30 PM� sponsored by:
MSC 244 STUDENT A LEADERSHIP A
DEVELOPMENT A PROGRAMS ?
757-4711
CALL FOR EN TRIES
ECU Literary and Art Competition
Sponsored by REBEL '93 Magazine
CASH PRIZES GUARANTEED PUBLICATION IN REBEL 93
CATEGORIES: � Poetry � Prose -Fine Arts -Applied Arts
Entry Deadline: November 4,1992, 5:00 p.m.
Additional information available at the Rebel office in the Publication Building.
Engtish Department Main office, and the School of Art Media Center
I i � - T
ATTIC
762-7307 1 209 E. 5th St.
EVERY Undefeated, Undisputed!
WEDNESDAY Thanks For Voting Us
The "Best Place To Hear
The Live Music"
'23DNE � I987M988M989M9901991M992
QP.EENVILLE TIMES BE�OEBS' POLL
Thursday. October I
r
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE'S
NATURAL FOODS SOURCE
Offering
NaturalOrganic Groceries
Wholesome Snacks & Treats
NaturalCruelty-Free Beauty Aids & Cosmetics
Body Building Supplements
byTwinLab
'BLUE PLANETLjfeFoods)
If
ECU'S Natural F
405 EVANS STREET MALL
Hours 10-6,M-Sat
758-0850
ALFREDO'S
New York Ptaa By The Slice
218E.5thSt.�752-0022
Sun, Mon & Tue
SPECIAL
Pitchers $1.50
TACO
CASA
EGYPT
In The Plaza Food Court .
BURRITO
CHEESBURGERJ
NACHOS&
CHEESE
& LARGE
DRINK I
99tf-32o7.Drafy9yf ADMISSIONbefore OwijWy Memberships�99 lliballs
Friday, October 2
m&bmit
$2 - 32oz DRA1T
Saturday, October 3
$3.00
with coupon
J
CARVER & CONSPIRACY
S2-32oiDRAFT RockWRoll S2-32oz DRAFT





"�Ill - I
HCUHaM
IN II
The East Carolinian
October 1, 1992
Classifieds
FORREiNTHELP WANTEDIHELP WANTED1�mm
Page 6
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS :1 and 2 bedroom
apartments. Energy-efficient,
several locations in town. Car-
peted, kitchen appliances, some
water and sewer paid, washer
dryer hookups. Call 752-8915.
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
707C 2nd St 2 bedroom Apt. 3
blocks from campus. Off Jarvis
St. Past City Market on Rt. Call
Howard 752-8114.
ROOMMATE WANTED:
Brand new apt Wesley Vil-
lage. Own Room, fully fur-
nished. Pay 1 3 rent and utili-
ties. Call 758-5089 or 931-8665.
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Roommate needed to share a
two-bedroom town house
apartment. Rent is $160.00 a
month and 1 2 electricity. Con-
tact: Stacy Peterson- Carriage
House Apartments, Apt. 60 -
321-1532 (Leave a message.)
FOR SALE
DORM REFRIGERATORS
used, very good condition.
$50.00. Warsaw Pawn, War-
saw, NC (919) 293-4040.
FOR SALE- CAR 1982 VW
Rabbit. 99K miles - one owner.
Fuelinjected. New tiresallfour.
Have all repair records - De-
pendable. You can love this car
as I have. Asking $500. Call
830-3974.
GOVERNMENT SIEZED
CARS, trucks, boats, 4wheel-
ers, motorhomes, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available your area now.
call 1-800-333-3737 ext. C-5999.
2 FREE KITTENS, black &
white, 1 male, 1 female, 6 mos.
old, supplies included. Call 752-
3364.
1989 CAVALIER white, excel-
lent condition, 33,000 mile
$4800 756-9394 after 6pm.
KING SIZE WATERBED for
sale $125.00! Contact 758-8006
ask for Joe!
HELP WANTED
TOPLESS DANCERS
WANTED - Great club, Great
money, unbelievable tips.
Work Thursday, Friday, Sat-
urday, 9 pm - 2 am. Call Sid
919-735-7713 or Paul 919-736-
0716. MothersPlayhouse in
Goldsboro.
EMERGENCY! Expanding
company needs hardworking
reliable students to mail our
diet brochures from Home
Dorm! Earn up to $200 FT or
$1000 FT! Employees needed
immediately! Forjobapplica-
tionsend self-addressed stamp
envelope: Colossal Marketing,
Employee Processing, P.O. Box
291140 Port Orange, FL 32129.
"HELP WANTED" EARN
$1,500 WEEKLY mailing our
circulars Begin now FREE
packet! SEYS, Dept. 164, Box
4000, Cordova, 380181000.
GUARANTEED WORK
AVAIL ABLE. Excellent pay for
EASY home based work. Full
part-time. Rush self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers
(G2) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham, NC 27705
S360UP WEEKLY. Mailing
brochures! Sparefull-time. Set
own hours! RUSH self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope:
Publishers (G1) 1821 Hillandale
Rd. 1B-295 Durham, NC 27705
WORK AT HOME: Assembly
, craft, typing and more! Up to
$500.00 a week possible. For
information write Source; 1840-
D Simonton Road, Dept. 9108,
Statesville, NC 28677.
ATTENTION! EARN $2500
Free Trip! Students, Greeks,
Clubs earn free Spring Break
trip after selling only 8 trips at
your school! Spring Break 1-
800-678-6386.
CAMPUS REPS WANTED!
Quality vacations to exotic des-
tinations! Sell Spring Break
packages to Jamaica, Cancun,
Bahamas, Florida. Fastest way
to free travel and extra $$$$.
Call Sun Splash Tours 1-800-
426-7710.
SPRING BREAK'93: Panama
City, Florida Sales Representa-
tive needed to work with the 1
Spring Break Team, Travel As-
sociates and Tour Excel sell the
best properties on the beach.
Summit Condominiums,
Miracle Beach Resort, Holiday
Inn, Pier 99, Earn top commis-
sion and free trips. For more
information call Jenny 1-800-
558-3002.
AEFOBIC INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED for the Recreation
and Parks Dept. and Green-
ville Aquatics & Fitness Cen-
ter. Experience preferred. Af-
ternoon, evenings, and week-
end hours. For more informa-
tion call Kathleen Shank 758-
6892.
EASY WORK! Excellent pay!
Assemble products at home.
Call toll free. 1-800-467-5566
Ext. 5920.
BRODY'S is accepting appli-
cations for Part-Time associates
in Men'sJuniors and Cus-
tomer Service Departments.
Flexible schedules to fit most
needs. Apply Brody'sThe Plaza
Mon-Wed l-4pm.
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT:
Earn $300 - $400 weekly. Day
and night shift available. No
experience necessary. Must be
at least 18 years old. Call day or
night 746-6762.
NEWNEWNEW Fairfield
Vacation Club, It's new and
exciting! We are selling vaca-
tions, it does not require a NC
Real Estate License. Commis-
sions are Fantastic! Full ben-
efits PLUS $800.00 per month
draw. Only good�No, only
GREAT salespeople apply. Sell-
ing vacations. Send references
to Cliff Hawk, Vice President
of Sales Fairfield Harbor 750
Broad Creek New Bern, NC
Proven sales background and
Positive attitude required. For
more information call 638-8011
ext. 225.
SHOPPER (PT): Visit local
restaurants and bars - write
detailed report. Expenses pd.
(703) 281-4436 for info.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE!
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call l-800-333-3737ext. P-3712.
COURIER TO WORK PART-
TIME for busy medical prac-
tice. Make deliveries, run er-
rands, do filing, applicants
must be able to work l-5pm
Monday-Friday and have a
good driving record along with
reliable transportation. Inter-
ested applications should send
their resume or make applica-
tion at Pitt Surgical, P.A. 905
Johns Hopkins Drive, Green-
ville, NC 27834.
SERVICES OFF! �RED
TYPING: Error free, quick and
dependable at reasonable cost.
Excellent typing and proof-
reading skills (grammar, punc-
tuation, sentence structure,
etc.). Call Pauline at 757-3693.
I INFORMATION
u ctrgest Llbrar Mi rder Catalog TV of Information In U.S. 1 subjects xfey with VteaMC or COO
TOLL FREE HOT LINE? 800-351-0222 m Calif. (213)4778226
Dr. rush $2 00 1 11322 Idaho Av�.o: R��arch Information 206 Los Angles CA 90025
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
You also get a FREE
HEADPHONE RADIO
just for calling
1-800-932-0528. Ext. 65
S Financial Aid Available S
Attention AH Students!
Lhdeagrs&CraduatefcOverS5B01kiiingranfc&
�ohotanhips ire now available from private sartor &
?vt'nui�avwo-iiorCJk'p'S�iid�it�WLionwide All
students an? eligible? Let us 1 iHp you locate the money thai
you are eltibk- u receive. Applications an now being
accepted. To receive your financial aid program caJJ:
Student financial Service
2(tt) 632-020 Ext. FM62
LOST AND FOUND
Precious long hairedcat lost in
hospital area. Named "Maggie
Reward. Call 752-9930
PERSONALS
AN ECSTATIC ECLECTIC
EXCLAMATION. O what
sweet WINE we drinketh! Our
vessels overflow with the
Aphrodesian Elixer of Esoteric
Illumination.
WRITERPHILOSOPHER
MUSICIAN and poetic soul
seeks friendship and corre-
spondence from like-minded
lady. Photos and letters to MV,
P.O. Box 8663, Greenville, NC
27835.
DRIVING FROM GREEN-
VILLE TO DURHAM
CHAPEL HILL on weekends:
I need transportation for my
son to and from Chapel Hill.
Will pay $20.00 roundtrip. 942-
6509.
DOES THE WORD PIGMY
remind you of anyone?? Yes,
this one is for you Heather! I
know this is you rough week
and I hope you know that I'll
do anything to help you out.
The weekend is almost here so
don't stress too hard. Smile
babes and have a good one.
Love, your roomie.
TOSIG EPPLEDGES: Thanks
for the great time at "Jamaican
me Sick We have to party
with you guys again soon.
Love, Chi Omega.
TO PHI TAU PLEDGES:
Thanks so much for rescuing
us at our lock-in. We had the
best time at your bid-day party
and especially meeting all of
the pledges. We hope to see
you guys soon! Love, Chi
Omega Pledges.
TO THE WALLFLOWER at
O'Rocks fri. Night: I looked
and I stared and I watched and
my fountain of youth was over
flowing. How can IC U again?
O'Rocks tonight? From: the
guy with the hat.
ANGIE AND AMBER:
Thanks for a great and success-
ful rush! It's great the way we
all worked together. Love, The
Sisters.
CONRATULATIONS: To the
Delta Pledge class of Pi Delta:
Carrie Lee Andreu, Wendy
Bailes, Amy Jo Bailey, Holley
Bell, Caroline Dombroski, Erica
Dourgherty, Amy Dowdee,
Elizabeth Falk, Tamera
Hargett, Melissa Hightower,
Kriston Jackson, Allysha
Koury, Terri Levesque, Mel-
issa Lutz, Marjorie Mauney,
Nichole Maybin, Honor
Nebiker, Susie Roupp and Star
Yarboro.
ALPHA OMICRON PI: Sis-
terhood ended Sun. and we
were in for a treat, it seems
down to Splash we were des-
tined to meet. Our first "grab a
date" of the new school year
and needless to say it was full
PERSONALS
of CHEER! Chantel grabbed
William surprise, surprise -
I'm just sorry we can't name all
of you other guys! A few left
early, but most stayed late,
proving once again Alpha
Omicron Pi socials are always
first rate.
TO LANBDA CHI ALPHA:
We're looking forward to get-
ting together tonight - The
Pledges and Sisters of Alpha Xi
Delta.
TO THE BROTHERS AND
PLEDGES OF THETA CHI:
Thanks for the social last week.
Let's for the social last week.
Let's get together and do it
again soon. Love, the Sisters
and Pledges of alpha Xi Delta.
CONGRATULATIONS on
your pre-engagement Stacy.
Hope your relationship last as
long as your ring. Hey, who
needsa diamond thatcuts glass
anyway?! Love, your sigma Sis-
ters. P.S. Tara C. and Julie, see
the single life is not so bad after
all.
SIGMA PLEDGES: Get ready
for pledge retreat Yourpledge
class will NEVER be the same
again. We love you. Your Sigma
Sisters.
KAPPA SIGMA: Get ready
for the hunt See you tonight.
Love, the Sisters and Pledges
of Sigma Sigma Sigma.
PI KAPPA PHI: Thanks for
the "Shang-Hi" what a surprise
you made our lock-in! Thanks
for the dance lessons. Looking
forward to a great year! Love,
the Alphas of Alpha Delta Pi.
THE ALPHAS of Alphas Delta
Pi would like to thank the As-
sociate Members of Lambda
Chi for a great time last Thurs-
day night. Let's do it again soon
- We're looking forward to the
Dike game!
ALPHA DELTA PI: Tomor-
row night Kingston Place is
gonna be loud cause it's finally
Stranger Mixer for the ADPi
crowd! The music will be
kickin' cause the DJ's cool, If
you don't go you'll be a dang
fool. So we'll see you there all
you lucky guys, just you and
the ADPi's.
CONGRATULATIONS TO
THE 1992 Junior Panhellenic
Officers; President - Charlotte
Rakowski, Vice President -
Kerri Sechman, Secretary -
Anna Porter, Treasurer - Jonni
Wainwright, Fundraising
Chairman - Rene Smallwood,
Public Relations - Amy
Dodson, Social Chairman -
Nicole Federinko, Philan-
thropic Chairman - Deana Cale
and Delegates; Leslie
Alexander, Michelle Baritell,
Katy Bonnie, Caroline Bray
boy, Edy Cline, Mary
PERSONALS
Dembrowski, Amy Gilly,
Mindy Graham, Jelynn
Kaplan, Beth Powell, Maria
Posey, Natalie Richards,
Heather Sa lter, Lisa Stine, Ryan
Thomas and Anna Zadiets.
ALPHA XI DELTA Bid night
was a blast. Hope to see you
soon. Love PIKA.
PIKA: Congratulations to our
Pi Pledges Class: Dale
Alexander, Mitch Anderson,
David Buter, Patrick Boyette,
David Bragg, Jeremy Finsklay,
Hank Gerock, Coady Haga,
Ken Hartpence, Darren Jones,
Jimmy McLaughlin, Eric
Meloche, Mike David O'Briant,
Brandon Pelton, Kevin
Robertson, Brian Rode, Rand
Shotton, Zach Stone, Greg
Sutton, Will Sutton, Zalon
Thurman, Rodney Vanek, Matt
Weyandt, B.J. Whitesell.
Buckle your seatbelts. The ride
is beginning.
THANK YOU: To all the so-
rorities who helped us with
Rush. Alpha Delta Pi, alpha
Phi, Calendergirls, and Alpha
Xi Delta. Love PIKA.
MIKE REED: Hang in the bud.
We are all thinking about you.
Your Brothers.
CHI OMEGA: Congratula-
tions on you flag football win
on Monday. Get ready to kick
butt in the finals.
LAMBDA CHI'S: We're ex-
cited about our social with you
on Friday, see you in you Ox-
fords and sexy boxers. Chi
Omegas.
CONGRATS BECKY LEWIS
on SGA Day Representative!
Love, Delta Zeta.
WAY TO GO on a great foot-
ball season, Delta Zeta! Thank
you to Douglas Littiken, Casey
Harris and Chris "perma-grin"
for your great coaching and
support. Love, the Delta Ze-
tas.
CONGRATULAIONS to the
Gamma Plaedge class of
Gamma Sigma Sigma, Fall
1992: Missy Bahnick, Darcy
Beasly, Cindy Briley, amy
Byrd, Jenni Campbell, Paggy
Chandler, Kristie Daly, Candy
Faircloth, Alyssa Fountian,
Katie Gaddy, Randi Gibbons,
Kimberly Goodin, Amy
Howell, Mary Hubley, Cindy
Hutchinson, Diane Jinkens,
Cheri Montgomery, Julie
Moore, Brith Paynor, Gina
Pickens, Melissa Readling,
Jenny Robbins, Kelly Scheele,
Martie Smith, charlene
STanley, angela Stevenson,
Beth Sullivan, Stacy Sutton,
Kara Williamson, Stacey
Woods. We Love you! The Sis-
ters of Gamma Sig.
Announcements
BISEXUAL-GAY-LES-
BIAN SUPPORT GROUP
Social support and activi-
ties. Meetings are closed. Call
757-676611:00-12:15Tues. and
Thurs. or 1:00 - 2:30 Wed. for
information on meeting time
and place.
STUDENTS FOR I IFF
Are you Pro-life? If so, you
are invited to join ECU Stu-
dents for Life. We offer sup-
port, information, and an op-
portunity to get involved. Call
Heather or Laurie at 758-7698
for details.
EAST CARPI INA STU-
DENT GOVERNMENT
ASSOC. HONOR BOARD
It is not too late to apply for
the SGA Honor Board.TheStu-
dent Government Office is now
taking applications. The dead-
line to apply is Fri Oct. 2,1992
by 5:00pm. Be a part of the
University Judicial Process!
IT'S A BOGFY1
Recreational services will be
sponsoring a Doubles Golf
Tournament - registration will
be Mon Oct. 5 at 5:00pm, Biol-
ogy 103. A small fee is required
and a team representative must
attend the meeting. For more
information call 757-6387.
HEY YOU VOII.FYFRS!
Recreational Services Vol-
leyball Registration meeting is
Tues Oct. 6 at 5:00pm in Biol-
ogy 103. Don't miss it!
AMBASSADORS
Hey, Hey, Look here To
the new Ambassadors of a new
year! Remember the Cook-out
and Congratulations.
POETRY FORIM
The ECU Poetry Forum will
hold its first meeting on Octo-
ber 1, 8:00pm, in Mendenhall,
room 241. The meeting is open
to all interested in reading and
or listening to poetry. If you
would like feedback on you
poetry, please bring 8-10 cop-
ies of each poem for distribu-
tion.
CALL FOR FNTRIFS
Deadline for Art, Poetry,
Prose Competition forthe Rebel
'93 is November 4,1992. Rules
and regulations can be picked
up in the Art Building Media
Center, English Dept. Main
Desk and Rebel Offices in the
Publications Building. All stu-
dents are eligible. Cash prizes.
LITERATURE RFADINC,
On Wed Oct. 7, Patrick
Bizzaro will read poetry and
Luke Whisnant will read fic-
tion at the Upper Crust Bakery
on 5th Street. There will be
musical entertainment be-
tween each reader. Writers are
encouraged to read their own
poetry for 3-4 minutes at the
Open-mic sessions following
the readings.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS
Thur Oct. 1�Faculty re-
cital featuring Selma Gokcen,
cello; John B. O'Brien, piano
with guest lecturers Bodo
Nischanand McKaySundwall:
Beethoven the Classicist.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00pm,
Free.
Fri Oct. 2�ECU Guest Re-
cital featuring Nitza Kats, pi-
ano .Fletcher Recital Hall,
8:00pm, Free. Sat Oct. 3�
Piana workshop by guest cli-
nician Nitza Kats. Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 10:00am-noon, free.
Mon. Oct. 5�ECU faculty re-
cital featuring Jay Pierson, bari-
tone and Victoria Fischer, guest
pianist, with Peter Makuck and
Adam Achonbrun, readers:
musical settings and readings
of poetry of Walt Whitman,
Langston Hughs, and Thomas
Hardy. Fletcher Recital Hall,
8:00pm, Free.
FT CLUB
To any interested Physical
Therapy Majors. MeetingGet
together Wed. at Sports Pad at
8:30 to help break the study
blues.
RECREATIONAL SFR-
VICES
A "Disc"et, A basket. Recre-
ational services w ill be offering
a Disc Golf Accuracy contest
on Tues Oct. 6, at 3:00pm at
the Frisbee Disc course- So
shine up those frisbees and
don't miss the fun! For more
information Call 757-6387.
STUDY ABROAD
Now is the time to apply for
the National or International
Student Exchange or for one of
many study abroad opportu-
nities! If you are interested in
paying ECU tuition and at-
tending one of 107 other uni-
versities in the United States
one of over 40 English speak-
ing foreign locations, investi-
gate the many opportunities
available to you through the
ECU exchange program. For
more information cal Ms.
Stephanie Evancho at 757-
6769. Pick up a brochure and
application form in Brewster
A-117.
-
-�






The East Carolinian
October 1, 1992
Lifestyle
Page 7
Artist exhibits drawings, illustrations
By Mike Harrison
Staff Writer
An ECU visiting artist is mak-
ing headlines in Washington, D.C
for a new exhibit thathas run through
the month of September.
Aglowingreview appeared in a
Washington, D.C,newspaper maga-
zineaboutCatherineWalker'swork.
The review read, in part, "Walker's
visions of light and movement ex-
amine sensuality, spirituality and the
dichotomy of human consciousness,
revealing a peculiar balance of real
and ethereal worlds
The self-deprecating Walker
guffawed when reading about her
works being, according to the re-
viewer, "a mastery of light and
shadow
Her works, particularly her
lithographs, are strong light and
shadow images thatmanage to radi-
ate a subtle, earthy glow.
Human bodies make up a large
portion of Walker's subjects for her
lithographs. The bodies frequently
come together in her works in com-
plicated, sometimes unclear visions.
Walker found her way to the
D.C. exhibit through the help of a
friend in New York. The friend told
her about a woman from Washing-
ton who wanted to start a gallery
ard would soon be searching
through New York for young,
emerging artists. Walker sent some
of her works to the woman. Feed-
back was favorable,andWalkerwas
then given a one-person show in
1991.
The current exhibit features 21
of Walker's drawings and nine of
her lithographs. The gallery has sev-
eral large showing rooms, which
display the work of vai ious artists.
Walker spends a huge amount
of time in her studio. She said she
loves to do her artwork, but added,
'Til do anything to procrastinate
Walker acknowledges a strong
interest in her work as a teacher, a job
which at first intimidated her.
She said she thinks people con-
sis ten tly see herasbeingself-assured;
but the thought of standing in front
of a group of students to perform her
teaching ritual scared her a lot at
first
Walker said her job experience
here has opened her eyes about as-
pects of teaching she never thought
about before.
"It takes an amazing amount of
energy to teach. 1 remember as a
student how hard I was working
and now I can look back at that time
and realize that I hardly recognized
what hard work was.
"It's amazing teaching begin-
ning students who know very little
because they improvesofast. It'sjust
really neat to see and they could
really get off on seeing how much
they improve
Walker was bom in London and
went to art school there for a year.
Twelve to 14 hours a day of school
was the norm and grades were non-
existent There was no pressure to
do the work because everyone had a
passionate interest in his or her work.
Walker said success in art de-
pends a lot on luck, but added, "You
can make your own luck by sending
stuff out all the time, by being made
as visibleas possibleYou start to be
recognized
Her works, particularly lier lithographs, are
strong light and shadow images that manage
to radiate a subtle, earthy glozv.
Fair presents
bungee jumping
to Pitt County
Courtesy Catherine Walker
Catherine Walker has several of her prints and drawings currently on
exhibit at the Sumner School Museum & Archives in Washington D.C.
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
The Pitt County Fair will
open its gates at 6 p.m. Monday,
Oct. 5, and will run through Sat-
urday 10. According to fair
manager El vy Forrest, this year's
Fair should be the biggest and
best in the history of the event.
Admission into the fair is $3
for adults and $2 for children.
Thursday night is college night,
ECU and Pitt Community Col-
lege students pay only $150 to
get in the gate with school iden-
tific?tion.
Fair-goers can purchase tick-
ets for rides and attractions on
the midway, or they can pur-
chase an $8 wristband on Mon-
day night, Tuesday, Thursday
and Saturday afternoon from
noon until4 p.m. Wristbands will
be honored until 6p.m. on Satur-
day.
According to Louis May,
spokesperson for the fair, Pitt
County features the largest mid-
way east of Raleigh. There are 37
rides and shows, along with
roughly 60 food and game ven-
dors.
"We try to bring entertain-
ment (to the fair) that you don't
see anywhere else May said.
"We try to bring unique enter-
tainment, things people will go
home and talk about
Besides the shows and at-
tractions on the midway, a vari-
ety of performances and exhibits
will bepresen ted. Lives tockcom-
petition and exhibits will be dis-
played in buildings off the mid-
way. Agriculture and commer-
cial exhibits will also be dis-
played.
A petting zoo and the 18-
building Village of Yesteryear
wiii also be open to the public
every night of the week.
In addition to regular exhib-
its, a variety of shows will be
performingduringthe week. The
Buck Swamp Kicking Cloggers
will perform on Monday and
Friday at 7:30 p.m. Polar bears
will perform in The Great Bear
Show Tuesday through Satur-
day. Wednesday night features
Championship Wrestling at 7
p.m. Four matches will be held,
includinga women's match. The
Hollywood Stunt Auto Thrill
Show will perform in the grand-
stand on Thursday and Satur-
day.
A new show this year is a
musical performance by ani-
mated animals which will repre-
sented every night of the week.
All the shows and exhibits off the
midway are free after admission
into the fair.
Perhaps one of the most
popular attractions at the Pitt
County Fair this year will be
bungee jumping. According to
May, Pitt County is home to the
See Fair, page 8
EXHIBITS
Freda Badrock and Emmv Whitehead.
Arlington Hall Gallery, Opens Sept. 29 -
Nov. 7.
PERFORMANCES
Nitza Kats, piano workshop and con-
cert. Concert - Fri Oct. 2, workshop - Sat
Oct. 3. Fletcher Music Center, free and
open to public.
Leo Kottke. guitarist. Oct. 3, Thalian
Hall in Wilmington, 8 p.m.
GREENVILLEPITT COUNTY
John McCutcheon. folksinger, YAPAS.
Oct. 3, Wright Auditorium, 2 p.m. $8
public, $5 studentyouth.
Pitt County Fair. Pitt County Fair-
grounds. Oct. 5-10, Schedule: 756-1919.
ECU Symphony Orchestra. Robert
Hause, conductor. Oct. 7, Wright Audito-
rium, 8 p.m. (919) 757-6851.
POETRY FORUM
Oct. 1 � Rm. 241 Mendenhall Student
Center at 8 p.m. students, faculty and the
public will be able to read poetry and
receive critical comments. The forum will
be held every first and third Thursday of
each month. Bring four to six copies of
each poem if you would like feedback.
For more info call Peter Makuck at 757-
6580 or 752-5041.
Storyteller lectures on Appalachian Indians
By David Jones
Staff Writer
The Iroquois Indians and Joe
Bruchac �what a combination!
Bruchac, a storyteller, started
off his Sept. 23 show with a few-
poems that have been published in
various magazines. "Transplanting
Trees" was about how life comes
from life and that when you trans-
plant a tree in order to save it, you
are preserving a literal jewel of the
earth.
Bruchac began the f i rst of many
short stories of the evening with
"The Story of the Peacemakers It
was a story of three Indians who
went around to the five major In-
dian nations of the northern Appa-
lachian mountains. They were able
to sway every leader to follow their
cause of peace except one warrior
chief. When all forms of reason went
for naught in terms of a persuasive
argument, the three Indians wrote
and sang a song to the chief. He was
so moved thatheimmediatelymade
peace with the other four tribes and
wenton to form the Leagueof Peace
which lasts through today. Oneside
of the American quarter pictures an
eagle holding arrows in its claws.
The arrows are representative of
the League of Peace showing that
five arrows bound together are
much stronger that one individual
arrow.
Bruchac then went into the ex-
tensive story behind the "Trail of
Tears" and the famous Apache
warrior Geronimo.
Many memorable quotes came
from Bruchac, including"Anything
in moderation is good, except
death He also spent a portion of
theevening reading selections from
many of his publications. He then
proceeded to throw copies of these
publications to the audience. He
did this in a manner not unlike the
way a drummer of a band throws
his or her sticks into a crowd after a
show.
Bruchac also sang songs. He
even tried to teach the audience an
Ind ian song. There was a rule estab-
lished at the beginning of the show
that whenever Bruchac said "Ho
the audience was to immediately
say "Hey It served to keep those
who were only partially interested
in the show very awake and alert.
Bruchac finished off theevening
with two poems.Thesecond of these
was "Birdfoot's Grampa Birdfoot
felt that his grandfather was intol-
erable because onenightwhen they
were driving home in the rain,
Grandpa insisted on stopping the
car every time he saw a frog to assist
it in crossing the street. Birdfoot
insisted to his grandfather that they
were in a hurry and simply did not
have the time tq stop for every frog.
Grandpa replied that the frogs had
places to go also and that humans
had no right to interfere with them.
This poem exemplified Bruchac's
attitude towards wildlife.
See Bruchac, page 8
�1
-JL-iJt .� . �: ��' � �'�WS!
"tm
1 iTl
ft . -Jf Mm
1 11" II
r jm
JOSiSLL .�r?
m a w f
MK J
B m
m1 1mm A
Eg. jl��i
f.Rgjr � l"VHK, v
L
YAPAS opens season with folksinger
Joe Bruchac brought his storytelling talent to ECU with Indian folklore,
tales, songs and poems.
By Joe Horst
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Folksinging and children's
music are the basis of the Young
Audience's Performing Arts Series
opening performance, songwriter
John McCutcheon.
McCutcheon has been a popu-
lar concert performer for almost 20
years. Though his records have been
coming steadily out for the past 15
years, McCutcheon wasn't recog-
nized until the 1983 release of his
first children's album, Howjadoo.
Howjadoo introduced a new birth-
day anthem, a song about a rubber-
blubber whale and captivated au-
diences with his musical style of
easy listening.
McCutcheon, along with
WoodyGuthrieand Raffi,has revo-
lutionized the "family album" la-
bel. Winning awards from Parents
magazine and the American Library
Association, McCutcheon offers
music that both children and par-
ents will enjoy.
In performance, McCutcheon
creates a unique brand of music by
teaching lessons. Playing many dif-
ferent instruments equally well,
McCutcheon introduces each in-
strument within their historical and
ethnic framework. In one perfor-
mance cansketcha picture show-
ing the world as a great orchestra
with each separate element com-
bining to create a whole unity of
sound.
Season tickets for YAPAS are
$25 for adults, $20 for ECU faculty
and stiff and $15 for students and
youth.
Single-event tickets sell at $8
for adults, $6 for faculty and staff
and $5 for studentsyouth.
McCutcheon's performance at
ECU will last about one hour. Fu-
ture events scheduled include ap-
pearances by the Fiddle Puppets
and dramatic adaptations of "The
Wizard of Oz" and "101 Dalma-
tians
Gymnasts to perform in Chapel Hill
By Julie Totten
Staff Writer
On Friday, Oct. 2 the Smith
Center in Chapel Hill will host
The 1992 Tour Of Olympic and
World Champion Gymnasts.
The same complicated rou-
tines millions of Americans
viewed over televised broadcast
last summer will be performed.
Women's gymnastics disciplines
will include the uneven parallel
bars, the floor exercise and the
balance beam. Men's disciplines
will include the high bar, parallel
bars, still rings and the pommel
horse.
�MHHHHIMHRMHnHmMi
Stan Feig, producer of this
tour, said, "It's obvious that
Americans love gymnastics and
this tour will give audiences the
opportunity to see these extraor-
dinary athletes perform their com-
plex and thrilling routines live
Olympians set to perform Fri-
day in Chapel Hill include: Ameri-
can Gold medalist Trent Dimas;
Shannon Miller,a five-medal win-
ner from the U.S. team; Grigori
Misutin, who won four silvermed-
als; and Vi tali Sherbo who brought
the Unified team six Gold medals.
Another feature of this
tourwill be the performances by
other world champion gymnasts.
Two-time World Champion and
three time U.S. champion Kurt
Thomas will perform along with
many others including: 1988
Olympic Gold and Silver medal-
ist Valerie Lukin; Svetlana
Boguinskaia of th.e Unified Team;
and Gold medalist Lavinia
Milosovici.
Tickets for this exhibition in
Chapel Hill are still on sale. Prices
are $22.50, $19.50 and $14.50.
All Ticketmaster outlets at
Tracks and Starship stores as well
as the Smith Center Box office are
selling tickets.
To charge by phone, call
Ticketmaster at (919) 834-4000.
��
W
F






maam
5 77re Easf Carolinian
OCTOBER 1. 1992

��
Government operations sneak into theatres
By Mike Harrison
Staff Writer
Underhand government op-
erations might not seem like a new
or unusual concept if you watch
CNN or Headline News with any
frequency, but the concept could
very well mark an exciting basis
for a new motion picture from Uni-
versal, Sneakers.
Several men unite for secret
government operations when gov-
ernment agents threaten to reveal
theirshady, usually criminal pasts.
Dan Aykroyd stars as Mother,
a gadget-collector who has spent
18 months in jail for breaking and
entering.
Robert Red ford is Bishop, the
head of a group of high-tech pro-
fessionalsand experts whoare now
hired to break into systems.
As a college student in the '60s,
Bishop and a friend Cosmo used
rheevolvingcomputer technology
to embezzle funds from the Re-
publican Party to their own group,
the Black Panthers.
Sidney Poitier is Crease, a long-
time worker for the CIA who was
fired in 1987 for a reported "per-
sonality conflict
River Phoenix is 19-year-old
Carl, a devilishly enterprising stu-
dent who broke into his school's
computer system to not only raise
his grades but to give himself a
scholarship.
David Strathaim is Whistler, a
blind "genius for sound and Mary
McDonnell is Liz, Bishop's old
Fair
Continued from page 7
only fair in N C. mat is bringing the
bungee to thrill-seekers.
Wesley Boatwright, manager
of Outer Banks Bungee, will bring
the bungee operation to the fair
each night of the week charging
$39 for college students (with stu-
dent I.D.) and $45 for the general
public.
While bungee jumpingis fairly
new in the United States, it is not a
new event in the world. Itbegan on
an island in the Sou th Pacific within
a band of Vanitu Indians. They
would jump off bamboo towers
with vines tied around their ankles
to prove their "right to manhood
Bungee jumping then moved
to Australia and was brought to the
United States in 1985 by Peter and
John Kockelman of Palsalto, Calif.
The brothers started jumping from
bridges and eventually moved to
cranes. The Kockelmans saw the
potential for business by opening a
training company stressing safety.
They quit their engineering jobs
with IBM and have been jumping
ever since.
Recently, there has been a lot
of controversy aboutbungeejump-
ing, according to Boatwright, be-
cause of the accidents that have
occurred. However, the majority
of these accidents have been em-
ployees who were not very con-
cerned about safety.
"When it is done correctly,
bungee jumping is very save said
Boatwright.
The Outer Banks Bungee com-
pany usesspecial bungeecords that
are equipped with a safety line in-
side the cord. If anything were to
happen to the cord, the safety line
would still hold the jumper. In ad-
dition to the safety line, a large air
bag is used to keep the jumper safe.
Bruchac
Continued from page 7
Joe Bruchac isa mediumheight,
mediumbuild,medium everything
looking guy. Yet, the averageness
stops there. Bruchac is in posses-
sionof a voice that sounds as smooth
as velvet. His hand gestures, though
subtle, fit perfectly into the presen-
tation of his readings.
Bruchac's stories and poems are
full of high morals such as this.
Over and over he stated that all
people are of one circle. Bruchac
said he was part Indian, part Ameri -
can and part Afghani, among oth-
ers. Based on this knowledge,
Bruchac tells people he is a human
being when they ask his national-
ity. He claims no nationality, save
that of the human race.
flame and his current reluctant ac-
complice.
Lawrence Lasker and Walter
F. Parkes, the Academy-Award
nominated writers of War Games,
wrote Sneakers with thehelp of Phil
Alden Robinson.
"In the 1960s, no one could
have anticipated what a powerful
tool the computer would be, or
how dependent the world would
become on it for storage and ma-
nipulation of information said
Parkes.
"For as much good as it would
contribute, the computer would
also present us with a tremendous
potential for crime. Suddenly, no
information is really secure, and
we are all faced with a threat to our
privacy
The idea for Stieakers originated
at a computer convention in 1981.
It was there that Parkes and Lasker
first heard the term "Sneakers
which referred to IBM's "kid pro-
grammers
Parkes and Lasker were later
told by a small computer maga-
zine editor the term was a label for
hired experts who test the securi-
ties of companies by secretly break-
ing into them.
Robinson, Parkes and Lasker
collaborated to write the draft of
the story. "The original idea was a
high-tech Dirty Dozen said
Robinson. "It didn't occur to us
that it was taking a long time until
we were about six years into the
project
The plot changed often
through the years as research con-
tinued and new political climates
emerged. "Weall loved caper films
and we never got bored with the
characters said Robinson. "But
our storylines ranged form "Three
Days of the Hacker' to 'Raiders of
the Lost Computer
Other real inventions used in
the movie include a Braille com-
puter keyboard, an access control
system known as the "Man Trap"
and a voice stress analyzer.
Sneakers also stars Timothy
Busfield and George Heam. It is
produced by Parkes and Lasker.
Branford Marsalis ("The To-
night Show with Jay Leno") pro-
vided the sounds of the soprano
saxophone.
He worked with an 88-piece
orchestra for Sneakers in the morn-
ing and spent afternoons at NBC to
perform on "Tonight
CHICKENHEAD
KEEP LOOKING! � D
LIFESTYLE WRITERS
Meeting at 5:45 p.m. today. If you are interested in writing, come to
The East Carolinian office, meet Dana and fill out an application!
SAMS LOCK &
KEY SHOPPE
�Custom Design Alarm
Systems
�AAA Lock-out Service
�Install Dead Bolts
1804 Dickinson Ave.
757-0075
FOOTBALL
MONDAY NIGHT
t IS BAC
I Dallas Cowboys vs.
5L Philadelphia Eagles
SPECIALS INCLUDE:
�Draft Beer - 954 a glass$4.95 a pitcher
�House Hiballs $2.00
�Juice Highballs $2.25
�Double Lime Margaritas $2.75
�Double Strawberry Margaritas $2.95
�Buffalo Wings 25t each
from 4 pm - Closing
�Drawings for Prizes Every Monday I
(located behind Quincy's Steakhouse on Greenville Blvd. 355-2946)
m
rt
�&��
JL
THURSDAY
STUDENT
SHI
NIGHT
$1.00 Domestics
$1.50 Imports
$2.50 Pitchers
$2.85 Ice Teas
�LADIES FREE
ALL NIGHT
�S
Study Smart with Cliffs StudyWare

? Program includes interactive computer software and Cliffs Test
Preparation Guide
? Most comprehensive study guide on the market
? In addition to GRE, available for Enhanced ACT, SAT. GMAT and LSAT
? Compatible with VGA EGA CGA and Hercules
? Mouse compatiblepull-down menus
? Immediate feedback
? Fun and easy to useColor graphics
, � Student Stores Hours
Student Stores Moni7m;8pm-
Saturday: 11a.m. - 5 p.m.
Telephone: 757-6731
30 "S1
fcASf GAROUNA UNBVERSTTY
ECU'S Climbing Tower offers
instructional climbing workshops, drop-in
supervised climbing, individualized climbing
instruction and group instruction.
The Tower is open for Drop-In supervised
climbing MonWedFri from 3-6pm
Sun from 1-5pm
Buy a:
Day Pass $3 per day
Sunday Pass $15 for 10 Sunday's
Weekday Pass $30 weekdays
Semester Pass $40 entire semester
The Tower is located next to the Allied
Health (Belk Building) end is available
for workshops on demand.
To get involved, call 757-6387 or
stop by the ROC in 117 CG.
This entitles you to a free
CLIMB ON US!
� �f MfWFfS 4arlaf inf-in tupirvUW illmk hturt (u� lUw)
All tquipmMt it ftmAM by ECU R�ertational Strviets.
VMIMMMMMMt
HLI NEXT WEeK

ViHE BIG
PIt COUNTY FAIR
BIGgEST FAIR ERST OF RRLEIGH!
WRtH IFOR DEtRILs IN TUESDAYS PRPEr!
HIGHWAY 264 EAST
BUNGEE JUMPING EVERY NIGHT
Now Serving the Greenville and
East Carolina Community
BEST OF TRAVEL
Tour Packages
pring Break Specials
Sporting Events
Nation Wide Service
Hotel and Motel Bookings for Local,
National, and International Services.
Best of Travel will handle
all your travel needs.
Best of Travel
1801 S. Charles Blvd. Suite 3
Greenville, NC 27858
1-800-841-0666





MflBMBl
The East Carolinian
October 1. 1992
Sports
Page 9
Cagers will stay tuned
Sports Information Department
East Carolina's basketball
squad will be on television at least
three times during the 1992-93 sea-
son as part of the Colonial Athletic
Association television package.
Twenty-four games overall,
involving CAA teams, will be tele-
vised on Home Team Sports.
The HTS package also is avail-
able to Prime Network affiliates na-
tionwide and may be seen in over
25 million homes across the coun-
try.
ECU will be on HTSTrime in
games at UNC Wilmington on Jan.
30 and American on Feb. 15.
The Pirates' firs t round game in
the CAA Tournament on March 6
will also be seen on HTSas will any
other game in the conference tour-
nament.
The number of games on HTS
Prime for ECU is up from last sea-
son. The Pirates were on television
in 1991-92 against UNC-
Wilmington in Minges Coliseum
and versus American in the open-
ing round of the CAA Tournament.
The CAA on HTSPrime has
its first telecastonJan.6with George
Washington visiting James Madi-
son. The package includes 17 regu-
lar season and seven tournament
games.
The CAA also has two games
airing on ESPN this season�James
Madison at LaSalle on Dec. 10 and
Richmond at George Washington
on Feb. 15.
Zophy brings home honors
Sports Information Department
East Carolina University se-
nior wide receiver refer Zophy
wasnamed the Independent Foot-
ball Alliance Offensive Player of
the Week Monday for his perfor-
mance against Bowling Green on
Sept. 26. Zophy also plays split
end, flanker and H-back and is
majoring in Finance.
The Burke, Va. native caught
12 passes for 148 yards and one
touchdown in ECU's 44-34 loss at
Bowling Green.
For the season,
Zophy leads the Pirates
with 29 receptions for
340 yards.
Memphis State,
with a 22-6 win over Ar-
kansas, claimed the
alliance's defensive and
special teams honors.
MSU's Danton Barto
was the defensive player of the
week, registering 16 tackles, in-
cluding 11 solos, a pass intercep-

Peter Zophy
tion, a fumble re-
covery and two
pass deflections
against Arkansas.
On special
teams, Tiger
sophomore
cornerback Ken
Irvin was the spe-
cial teams player of
the week, setting an
NCAA record for blocked punts
in a game with four against the
Razorbacks.
Water ski team nearly
sinks to bottom of lake
Photo by Dail Reed � TEC
James Lewis will try to keep his eyes open this season. The Bucs will be
on TV at least three times in the CAA's cable package with HTS.
The fine art of being a zebra
Recreational Services
There isalotmoretobeinga zebra
(also known as referees or officials)
than dressing funny and blowing an
annoying whistle. Zebras have many
more responsibilities. In fact, they do
all of them in the same instant. The job
of a zebra is not only to enforce the
rulesof the game,but they also have to
ensure that game conditions are equal
for both teams, make sure that playing
conditions and environment are safe,
control the flow of the contest, and
watch for un-sportsman-like behav-
ior and apply penalties when neces-
sary. Pretty impressive for those of us
who can't walk and chew gum at the
same time!
The most important aspect to re-
member about officiating is that ze-
bras are not your enemy. They are
there for your well-being and that of
fhegameitself.Sometimesit'shard to
look at it that way when you feel that
they have made a bad call, but no one
is perfect and zebras can't see every-
thing. Without them, sports would
be so unorganized that it wouldn't be
enjoyable. Zebras are your friends.
Not just anyone can be a zebra. It
takes special qualities to endure the
warm tempera hi res and hot tempers.
It takes dedication to do a good job at
officiating.
"Tobean effectiveofficial ittakes
someone with dedication, commit-
ment, and leadership assertiveness
Gaskins said. "It takes someone who
knows the rules and the spirit of them
and then how to apply them
Intramural officials are well
trained in these aspects through the
many officials meetings and clinics
before each season. The intramural
department holds three to fourclasses
for the officials to train them for effi-
ciency. They first learn the policies
and procedures. Then they instruct
of ficialson the rules and how to inter-
pret them. After that, officials are
taught about proper positioning.
Finally, the prospective officials
are ready to sport the polyester stripes
and power-demanding whistle.They
now get to step onto the court and
show their stuff in some practice
games with an experienced guide of-
ficial. This hands on training gets you
out on the playing field and teaches
you the ins and outs of conducting a
game.
It is a true art. The zebras of the
ECU intramural staff are well-trained
and seem to enjoy their work. Some
officials like Jeff Watson, have been
an official for three years now, have
mastered this art.
"I've enjoyed being an official
Watson said. "A lot of it is knowl-
edge. You are there to keep a fair
game anil hold the composure of the
game and it's players. You don't have
to be a master of rule interpretation.
Rules are important but you have to
ma keyour own decision. If it's not by
the rules, you have to use your best
judgement
Remember, if you go to a game
See Refs, page 10
Just do it, but beware
Wire reports
Most people think that buy-
ing a,pair of sneakers any more is
only slightly easier than choosing
sides in the debate over cold fu-
sion. And now comes one more
thing to think about.
Fakes.
Few people know it � and
few could tell the difference even
if they did � but there is a wealth
of counterfeit sporting goods
floodingworld markets rightnow.
The companies that make the
shoes and tennis rackets and golf
clubs that made this pasL week-
end of recreation possible (not to
mention expensive) assure us
there is no need for panic-yet.
Because beyond the T-shirt
vendors who pop up like mush-
rooms at the sites of many major
sporting events, very few coun-
terfeitgoodsappear to have made
their way onto these shores. And
the legitimate makers of those
same goods dropped a nice piece
of change last week to let the pub-
lic and the Congress know that
they intend to keep it that way.
In its first-ever campaign
aimed at customers, the Sporting
Goods Manufacturers Association
(SGMA) bought a quarter-page
advertisement in weekend edi-
tions of USA Todav headlined
"Knock-offs Are A Rip Off This
time-honored cry of "Buyer Beware
cost the association in the neighbor-
hood of $25,000 � peanuts to a trade
group out to protect an industry
whose members shipped 531 billion
worth of product to retailers last year.
It sounds self-serving, but the es-
sence of the SGMA's message is that
you get what you pay for; that if you
happen on flea market stall where
those gel-cushioned, air-inflated, en-
ergy-absorbing sneakers are selling
at a price that sounds too good to be
true, it probably is.
"Consumers over here rarely, if
ever, come in contact with counter-
feit footwear said Mary Ann Alford,
legal counsel for shoe manufacturer
Reebok, one of the association's 1,800
member companies.
It used to be that on walked into
a store wearing leather street shoes
and walked out a few minutes later
in canvas ones with both your feet
and your wallet only a little bit lighter.
These days, though, you have to
wade through phonebook-sized
pamphlets extolling space-age ma-
terials and using incomprehensible
diagrams to explain every one of the
75 or so technical advances built in to
the shoes, racket, clubs, etc. Then
you have to decide whether the en-
dorser � Bo, Michael, Magic, Dave
or Dan? � best fits your image of
yourself at play.
By Thomas Barnes
Staff Writer
The East Carolina Water Ski Team finished
10th out of 14 schools this weekend in the
South Atlantic Conference.
UNC-Chapel Hill hosted this tournament
which was held in Lexington, N.C at Clear
Lake.
Thorhas Barnes lead the team in slalom,
finishing 14th out of 53 ski&rs, totalling 28.5
buoys.
Barnes also led the team in trick skiing by
finishing 29th out of 54 with a disappointing
fall early in this trick run.
Leading the team in the jumping division
was Jason Humrick with a personal best. He
completed two of his three jumps which made
a large contribution to the team points.
The East Carolina Water Ski Team is hop-
ing for a much better weekend, after such a
poor showing, when they go to the team trials
for the Nationals in Milledgeville, Ga. at Lake
Walmee next week.
Photo from Recreational Services
Don 'tlookdown! The Climbing Tower offersa recreation alternative to climbing the walls inyour room.
Climbing to new heights
And now you're going have to
rethink all this every time some-
bodv offers you a bargain?
In a word, yes. At least if you
plan to buy any of this stuff from
anvbody besides a front-line retailer.
According to the SGMA, some
of the counterfeit goods look so good
that they enter legitimate distribu-
tion channels with ease. The major-
ity of counterfeiters set up small,
mobile operations in Korea and tar-
get only those hard goods � shoes,
shirts, tennis rackets and golf clubs
� that can be knocked off cheaply
and have some quality-control steps
that on be cut out at a profit.
Some pr(xiucts,suchas balls and
baseball gloves, are made on mar-
gins too slim to accommodate fakes.
And other products, such as base-
ball bats and helmets, are avoided
because they can involve liability,
which in turn draws scrutiny and
ultimately, the authorities.
Which brings up the second
part of the campaign. Most mem-
bers of the SGMA apparently are
unhappv with the level of coop-
eration from a number of govern-
ments in the Far East, particu-
larly Korea. And in addition to
advertising, they plan to spend
money lobbying the U.S. govern-
ment to make those sentiments
known to someof it - trading part-
ners.
Recreational Services
Recreational services now provides a new expe-
rience to the East Carolina community. The new
climbing tower,called the Hard Rock Tower, is now
available for the use of students, faculty, staff and
occasional guests.
The tower is located in the Allied Health field
behind the Allied Health Building. It is a two-tiered
structure with the first level being 20 feet and the
second level 32 feet in height. The tower has six
stations for a six-person capacity.
The Hard Rock Tower is made of solid plywood
and has foot holds made of natural rock. The tower
is geared for various rangesof difficulty. Anyone can
use it, whether a beginner or a seasoned pro. The
hold settings are changed every now and again for
the continued enjoyment of the tower's climbers.
Instructional Workshops are held at the tower
for perspective users. Climbing I teaches the basic
terminology and beginning equipment useof climb-
ing. Climbing II is for the more advanced climbers
who wish to use the facilities. You can sign up for
these instructional workshops at the Recreational
Outdoor Center.
The Hard Rock Tower is special because any-
one can use the tower. No matter what kind or how
much climbing you might have done, the tower is
tor you. It is an excellent stress release and an outlet
for frustration. Climbing can be an excellent prob-
lem-solving activity because you don't compete
against other individuals but you challenge your-
self.
What do you have to do to use the Hard Rock
Tower?Thetowerisavailableforuseeach Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday from 3 to 6 p.m. and Sun-
day from 1 to 5 p.m
You must bring your student ID. Your first
supen'ised dropping is free. Afteryour initial climb,
you can obtain daily passes for three dollars.
Youcanalsopurchaseweekly,weekend and fall
semester passes for various prices. For information
on the climbing tower, its useor instructional work-
shops, call or visit the Recreational Outdoor Center.
'Neon'moves to 'prime time'
Wire reports
When the Atlanta Falcons play at the Geor-
gia Dome, one of the plush sky boxes will be
fullof happy-go-lucky guests, compliments of
happy-go-lucky Falcons star Deion Sanders.
Officially,Sanderscutapersonalcheckfor
an estimated $100,000 for the suite. Unoffi-
cially, it was part of the delicate contract nego-
tiations that brought Sanders back to the foot-
ball team last week. The Georgia Dome offi-
cials had been quietly asked by the club to
reserve one of the suites for Sanders. He
received an extra $100,000 from the Falcons
in his complex package to use on the luxury
box.
Is it an outrageous act of generosity by
the Falcons? Not at all. In many ways, Sand-
ers was as responsible as anybody for selling
the Georgia Dome suites.
Without Sanders, the Falcons cannot play
the gambling, blitzing defense that has made
them successful.
Without Sanders, the Falcons would have a
reputation, but they wouldn't have a personal-
ity. Sanders, Vice President of Flayer Personnel
Ken Herock says, "is the greatest athlete I've
ever seen
Wait. What about Bo Jackson?
"Bo Jackson couldn't play corner Herock
says. "Deion can play wide receiver; he could
play tailback. He can do anything
Sure, it hurts that Sanders may miss Falcons
games, but considering the alternatives-Sanders
missing seven or eight games or not playing at all.
Noway the Falcons are contenders without Deion.
Accept Sanders for what he is � a once-in-a-
lifetime athlete.
Sure, he's brash. But America always has
loved brash when brash i- backed with greatness.





10 The East Carolinian
Rets '
Continued from page9
and it's really boring, you can al-
ways watch the zebras. If you are
interested in joining this rare
breed, contact David Gaskins or
Jennifer Chapman at 757-8367.
There will be a meeting for pro-
spective volleyball officials
Wednesday, Oct. 7 at 4:30 p.m. in
Brewster C103. A meeting for pro-
spective soccer officials will be
Monday, Oct. 12 at 4:30 p.m. also
in Brewster C103.
OCTOBER 1, 1992
LOOK!
There are plenty of tickets available for the
Oct. 10 football game against Duke in Durham, N.C.
Tickets are available in the ECU Athletic Ticket
Office in N linges Coliseum for16 each. The tickets
are available on a first-come, first-serve basis and
must be purchased by Monday, Oct. S.
P.S. All sports and wiwna-be writers, must
be at the meeting in Student Pubs at 5:30 p.m.
Now Accepting
Applications
For The 1992-1993
Judicial Boards
These positions offer an excellent oppor-
tunity to gain experience and leadership
abilities that will benefit you throughout
your life. At the same time, these posi-
tions will enable you to make valuable
contributions to East Carolina University.
For additional information and applica-
tions contact the SGA office at 218
Mendenhall.
.
All applications must be turned in by
Friday, October 2nd at 5 pm
FOR SCHOOL
SUPPLIES
Smithfichi Factory !eotamlina Pottery Outlet Cento,
Exit 95 or 91,1-95, Stwihfield, NC. (919) 989-6100. MonSat. 9-9, Sun. 1-6.
Discontinuedalmost perfect sjvrfs and fitness stitff.
Harris teeter
REDUCED-
SAVE
00
40-50 COUNT
MEDIUM
SHRIMP
DELI-BAKERY
TURKEY BREAST OR
YOUR CHOICE
HARRIS TEETER LOW PRICES ALL DAY, EVERY DAY
STUDENT'S
WE INVITE YOU TO APPLY
FOR YOUR HARRIS TEETER
COURTESY CARD.
Harris feerer
YOUR, NAME
YOUR ADDRESS
YOUR CITY, STATE mil
XX 010101
1111111
IT ALLOWS YOU TO
CASH PERSONAL
CHECKS AT OVER 134
HARRIS TEETER
LOCATIONS IN
GEORGIA, SOUTH
CAROLINA, NORTH
CAROLINA, VIRGINIA
AND TENNESSEE
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS $1.00
COUPON AND SAVE.
SELECTED ENTREES - jtkti
BUDGET 399
GOURMET 9ioozV
HT KING THIN m � M
SANDWICH 2m 29
BREADloaves I
SELECTED VARIETIES -
COLA2 LTR.0Jr
BATH 168.7 SQ.FT. JTQ
TISSUE 2PLY4ROLIPK 0W
$1.00 OFF COUPON
SAVE $h00
OFF THE SPECIAL PRICE OF ONE 15 OZ.
KELLOGG'S COCOA KRISPIES
This Coupon May
Not Be Reproduced.
limit On. Coupon
Pw Family, ?i Wit
WinS Minimum
PurcWof 510.00.
Otter Good
September 30 Thru
Odobir 6,1992
3929
PLU 2046
GROCERY
COUPON VALUE
ILG8
Hsrnsfeeter
�!
VALUABLE $1.00 COUPON
$ 1.00 OFF
ANY $3.00 OR MORE
PURCHASE IN OUR
DELIBAKERY
THIS COUPON MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED.
LIMIT ONE COUPON PER FAMILY PER VISIT
OFFER GOOD SEPT. 30 THRU OCT. 6, 1992
I
COUPON
VALUE
Lvo
DeliBakery
J
Harris Teeter
PLU 2068
01
$1.00 OFF COUPON
SAVE $1.00
OFF THE SPECIAL PRICE OF ONE
6.38 OZ. KELLOGG'S FUN PAK
UCM.
NotpRroducad
$ C&toLf 61
3429
PLU 2047
GROCERY
COUPON VALUE
$1.00
Harris Teeter
ej
Prices Effective Through October 6, 1992
Pric�s In The Ad Effective Wednesday, September 30 Through Tuesday, October 6, 1 992. !n Greenville Store
Only. We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept I
iv
1 Federal Food Stamps.





Title
The East Carolinian, October 1, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 01, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.898
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy