The East Carolinian, September 24, 1992







Check it out!
Democratic Vice Presidential candidate Al Gore is
scheduled to speak on campus Monday, Sept. 28
at 5 p.m. Gore's speech will focus on the Democratic
Party's national health care plan.
The location has yet to be announced.
�'���-
Weekend Weather
Variably cloudy and cool Friday and Saturday, chance of showers.
Highs in the mid 60s to mid 70s. Lows in the 50s.
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 9
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, September 24,1992
12 Pages
Writing stressed
in new curriculum
By Kim Williams
Staff Writer
Starting in the fall of 1993, all fresh-
men enrolled at ECU will have new writing
requirements added to those needed for
graduation.
The Faculty Senate has given its sup-
port to a new program called Writing Across
the Curriculum that will require all stu-
dents to have 12 semester hours of writing
courses, said program director Dr. Patrick
Bizzaro.
These courses will include English
1100 and 1200, with an additional require-
ment of six hours of "writing intensive"
courses. At least three of the additional re-
quirements must be in the student's major.
"This is a very important program
that has been in development for the past
seven years Bizzaro said. "It is pretty clear
that students aren't writing well enough to
be successful
Bizzaro, who was director of the Writ-
ing Center for five years, conducted a study
of 100 ECU graduates and found that 82
percent of them had no writing instruction
since freshman composition. He also found
that 49 percent of incoming freshmen are
unable to demonstrate minimum writing
skills in entrance essays.
"This is a national emergency that is
causing loss of productivity Bizzaro said.
" It's not just a problem at ECU
He said students that are nearing grad u-
ation are expressing more concern about their
ability to write, and that something needs to
be done between the time a student takes
freshman composition and the time he or she
graduates.
"This will make a difference in the job
market Bizzaro said.
Bizzaro said Writing Across the Cur-
riculum is not just a program that will en-
compass the English department, but one
that will be campus-wide. "The English
department does not want to create a writing
empire he said. "We want students to de-
velop a literacy in their own disciplines
The goal of this new program is to
involve writing-intensive courses in all the
departments on campus. "It's not just the
English department that is responsible
Bizarro said.
Bizarro said that Writing Across the
Curriculum will create very few new courses
because there are already courses that can
just be redesigned. "There is no real need for
courses to be developed he said.
Students who are currently enrolled
will not be required take the additional six
hours of writing courses, but Bizzaro said
that courses will be offered to students on a
voluntary basis to help them in the future.
See Writing, page 2
The hunt is on
?.
s 3
Photo by Dail Rfd � TEC
Carilyn Green recruits students for employment at Carolina Telephone. Representatives from 52 businesses
attended ECU'S Career Day Sept. 23 to provide students with information about their companies.
Enrollment up more than 1,000 from '91
By Karen Hassell
Staff Writer
According to the Office of
the Registrar, enrollment for the
fall semester at ECU reached
17,760students which excels last
year's enrollment by more than
1,000.
Jerry Clayton, assistant di-
rector of undergraduate admis-
sions, attributed the increase to
wide-spread marketing in areas
such as Virginia, Maryland and
New Jersey.
According to Dr. Thomas E.
Powell, director of admissions,
there was a higher than usual num-
ber of applicants. He said the num-
ber of applications was above nor-
mal as early as last October and
continued to rise throughout the
fall and spring.
"Around June or July, we
will find out how many positions
we will get to accommodate the
students said Marlene Springer,
vice chancellor for academic af-
fairs.
"We have to find
out how many students
come before they will tell
us how many faculty they
aregoingtogiveus. Then,
after that, it takes us six
months to a year to search
to find the right people
Springer said the
university is going to aim
for a 2 percent increase in
enrollment for the fall of
1993 compared to the 6
percent increase that oc-
curred in the fall of 1992.
"I would like to see
managed growth so that
we can get the faculty and
the space to accommo-
date the peoplewe have
Springer said.
Faculty increases havea two-
year lag behind increased student
enrollment.
Expansion of the campus has
been delayed by the failure of the
state legislature to pass the bond
1,067
o
o

K
3,333
WOMEN
11,928
UNI EtOIAKMIfS
Q
12,000
FROM 1989
SOURCE: ECU ADMISSIONS
BIE ADAM
referendum.
The referendum would have
given ECU about $38 million for
needed construction.
The funds were to be used to
expand Joyner Library, acquire the
property of Rose High School and
develop an animal research facility.
ECU has recently signed a
lease for the peripheral build-
See Enrollment, page 2
State SAT
scores increase
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writers
In past years, North Carolina has fallen far below the
national average in its Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). However,
the state has enjoyed an upward swing in average scores since
1989.
According to State Superintendent Bob Etheridge, who was
on campus last week to speak at the Chancellor's Forum, the
state's SAT scores have improved a total of 19 points over the last
three years. The largest increase occurred this year with an 11
point jump.
Etheridge attributed the increase to society becoming more
aware of the state's children and the education they are receiving.
He said people have become more focused on the importance of
a good education and have become more supportive of their
childrens' efforts to achieve.
"All children can learn Etheridge said. "I believe that.
When people believe in the children, the children will achieve
ECU also showed an increase in SAT scores for entering
freshmen. According to Skip Kirby of the Planning and Institu-
tional Research, the preliminary average SAT scores in 1992 for
freshmen is 900,45 points above North Carolina's average score
of 855. The College Board reported the national average SAT
scores as 899 points, wh ich pu ts East Carolina one point above the
See SAT, page 3
Student runs for
City Council seat
By Jeff Becker
News Editor
The ECU student who ran for the
Greenville City Council last spring will get
a second chance to get elected.
Patrick Pitzer lost the race for the
council's at-large seat in the May 5 election,
but because of voting law violations, the
State Board of Election called for a run-off
on Nov. 3.
Pitzer, the first ECU student to run for
a council position, placed third in the three-
way race last May.
At-large candidate Jack Wall placed
first in the election with 2,784 votes, 52 more
than runner-up Chuck Patrick. Pitzer re-
ceived 611 votes.
Pitzer said he expects to receive more
votes in the run off. He said the May elec-
tion fell oneday after final exams and many
students were not in town to vote.
"If I get the students activated, 1 have
a good chance he said. "If 20 percent of the
students vote, I will win the election. Even
a 15 percentstudentturnoutmay be enough
to win it
Pitzer said the students need some-
one on the council who can speak up for
such issues as parking near campus, the
downtown Halloween celebration and the
opening of new bars downtown.
"I'm just looking to have a student's
ear and voice in things that are not billed as
student issues but directly affect one-third
of the city � the 17,000-plus students he
said.
"If students want to find out why
something ha ppened, ho w i t can be a voided,
or what they can do if they feel that some-
thing needs to be changed, there should be
someone there who they can talk to
1992-93 SGA FALL ELECTIONS
CLASS OFFICERS
DAY STUDENT REPS. I DORM REPRESENTATIVES 11 SGA VICE-PRESIDENT
FRESHMAN PRESIDENT
ANGIE NIX
SOPHOMORE PRESIDENT
SHELDON JENKINS82
VIC MORRISON142
JUNIOR CLASS PRESIDENT
RICHARD PARAVELLA
SENIOR PRESIDENT
TOMMY SPAULDING
GRADUATE PRESIDENT
MICHAEL HADLEY
FRESHMAN VICE PRESIDENT
ANGEL HATCHER
SOPHOMORE VICE PRESIDENT
DEMETRIUS CARTER128
KATHRYN BOTT99
JUNIOR CLASS VICE PRESIDENT
TROY DREYFUSS
SENIOR SECRETARY-TREASURER
ERICA LEYDIC
MICHAEL CARNES
JOEL BRYNN THOMAS
J SHELDON JENKINS
GARY BEAMER
CLAUDINE NICHOLSON
ANNA HARRINGTON
GREG LEIGHTON
REBECCA ANN LEWIS
KAREN GREENWELL
RITA HOLMES
WILLIAM L. HASSELL. JR.
JOHN WILLIAM VAN ALST. JR
RICHARD PARAVELLA
DAMON P JOHNSON
ANGIE NIX
TROY S DREYFUS
CARRETT
CHARLES MORTEZ
FLEMMINC
SHEILA BOSWELL
JARVIS
JULIE BREAZEALE
KEITH DYER 700
DAVID TYRE378
GEORGE SARTINO17
TOTAL:
(A WHOPPING)
1,134
AjWWrV
HMMIBHi





2 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 24, 1992
I
crimeSene
September 10
Brody Outpatient Center
One case of Precision Glide blood collection needles was
reported stolen from the center. A lab assistant put them in a
store room on Sept. 1, and they were not there on Sept. 9 when
someone went to get them. The needles can only be used for
drawing blood, not for injections.
September 19
Jarvis Hall-second floor
A male non-student was found passed out on the floor of the
girls' wing of the dorm, and charged with trespassing. He was
intoxicated and said he was waiting for a girl. He said he
tapped on a window of the building and was let in by a female
he did not know.
September 20
Southwest of Jenkins Art Building
A male student was attacked by five or six suspects that
jumped him while he was walking. He said one of them hit him
with a fist in his right shoulder and then was struck in the back
by another attacker's elbow, causing him to fall. The attackers
are unknown.
September 22
Harrington Field
An unknown suspect poured gasoline onto the grass of the
field, and then set it to fire. The burned area spelled out the
word DOPE. The letters were between the pitcher's mound and
home plate. There was 10 square yards of damage.
Suite 301 Belk Hall
A resident of the room left while her roommate was watching
television and left the door open. When she returned, her
roommate had fallen asleep and her jewelry box was gone. The
contents were estimated to be worth $1,015.
Belk Hall-fourth floor
A male resident was sleeping with his door closed, but not
locked. When he awoke, the drawers of both desks were
standing open and some of the contents had been stolen
including, a radar detector, a watch and a 35 mm camera.
Slay Hall-first floor
A male resident left his room for about five minutes to go to
the drink machine and closed his door. When he returned, the
door was open slightly. When he entered, a suspect was
standing behind the door. The suspect said he was looking for
someone and had the wrong room. When the suspect left, the
resident found his wallet had been stolen.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel.
Taken from Public Safety crime reports.
Enrollment
Continued from page 1
the former Rose High School.
However, the university has not
yet determined what the build-
ings around Rose High School
will be used for.
Rose High School has
moved to its new location on Ar-
lington Boulevard, and the old
building is currently being used
as a middle school.
Springer said she believes
the bond will be passed by next
November.
Writing
Noting the large enrollment,
Chancellor Richard Eakin said the
"growth clearly is not occurring
at the expense of quality but "is
matched with growth in the qual-
ity of students' academic pre-
paredness
"We started planning very
early Springer said.
"The faculty already did a
wonderful job at contributing
their time to help us. We've had
to increase some classes, but we
Continued from page 1
haven't increased them all out
of bounds.
"We went into some of our
salary savings and hired people
to take up the slack. These are
part-time people
According to Eakin, the
number of North Carolina high
school graduates fell from
72,000 in 1989 to 60,000 this year.
The graduation rate is ex-
pected to reach a low of 58,000
by 1994.
Undergraduate enroll-
ment amounted to 14,844 stu-
dents. Graduate students were
2,916.
r
. rcr�ci?te.Sr"i2rocSet
"There has been a terrific
willingness on the part of the
faculty Bizzaro said. "It has
taken awhile because we don't
want it to be a free-for-all
Bizzaro said about 40 per-
cent of universities across the
country have implemented Writ-
ing Across the Curriculum pro-
grams, but the program is being
fine-tuned to fit ECU's needs.
"Only about one in four of other
universities actually have re-
quirements he said.
Currently, workshops are
running to help train faculty
members for the new Writing
Across the Curriculum program.
Intimacy
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Walt Disney World Co. representatives will present
an information session on the Walt Disney World
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room 1028 � General Classroom Bldg. Attendance at
this presentation is required to interview for the
SPRING '93 COLLEGE PROGRAM. Interview times and
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SEPTEMBER 24, 1992
'Big Sweep' helps
clean Greenville
SAT
By Tracy Ford
Staff Writer
One-hundred and thirty-
three volunteers scouted River Park
North, Green Springs Park, Green
Mill Run, Contentnea Creek,
Faukland boat landing and Town
Commons for trash in the second
annual Greenville Big Sweep on
Sept. 19.
Everything from a dryer and
old tires to an old lawn mower
were found in the ton of trash
collected.
"Most of what we got were
floating items, the stuff we could
see on the bank said Scott Vance,
volunteer with the ECU Environ-
mental Health Science Club.
"It was very successful said
Joy Hudson, Pitt County Engineer-
KAN'S
Make A
Big Hit
This
Big
Halloween
New selection
of masks &
accessories.
417 1.vans St. Mall
Downtown
752-1750
BUY � SELL � TRADE
ing Department. "I'm glad that we
didn't collect as much this year as
lastyear because that means maybe
people are changing
In order to volunteer for the
Big Sweep, volunteers sign up and
pick-up information, a glove and a
bag at the sight they wish to clean-
up and spend as m uch time needed
to get the job done.
The majority of the items col-
lected were bottles, cans,Styrofoam,
paper, glass and plastic. "We re-
cycle what we can Hudson said.
"The beverage cans and the glass
the plastics and the six-pack rings
will be recycled if we can scavenge
them out
The state wide effort, in its
sixth year, helps collect trash
throughout the waterways and the
surrounding areas.
national average.
Etheridge said if school re-
quirements are increased and stu-
dents are encouraged to take
tougher courses, SAT scores will
increase. He said the level of diffi-
culty in high school courses must
be increased to prepare students
for the SAT as well as to prepare
them to take their place in society.
Although Etheridge ex-
pressed pride in the increase in
North Carolina's SAT scores, he
said that North Carolina is not
where it needs to be in relation to
the national average.
The East Carolinian 3
News writers meeting today at 3:30 p jil
DOWNTOWN GDFFMYIU ff
NATURAL FOODS SpCffCf
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SPECIALS INCLUDE:
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�Double Strawberry Margaritas $2.95
�Buffalo Wings 25� each
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�Drawings for Prizes Every Monday I
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Register Tuesday, September 29
at 5pm in Bio 103
foil will be h�U Weenutiay, September 30
and Tfiarday, October 1 between 2 6��
All ECU Jtuienh, faeariy A staff eligible to inter
Prizes awarded for individuals
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TH-S: 11:00 a.ml :00 a.m.
Sun: Closed (Available For Private Parties)
505-C Red Banks Road
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321-0064
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,
4 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 24, 1992
N.G legislature puts animal research facility on hold
7

By Elizabeth Shimmel
Assistant News Editor
The plans for the expansion
of ECU'S Medical School Viva-
rium are among the many things
that did not receive funding be-
cause of the denial of a state bond
referendum.
The $300 million Capital Im-
provements Bond would haveal-
lowed the general public to vote
on construction throughout the
16 campus UNC system. Propos-
als included in the bond for ECU
were a $26 million expansion of
Joyner Library, a $5 million ac-
quisition of Rose High School
and the $7 million expansion of
the vivarium (animal research
facility) at the life science com-
plex.
The animal research facility
at the School of Medicine allows
medical students the chance to
work with animals in medical re-
search.
Richard Brown, vice chancel-
lor for Business Affairs said, "The
vivarium was not singled out, it
was one of four projects we were
seeking tohaveincluded in the UNC
bond issue
According to Dr. William
Pryor, chairman of the department
of comparative medicine, the ex-
pansion of the vivarium is neces-
sary for students to benefit from the
research facility.
Two years ago, Pryor and
his colleagues at the life science
complex asked the state for plan-
ning money and received
$375,000.
Under normal circumstances,
the appropriate amount of build-
ing funds are given after the plans
have been produced. This was not
the case for the vivarium expan-
sion program.
Brown said if the economy
improves, the vivarium could get
the bond money that is necessary
to expand the facility.
"If the economy turns
around, this project is pretty high
on the list,but will there be enough
money is the question Brown
said. "If there is another bond ref-
erendum, then there will be
enough money
However, officials at the life
science complex will continue to
push foranother bond referendum.
"When the state has leftover
money, the legislature meets to
decide where the money goes
Brown said. "The vivarium ex-
pansion is currently going back
into the 1993-95 capital request
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Finding out about graduate school is us easy
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October 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20
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Ask representatives what their schools have to offer Discuss
different programs of study and obtain school catalogs and
application forms.
While there, you can even attend special workshops on various
programs of study financing your education and preparing for the
GRE tests. All for just a $3 admission fee.
QmaUi avib tlte TliJd Vtsitots
December 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8
Monday After the Miracle
February 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16
East Carolina Dance Theatre
March 25, 26, 27, 28, 29 and 30
WORKSHOP SCHEDULE
8 30 IC X) PRE-FORUM Workshop an
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The East Carolinian
-
September 24, 1992
Opinion
Page 5
Somalian crisis must be dealt with
Hunger and death thrive in Somalia,
despite the fact that food arrives daily.
Hundreds of refugees lie in the heat and
: slowly waste away because United Nations
r officials are lagging in their promised duties
; to help the failing country. The U. N. is not
the only organization lagging in help to this
destitute nation, though. Foreign countries
� including the United States � have re
called their embassy staffs, further fueling
Somalia's crash.
Soldiers destined to guard the incoming
relief food are just now coming into the
country at the port of Mogadishu, though
they were promised months ago. Other cit-
ies are still prone to attacks from rival clans,
I fighting over control of each city.
In the city of Belet-Huen, 140 armed
guards were hired so as to protect incoming
planes from bandit attacks. This past week-
end, however, security broke down. The
U.S. military has stopped flights after get-
ting a bullet in the tail of one of their planes
and private relief groups can just not handle
the 40,000 people eating daily in Red Cross
kitchens.
A Red Cross worker said that food ship-
ments were "like a drop in the ocean" even
before ths Plights stopped. 'We get 4,000
(people) here every day; but we can only
feed 1,100 the worker said. "Many will go
back home without food
A SIDEWARDS GLANCE
The time has come for countries � in-
cluding the United States � to get off their
collective backsides and reinstitute help to
Somalia. The United Nations promised re-
lief months ago and is just now fulfilling
that pledge. Though the U.N. has admitted
some fault in not getting food to the people as
quick as they should have, that is not enough.
Admitting you're careless in your duties
is one thing, but to remain neglectful after
this admission only serves as a contradic-
tion in terms. Security in Somalia is non-
existent and only when the troops receive
their orders can food be properly distrib-
uted to the people that need it the most.
Closer to home, the United States gov-
ernment needs to re-evaluate their position
on Somalia. Though no one wants to see
U.S. soldiers injured or killed in a foreign
country, common decency dictates that some
form of aid needs to be given.
Obviously, private agencies are unable
to handle the tremendous amount of aid
that is needed.
Only governments � foreign and do-
mestic � can manage the intense load that
is needed to solve the problem. Further
indifference can only compound the issue
and a definite stance must be taken. If aid is
to be given, then give it.
Empty promises will just mean emptier
stomachs.
By David J. Jones
Wake up and smell the latex
!�-
.

Ten months ago to the day,
my sister gave birth to a very
healthy looking baby boy. They
decided to name the baby Tanner
Lee White (Yeah, I know Tanner is
a little goofy sounding to me too)
butanywayTanner grew quickly
and was a very manageable baby.
For a first child he seemed to be a
real gift from heaven.
Then complications set in.
Tanner was diagnosed, at six
months, with having a blood dis-
order. I'm not even going to try to
pronounce the name of this dis-
ease, but it had something to do
with the fact that Tanner's bone
marrow was not producing blood
correctly. His red blood cells were
only being produced at 1100 the
rate of a normal baby his age. To
complicate matters even more, his
liver's rate of detoxification had
increased three-fold. The net ef-
fect of mis was that anything that
Tanner's body was producing to
fix his blood problem, his liver
was screwing up or cancelling out.
The real kicker (and the crux
of this article) is that Tanner had to.
go to the hospital again yesterday.
I asked my parents what the prob-
lem was and they said that there
was no real problem, other than
the aforementioned ones de-
scribed above. Tanner was going
in to be tested for the HTV virus. I
thought that I was going to stop
breaming. Why on earth would
they be testing a, now, ten month
old baby for HIV? Then immedi-
ately it dawned on me that the
doctors were concerned about
Tanner catching the virus because
of all the transfusions he has to
have. He has to be tested from
now on (until he is cured) every
six months for HIV and he still has
to get his transfusions once every
two weeks to keep his red blood
cell count up.
A couple of months before
the situation that I have just de-
scribed occurred, my father and I
got into a very curious argument.
We were both watching the
evening news and the story that
had just aired was about the fact
that the New York public school
system was distribu ting condoms
to its high school students for free.
He said that high school age stu-
dents should not be having sex,
they were too young and that
condom distribution simply en-
couraged them (yeah, pop's a con-
servative through and through). I
tried to give him the argument
that besides the fact that condom
distribution promotes sexual
awareness, these students are go-
ing to engage in sexual intercourse
anyway. He still didn't agree.
There was no changing his
attitude until Tanner came along.
No one ever thinks about it until it
happens to them or to one they
love (sound familiar?). It hasn't
even happened to Tanner yet and
we're all scared to death and pray-
ing with all our hearts that he
comes through this all right.
I had a friend a few months
ago (yes he's still a friend we just
don't see each other as often now
since I moved) who, to put it
bluntly snagged a new girl every
weekend. He didn't seem to care
who she was, just as long as she
was cute. I met more people in the
short year that I lived with tfjis
guy than I did the previous five
years. He couldn't have cared less
about safe sex. He was just your
typical, stupid, braindead, jerk. I
expressed my concern to him
about this particular aspect of his
life. He just feigned concern and
dismissed the discussion.
I have met many people in
this town that fit this same type
character mold, male and female
alike. Folks, this is serious busi-
ness. AIDS and other forms of
STD's are on the rise in our coun-
try. Ithas nothing to do with "Fam-
ily Values" on the decline. This
has to do with caringabout people
and giving a damn about your
friends and neighbors.
It doesn't matter if you are
bisexual, heterosexual or homo-
sexual, this is a problem that af-
fects everyoneno matterwhat their
walk of life. The next time you and
you partner decid to make love,
show some love first by utilizing
some form of safe sexual practice.
It's not that much of an inconve-
nience and it certainly will put
your consciences more at ease.
Please people, realize that
it's your blood that Tanner is re-
ceiving.
Please think first so he will
have a chance at a long and fruit-
ful life. A life that, we his family
(especially his uncle), think he
deserves.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Jennifer A. Wardrep, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Acting Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Acting Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'1, Assistant Sports Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Deborah
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Billiard, Circulation Manager
M. Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Cori Daniels, Classified Advertising Technician
J. William Walker, Opinion Page Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community.since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
JOE OF ALL TRADES
By Joe Horst
Murphy Brown and Quayle square off
The issue of Murphy Brown,
Dan Quayle and family values
may have been beaten to death
already, but I'm going to give it
one last shot to finish the beast off
forever.
The whole issue started with
remarks Quayle made about
Brown in a speech in which he
blamed the recent Los Angeles ri-
ots on a "poverty of values
"It doesn't help matters when
prime- time TVhasMurphy Brown
mocking the importance of fa-
thers by bearing a child alone and
calling it just another lifestyle
choice Quayle said.
Tempers and issues flared af-
ter this speech, finally culminat-
ing in the season openerof Murphy
Brown, telecast Monday night.
Brown rebutted Quayle's com-
ments with an out-of-character
speech at the end of the show.
Possibly the most memorable
line in the speech came when
Brown specifically addressed
Quayle and his definition of fam-
ily values.
"Perhaps it's time for the vice
president to expand his definition
and recognize that whether by
choice or circumstance, families
come in all shapes and sizes
BOB'S WALL
Brown said.
� "Family values" broadens ho-
rizons
But, of course, I have to put
my two cents in and try to get the
last word.
In a society today that no
longer conforms to the happily
married husband and wife, 2.4
kids and a white picket-fence sce-
nario, attacking single mother-
hood can only be deemed a lesson
in ultimate stupidity. Not content
to be a virtual laughing-stock for
the media, Quayle decided to
climb on his horse and tilt the
biggest windmill he could find.
Don Quixote would have been
proud.
Single motherhood has be-
come a lifestyle of choice (and also
not of choice) that is accepted
readily now because of its preva-
lence. Twenty years ago, Quayle's
remarks may rave reached a more
favorable audience. But, in the '90s,
the only response that should have
been reasonably expected was
anger.
"Family values" is so broad
and wide a concept that to bring it
up only invites confusion and
puzzlement. So many different
styles of families exist today that
to profess that one is the only cor-
rect way to live only serves to
alienate every other part of the
country.
�So, let's finish it and get on
with our lives.
Well, the time has come to
throw the last clumpof dirt on this
political hot potato(e). Quayle has
upped his tough-guy image and
proven that he can take a stance on
a controversial issue. Now, if we
could get him to make that stance
thoughtful and well-considered,
instead of spur of the moment,
then maybe we'd have a decent
vice-president
Murphy Brown's done her
part, using television as a medium
for the views of a nation. As she
says, the only acceptable defini-
tion for a family is not "a mother,
a father and children A family is
a group of people working to-
gether not just because of blood-
ties, but because of the love and
caring that they share with each
other throughout their entire
lives.
TMuff said.
By Bob Dubliablo
Racism: the product of ignorance
When did racism start? Was it
the day the first slaveships landed
in Africa?
It is true that many of the
slaves who ended up in America
were actually sold to the white
slave traders by other Africans.
The many tribes of Africa were
constantly at war with each other.
After a battle, the victorious tribe
would take the survivors captive
and trade them for various goods.
The slave traders wou Id also barge
into villages and kill the inhabit-
ants, literally kidnapping the na-
tives in order to bring them back
to America.
So, you have the slave traders
who were murderers and pilagers,
and you have the African tribes
who felt no remorse trading their
enemies into slavery. One is just
as bad as the other, but I person-
ally don't believe it was a white
against black thing, not back then
at least.
Blacks have been persecuted
for hundreds of years, but I don't
believe this was the beginning of
racism.
The atrocities that took place
during the days of slavery were
terribly unjust, but remember that
we are talking about a time when
civilization as a whole was rela-
tively barbaric. For example, back
then people thought the cure for
syphilis was to have intercourse
with a virgin!
The days of slavery are not the
direct cause of racism and anger
that we all have to deal with now
in our daily lives.
I honestly don't believe that a
black person would be mad at a
white person, just because a white
person's ancestors were
slaveowners. What a person's an-
cestors did doesn't have anything
to do with the descendants who
are here now.
I don't think racsim began
with slavery. I think racsim began
the day slavery ended.
The concept of placing this
huge group of people into a soci-
ety which is entirely different
could not possibly have suc-
ceeded. The slaves had no idea
what freedom in America felt like.
They were placed into a society
that white people had created and
lived in.
The icing on the cake was these
new members of society were a
different color. These poor people
never had a chance to fit in and
feel normal, not to mention I'm
sure many white people treated
these newly freed slaves as if they
were just that; someone that used
to be a slave. Did they think these
people would just buy a house
and settle down?
Let's switch to a different time
in history, a more recent time pe-
riod. There was a point when black
people couldn't use the same wa-
ter fountain, eat in the same res-
taurantor ride where they wanted
to on the bus. Tnere were many
great black leaders who helped
their people to survive such a time.
Lately, I have heard people
say Malcolm X has become a popu-
lar figure from history because he
was violent. People have seemed
to think that violent actions will
bring a more rapid change.
1 don't think violence will
help end racism and I don't be-
lieve Malcolm X thought that ei-
ther. I think Malcolm X did what
he thought was right for that time
period. These are the 90s. I believe
we have to use many methods to
fight racism, violence is not on the
list.
One of the main ways to fight
racism is education. Well, I can
hear everyone in readerland
groaning about how I'm another
George Herbert Walker Bush. This
is not true.
When someone hates you be-
cause you are black or you hate
me because I'm a white, we have a -
problem. If you hate me because I
have no personality, fine. We need
to educate these fools who believe
color is grounds for hatred. I'm
tired of having to suffer because of
other people's ignorant actions.
I saw a man on CNN getting
interviewed. The riots had been
over for at least two weeks. The
man stood on the charred side-
walk in front of his burned out
building. Heexplained that he had
over $50,000 worth of clothing and
other inventory in his store. He
did not have insurance because in
that part of LA it was too expen-
sive. He said he had no money in
the bank, his life savings was in
the store. He was finished. He had
nothing to his name except the
ashes of the store.
Was that man a racist? Did he
deserve to have everything taken
from him? Did his store serve as a
sacrifice to end racism?
Did the rioters interview him
to see what kind of guy he was, or
what his stand on politics was be-
fore they burned his store down?
I don't think they did, the man
was black. He is one of the people
who this violence was supposedly
trying to hel p. Does that make any
sense?
li





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HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
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COLLEGE REP WANTED:
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FUGI: Cross between moun-
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seeks friendship and corre-
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TED AND LESLIE Congratu-
lations on your engagement.
By the way, thanks for calling.
Love Dave and Kristi R.
the BETA class of Phi Kappa
Psi-TimGabosch,TonyJoyner,
Jarrett Long, Mack Pridgen,
Derek Stepp, Ken Stewart,
Steve Tyler. The Brothers.
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA
Thanks for your help with
Rush. Phi Kappa Psi.
TOTHETACHI: AtThetaChi
Bid Night we had a ball. Many
did keg stands - and that's not
all! Everyone danced until they
were sore, we hope we didn't
break the floor! Thanks, Theta
Chi, we had a blast. This Bid
Night will remain a good time
from the past! Love, Del ta Zeta.
CONGRATULAITONS PI-
RATES on that awesome win
over South Carolina! Keep it
going! Love Delta Zeta.
SISTERS: We had a great time
last week- hope you did too!
We love you guys - ya'll are
terrific! Love, the Sisters.
PERSONALS
for all the FUN! Love, The Sis-
ters and Pledges of Alpha
Omicron Pi -by the way, where
did Jana spend the night?
CONGRATS to the new offic-
ers of the Alpha Omicron Pi �
Beta Rho Pledge Class - Pres. �
Beth McGee, V.P. - Tami John- ;
son, Sec. - Bonnie "blackball"
His'er, Tres. - Susan
Baranacascel, Chaplain - �
Amanda Wichard, Jr. Pan. - �
Mary Dembroski and Lisa
Stine, Fund. Holly Fleming,
Social - Christine Zamzow,
Hist. - Julie Fisher, Song leader
- Amy Johnson, Scholarship -
Jill Woolard, and V.P. Jr. Pan. -
Kerri Sechman.
SIGMA'S We're looking for- !
ward to partying with you to-
night. Remember, anything
goes when you party with the
big dogs. The Brothers of Delta
Chi.
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CHIP Thank you for a terrific
evening Monday! I cannot be-
lieve we've been going out for
two wonderful years! You're
everything I ever wanted in a
man and more! I look forward
to many more years with you
in my life! 1 Love You, Jamie.
CHI OMEGA, Thanks for your
support during Wednesday's
Rush. Like always we had a lot
of fun. Sigma Pi
SIGMA PI would like to con-
gratulate the Epsilon Pledge
Class to the Hood: John Burgh,
Kevin Cale, Tim Clune, Greg
Daisey, Dion Hawley, Chris
Doomer, Griff Gardner, Brent
Hood, Jason Kempton, John
Kessler, Shane McEnroe, Alec
Morrisette, Chris Mercer,
Bryan Nystrom, Jack Rasnic,
Jon Slaughter, Brad Stephens,
Robert taylor and Micheal
Weigand. The Brothers!
HEY A0, what's shaken! We
enjoyed hanging out with you
during Rush. About time we
finally got together! Next time
we will get f@!ed up! Ill
SIGMA PI would like to thank
Alpha Delta Pi for their large
turn out and support during
Rush! Lets get together soon!
Call Cracker.
TO ALL FRATERNITIES:
Congratulations on a success-
ful Rush! We had a great time
helping out! Love, Delta Zeta.
KA, Congrats on you new Fall
Pledge Class. Thanks for the
invite Saturday. We had an
awesome time. Lets do it again
sometime soon. Love, The Sig-
mas
SIGMA PLEDGES: You're
doing a great job. Keep up the
good work. We're all very
proud of you. So what, you
can't bake. Just kidding Love,
The .Sisters.
DELTA CHI: Get ready for
Thursday. Can't wait to party
with you again. See ya at Pasta
Works. Love, The Sigmas.
COME OUT and see the
"NEW" STUDENT PIRATE
CLUB Tues. Sept. 29 at 7:00pm
at the Pirate Club Social Build-
ing. Both members and non-
members are invited. FREE
food �drinks �prizes. For
more info call 757540.
AN ECSTATIC ELECRTIC
EXCLAMATIO. Owhatsweet
WINE we drinketh! Our ves-
sels overflow with the
Aphrodesian Elixir of Esoteric
Illumination.
CONGRATULATIONS: To
MS. NICHOLS: Thanks for all
you do. You're an awesome
house mother. We all love and
appreciate you very much. Get
ready for Thursday Love, The
Sigmas.
CHI - O - CATCH - is just
around the corner, so girls grab
your nets and put a hook on
your poles - anything that will
help you "catch" that cuteboy.
Gents be ready to be "caught
SIG EPS: We had an awesome
time at our " Jamaicany ou Sick"
Bid Day Party. Love the Chi
Omegas.
GO PIRATES: Good luck
against Bowling Green! Love,
Alpha Omicron Pi.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI -
CHEERS! To the wildest, crazi-
est, funniest, not to mention
the drunkest guys around!
Wether it was Beth"keg stand"
McGhee, Bart Simpson and
Fred Flinstone fighting, or liz
hugging the trash can - you
guys are the greatest! Congrats
to your new pledges and thanks
DELTA CHI: Congratulations
tot he new A.M's: Robbie Leon,
Richard Chambers, Mike Ama-
zon, Brad Cratch, Jeremy Troy,
David Gorleski, Doug Johnson,
Brian Godwin, Tom Thorton,
Frank Rygiel, Tim Flory,
Dwane Tucker, Chris Smith,
and Joey Shimblabla.
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA
will be holding Rush on the
following dates at MSC. Sept.
28, 29, 30. For more informa-
tion and rides please call 758-
8126 or 758-7689. Join the best
in service sororities.
ALPHA PHI PLEDGES:
Thank you for the great job on
Sister's Appreciation Day, it
meant a lot to us. Congratula-
tions on getting your pledge
pins, you deserved it. Keep up
the good work! Love, the Sis-
ters of Alpha Phi.
ANGIE TEW: Welcome to our
Delta Alpha Sisterhood. We are
happy to have you here! Love,
the Sisters and Pledges of Al-
pha Phi.
TO MRS. THORELL TO BE:
Congrats on your engagement,
Carl is in for it now! We love
you Peyton! Your Sisters of
Alpha Phi.
TKE: We had a great time Fri-
day night! Congrats on your
awesome pledges! Your neigh-
bors, the Alpha Phi's.
BEAT SOME BUTT AT
BOWLING GREEN: You are
tough and your are lean! We
know you can pass the test, in
our eyes you are the best! GO
PIRATES! Love, the Gamma
Sigs.
CHRISTINE: Are you happy
now that I put your stupid
name in the paper. Maybe
you'll become a celebrity or
something. NQT
Announcements
RTSFXUAl-GAY-LES-
FT AN SUPPORT CROUP
Social support and activi-
ties. Meetings are closed. Call
757-676611:00-12:15Tues.and
Thurs. or 1:00 - 2:30 Wed. for
information on meeting time
and place.
HTPFNT FrR T TFE
Are you Pro-life? If so, you
are invited to join ECU Stu-
dents for Life. We offer sup-
port, information, and an op-
portunity to get involved. Call
Heather or Laurie at 758-7698
for details.
CAMPU CHRISTIAN
FFTVQWSHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray,
study God's word, be involved
in social and service projects?
Need a refuge from time to
time? Campus Christian Fel-
lowship may be what you are
looking for. Our weekly meet-
ings are at 7pm Wednesdays at
our Campus House located at
?00 E. 8th St directly across
from Cotanche St. from
Mendenhall Student Center.
Everyone is welcome. For more
information, Call Tim Turner,
Campus Minister at 752-7199.
cToi nFN KFY NATIONAL
rJrNrR society
Welcome back Golden Key
Members! Our first meeting of
the 1992-93 school year will be
held Wednesday, Sept 23 at
5:00 in Speight 202. We will
hold our general meeting and
have our election of officers.
We need enthusiastic and en-
ergetic students to run for Presi-
dent, V ice-President and Sec-
retary. If there are any ques-
tions, please contact Dr. But-
tery at 757-6444.
RFMPVING
TNrr�MPiFTFSlNMATH
fififU
Students who received a
grade of Incomplete (I) in Math
Lab (Math 0001) Spring Semes-
ter, 1992, or during wither of
the 1992 Summer Sessions,
must be sure to remove the in-
complete by 3:00pm Friday,
Oct. 30,992. Otherwise the stu-
dent will receive a grade of "F"
and will be required to register
for and repeat Math 0001.
Please bring picture I.D.
PFPFFM'nc; ARTS
SERIES.
Emanuel Ax. a pianist, and
Yo-Yo Ma, a cellist, will per-
form on Monday, Sept. 28,1992
at 8:00pm. They will perform
classical music, including
works by composers such as
Brahms, Stravinsky, Chopin,
and Beethoven.
OMTCRON PFI TA KAPPA
ODK members meeting will
be held Thursday, Sept. 24,
from 12:15 - 1:00pm in
Mendenhall Student Center
room 241. All faculty, staff and
student members encourage to
attend, for regrets cqntact Lisa
Shibley at 757-4711.
PHYSICAL FDUCATIQN
MQIQE AN" fitness
�MPFTFNCYTEST
the test is scheduled for
Noon on Friday, Sept. 25 in
Minges Coliseum. A passing
score on this test is required of
all students prior to declaring
Physical Education as a major.
Any student with a medical
condition that would
contraindicate participation in
the testing should contact Mike
McCammon or Dr. Gay Israel
at 757-4688. To be exempted
from any portion of the test,
you must have a physician's
excuse. A detailed summary of
the test components is avail-
able in the Human Performance
Laboratory room 371. Sports
Medicine BuildLig.
FruFOIJFSTKTANCLUB
Meeting Thurs. Sept 24 at
5:00pm in Mendenhall Student
Center room 8C-D-E. All those
interested in horses should be
there, call Angela 931-8453 or
Holly 931-8760 with questions.
RFqnFNT EDUCATION
Interested in getting experi-
ence as a leader and being paid
for it. Become a resident advi-
sor. Interest sessions Sept. 28 -
Tyler Lobby - 4:30pm, Sept. 29
- Cotten Lobby - 5:00pm and
Sept. 30 -Green Lobby -4;00pm.
lNTFrPTirT10NTO
MEDITATION
A short course of instruc-
tion in meditation techniques
and philosophy willmeet 10:00
-11:30am, Sunday, Sept. 27, in
the Courtney Square Club-
house (Turn right off Arling-
ton Blvd one block South of
Plaza Mall.) The course will
continue for the next two Sun-
day mornings. All are incited.
Bring a cushion and wear com-
fortable clothing.
1NTFF,VTFW SKILLS
WORKSHOP
Seniors, graduate students
and cooperativeeducation stu-
dents who need help in devel-
oping or refining their inter-
view skills are invited to a
workshop sponsored by Ca-
reer Services. Come and learn
special techniques that will
help you prepare for the job
search! The workshop sched-
ule is: Tue. Sept. 29, 5:30pm
Bloxton House; Wed. Sept. 30,
3:00pm.
M
I I





The East Carolinian
September 24, 1992
Lifestyle
Page 7
Durham Blues Festival proves
Blues tradition continues
By Andy Sugg
Staff Writer
hoto courtesy Jim Holte
Dr. James Holte, author of "The Conversion Experience in America: A Sourcebook on ReHgr is Conversion
Autobiography developed an interest in religious conversion after watching late-night teievangelists.
'Seeing the light'
Professor's new book examines religion
Good God y'all! The Fifth An-
nual Bull Durham Blues Festival
will be rocking Durham Athletic
Park on the evenings of Sept. 25th
and 26th. The festival coincides with
Centerfest, the Durham Arts
Council's annual fall arts celebra-
tion. The weekend promises to be
more than fun, with free activities
during the day and intense blues
heating up the night.
This year's line-up will carry
on the tradition of excellence that in
the last four years has showcased
renowned blues acts like Bobby
"Blue" Bland, Koko Taylor, Otis
Rush, DeniseLasalle, Dr. John, Hank
Crawford and Johnnie Clyde
Copeland.
Friday's scheduled perfor-
mances mis year include the deep,
Check it out
Vie festival rims from 7 p.m. to midnight each night.
Tickets are available from tlie Durfmm Bulls box office (1-
800-545-5244) and locally at Qukksilver Record and CD
Exdiange on 5th Street. Ticket prices are $15 (one night)
and $25 (Two-night, advance sale only).
down-to-the-roots soul of The Otis
Clay Band; the boogie-woogie, get-
on-the-good-foot piano of Marcia
Ball and the foot-stompin butt-
rollin' zydeco of Chubby Carrier &
The Bavou Swamp Band.
Saturday'sheavyweight line-up fea-
tures hit-maker Tyrone Davis, the
drippinwith-blues intensity of
Walter "Wolfman" Washington &
The Roadmasters and the powerfu I
acoustic duo Cepahs & Wiggins.
Friday'sopeningnctwillbethe
winner of the acoustic category of
the Triangle Blues Scxiotv's talent
showcase. Saturday's warm-up will
be TheBull City Blues Band, winner
of the Piedmont Blues Preservation
Society's competition.
The Bull Durham Blues Festi-
val has delivered high-intensity
blues for thepast four yearsand this
year's festival promises to do it
again.
By Joe Horst
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Flip to any late-night channel
on a Sunday night and more than
likelv, vou'U see the latest in a pro-
fusion of teievangelists. Is this just a
new fad or the newest example in
religious history? Anew book by an
ECU English professor delves into
the religious experiences of 30 indi-
viduals and the similarities of each
experience.
"The Conversion Experience in
America: A Sourcebook on Reli-
giousConversion Autobiography
by Dr. James C. Hoi te of the English
department, studies autobiogra-
phies collected from early Ameri-
can pioneers to contemporary reli-
gious leaders.
Holte said his idea for the book
came from an interest in autobiog-
raphies and an experience with his
infant daughter. He and his wife
were taking turns sirring up with
the child early in the morning.
"The only thingon television at
the time wereTVevangelists Holte
said. "So my daughter and 1 would
sit in the rocking chair watching
this kind of 'other culture' that ex-
isted
Watching these TV preachers,
Holte became interested and, with
rch, soon recognized thattheir
religi iversion narratives
served as a constant in American
history.
Holte's book is one of the first
that studies the literature aspect of
the conversion experience, with an
emphasis on autobiographical ac-
counts. Most contemporary re-
search in the 20th century focuses
on the religious and psychological
aspects of the experience.
In his introduction, Holte
breaks down the narratives into
three basic parts. "Usually, the nar-
rative starts with the person's life
before the conversion. Then, the
conversion experience itself f l!ows,
and is finished with the person's life
after the conversion
Holte further breaks down each
individual narrative in his book into
three parts also: b'ography, autobi-
ography and criticism. Withineach
narrative, Holte uses his own and
other authors' criticism to put the
narrative into its timely perspec-
tive.
One of the characters in the
book that interested Holte the most
was Dorothy Day, author of "The
Long Loneliness Day started out
as a communist and an anarchist,
subsequently being arrested for
opposing the American entry into
the first world war. Later, Day be-
camea Roman Catholic and helped
found the Catholic Worker Move-
ment.
Other conversion accounts
come from diverse individuals such
as Jim Bakker, Carry Nation, John
Woolman and Malcolm X.
A common thread that runs
through some narratives is their
conversion cKcurring when they are
in a state of stress or crisis. Psy-
chologists have theorized that this
crisis causes a personality break-
down, but a Puritan ministernamed
Jonathan Edwards explained it as
"God preparing a person to realize
his own sinfulness said Holte.
"People out of a fundamental-
ist Protestant background can tell
vou the day and time it occurred
Holte said.
"A number of other writers
said conversion is an ongoing pro-
cess rather than a particular mo-
ment. Your background determines
how you describe what happens to
you Holte said.
Admitting that autobiogra-
phies are sometimes "one foot in
fiction and one foot in history Holte
says that they are nonetheless great
stories to read.
Priced at $59.95, the book will
beavailablein some bwkstores and
libraries.
"If it sells well as a resource
book in libraries said Holte, "I
think there will be an interest in
doing a less expensive paperback
version
Emanuel Ax and Yo Yo Ma
to perform classical touches
By Chandra Speight
Staff Writer
Pianist Emanuel Ax and cellist
Yo Yo Ma will give a joint concert in
EastCarolina's Wright Auditorium
Monday, Sept. 28. The recital will
feature the music of composers
Debussy, Mendelssohn and
Brahms.
Cited as two of contemporary
music's most esteemed artists, Ax
and Ma began performing together
professionally just over six years
ago. Their joint efforts have proved
advantageous, earning them two
Grammy Awards and fillingcount-
less auditoriums with pleased lis-
teners.
Both Ax and Ma have full solo
careers as well. Ma, a relatively
young artist in his late '30s, already
has five Grammy Awards to his
name. In addition to his concert
season and extensive tours, Ma de-
votes time each year to music edu-
cation through teaching summer
classes at Tanglewood Festival
School in Massachusetts.
A Paris native, Ma began play-
ing the cello at age four. He gradu-
ated from Harvard University and
studied at Juilliard. He is married
and has two children, Nicholas and
Emily.
Photo courtesy ICM artists
Emanual Ax and Yo Yo Ma will bring their classical talent to Wright
Auditorium Sept. 28 with the piano and cello.
Ax, a Columbia University
alumnus with a French major, is
considered by his peers to be the
greatest pianist of present time.
Noted for his poetic lyricism and
unique style, Ax's 20 albums have
taken top honors.
At the age of 25, Ax won the
First Arthur Rubinstein Interna-
tional Piano Competition in Tel
Aviv, Israel. Born in Poland, Ax
came to the United States to stud vat
Juilliard. He married pianist Yoko
Nozaki and they now live in New
York City with their two children,
Joseph and Sarah.
Both holding exclusive Sony
classical recordingcontracts, Ax and
Ma plan to continue to collaborate
their musical talents. Monday's 8
p.m. performance is sure to be a
welcomeaddition to EastCarolina's
Performing Arts Series and to please
classical music lovers.
Automatic Slims
classic rock sound will
mix with Sex, Love
and Money's luird
rock to create a night
destined to leave the
audience stomping in
the aisles.
September 24 at the
Attic � Sex, Love
and Money &
Automatic Slim
Raleigh band debuts in Greenville
By Joe Horst
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
With � reminiscent of the Black
Automatic Slim belts out Southern
r them. Automatic Slim will
and Money Thursday, Sept
rock with the b
oper � � �
24 at the Attic.
Automatic Slim started out as five guys
from various musical backgrounds hanging
out at Jag Stuciuis. They nct only get their name
from Howlin' VV 'If, but their "I am who I am
and I'm a 1 a 'til I fall down and die"
ras at a tiny bar in Raleigh pr
and the band took off from there. Record pro-
ducer John Custei kr ed the sound from the
first time he heard themand has produced their
last two tapes, even helping out with the writ-
ing in the studio.
The band- three-song tape is currently
selling at record stores and their live shows
attract larger and larger crowds. The band has
performed at the North Carolina Music Show-
in lune and plan to perform Oct. 1 at the
NewSouth Musi Mlanta.
them as "five
hard plaj ingdrinkinsmokin' guyswhodow'l
.ultanl " i heir music
1 u ws their ran
talents with a vengeance.
"Easy as It Seems" jams with hard electric
guitars and a drum back-beat by veteran drum-
mer Kenny Soule that leaves the listener with
tapping feet and an overwhelming urge to play
the air guitar. "Hell come high waterTake me
tor .ill I'm worthNo sun since Mondayand
I Ye got to get back to Earth" open up the lyrics
to this rockin' introduction to Automatic Slim.
'Too High" can be classified as a bluesy
ballad which brings to mind a scene of concert-
goers holding up lit cigarette lighters. The bass
guitars of Chris Basnight dominate in this cut,
See Automatic, page 8
PERFORMANCES
1992-93 Concert Series �
Tony Cox, percussionist. Sept. 24,
faculty recital, A. J.Fletcher Recital Hall,
8 p.m.
Emanuel Ax and Yo-Yo Ma. pianist
and cellist. Sept. 28, Wright Auditorium,
8 p.m. 757-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS.
Cedric Hairston. tuba player. Sept.
25, Fletcher Music Center Recital Hall,
7:30 p.m.
Greenville-Pitt County �
"The Odd Couple Farmville Com-
munity Arts Center, Sept. 24-27, Thurs
Sat. 8 p.m Sun. 3 p.m $6. (919) 753-
3832.
Sports Card Show. Carolina East Mall,
Sept. 25-27, FriSat. 10 to 9, Sun. 1 to
5:30.(919)756-1311.
Bethel Harvest Festival, downtown
Bethel, Sept. 26. For schedule, (919) 825-
1891.
"Break Loose to the Neuse II 4th
Annual Multiple Sclerosis Bike Tour,
Sept. 26-27. (919) 781-0676.
?l
. ����� .





8 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 8, 1992
'Recherche' artists commited to the uncommon Automatic
By Lisa Williams
Staff Writer
East Carolina University's
Wellington B. Gray Art Gallery
opened the 1992 school year with
an unusual exhibition called Redier-
die.
This exhibition features 35
works by 11 artists from the Phila-
del phia African-American artists or-
ganization.
Recherche, which means "un-
common or rare helps the artists
cope with some of the issues Afri-
can-American artists must face by.
They do this by becoming a collec-
tive force who have committed
themselves to the cause.
Members of this grou p are com-
posed of mid-career artists who
have become fascinated with the
creative process. They approach it
in stylistically and philosophically
different ways.
The artists work together so
they are able to share in their artistic
growth and at the same time en-
courage individual expression.
Recherche has exhibitions in
Europe and South America, as well
as all over the United States.
The artists rely heavily on ori-
entation and abstractionand present
their works in paintings, photo-
graphs, fibers and sculptures.
Through this, they are trying to re-
flect what is going on in their com-
munity.
The fiber and weaving con-
struction titled "Retreat at Blue
Mountain" by Nannette Acker-
Clark came from some of her per-
sonal experiences both immediate
and from her ancestors.
She said her work is not
planned,each section seems to grow
from the other.
"The works I create incorpo-
rate motifs and symbols of my Afri-
can American heritage � I hope to
embody someof the traditional and
spiritual concepts in the African-
American experiences in the coun-
try Acker-Clark said.
Her visual inspiration came
froma placewhereshe worked near
the mountains. This served as a re-
treat from a certain part of her life.
Don Camp's work could defi-
nitely be considered unusual be-
cause he takes memorable photo-
graphs and places them on mirrors
so that the image never leaves you.
By looking into a mirror you are no
longer equal with the image.
Another of the artists, Walter
Edmonds, created the oil painting,
"Tornado.
"The reason behind this tor-
nado is Edmonds' wondering if
people are doing something to our
earth to cause such catastrophes.
In a lecture given by Dr. Leslie
King-Hammond of the Maryland
Institute of the Arts Thursday night
at ECU, she described these artists
as dancing spirits experimenting
with light, form, color and shape.
"These artists don't believe in
perfection so their art depends on
symbols to represent the actual ob-
jects King-Hammond said.
She continued to say that Afri-
can-American artists receive nega-
tivity from the main stream com-
munity.
In addition, the internal parts
of the African-American commu-
nity aren'tsure whether thearthelps
or hurts them.
The main objective of the Re-
cherche group is for the viewer to
leave thinkingabouttheexhibition.
Recherche will be on exhibit
through Oct. 17.
Continued from page 7
"Too High" runs down the middle
of music with a smooth type of feel.
"Slave" starts out slow witfi a
jazzy feel to it and, with the onsetbf
tlied aims, builds toasimplerhythm
of blues and hard rock. Gene Tart's
lyrics are throaty and emotional,
giving the listener an image of him
romancing the microphone. "Slave"
finishes on a hard note with guitars
and drums clashing in competition
with the lyrics.
Automatic Slim brings back
the classic rhythm of rock 'n' roll
with a style all their own. As the
press release says, "They ain't like
nobodv
STUDENTS & FACULTY
INSURANCE
with LOW RATES &
MONTHLY PAYMENTS
Specialists for:
DWI's 'Youthful Drivers
Drivers with Points
& Motorcycles
GENE B. WATERS
FIDELITY INSURANCE
Formerly
Arlington Insurance
756-4488
What to do about those long meetings
that go nowhere:
MEETINGS:
ALL RIGHT OR AWRY
A SATELLITE TELECONFERENCE
SPOYSOKKD BY: S II DIM A l.l-ADI lSIIII A
DHVI-l.OPMl-M A I'ROGKAMSA
757 4711
OCTOBER 1,1992
3:30 - 5:30 PM, MSC 244
SALES OPPORTUNITY
with the nation's leader in
college marketing and media services.
EXCELLENT FINANCIAL REWARDS
MARKETABLE BUSINESS EXPERIENCE
Develop strong skills in sales by selling local advertising in the
East Carolina University schedule of classes. Flexible hours.
Great beginning for a career in the business world. Start with a
position with American Passage Media Corp. during the 1992-93
school year. Call Linda for more info. 800-173-6-174
PUBLICATION CELEBRATION!
In honor of the publication of Luke Whisnant's novel
Watching TV with the Red Chinese
Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill
and
wmm
. � present
MJ & frenz
featuring
Luke Whisnant, guitar
Stan Simmons, drums
Ronnie Daw, bass
and direct from Nashville,
MCA staff songwriter
Mark Johnson
Awkward segues! Pointless jams !
Completely unrehearsed walls of sound!
at FIZZ, Saturday, 26 Sept, 10 PM
Watching TV with the Red Chinese is available now at the ECU Student Store.
FOR SCHOOL
SUPPLIES
Smithfichi Factory Store, Carolina Pottery L hitiet Center,
Exit 95 or 97,1-95, Smithfichi, NC. (919) 989-6100. MonSat. 9-9, Sim. 1-6.
Discontinuedalmost perfect sports and fitness stuff.
mmmmmmmmm





�rf
The East Carolinian
m
September 24. 1992
Sports
ECU v. Bowling Green
Rob's Pick
Bowling Green State University
1991 record: 11-1-0 Raisin Bowl Champions
Primary offense: Pro I
Primary defense: 3-4
Offensive lettermen returning, lost: 12,9
Defensive starters returning, lost: 10,8
Special teams lettermen returning, lost: 3,1
Head Coach: Gary Blackney (Connecticut, '67)
Record at Schu h 12-3-0 (2 seasons)
Career Record: 12-3-0 (2 seasons)
General Information
Location: Bowling Green, Ohio
Enrollment: 18,000
Colors: Burnt Orange and Seal Brown
Nickname: Falcons
Conference: Mid-American
Stadium: Doyt Perry Stadium (30,599)
Surface: Natural Grass
Series Record
ECU BGSU
1971 21 47
1974 24 6
1989 41 6
@ Bowling Green
1992 Schedule (1-2)
Sept. 5 beat WESTERN MICHIGAN, 29-19
Sept. 12 lost to Ohio State, 6-17
Sept. 19 lost to Wisconsin, 18-39
Sept. 26 EAST CAROLINA
Oct. 3 at Central Michigan
Oct. 10 OHIO UNIVERSITY
Oct. 17 at Toledo
Oct. 24 at Akron
Oct. 31 MIAMI (Ohio)
Nov. 7 at Kent State
Nov. 14 BALL STATE
'A
Gary Blackney
I have a very bad feeling
about this game. BGSU should
not scare me but they do.
Tony Davis broke his thumb
and will likely beon the sidelines
with Jerry Dillon. Davis has
started to fill the shoes of Robert
Jones, quite well (43 tackles after
three games).
Missing too is Greg Grandi-
son. He has been noticeably ab-
sent from thedefensi ve schemes,
only participatinginroughly half
the plays of his buddy Davis. I
wish I knew the reason behind the
near benching of an All-American
candidate. I understand it as
much as this campus under-
stands why Sean McConnell
starts over the Satellite.
While fm on the subject of
who starts, first quarter points
are the thing we may be missing
the most against BGSU � we
havenone,zero,zip,zilch through
three games. Might this have
something to do with the open-
ing drive? If Coach Logan wants
to establish the running game in
the first quarter, I am sure Mr.
Anderson can hand the ball off as
well as anybody.
Enough negativity. Props go
out to Junior Smith. His 133 yards
rushing are the most by any Buc
since 1990. Maybe we have a little
running game but I would rather
not find out in Ohio. Please,
Mother Nature, don't let it rain. I
want the ball in the air. The better
we throw the larger the margin of
victory.
Mark Szlachcic
G
Chas' Pick
Crystal Balls
After an exhilarating win
over the South Carolina Game-
cocks, waterlogged fans had
these comments:
"I guess when it rains it
pours, but this is ridiculous
said Byron E. Bland, a political
science major. 'This year's kick-
ing teamcan'tevenkickahabit
Weall know this year's team
is lacking in the kicking depart-
ment. By no means is that a di-
rect attack or reflection of
Michael Jacobs and DekeOwens
ability. However, the ever
present 'hypothetical situation"
has to be addressed.
God forbid, Jacobs or
Owens should go down during
the course of the season. Can the
added pressure of the special
teams kicking game be carried
by the explosive offensive and
the dominating defense? Will
one kickerpunter be able to
maintain a high level of consis-
tency?
This weekends match-up
with Bowling Green will finally
expose the weakest link in the
ECU football chain. Unless Sean
McConnell and Michael Ander-
son can totally dominate the Fal-
con defense, the opportunity for
the "last play of the game" will
sway towards the Falcons.
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Ast Sports Editor
Richard Eakin, Chancellor
Nancy Jenkins, Mayor of Greenville
Brian Bailey, Sportscaster, Channel 9
Kevin Hall, WZMB Sports Director
Courtney Jones, SGA President
Tony Pino, soph physical education
Div. I computer rankings
avg:
ECUBGSU
2827
2024
3514
3120
3424
3127
1710
2717
131
2820
"The past two games were too close for comfort. Keep your fingers crossed
"We can't kick a habit
"The Pirates air show will carry the day
"The Pirates will Bowl them over
"We'll wear them down in the fourth quarter and win by ten
"Key injuries on defense could hurt the Pirates
"The key is good defense
'Tell Logan I said put in Anderson. Why doesn't Grandison play every down?
ECU is ranked 70th and Bowling Green 87th.
(Reminder this is for entertainment onlyPleaseNo wagering.)
Logan keeps level head as Head Coach
Page 9
McCaskill traveled
long path to ECU
By Chas Mitch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
On an average weekend,
weather permitting, you can find
ECU'S Volleyball Head Coach
Martha McCaskill on the water or
on the trails. Either behind the con-
sole of an Evinrude power boat,
d ragging the line on the skis, or just
out enjoying a nature trail. She is
truly an outdoor enthusiast.
"Oh, I love the outdoors. Wa-
ter skiing, snow skiing, boating, it
doesn't matter McCaskill said. "I
just love nature
McCaskill, no stranger to natu-
ral surroundings, is from Erwin,
N.C. Erwin is a small town in
Harnett County which houses
some of the most spectacular
wooded scenery in the state.
"Erwin has changed a lot over
the years. Even though it's still
rather small, it's still as beautiful
now as it was when I was younger
McCaskill said.
During her high school years,
McCaskill played basketball and
Softball for Erwin High School, af-
ter which she went on to play soft-
ball for the Tarheels of UNC-
Chapel Hill. In addition, she gradu-
ated as a Dean's List student in
1979 with degree in Health and
Physical Education. The following
year she earned her masters de-
gree and landed her first head
coaching job.
As a Head Coach, Martha Mc-
Caskill was very successful in
-aching out to her players with
her words of love, respect and com-
mitment. She led by example and
also gave unselfishly of her time. In
her first six seasons, McCaskill
coached her Valkories of D.H.
Conley to six consecutive state vol-
leyball appearances.
But, as in all lives, a little rain
must fall. With so much success and
happinessabound,Coach McCaskill
lostborhher parents within twoyears
of each other.
'It was a hard time for my sister
and I McCaskill said. "Since their
death, I have noticed, within me, a
change for the better
After the 1985 season, McCa-
skill continued to amass an impres-
sive 10-year coaching record. In
those 10 years, she managed a 212-
30 win lost record, was twice
named Coach of the Year, while
leading D. H. Conley to a 3A State
Championship in 1986. In 1989 she
was the Female Coach of the Year in
Region I. Her teams also finished
third in the state twice, and were a
second place finisher once.
So when asked, why did she
come to East Carolina? McCaskill
just smiled and said, "I was ready
for a change. I was offered the op-
portunity to coach at East Carolina
and I felt that this was an excellent
chance for me to continue to grow
Along with her new found du-
ties, Coach McCaskill managed to
assist theSpecial Olympicsof North
Carolina. For the last two Olym-
pics, McCaskill was appointed and
servf d as the Director of Volleyball.
"It was a lot of hard work, but it
was wonderful to see the kids hav-
ing so much fun and truly enjoying
themselves McCaskill said. "ECU
and the town of Greenville were the
co-venue holders for the Olympics
the last two years and it was good to
see the community and the school
working together to help such a
noteworthy cause
Coach McCaskill, now in her
third season, has visions of success
and happiness for the 1992 squad.
With her work cut out for her,
McCaskill and Lady Pirates have
setouttoaccomplished the unimag-
inable � a winning record in the
CAA. East Carolina has been the
cellar team since the league was
formed in 1986.
"The schools in the CAA have
sound volleyball programs and are
stable in their coaching and recruit-
ing departments McCaskill said.
"This year ECU is knocking on the
door, and should rise from thebase-
ment of the Colonial Athletic Asso-
ciation
With the last winning season
for ECU volleyball dating back to
1989 (16-15), the Lady Pirates are in
a position to turn some heads, and
open some eyes in the CAA.
'This year's group of young
ladies have a lot of heart and de-
sire McCaskill said. "They have
the chemistry and the potential to
make a lot of good things happen
on the court

By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
Pirate football fans have many fig-
ures to focus their attention on this sea-
- son. There are a multitude of players
I which can distract their eyes, a list nearly
I too long to mention. Who could forget the
twoexdtingquarterbacks,McGonnelland
I Anderson? Or the defensive terrors Tony
I Davis and Jerry Dillon?
However,giventhecurrenttwogame
win streak, and the possibility of another
successful season, the attention of ECU
fans is quickly turning toward Head
Coach Steve Logan. With memories of
last year's departure of former coach Bill
Lewis to Georgia Tech still fresh on the
minds of Pirate fans, many question
whether there is an Atlanta for Coach
Logan, if the team mirrors last year's
success.
Coach Logan tells Pirate fans not to
worry. Though he said he cannot predict
the future, he added, Tm not trying to
win and leave. I would sign a lifetime
contract if I could
Logan defends
the "unbelievable
offer" received by
Lewis, but under-
stands Pirate fans
being upset with
him.
Logan, named
the Pirate's 17th
j headcoachonjanu-
- ary 11,1992, served
; underLewisfortwo
; seasonsasoffensive
coordinator and
quarterback coach,
and for one season
coaching the Pirate
I running backs.
Logan, who also
Head Coach Steve Logan said he likes to teach on game
days.
served as personal mentor to Jeff Blake, is
developingcloserelationships with Michael
Anderson and Sean McConnell. He said of
all the aspects of his job, coaching the quar-
terbacks was the most enjoyable.
"Thaf s the fun part of what I do he
said. He also said that Michael Anderson
has become more trusting of him. "If s hard
to rum your mind and body over to some-
one in totality he said. "Michael has gotten
much closer .to that
Logan said he looks forward to the
prospect of Sean McConnell becoming a
graduate assistant coach in the next sea-
son, a situation he feels would not only be
good for McConnell, but for Anderson as
well.
Logan said that one of the reasons he
enjoys his job is toe area of Greenville and
the opportunities it provides for him and his
family. He and his wife Laura have started
both their sons in little league baseball, but
he emphatically states he is not a "Little
League Dad he said. "I have no ego for
their success. Whatever they want to do is
fine with me Logan does notwanthis sons
to follow in his football footsteps, however
� he is more interested in their academic
success.
Logan credits Tulsa coach John Cooper
with being a major influence on his coach-
ing career, and has adopted his easy-going
attitude for use at East Carolina. Logan does
not allow emotion to cloud his judgement
preferring to "teach on Saturday
Logan feels the exciting brand of foot-
ball played at ECU will do more for recruit-
ing than additions to the facilities. "I watch
other football teams and get bored Logan said. "One thing you can
count on when you go to an ECU football game is being enter-
tained
Logan feels the most important thing for the program is to
maintain a winning tradition. "If you win, you recruit good players
�Thaf s what I'm trying to do, Win, Win, Win. Sometimes I'm a little
too consumed with that, but I make no apologies for winning
��
Photo by Biff Ranson � TEC
What's a Chanticleer? Who caresR They got whipped by our Ladies.
Volleyball jams with
Jimmy and Terry
By Chas Mitch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
With Jimmy Jamm and Terry
Lewis filling the airways, the Lady
Pirates took to the hardwoods Tues-
day night against Coastal Carolina.
The electrifying sounds from the
movie soundtrack Mo' Money sent
the spark needed to aid the Pirates to
a three game sweep of the Chanti-
cleers.
According to Head Coach
Martha McCaskill, thechemistry and
opportunity is there for this years
team. "I'm so glad to see our kids
respond McCaskill said. "We were
clicking tonight, on both sides of the
ball
In three games, ECU white-
washed Coastal 15-8,154,15-10. By
toe time the crowd managed to get
into the groove of the match, the con-
test was over.
"We're still struggling on our
passes McCaskill said after the win.
"Even though we were successful in
three games, it doesn't allow enough
time to work on our digs and kills
Jenny Parson had a team-high
34 assists and Leigh Wilcox led the
offense with 12 kills. Freshman
Melanie Richard sparked the defen-
sive unit with her 11 digs.
The Lady Pirates are now 4-5and
will next square off against Virginia
Commonwealth on Sept. 25.
"VCU obviously is playing well,
and they have beaten some good
teams and have continued to play
extremely well McCaskill said. "I
know that they're able to play and
play well, so we need to work on
middle fielding and we will have a
chance to compete fairly well against
them





� ���
10 The East Carolinian
Recreational Services
Flag Football Picks
Frata � M
Fraternity Purple
1. Pi Kappa Alpha A
1. Sigma Phi Epsilon B
2. Sigma Phi Epsilon A
2. Pi Kappa Alpha B
3. Delta CM A
3. Beta Theta Pi B
Men's Cold
Men's Purple
1. Pray For Rain
1. Kodiac Attack
2. Nke-N-Smooth
2. Black-N-Blue
3. Super llo's
3. Hung Lo
4. Dudes With Attitudes
4. Hitmen
5. Don't Sweat Us VI
Sororities
Women's Independent
J. Alpha Delta Pi
1. Triple Threat
2. Alpha Omkron Pi
2. What To Say
3. Alpha Phi
3. Last Minute
SEPTEMBER 24, 19S2
Ticket Info.
There are plenty of tickets available for the Oct. 10
football game against Duke in Durham, N.C. Tickets
are available in the ECU Athletic Ticket Office in
Minges Coliseum for $16 each. The tickets are avail-
able'on a first-come, first-serve basis and must be
purchased by Oct. 5.
Ladies soccer in full effect
By Jaime Pierce
Women's Soccer interest has
reached a high, with over 411 people
coming out for the team. Unfortu-
nately, only 20 can go to a game,
according to the North Carolina
Women'sStKcerLeague(NCWSL).
The same 20 will not always go to
each game, encouraging hard play
during their three practices.
This year's club team also will
be playing a more hectic schedule
then in the past. This fall season. the
scheduleconsistsoffourhome games
(UNC-Pioneers, UNCW, VA Tech,
and a team from Georgia), four away
games (Chapel Hill, Raleigh Club,
Duke and VA i I two tour-
naments at William and Mary and
Appalachian Si
This past weekend started the
Women's Soccer C lub season
againstVA rechinBIacksburg. The
Pirate i rtfen.se had s �me trouble find-
ing the back o the I tokie net, but
Tech got past the Pirate's storing
twice off corner kicks and another
dmeby an unmarked player,result-
ingina3-0k ssfoi oui LadyPirates.
The team will be at home this
Sunday at 2 p.m. against the UNC
Pioneer Ciub on the n en's Varsity
Soccer field. The Lady Pirates will
also be sponsoring a freecar wash at
the Tantrv on 10th Street, Saturday
afternoon.
ECU MEDICAL BOOKSTORE
ITU
IMSTMJMMHT
AT THE
BRODY BUILDING
2ND FLOOR
Monday, September 28th
12:3(K 1:30 pm
Regular Hours
Monday - Friday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm
Closed from 1:00 to 2:00 pm
rldJTIS XBCTBi

REDUCED PRICE
BETTY CROCKER
SPECIALTY POTATOES
TYSON-HOLLr FARMS
GRADE"A" M HI
BREAST
QUARTERS
� �!����
DELI-BAKERY
ROAST BEEF
SLICED TO
ORDER
STORE BAKED
OR
REGULAR
DIET COKE OR
COCA-COLA
HARRIS TEETER LOW PRICES ALL DAY, EVERY DAY
STUDENT'S
WE INVITE YOU TO APPLY
FOR YOUR HARRIS TEETER
COURTESY CARD.
Hatrisfeetet
YOUR, NAME
YOUR ADDRESS
YOUR CITY, STATE Mil
XX 010101
1111111
I
VALUABLE 55 COUPON
BETTY CROCKER
HAMBURGER HELPER
m 6.5-8.75. OZ.
WITH
COUPON
IT ALLOWS YOU TO
CASH PERSONAL
CHECKS AT OVER 134
HARRIS TEETER
LOCATIONS IN
GEORGIA, SOUTH
CAROLINA, NORTH
CAROLINA, VIRGINIA
AND TENNESSEE
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS $1.00
COUPON AND SAVE.
VALUABLE $1.00 COUPON
I This Coupon Mi p
Not Be Reproduced
Limit One Coupon
I Per Family, Per Visit
With Minimum
Purchase of SI0.00.
I Otter Good
September 23 Thru
September29,1992
10901000
COUPONi :
VALUE
55 ON 2
GROCERY
VALUABLE 55 COUPON
I
WITH
I COUPON
This Coupon May
I Not Be Reproduced
Limit One Coupon
Per Family, Per Visit
I With Minimum
Purchase of S1000.
I September 23 Thru
September29,1992
I 10901000
i j COUPON
I VALUE
L M
12 OZ. BOX
TRIX CEREAL
GROCERY
Hatrisfeetet
9
I
$1.00 OFF
ANY $3.00 OR MORE
PURCHASE IN OUR
FLORAL DEPARTMENT
THIS COUPON MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED
LIMIT ONE COUPON PER fAMILY PER VISIT
OFFER GOOD SEPT. 23 THRU SEPT. 29, 1992
FLORAL
VALUABLE 75 COUPON
12 OZ. BOX
TOTAL CEREAL
I I
I I
I I
I I
I. This Coupon May
I Not Be Reproduced.
I limjt Ore Coupon
I
I
WITH
COUPON
ne .oupo(
ily. Per Visit
I Per ranitly
With Mini
Purchase of 5 1
I Offer Good
September 23 Thru
c : r.ion lOO")
00
September 29 1992
10901000
Prices Effective Through September 29, 1992
Prices In The Ad Effective Wednesday. September 23 Through Tuesday September 29, 1992. Jn Greenville Store
Only. We Reserve The Right To limit 6uontities. None Sold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept
t Federal Food Stamps.





I
Fred's Corner
fiasfe
By Sean Parnell
e-�.
��
TUS "Smfcc- OF TUE
fAU- OF CcMHUNN� fvvits
NjJ tv5Pv.rWeb PiBovJE-
Loose thinking can cause Diarrhea of the Brain or Stinkin'Thinkin
Secret Agent V7
V7 ?�� ro TJtf FLANCT RyfJAH -7 Ttf DISCOVER THE
HCASOH FOK THE S71WWoisrnMAtiee Of His fount�
imer. iCiEuTur rKAEToKpmn'
By Chris Kemple
By Ferguson and Manning
1 THIMh 1 fOUuP OS A
scexemy meetms. uihi&$
CMYOUTyPF,TAhE
PICTATIOtJ, AKP COM
o :eof-
Who.
euo
emit
omAB� Voor
GpMMCATOAJS-
IttEASTFeD A0 T5�-
1lOU6,Ak)D OJSRifiLO Trie
BotiDirJi Of 7W�yWPS
By Manning and Ferguson
v�:
Rich's Nuthouse
HEY,�MZNI�- "
i-AV� You 5CCTV
A SAAANA P��L
ANYWUER� ?
by Haselrig
wmere:
I PuT it-
The Scare Bears
by Mark Brett
Important
Cartoonists
Meeting
Today
Thursday,
September 24,
7:00pm.
Roll call:
Chth fcempe.
Brie Manama
Mrlc grett
izvt$ BrosArt
Shannon White
Ale Ferguton
�exn FhrneJl
fce.n Moore
Ptid Abu I
See You There.
��� '�
Friday. September 25
Hardsoul Poets
Saturday. September 26
MANIFEST DESTINY
HOURS
Mon & Tues 11 am-3pm
Wed 11am-3pm & 9pm-1am
Thurs & Fri 11 am-1 am
Sat 9pm-1am
513 Cotanche St
located across from UBE
758-0080
��������
BUNGEE JUMPING
HAS COME TO
GREENVILLE
The Body Produces
The Most Powerful
Drug Known To
Man
EXPERIENCE IT!
150
Foot
Tower Crane
EClf's Recreational Outdoor Center offers you
the lowest adventure equipment rental prices
And the highest quality equipment in the area.
Bungee Voyages
5251 -18
John Tyler Hwy
Williamsburg, Va.
23185
SPECIAL ECU RATES
$39 For First Jump
with college I.D.
At
PITT COUNTY
AGRICULTURAL FAIR
Oct5-Oct11 6-11pm
Located At County
Fairgrounds On 264 East
Over 30
Hems available
ResidentAdviser
Join us and be a part of the team
Don't watte another weekend
Drof by the ROC from 3�m-6�m Monday-Friday
and mate reservations for your next adventure!
Far mare details eall 75? 638?
I1IP.1IIIII.1
Resident advisor applications are available
at the Office of Resident Education,
Fletcher Residence Hall.
Application deadlines
fall 1992-�Oct. 14,1992 � spring 1993- Feb. 10, 1993
fall 1993-K)ct. 13, 1993 � spring 1994 -� Feb. 12, 1994
An equal opportunityaffirmative action university.
If interested in becoming a ResidentAdviser please attend
one of the following interest sessions.
Sept 21 Monday White lobby 4:30 pm
22 Tuesday Fleming lobby 5:00 pm
23 Wednesday Jones lobby 6:00 pm
n interest
CAROLINA
ITMIVtRSITY
28 Mondav
29 Tuesday
30 Wednesday
��� �.���
Tyler lobby 7:00 pm
Gotten lobby 5:00 pm .
Green lobby 4:00 pxn
� iihmiih. mi.mi ii iirin�rrr-nr-





J
I
PURPLE & GOLD
NOTHING FINER IN NORTH CAROLINA
ATTENTION ALL'
&Wk
PURPLE &G�
NOTHINd FINER IN NORTH C
FANS
THE 1992 HOMECOMING COMMITTEE
IS PROUD TO PRESENT
IMPORTANT DATES AND ACTIVITIES
� �
HOMECOMING
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25
ALL FLOAT DECORATION, HALL DECORATION
AND CANDIDATE ENTRY FORMS DUE
(For Forms & Information Call 757-4711 or Stop By 2 10 Mendenha
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30
MANDATORY MEETING FOR ALL ENTRIES OF THE FLOAT
DECORATING AND HALL DECORATING CONTEST
4:00 PM ROOM 244 MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
WEDNESDAYSEPTEMBER 30
MANDATORY CANE
ROOM 244 MENDI
OCTOBER
SUNDAYMONDAY �TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
111213 MEET THE 8 CANDIDATES 12 NOON MALL14 CANDIDATE ELECTIONS Mendenhall 9-6 Student Stores 8-5 Croatan 8-5 Allied Health 8-5 Bottom of College Hill 8-515
FRIDAY SATURDAY
16
PIRATEFEST
5:30 PM
MALL
RAY CHARLES
8:00PM
MINGES
17
10:00AM
PARADE
DOWNTOWN
2:00PM
GAME
FICKLEN
FLOAT JUDGING, SPIRIT AWARD, AND THE TOP 10 CANDIDATES WILL BE REVEALED AT PIRATEFEST
FOR EACH MEMBER OF YOUR ORGANIZATION WHO BRINGS A CANNED FOOD ITEM
5 POINTS WILL GO TOWARDS THE SPIRIT AWARD.
SPIRIT AWARD WINNER RECEIVES A LOVING CUP AND A CASH PRIZE.





Title
The East Carolinian, September 24, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 24, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.896
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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