The East Carolinian, September 22, 1992






Opinion
Ecoscam
Clinton-Gore exaggerate environmental problems
to appeal to eco-conscious voters.
Seepg. 4 for story.
Lifestyle
Happy Birthday
Drivin' n' Cryin' opened up the Attic's
21st birthday celebration Thursday.
Purple School Bus continued the cel-
ebration Friday.
See pg. 5 for story.
Sports
'Cocks come
up short
The Pirate football team beat
the Gamecocks 20-18 .
See pg. 9 for story.
r
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 8
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, September 22,1992
10 Pages
Candidates prepare for SGA election
By Elizabeth Shimmel
Assistant News Editor
David Tyre
As vice president of SGA,
David Tyre said he would pro-
vide students not only with lead-
ership qualities, but also with in-
tentions to work. hard.
"A lot f people say I'm a
good leader, bui I always look at
myself as a hard worker Tyre
said. "I don't expect people to fol-
low me; I expect them to join me
Tyre hasa history of involve-
ment in campus programs both
here and at Shaw University,
which he attended before coming
to ECU in the fall of 1991.
Tyre said the most impor-
tant thing students need is some-
one to be on their side. "Students
need someone who has their best
interest in mind and is not afraid
to get their nose dirty to be an
advocate for students
Better library resources in-
stead of a new recreation center is
a main concern David Tyre has for
university students. "My focus is
less recreation and a little more
education
Making SGA a more active
body of student government is also
a major concern Tyre has for the
university. "SGA needs to be more
open and willing to jump on is-
sues instead of being apathetic
towards issues that affect stu-
dents
Tyre also said he hopes to
make the vice president's position
more powerful. "In the past, (vice
president's seat) hasn't been a po-
sition of power
Tyre wants to change this
image of the job he hopes to fill.
"I'm very consistent and always
David Tyre
"A lot of people say I'm a
good leader, but I always
look at myself as a hard
worker. I don't expect
people to follow me, I ex-
pect them to join me
focused These are the qualities
that Tyre hopes will win the elec-
tion for him.
"I don't want to be looked
at as a minority candidate with
just minority interests in mind; I
want to get all students in-
volved Tyre said.
Getting more students in-
volved is also something Tyre
hopes to do if he became vice
president, "I want to get more
people involved, I've never been
a spectator, I've always been a
motivator
David Tyre hopes that hard
workand dedication will helphim
win votes and take over the job as
SGA vice president.
Keith Dyer
Keith Dyer began his involve-
ment with SGA in the spring of
1990 and has continued to be ac-
tively involved with student gov-
ernment over the past two years.
Dyer has served on several
committees and said his strength
rests in his ECU student govern-
ment experience.
Before deciding what it was
that the students of ECU would
want in their SGA vice president,
Dyer met with many campus orga-
nizations and committees.
"My main job on SGA is to be
a mediator between campus groups
and the legislature, otherwise they
have no voice Dyer said.
Dyer would also like to see
funding more evenly distributed
among campus groups. "I want to
create an even playing field for
allocations, I want the groups that
deserve funding to get it in a fair
way
Formulating strong relation-
ships with community leaders to
create a better understanding be-
tween the university and the com-
munity is an important part of
Dyer's campaign platform.
"I think I'm a good person to
beonSGAbecauseI'vegotabroad
scope of everything that goes on
campus and around the commu-
nity Dyer said.
Dyer would like to increase
the number of students who vote
in campus elections by extending
the voting to two days, and to pro-
vide computerized voting. This
would make votingeasierand more
accessible to students.
Another plan Dyer has to in-
crease student involvement with
SGA is to create a newsletter to
inform students about SGA and
VP candidates
debate on WZMB
Keith Dyer
"My main job on SGA is
to be a mediator between
campus groups and the
legislature, otherwise, they
have no voice
what goes on in each of their meet-
ings, such as the passing of bills
intended to aid students.
Dyer has been involved with
the passing of several bills and
helped to write the bill to extend
Joyner library hours.
He has also been an integral
part of many other small bills that
were passed by SGA.
An important part of Dyer's
idea to increase student involve-
ment is to get more dormitory resi-
dents interested in SGA, "I want to
get more people in the dorms in-
volved in SGA, such as getting the
Residence Hall Association to help
select dorm representatives
Keith Dyer said he offers
many advantages for the student
body if he is elected as SGA vice
president because of his experi-
ence and concern for students.
By Elizabeth Shimmel
Assistant News Editor
TheClinton-Bush presidential
campaign has taken a back seat to
SGA politics on ECU's campus.
As our country's leaders ex-
change blows on national airwaves,
our own SC A vice-presidential can-
didates participated in a heated de-
bate on ECU's campus radio air-
waves.
Keith Dyer, David Tyre and
write-in candidate George Sartiano
exchanged views, opinions and cam-
paignstrategiesonWZMBlastnight.
The planned 30-minute de-
bate turned into a 90-minute in-
tense discussion with all three can-
didates fielding questions from the
debate mediator, Tim Johnson, as
well as students who called in.
The callers' questions ranged
from parking to wire tapping, and
each candidate received specific
questions from the callers.
Each candidate said his main
concern was the needs of the student
body,buteachonehaddifferentideas
on how to address those concerns.
"The Student Welfare Com-
mittee addresses the concerns of
students, and should receive more
emphasis Tyre said.
Keith Dyer said that no one
committee should receive more em-
phasis that any other, but instead,
they all deserve more attention than
they are getting. Dyer said he could
do this if he is elected because he
would be "an exact representative of
people and give them what they
want
Sartiano said that more equal
funding for all campus groups would
create a better campus society.
Sartiano was confident in his
views and opinions despite the fact
that his name will not be on the
ballot. Sartiano turned in his appli-
cation for the position one day after
the Sept. 7 filing date.
"I missed the deadline
Sartiano said. "The deadline was on
Monday, and I got it in on Tuesday
Sartiano explained that there
was some confusion as to when the
filing date was, which caused him
to miss it.
Dyre relied on his previous
SGA experience to help him answer
questions, while Tyre and Sartiano
promised dedication to the position to
carry out their campaign objec fives.
Conference discusses
African problems
By Tracy Ford
Staff Writer
Fourth annual Chancellor's Forum held
Educational and economic
development discussed
By T. Carter & M. Pitts
Staff Writers
The Chancellor's Forum, a
two-day program on "Supporting
Community Leaders Initiatives for
Quality was held on campus
Sept. 17-18 and examined issues
related to education and economic
development.
An Arkansas public health
official, who delivered the key-
note address Sept. 17, said social
problems lead to medical prob-
lems and offered suggestions for
solving public health problems in
the state.
"Ifwedon'tsmoke,eatright,
don't drink and drive or do crazy
things we expand our life at least
12 years said Dr. M. Joycelyn
Elders, director of Arkansas De-
partment of Health.
She said 57 percent of the
pregnancies in the United States
are unplanned and unwanted.
"The black infant mortality
rate is two times as much as
whites Elders said. "The United
States has the highest birth rate for
adolescents in the industrialized
world
According to Elders, $26bil-
lion is spent in the United States to
support teenage families, with
$249 million in North Carolina
alone. She suggested that a preg-
nancy-education program for chil-
dren ages 5 to 18 should be estab-
lished nationwide.
Elders said shebelieveseast-
ern North Carolina is committed
to making improvements in the
society,but said more young males
need to be educated on how to be
a good father.
The main speaker at the Sept.
18 session said one way to im-
prove education is by focusing on
the three E's: equality, equity and
excellence.
Mary Futrell, a senior fellow
at Georgetown University, said
equality means all children in the
United States have equal access to
an education, equity is fairness
and justice in educating all chil-
dren, and excellence describes the
quality of education each child in
America should receive.
"The future of the nation is
in our children she said. "The
children in America's classroom
are our dependents today. Soon
we will become their dependents
Futrell also discussed the ef-
fects of the economy and health
care on education. She said 25
percentof the nation's children do
not have access to health care,
while, at the same time, many have
access to violence, drugs and
abuse.
"We can't talk about educa-
tion without talking about what's
happeningtoourcnildren Futrell
said.
She said that the old myth of
educating the best and forgetting
the rest must be replaced with a
new reality � education must
meet the needs of deprived stu-
dents, as well as the needs of the
"best
"If we don't educate our chil-
dren today, we will pay the price
A standing-room only
crowd packed a Brewster room
on Friday for the "Window on
Africa: Democratization and Me-
dia Exposure conference to dis-
cuss problems of media coverage
in Africa.
"Several things were accom-
plished by the conference, a clash
of ideas and also some new ideas
on how to solve some of the prob-
lems in Africa said Dr. Festus
Eribo, a professor in ECU's com-
munication department.
Seven different speakers
from all over the nation had dif-
ferent ideas on how Africa's me-
dia exposure problems could be
solved.
The two day conference
gave a chance for all the partici-
pants to discuss their ideas and
bring new information to the stu-
dents of ECU.
Dr. Jo Ellen Fair, University
of Wisconsin-Madison, warned
against assigning racial meanings
in the media that would distort
the view of the American public
toward Africa.
Recognized during the con-
ference was the expense of re-
porting from Africa.This expense
causes a homogenous product,
either produced by the African
government or a single news
source to come out of Africa.
Withoutdifferentviewpointsthe
reports can become distorted.
Another problem discussed
was the education system in the
United States.
According to Eribo many stu-
dents concentrate on the United
States in their studies and don't
realize the problems in covering
other nations, such as Africa.
According to Dr. Robert L.
Stevenson, University of North
Carolina-Chapel Hill, many coun-
tries have the same problem of
inadequate coverage by larger
countries such as the United States.
"The conterence was very
successful and appeared to offer
some solutions to the problems
Eribo said.
The result of the proceed-
ings along with the seven papers
presented will be published in a
booktobedistributed tolibraries
and institutions, according to
Eribo.
The book will also be sent
to some institutions in Africa in
order to inform the African me-
dia and governments of the solu-
tions found.
"There are many solutions
to the problems written about in
the papers Eribo said.
The book will be circulated
world wide and promises to help
with media coverage in Africa by
bringing light to the subject.
ECU receives 1.4
million for repairs
ECU News Bureau
Photo by Dail Reed � TEC
Dr. Joycelyn Elders, director of Arkansas Department of Health, offers
suggestions to improve the state's public health problems.
tomorrow she said.
According to Futrell, much
of education in the United States
is political, from the number of
students in the classroom to the
curriculum that is taught. She said
U.S. government has set national
standards for America'sschools,but
has not supplied the resources to
support those standards.
See Forum, page 3
Ten physical plant projects
on campus will get much-needed
upgrades as a result of appropria-
tions approved by the UNC Board
ofGovernorsSept.il. Thecapital
projects at ECU received funding
totaling about $1.4 million.
The largest amounts will go
toward re-roofing of Brevvster
Building ($294,500) and correct-
ing state insurance and safety
code deficiencies ($193, 100).
Proposed renovations of the
Howell Science Complex, which
willcost $192,400, wereapproved.
Also approved was installation
of a sprinkler system for the
Health Sciences Library
($187,700).
A supplementary television
production studio, built toaccom-
modate physically handicapped
students in the Department of
Communication, will beinstalled
See Funds, page 3





ijV f
2 77j� East Carolinian
� - -�� ��- i �"
SEPTEMBER 22, 1992
Students boycott bookstore
Gay, lesbian and other student activists at the University of
Wisconsin are boycotting a bookstore because a lesbian employee
was fired. Lois Corcoran said she was fired from the store because
of her sexual orientation. The boycott has received support from the
Wisconsin Student Association, which represents the school's43,000
students. "We support the boycott due to a strong show of support
of the student population said Amy Friedman speaker of the
Senate. "When we have civil rights violations we should support
our students The bookstore is not officially affiliated with the
university, but is the closest one to the campus.
Visiting Russian lecturer dies
A visiting Russian lecturer died in the home of his host of an
apparent heart attack, officials at the University of Arizona said.
Viennamin Chebotayev, 53, an atomic physicist, died in the home
of Peter Franken, a University of Arizona optical sciences and
physics professor. "He seemed in good health Franken told the
Arizona Daily Wildcat. "He was a super guy, a super scientist
Chebotayev, who was doing research at Yale University, was being
considered for a post at the University of Arizona. "I'm very sorry
that his new life couldn't have begun said Richard Powell, direc-
tor of the school's Optical Sciences Center.
Loan defaulters face penalties
College and university students in Texas who defaulted on
federal loans could have part of their wages seized as the Texas
Guaranteed Student Loan Corp. tries to get back some of the $900
million in unpaid loans. There are about 250,000 loan defaulters
who attended schools in Texas. A person is in default if the federal
govemmentguaranteed the loan and no payments have been made
within six months of the payment deadline. If defaulters do not
adhere to a repayment plan, employers will be contacted to with-
hold 10 percent of their net pay. The program began in August after
45 former students were contacted that their pay was going to be
seized unless an agreement is made.
College holds 24-hour reading
A 24-hour reading will be held at Dickinson College as part of
a national fund-raising event to combat hunger and homelessness.
Share Our Strength, a non-profit agency in Washington, D.C is
coordinating the national event, in which 200 writers will partici-
pate in the "National Reading: Writers Harvest for the Homeless"
today. While most readings at other sites in the United States may
last an hour or two, Dickinson has planned the only 24-hour
reading. About 40 established and aspiring writers will participate
in the Dickinson event.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel.
Taken from CPS and other newspapers.
Career Day assists in job-hunting
Bl SINKSS CAREER DAY 1992 RKGISTRANTS-TABLE assignmfnts
Co-sponsored by ECU Career Services mid the School of Business
Tuesday. September 22. 1992. 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m General Classroom Building
This event provides an opportunity to visit with employers in an informal environment to gain
information and to share information. Many of them will return to campus in the fall or spring to
conduct interviews.
I . Roadway Express
2. Brody's
3 . Burlington Industries
4 . Fastenal Company
5 . Wallace Computer Services
6 . Maddux Supply Company
7 . Wilson Trucking Co.
8 . Social Security Administration
9 . Dixon, Odom & Co. (Accounting Firm)
I 0. Carolina Telephone
I I. Integon
12. U. S. Coast Guard
13. First Citizens Bank
1 4 . Perdue Farms. Inc.
1 5. Ferguson Enterprises
16. NationsBank
I 7. Foot Locker
1 8. Wachovia Bank of NC
19. IBM Corp.
20. APICS
2 1 . First Union National Bank
22. Duke University Employment Office
2 3. United Parcel Service
24. McGladrey & Pullen (Accounting Finn)
2 5. Internal Revenue Service
26. Andersen ConsultingArthur Andersen
2 7. Southern National Bank
28. Campbell University, Wiggins School of Law
29. The Fidelity Bank
30. Southern States Cooperative, Inc.
31. Inst. of Internal Auditors
32. Northwestern Mutual Life
33. Northwestern MutualWR Baird
34. Xerox Corporation
35. Metropolitan Life
36. Waffle House
37. Carolina Freight Carriers
38. Rent America
39. Price Waterhouse
40. ECU School of Business Graduate Programs
4 1. ECU School of Technology Graduate Programs
42. Pic-N-Pay Shoes
43. F.N. Wolf&Co.
44. Jefferson Pilot
4 S. Institute of Management Accountants
46. UNC Center for Public Television
47. Sherwin Williams Co.
48. Paul B. Williams. Inc.
49. Great American Insurance Co.
50. Belk
5 I . Coopers & Lybrand (Accounting Firm)
52. ECU Career Services
Entrance
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FALL ELECTIONS 1992
WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 23,1992
9:00 AM UNTIL 6:00 PM
LOCATIONS
1. Mendenhall 6. Jones Cafeteria
7. General Classroom
8. Joyner Library
9. Between Jarvis &
Jenkins
2. Student Store
3. Croatan
4. Bottom of
College Hill
5. Health Science 10. Belk Building
Library
BRING YOUR STUDENT I.D. AND
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�SpWV j
SEPTEMBER 22, 1992
The East Carolinian 3

Honor board handles increased violence
Forum
By Karen Hassell
Staff Writer
The university's Honor and
Review boards have been get-
ting more violent cases for the
last few semesters, according to
Student Attorney General Allen
Waters.
"We've had several cases
dealing with stolen goods, stolen
items, books, bicycles and a lot of
domestic quarrels, like between
boyfriend and girlfriend Wa-
ters said.
The Honor Board is the first
board that a person goes through
when they appeal sanctions given
to them by the dean of students,
Waters said.
The dean of students pre-
sents sanctions for someone who
has done something in violation
of the Honor Code.
If the student is not satis-
fied with the ruling of the dean,
then he or she can take the case to
the Honor Board.
The Review Board is the ap-
peals court. A case may be taken
to this board after the Honor
Board rules on it. No new evi-
dence may be presented during
the Review Board case.
The seven-member boards
are made up of students who nor-
mally apply during the begin-
ning of the spring semester.
The current boards were
only recently completed due to
delays during the change-over of
attorney generals last spring.
Universityjudicial cases are
separate from public or city
courts. Students have the option
of filing a complaint outside of
the university.
The student contacts a law-
yer who then files the charges
with the magistrates office down-
town.
"That's happened almost
every time we've had an assault
case Waters said. "What hap-
pens downtown is completely
separate from what happens on
campus
Tailgating before football
We Want You!
The East Carolinian is now
hiring typesetters! Please
apply at our office, 2nd floor
publications building.
The Department of
Resident Education
is presently taking applications
for students who are interested
in serving on the
Residence Hall conduct Board
QUALIFICATIONS
�Must have clear judicial record
�Must have and maintain a 2.0 G.P.A.
�Must have resided in the residence
hall one semester and must be
presently residing in a hall
All interested candidates should
obtain an application from
110-A Fletcher Residence Hall.
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games has also been posing some
problems.
"We've been getting several
cases surrounding football Wa-
ters said. "Everyone gets pretty
wild about that. With these sort
of activities you are almost cer-
tain to have some cases come up
every week
Preliminary hearings are
held on Monday, with the attor-
ney general readingout the rights
and informing the accused of the
process and the procedures.
"1 think it's a really good
system Waters said.
"I think it's one of the stron-
gest judiciary systems I've ever
heard of outside of the U.S. court
system. I think every student is
treated pretty fair, and I think
everyone is innocent until proven
guilty
As a ttorney general, Wa ters
represents the university to pros-
ecute students who have violated
the Honor Code and or policies
and regulations as presented in
the student handbook.
Handbooks are available to
all students free of charge at vari-
ous areas around campus.
ECU's honor code states,
"You are on your honor not to
cheat, steal or lie
Continued from page 1
Futrell said everyone must
work together to make education
America's number one priority.
"Our children and their edu-
cation must be n-imber one. If we
are going to make America num-
ber one, we need to make our chil-
dren number one
Other speakers a t the Forum
included Bob Etheridge, state su-
perintendentof public instruction,
Rose Mary Lowry, president-elect
of the North Carolina Association
of Educators and Charles Evans,
memberof the University of North
Carolina Board of Governors.
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Funds
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Continued from page 1
in the basement of Joyner Library
at a cost of about $133,000.
Other repair and renovation
projects receiving funding were:
HVAC Chiller Replacement and
Repair�$109,300; re-roofing the
Old Cafeteria Building�
$102,000; renovation of the tennis
courts near Minges�$59,4000;
removal of asbestos from the
steam tunnel�$58,400; repairs to
campus streets and walkways�
$51,500.
The major capital project
planned for the coming months i�
construction of the $5.3 milliofl
625-seat Todd Dining Hall on Col-
lege Hill.
The Board of Governors
approved funding for the facility
by issuance of tax-exempt rev-
enue bonds at a 5.66 percent rate
of interest.
Alsoapproved were repairs
to Ficklen Stadium, funded by a
bank loan, and use of Traffic rev-
enues to pave a parking lot near
Brody Medical Sciences Building.
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Ask representatives what their schools have to offer Discuss
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While there, you can even attend special workshops on various
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layhoiise
1992-1993 Season
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October 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20
CXmaki and the fliciit UkHois
December 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8
Monday After the Miracle
February 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16
East Carolina Dance Theatre
March 25, 26, 27, 28, 29 and 30
iRnmen and Suite!
April 22, 23, 24, 25, 26 and 27
Five Terrific Shows for ONLY $35.00
?Matinee dates with a 2:00 p.m. curtain. .
All other dates are evening shows with an 8:00 p.m. curtain.
Charge by phone:
(919)757-6829
or, By Mail:
East Carolina Playhouse
East Carolina University
Greenville. NC 27858
or, Come By:
McGinnis Theatre
Monday - Friday
10:00 am until 4:00 pm
���� i�in s mwa �wrMMtMiriip





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The East Carolinian
September 22, 1992
Opinion
Page 4
Right to vote includes SGA election
Amendment XXVI of the Constitution
of the United States grants any citizen over
the age of 18 the right to vote in all public
elections. If, as American citizens, we all
were to take advantage of this right perhaps
we would be content with our society. In-
stead, we sit by quietly and allow our gov-
ernment to make decisions with which we
do not agree.
East Carolina University may only be a
small part of this nation, but when it comes
to elections, the rules of democracy and a
free society still apply.
The university may take away a lot of
our rights, but as students, we are all able to
vote in any open election held on campus.
This is one right the university cannot take
away from us.
By making an informed choice and vot-
ing in campus elections, we can change the
face of campus politics � that is when our
university will begin to work for the stu-
dents. Only when voter apathy is eradicated
can we fully and reasonably expect the uni-
versity to work toward student goals, not
administrative goals.
The Student Government Association
consists of a small number of students that
serve as representatives of the needs of the
overall campus. These representatives' cam-
paign platform ideas are a critical part of an
election. We all have the opportunity to
agree or disagree with their opinions and
ideas. The small minority of students who
choose which candidates will make up the
SGA are the few that take the time to be
informed.
The majority who do not take the time
to be informed seem to be the most outspo-
ken against the decisions and judgments of
the SGA. Perhaps these people would not be
heard criticizing the SGA if they made the
effort to choose, as a well-informed voter,
which candidate best suited their needs.
SGA elections will be held Sept. 23 at
various convenient locations around cam-
pus. All you need to vote is your ECU iden-
tification card and an opinion.
If being able to choose is so important,
yet so simple, why should you not go to the
polls? If you decide not to vote, you have to
live with your decision.
No one else.
Just you.
Clarification:
In the Sept. 10 issue, we inadvertently mislabeled a campus spectrum article ("Could it be that
rights were violated?") as a regular columnon this page. The author, Jess Tucker, is not employed
by The East Carolinian, and therefore, the article should have been placed in the Letters to the Editor
section. We, the Editorial Board, would like to express our sincere apologies for any misunderstand-
ing that may have resulted from this incident.
Thank you,
The East Carolinian Editorial Board
A VIEW FROM ABOVE
By T. Scott Batchelor
Ecoscam hypes up environmental problems
U. The National College Maga-
zine cameoutlastweek with what
itcalledan "Environmental Issue
Twenty slick-production pagesde-
signed to imbue the reader with
an eco-conscious shade of green.
The front page proclaimed in big
letters, "Earth Crisis and the left
margin said, "The sky is falling
referring to the thinning of the
ozone layer.
I'm sure a chill ran down the
spines of many who read of the
impending environmental doom,
much as the infamous radio broad-
cast of The War of the Worlds sent
listeners into a Martian-fearing
panic. I detect a parallel here.
H.L. Mencken once wrote,
"The whole aim of practical poli-
tics is tokeep the populacealarmed
(and hence clamorous to be led to
safety) by menacing it with an
endless series of hobgoblins, all of
them imaginary Enter Al Gore.
Ronald Bailey, author of
Ecoscam: The False Prophets of Eco-
logical Apocalypse, writes in the
Sept. 14 issue of National Review
that "Gore is a pretty conventional
Democratic liberal But when it
comes to the environment, Sena-
tor Albert Bore is an out-and-out
radical Goreoutlines these views
in his book Earth in the Balance:
Ecology and the Human Spirit.
Tree huggers are renowned
for their lengthy and grandiose
environmental poritifications, and
Gore is certainly no exception.
"At the heart of his world
view writes Bailey, "is an apoca-
lyptic vision of an Earth teetering
on the brink of destruction
Indeed, it appears that the
senator suffers from a disturbing
case of tunnel vision when it comes
to the environment. In his accep-
tance speech at the Democratic
Convention, Goreannounced that
"the task of saving the Earth's en-
vironment must and will become
thecentral organizing principleof
the post-cold-war world
And back in February, when
NASA theorized about a new
"ozone hole" which might form
over the northern hemisphere,
(which, by the way, never materi-
alized), senator Gore sounded this
tocsin on the Senate floor, "We
have to tell our children that they
must redefine their relationship
to the sky, and they must begin to
think of the sky as a threatening
part of their environment
I would like to call this sort of
speech hyperbole, but hyperbole
is recognized as 'figurative' lan-
guage. Unfortunately, Gorespoke
literally .This is not to counsel dis-
missal of all charges of abuse of
the environment. Of course there
are transgressions. Rather, a more
rational, less visceral dealing with
the issues facing us is needed. But
"rational" is not part of Gore's
lexicon.
According to Bailey's article,
Gore wants to shut off all debate
over the validity of ecological
apocalypse theory. In the Jan.2,
1989issueof Time magazine,Gore
asserted, "That term is no longer a
matter of any dispute worthy of
recognition 11 is this kind of blan-
ket statement of erroneous infor-
mation that is misleading the pub-
lic into a knee-jerk reactionary
environmenUlism.
A recent Gallup poll, Bailey
reports, found that of scientists
actively involved in global climate
research, 53 percent do not believe
global warminghasoccurred, and
30 percent say they don't know,
leaving only 17 percent who be-
lieve global warming has begun.
Even a poll commissioned by
Greenpeace found that 47 percent
of climatologists don't believe we
face the risk of a runaway green-
house effect and only 13 percent
believe such an event to be prob-
able. "Not exactly a solid scien-
tific consensus for catastrophe
says Bailey.
Here is where the crux of the
matter lies: Do we know enough
about these supposed Earth-
threatening phenomena to reach
any sound conclusions?
The answer is no. So, should
we trust the second highest office
in the land to a man who fever-
ishly charges off to save the world
from the imaginary dragon of en-
vironmental doom? Again the
answer is no.
Remember that in November.
And, as Ronald Bailey puts it, "re-
member whose judgement put
him on the ticket
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Jennifer A. Wardrep, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Acting Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Acting Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Assistant Sports Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Billiard, Circulation Manager
M. Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Cori Daniels, Classified Advertising Technician
J. William Walker, Opinion Page Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
The Eas' Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (M9) 757-6366.
Distributed by Tribune Media Services
$eM&CK wfficW? RUWOT
A SIDEWARDS GLANCE
By David J. Jones
Education is first step in improvement
I was driving back from my
parent's house about a month and
a half ago and I came upon what
appeared to be a funeral proces-
sion going down the highway. I
began to get really irritated be-
cause I was going to be la te getting
back to school and I had a class
that night. To my surprise, as I
came upon the line of cars I no-
ticed that there were police cars in
front and in back of the proces-
sion. Yes friends, you guessed it,
this was the Ku Klux Klan parade
heading towards Ayden to one of
their annual marches.
Obviously, I was disgusted
that such a throwback to the Ne-
anderthal, seclusionary principles
of a segregated society such as the
Klan purports could still exist.
When traffic let me, I switched
into the left hand lane, passed the
cars and made it to my class just in
time.
Being an education major I
am of ten asked, "Why do you want
the aggravation of trying to teach
aclassroomfullofbelligerentchil-
dren fordisgustingly low wages?"
That's an easy one.
I want to try to shed some
light into the minds of children
who are being raised by parents
with minds narrower than my vi-
sion after a couple of hours at
Splash during dollar night.
Now before I get lambasted
for speaking out against the free-
dom of speech and expression, let
me say this. I firmly believe that
the Klan has every right to march
and speak in public. I object to
having to pick up the tab for it.
A couple of months before the
Ayden march, the Klan marched
in Kinston. It cost the city of
Kinston $40,000 dollars to pro-
vide the protection against pos-
sible riots. I pay taxes in this state
and my parents pay property taxes
in Lenoir county. It was my money
that went to pay for their march to
ensure that no harm would come
to anyone by means of riot vio-
lence.
People need tobetaughtabout
such things and they need to find
out how things relate back to them.
How many of you out there
really have even the faintest idea
ofwhattheplatformofeitherpresi-
dential candidate is? How many
of you think your parents know
anything about Bush or Clinton?
Do you even know how to go find
outonce you realize that you know
nothing? And are tomorrow's vot-
ers (that's today's high school stu-
dents) ready to take on the re-
sponsibility of putting their lead-
ers in office?
Education is the only way to
show everyone the light of knowl-
edge. Yeah I knowitsoundscomy,
but it's not. Think about it, inner-
city schools are literal war zones.
The drop- out rate is at its highest
point ever in the history of this
nation.
Students are graduating high
school and they don't even know
how to read (but boy they sure can
play sports). Folks, theseexamples
are travesties of justice and they
are not the fault of the students.
They are raised and educated in a
system tha t teaches them that these
examples are facts of life.
Teachers are burning out
faster than colleges can put out
new ones to take their place. And
I'm not even going to go off on the
level of pay tha t is offered to teach-
ers. Teachers are the bestowers of
knowledge to young.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Columnist wrong in accusing Jones
To the Editor:
I don't want to start a "snow-
balling" effect with the matter of
SGA politics but I feel some things
need to be straightened out. The
article "We Need A New SGA
President" appalled and infuriated
me. I would like to give a little "Bit
O'Thought" myself to the student
body on this issue.
Last year Courtney Jones and
Sherry Smith did run together in
the SGA elections. Both had the
experience and knowledge to fore-
see the tasks they wanted to ac-
complish. Both of them also had
my support as well as other SGA
legislators, Greeks, non-Greeks,
minority students, graduate stu-
dents and many other people. The
Student Body did "take action on
their own" and voted for them by
a landslide. Courtney, however,
received even more votes when
the students voted for either can-
didate, they did not have to vote
for the other one. The ballot did
not state "vote for both Jones and
Smith
Courtney ran her election with
a "modicum of integrity" and did
not use any "unethical means
She had no idea before the elec-
tion orduring the campaign Sherry
would have to quit because of not
filing for the exemption status. Let
me point out executive of ficers can
be exempt for the summer itiner-
ary with no problems if they fol-
low the proper pr .edures.
Courtney Jones did not run
for the position to represent a so-
rority or fraternity or any other
group. She simply wants to serve
the students in the best way pos-
sible and to "fulfill the obligations
of Presidentas well I invite David
Jones and any other student who
share his views to attend the SGA
legislative v,o�Hngs this year.
Courtney is a valuable asset
to the SGA and to the Student
Body. It was her experience that
won the election for her and not
her running mate. Her chances
would not have been "wiped out"
if she had run single-handed. She
has done an outstanding job and
she has only just begun.
If you wish, David Jones, to
have another election to follow
the footsteps of Carolina�that is
your view. I'm sure ECU does not
want to foIlowCarolina's lead. For
one thing, we are at East Carolina
University�something to be
proud of and not the "laughing
stock of the North Carolina Sys-
tem The idea of another election
is ludicrous.
Let me add just one more view
of mine. I encourage all the stu-
dents to vote and get involved
with their Student Government.
Students truly have the power in
Student Government.
Lisa Berting
SGA Secretary
Athletic Director apologizes for mistreatment of flag
To The Editor:
Iamwritincyou in response
to the letter to the editor which
was published in the Sept. 17
issue of The East Carolinian.
My name is Jeffrey Davis. I,
too am a proud alumnus of ECU
and I am the assistant athletic
director for operations and
equipment. I superviseand man-
age a group of fine voung men
known as "Event Staff" for our
daily athletic department opera-
tionsand gameday preparations.
These young men are the
"back bone" of our department,
handlinga variety of tasks, while
putting themselves through col-
lege, sometimes working 50
hours a week.
I am heartily sorry that you
felt appalled in the manner in
which the American flag was be-
ing folded. Admittedly, it was
not the proper technique in
which the flag should have been
folded, but, I never witnessed
the flag being draped upon the
ground.
I never saw it touch the
ground, but if it accidentally did,
my staff meant no disrespect to
the flag or this country to which
you and many others have served
so proudly and courageously.
I do empathize with experi-
ences during the Vietnam War; I
can't even imagine the pain and
suffering witnessed during that
period. I do, however, have the
utmost respect for any woman
or man who serves their country
with honor, dignity and respect.
I appreciate your candor and
yourconvictions for what the flag
and America stand for:God, free-
dom, justice and the ability to
forgive others and respect your
fellow man.
Lessons are learned every
day in life and I'm positive one
was learned last Saturday by ev-
eryone involved.
Jeffrey L. Davis
Assistant Athletic Director
Operations & Equipment





The East Carolinian
September 22, 1992
Lifestyle
Page 5
Photo by Dail Reed � TEC
Purple School Bus proved to audiences Saturday night at the Attic's 21st birthday that they re not "just
another (Grateful) Dead cover band
Reggae and soca shine
with Gray and Sunfire
By Stacey Peterson
Staff Writer
Have VOU ever tried to define
reggae music? Wh.it is the appeal
of its danceable heat?
Reggae for most people con-
jures an idea of Haile Selassie (Ras
Tafari), the late Ethiopian emperor
who will save the hlack man from
the white man's oppression.
To Americans, reggae repre-
sents Rasta musicians with
dreadlocks, smoking cigar-size
joints and singing in patios to
rhythms bouncing like a rubber
ball.
Terhapsa more simplistic way
to describe reggae is "drunk uncle
harry" dancing inspired by a
greedy mind and booty.
Roily Gray and Sunfire, one of
the first reggae bands to play in
North Carolina, brought their
brand of reggae soca to the New
Deli Saturday night.
Roily Gray, born in Spevside,
Tobago, has been playing reggae
since 1972. He has played in vari-
ous groups such ,is Los Chicotos,
Jamaicaway and Firesticks.
( ray and his present band
Sunfire moved from Boston to
Chapel 1 nil in ll78 and have been
providing the southeast with their
variety of Caribbean music ever
since.
I he music of Roily Gray and
Suntire is considered soca (a mix-
ture of Calypso and funk).
This music, not really Bob
Marley and not really the Miami
Sound Machine, is a tickle on the
string, between guitar and bassand
heavily gartered around key-
boards.
The four regular members of
Sunfire are Joel Keel, bass guitar
and vocals; Wayne Sneed, drums,
percussion and Vocals; David
Woodward, keyboards and syn-
thesizers, and RollyGray, lead vo-
cals and guitar.
Cray, the leader and manager
ofSunfi re, writes most of the band
material and is now the president
of Leap Records in Chapel Hill.
"Some see it as political musu
said Gray.
"But I don't see like that It
goes beyond politics, i do a few
political songs, but most are pen o
ful love songs, dance music
loel Keel remembers back in
the early '80s when the band first
came to Greenville. "We used to
play at J.Js music hall th.it used to
be.H ross from The Attic 'said Keel.
"The people in Greenville have
always been very good to us, I
would like to thank everyone who
hasever been to one of our shows
After Saturday's show, it looks
like a eenvi I lew ill see another de-
cade of Sunfire fans.
Sunfire begin the Deli show
with a guest appearance bv Kins
kola who sang "Song ot Love
Gray and Sunfire continued with
"I Admire You and "(lot to Know
You Better all of which are son
off their la testalbum Let Your Body
Move.
As the night went i n, the band
covered more familiar groups with
coversofPeter bosh's "Equal Rights
and Justice" as well as songs by Bob
Marley and Ziggy Marley.
The highlight of the show was
"I Shot the Sheriff
I 'rummer Wayne Sneed san
on this song with a voice that Im-
mediately reminds one of a B'70s
A.M. radio station.
Roily Gray and Sunfire have
the history, the stamina and the
originality of being pioneers of
reggaeand soca music in the United
States.
Accord ing to Signal magazine,
"Sunf ire's biggest asset is its ability
to communicate with the Ameri-
can Audience. I he Ivrit sare easily
understood while the beat pirates
your hemoglobin
Purple School Bus jams
with continued birthday
Attic rocks to ring in 21st year
By Julie Totten
Staff Writer
The Attic featured Purple
School Bus Friday to continue the
celebration of their 21st birthday.
(Her SIX) people filled the Attic
before midnight to listen to the
seven-man band.
"lust another Dead cover
band is what I thought. So many
bands lean on covers to boast their
popularity or perhaps to make a
familiar connection with the au-
dience, when in fact what the au-
dience really wants is a true, au-
thentic message. This message-
was delivered bv the band and
clearly met the audience's de-
mands; originals. To mv surprise,
well over half the music per-
formed was written ev the band.
Furple School Bus was
formed in January of 1991 and is
composed of Jesse Jennings, key-
board; Todd May, drums; Bemie
Taylor, bass; Mark Harris, saxo-
phone; Scott Scala, vocals; Micah
IVetin,guitar; Kevin Sledge, gui-
tar.
This ensemble works well to-
gether to create emotional inten-
sity while still reflecting indi-
vidual talent. The guitars and
drums took the spotlight with
lengthy jams tacked onto the ond
of many songs.
Kim Rose, a junior at ECU,
said: "The drummer Todd May
- he does one of the best live
shows. I fe lets the audience know
"Everyone seemed to be so open-minded. As
far as our originals are concerned this is tlie
most open-minded audience we liave played
for so far
Members of Purple School Bus
he feels every beat he makes
Many people at the show
tended to compare Furple School
Bus to the Grateful Dead.
Lee Wheeler, an ECU senior
said, "They Purple School Bus
are the next Dead Others, like
myself, tried not to compare, but
rather listen for an original flair.
The band fears that many
people will stay away from their
shows because of the vicious
"cover band" image. Teetin said:
"I don't like being compared to
the Grateful Dead. Widespread
Tanic went through the same
thing. Let's see how far our music
will take us
According to the members of
Purple School Bus, they were very
pleased with the crowd. "Every-
one seemed to be so open-minded.
As far as our originals are con-
cerned this is the most open-
minded audience we have plaved
for so far said members of the
band.
The show came to a close
around 2 a.m. Besides giving Gre-
enville a great show, Purple School
Bus also enticed the crowd to look
beyond theobviousGrateful Dead
influence and listen for the origi-
nality in their sound.
This week at
the Attic
Sept. 24
Automatic Slim
opening for
Sex, Love and Money
Sept. 25
Mike Edwards and
the Banned
Sept. 26
Chairmen of the
Board
Pholu
Roily Gray, leader of Roily Gray and Sunfire. brought .i
Calypso and funk music to the New Deli Saturday night.
by OKI Hanson
mixture ol
Allen returns to form with 'Husbands and Wives'
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
plied before, namely shooting the lance the viewer from the happen-
film as if it were a quasi-documen- ingsonscreenisthejuxtapositionol
tarv.c ariol iPalma'9 inematogra past and present. A sense ot i onfu-
Husbandsand Wives, which was phy achieves a frenzied brilliance sion domini the film as to the
shown at E U a. a ,pe. lal ineak ,e camera jerks ,um jostles Con chronological order ot the events
preview, marks,) return to form for stantlv producing the effed that a whn h transpire.
Woody Allen. hand held camera is being used - lise ot Allen craftiness,
Despite the well-deserved criti- Iheintentofthistechniqueista the viewer is made to feel like a
asm thai wmeofhis more re. nl make the viewei realize thai he or voyeur. Allen shows the viewer the
films have sparked, the notion that sheiswatchingafilm Moattemptis most private ol convei iations be
Allen's mind has gone barren need made to involve the viewei in the tween people Husbands and V
to be dismissed. I hough many re- � v, riimr H(,lt aloofness i � i � probably his mostopenly xual
curring themes run through las communicated by me camera Ih.u him. ei
films he almost always manages to aloofness is accentuated by thecon udy(Mia Farrow) talks ab
create an interesting piece of cin- stant breaks in the story pmduced he, diaphragm to Gabe (Woody
emtu arl byhavinginterviewswithme tory Allen)before ?x;Sally(Jud I favis)
In Husbands .�, Wives Allen characters talks to hei therapisl freel) ol oi
uses a technique he has never ap Another technique used to dis gasms; lacl (Sydnej Pollack) Iis
tens to his friend viv idly de N i il
the actions of a call girl he knows.
I he predominate viewer response
is laughter caused bv the discom-
fort felt by having to witne s these
intimate conversations.
(ne ot the many reasons ih.it
Husbands and Wixxs works so well is
the multi-talented cast Although
Mia barrow emi 'le i a - mill h as a
wet noodle, the re a of the ai lie . .o.
and ac tors do marvelously well.
Special mention should be
madeof Sydney Pol lac k's portrayal
ol ,ii k, a man rei enllv separated
from his wife Sally. ai k falls madh
in love with it aerobii S instTUCtol
hall In � age who tall of a itrology
and lofu and who argues that
Shakespeare wrote about a King
Leo (as opposed to Lear).
Pollai k has already proven
himselfaqualitydiret torwith films
like Three I fays of theondor, c hit of
Africa and Footsie (in whi h he
plaved Dustin Hoffman's agent).
Now he also shows thai he has a
wonderful ability toa t. I Iis recent
i ameo in Death Becomes Her, as the
emergent v room do tot who ex
amines Mei ylStreep'sbn ikennei k,
was a bi ight snt in the film
I he m i i iew an ling fa el ii
Husbands and ivi i Woody
See Husbands, paged
Lit review
showcases
North
Carolina
writers
By Andy Sugg
Staff Writer
The assumed difference be-
tween joumalsand magazines isthat
journals are full of scholarly infor-
mation and have no pictures, car-
toons or Budweiserads.a magazine
is readable and fun, a journal is tech-
nical and boring. Enter the North
Carolina Literary Review, a new jour-
nal with refreshing writing that
showcases writers with North Caro-
lina connections.
Editor Alex Albright of ECU's
English Department says the NCLR
is "not just another literary maga-
zine or jargon-laden academic jour-
nal. It is a serious and entertaining
magazine whose purpose is to ex-
plore and explain the connections
four centuries of writers have had
with North Carolina
Features in the premiere issue
of NCLR include an interview with
,n. a new poem by A. R. Ammons;
a reminiscence on the late Randall
a rrett, by fel It vv pi et Fred Cliappell,
including three Jarrett poems; a pro-
file if IHth century explorer lohn
Lawson ("John Lawson: Gentlemen,
Explorer, Writer") and a photo-
graphic essay on North Carolina
migrant workers.
Regular departments include
Archives ("the Papers of Fred
Chappell at Duke University") and
Freedom of Spee h (Gene Lanier's
"Burned Anything Good Lately?" is
.i must read for those opposed to
censorship).
I ho N( LR is thought-provok-
ing and lucid. (let your copy .it the
Student Store and leleCted book-
stores tor $7.0. Single i opies ami
suhst riptions n' available by mail
(single issue price is $9 postpaid;
subscriptionprii eis S15 year, �
two years); mail orders should be
sen! along with a i he, J oi money
order payable to Nil IK to the
I111 iepartmenl ol English, II
No.theieaienolndwei .ei ad






6 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 22, 1992
Ramones release
'Bizarro' album
The Ramones have recently released their new album, Mondo Bizarro, an amalgamation of the weird.
Twelve new songs and one remake combine to tickle the musical taste buds.
By Bobbie Perfetti
Staff Writer
It took them three years, but the
Ramones have finally recorded a new
album to tickle our musical taste
buds. Entitled Mondo Bizzaro, the
band has given us 12 new songs and
one remake to jam to.
"The songs deal with some very
serious issues said Joey Ramone,
in a press release. "But on the whole
I think this is a very optimistic al-
bum
"Censorshit one of the tracks
on Mondo Bizarro, complains about
Tipper Gore and her parental advi-
sory labels that are being placed on
certain albums considered explicit.
"Strength to Endure" is a love song
�Ramones' style.
The band recorded a funky re-
make of The Doors' song, "Take It
As It Comes while "Poison He;irt"
contains lyrics that will bring people
back to reality. The refrain reminds
us how cold and uncaring our world
has become: "I just want to walk
right out of this world 'causeevery-
body has a poison heart
"I wanted to make the ultimate
Ramones album Ed Ramone said.
"That's what 1 think we've done
The New York based band came
onto the music scene in 1976 with
their album, "The R.imones The
band toured that year in England
around the same time that punk mu-
sic came into popularity. The
Ramones are said to be the catalyst
for punk.
"No group in the last 18 years
has been more important or influen-
tial, including the Sex Pistols said a
Spin Magazine article about the
Ramones.
The Ramones even starred in a
moviecalled Rock V Roll High School.
They also have written soundtracks
for both Pet Semetary I and Pet
Semetary .
Overall, Mondo Bizarro is anamal-
gamation of the extremely weird and
is well worth the listen. But beware,
do not listen to the entire album in
one sitting; nerves will be frazzled by
the third song. Instead, take each
song one at a time, sit back and enjoy.
To those who have never listened
to the Ramones or just do not like
their music, a word of advice � keep
an open mind; you might just sur-
prise yourself and buy their new al-
bum.
Husbands
Continued from page 5
Allen's writing. His wit has only
grown sharper, albeit more biting,
with age. So many wonderful lines
percolate through this film.
In a book that Allen's character
is writing there is a line about life,
"Life doesn't imitate art, it imitates
bad television
Judy complains to Gabe after
they have had a fight and he now
wants to have sex, "You use sex to
expresseveryemotionexceptlove
One interesting occurrence that
canbenoted fromexa mining Allen's
body of work is that the films in
which he stars are almost always
superior to the ones in which he
does not. Allen adds a neurotic pres-
ence to the films in which he acts
that always elevates those films to a
different, comic plane.
Although Husbands and Wives
cannot enter into thecinematic pan-
theon the way his best three works
Annie Hall, Manhattan and Hannah
and Her Sisters) have done, it does
deserve commendation for its style
and wit. NotsinceCriinesandMisde-
meanors has Allen managed to craft
such a rich work of art.
Although Woody Allen is not
to everyone's liking, Husbands and
Wives deserves to be seen. Even
those who do not like Allen cannot
help but find parts of this film to
enjoy.
Editorial
Columnists And
Typesetters
Needed.
Please Apply at
the Student
Publications
Building.
Editorial Columnists
Meeting Thurs 430
at Pubs. Bldg.
(Oh yeah, bring your I.D.)
VOTE
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The East Carolinian
September 22, 1992
Sports
Page 7
Pirates scared by 'Cocks in Columbia
By Michael Albuquerque
Staff Writer
It all came down to 37 yards
and a foot � the foot of USC
placekicker Marty Simpson.
Simpson, who had already
made four field goals earlier in the
gamefincludinga personal-best 50-
yarder), lined up from 37 yards
away with 0:15 left, and as his kick
sailed toward the uprights, it faded
wide to the right, giving East Caro-
lina a dramatic 20-18 win over the
stunned Gamecocks.
Even more remarkable, this
play came just 10 seconds after
Simpson's first chance at a game-
winning, 36-yard field goal.
On third downrt and 10 at the
Pirate's 19 yard line, the crowd of
60,030 stood to its feet, sensing a
South Carolina win as Simpson
lined up for the field goal.
What the USC fans did not
count on was ECU linebacker Tho-
mas Jones, who blocked what could
have been the game winner.
"The coaches told us he was
kicking the ball low Jones said
after the game.
"They said wecould get it if we
jumped up the middle
Jonesdid get it,butSouth Caro-
lina recovered the ball and since it
was then fourth down, had one
more chance for victory. Until
Simpson's second attempt sailed
wide right, that is.
"Therewasno time to get emo-
tional about the second kick
Simpson said. "After the second
kick 1 was very sad, but too much
was happening in between kicks to
get nervous
As dramatic as the last seconds
of the game were, they could not
overshadow what was perhaps the
Cult hero revealed
� "First downPirates!

; By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
j The scene is the same every
Saturday. A near-capacity Ficklen
stadium crowd watches its ECU
quarterback drop back into the
hotgun passing formation, avoid
me oncoming defensive rush, and
complete a 15 yard pass to one of
fiis awaiting receivers.
The crowd erupts into a deaf-
ening howl, applauding the tre-
mendous play of its offense. Their
team is in scoring position, poised
to seize the game from their rivals.
Then, just as the celebration
begins to quiet, a baritone voice
explodes over the stadium's pub-
lic address system: "Quarterback
Michael Anderson's pass is com-
plete to Morris Letcher for a gain
of 15 yards
The crowd braces in antici-
pation of what is to come. They
know this speaker quite well, and
the exciting message he is about
to deliver.
Finally, the deep voice ends
their suspense: "The ball is spot-
ted on the Virginia Tech 20 yard
line, where it is FIRST
DOWNPIRATES
The Ficklen crowd erupts again.
East Carolina football an-
nouncer John Mooreenjoys h;s role
in inciting these Greenville "riots
and views the fame of his broad-
cast style with those who attend
East Carolina football games as
"flattery
Moore recalled distinctly how
he developed the pause between
"First down" and "Pirates" that
has brought him a cult hero status
with football fans all over eastern
North Carolina.
"It was something that sort of
evolved around three years ago
he said. "I announced that there
wasa firstdown,and subsequently
closed down the mic to check some
statistics. I came back on and said
'Pirates' and it just sort of kept
going from there
Moore, an announcer for East
Carolina football games since 1984,
credited WNCT-TV's Jim Woods
for helping him get his job. "When
Jim had to stop announcing, he
recommended me for the job he
said. Moore knew Woods through
his 13-year experience at WNCT
radio.
Moore and his wifeof 24 years,
Diane, have lived mostof their lives
in Eastern North Carolina, except
for Moore's 13 month service in
Vietnam in 1968-9. Moore has
worked in broadcast radio since
1976.
He said it is "mind-boggling"
how East Carolina has grown in
the last decade. "If you had told me
that would have happened lOyears
ago 1 would never have believed
you
Moore said the enjoyment of
his job was due to his participation
in high school football � enjoy-
ment which carries into the an-
nouncing boom.
"Working with East Carolina
football isoneof the greatest things
I've ever done he said. "It's a big
thrill, a big thing in my life. Some-
times, after the game, the job turns
intoasocial event. It's terrific work-
ing with some of the wonderful
peoplefromourschool. People like
Lee Workman and Jeff Charles are
always a big help
Moore mentioned that the
sporting staffs from Syracuse, Pitt,
and Temple were all "class acts
butthestaff from the Universityof
See Moore, Page 8
One-on-one tourney
begins today
Recreational Services
Recreational Services will be holding a drop-in, one-on-one
basketball tournament on September 22nd and 23rd at
Christenbury Gym. This is designed to work around Wednesday
and Thursday class schedules, but you may compete both days.
You may sign up for the event from 4-4:30 p.m. on the given day.
The two items required for participation in the tournament
are a competitive spirit and an ECU ID. Both male and female
students are encouraged to participate.
The tournament is self-officiated and also single elimination,
so you must call fouls carefully! The winr irofech day's tourna-
ment will receive a priceless T-shirt and Michael's spot on the
Bull's roster.
The one-on-one tournament is a Program Enrichment Activ-
ity designed for the fun and enjoyment of the students.
Other PEA programs this fall include a frisbee disc golf
accuracy contest on October 6th and a Volleyball Serve Contest
October 21st. If you have any questions about these or other
recreation programs, call 757-6387 for additional information.
weirdest Pirate football game ever.
Less than two minutes into the
game, a torrential downpour began
that would not let up until midway
through the third quarter, soaking
the field and setting the tone for a
sluggish game by both teams.
"The rain affected our play tre-
mendously ECU head coach Steve
Logan said.
"Our offense did a good job
adjusting to the ground game, and
I'm extremely proud of them. We
strive for a balance offense, and I
think we achieved that tonight
Key USC penalties on both of-
fense and defense, combined with
an ECU fourth down and 14 yard
conversion on a fake punt by
Michael Jacobs helped lead the Pi-
rates (2-1) to their second straight
dramatic win.
"(Derek Batson) showed his
composure by breaking a tackle on
the fake punt and got the first
down Logan said. "I think that
was a key play in the game.
"Our team was not scared this
time at Williams-Brice. In 1990, we
were mostly sophomores, and 1
credit our upper dassmen with this
win
However, one sophomore who
deserves his share of credit along
with the upperclassmen is quarter-
back Michael Anderson, who threw
three touchdown passes and once
again helped lead the Pirateoffen.se.
Senior quarterback Sean
McConnell started his third straight
game for the Tirates but both quar-
terbacks seemed to have trouble
finding their rhythm in the heavy
rains until Anderson hit Clayton
Driver in the second quarter with a
45 yard pass to the South Carolina 7
yard line.
"With the rain a factor, the main
thing we wanted to do was make
first downs and hold onto the foot-
ball Driver said.
"South Carolina played hard.
Beating a good football team in a
hostile environment gives us the
confidence that we can win any-
where in the nation
East Carolina now rides a two-
game high into Ohio on Saturday to
face Bowling Green. However,
South Carolina and Head Coach
Sparky Woods faces a different fu-
ture with a seven-game losing
streak.
"We couldn't have played any
harder tonight Woods said. "We
put ourselves in a position to win,
but we just couldn't make it hap-
pen.
"Wecertainly improved, that's
thegood news. The bad news is that
we didn't improve enough to win
theballgame
Photo by Dail Read � TEC
This year's rugby team may be our best yet. as well as a national power this season.
Ruggers tame tigers, 50-0
By Richard J. Hooton III
Staff Writer
On Saturday, the East Carolina
Rugby teamexpected a tough match
against theClemson ruggers. What
they got was an easy season opener,
winning 50-0.
The Tirates began gearing up
for the Tigers during the last three
weeks, due to the hard fought 6-6
tie the previous season. Their new-
coach Larry Babit has been helping
the Pirates "clean up" the play as
well as perfect some much needed
strategy into the game plan of the
team.
In the first five minutes East
Carolina dominated the loose plav.
The first score was the result of a
line-out set up by Bert Hewitt and
Bob Thomas. The outcome was a
pass to Rich Hooton going straight
up the middle and over three de-
fenders for the first Pirate "try
Richard "Opie" Moss came close to
making the kick-after, but was un-
successful.
At the 15-minute mark the Pi-
rates were again close to the Tiger
try-zone when Bert Hewitt scooped
up a loose ball in a "ruck" and
blasted in with multiple defenders
clinging to him. The kick by Moss
was deflected by the post, and
missed the mark.
The Tigers began to get things
rolling on thewingbutwerequicklv
subdued by the aggressive tackling
of Casey Craigand Scott Major. The
two were responsible for causing
costly mistakes in the Clemson wing
leading to the Pirate scrum taking
charge of the dropped balls.
The next East Carolina score
was -caused by the "terrible two-
some" when a ball was dropped by
a Clemson Winger and flanker
Linwood O'Briant snatched it up
and passed to Jason Webb who
scampered 25 meters for the Pirates
third try in the first half of play. The
pointafterwould notbedenied this
time as Moss put the ball straight
through the uprights making the
score 17-0.
The East Carolina team sur-
mounted anotherattackbefore time
ran out as Jay Keller caught a line-
out and was driven into the try-
zone by Jack Cote. The kick after
was again made and the score at
half time was 24-0.
The Pirates changed their plan
of attack and began to run straight
up the middle. Sean Miller lead the
scoring drive with a crisp pass to JJ.
McCain who zig-zagged his way
through Clemson would-be tack-
lers for the fi fth try of the day, Moss's
kick was again successful. The next
three tries were due to East
Carolina's ability to capitalize on
See Ruggers, Page 8
Beck in love with game
By Bob Owens
Staff Writer
Like most American kids, Mike
Beck grew up on sports. At an early
age he learned to swing a bat and
begin to master thestrange grip used
to throw a football.
Eventua I ly he learned not to "step
in the bucket" when standing at the
plate, and finally accomplished
throwing a football in a spiral � sort
of � in backyard games with his
friends, He was your average, all-
American boy, butsomething wasn't
quite right.
He liked to kick tilings.
Hediscovered soccer at age five,
and by the time he was 10 it was an
all-consuming passion. After school
he would set up a small goal against
the garage wall and fire shots past
imaginary goalkeepers and friends
alike.
"Oh, I broke a few winck ws,got
in a little trouble said Beck. The
desire to learn control and still have
glass in the family home sent Beck to
practice juggling and ball control be-
side tlie new die power lines behind
his house. Day in and day out, Beck
found time to master the ins and outs
of the game. It paid off.
"In college soccer, everything is
moreintease-youdon'thaveasmuch
time to do things. In high school, if
you weregixdyou could pretty much
just dribble up the field. Here it's
faster, and instead of only having
three or four gtxxJ players on the
other team to worry about, all 11 are
good
Despite his love for the game,
there is one sore spot for Beck, the
treatment of the soccer program at
ECU, a school traditionally focused
around the Tirate football program
"They (the Athletic Department
and Athletic boosters) could be more
su ppi rti ve. Everything In Terevorves
around football. If we had some
more money (for scholarships) we
could get better players, get some
better equipment, and be more com-
petitive
Although ECU has over 17,000
students, the focus on putting foot-
ball first has shown when they face
schools with 3,000 students, such as
the University of Richmond, and
lose.
One thing the soccer team does
enjoy more man football isa personal
bond with their fans, many of whom
are ex-players themselves. After a
match, many of the players will walk
across the field to talk to their fans.
"EX) you see any of the football play-
ersdoingthat?" Beckasks. "Theyjust
head back to their locker room. They
don't know their fans
Beck doesn't mean to sound like
thejealousbovfriend. "I'mhappyfor
theguyson thefootball team. They're
See Mike Beck. Page 8
Box Score
East Carolina 0 7 6 7�20
South Carolina 6 0 3 9�18
FIRST QUARTER
USC � Many Simpson 50 field goal,
7:39 (9 plays, 27 yards, 3:44)
USC � Simpson 46 field goal, 3:24
(7 plays, 40 yards, 2:37)
East Carolina 0, South Carolina 6
SECOND QUARTER
ECU � Clayton Driver 7 pass from
Michael Anderson (Deke Owens
kick), 11:18 (7 plays, 84 yards,
2:18)
East Carolina 7, South Carolina 6
THIRD QUARTER
USC � Simpson 25 field goal, 9:2 1
(9 plays, 55 yards, 4:05)
ECU � Cedric Van Buren 3 pass
from Anderson (pass failed), 7:52
(5 plays, 48 yards, 1:29)
East Carolina 13, South Carolina 9
FOURTH QUARTER
USC �Simpson 22 field goal, 12:22
(11 plays, 37, 5:08)
ECU � Driver 6 pass from Ander-
son (Owens kick), 8:07 (13 plays,
74 yards, 4:15)
USC � Terry W'ilburn 2 run (pass
failed), 4:35 (8 plavs, 72 yards,
3:32)
East Carolina 20, South Carolina 18
TEAM STATISTICS
ECU USC
FIRST DOWNS
Rushing 6 16
Passing 10 5
Penalty 2 2
3RDEFF 5-14 6-16
4TH EFF 1-1 0-0
TOT YARDS 398 361
Total plays 69 78
Average gain 5.8 4.6
NET RUSHING 153 229
Rushes 28 57
Avg. per rush 5.5 4.0
NET PASSING 245 132
Comp-att 20 41 1221
Yards per pass 6.0 6.3
Sacked-yards lost 15 00
Had intercepted 0 0
PUNT-AVG 37.0 35.3
RETURN YARDS 1 62
Punts-returns 11 562
Kickoffs-returns 5115 4106
Interceptions 00 00
PENALTIES-YRDS 12100 755
FUMBLES-LOST 3 1 5-1
TOP 22:51 37:09
PLAYER STATISTICS
Missed Held goals: ECU Owens, 36,
USC Simpson, 39, 42
ECU rushing: Smith 20-1 '3, Van
Buren 5-29, Anderson 2-(-3), Let-
cher l-(-6)
ECU passing: McConnell 1-5-7,
Anderson 18-35-219, Jacobs 1-1-19
ECU receiving: ltcher 4-55, Driver
4-67, Zophy 2-26, Crumpler 2-32,
Batson 3-30, Van Buren 5-35
ECU UT-AT-TT: Carter 1-0-1, Cooke
1-0-1, Cunmulaj 3-0-6, Myers 0-1-
1, Taylor 2-0-5, R. Hurley 3-1-4,
Lewis 8-1-12, Davis 4-0-4, Jones 4-
3-7, Clayton 0-0-1, Floyd 4-0-4,
Walker 8-1 -9, Grandison 2-1 -3, Ren-
der 2-0-2, Tate 1-0-1. Foreman 5-0-
5, Cooper 2-0-2, Van Buren 1-0-1,
McBride 5-0-5, Crumbie 2-0-2, Rob-
inson 1-0-1
ECU
drops
two to
UNC-G
Sports Information Department
In day one of the UNC-
Greensboro Invitational, East
Carolina's volleyball team took
on UNC-G at'3 and UNC-
Asheville at 7 p.m. ECU lost
both matches.
Against UNC-G, ECU won
the first game but lost the next
three�15�7, 10-15, 6-15, 8-15.
For the Lady Pirates, Wendy
Shultz had 21 kills while, Kelly
Crowe had 12. lenny Parsons
helped on offense with her 46
assists. Defensively, Shultz and
Crowe did their part bv scor-
ing 12 digs each.
"We played hard, but had
too many hitting errors said
ECU head coach Martha McCa-
skill. "To be specific, we had
23 hitting errors in the three
games we lost
Against UNC-Asheville,
ECU lost in four again�10-15,
7-15, 15-13, 7-15. Once again
Wendy Shultz led in kills with
her 23, while Leigh Wilcox
racked up 12. Shultz also led
the Pirate defense with 16 digs.
Windy Mizlo kept ECU alive, if
only for a little while, with three
solo blocks and four block as-
sists.
See ECU Drops. Page 8
. .
MHM MMMMMNI





y
ii a� ii i m iTtffr i
1
8 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 22, 1992
Photo by Dail
ECU's soccer team fell to 1-3-0 overall and 0-1-0 in the Colonial Athletic Association.
Soccer team shoots blanks, lose 2-0
By Bob Owens
Staff Writer
The University of Richmond
edged out East Carolina in Colo-
nial Athletic Association soccer
action Saturday, Sept. 15, by a
final score of 2-0. The loss drops
ECU to 1-3-0 overall and 0-1-0 in
theCAA.
Leigh Cowlishaw scored the
game winning goal for Richmond
when Mark Stollsteimer centered
a corner kick into the box with 22
minutes remaining in the match.
UR's Stollsteimer and Jason
Machin picked up the assist.
East Carolina made several
offensive runs late in the match,
but was unable to convert any of
the seven second-half shots into
a score. Richmond outshot East
Carolina 19-12 in the match.
Bryan DeWeese recorded five
saves in 85 minutes in the goal
for the Pirates while ECU goal-
keeper Chris Libert recorded two
saves in five minutes.
Richmond's Roland Bruklis re-
corded no saves in 90 minutes in
the UR goal.
East Carolina will next travel
to Fayetteville, NC, to battle
Methodist College in a non-con-
ference match Sept. 22 at 4 p.m.
ECU's next conference match is
in Greenville against UNC-
Wilmingion Sept. 25 in a 1 p.m.
contest.
ECU drops
"UNC-Asheville had a 6-
foot-3-inch middle hitter and
Windy handled her. We got a
great game out of Windy to-
night said McCaskill.
Last Thursday, East
Carolina's volleyball team de-
feated Campbell in three
straight matches: 15-4, 15-13,
15-4.
"All in all the matches went
well said head coach Martha
McCaskill. "We were intense
and we gained confidence by
winning that close, second
match
Ruggers
Continued from page 7
the mistakes by the Tigers'
scrumhalf due to theconstant pres-
sure and hard hitting by Chris
Carney and Marshall.
Webb then showed how fasthe
was by outrunning the defense in
an 80-meter foot race to score his
second try of the day and Moss
finished on a good note making his
last kick.
Coach Babit will take the team
to Wilmington this Saturday fortheir
conference opener against UNC-W.
This will be the first step East Caro-
lina takes towards traveling toPhila-
delphia in December where the Na-
tional tournament will be held.
Continued from page 7
Senior Wendy Shultz led the
Lady Pirates on offense with 22
kills and only two errors.
"Wendy was intense Mc-
Caskill said. "She had a great
game. We've got to have that
from her.
"What's amazing is that she
can be even better. 1 don't let
her get satisfied
Senior Jenny Parsons,
ECU's top setter, had a strong
showing against the Camels,
also. She racked up 40 assists.
"Jenny showed tremendous
leadership. Without her sets
Moore
Continued from page 7
Miami was the worst he'd ever
worked with. "It was like they were
doing us a favor by being there
Moore has one son , John III,
who is a junior at ECU. Moore
said that his son has already ex-
pressed interest in following in
his father's footsteps, as he has
started assisting Moore in high
school football broadcasts. That
brings about the possibility of a
Moore legacy at East Carolina. If
that occurs, however, Moore does
not think that his son will adopt
his trademark slogan, "He'll
probably come up with one of his
own
Wendy wouldn't have all those
kills said McCaskill.
Leigh Wilcox provided ECU
with a total of four service ace�
On defense, Shultz led witri
five digs.
"Shultz could be better de-
fensively � she is getting bet-
ter said McCaskill.
McCaskill attributed the
win to teamwork.
"It all goes back to an im-
proved passing game. Good
passes led to Jenny's Parsons
sets and her sets led to Wendy's
Shultz 22 kills
Mike Beck
Continued from page 7
likegods � no like role models � to.
the people on campus. Thatisgreat
We'd like to be there .but I guess
you can't have everything
Whilemostfootball players will
hang up their helmets after their
senior season, many former soccer
players find careers coaching. Joe
Abood, Austin Batse and Matt
Cappola, all former Pirate players,
now serve as assistant coaches on
the team.
"I love it Beck says of soccer. "1
wouldn't know what to do without
it in my life. There will come a time
when I have to quit playing, but it
won't be anv time soon
Seafood House & Oyster Bar
IsTuTrewTpcaflC
$1.00 OFF Any Meal except specials
coupon good thru 103192 with Student I.D.
ShrTmp Plate $3.95
Trout & Shrimp Plate $4.95
Trout, Ocean Perch & Shrimp
Choice of Two $4.95
Offer Good Mon-Thurs
Washington Highway Take-outs Welcome
(NC33�xt)(10thSt.�xt) 7C0 71 70
Greenville, NC fJfc-JSf
�"�ERTIMB rf� WUCY-Each of these advertised items is required 10 be readily available lor sale
in each Kroger Slore eicepi as speciticaHy noled in ihis ad II we do run oui ol an advertised item.
we wiM otler you your choice ot a comparable item, when available, reflecting Ihe same savings
or a raincheck which win entilte you 10 purchase the advertised item at the advertised price within
30 days Only one vendor coupon will be accepted per item purchased
COPYRIGHT 1992 - THE KROGER CO. ITEMS AND PRICES GOOD SUN-
DAY. SEPT. 20 THROUGH SATURDAY. SEPT 26. 1992 IN GREENVILLE.
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES. NONE SOLD TO
DEALERS.
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
BULLET!
Adult
Entertainment
Center
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female
"Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers,
CASH PRIZE
Contestants need to be there by 8:00. Competition isfrcmi 9 to 11:00.
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Femaje'Exotic'Djrx:ejsi
-K.e-
Louis Rich
Turkey Franks
1-lb. Pkg.
Buy One Get One
FREE!
ASSORTED AVORS
10-K Sports
Beverages
64-OZ.
Buy one Get One
FREE!
I
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
! $2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
J Open Tuesday-SaturdayDoors Open 7:30pm
rEcZJiis Stage Time 9:00pm
BBJgJBlP Call 756-6278
I Dickinson Ava.
I
I
Strttifftu oLJt cjf Grmmrtltm 5 mltmm to &�rrs Storo
Valid N.C. I.D. Required
r.iiirT,if
GREENVILLE
TUESDAY NIGHT
ACOUSTIC NIGHT with Mark Johnson
Ladies Free - Drink & Bar Specials
THURSDAY NIGHT
SPECIAL APPEARANCE
BRUCE FRYE
a LONELY RIDER RAND
Ladies Free - Drink & Bar Specials
Private Club For Members & Invited Guests
IN THE PRODUCE DEPT.1'
REGULAR OR LIGHT
MICROWAVE
Pops-Rite
Popcorn
10.5-oz. Pkg.
Buy One Get one
FREE!
Kroger
Cough Drops
30-Ct.
Buy One Get One
CAFFEINE FREE DIET COKE,
DIET COKE, SPRITE,
coca cola
Classic
2-Liter
J fy
i






w�� � ii�iir
The East Carolinian
i

September 22. 1992
Classifieds
FORRFiNT
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS :1 and 2 bedroom
apartments. Energy-efficient,
several locations in town. Car-
peted, kitchenappliances, some
water and sewer paid, washer
dryer hookups. Call 752-8915.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 407
Biltmore St. $125.00month
plus 1 3 utilities. Call 758-0700.
HOUSEMATE WANTED:
Near campus, quiet, $162.50
month plus 12 utilities. Call
758-3311.
NEED A MATURE, respon-
sible female, preferably non-
smoker to share a 3 bedroom
apt in Tar River.
Will have own room. Rent is
$143.00, utilities not included.
Contact 758-7016.
FEMALE ROOMMATES
NEEDED: (Available Octo
ber 3rd.) To share a two bed
room at Georgetowne Apts1
block from downtown and
campus. Contact Laurie: 752-
9672.
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Male, non-smoker to share
large 2 bedroom apt. 1 block
from campus. $115mo. rent
13 utilities. Call 752-6181,
leave message.
F( )R SALE
SEIZED CARS, trucks, boats,
4 wheelers, motorcycles, by FBI,
IRS,DEA. Available your area
now. Call (800) 338-3388 ext.
C-5999.
fOR SALE: New 50 watt
0nkyo receiver. Has only been
jjtsed for a couple of months.
Still under warranty for 112
years. Call 830-9301.
2 U2 TICKETS: $30.00 each.
Row 38. Columbia, SC, Sep-
tember 23. Call 758-237Z Leave
message.
MEN'S AND WOMEN'S 26"
Free Spirit bicycles. $70.00 each.
321-1701.
DORM REFRIGERATORS
used, very good condition.
$50.00. Warsaw Pawn, War-
saw, NC (919) 293-4040.
R )R SALE
FUGI: Cross between moun-
tain, bike and street bike. Very
light weight. I deal for campus.
Less than a year old and only
used one semester. $115. Nicole
at 752-2968.
FOR SALE: Queen size
waterbed $125. Neg. 752-9169.
U2, U2, U2 - 2 U2 tickets for
sale. Concert in South Carolina
Wednesday Night. Awesome
price, both tickets only $50 -
Paid $60 for the pair - Must
Sale- Call 757-2618 - ask for
Sheri.
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NJQLWI USED CD'S
WANTED
ALASKA SUMMER EM-
PLOYMENT - Fisheries. Earn
$5,000 month. Free transpor-
tation! Room & Board! Over
8,000 openings. No experience
necessary. MALE or FEMALE.
For employment program call
Student Employment Services
at 1-206-545-4155 ext. A5362.
TOPLESS DANCERS
WANTED -Greatclub,Great
money, unbelievable tips.
Work Thursday, Friday, Satur-
day, 9pm-2 am. Call Sid 919-
735-7713 or Paul 919-736-0716.
MothersPlayhouse in
Goldsboro.
EMERGENCY! Expanding
company needs hardworking
reliable students to mail our
diet brochures from Home
Dorm! Earn up to $200 PT or
$1000 FT! Employees needed
immediately! For job applica-
tion send self-addressed stamp
envelope: Colossal Marketing,
Employee Processing, P.O. Box
291140 Port Orange, FL 32129.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE!
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call (800) 338-3388 ext. P-3712
HELP WANTED
"HELP WANTED" EARN
$1,500 WEEKLY mailing our
circulars Begin now FREE
packet! SEYS, Dept. 164, Box
4000, Cordova, 38018-4000.
GUARANTEED WORK
AVAILABLE. Excellentpay for
EASY home based work. Full
part-time. Rush self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers
(G2) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham, NC 27705
$360UP WEEKLY. Mailing
brochures! Sparefull-time. Set
own hours! RUSH self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope:
Publishers (Gl) 1821 Hillandale
Rd. 1B-295 Durham, NC 27705
COLLEGE REP WANTED: To
distribute "Student Rate" sub-
scription cards at this campus.
Good income. For information
and application write to: COL-
LEGIATE MARKETING SER-
VICES, P.O. Box 1436
Mooresville, NC 28115.
WORK AT HOME: Assembly
, craft, typing and more! Up to
$500.00 a week possible. For
information write Source; P.O.
Box 227, Dept. 9108 Greenville,
NC 27834.
ATTENTION! EARN $2500
Free Trip! Students, Greeks,
Clubs earn free Spring Break
trip after selling only 8 trips at
your school! Spring Break 1-
800-678-6386.
CAMPUS REPS WANTED!
Quality vacations to exotic des-
tinations! Sell Spring Break
packages to Jamaica, Cancun,
Bahamas, Florida. Fastest way
to free travel and extra $$$$.
Call Sun Splash Tours 1-800-
426-7710.
SPRING BREAK'93: Panama
City, Florida Sales Representa-
tive needed to work with the 1
Spring Break Team, Travel As-
sociates and Tour Excel sell the
best properties on the beach.
Summit Condominiums,
Miracle Beach Resort, Holiday
Inn, Pier 99, Earn top commis-
sion and free trips. For more
information call Jenny 1-800-
558-3002.
PHOTOGRAPHERS
WANTED: Bring your outgo-
HELP WANTED
ing personality, transportation,
and 35mm SLR camera and
become one of our professional
photographers. No experience
necessary�we train. Good pay,
flexible PT hours. Call 1-800-
722-7033 between 12-5pm M-F.
HEY, YOU WITH THE CAM-
ERA! Model seeks experienced
artistphotographer cor CRE-
ATIVE bw portfolio photo-
graphs. Interested? Call Cindy:
931-8566.
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED for the Recreation
and Parks Dept. and Greenville
Aquatics & Fitness Center. Ex-
perience preferred. Afternoon,
evenings, and weekend hours.
For more information call
Kathleen Shank 758-6892.
EASY WORK! Excellent pay!
Assemble products at home.
Call toll free. 1-800-467-5566
Ext. 5920.
BRODY'S andBrody'sformen
are accepting applications for
Part-Time Sales and Customer
Service Positions. Flexible
schedules to fit most needs.
SalaryClothing discounts.
Apply Brody's The Plaza Mon-
Wed i-4pm.
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPINGWORD PROCESS-
ING : Call Cindy after 5:30 or
leave message. Familiar with
all formats 15 years experience.
Low rates. Work guaranteed.
Call 355-3611
TYPING: Error free, quick and
dependable at reasonable cost.
Excellent typing and proof-
reading skills (grammar, punc-
tuation, sentence structure,
etc.). Call Pauline at 757-3693.
HWKM'WIiM
RAISE A COOL
$1000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
You also get a FREE
HEADPHONE RADIO
just fef calling
1-800-932-0528, Ext. 65
SERVICES OFFERED
S Financial Aid Available S
Attention AH Students!
Undngmds It Graduates. Ower $5 Bfflian In grand It
schotoiatups are now available from print �actor k
government natal for College Students nationwide. AI
students are eligible! Let us heto you locate tie money tat
you are eligible to receive. Applications are now being
accepted. To receive your financial aid program call:
Stydrat Ftuactal Services
flMUM�ataBMI
LOST ANDFOUND
HAVEYOUSEENablackmale
cat? Last seen in mall area a
week ago. Very worried family
is anxiously awaiting his re-
turn. Call Dana at 757-6366.
FOUND: Women's gold ring
on Sept. 17 in "the mall area
Please claim a t information cen-
ter in Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter.
PERS( ). ALS
PI DELTA local sorority will
be holding their annual Rush
at Mendenhall Multipurpose
room on Monday Sept. 21 from
7:30 -10:00pm, Tues. Sept. 22
from 7:30 - 10:00pm and on
Wednesday Sept. 23 from 7:30 -
10:00 pm. The sisters of Pi Delta
invite any girl to attend.
CHI OMEGA- Thanksforyour
wonderful support with Rush -
PHI KAPPA PSI.
CONGRATULATIONS to the
new Zeta Tau Alpha pledges:
.Rhonda Sortino, Jennifer
Sparboe, Susan Spears and
Renee Tinch.
BOWLING, BOWLING,
BOWLING! Who were those
crazy Alpha Omicron Pi's at
the bowling alley? Lisa - have
you considered taking lessons?
HaHa. Love, your Sisters.
VOTE KATE BOTT for Sopho-
more class Vice president!
ALPHA OMICRON PI
proudly supports KATE BOTT
for Sophomore Class Vice Presi-
dent
CONGRATS to all fraternities
on a great fall rush. Love, Al-
pha Omicron Pi.
RICH PAR AVELLA and Troy
Dreyfus for Junior Class Presi-
dent and Vice President - The
PERSONALS
right choice, the best choice and
the only choice!
TOMMOROW'S THE DAY -
Be a part of it, VOTE! Troy D.
and Rich P. - "NUFF SAID
LAMBDA CHI: Congratula-
tions on an awesome new fall
pledge class. We had a blast as
usual. Lets do it again some-
time soon. Love the Sisters and
Pledges of Sigma Sigma Sigma.
IT WAS THE MIDDLE OF
THE NIGHT and all the Sig-
mas were there, when we heard
a loud noise and all ran down-
stairs. And what to our
wonderous eyes did appear,
but all the KA's and Tripp's
butt in the Bare. Ol' Tripp gave
Amy a ring with real class, so
the KA's felt obligated to hog-
tie his!
Where he went later nobody
knows but next time you come
over Trip, please wear some
clothes. Congratulations Amy
W. and Tripp C. on your en-
gagement. Love the Sigmas.
CHI OMEGA Had a helluva
time at Rush Wednesday night.
We appreciate all the help and
we're looking forward to HC
float and the football game. The
Brothers of Delta Chi.
ALPHA PHI: Thanks for help-
ing with Rush Tuesday night.
Looking forward to partying
with you soon. The brothers of
Delta Chi.
ATTENTION ALL ECU FE-
MALES: GAMMA SIGMA
SIGMA WILL BE HOSTING
THEIR FALL RUSH TUES.
SEPT. 22 AND WED. SEPT. 23
FROM 7:30 TO 9:30 AT THE
CENTRAL CAMPUS MEET-
ING ROOM IN THE
FLEMMING HALL BASE-
MENT. UNDERGRADUATE
AND GRADUATE STU-
DENTS ARE WELCOME. FOR
INFO CALL 757-2921 OR 757-
2782.
ALPHA PHI: Happy Sister
Appreciation Day! We all love
you! Love the BETA PSI'S.
Announcements
BISEXUAL-GAY-LES-
BIAN SUPPORT GROUP
Social support and activities.
Meetings are closed. Call 757-
6766 11:00 - 12:15 Tues. and
Thurs. or 1:00 - 2:30 Wed. for
information on meeting time
and place.
STUDENTS FOR I .IFF
Are you Pro-life? If so, you
are invited to join ECU Stu-
dents for Life. We offer sup-
port, information, and an op-
portunity to get involved. Call
Heather or Laurie at 758-7698
for details.
ECU LACROSSE CM TB
A meeting for those inter-
ested in playing Fall andor
Spring Lacrosse will be held in
the basement of Christenbury
Gymnasium on Tuesday, Sep-
tember 22 at 5:00pm. For fur-
ther information, contact Lake
at 757-2465.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN!
FELLOWSHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray,
study God's word, be involved
in social and service projects?
Need a refuge from time to
time? Campus Christian Fel-
lowship may be what you are
looking for. Our weekly meet-
ings are at 7pm Wednesdays at
our Campus House located at
200 E. 8th St directly across
from Cotanche St. from
Mendenhall Student Center.
Everyone is welcome. For more
information, Call Tim Turner,
Campus Minister at 752-7199.
GOLDEN KEY NATTONAT
HONOR SOCIFTV
Welcome back Golden Key
Members! Our first meeting of
the 1992-93 school year will be
held Wednesday, Sept 23 at
5:00 in Speight 202. We will
hold our general meeting and
have our election of officers.
We need enthusiastic and en-
ergetic students to run for Presi-
dent, Vice-President and Sec-
retary. If there are any ques-
tions, please contact Dr. But-
tery at 757-6444.
TOASTMASTFRS
Graduating in the 90's?
Looking for that interviewing
edge? What will tomorrow's
employers look for?
Speaking Confidence, Good
Organization, Leadership
Skills, Listening Skills, Good
References and Experience.
Can these be had in only 3 hours
a month? Of course! Toastmas-
ters of Greenville will show you
how! Every 2nd and 4th
Wednesdays 7:00pm - 8:30pm
Sheppard Memorial Library.
Call Lawrence at 758-9272.
Guests are always welcome!
STUDENT COUNCII FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
SCEC will hold the initial
meeting of the Fall Semester on
Wed. Sept. 23 at 4:00 in Speight
202. All majors are welcome to
join this organization, you don't
have to be a SPED major. Come
find out what we are all about.
Refreshments will be served.
ECU'S FAMILY PRESERVA-
TION TRAINING SERIES
"Family Systems Theory
Approach To Family Preserva-
tion" will be present on Sept.
24 from 9:30 to 3:00pm at the
Rotary Club, Rotary Ave. in
Greenville. There is no charge
for the presentation but there is
a charge at the door of $5.25 for
the luncheon. To make reser-
vations send card to: Dr. John
Powell, School of Social Work,
ECU, 224-A Ragsdale, Green-
ville, NC 27858 or FAX (919)
757-4196. We hope to see you
there.
REMOVING
INCOMPLETES IN MATH
0001
Students who received a
grade of Incomplete (I) in Math
Lab (Math 0001) Spring Semes-
ter, 1992, or during wither of
the 1992 Summer Sessions,
must be sure to remove the in-
complete by 3:00pm Friday,
Oct. 30,992. Otherwise the stu-
dent will receive a grade of "F"
and will be required to register
for and repeat Math 0001.
Please bring picture I.D.
SAILING CIIJR
Anyone interested in form-
ing a sailing club at ECU, is
invited to attend the first orga-
nizational meeting to be held
on Wed. Sept. 23 at 7:00pm in
room 102 Christenbury Gym.
The club is interested in small
craft sailing including catama-
rans, sunfish and fling scotts as
well as other small craft and
larger boats.
ECHO
East Carolina Honor
Organization's next meeting
will be on Tuesday, Sept. 22 at
5:00pm in the General Class-
room Building room 2017. Hon-
ors students and Teaching Fel-
lows with a 3.4 GPA Welcome.
PERFORMING ARTS
SERIES.
Emanuel Ax. a pianist, and
Yo-Yo Ma, a cellist, will per-
form on Monday, Sept. 28,1992
at 8:00pm. They will perform
classical music, including
works by composers such as
Brahms, Stravinsky, Chopin,
and Beethoven.
OMICRON DELTA KAPPA
ODK members meeting will
be held Thursday, Sept. 24,
from 12:15 - 1:00pm in
Mendenhall Student Center
room 241. All faculty, staff and
student members encourage to
attend, for regrets contact Lisa
Shibley at 757-4711.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
MOTOR AND FITNESS
COMPETENCY TEST
the test is scheduled for
Noon on Friday, Sept. 25 in
Minges Coliseum. A passing
score on this test is required of
all students prior to declaring
Physical Education as a major.
Any student with a medical
condition that would
contraindicate participation in
the testing should contact Mike
McCammon or Dr. Gay Israel
at 757-4688. To be exempted
from any portion of the test,
you must have a physician's
excuse. A detailed summary of
the test components is avail-
able in the Human Performance
Laboratory room 371. Sports
Medicine Building.
ECU EQUESTRIAN CIIJB
Meeting Thurs. Sept 24 at
5:00pm in Mendenhall Student
Center room 8C-D-E. All those
interested in horses should be
there, call Angela 931-8453 or
Holly 931-8760 with questions.
P.US.H. THROUGH THE
BARRIERS
If you would like to work
towards reducing the architec-
tural, as well as the attitudinal
barriers that students with spe-
cial needs are faced with every
day, then come to the next meet-
ing of P.U.S.H. (People United
to Support Handicapped). The
meeting will be 5:00-6:00 on
Thursday Sept. 24 in Cotten
Hall Lobby. We will be work-
ing on our plans for Home-
coming. Come join the fun!
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS
Thur Sept. 24 �Faculty re-
cital featuring Tony Cox, per-
cussion (Fletcher Recital Hall,
8:00pm, free). Fri Sept. 25�
David Farrior, tuba and Cedric
Harston, tuba, senior recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00pm,
free).
GAMMA BETA PHI
We will be having our first
meeting of the year Tues Sept.
22 in Mendenhall Great Room
1 at 5:00pm. We will be look-
ing forward to seeing you guys
there.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
ASSOCIATION
Your chance to vote for your
student leaders will be Wed
Sept. 23. Polls will be open from
9:00am - 6:00pm. All you need
is your student ID. You can
make the difference.
I 1 1
Map To THE EAST CAROLINIAN 2nd Floor of the Student Pubs Building
1I JOYNER 1 LIBRARY
STUDENT PUBS







" '� Tl II
Si
PURPLE & GOLD
NOTHtNO FINER IN NORTH CAROLINA
ATTENTION ALL
PURPLE & GOLD
NOTHING FINER IN NORTH CAROLINA
FANS
HE 1992 HOMECOMING COMMITTEE
IS PROUD TO PRESENT
IMPORTANT DATES AND ACTIVITIES
FOR HOMECOMING
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 �
ALL FLOAT DECORATION, HALL DECORATION
AND CANDIDATE ENTRY FORMS DUE
for Forms & Information Call 757-4711 or Stop By 210 Mendenha
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30
MANDATORY MEETING FOR ALL ENTRIES OF THE FLOAT
DECORATING AND HALL DECORATING CONTEST
4:00 PM ROOM 244 MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30
MANDATORY CANDIDATES MEETING
4:30PM ROOM 244 MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
OCTOBER DATES
SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
11 12 13 14 15
13
MEET THE
CANDIDATES
12 NOON
MALL
14
CANDIDATE
ELECTIONS
Mendenha 9-6
Student Stores 8-5
Croatan 8-5
Allied Health 8-5
Bottom of
College Hill 8-5
16
PIRATE FEST
5:30 PM
MALL
RAY CHARLES
8:00PM
MINGES
17
10:00AM
PARADE
DOWNTOWN
2:00PM
GAME
FICKLIN
FLOAT JUDGING, SPIRIT AWARD, AND THE TP 10 CANDIDATES WILL BE REVEALED AT PIRATEFEST
FOR EACH MEMBER OF YOUR ORGANIZATION WHO BRINGS A CANNED FOOD fTEM
5 POINTS WILL GO TOWARDS THE SPIRIT AWARD.
SPIRIT AWARD WINNER RECEIVES A LOVING CUP AND A CASH PRIZE.
-rymm





Title
The East Carolinian, September 22, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 22, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.895
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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