The East Carolinian, September 17, 1992






�.
Can Courtney?
Was Sherry Smith's absence part of SGA
president Courtney Jones'plan to get elected?
See pg. 4
Irish Spring
The Frank and Walters
bring a breath of fresh
modern music from Ireland.
Seepg. 7.
Sports
Jerk them 'Cocks
The Pirate football team will face the
South Carolina Gamecocks Saturday.
See pg. 9.
m
The East Carolinian
mm1iBi.1111iM.iL1.iuu
Vol. 67 No. 7
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, September 17,1992
10 Pages
Medical school
receives top ranking
By Christie Lawrence
Staff Writer
The Association of American Medi-
cal Colleges (AAMC) ranked ECU's School
of Medicine first in the nation for primary
care physicians.
The first-place ranking strengthens
the school's reputation for graduating fam-
ily doctors, pediatricians and internal
medicine physicians.
"Weare very gratified by this achieve-
ment said Dr. James A. Hallock, vice
chancellor for health sciences and dean of
the medical school. "Not only is it proof
positive that our medical school is meet-
ing its foremost mandate, but it also re-
flects the return on the hard work of so
many people in creating an environment
that allows primary care medicine to flour-
ish
The AAMC conducted the survey by
looking back five years to the graduating
classes of 1987 and calculating how many
of those graduates are practicing primary
health care. The five-year time frame con-
firms that the general practitioners have
not moved on to specializing in a particu-
lar field.
More than half of the 1987 gradu-
ates of ECU's School of Medicine have
become primary care physicians. ECU's
ranking, shared with Southern Illinois,
showed 53.7 percent of graduates pur-
suing a career in primary health. The
percentage more than doubled the na-
tional rate of 25.6 percent.
ECU's School of Medicine,
founded in the mid70s, had a mission
to encourage and recruit medical stu-
dents in the field of primary health care.
According Hallock, the ranking shows
the school's consistent dedication to
producing general practitioners rather
than specialists.
"I think this report clearly demon-
strates the commitment that the school
has had to its mission of primary care,
and demonstrates the success that the
school has had in fulfilling that mis-
sion Hallock said.
Specialties such as cardiology, ra-
diology and gastroenterology attract
medical students who seek more money
See Med, page 3
Smashing Pumpkins
Photo by Dial Reed � TEC
Pumpkin grower Jim Craft of Hwy. 43 in Greenville gears up for Halloween. For the first time in three years, downtown
bars will remain open Halloween night.
Work begins on video yearbook
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
Instead of turning to that fa-
vorite page in the yearbook, it's
time now to fast-forward to your
favorite partof the video yearbook.
Last spring, the med ia board voted
on the video yearbook to be the
unprecedented annual student
media.
The Media Board spent
$53,000on new equipment for five
years, giving the yearbook an an-
nual budget of $10,000. In five
years, the equipment will need to
be updated. However, in previous
years, the university has spent at
least $60,000 annually to print a
yearbook.
Part of the new equipment
includes a software application
called the video toaster. The video
toaster gives the ability to send two
messages at once and allows the
user to take a piece of tape and edit
it in new ways. "The video toaster
"We want everybody's input,
we do not want anyone to feel
like they're left out
�Sam Matheny,
executive producer of the
video yearbook
is very current, it's really only been
available for about a year said Dr.
Harrell Allen, chair of the commu-
nication de-
partment.
"It repre-
sents a new
frontier, it's
21st-century
technol-
ogy"
Since
the video
toaster is so
current, the 10-person staff is learn-
ing as they go along. "We, the
class, had a nine hour session that
introduced us to the toaster said
Sam Malheny, executive producer
of the video. "This is a learning
process. We want to put together a
well-formatted, well-polished
product that everybody will be
proud of
Matheny said the toaster
gives high quality graphics and
editing. "The video toaster we have
is the most powerful in North Caro-
lina right now Matheny said. "We
want
everybody's
input, we do
not want any-
one to feel like
they're left
out
"I feel the
students are
very involved
and dedicated,
they're not just
doing a project, but something
real said Dr. Xue-Mei Zhang, pro-
fessor of the class. "The class is
ready toapply new knowledge and
do something good
According to Allen, the ma-
jority of colleges and universi-
ties are still using print instead of
video, but the movement will be
toward video because the new gen-
eration has grown up on video.
Another positiveaspectof the
video is the ability to see, "reality
on film opposed toa photo where
a picture is frozen.
The master copy of the video
will be ready April 1, 1993. The
Media Board will buy copies and
sell at cost to students. Allen also
hopes to have the video shown on
cable television channels around
the area so those students with ac-
cess to a VCR can tape the video
themselves.
Even though school isonly in
the fourth week, many events have
been covered.
"We've covered the football
games, Kingof the Hill, Greek Day
onthemallandtheKingstonTrio
Matheny said.
Any suggestions about the
video yearbook, or if there's an
event that you would like to see
covered, there will be a suggestion
box where you need to put your
name, what you want covered and
a phone number. You can put this
information in a suggestion box
outside the Media Board office.
Computer lab limited
to business students
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
Computers in the busi-
ness department's student lab
are available only to those stu-
dents enrolled in business
classes.
According to Rick Har-
ris, a microcomputer consult-
ant the academic computing
department, the business labs
were set up solely for business
students.
"The funds come from the
business school, not from the
general use fund Harris said.
The business lab is the
only computer lab on campus
that limits its users to students
within the department.
Ernie Marshbum, also of
the academic computing de-
partment, said the other com-
puter labs on campus are
funded through the general use
fund. He said the labs estab-
lished through the general fund
"must be open to everyone who
is part of the college commu-
nity
Still, many students may
not know where they can go to
use computers on campus. In-
structors can give students in-
formation about computers
available tor use within that
instructor's department.
The academic comput-
ing department publishes a
See Computers, page 3
Its a Rush
Forum to address public health concerns
ECU News Bureau
Photo by Biff Hanson � TEC
Fraternities place banners on the mall to attract new members. ECU's 17
fraternities began fall Rush Sept. 14.
An Arkansas publichealthofficialwill
deliver the keynoteaddressatEastCarolina
University's Chancellor's Forum, Sept. 17-
18, in Mendenhall Student Center.
Dr. M. Joycelyn Elders, director of the
Arkansas Department of Health, will ad-
dress the forum at 130 p.m. Thursday. In
her presentation, she is expected to offer
suggestion for solving public health prob-
lems in the state.
In addition to the health topic by El-
ders, the two-day program on "Supporting
Community Leaders Initiatives for Qual-
ity" will also examine issues related to edu-
cation and economic development.
Dr.JesseL WhiteofChapel Hill,chair
of the Commission on the Future of the
South, will address economic development
in the state, and Mary Futrell of Washing-
ton, DC, a senior fellow at Georgetown
University, will focus her presentation on
improving education.
While the forum's subject matter ap-
pears to be broad in scope, the three topics
arecloselvlinked,accordingtoforumdirec-
tor Dr. Henry Peel.
"When business or industry consid-
ers whether or n t to move into an a rea, they
look at things likeeducationor health care
he said. "When school superintendents start
planning in education, they have to consider
other things like economic development.
"We hope this forum will help county
managers and other county leaders solve
their education, health and economic prob-
lems and improve the quality of their com-
munities Peel said.
Peel said ECU hopes to use the forum to
demonstrate its commitment to helping the
region prosper.
"We want the Chancel lor's Fom m to be
more than just a two-day event. We have a
number of projects under way to stay in
contact with community leaders to help them
improve their communities he said.
Following each of the guest speakers, a
panel of experts willofferdiscussion of issues
in local communities.
Amongthoseparticipatinginpaneldis-
cussionsare. Robert Etheridge,statesuperin-
tendent of Public Instruction; Rose Marie
Lowry of Raleigh, president-elect of the N.C.
Association of Educators; William Owens of
Elizabeth City, presidentof the N.C. Associa-
tion of County Commissioners; Billy Ray
Hall of Raleigh, president of the N.C. Rural
Economic Development Center.
Thomas W. Bradshaw Jr president of
toe First Boston Corporation of Raleigh;
Charles Evans of Manteo, UNC Board of
Governors member; Steve Shore of N.C.
Primary Health Care Association; Bemie
Patterson of the Office of Rural Health and
Resource Development, and Dr. E. HJjrvey
Estes r. of the Kate B. Reynolds CorniTRirury
Practitioner Program of Raleigh.
The moderators for the panel discus-
sions are Betty McCain, a member of the
UNC Board of Governors from Wilson, Dr.
James Jones of the ECU School of Medicine
and Dr. Del ma Blinson of the ECU Rural
Education Institute.
School superintendents from
Edgecombe,GreeneJohnston,Perquimans,
Pi tt and Washington Counties will also par-
ticipate in focus group meetings.
All presentations at the Chancellor's
Fonim are free and open to the public. A
registration fee is required for community
leaders who attend meals and socials and
receive written materials. For furthest de-
tails, call the Chancellor's Forum office at
757-6862.
sponsor
The Chancellor's Forum is sponsored
annually by East Carolina University and by
Carolina Telephone & Telegraph Company.
The forum is expected to attract city and
county managers and commissioners, school
superintendents,hospitaladministra tors and
business leaders form across the state.
m





2t The Emrt varntiman
FFTEMBER 17, 1992
i
MQuntf OtheiCamp
Panel to discuss effects of media onLDCs
By Tracy Ford
Staff Writer
UNC increases recycling
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Office of
Waste Reduction and Recycling has made it a little easier for
students and staff to participate in recycling on campus. A new
residence hall recycling program include dornvroom uvvchng
bin- and more recycling centers around campus. W e think that
by providing individual containers in students' rooms, it will be
easier for students who want to participate said Wayne Kund,
UNC housing director. The new recyding centers allow students
and University employees to recycle aluminum, glass, glossv
magazines and newspapers.
ISU elevator crashes
Six students on an elevator in the Indiana State University
Student Union were shaken-up when the cable broke and the
elevator fell from the fifth to the second floor. "The doors flew
open " said Mamie Shike, an ISU student involved in the acci
dent.Shike said thelights fell from theceilmgottheelevator onto
the students. All of the students were treated bv a chiropractor
for back pain and are cons.dering turning the bills over to the
university.
California colleges lose funds
After a 63-day stalemate, California law makers passed a
budget that c t hundreds of millions of dollars from higher
education, proming college officials to consider new measures
to keep their schools solvent. The UC system will receive $224
million less than last year, an 11 percent cut. Officials were only
expecting a 7 percent to 10 percent cut. UC spokesman Rick
Melaspina said the system may consider increasing student fees,
administrative cuts, faculty cuts and limits on enrollment for
next year.
Newspaper bans military ads
The five-member editorial staff of the University of Central
Arkansas' student newspaper voted not to publish armed for, es
recruitment advertisements because of the military's ban on
gays and lesbians. Local recruiting offices spent between $1,000
to $1,500 on advertising per semester in the Echo, and usually
advertised in every issue of the paper. A spokesman for the
Army Recruiting Command said mat while the ban will have
some effect on recruiting efforts, officials w II find other ways fa
reach students. "We felt strongly enough editorially, so we
decided we shouldn't have their ads said Kim Green, editor ot
the Echo.
"Window on Africa: De-
mocratization and Media Expo-
sure a two-dav conference to
discuss the effects of media ex-
posure on developing nations
will begin today.
"This conference is a cross
reference of politics and mass
communication said Dr. Festus
Eribo,a professor in ECU's com-
munication department. "It is
unique because communication
scholars and political scienceare
coming together in one confer-
ence to discuss common prob-
lems and issues
Professors from across the
nation, including Wisconsin,
New York and California, are
attending the conference to
speak on a variety of subjects
pertaining to international me-
Check it out
"Window on Africa: Democratization and Me-
dia Exposure" begins today. The opening cer-
emony, which includes introduction of guests
and opening comments, will begin today at 9
a.m. and run to 9:30 a.m. Discussions will run
from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.
today and 9 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. on Friday.
dia development.
According to Eribo, the
conference will create awareness
and will be a challenge for ev-
eryone involved. "It will give
the (students) more information
and stimulate new ideas
The conference, hosted by
the international studies pro-
gram at ECU, will also intro-
duce at the opening ceremonies
the new director of international
studies, Dr. John Heise.
Some of the discussions
will include Africa's trend to-
ward democracy, communica-
tion and national development,
race in the construction of me-
dia image Russian press and
Africa and monitoring elections
in Africa.
"The participants are lead-
ing communication scholars
Eribo said. "Different scholars
have been invited to speak on
different topics that they have
already written papers
The opening ceremony,
which includes introduction of
guests and opening comments,
will begin today at 9 a.m and
discussions will run from 9:30
a.m. to 12 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 5
p.m. Friday'sdiscussions will run
from 9 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Help Wanted!
The East Carolinian is
now hiring typesetters.
Macintosh experience
preferred. Apply at
Student Pubs Bldg.
Joyce Etheridge
Contemporary Styles of the 90s
at Contempoary Prices
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Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel. Taken from CPS
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An employer's perspective of using your collegiate leadership
experiences to enhance your career.
Lisa Daniel.
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Dr. Jim Westmoreland
Director,
Caieer Services, ECU
Monday,
Sept 21, 1992
MSC 221
Regtstratior Required
3-4 pm RSVP at 757-4711
sponsored by:
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Entry Deadline: Monday, September 21
Fee: $15 per team . �
Takes Place: September 24, 25 & 27
Register at: 204 Christenbury Gym
Eligible: all ECU students, faculty, & staff
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�� Ml ��
� � I '
rt.
SEPTEMBER 17. 1992
The East Carolinian 3
�'
Employers to
recruit on campus
By Elizabeth Shimmel
Assistant News Editor
The 1992 ECU Business Career
Day for students will be held Sept 22
in the General Classroom Building.
Director of Career Services, Dr.
James Westmoreland, said the event
is a very important one for ECU stu-
dents. "This is one of the best oppor-
tunities to have companies come on
campus and to find out what their
hiring needs will be he said.
Representatives from 46 orga-
nizations will be present to meet and
speak with students from all majors
aboutprospectivecareersaftergradu-
ation. Banking, accounting firms, re-
tail industries, the federal govern-
ment and numerous other compa-
nies and associations will be avail-
able to share information with stu-
dents about their organizations.
"(Career Day) offers exposure
to a wide range of businesses and
organizations that are out there
Westmoreland said.
The Career Services office at
the Bloxton House has helpful litera-
ture available to students that can be
reviewed before they attend Career
Day. The literature can aid in formu-
la tingquestions toaskcertain organi-
zations.
"Students should think of
things they would like to ask pro-
spec hveemployers Westmoreland
said.
Some recruiters will also visit
various classes to inform students
about their organizations and what
employers look for in hiring new
employees.
"This is probably the best time
to find out what each organization
needsin employees Westmoreland
said.
Business Career Day is spon-
sored by the ECU School of Business
and the Career Services Office and
will run from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
"There will be an excellent
range of organizations, especially
with the economy the way it is
Westmoreland said. "Considering
that they may hire only 10 people
from across the state, the fact that
they are here to choose from ECU
students is important"
Many of the representatives
who comeforCareer Day will return
duringthe fall and spring to conduct
interviews with graduatingsrudents
at the Career Services office in the
Bloxton House.
In addition to Business Career
Day, Career Services has also
scheduled a Health Career Day for
Nov. 5, and an Education Career
Day for Feb. 16,1993.
Friday. September 18
Bad Bob & The
Rockin' Horses
Saturday. September 19
Roily Gray and
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HOURS
MonSTues 11am-3pm
Wed 11 am-3pm & 9pm-1 am
Thurs & Fri 11am-1am
Sat 9pm-1am
513 Cotanche St
located across from UBE
758-0080
Med
Continued from page 1
Computers
Continued from page 1
and prestige in their field. Due to
the increase in specialists, many
medical analysts feel that the future
will produce a shortage in general
practitioners.
Hallock attributed ECU's
strong showing in the report to a
concerted effort to support and el-
evate primary care that begins with
the student admissions committee.
"Clearly the perceptionof stu-
dents who apply to this school is
that we as a school are interested in
primary care said Hallock. "So,
naturally we attract students who
share that same interest
Hallock also attributes the
success to other factors, such as the
curriculumandorganizationalcul-
rure. The curriculum exposes the
students to primary care early and
often. Parity given to primary care
in relation toother specialties isdue
to an organizational culture.
"We attract students to the
school who have an interest com-
ing in, which is a critically impor-
tantfactor'Hallocksaid. "Our cur-
riculum supports and encourages
family medicine and primary care.
The students know our school is
committed to primary care, as well
as other specialties
The 1992 Report is the third
issued by the AAMC that measures
institutional goals. Prior to 1992,
the reports focused exclusively on
research funding.
The number one ranking was
listed as a part of the AAMC's 1992
Institutional Goals Ranking Report.
The association surveyed 126 med i-
cal schools concerning their goals
in five categories: primary medi-
cine graduates; graduates who be-
came medical school faculty mem-
bers; minority graduates; and the
amount of federal research grants
and contracts.
The report showed that 45.3
percent of ECU graduates accept
residencies in North Carolina, earn-
ing the school a ranking of 52nd in
the na tion. Hallocksaid ECU hopes
to encourage more doctors to settle
in eastern North Carolina.
The report also showed 7.1
percent of the school's graduates
had taken jobs with medical
schools, ranking the school 75th.
Of ECU's graduates, 9.4 per-
cent are minorities, placing the
school 36th. The 1990-91 federal
research grants and contracts were
$3.7 million ranking ECU 107th in
that category.
map of computer locations on
campus, along with a list of
computers and software avail-
able within each lab.
The most recent list was
published in August 1991. More
computer labs have been estab-
lished since that time.
Terry Harrison, assistant
manager of academic comput-
ing, said as soon as all depart-
ments have reported their up-
dated labs and software to aca-
demic computing, a new map
and list will be published.
Maps and software infor-
mation can be obtained from the
Austin building in Room 208.
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- 1
"(

- The Egg Carolinian
September 17, 1992
Opinion
Page 4
ECU should pave the way, not get paved over
In a traditional fashion, the university has
once again served its style of equity on its stu-
dents.
The University Curriculum Committee re-
cently decided that the 13 hour requirement for
social sciences would be reduced to 12 hours.
It is about time that the committe realized
that a 13 hour require is ridiculous inadepart-
ment whose courses typically carry three hour
creditsThree times four equals 12, not thir-
teen. Apparently, between 1978 and 1992 the
UCC could not figure out that three is not a
multiple of 13.
The UCC needs to look in a more pro-
gressive direction in the future. We can not
allow our school to uphold such innane poli-
cies as the 13 hour social science require-
ment. The simple fact that it has taken ECU
this long to get rid of this policy sheds a
lasting impression on the inner workings ot
this institution.
The UCC should be setting precedents tor
programming and diversity. They should be the
JOE OF ALL TRADES
front runners in North Carolina.
If ECU wants to take on a "new look ot
credibility, it needs to move forward rapidly
instead of dragging its heels on an issue as
trivial as a social science requirement.
The students of this university know that
ECU has the potential to be the best in North
Carolina and perhaps the natioa However, with
slow change and old ideas, the surge of growth
could end. ,
For students graduating in 1993, and
perhaps underclass students as well, it is too
late. Many seniors have taken that extra so-
cial science class to equal 15 hours instead of
an additional class in their major or field.
Students need to be aware of these
discrepencies in the system. There may be
others in general college, or even in indi-
vidual departments.
Check it out. Think about
requirements,talk to advisors, be aware of v ,L-� . .�w �
whatisrequiredforgraduation Dontletthe - RoW1 UaS changed Pirate lOOtDall
university get away with inconsistencies. FeaCtl BOW1 Iiab iaii& by (
J � btv,Q �iocf Hav in several Bowl). Things cnange. fc
A VIEW FROM ABOVE
By T. Scott Batchelor
By Joe Horst
Criminals promote social reform in future
wnif take it to its extremes, a criminal a
"The Criminal of today is the
innovator of tomorrow
�Emil Durkheim
Crime has been a very difficult
thing not only to define, but also to
enforce. Lack of responsibility on the
part of witnesses (most notably the
Kitty Genovese case, which I'll go into
later), is ever-changing societal views
that have a direct impact on Supreme
Court rulings and corruption in al-
most every part of the law enforce-
ment system are just a few problems
that a law enforcement official must
face when trying to do his or her job to
the best of their ability.
But possibly the most impor-
tant and significant aspectof criminal
law today is the fact that laws govern-
ing behavior have been re-interpreted
andre-re-interpretedtotheextentthat
illegal behavior20 years ago is now
classified as acceptable.
Problems with interpreting
enforcing the law
Kitty Genovese was attacked
by a man armed with a knife. For a
time period of around 30 minutes to
an hour, Genovese cried for help,
scream and holler as she stumbled
around the quad in which she was
attacked. Only after she died did any-
onebothertocall thepoliceand report
the crime.
To the best of my recollection,
that quad was surrounded on all sides
by high-rise tenements. If not all sides,
then it was enclosed by at least two, if
not three. Over 35 people saw the
attack take place either for the most
part or in its entirety � and did noth-
ing to stop it! Not one person raised
their window and yelled at the at-
tacker or called the police. On the
contrary, most sat in darkened rooms
and watched the event like it was on
theircolorTV.Thisblatantexampleof
society's unwillingness to get involved
served as a wake-up call to people's
lassitude in their belief of, "Oh, that
won't happen to me
This attitude is one of the cen-
tral problems law enforcement offi-
cials face when trying to do your job.
How can one "nab a bad guy" when
no one that saw the crime will come
forward to admit it? But more to the
point of this column, what example
are the courts setting by legalizing
certain actions that were illegal not
more than 10 years ago?
Society benefits from crime?
That quote from Durkheim
above thisarticle surrounds one of the
most interesting trends in law enforce-
ment I've ever seen. In the '60s, blacks
sitting in the front of busses or eating
at an all-diner was unlawful. But with
the advent of the civil rights move-
ment, those lawswereoverturned and
deemed unconstitutional.
Mind you, 1 don't feel that seg-
regation should be re-instituted. But
if you look at the concept as a whole,
it gets a little scary. Using this ex-
ample to illustrate a generality and
take it to its extremes, a criminal can
stand in court and say that his crime
was committed for the good of soci-
ety. If believed, then there is a prece-
dent set for future cases. Wait a few
years and that particular action that
this person was indicted on will be
stricken from the books.
Think that's bad? Let me take it
one step further. Once higher courts
have nullified high verdict crimes
such as murder, rape or manslaugh-
ter, then the lower verdict crimes will
move up in their sentencing. Soon
enough, you may be arrested and be
tried for littering or spitting on the
sidewalk. Not only may you be tried,
but just think of a country with people
in jail or on death row for jaywalking.
OK, maybe I've gone off the
deep-end a little bit with this idea.
(Then again, maybe not?) But
Durkhiem is considered to be one of
the forefathers for our criminal justice
system today. Can I be faulted for
wondering if some of his views that
are considered outlandish today may
not be considered sound, say in 20
years?
Society controls so much of our
judicial system today that it may not
be a big leap for us to seesomeofthese
not-so-sane ideas appear. New Su-
preme Court judges will probably be
needed within the next 10 to 15 years,
so who knows which way they'll go.
Only with some sane and ex-
tensive thought behind the rulings of
these cases can we be sure that our
country will not end up in this post-
Orwell design.
It was the coolest day in several
weeks here in eastern North Carolina,
and a perfect Saturday for football.
I eagerly donned my purple
ba�pball caD that says ECU on the
front and headed forFicklenStadium,
where there was the promise of thrill-
ing moments, hard-hitting action and
intense competition �not to mention
the football game down on the field.
My girlfriend and I arrived at
the stadium an ample amount of
time before kickoff (or so we
thought in our youthful folly). The
problem was, we had General Ad-
mission tickets, probably because
of something bad I did when I was
10 or 11 years old.
General Admission is like fly-
ing coach on an airline, only it's worse
because the peanuts aren't even free.
Going to Pirate football games
didn't used to be this hectic. Not many
years ago, a football ticket was about
as valuable as a handful of Confeder-
ate money.
Now, students have to present
a student LD. and a letter from their
Congressman just to get in the gate.
But that was BPB, (Before Peach
Bowl). Things change.
After fighting a swarm ot
other General Admissioners who
mosfly stood in the doorway aisles
like a herd of purple and gold deer
caught in a car's headlights, we
found a couple of seats on the end
of a bench, way up at the top of the
stadium.
Bench seatingat a sportingevent
is OK I guess, but if the people around
me had had red hair I would have felt
like one of the Waltons at dinner time.
Having made it through the
trauma of locating a seat, I stuffed
some Kleenex into my nostrils to stop
my altitude-induced nosebleed and
prepared to watch the Pirates feast on
a few Hokies.
It wasn't long before those 15
tiny bottles of bourbon that the guy in
front of me had drank began to show
some effects.
At first, there were subtle
signs that he was becoming intoxi-
cated, like when he yelled out,
"Wooo! (something) major strap in
a doodle 'urn Hokie (something)
and fire 'em (something) outta here,
woo doggie then proceeded to
A BIT O' THOUGHT
show his excitement by throwing
up on his friend's sneakers.
It' a good thing the gam? was
televised Sunday night so he could
see the second half.
Mostly, the people sitting
around me at the game were well �
behaved and had a good time.
Some guys behind me had
brought a bottle of rum and they kegt,
the soft-drink urchins busy delivery
ing cups of ice-cold mixer.
These young men and women
deserve a big round of applause. I. -
don't know how much they get paid
for dragging those unwieldy trays of
drinks up and down the stands, but
whatever it is, it isn't enough.
Despite the massive crowds and
the attendant inconveniences of big-
time college football, all in all I had a
good day Saturday.
My girlfriend underestimated
the power of the bright sunshine and
looks like a Chernobyl survivor, but
on the other hand I got to see the
Pirates pull off an incredible win
against Virginia Tech.
I think that's an equitable trade-
off.
By David Jones
We need a new SGA president
,r,i�- would ereatlv increase h
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
increase in fans creates new problems tor Hcklen
To The Editor:
On September 12,1 attended the
ECU vs. Virginia Tech football game.
As an alumnus of ECU and a former
Marine Corps Veteran of the Viet-
nam War (1968-1969), I was appalled
at what I witnessed after the game
ended.
I had tickets near the Virginia
Tech visitors and I was surprised to
see the flag of the United States
draped upon the ground as if it was a
raS
I realize those folding it may not
have understood what they were han-
dling. But as college students, I would
assume that most of them know the
flag deserves more respect than what
1 saw it receive by the "Event Staff"
after the great ECU win over Virginia
Tech.
To some it may be an old fash-
ioned sentimentality for "nothing
more than justapieceof cloth How-
ever, 1 did not feel proud as an alum-
nus of ECU that day.
Don Lundegard
ECU Alumnus
Class of 1973
TheEast Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Jennifer A. Wardrep, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Assistant Sports Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Richard Haselrig, Staff illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Cori Daniels, Classified Advertising Technician
Bill Walker, Opinion Page Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manage
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
�T . )cm emnhasi7in" information that affects
Greenville. N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 751 63�.
A few years ago, 1 attended the
Universityof North Carolina atChapel
Hill. I was able to see one election that
occurred there between three truly
remarkablecandidateswhowererun-
rung for the office of SGA president.
For the purposes of anonymity, 1 will
refer to them as Mark, Bill and Rick.
In a nutshell, Mark was your
basic run-of-the-mill Republican. He
was an African-American as well and,
politically speaking, it seemed to me
that Mark was the choice of the major-
ity He had the upper-middle class
vote and the minority vote, which
when combined, compromised a good
70 percent of the voting population on
Chapel Hill's campus at that time.
Bill was, according to my room-
mate who was on his campaign staff,
a solid candidate for office. In reality,
he was the only other person in the
running for the presidential position.
Bill was a Political Science major, he
knew his way around the Student
Government bureaucracy and he
wanted to run a clean campaign. Bill
was basically the Democrat of the race.
Rick was the third party inde-
pendent candidate. His ideas were
similar to Bill's. He simply did not
have the support Billhad and it looked
as though he had a snowball's chance
in a certain netherworld dimension of
winning (note the slight foreshadow-
ing here).
To make a long story short, Bill
won the election.
During the first runoff, no one
candidate had a clear majority of the
votes. Then during the second runof
of just the top two (Mark and Bill), Bill
received 53 percent of the vote.
But, problems began occurring
almost immediately. It was revealed
thatMarkhadmisappropnated funds
from other various SGA projects that
he was involved in, and had f unneled
them into his own campaign funds.
No one reallv liked this fact, but since
Mark did not win the election, there
was no problem Yeah, right).
There was no problem until less
than a week later it was discovered
that Bill and some of his campaign
staff weregoingoutonmidnightraids
and defacing ad posters and other
such campaign paraphernalia that be-
longed to Mark's camp.Both candi-
dates were disqualified from the elec-
tion after a long and drawn-out stu-
dent hearing.
Rick (remember him?) was
given the office of president and did a
great job of running the SGA that
year Chapel Hill was the laughing
stock of the North Carolina college
system that year, at least until we got
Rick in office and running the show.
I am sure that by now every
reader is wondering what is the pur-
pose of the article. Welt, in the immor-
al words of Bill CosbyI toM you
that story to tell you this one "
Last spring, we elected
Courtney Jones and Sherry Smith to
the offices of president and vice-presi-
dent respectively. By "we" I of course
mean that small percentage of stu-
dents that had brains enough to real-
ize that voting does make a difference
and did so.
But anyway, less than two
weeks into the summer, Sherry Smith
announced she would be resigning
from the office of vice president due
to a prior work contract that she had
to fulfill. Everyone was, of course,
shocked. All of her supporters were
hurt and most of all, Courtney Jones
must have been stunned.
As a matter of fact, in last
Tuesday's paper, she went as far as to
say that she did not think it would be
a problem when Smith resigned be-
cause she thought thatSmith had gone
through all the necessary procedures
to gain exempt status. "There is a pro-
cess that you have to go through to be
exempt for the summer that was not
carried out by Sherry was the exact
quote that Jones made on the subject
Now, then, case closed, right?
Not by a long shot. Way back on May
20 when it was announced by The
East Carolinian that Smith had quit,
Jones stated flatly that she knew Smith
wasgoingtoquitandhadplannedthe
whole summer itinerary around the
fact that there was going to be no vice-
president.
Well, gee whiz, it just seems
like Jones really knows her stuff and
had all her bases covered, huh?
Sorry, but I don't buy it. If Jones
knew that Smith was going to quit,
why did she choose her for a running
mate? Answer, because she knew it
would greatly increase her chances of
getting elected president. Also, why
were the voters not informed of this
situation beforehand?
If both candidates knew that
Smith was not going to be there for
part of her term before the election,
whywasthisinformationsuppressed?
Answer, because Jones knew it would
wipeoutherchancesofgetting elected
ifinformarionofthisnaturehadleaked
out She also knew that The East
Carolinian's staff had offered up its
choice for president as being Jonathan
Brooks, not Courtney Jor-s.
The end result was mat the in-
formation did not leak, Jones was
elected and now there is a new elec-
tion for vice president set for Sept. 23.
A good friend of mine told me
that the reason most people do not
like politics is that they do not like the
way it works. That may very well be
true and on a national scale there is
not much I can do about this fact ex-
cept vote my conscience and hope for
the best.
However, on this campus, my
voice is a little bigger by comparison
and I want something done about this
situation. I propose a new election for
president to take place at the same
time as the vice presidential election
Allow no new candidates, that would
take up too much time � , simply
have a new runoff between Brooks
and Jones.
It will cost a little extra money
and the ECU student body will look
bad for a little while, but at least we
will have taken responsibility for the
actions of our own and we will have
put a person in office that everyone
knows the whole story about without
any coverups.
Let's put a president in office
who wants to fulfill the obligations of
president as well as display at least a
modicum of integrity - not someone
whohas proven that they will useany
means necessary to get into office.
Now then, any of you out there
that agree, get over to the SGA offices,
complain to the advisors, write to the
paper do whatever it takes.
Let's try to make a change and
Sir w that it is truly the students who
have the power in Student Govern-
ment.





The East Carolinian
September 17, 1992
Lifestyle
Attic to celebrate 21st year
By Stacy Peterson
Staff Writer
Photo courtesy Chris Cutfaro
Drivin' n' Cryin' will help rock The Attic as it celebrates it's 21st birthday tonight.
"Imagine" if you will, it is fall 1971.
Finally Saturday night, you have spent
theaftemoonpolishingyour platform shoes
� you know, the ones that are so heavy
that you pulled a hamstring the last time
you wore them. You choose the perfect pair
of bell-bottoms not knowing that they are
going to completely cover the "stacks" you
just polished. You pick your afro to global
roundness and trim your sideburns. You
have invited all of your friends over only to
find your eight-track collection to be com-
pletely exhausted. You haveheard of a new
place on Fifth Street called "The Attic" that
features live rock 'n' roll. So you and all of
your friends hop in the riymou th and head
downtown. Life in Greenville will never be
the same.
The Attic, theoriginal rock'n'roll night-
club in N.C. was started by Tom Haines
and Stewart Cambell 21 years ago mis
month. The Attic got its name because it
was the actual "attic" of Bogies, which, at
the time, was the "Fiddlers Three
Restuarant According to Joe Tronto, the
present co-owner, some of the popular
bands that would frequent the Attic were
Brice Street, Jessie Bolt, Sidewinder, Super
The Attic celebrates its 21st birthday
Thursday, September 17.
Featured performance by Drivin' n' Cryin
Tickets are $10 in advance, $12 at the door.
Pick up tickets at the Wash Pub on 10th Street.
Grit Cowboy
Band and Nan-
tucket. Four of
these bands still
play to some ex-
tent today.
In 1975, The
Attic moved to a
vacant super
market building
across from The
Fizz and re-
mained there until Sept. 1982 when the
building burned completely to the ground.
A decision was then made to set up a tem-
porary operation at the "King And Queen
North" banquet room until another loca-
tion could be founil.
Only five weeks later, The Attic was
opened again in theoriginal location above
Bogies, while missing only four operation
davs. In 1984, The Attic was completely
remodeled ,ni I iquor was added to the bar.
Then in 1986, the co-founder Tom Haines
moved to Charlotte and became an agent
for "The Comedy Zone a network of the
biggestcomediansontlieEastCoast. About
two years ago Joe Tronto and Jeff Cobb
bought out The Attic and remain the own-
ers today.
Tronto has been associated with The
Check it out
J
Atticabout 15yearsand had actually started
by playing in bands that would play at the
club in theearlydays. According to Tronto,
"The Attic has always been visually ori-
ented, we wen- one of the first clubs to use
a seven foot screen Today The Attic has a
huge 15 foot screen and six 19 inch televi-
sions. Tronto believes the key factors that
have given the club its unusual longevity
are: staving innovative, providing a com-
fortable setting to club goers, cleanliness of
the establishment, and most importantly
the employees, managment, and staff.
"The Comedy Zone was added five
years ago and has turned out to be a big
success according to Tronto. Every
See Attic, page 8
Who's There?
Attic
Thursday
Drivin' n' Cryin'
Friday
Purple School Bus
Saturday
Trashed Gypsy
and Carver
Pasta
Works
Thursday
Klee Liles
Friday and
Saturday
Ledbetter
New Deli
Thursday
Two Pound Planet
Friday
Bad Bob & the
Rocking Horses
Saturday
Roily Gray and the Comgan's
Saturday
Bobby Z and
Implas
P'Rccks
Friday
Weird Zombie
Music Buffet
Saturday
Anti Scene vv
Picasso Trigger
Singing trio not
easily categorized
Sunfires
Fizz
Thursday
Essence
Friday
Panama Steel
Saturday
Old Habits
Walnut Creek
Sunday
Violent Femmes
and B-52's
Mother Nature
packs New Deli
RiotS interrupt musical treat Sirming with a breath of fresh music,
By Pamela Revels
Staff Writer
The Roches areoften described
as a folk-pop group, but since their
debut in 147f they have steadily
evaded being categorized.
The threesisters, Maggie, Terre
and 5uz7.v Roche, have produced
eight albums full of wit and hu-
mor. The group combines zany,
playful lyrics with heavenly har-
monies and the result is pure fun.
The music defies all of the other
neatlv pinpointed genres on the
market today.
Even though the trio's music
sways toward the ridiculous and
quirky, it is far from carefree. Many
of the songs deal with the ups and
downs of everyday life. The sub-
ject matter frequently rests on the
serious side, but the sisters never
lose their sense of humor.
A perfect illustration of this is
their latest album A Dove. The
gro Lip's sense of wit and irony pre-
vails in their choice to follow the
song "You're the One" with
"You're the Two which explain
the finer points of unfaithful rela-
tionships. Although this album
shifts to a more personal level than
the previous releases, The Roches
still maintain the witty repartee
they began with.
Maggie and Terre began sing-
ing folk music together in their
teens. The duet made an album in
1975 titled Seductive Reasoning.
A year later, their sister Suzzy
joined them for some Christmas
carolling in New York City. The
eloquent harmonies that the three
prod need co old not be denied, a nil
the duet became a trio.
Despite resistance, the sisters
insisted on playing their own in-
struments instead of singing over a
male-dominated band. After win-
ning this fight, the group became
an inspiration to other female mu-
sicians, such as The Indigo Girls.
By standing up to satisfy their own
The Roche sisters, Maggy Terre and Suzzy, have blended their talents
See Roche, page 8 ancj wit tostar in Tiny Toon Adventures, and produce songs and albums
"Out of all the clubs
we have played in
North Carolina, the
Deli is our favorite'
� members of Mother Nature
By Stacy Peterson
Staff Writer
Are you just a little tired of
attitude-stricken bands who have
the variety of an economy-size can
of vienna sausage?
Some bands today seem to be
sterile, lack
any emotion
and seem to
try to
outplay each
other rather
than trying
to find a
simple
groove.
This is
definitely
not the case
with "Mother Nature a (eenville
based classic rock bind.
Mother Nature was formed in
January 1991 and is composed of
Warren Sumner � bass, Mark Wil-
liams � vocals and guitar, Jon
Mathews � guitar and vocals and
Bert Swain � drums and vocals.
All are students here at E( L.
When asked why the band
chose to play lassk rock 'n' roll,
Mark Williams replied. "We all
grew up listening to classii roi I
and most of the artists we i. o erare
no longer around. It would be a
shame to let this music die out
Two of the most outstanding
features of this band are theirgenu-
ine, honest approach to the various
songs that span from the late '60s
to the present. Mother Nature has
a sound that compares to She
StegmondsTheUsualsand Cream
of Soule.
Saturday, Sept. 12th, Mother
Nature took its '70s review to a
packed house at the New Deli here
in Greenville.
According to the members of
Mother Natu re, "outof all theclubs
we have
played in
North Caro-
lina, the Deli
is still our fa-
vor i t e
Mother Na-
ture took the
stage about
10:30p.m.
and per-
formed a
high energy,
"take no prisoners first set.
The highlights of the first set
were "Paint It Black "Midnight
Rider "Seven Bridges Road" and
"You Really Got Me Now
The second set featured .1 ver-
sion of "Behind Blue Eyes" in which
the harmony was enough to give
one chill-bumps, hen, the band
delivered up "Brown-Eyed ail
followed bv'Train,Train" that as
enough to leave one breathless.
Then it happened � "good
ol' fashion" bar brawl fa i i iw com-
mon occurrence in downtown
Greenville) that ended the how
early, pissing the band otl as ell
.is the audieni e.
Irish band
charms listeners
Allinall.Mtli
i es i'ii. iugh -a il '
about anyi �ne
Natureprom-
tl if) just
By Rachel Parker
Staff Writer
Straight from Ireland, The
Frank and Walters bring a breath
of fresh air to modern music with
their uplifting lyrics and upbeat
music.
The three men who make
up The Frank and Walters hail
from a small village near Cork in
Ireland.
Growing up they spent most
of their time listening to the only
two records they owned.
Those records, which greatly
influenced their music, were
Seargean t Pepper by the Beatles and
Greatest Hits by Simon and
C .arfunkel.
Thev also wrote songs about
two drunken tramps who roamed
the streets of their hometown.
The three members of the
band are Paul Linehan, vocalsand
bass, Niall Linehan, guitar; ,m
Ashley Keating, drums.
All three write humerous and
surreal songs about their friends.
Basically,Paul Linehan writes the
lyrics and Keating and Niall
Linehan i onipose the music.
"Mi hael" is about their
best fi iend, theonly person in their
neighborhood to own a fancy car,
until he wivi ked it ,nv replaced it
with a bicycle.
"So smile and ride your bi-
cvcleYou never really look down
cause you're afraid that you'd see
the clouds, or maybeyou're afraid
of heightsYou have an awfully
long way to fall my friend So cycle
with your head in the clouds the
lyrics proclaim.
"Daisy Chain" emphasizes
the diversity of the people living
in the world.
"We don't know what's
wrong with them and they don't
know what's wrong with us
Doesn't anybody know why they
do all the things they do?Whv
don't we know why they say all
the things they say?Why don't
you know that you 're just not them
and they're just not you?"
"Walter's Trip" is more
surreal.
"I saw a giraffe as high as my
kneeHe was making shapes of
the letter Zlt rained blue sponges
for half an hour while the boys
they play chess in the tower
The Frank and Walters
charm listeners w ith their realistic
words and music.
The United States debut mini-
album was released lime 2, 1992.
Don't miss the band who is,
according to MME, the best Irish
band nil e the I i idei tones.
ART EXHIBITIONS
Wellington B. Gray Gallery �
Recherche, 3 5 works by eleven art-
is from Philadelphia African-
American's artists' organization, cur-
rently on exhibit.
William Fick: Linocuts, T by 6' to
4' by 8' large format prints presenting
satirical images depicting dilemma of
human condition, currently on exhibit.
Joyce Ogden: Personal Views.
Site-specific sculptural installation
coupled with year-long lecture pro-
gram on installation art, currently on
exhibit.
Jenkins Fine Arts Center �
Carol L. Overman, senior student
at ECU. Selection of art works consist-
ing of paintings in acrylic, silver jew-
elry designs, a woodcut print and a
variety of textile works. Display will
run Sept. 21-28.
Julie Lambeth, senior student at
ECU. Selection of av works consisting
oi direct dyes, a woodcut print, bead-
and a variet) ol textile works. Dis-
play will run from Sept. 2 1 -28.






?�
8 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 17. 1992
I
New ending in re-cut Blade
Attic
Continued from page 7
Roche
By Michael Harrison
Staff Writer
While Sneakers shows today's
potential technology at work, the
near future's potential technology
is depicted in director Ridley
Scott's re-cut Blade Runner.
Blade Runner achieved instan-
taneous wide-spread recognition
for its stylistic effects and unusual
storyline.
A vastly overpopulated Earth
of the future is facing a severe
backlash for genetic engineering.
Live human-like, but
murdering beings called
replicants, have been genetically
constructed to work as slaves on
other colonized planets. The
replicants look very human, and
some of them might be sneaking
to Earth to live as humans.
Enter Harrison Ford as Rich
Deckard, a "blade runner" whose
assignment is todiscover the mur-
dering replicants and eliminate
them.
Deckard is saved from a
replicantattack by Rachel (played
bv Sean Young) who turns out to
be a replicant herself. Despite his
common sense, Deckard is taken
in by her looks and charm.
A climatic confrontation
erupts between Deckard and
replicant leader Roy Batty (Rutger
Hauer), and Deckard is finally
forced tofacehisduty toeliminate
Rachel as a renegade.
The desire to do a re-edited
version dates back to the film's
original release.
"We are more used to the vi-
sual styleofBmfrRiHHernow,but
at the first research screenings, I
think people were over-awed by
the scenic tapes try and somewhat
confused by the storyline Scott
said. "After numerous previews,
we felt that the film needed some
additional narration, but I think
what we inserted was overkill.
Harrison (Ford) objected as well,
but it seemed to be required by the
audience, so we put it in
Gone now is Harrison Ford's
voiceover, and another ending has
replaced the first, more uplifting
one. Deckard and Rachel's ro-
mance is also more deeply ex-
plored now.
Scott said he believes movie-
goers have become more sophisti-
cated since '82, and thus, will be
more accepting of the new end-
ing, the one he had originally en-
visioned.
"I think this dark view of the
future was a bit shocking at the
time Scott continued. "Today,
it's much less so. Warner Bros,
had in its files a version of the film
which I had edited in 1982 and
they exhibited it in Los Angeles in
late 1991 to positive response.
When the studio showed this ver-
sion to me, 1 thought, 'We've got-
ten so close; why not complete
this as I'd like to see it today, for
audiences who appreciate his
material and now are ready to see
it in its undiluted form And from
this came the cut we're releasing
now
The production design was
very much unlike anything seen
before. Buildings typically aver-
age to be hundreds of stories tall.
Streets are jammed with people
and vehicles.
Scott said, "Blade Runner is
firstand foremost a detective story,
a thriller. It's not so much science
fiction as futuristic, or better yet,
of the future
Blade Runneraso stars Edward
James Olmos, M. Emmet Walsh,
Joe Turkel, Daryl Hannah, Brion
James, William J. Sanderson,
Joanna Cassidy, Morgan Paull,
James Hong and Hy Pyke.
Wednesday night The Comedy
Zone features two guest comedi-
ans, and is an example of The Attic's
continued variety.
The Attic has featured some of
the top comedians in the country,
including: Carrot Top (who will be
performing two shows during
Homecoming week), Ritch
Shydner, Mark "Skippy" Price,
Willie and Lester, Mike Mesmer
"Eyes Kevin Hughs and Blake
Clark. There are even plans now to
feature a locally-produced televi-
sion show spotlighting comedians
live from The Attic.
The Attic has featured some of
thenation'sbiggestacts. Bands who
have performed there include: The
Black Crowes, Greg Allman, The
Georgia Satellites, The Pointer Sis-
ters (who recorded a concert film
seen internationally at The Attic),
The Ramones, The Romantics and
Bonham.
The Attic has also seen various
forms of national recognition. The
club appeared on the cover of "Per-
formance Magazine" Sept. 3rd 1982
and has been mentioned on MTV
several times. The world famous
Attic T-shirts have sold an astonish-
ing90,tXX)since 1971,and havebeen
seen as far away as Toko. ji
FutureplansTrontohasforThe
Attic include keeping The Comedy
Zone strong, bringing in more new
bands such as Sex Tolice, Johnny
Quest, and Dillon Fence, and stay-
ing up with thenational band scene.
The Attic now also has the Pro-
gressive Dance NightSunday nights
featuring free jumps on the new
"velcro-wall
Another addition is The Attic
Unplugged every Tuesday night
featuring the best in live acoustic
music, once again proving the, di-
versity of the club.
The Attic will celebrate its 21st
birthday tonightwithlsland record-
ing artist Drivin' n' Cryin Tickets
are $10 in advance and $12 at the
door. Advanced tickets can be
bought at the Wash Pub on Tenth
Street. There will be limo rides, din-
ners, door prizes and all of the regu-
lar specials. Come out and join the
celebration and experience what
makes The Attic special.
Continued from page 7
musical needs, The Roches carved
a niche for future female acts.
The group has pursued sev-
eral interesting endeavors since
then. One of their most notable
projects was a Christmas album,
We Three Kings, recorded in the
1990 season. It contains the group's
versions of 24 popular carols.
They also did back-up vocals
on albums for the pop band Was
Not Was, and for country singer
Kathy Mattea.
The trio proved their tendency
toward silliness and fun by depict-
ing a group of singing roaches on
Steven Spielberg's television car-
toon series, Tiny Toon Adventures.
The Roches have appeared on
only one of the animated episodes,
but more are on the way.
The Roches have plans to re-
lease a new record this fall, and
they are currently on the road.
They will perform at Thalian
Hall in Wilmington Sept. 17 at
8:00p.m.
r Atpiofe
s
EX P
eadership Fair
L O S I
O N
? t
Discover Your Leadership
Potential!
Join an Organization!
Pnes (or SluJenls Include:
Climbing Wall Instruction Session and Pass!
Ray Charles Tickets
Bowiuig aid BtRvrdx Coupons'
midoitur r;r�,ow
I
Seafood House & Oyster Bar
YtumnYs
$1.00 OFF Any Meal �xcept Specials
coupon good thru 103192 with Student I.D.
Shrimp Plote $3.95
Trout & Shrimp Plate $4.95
Trout, Ocean Perch & Shrimp
Choice of Tujo $4.95
Offer Good Mon-Thurs
Washington Highway Take-outs Welcome
(NC33�xt) (lOthSt. �xt) 7CO Z170
Greenville, NC 34-3I4
Si�imi isaaBir a. D"rM ' Ps��x� wmhi
Eating & DrinkinvJ"Vf Satoon
MONDAY NIGHTFOOTBALL
IS BACK!
New York Giants vs.
Cicago Bears
SPECIALS INCLUDE:
� Draft Beer - 95$ a glass$4.95 a pitcher
�House Hiballs $2.00
�Juice Highballs $2.25
� Double Lime Margaritas $2.75
�Double Strawberry Margaritas $2.95
�Buffalo Wings 25t each
from 4 pm - Closing
� Drawings for Prizes Every Monday!
(located behind Quincy's Stealbouse on Greenville Blvd. 355-46)
SEASON OF SAVINGS
ft
A
FRESH
CHICKEN
LEG
QUARTERS
jrff� V4�
�I'lX-l.iidlMlLuA-ljC.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19,1992
RINSO ULTRA
LAUNDRY
DETERGENT
16 OZ
10 LOAD
OODLES
OF
NOODLES
� i�5? i
NABISCO
SALTINE
CRACKERS
HEAVY
WESTERN
T-BONE
STEAKS
HEAVY
WESTERN
BONELESS
SIRLON
STEAKS
LEAN-N-TENDER
FRESH
PORK
SPARERIBS

w
'BUSCH
I�OB�
2 LITER
COCA
COLA
CLASSIC
snszszsrjp.
rO�MMAl
BUSH OR
SCHLITZOR BUSH LIGHT
SCHLITZ LIGHT SUEP�ES
) tJ i24PACK-120Z
Jgf 12 PACK
2 LITER
COKE II
FORMERLY
NEW COKE
BREYERS � STOUFFERS
ALL NATURAL PREMIUM S,N.Gjr 5. STOUFFERS
ICE CREAM LASAGNA MACARONI
MILK &-4CQ & CHEESE
i
DONALD DUCK CHILLED
s ORANGE JUICE
GALLON





Secret Agent V7
By Chris Kemple
Laughter is a
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healing action. It's also an eight letter word.
By Sean Pamell
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14th & Charles St. SOOSO
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EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
30 KIDS NEED FRIENDS
� 2 Hours A Week � A Car � 2.2 G.P.A.
Kids Ages 4-13 - -
DEADLINE: SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 20
VOLUNTEER
757-6137
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The East Carolinian
Classifieds
SEPTEMBER 17,1992
Page 6
F( )R RENT
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS :1 and 2 bedroom
apartments. Energy-efficient,
several locations in town. Car-
peted, kitchen appliances, some
water and sewer paid, washer
dryer hookups. Call 752-8915.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: 2 blocks from cam-
pus, $160 per month plus oo
of utilities, phone, and cable.
Available now. Call 752-1596
for more information.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 407
Biltmore St. $125.00month
plus 1 3 utilities. Call 758-0700.
HOUSEMATE WANTED:
Near campus, quiet, $165.50
month plus 12 utilities. Call
758-3311.
HOUSE TO SHARE: Need
roommate male or female.
House has washer, dryer, deck,
and garage for storage. $200.00
PER MONTH plus 13 utili-
ties, cable and phone. Call Mike
or Ron 355-2627.
NEED A MATURE, respon-
sible female, preferably non-
smoker to share a 3 bedroom
apt in Tar River. Will have
ownroom. Rent is $143.00, utili-
ties not included. Contact 758-
7016.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Fe-
male, non-smoker; 2 blocks
from campus; small bedroom;
$100 rent 13 utilities and
phone. No pets. Available now.
More info call 757-2782.
FEMALE ROOMMATES
NEEDED: (Available October
3rd.) To share a two bedroom
at Georgetowne Apts1 block
from downtown and campus.
Contact Laurie: 752-9672.
FEMALE WANTED to share 2
bedroom apt. Rent $175.00 1
2 utilities. Must be neat and
have a good sense of humor.
Call (D) 757-2200,after 5:30.757-
2786 ask for Lyn.
ROOMMATE NEEDE: Male,
non-smoker to share large 2
bedroom apt. 1 block from cam-
pus. $115mo. rent 13 utili-
ties. Call 752-6181, leave mes-
sage.
FOR RENT: Parking space
available on Library St. 12
block from campus. Reasonable
rate call 830-9343.
FOR SALE
MOVING - MUST SALE:
Onkyo Tuner, Pioneer Amp.
JVC CDplayer wremote Bose
501 speakers $300.00. King size
4 poster waterbed, $300.00.
Walnut Exec. Desk $90.00. Call
Dean or Shelly 355-5847.
MUST SALE: Antique white
French Provincial bedroom
suite - will sell pieces individu-
F( )R SALE
ally. Also keyboard, lamps and
more.callChristineorVaughna
at 321-1302. Leave message.
FOR SALE: 1987 Dodge Colt,
new breaks and exhaust, 68 K
miles. Good condition - $1,800.
Call Tony 752-1340.
FORMAL DRESS: Perfect for
any formal occasion. Black T-
length rhinestone sprinkled
size 9-10. Call 355-7119 any-
time.
HAND DRUMS: Dounbeks,
Bodlrans, tablas, etc. call 756-
4226 for more information.
FOR SALE: New 50 watt
Onkyo receiver. Has only been
used for a couple of months.
Still under warranty for 1 12
years. Call 830-9301.
FOR SALE: G.E. portable ste-
reo - $50.00 or best offer. AM
FM stereo, duel cassette, high
speed dubbing, detachable
speakers and auxiliary jacks.
Call 931-9807 (Leave message).
2 U2 TICKETS: $30.00 each.
Row 38. Columbia, SC, Sep-
tember 23. Call 758-2372. Leave
message.
MEN'S AND WOMEN'S 26"
FreeSpiritbicycles. $70.00 each.
321-1701.
DORM REFRIGERATORS
used, very good condition.
$50.00. Warsaw Pawm, War-
saw, NC (919) 293-4040.
HELP WANTED
Hours are from 3:00 pm until
7:00 pm with some night and
weekend coaching. This pro-
gram will run from September
to mid-November. Salary rates
start at $4.25 per hour. For more
information, please call Ben
James at 830-4567 or Micheal
Daly at 830-4550.
TOPLESS DANCERS
WANTED - Great club, Great
money, unbelievable tips. Work
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 9
pm - 2 am. Call Sid 919-735-
7713 or Paul 919-736-0716.
MothersPlayhouse
Goldsboro.
HELP WANTED
in
Cost Plus! Computers
756-6390
386DX-40MHZ
4MB Ram
120MB Hard Drive
1.2 MB 5.25" Floppy Drive
1.44 MB 3.5" Floppy Drive
Super VGA .28 DP Monitor
1 MB SVGA Card
Dual Serial Ports
Parallel & Game Ports
101 Key Enhanced Keyboard
MouseDOS 5.0Windows 3.1
$1540.00
HELP WANTED
ALASKA SUMMER EM-
PLOYMENT - Fisheries. Earn
$5,000month. Free trans-
portation! Room & Board!
Over 8,000 openings. No ex-
perience necessary. MALE or
FEMALE. For employment
program call Student Employ-
ment Services at 1-206-545-
4155 ext. A5362.
FALL SOCCER COACHES -
The Greenville Recreation and
Parks Department is recruit-
ing for 12to 16part-time youth
soccer coaches for the fall youth
soccer program. Applicants
must possess some know 1( -Ige
of the soccer skills and 1. ve
the ability and patience with
youth. Applicants must be able
to coach young people ages 5-
16, in soccer fundamentals.
EMERGENCY! Expanding
company needs hardworking
reliable students to mail our diet
brochures from Home Dorm!
Earn up to $200 PT or $1000 FT!
Employees needed immedi-
ately! For job application send
self-addressed stamp envelope:
Colossal Marketing, Employee
Processing, P.O. Box 291140
Port Orange, FL 32129.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE!
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call (800) 338-3388 ext. P-3712
"HELP WANTED" EARN
$1,500 WEEKLY mailing our
circulars Begin now FREE
packet! SEYS, Dept. 164, Box
4000, Cordova, 38018000.
GUARANTEED WORK
AVAILABLE. Excellent pay for
EASY home based work. Full
part-time. Rush self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers
(G2) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham, NC 27705
$360UP WEEKLY. Mailing
brochures! Sparefull-time. Set
own hours! RUSH self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope:
Publishers (G1) 1821 Hillandale
Rd. 1B-295 Durham, NC 27705
COLLEGE REP WANTED: To
distribute "Student Rate" sub-
scription cards at this campus.
Good income. For information
and application write to: COL-
LEGIATE MARKETING SER-
VICES, P.O. Box 1436
Mooresville, NC 28115.
BRODY'S & BRODY'S FOR
MEN are accepting applications
for Part-Time Sales and Cus-
tomer Service Positions. Flex-
ible schedules to fit most needs.
Salaryclothing Discount. Ap-
ply Brody's The Plaza Mon-
Wed. l-4pm.
WANTED BARTENDERS
WAITRESSES: Apply in per-
son Mon-Thurs. between 2-
4pm. No phone calls, Please!
Professor O'Cools 605A Green-
ville Blvd. (Behind Quincy's).
Computers, Inc 106 E. 5th St.
752-3694.
WORK AT HOME: Assembly
, craft, typing and more! Up to
$500.00 a week possible. For
information write Source; P.O.
Box 227, Dept. 9108 Greenville,
NC 27834.
ATTENTION! EARN $2500
Free Trip! Students, Greeks,
Clubs earn free Spring Break
trip after selling only 8 trips at
your school! Spring Break 1-
800-678-6386.
CAMPUS REPS WANTED!
Quality vacations to exotic des-
tinations! Sell Spring Break
packages to Jamaica, Cancun,
Bahamas, Florida. Fastest way
to free travel and extra $$$$.
Call Sun Splash Tours 1-800-
426-7710.
MODELS Susan's needs you
now! 809-A Red Banks Rd
Greenville. New TV commer-
cials in production. Require-
ments: Height 5'7" and up, size
6-8, some previous modeling
or pageant experience.
THURSDAY BABYSITTER
NEEDED from 8:30am to
11:30am. Must have experience
and energy. Transportation
necessary. Susan 758-5345.
LOST AND FOUND
ily is anxiously awaiting his
return. Call Dana at 757-6366.
PERSONALS
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
You also get a FREE
HEADPHONE RADIO
just for calling
1-80d-932-0528.Ext.65
SERVICES ()FFERED
TYPINGWORD PROCESS-
ING : Call Cindy after 5:30 or
leave message. Familiar with
all formats 15 years experience.
Low rates. Work guaranteed.
Call 355-3611.
TENNIS LESSONS: Student
and Faculty; $7 per hour. Call
752-8280.
S Financial Aid Available S
Attention All Srudenral
Undergrade k Grad uaiea. Over $5 Billion k gran
scholarships are now available from private sector Ac
government sources for College Students nationwide. All
student! are eligible! Let us help you locate the money that
you are eugMe to receive. Applications are now bang
accepted. To receive your financial aid program call:
Student Financial StTVicn
BlftagMBaUaafcHM
WRITERPHILOSOPHER
MUSICIAN and poetic soul
seeks friendship and corre-
spondence from like-minded
lady. Photos and letters to MV,
P.O. Box 8663, Greenville, NC
27835.
SIGMA PLEDGES : Hope
you're having a great week.
Get excited! It won't be long
now until you find your big
sis Love, the Sisters.
ANNE SELDON & Ken
Ashby thanks for making
Parent's Day such a great suc-
cess. Ken, you were very handy
with those tents. Thanks again!
Love the Sigmas.
PI DELTA local sorority will
beholding their annual Rush
at Mendenhall Multipurpose
room on Monday Sept. 21 from
7:30 -10:00pm, Tues. Sept. 22
from 7:30 - 10:00pm and on
Wednesday Sept. 23 from 7:30
- 10:00 pm. The sisters of Pi
Delta invite any girl to attend.
RAIN FALLING Reality call-
ing. Mind flies Reality dies.
ALPHA OMICRON PI
proudly supports KATE BOTT
Z for Sophomore Class Vice-
President!
GO PIRATES Good luck
against South Carolina! Love,
Alpha Omicron Pi.
CONGRATS to the Alpha
Omicron Pi flag football team!
2 shut-outs in a row! Keep up
that winning tradition! Alpha
Omicron Pi and Damn proud
of it
VOTE KATE BOTT for
Sophomore Class Vice-presi-
dent!
PERSONALS
you're 3 man. Cheers from 114
TO THE ECU FOOTBALL
TEAM and fans: Congratula-
tions on the game against VA
Tech! Lets win again in South
Carolina. Go Pirates! - Alpha
Xi Delta!
TO THE ALPHA XI DELTA
FOOTBALL TEAM and
Coach Micheal Baker: The
plays are in full effect along
with the cuts and bruises. We
wish you a great season with
no loses! Libos, the Sisters and
pledges of Alpha Xi Delta.
TO KAPPA SIG and Angelica
Pena: Thank you for the Par-
ents Weekend celebration!
Love the Pledges and Sisters
of Alpha Xi Delta.
FOOTBALL PLAYERS AND
FANS: Congratulations on
your victory against VA Tech!
Hope everyone had as much
fun as we did! Party on, Pi-
rates! Love, Gamma Sigma
Sigma.
TWAS THE NIGHT OF
TOGA and all through the
place. Fred Flinstone was
groovin to JQ's bass. The cat
thief and Eddie's cramps were
no joke. I got two words for
Sam � Poison Oak.
TO THE B�@!CH who stole
my hat at Toga Friday: You
can run but you can't hide!
You know who you are and
you'll never be able to wear it
in public. I Want My Hat Back!
JB
WAY TO GO Alpha Phi flag
football players! Keep up the
great job!
WE PAY CASH OR CREDIT
For Unwanted CD's,
Cassettes & Vinyl
Stop By or Call CD ALLEY
Downtown 758-5026
IMMEDIATE OPENING:
Typist Secretarial person. Ap-
ply in person between 9:00 -
5:00 Monday thru Friday at SDF
LOST AND FOUND
HAVE YOU SEEN a black
ma le cat? Last seen in mall area
a week ago. Very worried fam-
CONGRATULATIONS to
the new Zeta Tau Alpha
pledges! Amy Barber, Heather
Burgee, Deana C?le, Michelle
Chrisman, Edy Cline, Krista
Dalkowski, Tammy Hardison,
Laura Hogan, Jen Lyons, Tara
Martinelli, Lisa Melisauskas,
Alicia Nisbet, Roxanne
Reynolds, Natalie Richards,
Jennifer Shetzley, Jennifer
Tysinger, Leigh Ann Watkins,
Stacey Wilmoth and Robin
Wilson. Love, the Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS to
the new initiates of Zeta Tau
Alpha: Kate Baebler, Lara
Marr, Eileen Moore, Jodi
Simmons and Jill Wagner.
TO THE DEADHEAD, the
BALDHEAD, and the RED-
HEAD: Don't take life's joke
on you personally, It's only one
big drinking game And
TO THE BETA PSI
PLEDGES: We had so much
fun on biglittle hunt. We hope
it was worth the search! Love,
your Alpha Phi Big Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS to
the pledge class officers of Al-
pha Phi: President, Julie
Breazeale; Vice President,
Janet Funderburk; V.P. of
Scholarship, Amanda Baer and
J.P. Worley; Treaasurer,
Heather Joyce; Recording Sec,
Amy Rogers; Social Chairman,
Cathy Choate; Activites Asst,
Amy Moss; Chaplain, Tammi
Hakooz; Panhellenic Del
Katy Bonny; Panhellenic Rep
Mindy Grahm and Jonni
Wainwright; Philanthropy,
Jodi Rittenhouse and Jenny
Ransey; Historian, Kathy
Molnar; Lock out, Malinda
Sikes; Scrapbook, Kristen
Shiavone; Sisters Party,
Courtney Faison; Fundraiser,
Wendy Spencer; Big and Little
Chariman, Wendy Bosttan.
We look forward to an Awe-
some year, Love, the sisters of
Alpha Phi.
Announcements
BISEXUAL-GAY-LES-
BIAN SUPPORT GROUP
Social support and activities.
Meetings are closed. Call 757-
6766 11:00 - 12:15 Tues. and
Thurs. or 1:00 - 2:30 Wed. for
information on meeting time
and place.
P.U.S.H. THROUGH THE
BARRIERS
If you would like to work
towards reducing the Archi-
tectural, as well as the attitudi-
nal barriers that students with
special needs are faced with
every day, then come to the
next meeting of P.U.S.H.
(People United to Support the
Handicapped). The meeting
will be 5:00-6:00 on Thursday,
September 17 in Cotten Hall
Lobby. We will be working on
ourplans for Homecomingand
an Awareness Week. Come join
the fun
CAM. FOR ENTRIES
The Rebel Magazine, ECU's
literary and arts publications'
annual competition is calling
for entries. Deadline is 11-4-92
at 5pm. Regulations and entry
forms are located at the Rebel
office in the Publication Bldg
English Dept, main office and
School of Art Media Center.
COUNSELING CENTER
Men's Issues: This group
will explore current society ex-
pectations of men and the pres-
sures men experience. The
group will focus on exposing
stereotypes and redefining
what it means to be a man in
light of current ideas about
emotional health and well-be-
ing. Mondays beginning (9-21-
92 from 3-4pm in 329 Wright
Building. Call 757-6661.
STUDENTS FOR LIFE
Are you Pro-life? If so, you
are invited to join ECU Stu-
dents for Life. We offer sup-
port, information, and an op-
portunity to get involved. Call
Heather or Laurie at 758-7698
for details.
RF.A1. CRISIS INTERVEN-
TION
We need your experience!
Your achievements in every-
day situations can be useful to
others. Earn that feeling of ac-
complishment. Real crisis cen-
ter is recruiting volunteer cri-
sis counselors for our tele-
phone hot-line and walk-in
center. We will be offering
training classes in this enrich-
ing field beginning September
21, 1992. Call 758-HELP or
come by 312 East 10th Street.
REAL CRISIS INTERVEN-
TION
Teens! Dial-A-Teen is inter-
ested in your valuable time.
We are looking for special
teens, between the ages of 15
and 18, who would like to vol-
unteer their invaluable listen-
ing skills to help others in cri-
sis. We are offering training
classes for our teen hotline be-
ginning September 21, 1992.
Call 758-HELP or come by 312
East 10th Street.
COUNSELING CENTER
Therapy group for survivors
of Insest and Molestation
Wednesdays from 3:30 -
5:00pm. Call 757-6661 for more
information.
COUNSELING CENTER
Support group for women
with eating disorders. Students
only. Thursays, 3:30 - 5:00pm.
Call Dr. Sara Shepard at 757-
6661 for more information.
FCHI ACROSS CLUB
A meeting for those inter-
ested in playing Fall andor
Spring Lacross will be held in
the basement of Christenbury
Gymnasium on Tuesday, Sep-
tember 22 at 5:00pm. For fur-
ther information, contact Lake
at 757-2465.
INTRODUCTION TO
MEDIATION
A short course of instruc-
tion in mediation techniques
and philosophy will begin 10:00
- 11:30am, Sunday, September
20, in the Courtney Square
Clubhouse, of Arlington Blvd.
one block south of Plaza Mall.
The course will continue for
the next three Sunday morn-
ings. All are invited. Bring a
cushion and wear comfortable
clothing. The instruction is
sponsored by the ECU Bud-
dhist Mediation and Study
Group.
SCHOOT OF MUSIC
EVENT
Sunday, Sept. 20, the ECU
School of Music will present
"Concert on the Lawn an
event of the Friends of the
School of Music for members
and their guest. For more in-
formation call 757-6851.
WINDSURFING!
ECU Recreational Services
will be sponsoring a
windsurfing trip on Friday,
September 25 - Sunday, Sep-
tember 27. Take a break from
the stress and come out and
have some fun! The cost is
$4.00students and $5.00fac-
ulty- staff-guest. This includes
basic instruction, rigging,
transportation and board bal-
ance. A pre trip meeting will
be haled on September 23 at
5:00pm in Brewster D-101. For
further information call 757-
6911.
WINDSURFING CLUB
MEETING
This Thursday, Sept. 17 at
5:30 in Christenbury Gym Rm.
102. If you are interested in
learning to windsurf, compe-
tition windsurfing, or just per-
fecting your jibes, loops, etc.
This is the group for you. You
can windsurf regardless of
height, weight or income.





The East Carolinian
September 1 7, 1992
Sports
Page 9
Prediction
Pirates will jerk 'Cocks around
By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
The 'Cocks can't hang with a bunch
of hostile Tirates.
The Rues will sail into Columbia and
leave with their second victory. Unfortu-
nately, the fans that will fill William-Brice
Stadium will be calling for the head of
South Carolina Head Coach Sparkv
Woods (who may be looking for a new job
soon).
Michael Anderson has proven he is
quite capable of running the offense and
wide receiver Peter Zophy, who had 111
yards receiving on nine catches against
Virginia Tech, has shown he is quite ca-
pable of catching the "Satellite's" signals.
Tony Davis stepped forward as a de-
fensive force last weekend to help ease
the pain of an injured Jerry Dillon, while
Greg Grandison gave the fans a glimpse
of his Ail-American abilities by stealing
two Maurice DeShazo passes to preserve
the Buc victory-
Pholo by Dail Reed � TEC
Peter Zophy zoomed for 111 yards on nine catches against the Hokies of Virginia Tech.
Believe it, USC can
count on the loss
By Chas Mitch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
See 'Cocks, page 10
Head Coach Steve Logan and com-
pany, will tike aim this weekend at one of
East Carolina's long time nemesis. The
Gamecocks of South Carolina has a 8-1 lead
in head-to-head match-tips, and are look-
ing to revenge last year's loss to the Bucs.
According to Coach Logan, the pri-
mary reason why the Gamecocks are so
successful against the Pirates can be
summed up in one word, intimidation.
"I've been involved in two match-ups
with South Carolina and quite frankly, we
took the field scared Logan said. "This
time we will not be intimidated bv the team
or the size of the stadium
With two games under their belts, the
chances of a South Carolina rout are slim to
none. Even though VVilliams-BriceStadium
seats 75,lXX land the fans of the Gamecocks
can be loud, obnoxious and unruly, the
Pirates should come out of this match-up
unscathed.
On the offensive side of the ball, ECU
holds a decisive edge in consuming the
football field. While USC is still having a
hard time trying to find the offensive chem-
istry, Sean McConnelland Michael Ander-
son have made their own chemistry.
McConnell is like the Desert Fox, Gen-
eral Erwin RommelLhesetsup the ground
game and leaves the opposition in total
disarray, while Anderson fits the mold of
Storming Norman Schwarzkopf.
So, after 60 minutes of head slapping,
body smashing and ass-kicking football,
the Gamecocks will be cockless as the Pi-
rates romp over them. Pirate faithful, you
can "paint this one purple" as the total
package of offense, defense and special
teams will bring home yet another Pirate
win.
ECU v. South Carolina
ECU
1991 record: 11-1-0, Peach Bowl Champions
Primary offense: Pro-option
Primary defense: Multiple 50
Offensive lettermen returning: 5
Defensive lettermen returning: 6
General information
Location: Greenville, N.C.
Enrollment: 16,693
Colors: Purple & Gold
Nickname: Pirates
Conference: Independent
Stadium: Ficklen (35,000)
Surface: Grass
Previous Results
ECU USC
1977 16 19 (first meeting)
1991 31 20
Gamecocks lead series 8-1
only two of the nine previous meetings
have been played in Ficklen. While four
of the top ten crowds ever to see ECU
play have been in William-Brice Stadium.
South Carolina
1991 record: 3-6-2
Primary offense: Multiple
Primary defense: Multiple
Offensive lettermen returning, lost: 6, 5
Defensive starters returning, lost: 6,5
Special teams lettermen returning, lost: 4,1
Head Coach: Sparky Woods (Carson-Newman, 76)
Record at School: 15-17-3 (4 seasons)
Career Record: 53-36-5 (9 seasons)
General Information
Location: Columbia, S.C
Enrollment: 25,613
Colors: Garnet and Black
Nickname: Gamecocks
Conference: Southeastern
Stadium: William-Brice (72,400)
Surface: Natural Grass
1992 Schedule
Sept. 5 lost to Georgia, 6-28
lost to Arkansas, 745
East Carolina
at Kentucky
at Alabama
MISSISSIPPI STATE
at Vanderbilt
TENNESSEE
LOUISIANA TECH
at Florida
at Clemson
Znim Cimmulaj
Michael Anderson
i
Conch Sparky
Woods
Sept. 12
Sept. 19
Oct. 3
Oct. 10
Oct. 17
Oct. 24
Oct. 31
Nov. 7
Nov. 14
Nov. 21
m
lirnndon Bennett
Crystal Balls
ECU USC
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor 38 17
( has Mitch'l, Ast Sports Editor 42 17
Nancy lenkins, Mayor 2M 14
Kevin Hail, WZMB Sports Dir. 3S 21
Richard Eal in,hancellor 30 14
Courtney Jones, SGA President 21 14
Kisha Hubbard, Soph psych. 40 lo
Vince Thomas, Soph comm. 35 21
Brian Bailey, WN( I-TV 34 20
ave:
34
"The 'Cocks are impotent. ITiey can't score
"No contest
"I think ECU has ti be twice a- gi x x.1 as S uth (an lina.
"Expect more trick plays from ipecial teams
No comment
"The Pirates have begun their win streak
"Because South Carolina is sorry
"We're gonna kick that ass
"Fans are so unhappy vith Sparky V Kids, if ECl
lumps on top early (the fans) won't be a factor
(( 'in e again, the opinions expressed here are
purely for entertainment purposes. Please
no v aeei inj
Photo by Dail Reed � TEC
Defensive Coordinator Chris Thurmond takes it one play at a time and lets the statistics come.
Vision creates leadership
for defense coordinator
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
It is imperative for someone
who leads to have a vision. Luckily
for the East Carolina Pirates, their
defensive backs have such a leader
in the Defensive Coordinator Chris
Thurmond.
Thurmond's attitude that "the
next play is the most important" has
already beo 'me standard on the Fi-
nite defense1. Given the defensive
stand made in the last minutesof the
Virginia Tech game, it seems the
Pirate defense is focusing on im-
proving their national ranking from
last year's 83rd. Ranking, however,
is of minimal importance to
Thurmond.
'We're just trving to concen-
trate on aUgnmentand assignment
hesaidIfwejustconcentrateonthe
fact that the upcoming play is the
most important, the statistics will
take care of themselves
1 hurmi aid said tli.it "alignment
and assignment" is quite relevant to
his integral philosophy in coaching.
"The most important play is the next
playhe said. Thurmond tries to get
his players to focus on that play and
not dwell cm the play that just oc-
curred.
Thurmond, a 39-year-old Okla-
homa native, began his career at
McAlesterhigh school in 1976, after
graduating from the University of
Tulsathepreviousvear. He returned
to his alma mater in 1983 and com-
pleted a nine year association, before
receiving the call to come to join
SteveLogan'scoachingstaff at ECU.
Thurmond credits much oi his
success in coaching to his mentor,
Bobby Troctor, a long-time second-
ary coach at the University of Okla-
homa.
"We have a similar personal-
ity he slid. "He took an interest in
me early in mv career, and always
answered any oi mv problems As
a local high school coach fhurmond
would drive to meet Proctor in the
Oklahoma film room and review
game films. Thurmond said Proctor's
advice is still available on a weekly
basis, as the two friends talk often.
Thurmond said hedoesn'tmind
the publ icity received by the offense
and hopes they continue their suc-
cess.
"When the offense performs
well it's always gcxd for us. The one
great thingaboutcoachingatECU is
that we are never out of a game
Thurmond said. He is alwavs pre-
pared to motivate his defense into
stopping the other team, as was
proven in the last stand in the Vir-
ginia Tech game.
"We always prepare for pres-
sure situations he said. "But in a
situation like that there's not as much
pressure as other times, mainly be-
cause, everyone expects the opposi-
tion to score. We view those times
moreasopportunities,tlian pressure
Pirate tansevervwherehopetlie
Pi ratedefensecontinuestoseize their
opportunities.
ECU'S TOP BENCH PRESS WEIGHTS
SOURCE: ECU MEDIA GUIDE





�i'j - �
���.1� . �1 �
mmmmmmmmmmmum
"i
10 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 17, 1992
'Cocks
Continued from page 9
South Carolina has shown
nothing other than ineptitude in
their first two games of the sea-
son, totaling just 13 points while
allowing 73.
This year marks the centen-
nial for South Carolina football.
Bad timing (it is also Parent's
Day).
ECU's band plays better than
USC's. The 'Cocks receivers would
have an easier time catching a cold
than the ball and theirdefensewill be
lucky to catch their breath.
Injury Update
Senior Halfback Ronnie Williams suffered a separated
shoulder against Syracuse and is out for the season. Redshirt
freshman Derrek Batson now starts at halfback.
Senior weakside linebacker Jerry Dillon has a broken
thumb on his left hand suffered against Syracuse. He did
play against Virginia Tech but did not start. Junior Thomas
Jones started at weakside linebacker.
Coaches are hopeful that senior linebacker Adrian
Barnhill can return this week to practice. Barnhill has
missed the last several weeks of practice with a hairline leg
fracture.
The East Carolinian
will be whipping
WZMB's azz in the sec-
ond-annual volleyball
challenge.
Front row seats are
still available. Call the
paper or the station for
more information.
(clip and save) LvJwJV ! (bring to meeting)
There will be a mandatory Sports Writer meeting in the
Student Pubs Building. This is for all writers and anyone
INTERESTED in being a writer.
This means you: Daniel "Don't Be Late" Willis, Ricky
Charm, Bob "Fill Me In" Owens, Robert Joyner, Colin
Mohlmann, James Timmons (did I spell that right?) AND
ALL THE REST � YOU KNOW WHO YOU ARE
E ARE TWO SIDES TO �
G A NURSE IN THE ARM
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member oi the Army Nurse
I Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
J not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you're earn-
ing a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 3219, Warminster,
PA 18974-9845. Or call toll free: 1-800-USA-ARMY, ext. 438.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 17, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 17, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.894
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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