The East Carolinian, September 15, 1992






Opinion
I meant to Believe
Repent ye Pirate unfaithful. Fair-weather fans
must stay seated until football games end.
See pg. 5.
Lifestyle
Singing the Blues
Joe Cocker joined B.B.
King, Dr. John and Buddy
Guy for a Friday Blues
Festival.
Seepg. 7
ma
Sports
Hokie Pokie
The Pirate football team pulled out a
victory over Virginia Tech in front of
35,100 fans for Parent's Weekend.
See pg. 9.
ItemLCmvlinian
Vol. 67 NO. 6 rirmlotSrwr. fi tV( rn iwi- 7
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
SGA to fill
Vice President
Tuesday, September 15,1992
12 Pages
� M �
position
Hokies get poked
By Elizabeth Shimmel
Assistant News Editor
SGA will ho'd an election
for a new vice president to fill the
position that newly-elected
Sherry Smith was unable to fill
last spring.
Smith resigned May 7 to ful-
fill a summer work contract she
was committed to before she ran
for the job of vice president. It
was her understanding that she
would be able to receive a written
excuse from the SGA to return in
the fall and resume her job.
"I thought it was really
simple, I thought all I had to do
was get a written excuse from the
secretary Smith said.
However, the SGA consti-
tution mandates the attendance
of the three members of the ex-
ecutive board for the entire sum-
mer, and any member requesting
an exemption must appeal to the
Review Board.
"The president, vice presi-
dent and treasurer shall be re-
quired to attend summer school
and assume all duties for the op-
eration of the Student Govern-
ment Association. Exceptions
to this rule can only be made by
the Review Board. Any officer
desiring an exception must file a
formal request no later than 30
days before the end of spring se-
mester
Before the spring elections
were held, SGA President
Courtney Jones was aware that
Smith had intentions of leaving
at the end of the semester.
Jones also did not think it
would be a problem for Smith to
return in the fall if she followed
the proper actions for an exemp-
tion.
"There is a process that you
have to go through to be exempt
SGA Vote
The SGA vice
presidential election will
be held Sept. 23. The
polls will close at 6 p.m.
and each student must
bring an ECU identifi-
cation card to vote.
for the summer that was not car-
ried out by Sherry Jones said.
Smith had less than 30 davs
before the end of the semester
when she learned the appropri-
ate actions for an official excep-
tion.
Smith then went immedi-
ately to the attorney general to
try to get an exception.
"f Executi veofficers) can get
excused for medical reasons, and
I knew that in the past there were
executive officers excused for
other reasons Smith said.
After three days of confer-
ring with Ronald Speier, dean of
students, the attorney general
came to the decision that Smith
would not be able to keep her job
if she left for the summer.
Smith said she decided she
needed to leave for the summer
to take on her new summer job.
"I had one night to decide
whether to go or stay, and I de-
cided to go
Smith said she has no inten-
tions of becoming involved with
SGA again. "My focus now is get-
ting into my career, so I'm not
going to do anymore extracur-
ricular activities Smith said.
Keith Dyer and David Tyre
are both running to fill the vice
president position. The election
will be held Sept. 23.
Photo by Dial Reed � TEC
Dorm resident allowed to keep amplifier
Z-� ��me I had to get rid of it he said. tential of nmrlnrina �,rU �.�,�a iL.� . .
By Kim Williams
Staff Writer
A resident (if Jones Hall who
was originally told he had to get
ridofhisguitaramplifierwillnow
be able to keep it.
SeniorDan Henry said a resi
dent assistant told him he must
remove his guitar amplifier from
his room after she walked by and
noticed him playing a guitar.
Henry said his playing was
not loud enough to cause any dis-
turbance.
"The RA had to ask if I even
had an amplifier before she told
me I had to get rid of it he said. tential of producing more sound
After the RA told Henry mat than a stereo.
Police break up fight downtown
he must get rid of the amplifier,
Henry said he was not concerned.
"I just blew it off because I
wasn't cranking it up, so I stuck it
under a desk with a sheet over it in
case we had a fire drill he said.
Henry had to vacate his room
when a fire drill occurred in Jones
Hall on Sept. 1.
When he returned, his RA
and buildingcoordinator Joe Bow-
man had found the amplifier and
told him he must get rid of it.
Henry said the hall officials
told him the amplifier had thepo-
"VVhich is ridiculous
Henry said. "Next they will be
telling me that I have to have a
smaller stereo
Henry, who took the ampli-
fier home the following weekend,
said that he felt it was unfair be-
cause his amplifier was small and
nobody ever complained about it.
"The bottom line is I pav close to
$80X1 to live here he said.
Although this year's edition
of living Spaces states that
amplified musical equipment and
drums are not permitted" in the
residence halls, Director of Resi-
dent Education Carla Jones said
that Henry will be allowed to bring
his amplifier back if he wishes.
"If students haveamplifiers,
we are asking that they not use
them becauseof noise Jones said.
Shesaid,however, thatif stu-
dents use them so as not to merit
any complaints, then they are not
creating a noise problem.
Bowman said the staff of
Jones Hall is in the process of con-
tacting Henry and informing him
of the situation.
By Shay Pierce
Staff Writer
After the Syracuse game on
Sept. 5, many students headed
downtown to finish off the night.
Both levels of the New Deli were
packed with Queen Sarah Satur-
day fans, but little did they know
their night would end in chaos.
New Deli manager, John
Lambraktsays it was "something
you'd see in a movie people get-
tinghit with bottles, chairs flying
The bar roombrawl erupted
when the New Deli staff tried to
take out several young men who
were starting trouble in the pool
room. They were "older northern
guys possibly Syracuse fans,
Lambrakissays. Hesaid therewere
probably 20people involved in the
fight.
Lambrakis called 911 for the
police, who came and cleared the
bar by spraying mace into the
crowds of people.
Trina Campbell, a student
who was upstairsduring the whole
ordeal, described the scene as crazy.
"All of the sudden all the people
around me started coughing and
someone yelled, 'I think its sul-
fur Campbell recalls everyone
ran downstairs and outside to find
mass confusion. "There were po-
lice cars and people on the ground
By Jennifer Ellison
Staff Writer
Greenville Police arrested a New Deli
Sept. 5. The police used tear gas to
andagainstthewallitwascrazy
Lambraki said ceiling fans pulled
the fumes upstairs where it reached
the crowds.
One person was arrested in
the hysteria. Ironically, the person
was a New Deli employee, Peter
Thornton. Concerning the police,
Lambraski said, "They did their
job but they got the wrong guy
William Harris of Public Af-
fairs explained Thornton's arrest
was based on him being the one
person saw to be mostaggressive
" Thornton's trial will be held later
in the month.
As for the spray used, it was
employee during a brawl in the bar
disperse the crowd.
not mace but capstan, a derivative
of cayenne pepper. This new
method of crowd disbursement
causes no permanent damage, as
does mace.
"The spray is an inflamma-
tory which causes mucous mem-
branes to swell, eyes to close, some
coughing Harris said.
According to Harris, using
capstan means policedon'thave
to hit people or cause injury in
times like this
No one knows who the
people that started the fight are,
and it is possible they were not
local students.
The number of social science
requirements for General Educa-
tion has been changed from 13
hours in the 1991-92 catalog to 12
hours in the 1992-93 catalog.
"It should have been done
many years ago said Herbert
Carlton, a political science profes-
sor who has been a member of the
University Curriculum Commit-
tee for several years.
The University Curriculum
Committee is made up of about 12
people; professors from different
departments and one student from
Student Government Association.
The committee meets once a ear
to discuss changes in the
university's curriculum.
According to Carlton, a
change occurred during the late
1970s in which ECU sw;tched from
a quarter system to a semester sys-
tem. When this change occurred,
most of the departments in Social
Sciences provided the students
with three semester hour classes.
"This tended to direct more
students towards psychology
classes said Cariton, "because
they would have to take the two
hour classes to equal a total of
thirteen hours
The new curriculum, accord-
ing to Carlton, should allow stu-
drops
dents tospend moreoftheirhours
on classes they need for their ma-
jors rather than on classes for Gen-
eral Education requirements.
It is also believed that any
student can move to the more re-
cent catalog and use the 12 hours
of Social Sciences instead of the 13
hours, and not interfere with
graduation plans.
"I think the new system is
great stated Amy Lowe, an ECU
junior. "Not everyone likes psy-
chology, and it eliminates having
to take unnecessary hours
No one from the psychol-
ogy Department could be
reached for a comment about the
new curriculum.
Motorcycle safety program gains national status
By Kenneth Chesson
Staff Writer
A statewide motorcycle safety program based
ere at ECU has gained national status. This pro-
gram will help motorcycle riders have a safer ride.
The N.C Motorcycle Safety Education Pro-
gram received accreditation Aug. 18 from the Mo-
torcycle Safety Foundation of Irvine, Ca. The foun-
dation is the primary accrediting agency for instruc-
tion courses for bikes.
"In 1989 legislation passed a bill establishing
the program lor four years said Rosemary
Unsworth, director of the program. "A $3 motor-
cycle registration fee will finance the program at 11
community colleges across the t.tte
"What we do here is work with any community
college that wants to set up a motorcycle safety course
Unsworth said.
Local community colleges that offer the motor-
cycle safety program are Coastal Carolina Commu-
nity' College in Jacksonville, Lenoir Community Col-
lege in Kinstonand Wake Technical Community Col-
lege in Raleigh.
The program offers two different classes, a
beginning rider course and an experienced rider
course Unsworth said.
"The beginning rider course is 20 to 22 hours
Unsworth said. "In thiscoursethestudentsaretaught
See Motorcycle, page 3
p- HMm





2 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 15, 1992
Library science program
moves to School of Education
Trial set for Florida murders
A trial date has been set for Danny Rolling, who is charged
with murdering five college students last year. Rolling will go on
trial Sept. 1, 1993 for killing four University of Florida students
and one Santa Fe Community College student. All were found
slain in campus-area apartments in August 1990. Rolling, who is
serving five life terms for robbery and burglary convictions, is
charged with five counts of first-degree murder, three counts of
sexual battery and three counts of armed burglary.
Southern Illinois cools off
Air conditioning has returned to lOSouthem Illinois Univer-
sity buildings that had been without cool air since a July 24 failure
inoneof the school's air conditioning refrigeration machines. "We
were burning up over here said College Of Liberal Arts Dean
John Jackson. "We're hermetically sealed, so when it would be 85
outside, it would be 90 in here The air conditioning came back on
Aug. 24, the first day of classes for the fall semester.
Low enrollment forces closing
The oldest independent school of technology in the United
States will not be open this fall, due to financial problems and
declining enrollment. The trustees of Spring Garden College said
they decided to cancel classes "after extensive but unsuccessful
efforts to re-secure the long-term viability of the institution The
college, which offers degrees in computer technologies, architec-
ture and interior design among others, was founded in 1851 and
is a Philadelphia landmark. Officials said the school has a debt of
more than $10 million and an operating budget of $5.5 million.
Six injured in gunf ight at NCCU
Six people were injured when gunfire broke out during an
argument Saturday night on the North Carolina Central Univer-
sity campus. Three others received minor injuries while attempt-
ing to flee. According to the chancellor's office, all of the injured
were treated at local hospitals and released by Sunday morning.
The dispute began when a man assaulted a female student while
she was talking to friends, officials said.
Filmmaker to visit UNC
Fliers touting a planned visit by filmmaker Spike Lee are
being handed out on the UNC campus. Lee will arrive on campus
next week to support for student demands for a black cultural
center that occupies an entire building. Students want Chancellor
Pardin to make a decision by Nov. 13.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel. Taken from CPS
and other newspapers.
By Christie Lawrence
Staff Writer
The library science program
at ECU recently moved from the
College of Arts and Sciences to the
School of Education.
According to Chancellor Ri-
chard Eakin, the transfer became
effective July 1. The reorganiza-
tion of these programs will com-
bine librarianship with media and
instructional technology.
The Department of Library
and Information Studies had been
a part of the ECU College of Arts
and Sciences since 1966. Dr. Keats
Sparrow, dean of the College of
Arts and Sciences, said although he
is sorry to lose this department, he
believes the recent reorganization
will enhance the program for stu-
dents interested in library science.
"The merger with the School
of Education is a logical placement
for library science, holding poten-
tial for greatly strengthened pro-
grams Sparrow said.
The new department offers
both the Master of Library Sciences
(MLS) and Master of Arts in Edu-
cation (MAEd) degrees. As a part
of this reorganizational transfer,
the new department was renamed
the Department of Library Studies
and Education Technology.
Dr. Charles R. Coble, dean of
the School of Education, said the
merger prepares the students for
the information society in the 21st
century, and he welcomes the new
department into his school.
"I am pleased with this op-
portunity for a closer integration
of instruction for classroom teach-
ers, library services and media re-
sources Coble said. "Interweav-
ing these programs will enable us
to instill in teachers an apprecia-
tion for how they and their stu-
dents can access information
Lawrence Auld will serve as
the new chair for the department
of Library Studies and Education
Technology. Auld was previously
chair of the Department of Library
Information Studies. Auld said he
is looking forward to workingwith
the faculty in this new venture.
"The new department opens
the way to several exciting oppor-
tunities for developing new sys-
tems of delivery of information to
residents of the East Auld said.
Sorority rush down from previous years
By Shay Pierce
Staff Writer
Sorority rush began Aug. 17,
but open bids are still being dis-
tributed by those sororities who
did not make quota.
There were 263 women reg-
istered for fall rush compared to
306inl991. After 77 dropped out,
177 were left to receive bids.
Quota was set at 33 for each
sorority excluding Zeta Tau Al-
pha. Originally only two sorori-
ties made quota, but most have
been able to pick up their full
amounts through open bids.
According to thePanhellenic
Council President Jean McAleese,
there seems to be a trend across
the country with rushee numbers
down, possibly due to financial
reasons related to the recession.
Another problem panhellenic
acknowledges is that "Gir!i seemed
to have certain preferences
McAleese said. Because of these
segmented groups, many rushees
dropped out when they did not get
a particular bid from the sorority of
their choice.
Panhellenic is a council of
representatives fromalleight ECU
campus sororities.
The organization has re-
ceived many honorable awards
including second place for most
outstanding rush system and sec-
ond place for most rush council in
1992. They have also received two
outstanding panhellenic of the
south awards.
Zeta Tau Alpha held their
rush two weeks after all of the
other sororities to increase their
number of members and to keep
them from having a set quota.
The panhellenic council
joined together all of ECU's so-
rorities to help make the Zeta Tau
Alpha rush a success.
Next year, panhellenic will
set quota a day later instead of in
the middle of rush week to be
better prepared for dropouts.
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SEPTEMBER 15, 1992
The East Carolinian 3
Germany to lower interest rates Motorcycle
Continued from page 1
Wellington Post
ROME � In a stunning deci-
sion, Germany announced Sunday
that it will cut its interest rate a
move that could bringdown rates
worldwide and rejuvenate the ail-
ing global economj.
The move bv Germany's cen-
tral bank, the Bundesbank, follows
months of economic and financial
market turmoil in Europe, which
has been hard-hit bv the
Bundesbank's policy of keeping
rates high to battle inflation.
Germany had been under
intense pressure from the United
States and economical h struggling
allies in Europe to reduce rates.
The United States also has
been victimized by high German
rate which have caused a sharp
decline in the dollar's val ue against
the German mark
The announcement of the
German rate cut wa made via the
European Community after a
round of weekend conferencecalls,
officials said.
Thecut will be accompanied
bv a realignment of the European
Monetary System, the framework
for keeping order among Europe's
many currencies.
The size of the German rate
cut, to be announced Monday, will
be about 1.5 percentage points, ac-
cording to Italian sources.
Short-term German interest
rates have been in the 8.75 percent
to 9.75 percent range.
The move surprised foreign
financial markets. In early Asian
trading Monday, the value of the
dollar rocketed from 1.44 (ierman
mark to 1.50 marks, a traders
fled the mark in favor of dollars.
�s recently as last week,
Bundesbank 'resilient Helmut
Schlesinger had insisted that Ger-
main- needed to maintain high in-
terest rates to fight in fiat ion, which
has -urged with the financial cost
of uniting western Germany with
the formerlj Communist eastern
Germany.
Schlesinger said lasl week
that the German Bundesbank
currently sees no room for maneu-
ver to lower rates
Rut the deepening economic
turmoil elsewhere in Europe ap-
parently swayed the hand of the
normally fiercely independent
Bundesbank: Other European na-
tions, forced to match Germany's
lugh rates or see their currencies
devalued, were facing crisis situa-
tions.
In a shocking rebuke to the
Bundesbank last week, Sweden
raised its short-term interest rates
from lo percent to 73 percent in a
desperate attempt to stop the flight
of money from Sweden to Ger-
many.
Italy also raised interest rates
on Thursday,and speculation has
been rampant that Britain would
be forced to do the same.
What is more, concern has
been rising through hi t Europe that
French voters might reject the all-
important Maastricht Treaty of
European economic integration,
which German leaders have
strongly supported.
The French referendum is
Sunday, and the German rate cut
is expected to take ammunition
away from anti-unity factions who
have lambasted the Germans for
ignoring their neighbors'concerns.
With the German rate cut -
the firstsince January 1990�other
European nations now will have
room to cut their rates, potentially
boosting their weak economies.
France and the Netherlands
indicated Sunday that they would
follow Germany.
And the United States also
could see lower interest rates be-
cause of Germany's decision.
Economists believe that the Fed-
eral Reserve has been eager to cut
rates further to help the stagnant
American economy, but could not
so long as the dollar continued to
fall versus the German mark.
Secretary of the Treasury
Nicholas Brady said Sunday that
the United States was "especially
pleased that the Bundesbank in-
tends to reduce interest rates.
This is a positive develop-
ment for world markets and will
help fulfill President Bush's long-
standing efforts to ensure the
strengthening of world growth
In the realignment of the
European Monetary System, Italy
will devalue the lira 3.5 percent,
while the other nations will follow
the German mark and revalue3.5
percent. That will mean an effec-
tive drop of 7 percent in the value
o( the lira when exchange markets
open Monday.
how to ride a motorcycle. This
course consists of classroom work
and on-bike experience. Motor-
cyclesare provided for the students.
" rheexperienced ridercourse
requires that the student have at
least six months experience riding.
This course is geared towards how
to lower the risks of riding and
practice skills that lower the risks of
accidents.
"We also provide a certified
motorcycle safety instructorcoursc
in which we supply all of the train-
ing materials. The instructors
course is four weeks long and the
individual must be dedicated and
motivated.
c ross the s ta te we now have
60 certified safety instructors
I nsworth said. "After they are cer-
tified, they are given a job at one of
the community colleges where the
course itaughtbecauseeachsafetv
course must be taught by a certified
trainer. Another requirement of the
instructor is that they know First
Aid and CPR
This semester there are 131
registered motorcycles on campus.
East October a motorcycle club was
started on campus. "We started the
club with safety in mind Jason D.
Moore, club president said. "We
tell the members to keep a cool
head on them while riding their
bikes on campus and not to drive
wild. We also keep a list of names
and phone numbers to the mem-
bers so when they go out riding
they can call a friend. It is always
safer to ride with three or four
others than bv yourself
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Mendenhall Room 248
7:15 pm
Tuesday, September 15 &
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(Refreshments)
Apostolic Campus Ministry
THE SIGHTS.THE SOUNDS.
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aanHHai
4 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 15, 1992
Gun and 'Rambos' are the rule
Washington Post
MOGADISHU, Somalia
One of the most dangerous cor-
ners in one of the world's most
dangerous capitals is the gun
bazaar at the central marketplace
here. "
It stands as a stark re-
minder of how difficult the task
will be to establish order in a
country gone gun crazy.
The bazaar is actually just
two tables in an un-imposing
corner stall, tucked away at the
end of a dusty alleyway.on the
divided city's south side.
It is a kind of convenience
store for heavy firepower, offer-
ing weapons ranging from hand-
guns and hand grenades to as-
sault rifles and grenade launch-
ers.
Somali men, young and
old, come here to have guns re-
paired, replaced or reloaded.
In a city awash with guns,
firearms, it seems, come cheaper
than food and fuel.
The U.Smade M-16 as-
sault rifle sells for about $75.
Much preferred by the young
militiamen who swagger
through the town is the Russian-
made AK-47, which sells for
about $100.
It is perhaps a telling sign
of the chaos in Somalia that the
priceof ammunition recently has
risen to 5,000Somali shillings �
just under $1 � for each bullet.
Foreigners typically are
greeted at the gun bazaar with a
chorus of unmistakable and
menacing "clicking" sounds
made by clips being fastened,
rounds being loaded and safety
catches being released.
Adan Gedi Adan, a Somali
translator, tells a foreign jour-
nalist to relax, that loading a
round and clickingoff the safety
catch is the way Somali men
greet each other as friends.
Since Somalia slid into an-
archy, the translator said, the
most popular videotape at street
stalls is "Rambo
"They love Rambo said
Adan, who has himself viewed
the violent, superhuman exploits
of the fictional U.S. ex-com-
mando six times. "And, in the
morning, they will try to prac-
tice what Rambo was doing
The job of imposing some
kind of order on a country full of
gun-toting Rambos will fall first
to a U.N. contingent of 500 Paki-
stani soldiers, whose mission
will be to secure the Mogadishu's
port facilities, the international
airport and the warehouses
where relief supplies for the fam-
ine-wracked country are stored.
An advance team of 60 Pa-
kistanis is due to arrive here
Monday aboard a U.S. transport
plane.
The group's commander,
Brig. Gen. Imtiaz Shaheen, is un-
der no illusions about the diffi-
culty of the mission. "This place
is bad news he told reporters
here last week.
Shaheen said his troops
will be carrying only small arms
for self-defense and to secure
strategic areas.
"You don't bring anti-tank
weapons he said, alluding to
the U.N. peace-keeping role.
"You don't bring cannons, and
you don't bring heavy offensive
weapons
Shaheen said the most im-
portant piece of information for
the arriving troops will be a de-
tailed explanation of the nature
of Somalia's gun-fixated society,
so his soldiers will know that
not everyone who carries a gun
here is an enemy.
Shaheen, in an interview,
said he expects incidents to oc-
cur, citing as an example the
shooting two weeks ago of two
U.N. observers by someone who
opened Many believe that the
international community must
take the initiative in trying to
re-establish order in Somalia
by first seeing that the popula-
tion is disarmed.
Some have suggested
trading food for firearms or
paying Somaiis to turn in their
weapons.
Rakiya Omaar, the Somali
executive director of Africa
Watch, a human rights group,
said the only hope is for the
United Nations to disarm the
population by force.
"Somebody just has to
take those guns away she said
from London. "Force is the only
thing these young kids under-
stand
Attention
news
writers
There will be a
writers
meeting
Thursday at
3:30 p.m.
Beverages and
snacks
provided.

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mmmmmmmmmmtmmmim
rfNhjMiKMiMi
The East Carolinian
September 15, 1992
Opinion
Page 5
Opinion page : proof of freedom
After five publications the editor, would
like to clarify the purpose and scope of the
Opinion page.
The Opinion page serves as a forum to
students, and members of the ECU commu-
nity. It contains carefully constructed criticisms,
witticisms and other commentaries on politi-
cal, educational and communal issues.
The ideas expressed by the columnists are
not necessarily those of the editorial or execu-
tive board of The East Carolinian. Each colum-
nist has a different opinion on most topics.
This variation of minds produces a selec-
tion of opinions to match most political and
other orientations.
Letters to the editor serve as a reply sec-
tion to any objectionable or offensive columns.
�The letters to the editor are open to any readers
-oiTlie East Carolinian. Anyone findinganOpin-
lion column offensive should check the first
�amendment, then write a letter.
The letters to the editor section also serves
!as public arena for you to voice your opinion
I
TALK'S WORDS
about issues at ECU or anything of concern.
The masthead column (the one you are
reading) is the opinion of the editorial board.
Each issue, the masthead brings the reader the
collective opinion of the people who produce
this paper.
The Opinion page is, in essence, a printed
form of the freedom of the press. The United
States of America affords us the right to have an
Opinion page. We are allowed to express our
feelings, favorable or otherwise, toward our
government.
This right is sometimes overlooked, but we
should appreciate it and treat it with care and
respect.
Many governments do not allow their citi-
zens this freedom to say what they feel. Some
governments do not allow freedom of choice,
much less of religion or expression.
With this right, The East Carolinian will
continue to bring its readers uncensored
thoughts, ideas and opinions. If you find this
offensive, choose another country.
By J. William Walker
Television thrives on ignorance of audience
Call me a cynic of the enter-
tainment industry if you will, and
I'm sure someone ill, but most
TV shows today are no' worth the
time spent watching them.
MillionsofAmericansevery
day spend more time with their
TV than theyspend with their chil-
dren. Cable TV has capitalized on
this weakness of minds, and has
created a microcosmic world
where 30 channels lie at stand-by
24 hours a day, sevendays a week.
This presents a problem for some
people.
Judging by the content of
commercials aired locally, most of
those people with problems are
right here in Eastern North Caro-
lina.
The other day, Johnny, or
rather Krazy J. from Southside
Furniture Liquidators damn near
jumped out of the screen and into
my living room. He was talking at
about a thousand wo. ds a minute.
He mentioned something about
sleepers and sofas, TVs and ste-
reos, all available with 0 inter-
est, and no money down. He was
dressed in a cowboy outfit, and he
kept jumping up and down, hop-
ping from one end of the store to
the other. I kind of felt sorry for
this man. I mean, are times that
tough that this guy would give up
every, and I mean every shred of
dignity and self-respect?
Now folks, the producers of
this rubbage at Brand X Market-
ing probably looked into this ad
and decided this was the best way
they could do it. They looked at
the average viewer in this area
and concluded that the best way
to persuade Joe Average Eastern
North Carolina to go to your store
is if you dress up like a cowboy
and etc. The problem is either
with the viewers or with Brand X
Marketing. I'm scared to go to
Havelock now, much less
Southside Furniture Liquidators.
But it is conceivable that
many of our core societal prob-
lems lie at the base of our cable
connection. 1 f so, the problem then
shifts to our lack of reading. Most
people will easily substitute a 30
minute sitcom for the laborious
task of deciphering that cryptic
codewecall the English language.
"Books are the key element
in our never-ending process of
education That was a quote by a
high school English teacher of
mine, George Squires. The man
had two master's degrees, was
working on his English doctorate,
taught three high school English
classes every day and still found
the time every day to read an en-
tire novel.
His advice is sound. Books
offer us that extra edge. They lend
to our character a veritable array
of vocabulary that not only helps
us communicate, but also puts the
power of rhetoric at our finger-
tips.
Tha t power is wha t sepa ra tes
us from canines and baboons. Feed
your head.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Increase in fans creates new problems for Ficklen
To the Editor:
If someone has not already
noticed, there are a few problems
at the night home football games.
Unless there is some kind of
change or stricter enforcements,
there will be some regrettable in-
cidents.
What happened to the flood-
lights under th� north stands dur-
ing the Syracuse game? Lights on
the south end worked and the
restrooms and refreshment stand
lights worked correctly, but not
the overhead lights. Twice, I saw
people slip and fall on dark rain-
soaked stairwells.
During the first quarter, I
went to the men's bathroom only
to find desperate young women
standing in line for the toilets. I
knew the lines outside the
women's restroom to be far too
long and I overheard one of the
ladies state that the women's room
had no toilet tissue. Some males
entered screaming horrible oaths
at the women, such as "Get the f�
out, bitch and "Find your own
pisser, bitch These statements
came while other men (boys) beat
on the stalls occupied by women.
"Southern gentlemen' is such a
fleeting term these days.
Tailgating before the game
left much to be desired, especially
when there are two port-a-johns
per 1,000 people. The wooded area
near the baseball field seems to be
the most popular area for both
sexes to relieve themselves.
Now that more people are
going to the football games,due to
recent team success, more needs
to be done in providing public
facilities for the increase in crowds.
lftailgatingistocontinue,weneed
more port-a-johns. We have an-
other night game coming up on
October 29th(that should be inter-
esting, two days before Hallow-
een) and the lights under the sta-
dium need to be working prop-
erly by that time. Gentlemen, and
I use that term loosely for some,
act youi age and not your I.Q. if a
lady is in need. It is against the law
for a woman to use the men's bath-
room, but that doesn't excuse brut-
ish behavior. It is evident that fore-
thought was not used about ail-
daytailgatingandthehazardsofa
night game.
D.H. Marr
History
Graduate Student
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Jennifer A. Wardrep, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'I, Assistant Sports Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Billiard, Circulation Manager
M. Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Cori Daniels, Classified Advertising Technician
Bill Walker, Opinion Page Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Dai I Reed, Photo Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served ihe Hast Carolina campus commumly since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg IX'I I,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757 6366.
'SAY, KID ANY CHANCE OF GETTIN'A PLAIN PL' SLICE OP APPLE Pig AfiOgNPMER� ?1
CHAS SEZ
By Chas Mitch I
Anti-multi-culturalism is a crime in itself
Isitinherited,orisitinbread?
Is it taught, or is it assumed?
Dopeoplegrow up thinking
Anti-semites or do they grow-up
believing in the Supremacist
theory (be it black or white)? Reli-
gion has little if anything to do
with this subject, for the Toiah,
Koran and Bible speak of love and
preach togetherness throughout
their scripture.
Early Friday morning
around 3 after the bars of down-
town Greenville had closed and
all of the local eating establish-
ments had served up their last
pizza, burgers and fries, I was on
my way home from the publica-
tions building when I received an
unexpected, but overdue wake-
up call. As the streets were filled
with cars and trucks of drunks
and designated drivers, one par-
ticular vehicle transporting three
individuals slowly passed by my
direction and one of the passen-
gers shouted out, "Hey nigger,
what cha doing?"
1 would be lying if I said that
I wasn't mad, but being the prod-
uct of a multi-cultural family, rac-
ism has always been present. At
first 1 just stood there, feeling hurt
and shocked while wondering
what 1 had done to that person to
make them shout obscenities at
me. However, the rationalizations
were too far and few between, for
I know that hatred is a trait that we
are not born with, but it's some-
thing that we all acquire during
our life times.
Every living, breathing and
functional human being is preju-
diced. To be prejudiced is per-
fectly natural, but when hatred
and violence is the sole center of
BOB'S WALL
one's prejudice, then there is a
massive problem.
Some people react to vio-
lence with additional violence,
while others try to curb the origi-
nal violence with words of love
and peace. 'Some say let's take an
eye for an eye, but soon this will
leave everyone blind" (to para-
phrase Dr. Maiiin Luther King,
Jr.). The truth of the matter is that
wehave reservations towardother
people and cultures simply be-
cause we are unfamiliar with that
particular situation. When Jane
Smith calls Connie Nakamoto a
jap, it not only shows her lack of
understandingbut her insensitive
nature for the Japanese culture.
Also, it reflects her level of educa-
tion. Until we, today's and
tomorrow's leaders tell not only
our children, but our parents and
friends that name calling and ra-
cial slurs are just a form of igno-
rance and hatred, and is no longer
acceptable, then maybe we can
move on.
It cannot be said enough that
history repeats itself when indi-
viduals fail to learn from previous
events in time.
When 1 was young, my
grandmother would tell me sto-
ries of the Holocaust, an even t that
took place within her lifetime and
has changed the course of history
forever. Shespokeofmanyevents
that even today are just coming to
light. Aside from theobviouscon-
centration camps, mass genocides
and the systematic burning of live
hu. ian flesh, there are the stories
of how Jews and Gentiles united
for the betterment of mankind and
how large numbers of German citi-
zens lost their lives just attempt-
ing to help the millions of Jews
during a time of destruction and ,
mass murder.
Stories of how her close rela-
tives, neighbors and friends were
persecuted and tortured gave me
enough strength, guidance and
understanding to try to combat
the situat'on in a intellectual sense
and not a physical sense.
It has been said time and
timeagain,thatweasyoungadults
are the products of our environ-
ment. It doesn't matter if we grew
up in the Southside of Chicago,
BugTussell,MississippiorBel Air,
California, we reflect directly the
views of our parents, grandpar-
ents, friends and families toward
the outside world.
In order for our present and
future society to grow away from
ignorance and hatred, we must
begin to try to understand our
fellow people. Even though the
United States is referred to as the
"cultural melting pot" of the
world, we must learn to fuse our
difference together and express
ourselves in a more positive man-
ner.
The L.A. riots were just a
mere example of the current race
relations situation here in the
America. The ECU students who
participated in the hate crime
which was committed Friday
should be aware of not only the
criminal implications but the im-
pact on student behavior on cam-
pus as a whole.
I don't want to over state the
obvious from John F. Kennedy,
Martin Luther King or even
Malcom X, so why don't we just
offer a little respect and under-
standing. Shalom!
By Bob Dubliablo
Fair weather fans forced to believe
Well, I just hate to start this
column with a definition, but it
really is just too perfect to re-
sist.
Believe: to accept as true or
real. 2. To credit with veracity.
Now I'm in trouble. I don't
know what veracity means. Ve-
racity: adherence to the truth,
truthfulness. These definitions
are straight out of The American
Heritage Dictionary, Second Col-
lege Edition. Upon combining
those two wonderful defini-
tions, I've come up with this
definition of "believe to ac-
cept as true or real. To credit
with truthfulness.
So, instead of "We Believe
the slogan should be"Wecredit
the Pirates with truthfulness
Oh, those wonderful group of
boys, "The Pirates they're
such honest young lads. I can
just hear Aunt Bea up in the
stands, "You throw that ball
honestly, Michael
1 really am disappointed
with myself, and I'm sure that
if you are honest, some of you
reading this are feeling guilty
and disappointed for the same
reasons I am. 1 gave up on the
Pirates! Again! I mean (golly
gee willikers) these are my
boys! My blood is purple until
you cut me and then it turns
red.
I was in the car frantically
trying to tune in the game and
by the fourth quarter I was ter-
rified. The announcer made a
comment on how some people
had left at halftime. We gave
up on the Pirates and they still
delivered for us. Our team is a
hell of a lot more loyal to us
than we were to them.
The Peach Bowl should
have taught us a lesson, but how
soon we forget. Especially when
there is a lost football game to
use as fuel for the fire of criti-
cism we so readily start. Why
are we in such a hurry to throw
in the towel and give up on oui
football team? I'm just a "fair-
weather fan when things are
good, I love the Pirates. They
lose one football game and I've
given up.
Don't try to get out of this
all of you people who left at
halftime, you are just as bad as
1 am. We're the worst kind of
sports fan slime. Theobnoxious
fan, the drunk college upstart,
the old alumni weirdo, the nerd
dressed head to toe in Univer-
sity regalia, none are even close
to us. We should be banned
from Ficklen.
But they just won't do it,
the team, Coach I ogan, they
always forgive us, grant us
mercy, and allow us back into
the stadium for the next home
game. The guilt is unbearable!
Please forgive me, please for-
give us!
Well, I've decided that we
should all write a letter of apol-
ogy to each member of the team
and the coaching staff. "We
Believe" is not going to become
"We Believe Sometimes io
way.
The Fair-weather Fans of
Ficklen (FFF) Unite! We will
never give up on those Pirates
again. The Die-Hard fans will
hopefully be kind enough to al-
low us, the FFF, to return to our
seats. The next home game, we
will be in full force. The 12th
man in the stands shall be a
huge player. We won't go away
either, at every home game ex-
pect us there.
Ficklen is going to be so
packed full of fans that the slogan
may change. How about "Don't
doubt thePiratesoryou'll get your
ass spanked?" That might be a
little bit long for a bumper sticker.
v





t
-
�7
The East Carolinian
September 15,1992
Classifieds
Page 6
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS 1 and 2 bedroom
apartments. Energy-efficient,
several locations in town. Car-
peted, kitchen appliances, some
water and sewer paid, washer
dryer hookups. Call 752-8915.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: 2 blocks from cam-
pus, $160 per month plus oo
of utilities, phone, and cable.
Available now. Call 752-1596
for more information.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 407
Biltmore St. $125.00month
plus 1 3 utilities. Call 758-0700.
HOUSEMATE WANTED:
Near campus, quiet, $165.50
month plus 12 utilities. Call
758-3311.
HOUSE TO SHARE: Need
roommate male or female.
House has washer, dryer, deck,
and garage for storage. $200.00
PER MONTH plus 13 utili-
, ties, cable and phone. Call Mike
or Ron 355-2627.
NEED A MATURE, respon-
sible female, praferably non-
smoker to share a 3 bedroom
apt in Tar River. Will have
own room. Rent is $143.00, utili-
ties not included. Contact 758-
7016.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Fe-
male, non-smoker; 2 blocks
from campus; small bedroom;
$100 rent 13 utilities and
phone. No pets. Available now.
More info call 757-2782.
FEMALE ROOMMATES
NEEDED: (Available October
3rd.) To share a two bedroom
at Georgetowne apts1 block
from downtown and campus.
Contact Laurie: 752-9672.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
share 2 bedroom apt. 1 block
from campus. $115month
rent 13 utilities, call any
time 752-6181, leave message.
FOR SALE
SEIZED CARS, trucks, boats,
4 wheelers, motorcycles,by FBI,
IRS, DE A. Available your area
now. Call (800) 338-3388 ext.
C-5999.
F( )R SALE
erator. Only used 2 semesters -
$75.00. Yamaha Keyboard with
many special affects - $100.00.
Or best offers. 752-2478.
FOR SALE: Oneill "Chill
Killer" wetsuit, $95.00. Roland
practice amplifier, $65.00. Mach
77 Morey Boogey Board, $35.00.
All prices are very negotiable.
Call Chris 830-1751.
MOVING - MUST SALE:
Onkyo Tuner, Pioneer Amp.
JVC CD player w remote Bose
501 speakers $300.00. King size
4 poster waterbed, $300.00.
Walnut Exec. Desk $90.00. Call
Dean or Shelly 355-5847.
MUST SALE: Antique white
French Provincial bedroom
suite - will sell pieces individu-
ally. Also keyboard, lamps and
more, call Christine or
Vaughna at 321-1302. Leave
message.
DTK PERSONAL COM-
PUTER: 40 Meg Hard Drive, 5
14 and 312 inch High Den-
sity floppy drives, Samsung
VGA monitor, Panasonic 24 pin
Dot-Matrix printer, mouse.
$795.00. Call 756-5546.
FOR SALE: 1987 Dodge Colt,
new breaks and exhaust, 68 K
miles. Good condition - $1,800.
Call Tony 752-1340.
FORMAL DRESS: Perfect for
any formal occasion. Black T-
length rhinestone sprinkled
size 9-10. Call 355-7119 any-
time.
HAND DRUMS: Dounbeks,
Bodlrans, tablas, etc. call 756-
4226 for more information.
DODGE COLT, 1977, wagon,
standard transmission, AC,
good condition, very reliable.
$600.00. Call 355-4918 after
6pm.
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
ALASKA SUMMER EM-
PLOYMENT - Fisheries. Earn
$5,000month. Free transpor-
tation! Room & Board! Over
8,000 openings. No experience
necessary. MALE or FEMALE.
For employment program call
Student Employment Services
at 1-206-545-4155 ext. A5362.
FOR SALE : Dorm size refrig- FALL SOCCER COACHES -
The Greenville Recreation and
Parks Department is recruiting
for 12 to 16 part-time youth
soccer coaches for the fall youth
soccer program. Applicants
must possess some knowledge
of the soccer skills and have the
ability and patience with youth.
Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-16,
in soccer fundamentals. Hours
are from 3:00 pm until 7:00 pm
with some night and weekend
coaching. This program will
run from September to mid-
November. Salary rates start at
$4.25 per hour. For more infor-
mation, please call Ben James
at 830-4567 or Micheal Daly at
830-4550.
TOPLESS DANCERS
WANTED - Great club, Great
money, unbelievable tips. Work
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 9
pm - 2 am. Call Sid 919-735-
7713 or Paul 919-736-0716.
MothersPlayhouse in
Goldsboro.
SPRING BREAK '93 - Sell
Trips, Earn Cash & Go Free
Student Travel Services is now
hiring campus representatives.
Skipackagesalsoavailable. Call
1-800-648-4849.
EMERGENCY! Expanding
company needs hardworking
reliable students to mail our diet
brochures from HomeDorm!
Earn up to $200 PT or $1000 FT!
Employees needed immedi-
ately! For job application send
self-addressed stamp envelope:
Colossal Marketing, Employee
Processing, P.O. Box 291140
Port Orange, FL 32129.
WORKING MOTHER SEEK-
ING motivated energetic indi-
vidual to organize activities for
3 children (14,10,7) Saturdays
9:00 am - 6:00. Call Jeff Glenn
355-2350 p.m. $5hr.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE!
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call (800) 338-3388 ext. P-3712
"HELP WANTED" EARN
$1,500 WEEKLY mailing our
circulars Begin now FREE
packet! SEYS, Dept. 164, Box
4000, Cordova, 38018000.
WANTED : Ambitious People
to sell T-shirts to college stu-
dents. Many designs to choose
HELP WANTED
from. Average $20 hour. No
financial obligations. Call for
free information Belkat T's 800-
892-8782 (12-5pm)
GUARANTEED WORK
AVAILABLE. Excellent pay for
EASY home based work. Full
part-time. Rush self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers
(G2) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham, NC 27705
S360UP WEEKLY. Mailing
brochures! Spare full-time. Set
own hours! RUSH self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope:
Publishers (Gl) 1821 Hillandale
Rd. 1B-295 Durham, NC 27705
COLLEGE REP WANTED: To
distribute "Student Rate" sub-
scription cards at this campus.
Good income. For information
and application write to: COL-
LEGIATE MARKETING SER-
VICES, P.O. Box 1436
Mooresville, NC 28115.
BRODY'S & BRODY'S FOR
MEN are accepting applica-
tions for Part-Time Sales and
Customer Service Positions.
Flexible schedules to fit most
needs. Salaryclothing Dis-
count. Apply Brody'sThe Plaza
Mon-Wed. l-4pm.
WANTED BARTENDERS
WAITRESSES: Apply in per-
son Mon-Thurs. between 2-
4pm. No phone calls, Please!
Professor O'Cools 605A Gre-
enville Blvd. (Behind
Quincy's).
IMMEDIATE OPENING:
Typist Secretarial person.
Apply in person between9:00 -
5:00 Monday thru Friday at SDF
Computers, Inc 106 E. 5th St.
752-3694.
WORK AT HOME: Assembly
, craft, typing and more! Up to
$500.00 a week possible. For
information write Source; P.O.
Box 227, Dept. 9108 Greenville,
NC, 27834.
SERVICES OFFERED
TENNIS LESSONS: Student
and Faculty; $7 per hour. Call
752-8280.
S Financial Aid Available S
Attention All Students!
Undeigrads at Crad uatea. Over $5 Billion fci grant k
acholanh are now available from private sector &
government sources tar College Students nationwide. AH
students are eHgibtef Let u hejp you locate the money thai
you are eligible to receive Applications are now being
accepted. To receive your financial aid program call
Student Financial Service
ttOtt&M-OTMEnt.FSMl
PERSONALS
PERSONALS
SIGMA'S Back the Pirates! .
ECU FRATERNITIES: Good
luck with Fall Rush '92! We
know it will be a success! Love
the Pledges and Sisters of Al-
pha Xi Delta.
ANTHONY - Sorry about your
hand but thanks for the pitch-
ers, entertainment, and even
the Elbo on a Sat. night! You're'
the shit! Love, Jana, Lisa, Kate,
Christine, Shrub and Jill.
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPINGWORD PROCESS-
ING Call Cindy after 5:30 or
leave message. Familiar with
all formats 15 years experi-
ence. Low rates. Work guar-
anteed. Call 830-4334
ALPHA SIGMA PHI - Would
like to invite ECU men to Fall
rush - Sept. 15-17. For more
info call 757-3516. - 422 West
5th St. GO GREEK!
CHI OMEGA, would like to
congratulate the new pledge
executive: President - Carole
Sharpless, Vice. Pres. - Martha
Peacock, Sec. - Amy Sadler,
Trea. - Kathy Sare, Spirit - Beau
Beauchmenin and Joy
Newman, Jr. Panhellenic Exec.
Member-Beth Powell & mem-
bers - Michele Baritell & Char-
lotte Rakoski, Comm. Service -
Michelle Steiner, Song Leader
- Robbyn Shulman, Corre-
sponding Sec. - Tricia Crotts,
Intramural Reps. - Ann Ripchik
& Dee Huskey, Alcohol
Awareness - Howey Mc Auley,
Campus Act. - Margaret
Kowalski. We know you will
do a great job You're the best
and good luck We love you -
the Sisters of Chi Omega.
KAPPA SIGMA: We had a
great time at the tailgate last
Saturday Love the Sisters of
Chi Omega.
ZETA TAU ALPHA: Con-
gratulation on your great rush
turnout! We wish you only the
best. Pi Delta.
DIA BOSTIC: Ever since out
first kiss, I knew you were the
one. So finally the time has
come to ask you to be my DIA-
MOND LADY. Will you
marry me? Love, Jeremy.
SIGMA FOOTBALL: Keep
up the good work. Love, Sigma
Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS to
Laura Hunniford onher Kappa
Sigma engagement! Love,
Sigma Sisters.
HEY ALPHA OMICRON PI
The fat man sits alone on the'
radiator with his mayo and
Dew while the green toad
coo's softly!
JENNIFER KULA, Jill
Woolard, Candida Fipps, Keri
Sechman, Lisa Stine, Susan
Barnacascel, and Amanda
Whichard - You made the right
choice! Congrats! Love, the Sis-
ters of Alpha Omicron Pi.
HEY DZ PLEDGES: Are you
ready for Big Sis Week? Get
psyched Love, the Sisters.
DELTA ZETA PLEDGES:
Have you guessed your big sis
yet? Get ready for a surprise!
Love, the Sisters.
GOOD LUCK to all fraterni-
ties with rush! Love, Delta Zeta.
THE BROTHERS of PHI
KAPPA PSI wish all fraterni-
ties good lick with rush!
PHI KAPPA ALPHA: Thanks
for a great tailgate party for the
Syracuse game! Love, Alpha
Delta Pi.
KAPPA ALPHA: We had a
great time Saturday for Parent's
Weekend. Love, Alpha Delta
Pi.
LAMBDA CHI: Thanks for a
great pre-downtown last
Thursday. Love, Alpha Delta
Pi.
THE LONELY DARKNESS of
night moves on like snails on
rocksalt.
KIRSTEN: A word of advise:
Skinny dipping can sometimes
cause you to catch a cold. But
not always.
Guess who. �-
Announcements
. �
BISEXUAL-GAY -
T FSBTANSUPPORT
GROUP
Social support and activities.
Meetings are closed. Call 757-
6766 11:00 - 12:15 Tues. and
Thurs. or 1:00 - 2:30 Wed. for
information on meeting time
and place.
P.U.S.H.THROUGiITHE
BARRIERS
If you would like to work
towards reducing the Archi-
tectural, as well as the attitudi-
nal barriers that students with
special needs are faced with
every day, then come to the
next meeting of P.U.S.H.
(People United to Support the
Handicapped). The meeting
will be 5:00-6:00 on Thursday ,
September 10 in Cotton Hall
Lobby. We will be working on
our plans f or H omecom ing and
an Awareness Week. Come join
the fun
IMMUNIZATION CLINIC
Student Health Center. Sep-
tember 16,1992 from 8:30am to
11:30am and from 1:30pm to
4:00pm. No appointment Nec-
essary.
AED
raght9epTT5,1992. AH pledges
and existing members are
urged to attend. The speaker
promises to be interesting as
well as surprising. Make plans
to attend.
FCIJCRFWCLUB
Do you enjoy beating teams
like Duke, Carolina or NC
State? Would you like to com-
pete against Ivy League schools
like Harvard or Yale? Do you
like the thrill of victory? sound
like fun? Try the East Carolina
Rowing Team No experience
necessary. Beg inners and
Freshmen welcome. All inter-
ested males and females should
call Angie at 830-3926 or Chris
at 752-8613.
NRHH
Welcome back all National
Residence Hall Honorary
Members We are ha ving an
important meeting Tuesday ,
Sept. 15 at 5:00pm in Fletcher
Residence Hall basement.
Nomination and election of
new officers is on the top of the
agenda. All members are asked
to present. For more informa-
tion or if you are unable to at-
tend please contact India
Vaughn 931-7408.
FAST CAROLINA UNIVER-
SITY GOSPFT. CHOIR
The East Carolina Univer-
sity Gospel Choir is having a
concert of September 15,1992,
jn Fletcher
ould love for
ybu to come and join in with
us.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray,
study God's word, be involved
in social and service projects?
Need a refuge from time to
time? Campus Christian Fel-
lowship may be what you are
looking for. Our weekly meet-
ings are at 7pm Wednesdays at
our Campus House located at
200 E. 8th St directly across
from Cotanche St. from
Mendenhall Student Center.
Everyone is welcome. For more
information, Call Tim Turner,
Campus Minister at 752-7199.
MIDDLE GRADES EDUC.
CLUB
Middle Grades Education
Club meets Today at 3:30 pm in
308 Speight. Anyone interested
should attend. Represents will
be served.
TEAM TENNIS ANYONE?
ECU Recreational Services
will be sponsoring a team ten-
nis tournament - registration is
Tuesday, Sept. 15 at 5:00 in Bi-
ology 103. For more informa-
tion call 757-6387.
TNTFRFSTFDINVOLLY
BALL?
ECU Recreational Services
will be sponsoring a CO-Rec
volleyball tournament. Regis-
tration is Tuesday, Sept. 15 at
5:00 in Biology 103. For more
information call 757-6387.
BOWLING ANYONE?
ECU Recreational Services
will be sponsoring a bowling
tournament. Registration will
be held Tuesday, Sept. 22 at
5:00 in Biology 103. A small fee
is required. For more informa-
tion call 757-6387.
CLIMBING?
ECU Recreational Services
will be sponsoring a Climbing
II workshop on September 24
at 3:00pm at the Climb Tower.
Come out and enjoy the fin!
The cost is $8.00Students,
$10.00Faculty - Staff - Guest,
the cost includes transporta-
tion, equipment, climb instruc-
tor, anchor systems, and belay-
ing. For more information cal
757-6387.
THF BIC. SPLASH GOLF
BONANZA!
ECU Recreational Services
will be sponsoring a Big Splash
Golf Bonanza! An information
meeting will be held Tuesday,
Sept. 229 at 5:00 in Biology 103.
A small fee is required. For
more information call 757-6387.
WINDSURFING ANYONE?
ECU Recreational Services
will be sponsoring a
Windsurfing I Workshop on
September 17, 7pm
ChristenburyGym (Room 117).
Come out and enjoy the fun!
The cost is $4.00students,
$5.00faculty-staff-guest. The
cos covers basic instruction, rig-
ging and board balance. For
more information call 757-6387.
KAYAKING:
ECU Recreational Services
will be sponsoring a Kayaking
trip to Bogue Sound, Emerald
Isle on October 4. The of the
trip is $25.00 students, $35.00
faculty - staff - guest. The cost
includes basic instruction,
transportation, food, Kayaks
and equipment. A pre-trip
meetings is planned for Sep-
tember 30 at 3pm Brewster
D101. For further information
call 757-6387.
PRF-PHYSTCAT THERAPY
Si'
For interested pre-PT ma-
jors! Our first meeting of the
year will be held on Wednes-
day, Spet. 16 at 8:00 in the MSC
room 221. Come and meet the
officers and see what our club
is all about. If you have any
question call Melanie at 931-
8343.
RFBFL MAGAZINE
The Rebell Magazine, ECU's
literary and arts publications
annual competition is call for
entries. Deadline is 11-4-92 at
5pm. Regulaions and entry
forms are located at the Rebel
office in the Publication Bldg
English Dept. main office and
School of Art Media Center.
COTTNSFT ING CENTER
Time Management: Learn
strategies to cope with the de-
mands of academics and uni-
versity life. Wednesday, Sept.
16 from 3-4pm, 313 Wright
Bldg. Call 757-6661 for more
information AND Coping with
Loss: This support group is
designed for those who have
experienced the loss of a sig-
nificant other. The focus will
be on understanding feelings,
reactions to loss, how to move
toward recovery, taking care
of needs, and developing a
positive outlook. Wednesdays;
beginning September 16 from
2-3pm in 329 Wright Building.
Call 757-6661 for more infor-
mation.
COUNSELING CENTER
Men's Issues: This group
will explore current society ex-
pectations of men and the pres-
sures men experience. The
group will focus on exposing
stereotypes and redefining
what it means to be a man in
light of current ideas about
emotional health and well-be-
ing. Mondays beginning (-21-
92 from 3-4pm in 329 Wright
Building. Call 757-6661.
CAMMA BETA PHI
Attention: Mandatory meet-
ing for officers only! Meet at
3:30 in Brewster A 310, Thurs-
day, September 17th. Please Be
There!
DFCISION SCTFNCF SOCI-
EIX
The Decision Science Soci-
ety will be holding a meeting
on Wednesday Sept. 16 at 4:30
in GCB 3009. Officers will be
elected and committees will be
formed. All majors are wel-
come!
H�





The East Carolinian
September 15. 1992
Lifestyle
Page 7
Festival sings the blues
By Woody Barnes
Staff Writer
The Great American Blues
Music Festival '92 at Walnut Creek
Sept. 11 offered both a refresher
course for us already initiated and
a Cliff's Notes reference for new-
comers to America's heritage of
the blues.
Friday's show, featuring B.B.
King and other blues legends, set
off a night shining under a nearly-
full moon with those who shine in
blues music history.
Opening the night, The Fabu-
lous Thunderbirds set the pace for
thenon-stop-rocking,don't-sit-in-
your-seat sets.
This Austin, Tx. band is
known for playing the likes of
Muddy Waters and AlbertCollins.
With a free style that only comes
from a live performance, lead
singer Kim Wilson offered his stel-
larsolo harmonica-playing for sev-
eral minutes.
"Tough Enough the band's
only Top-10 hit, seemed to be the
only widely recognized song. And
then it was over. The set lasted less
than 30 minutes � just enough
foreplay just to tease
The various backgrounds of
the musicians added to the flavor
of the evening. Dr. John, origi-
nally from New Orleans, played
killer keyboards in his set.
In support of his new album,
Dr. John entertained us with hits
from his new album, Dr. John, Goiri
Back to Nav Orleans.
Playing the most electrifying
set of the evening, Grammy-
award-winning Buddy Guy
sizzled. Bom in Louisiana and re-
Soley American,
the Bines Festival
timed the ear of even
those ivho weren't
avid bines fans and
turned the curious
onto a category of
music that will live
with them forever.
located in Chicago, Guy has been
a side man to the likes of Muddv
Waters and Howlin'Wolf and has
been playing for over 30 years.
Jimi Hendrix once cancelled a gig
just to catch Buddy Guy in a club
and sit at his feet with a tape re-
corder.
His mastering of the guitar,
playing such classics as "Knock
on Wood" and using a drumstick
as a guitar pick, was tight as he got
a little loose with the audience.
Offering a personal thank you to
the fans, he left the stage to enter
into the audience. Here his play-
ing was fueled by the crowd's
crescendoing energy.
At 55, he may be eligible to
join A ARC, but he is another three
See Blues, page 8
B.B. King
(right) and
Buddy Guy
(center)
masterfully
brought the
crowd to their
feet at Walnut
Creek. They
were joined by
the Fabulous
Thunderbirds,
Joe Cocker
and Dr. John
for The Great
American
Blues Festival.
Friendship and comraderie key to Upstart Crows' success
By Mike Harrison
Staff Writer
A scant audience in
Mendenhall's Underground Tues
Sept. 8, was the lucky recipient of an
emerging performingduocalled the
Upstart Crows.
BeckShultz,a full-timestudent
and nearly a full-time KFC worker,
does lead and back-up vocals and
plays instruments�namelya mean
guitar.
Dan Machold, a busy-aholic of
sorts, plays a loud but vibrant key-
board and,like Shultz, isa lead and
back-up vocalist.
The Upstart Crows' standard
show consists of roughly 15-20
songs, performed together. During
the show they'll each take separate
breaks, leaving the other to perform
three or four songs alone.
Machold and Shultz classify
their music as melodramatic. "It's
like hard-soft music Shultz said.
"I think we're kind of unique with
our sound
The band originated in the fall
of 1989. Shultz and Machold saw an
opening band at O'Rock's one night
that Machold said "sucked
Machold said the duo knew they
could play better than the opening
band they were watching.
They had each written songs
for years, so the backlog of original
music provided a library to begin
with. Most of the old songs were
really bad, according to Machold,
because he had written them in
middle school.
"I think we're both much better
writers now-a-days Machold said.
A few weeks after the fateful
night at O'Rock's, Machold and
Shultz began to perform at New
Deli's Open-Mic nights.
They were chosen to play at the
Underground Tuesday night, be-
cause they had performed at open-
mic night last year at Mendenhall.
"That's how we started out
Machold said. "We'd just show up
and play"
"We got sort of a small follow-
ing Machold said. "Gael and Rich,
the folk duo that played here a lot,
helped us because they played at
the Fizz, and they would have us
open up. And eventually we started
getting gigs ourselves at the Fizz
Machold and Shultz frequently
sing varying lyrics simultaneously.
Even though they write music
separately, they often work on each
other's pieces, looking for improve-
ments, changing notes or lyrics.
Chords are first to be tackled
when learning a new song. Next
comes the harmonv. Then once it's
learned, they make minor changes
wherever it's felt changes are
needed.
The Upstart Crows are to per-
form with three other bands at
O'Rock's on Sept. 18 and 25, start-
ing at 9:30. The cover charge each
night will be $4.
Both performances are for a
compilation tapeorCD that will be
produced and sold mostly in
Greenvilleand sent to college radio
stations.
Songs of the Upstart Crows in-
clude: "Beaten rath "Skeleton
Closet "Metaphysics "Suburban
Wilderness" and "Spider Love
Song which is a spoof on love
songs.
Shulz and Machold's working
relationship seems spirited and
friendly when they talk about each
other.
"Dan freaks outright before we
ever play Shultz said, laughing.
"I don't freak out Dan said
emphatically.
"He has PMS Shultz contin-
ued, "Pre-Music Syndrome
"Let's not do this Dan said
withonlyahalf grin, then admitted,
"I tend to get nervous
"He gets really grouchy
Shultz said, still laughing, "and he
takes it out on me
They practice two to three times
a week for a couple of hours at a
time. "For some unknown reason
Machold said, "when we're prac-
ticing, my voice tends to give out
Photo by Dail Reed � TEC
Becky Schultz and Dan Machold of The Upstart Crowes share a unique musical relationship. They are
pictured here at Mendenhall's Underground during their Sept. 8 performance.
after about an hour, but when we that airs on Saturdays from 11 a.m.
play(perform),lcansingforlikean to 1 p.m. He works at Wendy's on
hour and a half, two hours 10th St. about eight to 10 hours a
Machold's class schedule con- week and at CD Alley downtown
about "once everv couple of weeks,
or so, when they need somebody
Shultz'sdassscheduleincludes
sists of 12 hours. In addition, he is
alsotheProgramDirectorofWZMB,
for which he also hosts a folk show
15 hours. She also works a regular
rotation shift at WZMB and is head
of the station's New Age Show,
which runs on Sunday mornings
from 8 to 10. Shultz describe her-
self as "frantic, yet controlled and
verv eccentric.
Upper Crust hosts poetry reading
"Vanities" casts obvious talent
By Claudette Peale
Staff Writer
Wednesday, Sept. 9, marked the start of some-
thing new for poetry readings at ECU. Thanks to the
work of Adam Schonbrun, regular poetry readings
will now be held off campus at the Upper Crust
Bakery.
Dr. Patrick Bizarre began the evening with a
short welcome followed by Dr. Julie Fay, professor
of English at ECU and author of Portraits of Women,
a collection of poems.
Fay has been giving readings for roughly 20
years and says her influences range from
Shakespeare to Plath to the rock 'n' roll music of the
sixties.
"It wasn't necessarily the music that influenced
me but the lyrics which were in themselves poems
said Fay.
Fay read several poems from Portraits of Women
along with new poems never read publicly.
A musical intermission by Mike Hamer and
Luke Whisnant, both ECU professors of English,
followed the poets.
Dr. Peter Makuck began the second half with
another reading. Makuck attended Kent State Uni-
versity in 1970 when the riots erupted there.
"My wife and I were both on the field that day:
1 guess we were lucky said Makuck.
Makuck came to ECU in 1976, where he has
been teaching and writing ever since.
So far he has written three btx)ks of poetry and
acollec tion of short stories. In addition, he hasedited
a collection of essays and presently works as an
editor for Tar River Poetn a national poetry maga-
zine.
Makuck is also in charge of the Poetry Forum
held in Mendenhall.
Makuck read several poems from his latest
book, The Sunken Lightship, as well as a selection of
new poems.
Makuckclaims William Faulkner as his greatest
infl uence because of h is wonderful use of language.
The evening wrapped up with an open mike
where several ECU students read their poetry.
Refreshments from the bakery were served and
overall the atmosphere was relaxed.
The next poetry reading at the Upper Crust
Bakerv is slated for Oct. 7 at 8 p.m.
The readers will be announced at a later date.
By Joe Horst
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
The Lost Creek Cafe in New
Bern is hosting three ECU stu-
dents in the dinner theater pro-
duction of Jack Heifner's, "Vani-
ties
Directed by Marie Infinito,
"Vanities" is the story oi three
high-school friends who grow up
and realize that their friendship
will not remain the same, no mat-
ter how mui"h they would like it
to. 1 hev discover the age-old
maxim that people change with
time, .ind are not the people that
memory may have them be.
Opening night proved to be a
little choppy in its entirety. Pauses
were taken so often that it was
hard not to lose interest The obvi-
ous rear-on for the slowness was
the last minute addition of actress
Beth Quarles. With less than one
dav to rehearse, Quarles was
forced to act with the script in
front of her. Given enough time,
the script should disappear and
the acting talent should show
through.
All of the actresses showed a
comraderieand togetherness that,
at times, overcame the script prob-
lems. Each complemented the
other with their internal connec-
tions and stayed consistent with
their character choices through-
out the play.
Kim Patterson, playing Mary,
gives a carefree performance in-
terlaced with bouts of realitv. 1 ler
avant-garde attitude is easily seen
through as a defense against the
world around her.
Pam Marcotte, who plays
Joanne, provides comic relief as
the prim and proper girl who has
her whole life planned out. A hus-
band, two kids and a house with a
picket fence is what Joanne wants
and gets, but to the exclusion of
realizing the actual world around
her. Marcotte's straight-laced,
blinders-on portrayal brings many
a laugh from the audience.
Last, but not least, is Quarles'
clutch performance as the intro-
spective Kathy. For someone who
had a script in front of her virtu-
ally the entire play, Quarles hits
some moments like the veteran
actress she is. Her quiet, unas-
sumingcharacter is the third point
on the triangle relationship and
promises to improve with time. �
Opening night's performance
should in no way be indicative of
future performances. With the ob-
vious talent in this cist, it's only a
matter of time until they reach the
level of excellence the) deserve.
For a funny nd thought provok-
ing night, the Lost reek afeisa
drive worth taking
.





ii-
8 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 15, 1992

Blues
Continued from page 7
decades from retiring. It is easy to
see why Eric Clapton said in a
biographical clip, "Buddy G' iy is
by far and without a doubt the
best guitar player alive
Then there was "Blues Boy"
King. Actually, the spotlight was
concentrated on B.B. King's Blues
i Band. They played before King
even appeared on stage, forcing
us to hear solos from players we
didn't know or care about. This
was all in anticipation of the ap-
pearance of The King of the Blues,
L a six-time Grammy-award win-
�� ner, inducted into both the Blues
Foundation Hall of Fame and The
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
Even after King appeared on
stage, he was playing more to his
band with "Let the Good Times
Roll" than the fans who wanted
The King himself. When he finally
got started, he belted out a sassy
"Rock Me, Baby leading the au-
dience in repeating the chorus in
rhythm with Lucille, his beloved
guitar.
It would have seemed that
someone who used to play in four
towns a night would not need to
sit down to continue his set. De-
" spite the fact that King's perfor-
mance did not live up to my ex-
pectations, it was a memorable
enough experience to tell the
grandkids about.
Though the traditional blues
acts were the highlight, Joe Cocker
was a nice addition. But, when the
projection screens floated down
to show slide flashes of Cocker's
life, it built the mood for the fin-
ishing act.
Cocker started with the 70s
hit "Cry me a River beginning
the ascent which peaked with
"Feeling Alright The crowd of
mostly forty-something sat down
Buffet to give local bands exposure
BOOKS
Rankings for
hard-cover
books in the
New York
area as re-
ported by
selected
bookstores
Fiction:
1. THE VOLCANO LOVER
by Susan Sontag
2. BEFORE AND AFTER
by Rosellen Brown
3. WAITING TO EXHALE
by Terry McMillan
4. THE SECRET HISTORY
by Donna Tartt
5. SIN
by Josephine Hart
6. THE PELICAN BRIEF
by John Grisham
7. POSESSING THE SECRET OF
JOY
by Alice Walker
8. GERALD'S GAME
by Stephen King
9. FATHERLAND
by Robert Harris
10. THE BRIDGES OF MADI-
SON COUNTY
by Robert James
Waller
Non-Fiction:
1. TRUMAN
by David
McCullough
2. THE LAST TSAR: The Lite
and Death of Nicholas II
by Edvard Radzinsky
3. UP IN THE OLD HOTEL
by Joseph Mrtchell
4. TRAUMA AND RECOVERY
by Judith L. Herman
5. THE SILENT PASSAGE:
Menopause
by Gail Sheeny
6. CROSSED OVER
by Beverly Lowry
7. THE MEASURE OF OUR
SUCCESS: A Letter To My
Children and Yours
by Marian Wright
Edelman
8. DIANA: A True Story
by Andrew Morton
9. EARTH IN THE BALANCE
by Al Gore
10. WOMEN WHO RUN WITH
THE WOLVES
by Clarissa Pinkola
taken from LA Tlimt-Wmthlngton Pott mwi
anrtc9
to enjoy "Up Where We Belong"
and "I Believe Climaxing with
"Leave Your Hat On from the
infamous movie 9 12 Weeks, the
crowd was aroused back on its
feet for another round.
Encores seem to be Cocker's
favorite concert essentials: "You
Are So Beautiful" and "A Little
Help From My Friends" preluded
the final song of the evening, "The
Letter
Overall, the show was a satis-
fying performance tha t incl uded a
memorable cross-section of acts.
Soley American, the Blues Festi-
val tuned the ear of even those
who weren't avid blues fans and
turned the curious onto a category
of music that will live with them
forever.
By Joe Horst
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
During the next two weekends,
Rockefeller's will host the Weird
Zombie Music Buffet (W.Z.M.B.),
two showcases designed to give
Greenville bands recognition.
"We want to promote the mu-
sical scene here in Greenville said
Paul 'Beef Meador, music director
of campus radio station WZMB.
"We want people to take notice of
the bands here and give the bands
the recognition they deserve
O'Rockefeller's and individu-
als of the management staff at
WZMBareworking together to pull
off the showcase, which will feature
four bands each night.
Along with local recognition,
W.Z.M.B. hopes to get the bands
regional and national attention. All
proceeds from both showcases will
go to the production of slim-line,
jewel case CDs. The 500 total CDs
will then be sent out to other radio
stations in the hope that they will
play the bands' music. Another
goal is to get the bands playing jobs
up and down the East Coast.
All the bands have paid for
their own recording time in sup-
port of this endeavor.
"It's a good way for local bands
to get exposure outside of
Greenville Stephanie Poliakoff
and Stacy Evans of Tribal Lullabies
said. "We need our music to reach
more people than it is now
Jim Phillips, bass player for the
band Skullbuckle, agrees with that
sentiment.
"It's a good idea and a good
way for us to get heard by record
companies Phillips said. "It will
let more of the public know what
our sound is
Friday, Sept. 18, Earth
Murchants will start out the night's
festivities. Euphoria will follow
them, and in turn be followed by
King Pin. Tribal Lullabies will close
the night with their avant-garde
style of playing and music.
Next week, on the 25th, Foun-
tain of Youth will open for the sec-
ond showcase.Skullbuckle will take
the stage with their grunge sound
after that, Kill Kids will follow wi th
their own unique brand of music
and the Upstart Crows will close
the two-weekend Buffet.
Each band's set will run ap-
proximately 45 minutes, combin-
ing for a total of three hours of pure,
unadulterated Greenville music.
Tickets will be sold at the door for $4
each per night.
For the die-hard fans of these
Greenville-based bands, this show-
case is the event of the year. The
W.Z.M.B. will also give newcomers
to this kind of music a good all-
around show and two nights to
remember.
Meeting Thurs-
day at 5:45.
Please attend for
story assign-
ments. If you are
interested in
writing, please
fill out an appli-
cation at The
East Carolinian
office.
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��ri-jr Mil "I
The East Carolinian
September 15, 1992
Sports
-
Page 9
The game at a glance.
Va.Tech
East Carolina
0
10
14
6
10-27
14-0
FIRST QUARTER
Ryan Williams 34-yard field goal (5 plays, 55 yards, 1:51)
Va. Tech 3, East Carolina 0
SECOND QUARTER
Cedric Van Buren 20-yard pass from Michael Jacobs (Deke Owens kick)
(4 plays, 28 yards, 1:11)
Va. Tech 3, East Carolina 7
Deke Owens 26-yard field goal (7 plays, 30 yards, 33)
Va. Tech 3, East Carolina 10
THIRD QUARTER
Maurice DeShazo 1-yard run (Williams kick) (11 plays, 71 yards, 4.19)
Va. Tech 10, East Carolina 10
Tyronne Drakeford 40-yard interception return (Williams kick)
Va. Tech 17, East Carolina 10
Clayton Driver 39-yard pass from Michael Anderson (Owens kick blocked)
(7 plays, 77 yards, 2:59)
Va. Tech 17, East Carolina 16
FOURTH QUARTER
Greg Grandison (5) and Tony Davis (53) anchored the Pirate defense and held the Hokies1 running game in chehck.bVDf"MKl
ECU defense halts Hokies
�TEC
By Chas Mitch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
What do you get when you
have a fake field goal, three in-
terceptions, two fumble recov-
eries and 35,000 screaming Pi-
rate fans?
You get a 30-27 East Caro-
lina win over the Hokies of Vir-
ginia Tech and Head Coach
Steve Logan's first career win
at the helm of a Division I
"school.
"To win this football game
was just a giant, giant step for-
ward for the seniors in particu-
lar, and the fans of East Caro-
lina Logan said.
With much talk about the
offensive aerial assaultof ECU,
this day belonged to Defensive
Cross
country
teams take
third at
VVflmirgJon
Coordinator Chris Thurmond
and the swarming Pirate de-
fense.
Tony Davis led the defen-
sive line attack with 15 tack-
les, three quarterback hurries
and a fumble recovery. In the
secondary, top Thorpe candi-
date Greg Grandison picked
off two of Maurice DeShazo
passes and racked up seven
tackles.
While on special teams,
Morris Foreman and Morris
Letcher turned in their usual
strong performance. How-
ever, the fake field goal-touch-
down pass from Michael Ja-
cobs to Cedric Van Buren was
the unit's most spectacular
performance of the young sea-
By Michael Albuquerque
Sports Information Department
Host UNC Wilmington won the
men's race and Duke claimed the
women's title in the Eighth Annual
Seahawk Invitational Cross Coun-
try Meet Saturday at Brooks Field.
In the men's 8-kilometer race,
East Carolina placed third with a
total of 53 points among three other
schools. Sophomore Sean Connelly
ted the way for the ECU men with
a personal best 27:39 for a seventh-
place finish (eighth overall) among
26 runners. UNCW's Sam Bobbit
topped the field at 25:51.
"Several of our guys had great
races today ECU Assistant Coach
Charles Justice said. "We were able
to displace some of (the opponents)
top runners with our own guys,
and that's something we haven't
been able to do in the past
For the women, ECU finished
in a tie for third with 66 points.
Sophomore Stacy Green led the
Lady Pirates with a personal best
18:46 good for second place (third
overall). Marianne Marini scored
second for ECU (10th overall) with
a time of 19:45. Chris Myers, an
attached runner, placed first over-
all at 18:21.
ECU FINISHES:
Men � 1. Sean Connelly, 8th
See Cross Country, page 10
son.
The at-times shaky perfor-
mance of dual quarterbacks
Sean McConnell and Michael
Anderson, along with the five
offensive turnovers weighted
heavy late in the game.
"There were opportunities
galore for a bunch of young
pups to spit at the bit, but they
wouldn't do it Logan said of
the turnovers.
But as expected by many,
the game came down to an
ECU defensive stand which
yielded only a three point field
goal to the Hokies and gave
the Pirates the ball with 3:26
left and a five point deficit.
So now with the improb-
able in place, Logan stole a
page from last season's come-
from-behind year.
Anderson and company
took time off the clock and
consumed 71 yards in eight
plays to hit paydirt. A 21-yard
touchdown pass to tight end
Carlester Crumpler with 42
seconds ignited the 35-plus
thousand fans at the Stadium.
With a one point lead, Lo-
gan opted for the two point
attempt and came away with
an Anderson to Clayton Driver
conversion.
By this time, Pee-Dee The
Pirate was rolling in the end
zone and the 15,000 "true Pi-
rate faithful" along with an
additional 15,000 ECU sup-
porters went into an orgasmic
frenzy.
See Hokies, page 11
Tony Kennedy 3-yard run (Williams kick) (5 plays, 25 yards, 1:29)
Va. Tech 24, East Carolina 16
Pete Zophy 17-yard pass from Michael Anderson (2-pt conversion failed)
(7 plays, 92 yards, 2:10)
Va. Tech 24, East Carolina 22
Ryan Williams 22 yard field goal (4 plays, 1 yard, 1:38)
Va. Tech 27, East Carolina 22
Carlester Crumpler 21-yard pass from Anderson (Anderson to Driver)
(8 plays, 71 yards 3:04
Va. Tech 27, East Carolina 30
TEAM STATISTICS
Va. Tech
FIRST DOWNS
Rushing 17
Passing 14
Penalty 0
3RD DOWN EFFICIENCY 6-17
4TH DOWN EFFICIENCY 1-1
TOTAL NET YARDS 357
Total plays 74
Average gain 4.82
NET YARDS RUSHING 259
Rushes 281
Average per rush 4.82
NET YARDS PASSING 98
Completed-attempted 718
Yards per pass 5.4
Sacked-yardslost 110
Had intercepted 2
PUNTS-AVERACE 42.4
RETURN YARDAGE 100
Punts-returns 326
Kickoffs-retums 655
Interceptions 374
PENALTIES-YARDS 430
FUMBLES-LOST 5-3
TIME OF POSSESSION 29:48
East Carolina
30
22
1
8-17
1-1
516
87
5.93
90
111
5.93
426
3458
73
112
3
32.4
71
132
568
240
439
2-2
30:12
PLAYER STATISTICS
Missed field goals: VT (Williams, 43 and 39), East Carolina (Owens, 47)
VTnjslg:DeShazol2-37,HebrOT22-128,Poindexter9-264-lodges3-12,Kennedy 10-56.
ECU rushing: McConnell 1-2, Anderson 4-10, Van Buren 11-39, Smith 13-59.
VT passing: DeShazo 7-18 for 98 yards, 0 TDs, 2 INTs
ECU passing: McConnell 7-13 for 57 yards, 0 TDs, 0 INTs. Anderson 26-44 for 349
yards, 3 TDs, 3 INTs
Jacobs 1-1 for 20 yards, 1 TD, 0 INTs
VT receiving: Hedges 3-25, Hebron 2-10, Freeman 2-63
ECU receiving: Zophy 9-111, Van Buren 5-49, Crumpjar 4-59,
Smith 1-6, Linville 1-3, Batson 7-87, Driver 4-82, Letcher 1-3, Hicks 2-26
ECU UT-AT-TT: T. Davis 5-10-15, Lewis 2-7-9, Cunmulaj 4-3-7, Floyd 5-2-7, Gran-
dison 4-3-7, T. Jones 3-4-7, Foreman 5-1-6, Dillon 2-2-4, Walker 2-2-4, Clayton 1-1-
2, Crumbie 2-0-2, R. Robinson 2-0-2, Batson 1-0-1, Beasley 1-0-1, Carter 0-1-1, Cotton
1-0-1, R. Hurley 0-1-1, McBride 0-1-1, Render 0-1-1, W. Scott 1-0-1, D. Taylor 0-1-1
No survivors in Pirate soccer victory
By Bob Owens
Staff Writer
Mount Olive College Goalkeeper
Tommy Popovic musthave felt like he went
down with the ship, Sept. 7 as the Pirate
soccer team sent Mount Olive College to the
bottom, 6-1, in the Pirate's home opener.
There were no survivors.
The first half was one for the ECU rook-
ies. Freshman David Little struck early for
the Pirates,scoringhisfirstcareergoal seven
minutes into the contest. Dan Staton col-
lected the assist.
Marc Mullin, a freshman from Jackson-
ville, put ECU up 2-0 on a penalty kick 29
minutes into the contest After a foul inside
the penalty box, Mullin set up and drilled a
screamer past thedivingPopovic, who may
have wished he was somewhere else. A
third freshman, Dusty Belk, scored an
unassisted goal at the 40-minute mark to
givethePiratesa3-01eadgoinginto the half.
Tim McCoy of Mount Olive provided
theonlyoffenseforhisteamatthestartofthe
second half, scoring on a penalty kick that
slipped past ECU goalkeeper Chris Libert.
Veteran East Carolina forward Bryan
Harpole avenged the goal less than five
minutes later, putting ECU up a comfort-
able 4-1.
When ECU head coach Scooty Carey
put junior Mike Patterson into the game in
the second half, i t was adding fuel to the fire.
Patterson, last season's second-leading
scorer, tallied two goals in less than 20 min-
utes of play in the team's scrimmage against
North Carolina Wesleyan, a feat he was
about to repeat.
Patterson found the back of the net on a
pass from JUCO transfer Zack Fine with 65
gone by to give ECU a commanding 5-1
lead.
His second and final goal of the contest
was indicative of the whole game.
With only five minutes remaining in
thecontestMountOliveattempted to mount
one final offensive surge. An errant pass
ended up at the feet of Patterson, and the
Pirate junior was off to the races. He broke
awayfromdefenderMike Reed near mid field
and went one-on-one with a charging
Popovic. Patterson faked right, dribbled left
and tapped the ball into the defenseless net,
cementing the final score, 6-1, in the Pirates'
favor. ECU ou t-shot Mount Olive 24-5 in the
match.
On the downside for the Pirates, start-
ing goalkeeper Bryan DeWeese went down
with a mild shoulder injury late in the first
half of play. Chris Libert played the remain-
ing 55 minutes and picked up the shared
win.
ECU then traveled to face the 14th-
ranked Tarheelsof North Carolina in Chapel
Hill on Sept 10. The Tarheels went up early
when Hassan Pinto scored the first of his
three goals 9 minutes into the contest � a
header fromsix yards out.Neither team was
able to generate any offense for the remain-
der of the half, and the Pirates rested, down
1-0.
UNC went up 2-0 when David Monroe
scored a header off of a UNC comer kick at
the 57 minute mark. From then on, the expe-
rienced Heels went on to score three more
times in the remaining 20 minutes of the
contest. Pinto scored his second and third
goals at 57 and 77 minutes, with Michael
Masha delivering the final blow with two
minutes remaining to give UNC a 5-0 vic-
tory. Watson Jennson recorded the shutout
in goal for North Carolina, while DeWeese
and Libert split time for ECU. DeWeese
recorded seven saves in the contest, with
Libert contributing one. UNC out-shot the
Pirates 27-U.
East Carolina, now 1-1, returns home to
face Virginia Commonwealth in a 7 p.m.
contest tonight in Richmond, Va. The Pirates
open Colonial Athletic AssociationplaySept.
19 at ECU Field against the University of
Richmond. The match is scheduled for a 2
p.m. start.
Photo by Oail Reed � TEC
ECU soccer was out-matched against UNC-Chapel Hill yet gave Mount Olive a spanking.





10 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 15, 1992
Lady Pirates look toward
N.C. State after first victory
Sports Information Dept.
On Friday night, East
Carolina's volleyball team beat
Mount Olive 15-4,15-6,15-4 and
claimed their first match win of
the 1992 season.
"I came into the locker room
tonight saying that I wanted to
kick some butt head coach
Martha McCaskell said. "I wanted
to see some confidence and some
intensity. I told the girls that you
have to wan tit, you ha veto know
you can do it and you have to be
out for blood every time you step
on the floor
On the offensive side of the
ball, Jenny Posey made things
easier on the team by serving a
total of four aces. Senior Wendy
Schultz led the Lady Pirates in
kills with 14 and senior Jenny Par-
sons contributed 36 assists.
Defensively, Jenny Parsons,
Jenny Posey, Wendy Schultz and
Leigh Wilcox all had three digs a
piece.
"Schultz came around in the
third game and really helped us.
Melanie Richards had three good
practices last week and she has
confidence. Windy Mizlo
played well. It was a team ef-
fort tonight McCaskill said.
The ECU volleyball team
returns to action on Sept. 15
when they travel to N.C. State
for a 7 p.m. match.
"We want to go to State and
prove that we can play with
them. We can. Now we just
need to believe it McCaskill
�aid.
Photo by Dai! Reed � TEC
Wendy Schultz will provide the power that may propel the Bucs past the Wolfpack of N.C. State.
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Dairy
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Cross Country
Continued from page 9
place, 27:39. 2. Eric Adamski,
10th,28:02. 3.MarkMathis,llth,
28:07. 4. Tony Chadwick, 13th,
28:27. 5. Stacey Cochrane, 16th,
29:12. 6. Rodney Williams, 21st,
29:44. 7. Chris O'Shields, 24th,
30:49.
Women � 1. Stacy Green,
3rd, 18:46. 2. Marianne Marini,
10th, 19:45. 3. Cathrine
Norstrand, 17th, 20:11. 4.Jesska
Montgomery, 18th, 20:14. 5.
Gretchen Harley, 24th, 21:14. 6.
Susan Hu, 27th, 21:31. 7. Jennifer
Kalanick, 28th, 22:09. 8. Kelly
Hanna, 30th, 22:51.
TEAM FINISHES:
Men � 1. UNC Wilmington,
31 points. 2. Richmond, 36. 3.
ECU, 53.
Women � 1. Duke, 37. :2.
UNCW,52.3. (TIE) ECU,66; Rich-
mond 66.
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SEPTEMBER 15. 1992
The East Carolinian
11
Photo by Dail Reed - TEC
Tony Davis, a native of Boston, led the Pirate defense by picking up
where Robert Jones left off, recording 15 tackles against the Hokies.
Hokies
Continued from page 9
As the look of shock filled
the faces of the Hokie fans, Vir-
ginia Tech mounted one last
comeback in the remaining sec-
onds. As DeShazo dropped back
to pass to an apparent wide
open receiver, Grandison
stepped in for his second inter-
ception to ice the Pirate win.
"I'm going to ask (athletic
director) Dave Hart if it's pos-
sible for me to award a game
ball to the fans of East Carolina
"University to put in our trophy
lease signifying this victory be-
cause they just wouldn't let the
-kids quit Logan said This
win was important to a young
football team
In sharp contrast to last Sat-
urdays game, the Pirate defense
rose to the occasion.
"We practice all last week at
full speed and that helped a lot
with our timing Davis said.
"With the all out attack mental-
ity of Coach Thurmond, our de-
fense played to our own expecta-
tions
Zaim Cunmulaj and Greg
Floyd contributed seven tackles
each, as the Pirate defense held
Va. Tech to 357 total yards as
compared to 634 verses Syracuse.
Tenth Street BP
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Garrett Hall Kings of Hill for fourth straight year
Recreational Services
They marched onto the hill
with enthusiasm that could not be
denied. They fought in vast num-
bers till the games concluded.
When the dust had settled, the
men of Garrett Hall left as King of
the Hill champions for the fourth
consecutive year.
The fifth annual King of the
Hill competition was well a ttended
by students in all residence halls at
ECU. The competition boasted sev-
eral different events to compete in,
giving everyone something to in-
volve themselves with. There were
competitive events such as 3-on-3
basketball and volleyball, but there
were also some rather unusual
events thatweremadefor fun rather
than competition. Those that
seemed to be enjoyed the most were
the hoop-the-human event and the
limbo contest.
The true goal of the King of the
Hill competition is attendance by
as many students as possible. Par-
ticipation is the most important
aspect of the games. Students had
many different reasons for partici-
pating, but the reason shared by all
participants was overall fun. Along
with the opportunity of competi-
tion there was also a social aspect to
the event. Many students came
solely to meet people.
"King of the Hill is pretty cool
because everybody comes out to
have fun and support their hall
GregSchehr said. Many people felt
this way about the event and
thought it was agreataltemative to
the other social options associated
with college life.
"I think King of the Hill is great
because sometimes it gets a little
boring around here and this gives
us something to do as an alterna-
tive to going downtown or par-
ties ShaneBrumfield iJonesHall
resident, said.
King of the Hill was enjoyed
by all and was climaxed by three
1. What team did the Dallas
Cowboys trade with to get the No. 2
draft choice they used to select Tony
Dorsett in 1977?
2. Who, after Wilt Chamber-
lain, has scored the most points in a
single NBA game?
3. What's par at the 6,815-yard
Pebble Beach Golf Links?
4. Who was the cashier's check
for $1 million that ABA executive
assistant Thurlo McCrady kept af-
ter retiring made out to?
5. What pitcher was the first
member of the DetroitTigerstoearn
$100,000 a season? �
6. What wide receiver from
Clemson caught a team record 85
passes for the San Francisco 49ers in
the 1981 NFL season.
7. What boxer was originally
slated toopposeSylvesterStallone
in Rocky?
8. Who was Muhammad AH
talking to when he was told
"You're a bright boy,
Muhammad and replied:
"You're notasdumbasyou look"?
9. What National League
baseball dub was known briefly
as the Rainmakers and the Or-
phans?
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tug-of-war competitions between
the two top finishers in each divi-
sion. In the female competition, the
women of Greene hall were on top.
The Co-ed division ended with a
standoff between Jones and
Fleming Halls. After an intense and
drawn-out struggle, Jones Hall was
declared thewinner.The males had
an exciting finish as the men of
Garrett and Aycock Halls fought
for pride. The boys from Garrett
won, ending a methodical compe-
tition for the men of main campus.
"If we were from Scott or
Aycock, it would be different. If we
lived across the street, it wouldn't
be as important for us to win. We
wouldn't have as much incentive.
We love going up to the hill and
bringing back the ti tie to main cam-
pus Brian Kirby, a Garrett RA,
said.
Theresidentadvisorsof Garrett
Hall have been promoting the event
since the opening of school. Any-
one who walks through their halls
realize the intensity of this group.
Signs, banners and fliers all remind
the students of the importance of
the event.
"We are hyping it up with ban-
ners and we talked about it in the
hall meetings. We tried to get the
younger guys involved because we
have an incentive to win. We like it
tobeajointeffort'KevinSpragley,
a Garrett RA, said.
"Even after they changed the
rules westill thought wecould win.
It used to be that whoever had the
greatest participation was the
champion, but now it's by points.
We feel they changed the rules be-
cause of us, which gave us even
more incentive to dominate said
Spragley.
Domination was one thing they
did accomplish. The men from
Garrett had success in most every
event and enjoyed themselves
while doing it. They exemplified
the King of the Hill purpose and
spirit.
Don1 like the sports page? Do some-
thing about it!
Let us know what you would do to
improve this section or, if you can
write, turn in an application and show
ECU what you can do.
CAUTION!
SOME PEOPLE CONSIDER THESE BOOKS DANGEROUS
AMERICAN HERITAGE DICTIONARY � THE BIBLE � ARE YOU THERE.
GOD? ITS ME, MARGARET � OUR BODIES, OURSELVES � TARZAN
ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND � THE EXORCIST � THE
CHOCOLATE WAR � CATCH-22 � LORD OF THE FLIES � ORDINARY
PEOPLE SOUL ON ICE � RAISIN IN THE SUN � OLIVER TWIST � A
FAREWELL TO ARMS � THE BEST SHORT STORIES OF NEGRO
WRITERS � FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON � ULYSSES � TO KILL A
MOCKINGBIRD � ROSEMARY'S BABY � THE FIXER � DEATH OF A
SALESMAN � MOTHER GOOSE � CATCHER IN THE RYE � THE
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ONE DAY IN THE LIFE OF IVAN
DENISOVICH � GRAPES OF WRATH � THE ADVENTURES OF
HUCKLEBERRY FINN � SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE � GO ASK ALICE
BANNED BOOKS WEEK-CELEBRATING TMB FREEDOM TO READ
Banned Book Week � Sept. 26th - Oct. 3rd, 1992.
ECU Student Stores � Wright Building � 757-6731
WEDNESDAY
NIGHT
PARTY
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 15, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 15, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.893
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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