The East Carolinian, September 10, 1992






I
Lifestyle
ECU gets classical
Steve Cerutti has helped establish a
new classical studies minor at ECU.
See page 13 for the story.
Poking it at home
This weekend ECU hopes to do the
'Hookie Pokie' for their first win of the
season. See page 19 for more on ECU
football.
Weekend Weather
Partly cloudy, chance of showers and thunderstorms.
Highs in the 80s.
w
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 3
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, September 10,1992
Marilyn Quayle speaks
at Greenville Hilton
22 Pages
By Jennifer Ward rep
and Jeff Becker
Editors
During a campaign stop in
Greenville Wednesday, Marilyn
Quayle urged voters to ignore
democratic hype and to support
the Republican Party's strong fam-
ily values. Quayle made a stop at
the Hilton Inn to raise money for
the Bush-Quayle ticket and to gain
voter support.
"You have a wonderful
president in George Bush Quayle
told the crowd of about 250. "He
hasbeen the line standing between
that tax-and-spend Congress and
your pocketbooks
Quayle travelled to
Greenville after a trip to Florida in
effort to relieve victims of the re-
cent Hurricane Andrew.
"She rolled up her sleeves
and went to work for the people of
South Florida said Jack Hawk,
North Carolina Republican Party
chair, in his introduction of
Quayle. "That's what kind of lead-
ership she has brought this coun-
try. Marilyn Quayle has been an
inspiration
Quayle cast disapproval on
the mostly democratic Congress
and denounced Arkansas Gov. Bill
Clinton's economic plan. "He's
going to put America out of work
� he doesn't talk about that very
much
She said the solution to the
country's unemploymentproblem
lies in protecting small businesses
from high interest rates, not in
Clinton's idea of creating govern-
ment jobs.
"The answer is to stimulate
our economy enough so that we
can get (people) jobs in the private
sector she said. "Give them a job
with dignity give them back
dignity to themselves
Quayle also expressed dis-
agreement with Clinton's welfare
policy, saying that the role of gov-
ernment is to help people when
they are down.
"We'll help people get skills,
but you have to ask for it you're
not children she said.
During her Speech, Quayle
defined and defended the Repub-
lican Party's much talked about
ideal of family values. She said
that when children leave home,
these values are not reinforced.
"It's teaching our children
respect, beinghonest, integrity, the
See Quayle, page 3
Grinding the axe
Photo by Dail Read
Mike Edwards and The Band tear up the mail. Wednesday the Inter-Fraternity Council celebrated
Rush Greek Day with a party on the mall.
Photo by D.il Rwd � TEC
Marilyn Quayle receives an ECU Peach Bowl "I Believe" sweater following her campaign remarks
Wednesday. She addressed a crowd of 250 people at the Greenville Hilton.
Ficklen to be renovated
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Officials at ECU will start
massive renovations of Ficklen Sta-
dium after the football season is
over.
The thrust of the mainte-
nance project will be the removal
of the older, central section of the
stadiumand replacingitwith fresh
concrete and reinforcing bars.
Maintenance crews will re-grout
and re-seal the existing concrete
and perform other maintenance
tasks on the existing concrete.
The central section (on the
north side) of the stadium encom-
passes roughly 20 percent of the
existing seating capacity.
Because of present old dete-
rioration, certain rows of seats
were re-enforced this summer to
last for two full football seasons.
Richard Brown, vice-chan-
cellor of business affairs, said that
after this re-enforcement, no fur-
ther cracks were sighted.
"We rang -netting under-
neath the rows to make sure that
no one would be hurt from falling
plaster Brown said. "But there
wasn't any further cracking or
chipping that fell into the nets
Money for this phase II
project will come from presentstu-
dent fees and a bank loan the uni-
versity will receive, totaling more
than $2 million.
"This is a major repair and
maintenance project Brown said.
"We also hope to put up new chair-
backs along with the new cement
An existing $15 fee students
pay for maintenance of Ficklen
will be used to pay off the bank
loan, with the Athletic department
backstopping any additional costs
that may occur.
"The money coming from
student fees will cover approxi-
mately two-thirds of total costs
Brown said. "These costs will also
include routine maintenance and
service
Repairs will start after the
last home football game of the sea-
son, and will be done in time for
the start of the next season.
parking
By Kenneth Chesson
Staff Writer
For the past few years, parking has become a
growing issue here at ECU. New parking spaces
bring relief for University students.
"The University bought two houses across
from Wendy's, which we call the Charles Street
Lot said Pat Gertz, director of Parking and Traffic
Services. "The university removed the two houses
and placed gravel in the lot to give the university
much needed parking spaces. The new lot will hold
about 42 vehicles and ir addition to the new lot we
have a cemented parking slab that will hold about
six motorcycles
The Charles Street Lot is not the only new
parking ECU has acquired. "The University now
owns James Street (in front of Mendenhall) Gertz
said. "In the past, basically anyonecould park there.
Now that the University owns James Street it will
park 12 university registered vehicles
An added relief to commuters is the parking at
Minges. "What most people don't realize is that the
new lot at Minges is not only for Freshmen, but also
for uniyersity registered vehicles Gertz said. "We
have a'shuttle that takes commuters from Minges to
Mendenhall every 15 minutes
Not only has the University created new park-
ing places for cars, they have also been working on
parking places for motorcycles. "We recognize there
is also a problem with motorcycle parking Gertz
said. "Most of the motorcyclists park behind the
Theatre of Arts building. This summer we added
motorcycle parking to the south side of the Sports
Medicine Complex, behind the Pirate Club. We are
making an attempt to improve motorcycle parking
and trying to create additional parking places
With enrollment at ECU increasing and the
university making plans to expand,Gertz said within
five to seven years the students at ECU could expect
some form of parking structure on the west end of
campus. Gertz also added that within 15 to 20 years
the students could expect another parking structure
on the east end of campus.
Governor proclaims Literacy Month
Inside
Opinion 4
Classifiedsiq
Lifestyle13
Comics j�
Sports19

M-im. . miimmmmmmmmammmmmmmmmmajjup�ujh.jil. l j-�jiilii�iiil�.iiii u rim .u.jpfj iim. 11 . j
By Karen Hassell
Staff Writer
Gov. James G. Martin has
proclaimed September "North
Carolina Literacy Month" to
show the importance of literacy
and how citizens can become
part of the solution.
According to the 1990Cen-
sus, 28 percent of North Caro-
lina adults 18 or older have com-
pleted less than the 12th grade.
It is estimated that by the year
2000 the median job will require
13.5 years of education.
About 45 million adults in
the United States holding jobs
today are either functional or
marginal illiterates.
There were 19,417 drop-
outs from grades 7-12 in North
Carolina in the school year 1990-
91, producing an annual state-
wide dropout rate of 3.91 per-
cent.
In 1990-91, more than
120,000 adults enrolled in the
literacy programs in the state.
To help these people, about 6,000
people served as instructors,
counselors, administrators, vol-
unteers and paraprofessionals
in North Carolina's programs
last year.
There are success stories.
Alvin R. Cole is a 39-year-old
who has learned to read. He left
school in the 10th grade. He
said his grades were not terrible,
but he had a lot of trouble read-
ing. He discovered through a
literacy program that he has dys-
lexia. Through the program, he
has overcome his disability and
learned to read.
Although they do not have
any literacy programs,
Sheppard Memorial Library
supplies Literacy Volunteers of
America with a room to use for
sessions. They also provide be-
ginner books that are geared
toward adults.
"News For You a New
Readers Press Publication is a
newspaper that provides news
in a simplified style for the new
See Literacy, page 8
I
� Sri
i I





2 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 10, 1992
UNC library crippled by budget cuts
Course aids Greeks
A new program at the University of Dayton automatically
enrolls sorority and fraternity pledges in a course entitled "Greek
101 The five-week short course focuses on contemporary issues
such as AIDS, gender issues, drug and alcohol awareness, motiva-
tion and delegation with leaders of the Panhellenic and
Interfraternity Councils. Melissa Timson, coordinator of Dayton's
Greek Life said, "They are getting rid of the 'Animal House'
image. And we only give the information out once, rather than to
24 different organizations it's making a difference
Students write about sex etiquette
Four undergraduate students at Emory University have just
published "Sexual Etiquette 101 a book they hope will become
required reading for college students this year. The authors of the
pocket-size book were led in their efforts by Robert A. Hatcher,
M.D a professor of gynecology vd obstetrics, in an attempt to
educate students about sexuality. The book tells readers what they
need to know about contraception, preventing date rape and
sexually transmitted diseases such as AIDS and chlamydia.
Student burglar shot and killed
A woman who broke into the chancellor's mansion at the
University of California at Berkeley was shotand killed when she
charged a police officer with a machete, campus police said.
Rosebud Abigail Denovo, 19, protested the university's plans to
build recreational facilities at People's Park, saying it would
displace homeless people living there. The park has been a protest
site since the 1960s. The Chancellor, Chang-Lin Tien, and his wife
locked themselves in a bathroom during the altercation and were
unharmed.
School teaches exotic animal life
Each year, about 50 students from the United States and
abroad are accepted into the Exotic Animal Training and Manage-
ment Program at Moorpark Community College. Here, the stu-
dents learn to feed lions, train a monkey to help a paraplegic,
entertain a crowd with a California sea lion, and even make a
vulture into a movie star. Many students find the school to be
tougher than they had expected. They have to be up before dawn
nearly seven days a week to feed and care for the 200 animals, and
then take classes during the day. The theories learned in the
classrooms are them put into action at the college's Teaching Zoo.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel.
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP)
�Combine budgetcuts with soar-
ing book and journal prices and
you get a crippled library.
That's what is happening at
the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill, say advocates of
the university's libraries.
For James Govan, the univer-
sity librarian who retires in Decem-
ber, the budget crisis caps nearly
two decades spent building UNC-
Chapel Hill's library into one of the
nation's top research libraries.
"We were on the verge of
being one of the top 10 or so in the
country said Govan, 66. "And
then the bottom fell out
In recent years, inflation and
the dollar's devaluation against
foreigncurrencieshavedrasticaHy
pushed up the price of books and
academic journals, many pub-
lished abroad. Some scientific jour-
nals now cost several thousand
dollars annually. As a result, uni-
versities that don't get more money
each year must cut journal sub-
scriptions and buy fewer books.
Numbers illustrate the
library's budget problems:
� The current book budget
hasn't been this low since 1970-71.
That'sbecauseUNC-ChapelHillhas
shifted money from its book b udget
to pay the rising cost of journals and
other serial publications.
�This year, the university's
academic affairs libraries likely will
buy fewer than half the 81,489
books they bought in 1984-85.
Since 1985, the academic af-
fairs libraries have canceled about
1,800 subscriptions � nearly 10
percent of their paid subscriptions
to journals and other publications.
"UNC's survival as a major
American university is threat-
ened" without more money, a li-
brary task force reported last year.
"We have to get some kind
of signal out that things are des-
perate Jaroslav Folda, an art pro-
fessor who chairs the library's ad-
ministrative board, told TheChar-
lotteObserver in an interview pub-
lished Tuesday. "They were des-
perate four years ago, but now
they're even more desperate
UNC-Chapel Hill's library
has nearly 4 million volumes. For
$10 � the cost of a library card �
any North Carolina resident 14 or
older can check out books.
Thousands of people visit
each year. In the heart of the se-
mester, Davis Library, the cam-
pus' main library building, sees
10,000 people daily.
The Association of Research
Libraries ranked UNC-Chapel Hill
15th in size among 107 research
libraries during the 1985-86 school
year. But its ranking had fallen to
22nd in 1990-91, the most recent
figures available. The university's
ranking based on number of books
purchased annually also plum-
meted, from 10th to 48th.
The academic affairs librar-
ies would need about $2 million to
regain the purchasing power they
had in 1985, Govan said.
For now, Provost Richard
McCormick said he wants to trans-
fer funds within the university to
give the library more money,
though he admits that's not an
ideal solution, since other budgets
are tight too.
"If you have to make a tough
call and the Legislature isn't going
to rain additional money on you
right now, you do what you have
to do
Professors also want state
legislators to repeal the law that
requires state universities to pay a
sales tax on the books and sub-
scriptions it buys.
Open House
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SEPTEMBER 3. 1992
The East Carolinian 3
Quayle
Continued from page 1
"You are on a roll in North
Carolina and shouldn'tbe
stopped by anyone'
�Marilyn Quayle
value of hard work she said. "In
a civilized society, there must be
distinct rights and wrongs taught
to every citizen
Quaylecited oneof problems
with reinforcing family values as
Hollywood. "There are very few
movies out that I would take my
children to
she said.
"There are a
few really
good G and
PG movies,
but they're
not making
the money
She said
the democrats cannot do anything
about mis because "their money
comes from Hollywood
Quayle praised North Caro-
lina Republicans running for state
congressional seats as well as the
republican candidate for governor.
"You are on a roll in North
Carolina and shouldn'tbe stopped
by anyone she said Ai .d let Jim
Gardner lead the way
She said the Bush-Quayle
ticket is also hindered by negative
press coverage of the election.
"Never seen it so blatant she said.
"The national media won't give
the Republican Party a fair shake
In addition, Quayle criticized
Clinton's recent interview with
Rolling Stone and his suggestion in
the piece that national health care
policy should resemble the Cana-
dian system.
"The answer to our problems
is not social-
ized medi-
cine she
said. "He
wants the Ca-
nadian sys-
tembut just
look at the
border states.
People are
coming across for health care
When asked about Hillary
Clinton's remark that she would
act as an advisor to her husband if
elected, Quayle said she felt that
roles differed between marriages.
"You take the role that is best
for that marriage she said. "That
is what works for them
Quayle also commented on
her husband's potato misspelling
incident. She said she thought the
press was "rather ridiculous" in
the criticism he received and that
they "probably had to go look it up
themselves
Helms returns to work after surgery
(AP) � After a three-month
absence recovering from heart sur-
gery, Jesse Helms is on the job again
in the U.S. Senate.
But first he had to give up the
cigarettes. And the barbecue.
And despite still feeling a bit
weak after heart surgery in June, he
seems ready to take up right where
he left off.
"I like being here Helms, 70,
said Tuesday in a telephone inter-
view from Washington with The
News & Observer of Raleigh. "I got
hugged and all that by the senators
whom I hadn't seen for three
months
Helms is ready with several
amendments for whatever legisla-
tion the Senate takes up�just what
he need s to get his opponents on the
record on countless issues. He is in
the national news again�and he is
criticizing the news media again.
. The North Carolina Republi-
can said he still feels some weakness
in his legs, but he feels fine other-
wise.
His doctors have put him on a
strict diet and he must take regular
medication, he said, but he will not
have to make any regulaj visits to
doctors.
After getting him to give up
smoking, Helms' doctors have told
him not to eat such favorites as bar-
becue, eggs or country ham� a diet
thathascausedhimto lose lOpounds.
"It consists entirely of things
that aren't fit to eat he said.
In June, Helms underwent
quadruple bypass and heart valve
replacement surgery in Raleigh. He
recuperated at his Raleigh home af-
ter being released from the hospital.
After his surgery, Helms said
he could barely go five minutes on
an exercise bicycle without huffing
and puffing.
Before he returned to Wash-
ington, he was doing 30-minute
workouts.
"Every morning I get up and
walk and puff and blow. I puff and
blow a little less every day, which I
guess means I'm gettinga littlestron-
ger every day Helms told WBTV
of Charlotte.
OnTuesday,hisfirstdayback
in the Senate, Helms attended a
policy luncheon with other Repub-
lican senators.
This news is
for your fun
and information.
Please
� �
no wagering
Friday. September 11
BS&M
Saturday. September 12
Mother Nature
Wednesday. September 16
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RUSH
ECU'S 1 FRATERNITY
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Thursday, September 17
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Friday, September 18
Brothers & Rushees Only
Call 757-0487 or 757-0305 or
830-9647 or 830-9646
For More Information Or A Ride





�NAMMBMIMMM
W
The East Carolinian
September 10, 1992
Opinion
Page 4
A VIEW FROM ABOVE
By T. Scott Batchelor
Smoking policy vague
Belief will be key component for Pirates
Second-hand or passive
smoke is very dangerous to non-
smokers. Those who do not
smoke should not be forced into
figured all of the details would
work themselves out. There were
plans to accommodate the
no
smokers and there was no pun-
breathing the dangerous toxic ishment set for die-hards. With-
chemicals. There can be no logi- out these details sorted carefully,
the ban will be ineffective.
Most smokers understand the
reasoning behind the rule and
most are adjusting well to the
cal argument against the ban on
smoking.
While this is understood, the
university needs to take a de-
finitive stand on the issue with changes.
clear rules, a defined reprimand However, non-smokers and
for offenders, and an acceptable administrators must understand
smoking area. that the ban will not stop people
The administration just de- from smoking, and we need to
cided one day that smoking solve the problems presented by
would not be allowed and they this new rule.
JOE OF ALL TRADES
By Joe Horst
What are you gonna do, arrest me for smoking
I can see it now.
Tha t lone man walks the side-
walks of East Carolina, with a
badge on his chest and a ticket
machine across his shoulder. His
job � to serve and protect the
students of East Carolina Univer-
sity. Often maligned and misun-
derstood, he does his job not for
the fame, not for the glory, but for
that warm, fuzzy fueling he gets
when he knows he's helped some-
one.
Then, the call comes in.
His heart leaps. His adrena-
line starts pumping. He walks just
a little bit faster. This is what he's
trained all those months to handle
� what it'll be? Hostage situa-
tion? Car needing to be towed?
Doesn't matter, he's on the case.
Hepullshis walkie-talkie from
its holster (the only holster he has),
and speaks in what he believes to
be a voice crossed between John
Wayne and Dirty Harry.
"This is 36, dispatch. Repeat,
over
The walkie-talkie crackles
with static for a moment, then
clears to make way for that all-
important dispatcher's voice, ur-
gently imparting where he's so
desperately needed.
"Thirty-six, we got a smoker
in GC, over
The Smoke Police are on the
job.
Smoke Police�truth or fiction?
You think I'm kidding? That
just may happen in the not-too-
distant future judging from the
new Clean Air policy thathas been
enacted. It's so general that half
the university officials don't even
want to talk about it for fear that
they may say the wrong thing.
And don't even try to figure out
exactly what'll happen if you're
caught smoking in a university
building, I doubt if even the per-
son who catches you will know.
It seems to be a contradiction
in terms to ban cigarette smoking
in a state whose principal source
of economy is tobacco sales and is
it the lesser of two evils to pollute
the outdoor air as opposed to the
air in the buildings?
The worst thing about this
new policy is that it was instituted
without any thought to how these
buildings could be made smoker-
friendly. The administration put
the cart-before-the-horse in this
fiasco; saying that people could
smoke in "well-ventilated" areas,
which seems to be no place on
campus surrounded by four walls,
and now the latest is that "smoke-
eaters" are being looked into to be
placed in poorly-ventilated areas.
New Clinton scandal
"Son, I'm gonna have to ask
you to put the cigarette down
He stands with his hands
clasped behind his back, balanced
on the balls of his feet, the merry
red of the cigarette ash twinkling
in his mirrored sunglasses.
"I'm sorry, officer, 1 just lost
my head. It'll never happen again
The abashed and timid student
jumps to his feet and crushes out
thecigarettequickly,asifthatwill
make this tiresome episode finish
faster.
"Well, I'm sorry, too. But if I
let you go, then I'll be setting a bad
example to the rest of the campus.
I'm gonna have to write you a
ticket He pulls out his special
Smoke-Enders ticket pad and
reaches for a pen from his shirt
pocket. "Let me see your ID
"What do 1 have to do?" the
studentquiveringlyasksasheten-
tatively hands over his laminated
mug-shot.
"Since you seem like a nice
guy, I'm gonna let you off easy
He pokes the crushed stub with
the point of his pen so as not to
disturb possible fingerprints. "You
only smoked abouthalf of it � I'll
fine you $20 He scratches an X in
the box between "Didn't inhale �
Verbal Warning" and "Smoked to
the filter w possible harmful car-
cinogens released into the atmo-
sphere � refer to Dean Speier's
office
The student meekly signs (in
no way admitting he committed
the crime, of course) and accepts
the ticket with the obligatory face-
tious reply, "Thank you, officer
Like the guy just did him a big
favor.
Get a clue, guys.
Roughly one-half of this cam-
pus smokes, which means that
now we'll have 8,000 people sit-
ting outside trying to get their nico-
tine fix, instead of in the hall in
front of their class. If the adminis-
tration passed this policy to try to
get people toquitsmoking, it'snot
working. The only change tha t has
come about on this campus has
been that it looks more crowded
and a hell of a lot messier, thanks
to the excess of cigarette butts ly-
ing around everywhere.
Enactinga policy withouthav-
ing any rules for enforcement or
even plans to lessen the initial
impact is a lesson in stupidity.
Though some readers may not
believe me, I am a non-smoker.
It's not the idea of smoking re-
strictions I have a problem with,
it's this inane way the university
has gone about trying to solve the
problem.
I can think of at least a dozen
different problems this adminis-
tration can address that are 10
times more important than a smok-
ing ban�parking and availability
of classes, just to name two. But if
you're going to do something, do
it right. Don't go about it har-
assed and without thinking it all
the way through. This bridge-
burning mentality only makes the
school look stupid and in the long
run, detracts from our reputation.
I was one of the record-break-
ing 36,500 persons in attendance
at ECU'S first football game of 1992
Saturday night. The Pirates, true
to form, played with a great
amount of heart. But, alas, our
gridiron gladiators came up short
of a victory.
What I saw on the field at
Ficklen Stadium that night was a
combination of skill, teamwork
and perseverance. The only ele-
ment missing was a crucial one �
experience. Nevertheless, it was
an exciting game; the Pirates are
simply a fun team to watch.
Sitting in the huge stadium,
surrounded by a sea of humanity,
I realized that Ficklen had been
transformed from a mere venue
for displaying college athletics: It
had become a crucibie of loyalty
and faith.
For the players down on the
field sporting their respective team
colors � Pirate Purple and
Orangemen Orange � the battle
was a physical contest guided by
mental sharpness, both from the
coaches on the sidelines and the
men on the field.
No doubt the level of espiril de
corps was high down there in the
flat bottom of the crucible. Loy-
alty to the team, to the school, to
some intangible goal is what drives
these men to their limits of physi-
cal endurance.
The tears, sweat and yes,
sometimes blood, all flow into a
common well called loyalty.
And then there are the specta-
tors perched along the sides of the
crucible high above the fray.
We all come to watch Our
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Jennifer A. Wardrep, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitchell, Assistant Sports Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Billiard, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weed man, Layout Manager
Cori Daniels, Classified Advertising Technician
Bill Walker, Opinion Page Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letlers expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, the East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Ixitters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bklg , E l
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Team. Our Team is down there
engaged in what the uninitiated
might at times perceive as mortal
combat. We cheer and whistle and
yell and rattle keys in loyal sup-
port of Our Team; many of us
wear purple and gold and sing
chants like: "Hey, EC, you look so
gixid to me
Without the exception of one
special phrase (emblazoned on
everything that it'll stick to), this
scene could pass for any other in a
long line of Pirate football games.
That very special phrase is "I
Believe
A deceptively simple slogan
bursting at the seams with mean-
ing and feeling. What it stands for
is loyalty and faith. During ECU's
1991 football season culminating
in a Peach Bowl victory over N.C.
State, Pirate fans said "I Believe"
over and over, turning the words
into a verbal talisman, a mantra to
be repeated a thousand times to
ward off defeat.
Those two words created a
lifeline,an umbilical cord between
Our Team and us, the loyal fans.
Through it, they were nourished
and vivified.
Imagine beingoneof the ECU
players up against a formidable
opponent. Perhaps the
oddsmakers (who have never
heard of "I Believe") had the Pi-
rates pegged as the underdogs.
Now imagine thateverywhere
you look you see the signs of "I
Believe and everything you hear
is echoing with thatsa me, unadul-
terated phrase of faith.
If so, can victory be far be-
hind?
I love the concept. That is why
1 was so perplexed at last week's
game to see thousands of peopfe
swarming to the exit gates during
the third quarter of play. Admit-
tedly, ECU was a good deal be-
hind in the score at the time. How
much behind is irrelevant,because
points aren't the point here. What
does matter is the display of infi-
delity these mutineers put on.
And what a display it was.
For about 30 minutes a con-
stant stream of people, many of
them wearing shirts that read "I
Believe spilled down the stairs
and out of the "vomitories I
didn't count them, but I bet a full
two-thirds of the fans (is that the
right word?) left five minutes into
the fourth quarter.
"Where is the loyalty?" I asked
aloud. But no one was around to
hear me.
We need to revive some of the
spirit that Pirate fans are capable
of bringing to bear. I know ifs
there.
My memory of last January's
conquest in Atlanta is still vivid. I
was proud of my Pirates then, and
of the Pirate fans. It was in the last
few minutes of that momentous
game against the Wolfpack that
Our Team needed us the most,
and we came through for them.
So keep that memory alive.
Stick around for the whole game,
not only when we're up, but also
(and perhaps more importantly)
when we're down.
Like using a toss to ward off
vampires in those old Dracula
movies, "I Believe" only works if
you have faith.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Preston's idea of family values spiteful
In last Thursday's (Sept. 3)
edition of the East Carolinian, 1 read
an article written by Michael
Preston addressing the issue of
family values that warrants a re-
ply. Upon reading and reflection
of Mr. Preston's article, I offer Mr.
Preston my heart-felt respect for
overcoming the hard times of ridi-
cule and family problems he spoke
about when he was younger. I'm
willing to overlook the negative
commentyou madeaboutthevice-
president, especially since this is
an election year and emotion can
cloud reason. In your article, you
assailed the concept of family val-
ues; however, do you realize that
you overcame your personal prob-
lems with the love and support of
your family?Theloveof your fam-
ily helped you riseabovethe hard
ship to work hard and complete
your college education.
You seemed to take extreme
offense tha t the Bush-Quayle team
infused the concept of "family
values" into this year's presiden-
tial campaign. Your letter seems
to be a knee-jerk reaction to them
raising the issue. Perhaps you feel
that since they raised the issue of
"family values you assume these
values are automatically owned
by the Republicans. I think you
know that deep inside this is not
true. The concept of family values
are owned by everyone - - not just
Demtxrrats or Republicans.
"Family values" are non-par-
tisan, more importantly, it's a con-
cept of decency which all people
innately havedespite external fac-
tors that solidify or change things
like their political viewpoints or
musical tastes. Here's an example.
I used to listen to rock and roll,
and 1 still do from time to time;
however, I listen to more jazz these
days. My music preference has
changed. On the other hand, I was
raised to value other people's
property by not stealing. That was
a good value instilled in me by my
parents. That has not changed.
Mr. Preston, when you enter
the teaching profession as an En-
glish teacher and discover that a
student has plagiarized a paper,
will you tell them, "Good job �
do it again?" 1 doubt that you will;
therefore, you have to have these
values instilled within yourself.
Unfortunately, you have to put a
political twist to this concept to
self-serve your agenda.
Please remember that these
idealscannotbedoled out through
government subsidies or grants.
They come from the heart of a
prospective parent or teacher.
Once again, true love, responsibil-
ity, decency and knowing right
from wrong are values not owned
by one political party, but are
owned by all.
1 know you're not sold on
Bush-Quayle tor 1992 as I am; how -
ever, not once have they said an
individual had to be a certain way
to have "family values Unfortu-
nately and automatically, your
articleassumes that no one is wor-
thy of family values if they are
crippled, gay, elderly or in a mi-
nority. I'll use the word you used
frequentlyinyourarticle�shame.
Shame on you Mr. Preston, for
that assumption.
Finally and most importantly,
I'm disturbed by your statement,
"I'm going to teach the children
about Dan Quayle's hatred 1 can
understand this statement in the
heat of a political argument, but
do you really mean what you are
going to do? If you mean it, then
your services would be better uti-
lized as a spin doctor for a political
organization. They are looking for
the dedication that you verbally
espouse. The Bush-Quayle and
Clinton-Gore race will beoverand
life will go on regard less of who is
president. Mr. Preston, if you do
go on to become an English
teacher, I can safely assume that
you will not teach your students
to hate anybody.
You might not politically
agree with a candidate; however,
your responsibility to teach your
students basic values rises far
above the limited spectrum of the
political arena with which you
speak from.
Dan Mills
Junior
Communications

i
MMMM �





? j

September 10, 1992
The East Carolinian 5
WALK'S WORDS
By J. William Walker
Legalization offers alternative to drug war
It's a simple idea, really. Give
the people what they want.
It's economical, it's constitu-
tional and above aH, it's practical.
Whoever decided that declaring a
"war" on drugs would remove
them from this country was not
thinking clearly. The removal of a
substance (a plant in most cases)
that offends or could harm some-
one is exactly what our constitu-
tion protects.
We have spent millions of
dollars and thousands of hours to
what end? Cocaine, a front-line
enemy, is in fact more available
and cheaper today man it was at
the beginning of this "war Mari-
juana use is increasing in high
school students. The only thing
this "war" has given us is crack, an
even deadlier form of cocaine.
That's right, crack (the low-cost-
easy-to-smuggle-easy-to-sell-one-
hit-addiction-machine) is a prod-
uct of this war. Maybe I'm crazy,
but shouldn't we consider an al-
ternative approach, maybe one
mat works?
The common response to a
problem is to try to find a solution
to that problem. If the first solu-
tion does not work, doesn't it seem
logical to try a different solution?
Let's consider some facts:
� The demand for illegal
drags is high.
Economics tells us if a prod-
uct is demanded, it will be sup-
plied. Illegal drugs make people
want more drugs. Now, we can
call this a major problem, or we
can cash in on the realities of the
situation. The government refuses
to apply reason to this dilemma.
The same thing happened in the
1920s with the prohibition of alco-
hol. Granted, that's an overused
argument, but if we can't leam
from our mistakes, what can we
do? People in the 1920s thought a
world with alcohol would create a
chaotic stumblerzoneof lushes and
alcoholics. But it didn't.
Applying a dose of realistic
human behavior tells us that most
people naturally don't want to be
useless bums in a constant drug-
induced daze. Making drugs legal
will not create a massive wave of
first-time druggies.
� Illegal drags are available.
The illegal drug industry is
lucrative enough that dealers will
continue to deal as long as it's ille-
gal. Drugs' illegal status provides
dealers incredible incentives. A
single kilogram of cocaine can pro-
vide a $24,000 reward. With those
incentives, who is going to turn
down a $100,000 dollar per week
career as opposed to a $4.25 an
hour job flipping burgers? The
"war" has inflated the business to
the extent mat the benefits exceed
the costs.
� Our methods aren't work-
ing.
Illegal or legal, the message
has been sent loud and clear;
people will use drugs. Despite
constant efforts to cast out the
filthy drugs, they are here. Every
day, the demand for drugs gets
higher and higher and higher.
Our police are out-gunned
and out-manned. Thousands,
have died, and thousands more
will die. Method A will not get us
to objective A.
Through a system of careful
control, we can put a lid on this
problem. Government regulated
drug stores, like ABC stores,
would create millions perhaps
billions of dollars in annual rev-
enues.
An age limit could be en-
forced, as with alcohol and to-
bacco, quality control could be
regulated, and dosages could
even be controlled. Revenues
could be directly pumped into
education about drugs and reha-
bilitation from drugs. All it takes
is a little logic, reason, and fore-
sight, and this pointless "war"
could be over.
The system doesn't work, it's
not going to work, so let's find a
solution that will provide an ac-
ceptable outcome. I don't think
legalization is the only way, but
at least it's a different way.
Control rather than prohibi-
tion is a much more realistic con-
cept when dealing with an epi-
demic such as drugs. Think about
it.
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BOB'S WALL
By Bob Dubliablo
Good ole' Billy Bob Clinton is a joke
Yesterday, I read Rolling
Stone's interview with Bill Clinton
and I can't help but laugh.
I'm not laughing at dear old
Bill, or should I call him Billy Bob,
the good old boy from Arkansas?
I'm laughing at the bullshit. It
comes at you from every angle
these days because its time for the
World Series of Politics. It's time
for the president of the United
States to be elected, and the Demo-
crats and the Republicans treat it
like a Superbowl.
Back to dear old Billy Bob
Clinton. My hat is off to his
innovations. Why pick one
image to portray? Why not do it
all? We've got Billy Bob the
good old boy who eats his fried
fish and hushpuppies in a little
restaurant straight out of Andy
Griffith. We've got Billy "Ray
Charles" Clinton who wears Ray
Ban sunglasses and can play a
sweet saxophone riff for you on
the Arsenio Hall Show.
I can just hear his political
handlers now, "OK Bill, you get
your saxophone out and polish it
up real good and shiny. We'll put
you on Arsenio and everyone will
say hippie! Hooray 'Bill Clinton
cares about the black people in
America, and boy can he play a
mean sax 'He's got my vote I
bet the problems of black people
were all Bill and his foursome
could talkaboutthedayheplayed
golf at the all- white country club!
Hey, we're not done yet. He's
more versatile than a Barbie doll.
Let's put a suit and tie on him and
pair him up with Ken, (oops I mean
Al Gore) and we've got Bill Clinton
Carter. The honest politician who
will work hard and fix all of our
problems. Yeah right, what are
you going to do, give away Alaska
Bill? The Panama canal is already
gone. I guess you can boycott the
Olympics or something profound
like that.
Lef s check old Billy Bob (that's
my fa vori te character he plays) on
an issue, how about law enforce-
ment? Billy Bob has the perfect
good old boy answer.
He and the Mayor have started
a midnigrit basketball league in
North Little Rock. He had been
talking to a couple of hundred kids
and their parents. Big deal! North
Little Rock? A couple of hundred
kids? Does he plan a sweet little
midnight basketball for thousands
of kids in East L.A.? Are kids just
going to quit their gangs, shoot a
few midnight baskets by moon-
light and become Michael Jordan?
Then they will all be millionaires
and live in a big mansion in Chi-
cago happily ever after.
C'mon Billy Bob, can you say
ED U CA TIONYou have to give
kids a way to make something of
themselves because that is all most
of them have got. I realize the thou-
sands of problems involved, but
they all come back to education. If
a kid has a fifth grade education,
he can't ever get a job good enough
(the hell with good enough, lets be
honest), he can never get a job that
pays enough MONEY, so that he
or she can get something out of mis
hard-ass world we live in. I just
can't believe Billy Bob didn't even
mention education. Midnight bas-
ketball? Do they even get their very
own neet-o uniforms Billy Bob?
Here is a little quote, "If you
want less police brutality you
should have more police on the
street Why, so they can keep a
better eye out to make sure no-
body is filming mem? There must
have been a dozen cops on the
scene before they were finished
kicking Rodney King's body. We
don't need more cops as badly as
we need more good cops.
Idon't know anyone who is an
aspiring policeman. If we didn't
waste away billions of dollars ev-
ery year at the hands of a bunch of
idiots who can't even handle their
own personal checkbooks, we
could pay policeman a decent sal-
ary. Then we would have more
intelligent, decent cops who care,
and less cops who just want to bust
someone's ass.
Can Billy "Ray Charles"
Clinton say GOV ERN MENT
SPEN DING? I guess not, he just
toots his sax , smiles at Arsenio
and hires a few million more po-
liceman.
Bill Clinton is a joke. He just
happens to be decent looking and
can talk a good load of crap, two
qualities that make a good used
car salesman. Unfortunately, in
this day and age they also seem to
make a good presidential candi-
date and mat scares the hell out of
me.
If everyone would vote, the
Democrats and the Republicans
would take the people seriously.
The way things are now they just
rent out the Astrodome and see
who can blow up more balloons,
or who's wife can give a better
speech about what a great guy
their husband is. I think neither
candidate has what it takes to run
this country.
The people need to take
charge. Our government is here
to serve us. We elect them to do a
job. Maybe if we all voted, we
would have some good candi-
dates to choose from in the next
election. Pick the lesser of two
evils and vote.
The fact that we allow our
congressmen to vote on how our
tax money is spent after we caught
a large portion of them writing
thousands of bad personal checks
amazes me.
The American people need to
react when they witness such be-
havior. We need to vote these idi-
ots out of our government.
The Democrats and the Re-
publicans know that they can in-
fluence voters with commercials,
dirty laundry,big fancy conven-
tions and various other methods
that are best described as a bunch
of shit.
We all need to seek infor-
mation about candidates and
do all that we can to elect the
best person for the job whether
they are black or white, man or
woman.
We are the best country in the
world. Why should we settle for
anyone but the best to beour presi-
dent.
THE WAVL
By Jess Tucker
Could it be that rights were violated ?
Pigs. Dirty, rotten, stinking
pigs. That's right, Greenville P.D
I'm talking to you. The following
is a mostly true account of one of
my brutal run-ins with the
Greenville Police Department. The
opinions expressed in this savage
tale are not necessarily the opin-
ions of The East Carolinian, since I
barely read this fine periodical,
much less authorize myself to
speak for their staff. Much thanks
to J. W. Walker for the opportu-
nity to pour out my heart in this
gut-wrenching depiction.
It was daytime, and I was up
to my usual daytime activities of
doing nothing. My crime was en-
tertaining two lovely blondes in
the far corner of my house, crank-
ing up the demigod of demigods,
Jimi Hendrix. Crosstown Traffic, I
think; but definitely Electric
Lady land. Out of the corner of my
eye, I caught a snoopy-looking
idiot sneaking around outside of
my house, positioned like some
big-time Marine ready for some
type of conflict. I, of course, blew it
off and went back to babbling
about how cool I was, or some-
thing along those lines.
Before I knew it, the house
was surrounded by pigs in full
camouflage riot gear, probably not
two months ou t of that police acad-
emy they have going to over there
at Pitt Community College.
Getting back to the story � I
mean the incident. After seeing
the entire police force surround
my house like flies on a fresh pile
of dog stuff, I decided that it was
time to take a look and ask one of
these soldiers of fortune what the
deal was.
As I was getting up off the
bed, I heard three cracks of thun-
der that distinctively belonged to
none other than the nine-millime-
ter carried by the G.D.P. One of
these scoundrels had taken it upon
himself to come in my house and
fire his weapon!
I bolted towards my bedroom
door, anxious to catch the person-
ality-less zit in the act, and was
met at the door by a sweaty, beady-
eyed little man, probably younger
than me, dressed in that all-too-
familiar black ninja suit. I was
blinded by his shiny gold badge,
and as I brought my arm up to
shield my damaged eyes, he took
the opportunity to pin me up
against the wall and jam the barrel
of his gun into well, my mouth
would sound cool, but he really
just waved it in my direction.
"Where's your roommate,
Jodi Binn?" he screamed at me in
almost unintelligible monosyllabic
grunts. At this point, the girls were
whining and carrying on in a gen-
eral state of panic trying to cover
themselves so the uniformed bas-
tard couldn't see them. But, fortu-
nately for them his attention was
focused all on me.
.A" I tried to sputter.
"Don't lie" he screamed, blood
vessels popping out of his odd-
shaped little head. "I'll take you
downtown and lock you up un-
derneath the jail
All of a sudden, a gray-haired
cop walked in on this frantic little
scene (the idiot's supervisor, no
doubt), and, I swear to God in
heaven above, started laughing!
No; giggling like a giddy little
school girl! He looked at the cop
that was violating me, winked at
him, and said to your humble nar-
rator, "C'mon now son, you're
only making this worse on you
and Jodi
I replied, "Jodi ain't here, I
don't know where he is, what do
you want?"
"Shut up screamed the
whinyyoungcop. "Don't backtalk
the officer
The supervisor showed his
appreciation by smacking the
young punk on the back of the
head and giving him a dirty look.
"F� him the supervisor
said, and I was flung to the ground
like some peasant.
The two officers were then
joined by more idiots in black suits
and all half-dozen or so proceeded
to search my house, breaking
things in their attempt to locate
"evidence
I sat back and watched the
whole affair and managed to catch
a few clues as to what the hell was
going on. It seems that someone
with longhair and a bandana (ooh
� great description), vaguely re-
sembling Jodi, had broken into a
neighbor's house and stole noth-
ing. That's right, nothing.
Eventually, the crack team of
specialists left my house, my
abode, mi cas? and I never heard
from them again (on that particu-
lar case, of course).
I suppose that they finally
found their "criminal who was
probably just some drunk art fag
that wandered into the wrong
house, butonly God and theG.P.D.
knows how many other lives were
violated to "get their man Do the
means justify the ends? I think
not.
It's not a matter of right, it's
just a matter of wrong.
GEORGE'S IVORY TOWER
By George Sartiano
Freshmen: get involved or get out
Freshman. It seems like they
come from another planet. They
come to college with all these pre-
conceived notions about the way
college is supposed to be, but un-
fortunately for them, it seldom
works out the way they think its
going to.
It seems like all of their ideas
about college come from those stu-
pid B- movies about Spring Break,
rushing Greek organizations and
nerds. Almostall of the guys think
that when they get to college they
are going to be the lucky 18-year-
old who ends up going out with
the beautiful 22-year-old home-
comingqueen, and of course she'd
be going out with him because he
is the coolest guy on the campus.
The same goes for the young
women on campus, except they
think they'll be going out with
some older man who will treat
them like the glamorous young
woman they think they are.
WRONG. Now, of course,
there are always exceptions to ev-
ery rule, but it doesn't happen
often enough for anyone to really
hope that it will happen to them.
In any case, these young people
are forming their ideas based on
movie screenplays. The screen-
plays were written by older indi-
viduals who were trying to visu-
alize the fantasies they had before
and during their first few years of
school. These freshmen are basing
their ideas about college on the
fantasies of others.
Of course, thatdoesn't change
the attitudes of these freshmen
any. They still think they are go-
ing to be the coolest guy or gal on
campus. They have the BMOC (Big
Man On Campus) syndrome.
They all think that they can
out dress, out dance, out drink,
out party and generally out cool
everyone on campus,even the fifth
and sixth year seniors (who are
basically professionals at all of the
above at this point). These fresh-
men believe they are the greatest
simply because of who they are,
and if you don't know who they
are, then you must be a nobody
yourself.
The whole si tua tion is enough
to make you laugh. So many of
these young people come to school
with all these grand ideas about
how they are going to change the
campus. I don't know how many
times in the last week I've heard
freshmen say something like, "I
don't want to just be another do-
nothing student here on campus, I
actually want to do things here. I
want to be involved That word
involved always get me. I just want
to laugh every time I hear it It
sounds like they are just re-hash-
ing parts of their interview with
the people in admissions. Chances
are they'll just end up going
through school without actually
doing any of those grandiose
things they have planned.
They probably won't have any
real affect on the school. The rea-
son for that being that they get
caught up in "other things" like
partying, girlfriend or boyfriend,
sports, studying, etc. and they do
not have "enough time" to get
involved. Like I said, it always
makes me laugh when I hear them
say stuff like that, because the
chances are they actually won't
do anything about it.
I guess we all are allowed to
be stupid sometimes. I know I had
a major case of the BMOC Syn-
drome my freshman year. Unlike
the guys in Revenge of the Nerds, 1
was just a dork, and 1 sure as hell
didn't get the girl.
4
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FRED RE-CNKSN BUtiTW M�asH4.L
OAVC BEAiJCHAMO KENNETH STWCKUWD
BENJAMIN PARROTT
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1992
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Pikes Performed Over
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Local Charities!
AN-HOMy ANDHAS BWUWDSC OStKftME
Pike Party!
THURSDAY
SEPT. 17
Meet the
FRIDAY
SEPT. 18
Invitation Onl-
Alpha Delta Pi Alpha Xi Delta
Tip!
For any information about Rush or obtaining a Pike Calendar Please Call 830-1256 or 758-2110





��
8 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 10. 1992
TATE
WS
Hunt, Gardner swap jabs on state crime
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Can-
didates for governor today attacked
each other on crime issues, a day
before they meet in the first debate
of their campaign.
Republican candidate Jim
Gardner attacked Democrat Jim
Hunt's record on crime during
Hunt's two administrations, from
1977 to 1985. Hunt said the state's
crime raise rose while Gardner was
lieutenant governor.
Hunt and Gardner are sched-
uled to debate Thursday afternoon
in Charlotte.
Speaking to about 75 law en-
forcement officers at the
Mecklenburg County Police head-
quarters, Gardner said the state's
Fair Sentencing Act helped set
criminals free too early.
Gardner brought Sh'rley
Hardeeof Wilmington to tell about
her son's murder during a frater-
nity party in 1987 at Appalachian
State University. She said the man
convicted of slaying her son, who
was shot between the eyes, was
released from prison after serving
18 months of a 15-year sentence for
second degree murder.
"My son's life is worth more
than 18 months Mrs. Hardee said.
Gardner blamed Hunt for
spearheading the effort to change
the state's sentencing laws.
"The Fair Sentencing Act is
one of the dumbest pieces of legis-
lation ever passed in North Caro-
lina Gardner said. "Let me tell
you, Jim Hunt, it's not working. It's
a mockery
Gardner also said Hunt
should never have commuted the
life sentence of Roy Lee Fox, who
killed again after he was released
and died this year in Central Prison.
Hunt has said it was a mis-
take to commute the sentence at the
urging of federal officials because
Fox testified against another crimi-
nal.
"I don't care if the Pope and
the president came to my desk, I
would never have signed that or-
der Gardner said.
Hunt, who held a news con-
ference to announce formation of a
small business advisory council,
said Gardner's attack on the Fox
case was "part of his charge-a-
week
"Last week, he blamed me
for the Hamlet nre'hesaid. "Now
this. What will it be next week?"
"I'm very sorry that after that
man got out he committed another
murder Hunt said. But we
have to look at the entire Hunt
record. Crime went down 11 per-
cent while I was in office. When I
leftwewere number 31 inthecoun-
try. Last week, it was announced
we're up to 17th and that all hap-
pened under Jim Gardner's watch
Hunt also said his business
advisory council would be made
up of 400 owners of small busi-
nesses across the state.
"Some 75 percent of our
state's new jobsare created by small
businesses Hunt said. "There's
no question wecan boost our state's
economy by helping small busi-
nesses thrive
Literacy
Continued from page 1
reader.
The community colleges
provide literacy services at over
200 off-campus sites through-
out the state.
Nationwide, literacy has
gained widespread importance.
Goals have been established to
promote a well-read society.
Goal one says that all chil-
dren will start to school ready to
learn.
This goal, accepted by U.S.
governors and the White House,
is to be accomplished by the year
2000. Another goal is geared to-
ward adults.
To be established by the
same date, it pushes all Ameri-
cans to have the reading skills it
takes to make them productive
workers and citizens.
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���?�
SEPTEMBER 10. 1992
The East Carolinian 9

NATI0NAL
Chiles says Bush's offer isn't enough
MIAMI (AP)�Gov. Lawton
-Chiles says President Bush's offer
. of $7.6 billion in hurricane aid will
fall far shortof Florida's needs, some
ofwhichareonlybeginningtocome
to light.
Chiles flew to Washington to
lobby for more federal help Tues-
- day as some Florida voters cast
ballots in Army tents and the mili-
tary told harrowing stories about
hidden pockets of devastation.
Bush said he wanted Con-
. gress to appropriate the $7.6 billion
, for emergency cleanup and rebuild-
ingin Florida and Louisiana, which
. -were battered by Hurricane An-
drew, and Guam, which was hit by
Typhoon Omar.
Chiles didn't criticize the of-
fer, but said Florida alone would
need $6.7 billion to $9 billion in
federal aid.
"It looks like basically his
; number is about half of what we
. think our damages are the gover-
nor said.
The federal response so far
has included 22,000 federal troops
�in the damaged area, emergency
j relief checks, low-interest loans and
I visits from more than half the mem-
bers of Bush's cabinet.
In a further sign of federal
; interest, The Washington Post re-
j ported today that the Department
of Housing and Urban Develop-
� ment is undertaking a full-scale re-
view of mobile home regulations.
Manv mobile homes were
shredded by the hurricane, and a
Dade County building board has
recommended banning them in the
county.
In Homestead, one of the
hardest-hit cities, the City Council
ordered its staff Tuesday night to
study a mobile home ban. In the
meantime, it passed a resolution
allowing residents to move into
mobile homes or recreational ve-
hicles while they repair damaged
houses.
Nearly 2,000 people are liv-
ing in military tent cities, and 65
other olive-green tents did duty as
polling places Tuesday in a hurri-
cane-delayed primary in Dade
County. The rest of the state voted
on time last week.
The 26 percent turnout was
only slightly worse than the usual
30 percent for a primary. "I think
it's a pretty good turnout under the
circumstances said Gisel'a Salas,
assistant superintendant of elec-
tions.
Among other races, the
county's voters elected Carrie Meek
as Florida's first black member of
Congress since Reconstruction.
If the election represented a
return to everyday life, there were
other disturbing signs that things
were far from normal.
The Army reported that its
troops were continuing to find
"small pockets of victims requiring
basic assistance
In one example, Chief War-
rant Officer Jerry Holmes of the
3220th Army Garrison said a re-
serve unit found about 60 people
hunkered down Monday in an
apartment complex for the elderly
in Cutler Ridge, a hard-hit section
south of Miami.
The residents had refused to
evacuate their apartments during
the stoi m, and had spent the subse-
quent two weeks holed up in locked
apartments, armed with shotguns,
refusing to emerge for fear of loot-
ers.
Holmes, in a written account,
said the elderly people begged the
reservists for food and grabbed
water and toilet tissue off an Army
truck.
"These poorpeopleweresim-
ply confused by events and did not
know what to do he said.
He said the reserve unit left
and returned with food, water, ice
and other essentials.
Woman dies after car stolen
SAVAGE, Md. (AP) � Two
suspected hijackers have been
charged in the death of a woman
who was dragged several miles
after her car was stolen with her 2-
year-old daughter inside, police
said.
Pamela Basu, 34, was taking
her daughter to preschool Tues-
day when she was forced from
behind the wheel at a stop sign
near her home, police said. The
two hijackers climbed into Basu's
BMW and droveoff with the child,
police said.
They stopped briefly about a
half mile away and threw the child
out of the car, still in her car seat,
witnesses said. The child was not
injured, said Detective Mike
Sherman of the Howard County
Police Department.
Ms. Basu either grabbed onto
the car or her clothing was caught
as the mendroveaway, police said.
She was dragged for several miles
before the driver apparently ran
into a fence to dislodge her, police
said.
The hijackers crashed the car
and fled on foot after being spot-
ted by police about 1 12-hours
later, about six miles from the scene
of the abduction, police said. One
wascapturedimmediatelyand the
other a short time later with the
aid of a police helicopter, police
said.
Rodney Eugene Soloman, 27,
and Bernard Eric Miller, 16, both
of Washington, D.C were charged
Tuesday with first-degree murder,
kidnapping, robbery and felony
theft. Solomon was the driver, po-
lice said.
The East Carolinian
For all the best
news, sports and
lifestyle articles,
read
The East Carolinian.
DOCTOR BARBER SHOP
WetDry Cuts $7.00
Shampoo & Cut $10.00
No Appointment Necessary
222-D Cotanche St.
758-3802
�:
ANCHElST
Corner of 3rd & Cotanche
RAY BAN
$39.95
WAYFARER OR
LRG. METAL
Doctors VisionCenter
OD
PA
V
Dr. Peter W. Hollis & Dr. R. Ted Watson
A99 E. Greenville DM 756-9404
We stock Oakley, Revo, Serengeti and Hobie sunglasses.
HANK'S
HOMEMADE
Ice Cream,
Yogurt & Sorbet
Open Daily
11 am - 11pm
316 E. 10th St.
758-0000
Hank's Old Fashioned Ice Cream
316 E. 10th Street
1
Buy One - Get One
FREE MINI-SUNDAE
expires 9-10-92
i
WjjA
Tenth Street BP
2704 E 10th Street 752-0418 WRQR 94.3 & 10th Street BP invite you to come by & register for a FREE GIVEAWAY this week
10 GALLONS BP GAS
Come see us for quality BP gas & Atlas products
THE COMIC BOOK STORE open 7 days
919 Dickinson Avenue A WEEK
, ru Greenville, NC 27834 MON-SAT 9:30-6
3d mLm (919) 758-6909 SUN 2:00-6
IMPORT SERVICE
Established in 1976
We service all foreign cars: BMW, Mercedes, Toyota,
Honda, Nissan, Saab, VW, Porsche, Volvo, Subaru,
Alfa Romero, Jaguar, and all others
EXPERT WORKMANSHIP
756-9434
OWl
At Professor
v � if
Eating & DrinkingCTV-f Saloon
MONDAY NIGHT (jFOOTBALL
IS BACK!
fc SPECIALS INCLUDE:
�Draft Beer - 95t a glass$4.95 a pitcher
�House Hiballs $2.00
�Juice Highballs $2.25
�Double Lime Margaritas $2.75
�Double Strawberry Margaritas $2.95
�Buffalo Wings 254 each
from 4 pm - Closing
�Drawings for Prizes Every Monday!
(Located behind Quincy's Steakhouse
on Greenville Blvd. 355-2946)






mm
� � I.�fc� �
77ie Zsotf Carolinian
September 10. 1992
Classifieds
Page 10
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS
1 and 2 bedroom apartments. En-
ergy-efficient, several locations in
town. Carpeted, kitchen appli-
ances, some water and sewer paid,
washerdryer hookups. Call 752-
8915.
NEEDED: 2 blocks from campus,
$160 per month plus oo of utili-
ties, phone, and cable. Available
now. Call 752-1596 for more infor-
mation.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 407
Biltmore St. $125.00month plus
13 utilities. Call 758-0700.
HOUSEMATE WANTED: Near
campus, quiet, $165.50month
plus 12 utilities. Call 758-3311.
HOUSETO SHARE: Need room-
mate male or female. House has
washer, dryer, deck, and garage
for storage. $200.00 PER MONTH
plus 1 3 utilities, cable and phone.
Call Mike or Ron 355-2627.
CONSIDERATE LAID-BACK
roommate needed. (Female pre-
ferred) Across thestreet form cam-
pus. UQ deposit. 13 utilities and
rent. Cathy or Nicole 752-2968.
FOR SALE
HELP WANTEDIHELP WANTEDIPERSONALSIPERSONALSIPERSONALS
SEIZED CARS, trucks, boats, 4
wheelers, motorcycles, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available your area now.
Call (800) 338-3388 ext. C-5999.
FOR SALE Pair of used 180
Rossignol skiis price negotiable.
Call (919) 753-4929.
19" FISHER mountain bike, many
extras! 752-0392
FOR SALE: Oneill "Chill Killer"
wetsuit, $95.00. Roland practice
amplifier, $65.00. Mach 77 Morey
Boogey Board, $35.00. All prices
are very negotiable. Call Chris 830-
1751.
MOVING-MUSTSALE: Onkyo
Tuner, Pioneer Amp. JVC CD
player wremote Bose 501 speak-
ers $300.00. King size 4 poster
waterbed, $300.00. Walnut Exec.
Desk $90.00. Call Dean or Shelly
355-5847.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT - Fisheries. Earn $5,000
month. Free transportation!
Room&Board! Over8,000open-
ings. No experience necessary.
MALE or FEMALE. For employ-
ment program call Student Em-
ployment Services at 1-206-545-
4155 ext. A5362.
FALL SOCCER COACHES -The
Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting for 12 to
16 part-time youth soccer coaches
for the fall youth soccer program.
Applicants must possess some
knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and patience with
youth. Applicants must be able
to coach young people ages 5-16,
in soccer fundamentals. Hours
are from 3:00 pm until 7:00 pm
with some night and weekend
coaching. This program will run
from September to mid-Novem-
ber. Salary rates start at $4.25 per
hour. For more information,
please call Ben James at 830-4567
or Micheal Daly at 830-4550.
TOPLESS DANCERS
WANTED - Great club, Great
money, unbelievable tips. Work
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 9 pm
- 2 am. Call Sid 919-735-7713 or
Paul 919-736-0716. Mothers
Playhouse in Goldsboro.
SPRING BREAK '93 -Sell Trips,
Earn Cash & Go Free Student
Travel Services is now hiring cam-
pus representatives. Ski pack-
ages also available. Call 1-800-
648-4849.
EMERGENCY! Expandingcom-
pany needs hardworking reliable
students to mail our diet bro-
chures from HomeDorm! Earn
up to $200 FT or $1000 FT! Em-
ployees needed immediately! For
job application send self-ad-
dressed stamp envelope: Colos-
sal Marketing, Employee Process-
ing, P.O. Box 291140 Port Or-
ange, FL 32129.
WORKING MOTHER SEEK-
ING motivated energetic indi-
vidual to organize activities for 3
children (14,10,7) Saturdays 9:00
am-6:00. Call Jeff Glenn 355-
2350 p.m. $5hr.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE!
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call (800) 338-3388 ext. P-3712
"HELP WANTED" EARN $1,500
WEEKLY mailing our circulars
Begin now FREE packet! SEYS,
Dept. 164, Box 4000, Cordova,
38018-4000.
WANTED : Ambitious People to
sell T-shirts to college students.
Many designs to choose from. Av-
erage $20 hour. No financial ob-
ligations. Call for free information
Belkat T's 800-892-8782 (12-5pm)
GUARANTEED WORK AVAIL-
ABLE. Excellent pay for EASY
home based work. Full part-time.
Rush self-addressed stamped en-
velope: Publishers (G2) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham,
NC 27705
S360UP WEEKLY. Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull-time. Set own
hours! RUSH self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers
(Gl) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
WORK AT HOME: Assembly,
crafts, typing and more! Up to
$500.00 plus a week, possible. For
information write: Source 1840-D
Simonton Road, Dept. 9108,
Satesville, NC 28677.
SERVICE OFFERED
TYPINGWORD PROCESSING
Call Cindy after 5:30 or leave mes-
sage. Familiar with all formats 15
years experience. Low rates. Work
guaranteed.
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND: Sandy brown colored
mutt found near Wash Pub on
10th Street. Call 758-8420 for fur-
ther information.
PERSONALS
DELTA CHI SAYS GO GREEK!
ALONE IN NIGHT'S darkness,
save for the gate of dreams, 1 long
for the etherial luminescence of
DAWN. Call me.
WRITERPHILOSOPHERMU-
SICIAN and poetic soul seeks
friendship and correspondence
from like-minded lady. Photos
and letters to MV, P.O. Box 8663,
Greenville, NC 27835.
SIGMA NU- Thanks for helping
out of Thursday with Pref! We
had a great time. Look forward to
getting together again with you
guys real soon! Love Zeta.
THE ZETAS would like to ex-
press their gratitude to all the fra-
ternities and sororities who hung
banners, passed out fliers, wore
out buttons and gave their time to
help us with rush. You helped us
to make it a great success! Thank
you- Zeta Tau Alpha.
CONGATULATIONS to the new
Zeta Tau Alpha pledges! We love
you all! Love - The Sisters.
SHAWN,Ihearyouknockingand
it's because your 21! I'll see ya
later downtown but don't yell
who's your daddy! - Mare.
WENDY DAVENPORT: It took a
year, 5 months and 7 days to real-
ize just how special you are to me.
So finally I've come to my senses.
Will you marry me? Love, David.
TREEHUGGER - Happy Birth-
day! I love you baby! Love
TREEHUGGER II.
LAMBDA CHI: We had a great
time tailgating Sat. Love, the Al-
pha Phi's.
TO ALL FRATERNITIES: Bestof
lick during rush! Love the Alpha
Phi's.
THETA CHI - The party never
ends! Whether tailgating through
nothing could dampen our fun!
Thanks and good luck with rush!
Love, the sisters and pledges of
Alpha Omicron Pi.
GO PIRATES! Good luck against
VA Tech! Love Alpha Omicron
Pi!
CHRISTINE (CATHY), Whatex-
actly were you doing behind that
air conditioner at Stratford Arms?
A BELATED CONGRATULA-
TIONS and a big "COO" to Jamie
Hixon on her Theta Chi lavilier!
Love, the sisters and pledges of
Alpha Omicron Pi.
THE SISTERS and pledges of
Alpha Omicron Pi would like to
wish all fraternities a fun and suc-
cessful Fall rush! GO GREEK!
CONGATULATIONS to the new
Beta Sigma pledge class of Alpha
Xi Delta: Leslie Alexander, Geor-
gia Alexis, Nanvy Barrett, Misty
Blalock, Sara Boswell, Michelle
Bowan, Krista Britton, Jenifer
Byerly, Holly Casey, Kristen
Cockrell, Katie Craig, Amy
Dodson, Marianne, Fink, Kelly
Fountain, Kristen Gale, April Har-
ris, Stacie Heming, Dana King,
Sally Lackey, Stephainie Martin,
Dorothy Matheson, Jennifer
Michno, Jill Michno, Karen
Obermller, Maria Posey, Chris
Rutter, Kiersten Sadler, Courtney
Shelton, Toni Smith, Christina
Pears, Liz Sweeny, TorieThurston,
Holli Vardemen. We love you!
Libos, the sisters of Alpha Xi Delta.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI -Would like
to invite ECU men to Fall rush -
Sept. 15-17. For more info call 757-
3516. - 422 West 5th St. GO
GREEK!
ECU FRATERNITIESGoodluck
with rush next week. Love, Alpha
Delta Pi.
P1 KAPPA ALPHA: We're look-
ing forward to another great
parent's weekend! Love, Alpha
Delta Pi.
TO THE PI KAPPS: Thanks for
an awesome tailgate Saturday!
Good food, good company - who
could ask for more? Love, Delta
Zeta.
YO MO! Be careful! I now have the
ultimate ability to embarrass you if
need be! Hey Blackmail, now.
there's a good word. Your roomy.
GAILSTER, doing the Gale thing.
The Galaroony, the Gailmeister.
The Gailinator.
$ Financial Aid Available S
Attention All Students!
Undt-rads&Craduates.Over$5Billion ;e ots&
scholarships are now available from private sector &
government sources for College Students nationwide. All
lhaknto are eligible! Let us help you locate the money that
you are eligible to receive. Applications are now being
accepted. To receive your financial aid program call:
Student Financial Services
ft�n�M�MF.�LFSa61
BASEBALL
CARD SHOW
SUNDAY. SEPT. 13
9 am-4 pm
HILTON INN
207 SW Greenville Blvd
ADMISSION: $1.50
Children 6 and under: FREE
SHOPPING SPREE-
EVERYHOUR �
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
You also get a FREE
HEADPHONE RADIO
just for calling
1-800-932-0528, Ext. 65
Joseph Ira Coleman
Attorney At Law
110 Avon Lane
Greenville, NC
(919)355-7495
TRAFFIC TICKETS � WILLS � DWIs
Competent Representation For A Reasonable Fee
Announcements
BISEXUAL- GAY -LES-
BIAN SUPPORT GROUP
Social support and activities.
Meetings are closed. Call 757-
676611:00 -12:15 Tues. and Thurs.
or 1:00 - 2:30 Wed. for informa-
tion on meeting time and place.
FPSIT ON SIGMA ALPHA
Epsilon Sigma Alpha will be
having a car wash on Sun. Sept,
13 from 12:00 - 4:00 at the Shell
Station on Greenville Blvd. All
donations will go to Hurricane
Andrew victims in Florida.
ATTFNTION: ALL EDU-
CATION MAIORS
The department of Speech-
Language and Auditory Pathol-
ogy (SLAP) will be providing the
speech and hearing screening for
all students eligible for admis-
sion to Upper Division of Teacher
Education on Monday, Sept. 14;
Tuesday, Sept. 15; and Wednes-
day, Sept. 16. The department
will be testing from 5:00 to 6:00
each day. No appointment is
needed.
ORIENTATION TO
CAREER SERVICES
The Career Services office in-
vites seniors and graduate stu-
dents who will graduate in De-
cember, 1992 or MaySummer,
1993 who were unable to attend
the first Orientation to Career Ser-
vices meeting to participate in one
of the following sessions which
will be held in Bloxton House.
Students need attend only one of
these sessions. Sept. 15,3:00; and
Sept. 24, 2:00. The staff will give
an overv iew of career services and
distribute registration forms.
They will discuss procedures for
establishing a credentials file and
participating in employment in-
terviews on campus.
eCU EQUESTRIAN CLUB
Will meet Wednesday Sept.
9th at 4:30 in Mendenhall Room
14 (downstairs). Anyone inter-
ested in horses should be there!
Beginner and advanced riders
welcome. Call Angela 931-8453
or Holly 931-8760 with questions.
ECUTTA
If anyone is interested in par-
ticipating and playing in a pos-
sible table tennis club. Please con-
tact Al Hunt at 758-9562 after
6:00pm. Interest needs to be
stated before Sept. 30,1992.
PRE PHYSICA
THERAPY CLUB
Any P.T. to be interested in play-
ing intramural volleyball with the
Pre- Physical Therapy Club - Call
Dawn at 321-0025 before Septem-
ber 13th.
THE KINGSTON TRIO
Will perform on Friday, Sep-
tember 11. 1991 at 8:00pm. The
Trio (Bob Shane, Nick Reynolds,
and George Grove) plays and
sinf; music including such clas-
sics as "Greenback Dollar "The
Reverend Mr. Black "Early
Morning Rain and "Where
Have All the Flowers Gone?"
P.U.S.H. THROUGH THE
BARRIERS
If you would like to work
towards reducing the Architec-
tural, as well as the attitudinal
barriers that students with spe-
cial needs are faced with every
day, then come to the next meet-
ing of P.U.S.H. (People United to
Support the Handicapped). The
meeting will be 5:00-6:00 on
Thursday ,45eptember 10 in Cot-
ton Hall Lobby. We will be work-
ing on our plans for Homecom-
ing and an Awareness Week.
Come join the fun
STUDENT UNION VI-
SUAL ARTS
The Visual Arts Committee
of the Student Union would like
to thank all ECU students to sub-
mit artwork in "The All Student
Show There is no entry fee and
only one piece of work per per-
son. The deadline is September
11. We will be accepting artwork
September 10, from 2:00 to 4:00
and September 11, from 2:00 to
6:00. Bring your artwork by room
8 C-D-E of Mendenhall. Call 757-
4715 for more information.
IMMUNIZATION CLINIC
Student Health Center. Sep-
tember 16, 1992 from 8:30am to
11:30am and from 1:30pm to
4:00pm. No appointment Neces-
sary.
ECU SCHOOI OF MUSIC
EVENTS
Movement workshop featur-
ing Phyllis Weikart with a focus
on Integrated Learning through
movement and Folk Dance on
Sept. 11 & 12. A sequential ap-
proach for grades K-6. Willis
Building Friday from 6:00 -
9;00pm and Saturday from
9:00am - 5:00pm. Fee for non-
ECU students. For more infor-
mation call Linda High, director
at 757-6331.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
The Newman catholic stu-
dent Center would like to wel-
come the parents and invite you
to join us at the center for Sunday
Mass. Saturday evening at 5:30.
Sunday ll:30amand 8:30pm. The
Newman Center is located next
to the East end of campus at 953
E. 10th St. For further informa-
tion call Fr. Paul at 757-1991. .
ALPHA EPSII ON DELTA
HONOR SOCIETY
AED will meet Tuesday night
Sept. 15, 1992. All pledges and
existing members are urged to
attend. The speaker promises to
be interesting as well as surpris-
ing. Make plans to attend.
ECU CREW CLUB
Do you enjoy beating teams
like Duke, Carolina or NC
State? Would you like to com-
pete against Ivy League schools
like Harvard or Yale? Do you
like the thrill of victory? sound
like fun? Try the East Carolina
Rowing Team No experience
necessary. Beg inners and
Freshmen welcome. All inter-
ested males and females should
call Angie at 830-3926 or Chris
at 752-8613.
GRAND OPENING
Hidden Treasures Thrift
Shop, located on the Evans
Street Mall is scheduled to open
on September 11. Store hours
are 10,00 - 4:30 Monday - Satur-
day. The shop is operated by
the Pitt County Mental Health
Center.
NRHH
Welcome back all National
Residence Hall Honorary Mem-
bers We are having an im-
portant meeting Tuesday, Sept.
15 at 5:00pm in Fletcher Resi-
dence Hall basement. Nomina-
tion and election of new offic-
ers is on the top of the agenda.
All members are asked to
present. For more information
or if you are unable to attend
please contact India Vaughn
931-7408.
TRAVEL-STUDY-
LEARN
It's not too late to apply for
the National or International Stu-
dent Exchange or for one of many
student abroad opportunities! If
you are interested in paying ECU
tuition and attending one of 107
other universities around the
United States or one of over 40
English speaking foriegn loca-
tions, investigate the many op-
portunities available to you
through the ECU exchange pro-
grams. The first of many infor-
mation sessions will be held on
Thursday, Sept. 10 at 4:00pm in
GCB1003. Please try to attend to
find out about the opportunities
awaiting you! Check you ECU
Student Activity Calender for
future information sessions or call
MS. Stephanie Evancho, 757-
6769, for an appointment and pick
up a brochure and application
form soon.
LITERACY VOLUNTEERS
OF AMERICA
Pitt County would like to re-
mind people that Tutor training
Workshop will begin September
10th. If you would like to become
a tutor please call Literacy Vol-
unteers of America - Pitt county
at 752-0493 for more information.
ATTFNTION PIRATE
FANS
Homecoming 1992 is just
around the corner and should be
one of the best ever. For those
registered student organizations
interested in the float contest, hall
decoration contest, or competi-
tion for homecoming candidate,
a few important dates are ap-
proaching. September 25 -
5:00pm All entry forms due to
Room 210 MSC. If your organi-
zations has nor received an en-
try form, pick one up in Room
210 MSC. September 30 - 4:00pm
Mandatory meeting with con-
tact person for each hall or float
entered in contest. Room 244
MSC. Immediately following
this meeting, at 4:30, Homecom-
ingcandidates will meet in Room
244 MSC.
PHI SIGMA PI NA-
TIONAL HONOR FRATER-
NITY
If you have a 3.3 or higher
GP A and 32 - 96 completed credit
hours, you are invited t attend
the informational meeting
(Smoker) of Phi Sigma Pi Na-
tional Honor Fraternity. The
meeting will be held Monday,
Sept. 14 at 7:00pm.in Jenkins Art
Building Room 1220. Refresh-
ments will be provided, so come
and join us.
HAUL
Come one come all Are you
interested in having a hands on
exerience with the Hotel and
restaraunt fields? Then join the
Hopitality Managment
Association. Come to our first
meeting Sept. 14 at 3:00pm in the
Humane Environment Sciences
Building in room 235.
FAST CAROLINA
1INTVFRS1TY GOSPEL
COBOL
The ECU Gospel Choir is
having a concert at 7:00pm in
Hetcher Music Hall. We would
have for you to come join in with
us.





-
SEPTEMBER 10, 1992
The East Carolinian
11
1
WC)RLP NEWS
Yeltsin postpones visit to Japan
ANC demands removal of black leaders
JOHANNESBURG, South
Africa (AP) � African National
Congress leaders are demanding
the removal of all conservative
black homeland leaders, includ-
ing the general whose forces killed
24 protesters in Ciskei.
ANC activists said they
would march today on the tiny
Qwa Qwa homeland to demand
the resignation of homeland leader
T. K. Mopeli. Homeland authori-
ties said they would ignore ANC
demands.
Ciskei homeland security
forces opened fire Monday on an
ANC march demanding the ouster
of military ruler Brig. Gen. Oupa
Gqozo, killing 24 protesters and
wounding some 200.
The deaths deepened the cri-
sis created when the ANC pulled
out of talks with the government
in June to protest violence in black
townships and to demand a multi-
racial interim government.
ANC officials say the future
of the homeland system has be-
come a major obstacle to resuming
talks and must be resolved before
there can be any hope of progress.
They are demanding that
President F.W. de Klerk remove
Gqozo from power. South Africa
says Ciskei is independent and it
cannot remove Gqozo.
South Africa controls most
affairs in the homelands � estab-
lished under apartheid as sepa-
rate nations for blacks, leaving
most of the territory to whites. The
homelands, dependent on South
African aid, are mostly dominated
by authoritarian regimes. Almost
no one recognizes them as inde-
pendent.
The homelands are expected
to rejoin South Africa under a new
constitution that would have
whites share power with the black
majority. But conservative home-
land leaders hope to continue as
regional governments.
"The whole issue of
reincorporation of the homelands
has moved right up the agenda.
Gqozo is running wild and it has
now become a matter of urgency
to remove him ANC spokesman
Carl Niehaus said Tuesday.
Gqozo was initially sup-
ported by the ANC when he seized
power in a 1990 coup, but relations
became strained as he adopted an
increasingly independent course.
ANC leaders also called for
removal of President Lucas
Mangope of Bophuthatswana,
Mangosuthu Buthelezi of
KwaZulu and Mopeli of Qwa Qwa.
Mangope and Buthelezi, leader of
the Inkatha Freedom Party, are
bitter opponents of the ANC.
ANC leaders said at a rally in
Johannesburg on Tuesday that all
of the conservative homeland lead-
ers were government puppets who
had to be removed. But they did
not call for removal of the military
rulers of the Transkei and Venda
homelands, who are ANC allies.
"The people are marching.
The people are demonstrating. The
people are marching forward to
democracy said senior ANC
leader Alfred Nzo at a protest out-
side the Ciskei consulate on Tues-
day.
MOSCOW (AP) � President
Boris Yeltsin Wednesday indefi-
nitely postponed his trip to Japan,
sources said, a move that came amid
growing friction in a longstanding
territorial dispute over a group of
islands.
High-placed sources in the
Russian Foreign Ministry and the
Japanese Embassy confirmed that
Yeltsin's trip, scheduled for Sept. 13-
16,had beendelayed.The report was
first carried by the Interfax news ser-
vice, which cited Japanese sources.
No reason was given for
Yeltsin's decision, and his office
would not comment immediately.
The dispute over the Kuril Is-
lands has been the major stumbling
block in relations between Russia
and Japan. The former Soviet Union
seized the islands in the final days of
World War II, and the nations never
signed a peace treaty formally end-
ing the war.
Yeltsin also is delaying his trip
toSouthKorea,whichhehad planned
to visit along with Japan, Interfax
said. Yeltsin now plans to go to South
Korea in December and will com-
bine that trip with an official visit to
China, the news agency said.
U.N. Blames Bosnians for attack
The Purple and Gold Special
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SARAJEVO, Bosnia-
Herzegovina (AP) � The U.N.
commander in Sarajevo Wednes-
day blamed Bosnian forces for
an attack on a U.N. convoy that
killed two French peacekeepers
and wounded five others.
French U.N. officers also
said today the machine-gun fire
on the convoy came from a sub-
urb held by Bosnian government
forces, and the French govern-
ment demanded that the killers
be punished.
The attack occurred Tues-
day near Sarajevo airport, where
a vital airlift of humanitarian aid
was suspended after an Italian
aid plane was downed last
Thursday. Clashes have raged
for days around the airstrip.
In Geneva, representatives
of Bosnia's warring ethnic fac-
tions made some progress in 2
12 hours of talks on how to
improve security for interna-
tional relief flights, mediator
Vicente Berastegui said without
elaborating.
Berastegui said the group
would meet again Thursday.
U.N. spokesman Pierre
Mehu said aid flights were not
likely to resume before Tuesday,
when final decisions on propos-
als, including U.N. supervision
of anti-aircraft weapons, could
be made.
In Sarajevo, Brig. Gen.
Hussein Aly Abdulrazek said
"irresponsible elements" among
the Bosnian government forces
attacked the 36-truck convoy
from less than 100 yards away.
"It was clear that the fire
came from the Bosnian side
the Egyptian officer told a news
conference.
He said the French convoy
commander had first negotiated
a cease-fire with government
and Serb forces.
Fighting ceased for about
20 minutes, the convoy began
moving over the airport runway
and it was then hit by Bosnian
fire.
U:N. spokesman Yusuf
Khalef said earlier that at least
five minutes of machine-gun fire
raked the convoy of vehicles that
were painted white and marked
with "U.N lettering.
Sefer Halilovic, com-
mander of Bosnian forces, told
The Associated Press that the
government was studying the
issue and meeting the U.N.
forces.
In addition to the dead, five
French peacekeepers were
wounded and a sixth was put
under psychological observa-
tion, officials said today. Initial
reports said two soldiers were
wounded.
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The East Carolinian
September 10. 1992
Lifestyle
Page 13
Derek Trucks, The Allgood Music Ca and
Allmans smoke The Creek
By Bill Walker
Staff Writer
Photo by D�ll Reed
Dickey Betts of the Allman Brothers band made his guitar scream at Sunday's show at Walnut CreuN.
mixed crowd danced with delight throughout the whole set and was disappointed that the show had to end.
It looked like a cross between
a Dead show and a Harley-
Davidson convention.
The rainy weather couldn't
hold a single fan from enjoying
mis show. The signs were with the
crowd as a brilliant, well-defined
rainbow arched across the hori-
zon with the pot of gold located at
center stage.
WRDU cel-
ebrated it's
eighth birthday
Sunday evening
with Derek
Trucks, The
Allgood Music
Company and
The Allman
Brothers.
When De-
rek Trucks took
the stage, 1 hon-
estly thought it
was a joke. This
13-yr-old boy
has his own
band with vari-
ously-influ-
enced musi-
cians. His
keyboardist has played with Bad
Company and Foreigner, and his
blues guitarist has played with
Tom Petty. Trucks, whose guitar
was almost bigger than he, is still
in middle school. However, he got
the last laugh as soon as he played
his first lick.
The kid was smokin He had
talent, style and the ability to play
the guitar in a way not all too
unfamiliar to the late Duane
Allman. Anyone who tellsyou that
mastering the guitar takes years
needs to talk with Mr. Trucks.
Following the little man's stel-
lar performance, The Allgood
Music Company stormed thestage
with their Athens-based rock
sound. Allgood has evolved since
last year and they showed off the
fruits of their labor. The band has
become tighter and their sound has
gone through a metamorphosis,
leaving them at a new level of cre-
ativity and performance. They left
the stage and it was time for the
main event.
When the Allmans take the
stage, they're not gonna give you
70 percent. They throw down a 110
percent foot-stomping, rocking and
rolling, ass-kickin jam session.
"Testament" and "Statesboro
Photo by D�ll �e�d
Gregg Ailman delicately plays a slow and sweet version of "Melissa
Blues"started the incredible set that
included an accoustic version of
"Midnight Rider
Shortly after they came onto
stage, The Allman's jammed out
with "Blue Sky" in celebration of
the clearing weather. The crowd
went nuts with people dancing on
their seats, in the aisles and around
in circles.
A marbelized fluid-flow of oil
graced the screen, pulsing in tempo
with the tunes. The final product
complimented the style that dis-
tinctly is the Allman Brothers.
The Allmans, along with The
Marshall Tucker Band, The Charlie
Daniels Band and Lynryd Skynryd,
were at the forefront of the so-called
Southern Rock movement 20 years
ago. The sound, heavily influenced
by blues slide guitar with rock
rhythms, now almost penetrates
into progressive rock, according
to Allman Brothers bassist Allen
Woody- "See, what the deal is,
man, this is a progressive rock 'n'
roll band he said in a press
release.
Woody'sdistinctionwascor-
rect. The band's sound Sunday
night was not a repetition of old
Allman's albums (wouldn't mat
have been nice?) but rather an
excellentmixof
the old and the
new to create
exactly what
Woody labeled
them � Pro-
gressive rock'n
'roll.
The
Allman Broth-
ers wrapped
up the rockin'
show with an
extended ver-
sion of Tied to
the Whippin'
Post
Every time they
seemed to play
the final cli-
max, they
jumped back into thechorus. This
was much to the delight of the
frenzied crowd.
The last minutes of the show
weredefinite, despite cheers and
encouragement. The crowd was
disappoionted that the show had
ended.
"The show was incredible�
so good that the crowd was
spoiled said Suzanne Cox, an
ECU sophomore. "Any show
seen at Walnut Creek in the near
future will probably be a
disappoinment after this one
Even out to the parking lot
strains of Allman tunes rose from
car windows, and smiles graced
everyone's face. Accordingtoone
enthusiastic fan, "Tonight was
second best only to a Dead show
Paper Boys: Xr8
By Joe Horst
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
I was watching lay Leno's
monologue one night last week
whenhe mentioned thatmostnews-
papers were phasing out their pa-
per boys. Boy, did that bring back
memories.
Aside from the apparent sexist
titie, (I think they now call them
paper deliverers) I had that job when
I wasabout 12 or 13 years old. Look-
ing back on it now, I see that one job
taught me more and has stayed
with me longer than any other job
I've ever had.
Let me paint you a picture. A
13-year-old boy gets home from an-
other regular day at school. He finds
two to three stacks of newspapers
and ads, roughly half his height,
patiently waiting for him on a cor-
ner of his driveway. He walks into
the house, grabs a snack and walks
into the garage to start folding and
rubber-banding each newspaper.
He pulls out his stool from its
resnhgplaceand also grabs the large
coffee can that he has filled with
rubber bands. After a while, he
settles down to a rhythm of fold,
rubber-band and put to the side.
Thump goes his hand, snap goes the
band, and place goes the paper. After
around 15 to 30 minutes, (depend-
ing on the size of the newspaper)
the boy returns to the house to wash
off that inevitable black newsprint
from his hands.
After that ritual is completed,
he grabs his newspaper bag, throws
it over his shoulders like a Mexican
poncho and begins to fill it up with
that day's papers. If the papers are
too large, then he may have to leave
some and come back for the rest
later. But if he's lucky, he can fit all
of his 70-80 customers in one trip.
He jumps on his bike, mindful
of the weight until he has delivered
a quarter of the route, and then
breezes through the rest, softly
whistling some unknown tune.
End of the month rolls around,
and it's time to collect his wages. He
spends roughly a week or so going
around to the different houses, re-
peating that now-familiar opener,
"Hi, I'm your paperboy. I'm here to
collect" Sometimes he gets put off
with some excuse, but most of his
customers pay him with a check
and a smile. After he has finished,
he counts all the money and figures
out just what kind of money he's
made.
The holidays and February (be-
cause of its length) are the best for
ti ps, people are in a good mood and
willing to spread it around. The boy
gets charged a certain amount for
each paper he receives, and also for
any supplies (rubber-bands or bags
for rainy weather) he needs that
month. On a good month, he can
makeover $150 for a coupleof hours
work a day.
OK, maybe rveglamorized and
simplified toe job a bit, but that's
what time and distance will do for
memory. But there are some things
thataretrueand remain the same to
this day.
That job taught me responsibil-
ity. Every day, it was my duty to get
those papers out. Not my parents,
not my brother or sister, mine. I took
pride in making sure that each pa-
per 1 delivered was puton the porch,
(porched, as I called it) right next to
the front door. None of my papers
came to a customer wet or soggy�
if it rained, 1 put plastic bags around
See Paper, page 15
Duke alumnus establishes classics department
By Dana Danielson
Lifestyle Editor
When it comes to classical languages, it's not all Greek
to Steve Cerutti � it's Latin, too.
"When I get up in the morning 1 can't wait to go to
work said Cerutti, assistant professor of classical lan-
guages in toe newClassical Studies program. "Every day is
different � it's never the same from day to day, class to
class, year to year. I couldn't imagine doing anything else
Originally from New York City, Cen'tti attended the
University of Iowa where he double-majored in English
and classics. He made a cultural leap to Duke University
with a teaching fellowship and worked toward his Ph.D. in
classics.
Cerutti is teaching Latin I, II . ,
and III of the Classical Studies l ua lo WKe
Minor in his first semester at my Latin book
The program is an inter- o to a bar, get a
pitcher of beer
and a burger and
sit there
�Steve Cerutti, of his
collage years
disciplinary program including
an introductory course and se-
nior seminar. Electives include
courses in art, foreign languages,
history and philosophy. Cerutti
hopes archaeology will be in-
cluded in the future.
"What they brought me here
to do is basically organize the classical languages said Cerutti And
also to in trod uce Greek into the curricul um so that our minor progi am
can turn into a major, and hopefully someday into a full classics
department
Cerutti is pleased with the program courses so far.
"Traditionally first year Latin has taken two years to teach said
Cerutti. "With my first year class, which 1 consider the flagship class
of the program, they are going to be getting through this in one year
and then going on to read actual authors in their second year. This has
never happened before at ECU. And the same can be said for Greek as
well
Cerutti applied for the same jobs asa fellow graduate student and
friend at New York University and ECU. The friend was hired at NYU
for only one year and Cerutti is now on a tenure track with the Classical
Studies program.
'it'sweird how lifeworkshe saidToutou-Ayou're going to get
into one thing and next thing you know you do something and it feels
so right. 1 think how tenuous it was to get to Duke and from Duke to
here.
"My mom always said when I was interviewing for jobs, The
place you are looking for is looking for you said Cerutti And when
1 came out here that was the feeling; it was mutual. It's like a
relationship. If you meet someone and you're really into them and
Photo by Biff Ramon
they're really into you it's
going to really work out.
"So far I still feel like I
made the best choice incom-
ing here. And I hope they
feel the same way in hiring
me
Cerutti "accidentally"
launched his interest in lan-
guage in college.
"When I got to Iowa I
didn't know anybody
there he said. "I felt inse-
cure about just going out
and hanging out without
having a book in front of me
so I used to take my Latin
book out to a bar, get a
pitcher of beer and a burger
and sit there.
"So I started acing the
tests basically just because I
was a lonely guy
Cerutti's interests in-
clude motorcycles, flying
planes, the beach, archaeol-
ogy (he spent a summer dig-
ging in Pompeii) and writing. Cerutti wrote his dissertation on Cicero
and hopes someday to dig on the Palatine with the American Academy
in Rome. Presently he is writing a paper about the study of ancient
Roman coins at the American Numismatics Society in New York in
hopes of having it published.
Other writing accomplishments include screenplays, fiction pieces
and articles for Southern California Hoi4se and Garden while teaching
secondary schwl in California.
Cerutti's love for his job surpasses any hobbies, including writing.
"Right now, my main thing is my job he said. "1 don't mean to
come off sounding like some company man. This is really what I do and
I'm the kind of person who puts everything they have into their
profession.
"1 think what you do and who you are is toe meat. My job is who
I am
The Classical Studies Minor is the brainchild of Dean of the School
of Arts and Sciences, Keats Sparrow. Anthony Papalas of the history
department is the director.
"Without Dean Sparrow's support we couldn't have this said
Cerutti. "He's great to work with and have on our side
Cerutti hopes to generate more interest in the program. Anyone
who would like more information, stop by and visit him in the foreign
language department.
�� �
��





'
14 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 10. 1992
Cage, Elvis impersonators, gambler steal screen in 'Honeymoon'
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Honeymoon in Vegas is a new
film involving a couple about to be
married, a gambler and a gaggle of
Elvis impersonators.
Thestory opens with JackSinger
(Nicolas Cage) visiting his sick
mother in the hospital.
Jack's mother wants him to
promise her two dungs before she
dies: that he'll always love her and
that he'll never get married. Jack
hastily agrees as his mother passes
away.
Four years later, Jack has a sen
ous girlfriend, Betsy Nolan (Sarar
Jessica Parker), who wants a rea
commitment fromhim. Jack just can
not seem to bring himself to marry
He often dreams of his mother ant
cannot bring himself to break hi
promise to her.
Eventually, Jackrealizes thath
must live his own life. He and Bets
head to Las Vegas to get married.
As the prenuptial couple �
rives at the hotel, a local gamble
Tommy Corcoran (Jarnes Caan
espies Betsy. Betsy, it seems, looks
remarkably likeTommy'sdead wife.
Tommy feels that he must marry
mis girl. To do so, he sets up a poker
game to swindle Jack.
When Jack gets $65,000 deep in
debt, Tommy offers him a way out;
Photo coort��y Columbia Picture
'Honeymoon' hosts a handful of memorable ana amusiny maiaoieia.
Tommy will take Betsy for a week-
end as payment. After considering
their options, Jack and Betsy decide
that Tommy's deal is their only
choice.
When Tommy takes off for
Hawaii with Betsy at his arm, Jack
heads back home. Soon thereafter,
Jack decides he must find Betsy, so
he begins an odyssey to win her
back.
Honeymoon in Vegas elicits
beUyfulls of laughs as Cage val-
iantly tries to find his fiancee.
At one point, Jack waits in line
at the airport. The gentleman at the
head of the line slowly asks the
attendant about a variety of flights
while the people behind him fume.
Jack has no time to waste, so he
storms to the frontand vociferously
demands that the man expedite his
transaction.
The humor emanates from
Jack's harried actions. He seems to
epitomize the kind of man Bruce
Springsteen sings about in "Local
Hero "These days I'm feelin' all
right'Cept I can't tell my courage
from my desperation
When Jack jumps from a plane
with The Hying Elvises, he does so
out of desperation. He will find
Betsy at any cost. The many people
who witness his actions view them
as courageous but Jack (and the
audience) knows better.
The small touches in Honey-
moon in Vegas blend hilariously into
the storyline.
Jerry Tarkanian makes a cameo
and pokes a little fun at himself by
appearing as a gambler in a card
game. At one point, the camera pans
to Tark as he chews nervously on a
cloth napkin.
Another funny sequence in-
volved Peter Boyle in a side-split-
ting role as Chief Oman, a Hawai-
ian resident who sings Broadway
show tunes.
Another pleasant part of Hon-
eymoon in Vegas is the soundtrack
full of Elvis songs. Bruce
Springsteen, John Mellencamp,
Amy Grant and Billy Joel can all be
heard crooning Elvis songs.
The main problem with Honey-
moon in Vegas is that there are two
films in one. The one film contains
Singer, Tarkanian, Oman and The
Hying Elvises. The other and less
successful film is the one in which
Tommy woos Betsy.
Neither Caan nor Parker is par-
ticularly memorable in their respec-
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tive roles. Their characters main-
tain no conviction and their mo-
tives seem suspect throughout the
film.
Tommy's position in Vegas is
never really clarified. He seems to
be a tough customer, yet he tells
about his two children, his grand-
children and his beloved wife. Too
much effort is spent trying to justify
Tommy's actions rather than just
letting the situation stand on its own.
But this inferior film is worth
tolerating to see the host of interest-
ing characters that Jack meets.
Honeymoon in Vegas elicfts
enough laughs to please any movie-
goer with its buoyant tale of love
overcoming all obstacles.
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SH0M
it vii
SEPTEMBER 10, 1992
The East Carolinian
15
Who"s
There?
Pg$fq W?fKS
9YU-12 � Victor Hudson
O'Rocks
911 � TodcJcf opstetos wln
Burta Ground
9f2 � sAawrv Not So
Danj torouj, Jenny Any Kind
911� BS
912 �Morh�rl
912
� BigBwrip
Paper
Continued from page 13
Friends of Sheppord Memorial Library
BOOK SALE
September 11,12, & 13
at The Plaza Mall (next to Roscoe Griffin Shoe Store)
Great Assortment of Titles: 25tf-$5
Fiction Biographies � Literature Classics
I Poetry Cookbooks � History � How To's
� Sports � Children's Books � Sports
� Dictionaries � Reference
Friday & Saturday 10-9, Sunday 1-6
rwiirr.irK
IT
GREENVILLE
MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL
2 FREE REDSKINS TICKETS
Given Away Every Monday Night
Also FREE Pizza A Other Prizes Given Away
This Monday Detroit Lions vs Redskins
See N.F.L. Football in person!
Private Club For Members & Invited Guests
QOpfat-Pi QJitapter
CfiriHrtereb 1966
JOnst (LTarnlma jMmfjerattrj
700 3�ast 10th trret - $.09. Uox 4356
(Hrenthilb, Korth Carolina 27836
PinnF (919) 752-55-13
all of them. And it paid off. Soon
enough, people were thanking me
and tips were just a little bigger.
Thatjob also taught me how to
deal with people. It taught me how
to be polite even when you mink
someone's just jerking you around.
I found out when to be friendly and
give a little, and when to be hard
and not give an inch
That job taught me about
money. Having to figure out
whether my bill from the paper was
right, who owed me money from
last month, whether the receipts 1
gave my customers were correct�
all these taught me the importance
of money. I'm not saving money is
the only thing in life, far from it, but
I know now that if you have it, it
needs to be taken care of. Other-
wise, you may not have it for long.
But I think the most important
thing I have ever learned in that job
was pride in myself. I liked being
able to say that I'd never had a
complaint for three months run-
ning. I liked being able to pay my
bills on time and not have to worry
about them for another month. The
best thing of all, though, was know-
ing I didn't do a half-assed job. To
this day, I still pride myself on the
belief mat when I do something, I
give it my all and nothing less.
So when I heard that this job
may be a thing of the past, I felt a
little sad. I'd like to know that my
kids can learn all these things (and
so much more) from just one job. In
a ti me where money and profitseem
to be the bottom line, I hope that
newspapers will stop and look at
the human side a minute.
Keep the paper deliverers. Let
a kid have some joy from doing a
good job. God knows, we need as
much joy as we can get
P UTT- P UTT Mon"7hur
J& With over 1,000 FM �
3Z cou�� wor,d wWe- 8tturd�y lo-n
yyV ' 10th St put Dunkfn Donuts Sunday mo
nc��- � n� �
I
I
i
I
explr� September 16. 19821 expires September 15, 1892
Read The East Carolinian
and speak well of its staff,
or we'll print nasty things
about you.
" understand, dear. You got a special student price
on the PS2Andyou're what? Sending money
home! Hang on, I'll get your father
z.�-
How're you going to do it?
Give your parents a pleasant surprise. Tell them how much you saved
on your IBM Personal System2� and IBM Printer with the special
student prices.
What's more, the IBM PS2� Loan for Learning makes
paying for your PS2 even easier.
Let us show you how easy it is to own and use a PS2.
It comes with easy-to-use, preloaded software, IBM
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You'll see how quickly you can
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sparkling graphics that could give
your professors a pleasant
surprise, too.
ECU Student Stores
757-6731
William Compton
IBM Collegiate Representative
?This offer is available only to qualified students, faculty and staff who purchase IBM PS2's through participating campus outlets. Orders are subject to availabil-
ity. Prices are subject to change and IBM may withdraw the offer at any time without written notice.
D3M Personal System2 and PS2 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation





�BMHMMMMII
By Chris Kemple
r-





SEPTEMBER 10. 1992
The East Carolinian
17
Symphony features renowned violinist
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
The North Carolina Sym-
phony opens its 1992-93 season
this week, and Greenville is the
second stop on the tour. World
renowned violinist Kyoko
Takezawa will be the feature art-
ist in the performance Thursday,
at 8p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
According to Jenny Spiker,
public relations director of the
North Carolina Symphony, the
program will consist of classical
music that will be familiar to the
audienceIt is a very accessible
kind of music said Spiker. "It
features oneof the best violin con-
certos ever written
Takezawa is no stranger to
the stage. She began studying the
violin at three years of age and
was touring the United States
with the Suzuki Method Associa-
tion at age seven. When she was
Check it out!
For ticket information, contact the ECU Central ticket office at 757-
4788. Tickets can be purchased at the door on the night of the
concert for $15 for adults, and $13 for senior citizens and students.
11, Takezawa won the All Japan
Competition for Students, accord-
ing to Spiker.
Now in her mid-20s,
Takezawa is well on her way to
becoming a star.
"Her name is not big yet
said Spiker. "but it may become
big in the next few years
In Thursday night's perfor-
mance, Takezawa will perform
Mendelssohn's Concerto in E Mi-
nor for Violin and Orchestra,
Opus 64. Spiker said that
Takezawa performed the same
concerto in Los Angeles and
earned favorable reviews in local
papers for her artistic ability.
Music Director and conduc-
tor Gerhardt Zimmermann will
direct Thursday night's perfor-
mance. Under his direction, the
orchestra will also bring to the
stage Respighi's Gli Uccelli (The
Birds) and "Jupiter Mozart's
Symphony No. 41.
Thursday's performance is
the first in the Pitt County 1992-93
season.
The second performance will
be held on March 4,1993, and will
feature pianist Leon Bates.
The Pitt County Chapter of
the North Carolina Symphony So-
ciety brings the orchestra to Gre-
enville, with tickets for both con-
certs available through Kelly
White of the Pitt County chapter.
Harris teeter
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�ff J





18 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 10, 1992
1
Love Bone: essence of Seattle sound
By Pam Revels
Staff Writer
Mother Love Bone delivers a hard
hit of pure Seattle rock with their self-
titled double CD that hits music stores
Sept. 22.
Thecompilation is comprised of pre-
viously released material from their EP
Shine (1989) and their first album Apple
(1990). The music on this collection en-
compasses the essence of the now defini-
tive Seattle sound.
Songs like "Chloe DancerCrown
of Thorns" and "Gentle Groove" are
slower tracks that produce a haunting
and erotic mood. Andrew Wood's vo-
cals capture a mesmerizing serenity
plagued by what the lyrics describe as "a
broken kind of feeling Powerful guitars
and an unabated rock 'n' roll spirit domi-
nate most of the tracks from Mother Love
Borte.
In "This is Shangrila Wood belts out
lyrics, begging "Get me to the stageIt
brings me home again He is backed up
bythebeatingdrumsofGregGilmoreand
the searing guitars oi Bruce Fairweather
and StoneGossard,along with Jeff Ament's
rhythmic bass.
With driving guitars and pounding
drums propelling the music, and Wood's
throat) screaming vocals, Mother Love
Bone can not miss.
Described in a press release as the
"forerunners of the Seattle rock scene the
band resembles a mix of Pearl Jam,
Soundgarden and Nirvana.
The resemblance is no coincidaice. In
fact, after the death of singer Wood, band
members Gossard and Ament formed the
group Pearl Jam.
The East Carolinian:
The toughest job you'll
never love.
Come by today and apply at our recruiting office, 2nd
floor publications building.
Photo courtesy Mercury Entertainment
Mother Love Bone combines haunting and erotic with powerful
rock 'n' roll to produce a sound not to be missed.
Art director wins photo award
ECU faculty member Charles
Lovell has been awarded "Best of
Show" in the "History of the lower
Colorado River" photography com-
petition.
Lovell, who is trie director of
the Wellington B. Gray Art Gallery
at the ECU School of Art, won the
award during the 1992 Cultural
Council of Yuma, Az. This regional
exhibition, held July 11-31 at the
Century House Museum in Yuma,
was judged by Rex Gulbranson of
the Arizona Arts Commission.
"It's really great to be recog-
nized for something that I love to
do Lovell said. "I feel extremely
proud to have been chosen by Rex
Gulbranson and the Arizona Arts
Commission in the area of black and
white photography
Lovell is an active photogra-
pher and presently the coordinator
of the Community Arts Manage-
ment program at ECU. He has
curated numerous ej JMtionssuch
as the 1992 Jacob Lawrence travel-
ing exhibit. Lovell has been with the
ECU School of Art for two years.
Sound
Protection!
What's the perfect thing to give yourself and to
everyone you love?
A new PAAL.�
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sense danger from. Wear it on your belt or purse- pull the
pin if you must.
Ideal for students, joggers, travellers, shoppers,
public transit riders, late shift workers, seniors,
women and the person
who wants to keep
everything.
Personal
Security
Products
Scott C. Cox
(919) 830-9348
S32.37 (includes tax) and SI.00 will be given to the Real Crisis Center
in the name of Personal Security Products and Beta Theta Pi.
Charles Lovell displays the talent that won him a photo award with this untitled piece, shot in Yuma, Az.
PHIKAmUUI
MAIL ORDER FORM Check enclosed ?
Mail to: Personal Security Products
210 N. Library Street
Greenville, NC 27858 or Call: 830-9348
Deliver to:
L,
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"J
FREE SNEAK PREVIEW
Small Ad Promoting Big Fun:
SPECIAL EVENT
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FOR A
RIDE
7 5 7 -1319tt44fn
8 PM Tuesday
September 15th
OKT House
Look For Banners At
ECU vs. Tech Game
FREE MOVIE POSTERS
Tuesday, Sept. 15
8:00 PM
Hendrix Theatre
Passes Available At
Mendenhall Info Desk
Presented By
The Student Union
Films Committee
k





�wmhww.j��
� iniiiiwiiiiii" mil Inn Urn
Tlie East Carolinian
September 10, 1992
Sports

Page 19
Pirates to sail past Hokies
- By Robert S. Todd
JSports Editor
; Last week before deadline,
former Sports Editor Brian Kernscon-
vihced me ECU would pull it off. He
appealed to my sense of pride and I
certainly did not want to be the one
not to believe. I let my heart do my
thinking. I actually convinced myself
ECU would indeed win.
Not this week. I am certain they
can win (and that is different than
saving they will win).
Just the facts ma'am: Virginia
Tech is not as good as Syracuse. If the
Pirates can throw for over 500 yards
againsttheOrangemen they are good
enoughtodoaboutthesameorbetter
versus a bunch of Hokies. Michael
Anderson must throw for a higher
percentage than last week and his
receivers and tight ends must do a
better job of holding on to the ball.
Unfortunately, the Orangemen's
ground attack tore our defense apart
and the Hokies rushed for over 400
yards against James Madison. JMU's
defense is not as good as ours, even
with the possibleabsenceof linebacker
Jerry Dillon. Don'texpect the Hokiesto
do quite that well on the ground.
ECU'sdefensewillhavetostepup
and contain the running game Vir-
ginia Tech put 49 points on the board
last week. The Hokies cannot score
more than 31 this week or the Pirates
will be hard pressed for toe victory.
A Buc loss would be more an
indication of lack of preparation and
coaching than lack of talent ECU is
the better team and should they loose
do not point your fingers at the play-
ers.
This is a game ECU should win.
Va. Tech no match for ECU
' "ft
flB �1 �? x.
1 � m1 IlPx !� � J 1 'ilmk'U i�iilW�' ' � (� P �
Photo by Dail Resd
By Chas Mitchell
Assistant Sports Editor
i
In the football world East Caro-
lina University is known as Eastern
Carolina, Easton Carolina and at
times Easter Carolina. But since the
1?83 and 1W2 teams, people are
beginning to get the name right.
i Words such as scrappy, tena-
cious and relentless are used to de-
scribe ECU football as a whole.
Under the guidance of first-year
Head Coach Steve Logan, the Pirate
football program has taken on a
new meaning and has provided ex-
citement for the sports world to see.
Saturday night's match-up
against Syracuse showed that this
year's team has the talent and capa-
bility of producing another win-
ning season. Although still a young
team, it was easy to see the unity
and respect for each other built dur-
ing the contest.
With the flash and brilliance of
Morris Foreman returning punts
and kick-offs and the exciting acro-
batic catches of Morris Letcher, tine
Pirate's special teams and offense
gave the fans of Ficklen Stadium
just a glimpse of what's to come.
Quarterbacks Sean McConnell
and Michael Anderson managed to
pass fairly well against one of the
nation's better defenses. However;
unless the receiving core as a whole
carries their own weight, we can
expect the unexpected.
McConnell will get thenod and
with the experience and leadership
of senior split-end Clayton Driver,
the aerial passing assault of Logan
will shred the Hokies defenseapart.
Va.Techruns the ball extremely
well, and will challenge the Pirate
run defense. Zaim Cunmulaj and
Christian Infinite will have their
hands full up front, while Tony
Davis and his fellow linebackers
must come through in
boonedogging the Hokies' running
attack.
When it's all said and done, the
Pirates will celebrate their first win
of the season. Derrek (Heisman
posing) Batson, Pete Zophy and
Carlester Crumpler must ha ve their
usual sure hand performance in
order to secure the victory. With the
added confidence from game one,
the Pirates should send Va. Tech
back to Blacksburg with a saber
slash in their hearts.
ECU 28 VA.TECH 21
Morris Letcher and the Pirate offense will be doing the Hokie Pokey Saturday afternoon in Ficklen.
ECU FOOTBALLS TOP 40 YARD DASH TIMES jk
CARLOS BLAKE 4.33
;�5$
CHARLES MILES 4.33 E

MORRIS LETCHER 4.40 1?
A?
EMMANUEL McDANIELDIA HICKS 4.SO
ftv
JUNIOR SMITHFRED WALKER 4.52 T

HANK COOPER 4.54 -
SOURCE: ECU MEDIA GUIDE VXf-BIE ADAM
Inside Pirate Football '92
Virginia Tech
1991 record: 5-6-0
Primary offense: Multiple
Primary defense: Wide-Tackle-Six
Offensive lettermen returning, lost: 18,12
Defensive lettermen returning, lost: 18,9
Special teams lettermen returning, lost 4,1
Head Coach: Frank Beamer (Virginia Tech, '69)
Record at School: 22-32-1 (5 seasons)
Career Record: 64-55-3 (11 seasons)
General Information
Location: Blacksburg, Va.
Enrollment: 23,000
Colors: Chicago Maroon and Burnt Orange
Nickname: Hokies
Conference: Big East
Stadium: Lane StadiumWorsham Field (51,000)
Surface: Natural Grass
1992 Schedule
Sept. 5 JAMES MADISON (49-20)
Sept. 12at East Carolina
Sept. 19 at Temple'
Oct. 3 WEST VIRGINIA
Oct. 10 at Louisville
Oct. 17 N.C. STATE
Oct. 24 MIAMI (FLA.)
Oct. 31 at Rutgers
Nov. 7 at Syracuse
Nov. 14 SOUTHERN MISS
Nov. 21 VIRGINIA
Big East Conference game
Vaughn Hebron
Greg Grandison
ECU
1991 record: 11-1-0
Primary offense: Pro-option
Primary defense: Multiple 50
Offensive lettermen returning: 5
Defensive lettermen returning: 6
General Information
Location: Greenville, N.C.
Enrollment: 16,693
Colors: Purple & Gold
Nickname: Pirates
Conference: Independent
Stadium: Ficklen (35,000)
Surface: Grass
Previous Results
1957
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
Series tied 3-3
Home game
Rutty Rendition
Crystal Balls
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'1, Assistant Sports Editor
Kevin Hall, WZMB Sports Director
Richard Eakin, Chancellor
Courtney Jones, SGA President
Brian Bailey, Sportscaster, Channel 9
Ameer Abdullah, Soph criminal just.
NCAA Div. I computer rankings
avg:
��LJYI
4231
2117
4928
2821
2820
3124
1024
9.79
3024
Tale of the Tape
East CarolinaVirginia Tech
64,281Offensive Line 64,277
6412,226Tight Ends 6-3,238
5-11 12,179Wide Receivers 5-1112,174
5-1112,189Offensive Backs 5-1014,209
6-3, 253Defensive Line 6-312,262
6-112,219Linebackers 6-112,220
5-1012,184Secondary 5-11,183
Wendy Schultz
leads through
friendship
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
Leadership. It's a simple word that carries com-
plex connotations. It brings tremendous responsibili-
ties that only
those in this po-
sition can un-
derstand. It can
make a person
into the loved
hero, and the
next instant can
turn them into
the genuinely
abhorred.
Senior vol-
leyball co-cap-
tain Wendy
Schultz is begin-
ning to under-
stand what that
feeling is like. In
order to bring
the East Caro-
"Hookies are not as good as the Orangemen. If we don't win it's going to be a long season.
"As in last week, turnovers will be the key. The fewer the better"
"The Bucs will redeem themselves
"Very impressed with Pirate offense last week
"Thank goodness it's not Syracuse
"Key is to stop Va. Tech running game. Big play late in the game will decide finish
"There's still a mental shock from the last game
ECU is ranked 82nd while Virginia Tech is 25th
(once again, this is purely for fun. Please no wagering.)
Wendy Schultz
Scott named to list of 12 for Lombardi Award
Sports Information Reports
Tom Scott, a senior offensive tackle
from EastCarolina University, isoneof
12 semi-finalists for the 1992 Rotary
Lombardi Award, given annually to
the college football lineman of the year.
Since 1970, the Rotary Lombardi
Award has been presented to the col-
lege football lineman � offense or de-
fense � who, in addition to outstand-
ing performance and ability, best ex-
emplifies the characteristics and disci-
pline of Vince Lombardi, the legendary
coach of the Green Bay Packers.
The 1992 nominees for the 23rd An-
nual Rotary Lombardi Award are: Mike
Compton (C), West Virginia; Eric Durry
(DE), Alabama; Mike Devlin (C), Iowa;
Marvin Jones (ILB), Florida State; Lin-
coln Kennedy (OT), Washington; Rusty
Medearis (DE), Miami, Ha Coleman
Rudolph (DT), Georgia Tech; Tom Scott
(OT), East Carolina; Will Shields (OG),
Nebraska; Chris Slade (DE), Virginia;
Aaron Taylor (OG), Notre Dame; and
Jeff Zgonina (NG), Purdue.
The 12 players were selected in the
first of a three-tiered balloting process
conducted by the accounting firm of
KPMG Peat Marwick. The 260 member'
selection committee is composed of
former winners, coaches, sports broad-
casters and football writers from across
the country. The list of 12 will be nar-
rowed down to four finalists to be an-
nounced during the first week of No-
vember.
Scott becomes the second Pirate in a
row to make the Lombardi Award's 12
semi-finalists. Last season, ECU line-
backer Robert Jones made the first list
before missing the cut to four.
"Being one of the 12 semi-finalists
for the Lombardi Award is a tremen-
dous honor Scott said. "It says so
many things about you as a football
player and a person. I just hope that I
can live up to that this season and help
our team have another great year
The winner of the 1992 Rotary
Lombardi Award will be announced
Thursday, Dec. 3,1992, at the climax of
See Scott, page 21
Una women's volleyball team from last in the CAA
conference, she and her senior colleagues must exhibit
the qualities of leadership. Some would attempt to do
this through intensity, some through harsh drilling;
Wendy Schultz said she will make her attempt through
friendship.
See Schultz, page 21
ECU Injury Update
Senior Halfback Ronnie Williams suffered a sepa-
rated against Syracuse and will miss the Virginia Tech
game. He will be reevaluated on a week-by-week
basis.
Senior outside linebacker Jerry Dillon broke the
thumb on his left hand against the Orange and is
questionable for the Virginia Tech game.
Senior linebacker Adrian Barnhill has a hairline
fracture in his leg and missed the Syracuse game.
Coaches are hopeful that the backup inside linebacker
can return to the practice field in a week or two.
Sophomore offensive guard Jerry Keller is day-to-
day with a back injury. The back injury has been with
Keller since high school, but was re-aggravated last
season. When healthy, Keller starts at left guard. Nev-
ertheless, he missed the Syracuse game.
Derrick Fields suffered an ankle injury in the
team's first scrimmage on Aug. 22. The senior outside
linebacker did dress out for the Syracuse game but did
not play.
K-rt
i
i
at
v-1
"





20 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 10 , 1992

My name is Pee-Dee
By Chas Mitch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
You can call me Pee, or you can
call me Dee, or you can even call me
Blackbeard; butyou don't have tocall
mePetey.
This year Pee-Dee Pirate is sport-
ing a new look. Not only does Pee-
Dee has a different style of a swash
buckling hat, but he also have had a
few alterations done to his purple
and gold garb of insanity. All and all,
this Pirate of mischief and mayhem is
backtoleadthel992-93athleticteams
to victory. But the question still re-
mains, who the heck is Pee-Dee Pi-
rate?
By day, he's a mild manner col-
lege sophomore who likes baseball,
hot dogs, and mom's apple pie, but
when it's time for the roar of a enthu-
siastic football crowd, or a special
appearanceatanareaevent,thissome-
what casual, God-fearing all -Ameri-
can boy transforms to East Carolina's
own Pee-Dee Pirate.
Rod Gray, who is in his second
year as Pee-Dee, has many stories to
be told. He's been trampled, stam-
peded, mugged, tossed around,body
slammed and mauled by many of his
tiny friends just to name a few.
"We as adults know that inside
thecostumeisa real person,butwhen
little kids walk up to me and start
talking and hugging me, then I know
what I do is worth my while Gray
said. "If s pretty much a show for the
young one'sas well as supporting the
school during weekly events
The life of a team mascot has its
glory moments as well as moments
not so glorified. One which comes to
mind is when during the exhilarat-
ing celebration of a Pirate win over
Pi ttsburghlastyear, three intoxicated
ind ividuals (who will remain name-
less) ran onto the field along with
4,000 other screaming Pirate fans,
ran over Pee-Dee and took his head
and hat and commenced running
around the field. After several min-
utes of a headless Pee-Dee, some
loyal Pirate supporter finally ran
down the culprits and returned the
missing head wear to Pee-Dee.
"It was wild, just unbeliev-
able Gray said. "The following
week I received phone calls, cards
and letters asking was I O.K. and
will Pee-Dee be at the game. So to
add to the mindset of the students
and fans, I wore a huge bandage
and walk round with a cane, it
was hilarious Gray said with a
smile.
Gray, along with first year Pi-
rate Bill Tarplee, will be handling
the public appearance duties of
Pee-Dee for this year. Hopefully
this ye year will not be as rough
for Gray and Tarplee as previous
years for our beloved Pee-Dee.
J
New Life
Christian
Fellowship
Come join us each week for fun,
fellowship, and Bible study.
7:00 pm Thursdays
2024 General Classroom Building
Eddie Hilliard � 830-6814
Campus Minister
WELCOME BACK ECU
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MEET LADIES OF DELTA ZETA
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18
BID NIGHT WITH TRI SIGS
"OLDEST AND MOST ESTABLISHED AT ECU"





SEPTEMBER 10, 1992
The East Carolinian 21
Schultz
Continued from page 19
Schultz enters her interview in
a casual disguise, her long blonde
hair tucked tightly into a darkbase-
ball cap. However, her eyes reflect
an energetic brightness that can
not be hidden. After three minutes
talking with her, it is quite appar-
ent that she has no trouble relating
with anyone.
"I could pretty much get along
with anybody Schultz said. "1
feel good relationships are very
important in a sport like volley-
ball
Schultz said she feels the team
has drawn closer since last year's
disappointing season. "We've got-
ten rid of a lot of bad attitudes she
said. "There are a lot less cliques
than last year
A Greenville immigrant from
the suburb of Gibsonia, Perm
Schultz has adapted to the area
very well. She said she likes the
weather in Greenville better than
her northern homeland and pre-
fers the college environment here
to that of Pitt University, the clos-
est major college to her hometown.
"Pitt's a college stuck in a city
Schultz is short on self praise,
instead referring to her team, espe-
cially to fellow leaders Jenny Par-
sons and Wendy Mizlo. She said
she believes thatthe increased lead-
ership these two players provide
has made mis season's practices
"200 times better Schultz is also
complimentaryofthecropof fresh-
man players on her team. "They
will be a major asset"
Coach Martha McCaskell is far
Scott
the black-tie dinner held in honor
.of the four finalists. The event,
: which benefits the American Can-
cer Society, will beheld at the Hyatt
Regency Hotel in downtown Hous-
ton. Prior to the dinner, finalists
; will visit the Houston Oilers train-
:ing facility, children undergoing
! treatment forcanceratM.D. Ander-
son and Texas Children's Hospi-
tals, and enjoy Houston hospital-
ity.
To qualify for the award, a can-
didate must be a down lineman�
either offense or defense�setting
up no further than 10 yards to the
left or right of the ball, or a line-
backer setting up no further than
five yards from the line of scrim-
mage. Both on and off the field, the
player must display leadership, de-
sire, self-discipline and a respect
for authority.
FREE
PREGNANCY
TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy
Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:30-3:30
more willing to talkaboutSchultz's
achievements, than the senior player
is.
"Wendy led the team in hit-
ting McCaskell said. "She was also
the on and off the court leader. She
is a class act on and off the court.
Wendy hasn't lost control of her
game since her sophomore year.
She is a tremendous Mocker. I think
Wendy, to risk stealing from the
Army theme, is trying to "be all she
can be Wendy needs to work on
her passing and her defense, but
those areas have improved
McCaskell and Schultz will
work to achieve one major goal for
the year: a winning season.
Schultz said that while volley-
ball is demanding, and the travel is
a grind, she likes the regimen it puts
on her. She lifts weights three times
a week at 7 A.M and practices for
two hours a day. And what does
this bundle of energy do on her
spare time? "Sleep she said. "You
don't get much free time, I spend
mine taking naps
Coming from a family with two
older sisters and one older brother,
the youngest of the Schultz clan has
counted on the support of her par-
ents and the fans of the team, to get
her through the trials of compet-
ing in a non-revenue sport. She
feels the participants of such
sports have to love the sport more
than higher publicity. Schultz said
she plays volleyball for that rea-
son. "I play volleyball because I
love it
Logan confident of Pirate victory
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
The Pirate football team, nursing
the bumps and bruises sustained in
Saturday's42-21 defeatbyNo.9Syra-
cuse, is maintaining an attitude of op-
timismforitsSept 12showdownwith
the Virginia Tech Hokies.
The East Carolina coaching staff
must now prepare for the "big-blitz"
defense and grinding running attack
Hokie coach Frank Beamer will as-
sault them with
Pirate coach Steve Logan doesn't
feel disappointment after the Syra-
oisegamewillaffectthePiratesagainst
Beamer's Hokies.
"I don't think there's any sense
that there's anything wrong with our
football team he said. 'There's a tre-
mendous amount of interest by the
players because we played a lot of
people. Our kids will practice hard
because they believe if they do, they
will play
Logan feels the key to a Pin j
victory over the Hokies will be stop-
pingtheonslaughtof tailbacks Vaughn
Hebron and Tony Kennedy. "We've
got to demonstrate the ability to stop
the run In last year's 24-17 victory
over Virginia Tech the Pirates allowed
Hebron and Kennedy to combine for
180 of the Hokies 219 rushing yards.
Linebacker Jerry Dillon feels opti-
misticaboutthePirates'abilirytocorne
badcfromlastweek'sdisappointment
andcontaintheHokies'ground threat
"We lost together and well re-
bound together he said. Dillon said
he expects Tech's offense to come
straight ahead, a contrast to the
"mumbo-jumbo" style displayed by
Syracuse. Dillon said the team is pre-
pared for "a knock-down-drag-out
brawl and expects "a couple of
scuffles
Senior quarterbackSean McCon-
nell is expected to start the game, with
sophomore Michael Anderson seeing
plenty of action. Anderson said the
key tooffensivesuccess would be the
ability of him and McConnell to read
Virginia Tech's defensive schemes.
"We're looking to capitalize on
the Virginia Tech blitz Anderson
said.
Following Vince Lombardi's
untimely death of cancer, the Ro-
tary Club of Houston initiated the
event that has raised over $15 mil-
lion for cancer research. The tro-
phy is a 40-pound block of granite
atop a silver pedestal. The sym-
bolic design was created by Hous-
ton Rotarian and professional art-
ist, Mark Storm.
TONIGHT
The Surf Report
Surf Shop
BIKINI
CLASSIC
in association with Venus Swimwear
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LADIES FREE
To enter call
Bogie's 752-4668 or Surf Report 355-6680
NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
Would like to
WELCOME THE PARENTS
and
Invite Them To Join Us
At The Center
For Sunday Mass
Saturday Evening Mass
September 12 only at 5:30 pm
Sunday 11:30 am and 8:30 pm
All Masses are at the Newman Center
which is located
next to the East end of campus at 953 E. 10th Street
Stop by the Newman Catholic Center anytime
and see the recent improvements.
Fr. Paul Vaeth and the Newman Catholic
Center Community (757-1991)
1 7 "Areyou being served?"
Episcopal Student Fellowship
Invites You to Join Us Each Wednesday
Beginning September 2nd, 5:30 pm Celebration of Holy Eucharist
followed by supper and conversation
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
401 East 5th Street
(cross 5th Street in front of Garret Hall, walk down Holly Street to 4th Street)
You Are There!
Schedule of Services
Sunday, September 20: FallWinter Schedule begins
Holy Eucharist - 7:30, 9:00, 11:00
Campus iMinistcr: Marry Gartman � 752-3482
ALPHA STGMA PHI
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Wed Sept. 16 PIZZA & POOL TOURNEY
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ALL FRESHMEN WELCOME
SORORITIES REPRESENTED EACH NIGHT
For More Information. Call 757-3516
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 10, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 10, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.891
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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