The East Carolinian, September 8, 1992






tM�m inmw �
Lifestyle
Sunday at the Creek
The Allman Brothers Band jammed to
an enthusiastic crowd Sunday. Look for
the write-up in Thursday's paper.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 4
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, September 8,1992
10 Pages
ECU receives grant
to study oil drilling
By Tracy Ford
Staff Writer
ECU received a $795,000 grant to study the
socio-economic effects of exploratory drilling
off the coast of North Carolina.
The study, funded by the U.S. Department
of the Interior, will investigate the effects of
drilling on the economy and people of the coast.
The Virginia Institute of Marine Biology is also
conducting a complementary biological study
to complete the report.
Once the Department of Interior receives
the information from both studies, it will con-
sider Mobil Oil Corporation's request to drill on
its lease 45 miles off the coast on an area of the
outercontinental shelf.
According to Bill Queen, director of Inter-
coastal Marine Resources, two problems may
result from off-shore drilling.
"One is the leakage of oil that may do harm
to the natural environment he said. "A second
concern, if oil is found and you go from an
exploratory level of effort to a production level
of effort, large numbers of people would move
into the area. With a lot of outsiders moving in,
you would totally change the nature of these
communities
East Carolina's research will address the
second concern of rapid growth in the coastal
communities between Norfolk, Va to just south
of the Atlantic Beach area.
"It's going to be one of the most compre-
hensive investigations of the area that's ever
been done said John Maiolo, a researcher with
the ECU Institute for Coastal Marine Recourses.
"I live in the coastal zone and every piece of
information that comes out has a bearing on me
"With 40 or so years of national and inter-
national experience in drilling in off-shore wa-
ters, a lot of information has been collected about
the way off shore communities develop Queen
said. "And then how at the end of production the
communities decline
According to Queen, the federal govern-
ment, with the right information, could prevent
or minimize thedisruptions off shoredrillingcan
cause on both ends.
"One of the purposes of the study is to
identify concerns and then to develop methods
to keep that concern from becominga reali ty or to
See Oil, page 2
Pump it up
Photo by Biff Ranson � 77� East Carolinian
Petey helps raise Pirate spirit Friday night at the pep rally at the bottom of College Hill. More than 200
students joined ECU'S cheerleaders, marching band and Pure Gold dancers in the festivities.
Students charged
with computer theft
By Jeff Becker
New Editor
ECU Public Safety offic-
ers arrested three students
Thursday and charged them
with running a computer theft
ring that netted $41,000 in
equipmentduringthelastyear.
The three students �
Athena Iris Wuensch, 21, of 822
College View Apartments;
Douglas Earl Hale, 23, of 920
College View Apartments; and
George Lewis Eberle Jr 26, of
902 College View Apartments,
were charged with the theft of
computers from labs on cam-
pus and a Greenville business.
"We have experienced a
large number of thefts over a
one-year period or longer said
James DePuy, ECU's director
of Public Safety.
"They are an organized
theft ring that we are bringing
to a conclusion here
Public Safety Lt. Keith
Knox said $10,964 worth of
equipment was recovered, in-
cluding an assortment of IBM
and Macintosh computer parts
and a Hewlett-Packard printer.
Knox said that from Oct.
14,1991, to Aug. 24,1992, seven
thefts were reported from ECU
labs. He said a total of $41,000
in equipment was stolen, and
all the thefts had similar cir-
cumstances.
"The students were ex-
employees in the labs, and one
had just been hired back for the
fall Knox said.
Weunsch is charged with
one count of breaking, entering
and larceny and three counts of
possession of stolen goods.
Hales faces three charges of
breaking, entering and larceny,
and Eberle faces two counts of
breaking, entering and larceny.
All were released on a $15,000
bond.
Officials say smokers will follow ban
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Although ECU's new Clean
Air Policy started Sep. 1, enforce
ment of the smoking ban in uni-
versity buildings remains a politi-
cal hot potato in the administra-
tion.
During thesummer, the ECU
Board of Trustees approved a reso-
lution banning all smoking within
all campus buildings that are ei-
ther poorly ventilated or not ven-
tilated at all, with the exception of
the residence halls.
At the time of the policy's
enactment, SGA President
Courtney Jones dissented, along
with Trustee William Furr, citing
the overbreadth of the resolution.
"They want to put a smok-
ing area where it can go but
there are no regulations Jones
said. "There's not even a penalty
for those who ignore the policy
Administrators at ECU are
in concurrence with the belief that
most individuals will follow the
new policy.
Richard Brown, vice-chan-
cellorofbusinessaffairs,said most
people respect the rights of non-
smokers.
"We hope that all individu-
als will courteously and responsi-
bly adhere to this policy Brown
said. "For the most part, people
have been sensitive to non-smok-
ers' rights. I really don't think it
will become a problem
Although officials may be-
lieve that most people will not fla-
grantlydisobev the policy, theques-
tionstillremainsas to possible sanc-
tions ag.iinst those vv ho do.
Enforcement of the new
policy is handled under the gen-
eral rule stated in the code of con-
duct in the 1992 Student Handbook,
� which states, "A student shall re-
frain from any violation of a uni-
versity policy, city ordinances and
state or federal laws
Smoking in a designated
non-smoking area is then covered
only in "university policy be-
cause of the lack of any city ordi-
nances covering that offense.
Greenville Chief of Police
Charles Hinman stated that the
police have no policy or proce-
dure to handle this offense.
"We've had no complaints
or action against anyone for smok-
ing in a non-smoking area
Hinman said.
Along with the city police,
neither theCounty Health Depart-
ment nor the Fire Deparrmenthave
any restrictions on their books re-
garding smoking bans.
"Enforcement of smoking in
a non-smoking area is up to the
management of that area said
Fire Chief Raymond Carney.
Sanctions against students
who refuse to put out a cigarette in
a designated non-smoking area
also fall under the general rule of
disciplinary offenses. The Student
Handbook, states "These rules . . .
prescribe certain behavior which
is harmful to the orderly opera-
tion of the institution and the pur-
suit of its legitimate goals
Sanctionscan include a writ-
ten reprimand, a fine of no less
than $10 or more than $250, the
takingofthestudent'sactivitycard
for a specified period of time and
possible suspension or expulsion.
Sanctions against state em-
ployees that disobey the new
policy run in a moreorderly direc-
tion.
According to Brown, state
employeeoffenders will follow the
hierarchy of their individual de-
partment.
"They would go through the
chain-of-command in theirdepart-
ment and, if necessary, on up
through the administration
Brown said.
EnforcementoftheCleanAir
policy falls into a large grey area
in the university regulations, and
seems to be left up to the indi-
vidual smoker to respect non-
smokers' rights.
Tailgating
Former student sentenced
to 15 years for sex crimes
Molester also faces charges
inTarboro and Statesville
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
Photo by Biff Ranson � Tha East Carolinian
Students tailgate before the ECU-Syracuse game Saturday night. A record setting 36,500 fans filled Ficklen
Stadium to watch the Pirates battle the Orangemen.
A former ECU student and church or-
ganist pleaded guilty Thursday in Pitt
County Superior Court to sexual offenses
involving three children.
Dennis Keith Daniel, 26, pleaded guilty
to three counts of taking indecent liberties
with three teen-age boys during the sum-
mer of 1991.
Judge G.K. Butterfield sentenced
Daniel to fifteen years in prison, 10 years of
which were suspended.
Butterfield also ordered Daniel to seek
sexual offender counseling, along with other
conditions of probation.
Daniel, formerly a music major at ECU,
and an organist at First Baptist Church in
Tarboro, could have received 30 years in
prison.
He originally was charged with 12
felonv sexual offenses.
Edward Turnage, a former roommate
of Daniel, said he was initially shocked upon
hearing of Daniel's arrest.
"Dennis is definitely not a monster
Turnage said. "He's the type of person who
would give you his last dollar, if you needed
it
Turnage said he knew Daniel was in-
voked with pornographic material but had
no knowledge of "the other items" relating
to Daniel's conviction.
Two of the adolescents victimized by
Daniel were employed by him as
groundskeepers at Carriage House Apart-
ments.
According to Turnage, the boys would
come into the apartment during breaks to
view pornagraphic films.
Daniel faces other charges in Tarboro
and Statesville, said Detective Larry Parker
ot the Pitt County Sheriff's Department,
One of these charges involves alleged
molestation of a 14-year-old girl.
mtw





2 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 8, 1992
Continued from page 1
Student beaten to death
Eight men have been arrested on second-degree murder
charges in the beating death of a 19-year-old University of Miami
pre-med student. Luven Phan Nguyen went into a coma and died
after receiving repeated blows to his head. Nguyen was chased,
kicked and beaten by as many as 15 young men after he objected
to slurs about his nationality at a party. Prosecutors also will
consider pursuing hate crime charges against all of the men
arrested.
College offers paid internship
Carthage College is offering a new, paid internship to all
students who complete four semesters of Japanese language
study. The paid internship in Japan is the only one offered in the
United States. Irene Kraemer, dean of modern languages at the
college said the goal of the Japanese program is to immerse
students in the culture. Kraemer said the program does not
require students to be fluent in the language, just "to be able to
function in Japanese
Hurricane closes schools
Hurricane Andrew forced the cancellation of classes at many
Florida universities, including Florida International University.
Uprooted trees were seen across the entire Florida International
University campus, and the windows of many buildings were
knocked out by the force of the hurricane. An official at F1U in
south Miami said the school was without power and he did not
know when it would be restored. However, the Florida Power and
Light Company said some areas of the state could be without
electricity for weeks.
Professors create election video
Two video-toting professors from Ball State University are
patrolling the political conventions in search of footage soon to be
seen in thousands of college classrooms. Ralph Baker and Joe
Losco are producing two videos that will accompany two best-
selling political science textbooks. Oneof the two videos will focus
on the 1992 campaign, and the other will focus on the role of party
politics in the race for the White House. Losco said the tapes will
be effective because today's college students are part of a "visual
generation
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel. Taken from CPS and other
campus newspapers.
News Writer positions available:
Apply at The East Carolinian office, 2nd floor,
publications building.
develop public educational mate-
rials to show the concerns are not
legitimate Queen said.
The study will also examine
how exploratory drilling on the
outer continental shelf effects in-
dustries along the coast, such as
tourism and fishing. According to
Queen, the residents are con-
cerned about the changes this
could bring to the coast.
"Thev are afraid if a lot of
development occurs it will dimin-
ish the attractiveness of coastal
North Carolina as an area of tour-
ism Queen said.
Tim Sullivan, regional su-
pervisor for the Department of the
interior's Minerals Management
Service, told The Daily Reflector
that the study, which started with
the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 and
the Outer Banks Protection Act,
asked the Secretary of the Interior
to form an environmental sciences
review panel.
Friends of Sheppcad Memorial Library
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The panel recommended
that two different studies, a socio-
economic and a biological, be com-
pleted before dri I ling off the Outer
Banks is considered.
The stud v has targeted many
coastal communities: Manteo,
Wanchese, Kill Devils Hills,
Hatteras, Buxton, Frisco,
Okracoke, Morehead City, Beau-
fort, Atlanlic Beach and Atlantic,
a small fishing village just south
of Morehead Citv.
"What this gives us is a set
of communities directly impacted
by any outercontinental shelf ac-
tivitv, plus a community that
could be impacted just by the fact
that thev dispatch boats Maiolo
said.
Thegrantisthe largest ECU
has ever received.
"It's certainly not the only
one, and we hope to attract some
additional support in the future
Queen said.
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fc at;
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SEPTEMBER 8, 1992
Walter Jones' condition worsens
NORFOLK, Va. (AP) � The
dean of North Carolina's congres-
sional delegation, Walter B. Jones,
was fighting for his life after sev-
eral vital organs began failing, an
aide says.
"The congressman's condi-
tion has worsened and is now con-
sidered grave said Nancy Fish,
Jones' Washington press aide.
"Several of his vital organs are
now failing
Jones, 79, who has repre-
sented North Carolina's 1st Dis-
trict for 12 terms, has been at
Sentara Norfolk General Hospital
since Aug. 25.
Earlier that day, Jones com-
plained of difficulty breathing at
his Nags Head, N.C summer
home.
A doctor at the Outer Banks
Medical Center said Jones ap-
peared to have pneumonia, and a
Coast Guard helicopter was called
to take Jones to Sentara Norfolk
General.
Jones seemed to be improv-
ing last week. His wife, Elizabeth
Fischer Jones, and his son, state
Rep. Walter B. Jones Jr both had
said the congressman would be
transferred to Walter Reed Army
Medical Center in Washington to
recuperate.
But fluids continued to accu-
mulate in his lungs, said Dr. Julie
Leafe Damman.
Jones' formal residence and
political base is in Farmville in Pitt
County. For more than 25 years,
he represented the old 1st Con-
gressional District, which covered
most of northeastern North Caro-
lina.
After winning an interim
election in 1966, Jones won 12 U.S.
House terms�often winning with
60 percent ralities.
But this year, the 1st District
was re-drawn to create an area
where the majority of voters are
black. Part of the former 1st Dis-
trict, including most of the Outer
Banks and Currituck and Camden
counties, became part of the 3rd
Congressional District.
Jones said, "Many of my old
friend will no longer be able to
vote for me ' and decided not to
seek re-election.
He backed his son to win the
new 1st District Democratic pri-
mary in May. But the younger
Jones was defeated in a second
primary by Eva Clayton, a Warren
County commissioner.
NATIONAL
Man shoots neighbor for trespassing
NEW ORLEANS (AP) � A man shot and killed his neighbor
when the neighbor cut beyond his property line with a lawn
edger, police said.
Alfred Abadie, 37, was booked for murder Friday in the
slaying of Curt King, 42.
Investigators said Abadie took refuge in his house before
surrendering to a SWAT team.
Police said Abadie started a fight when King cut about three
inches onto Abadie's property with the lawn edger, then shot
King three times. It wasn't immediately known whether the men
had feuded before.
Crowd gathers, hopes to see Virgin Mary
MARLBORO TOWNSHIP, N.J. (AP) - More than 7,000 worship-
pers wereexpected tocrowd into the backyard of a man who says the Virgin
Mary appears to him on the first Sunday of the month.
But town officia Is urged people not tocome to Joseph Januszkiewicz's
home because of limital parking and rest facilities in this rural community.
"This is basically just 10,000 people who stop over Joe's house to
worship Marlboro Police Capt. Robert Stover said. "It's a tremendous
strain on the community
Januszkiewkz,a54-year-olddraferran,saidt
tDhimdaily,bathedinagoldenlighUnhisrjaclcyardforl8monthsbefo
him she would appear only on the first Sunday of each month.
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The East Carolinian is looking
for a few good people.
Positions to be filled include:
Lifestyle Editor &
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Please apply at our office in fcfc
Student Publications Building.
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4 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 8, 1992
campaigns
Day weekend
HENDERSONVILLE, N.C
(AP) � President Bush had lunch
with a Democrat in Asheville and
got drenched during a speech in
Hendersonville on Saturday dur-
ing his Labor Day weekend cam-
paignswing through western North
Carolina.
"The major issue in this cam-
paign is that the government is too
big. It spends too much and taxes
too much, and the other side wants
to spend and tax more Bush said at
the North Carolina Apple Festival
in a speech cut short by the rain.
Bush praised thestateforhelp-
ing out victims of Hurricane An-
drew and for its patriotism during
the Persian Gulf War.
He also put in a word for the
state's Republican congressmen,
saying more like them would solve
the problem of a "grid-locked Con-
gress
EarlierSaturday,thepresident
and his wife, Barbara, dropped in
for lunch at the home of Roy and
Diantha Harris in Asheville.
"You never thought we'd
show up, did you?" Bush told Har-
ris, who had invited Bush to his
home during a live CBS interview
with Bush in the Rose Garden last
July 1. Harris was among a number
of White House visitors invited to
be in the audience.
Harris, an industrial eng-neer,
told reporters he was a registered
Democrat and sidestepped a ques-
tion on whether he would vote for
Bush. "Everybody's pleased by
the first family's visit, Harris said.
Acrowdofthousandsjammed
the streets in Hendersonville by
noon Saturday, awaiting Bush's ar-
rival. Among the many signs toted
by supporters of the Republican
ticket was one with the message:
"Bush: Love You to the Core
Across the street from the
courthouse where Bush was sched-
uled to speak, supporters of Demo-
crat Bill Clinton had suspended a
large Clinton-Gore banner across
the front of a two-story building.
The crowd cheered when a man
climbed to the top of the building
and cut the banner down.
The gathering became a sea of
multi-colored umbrellas around 2
p.m. when what had been a mist
most of the day turned into heavy
rain. Some without umbrellas dis-
covered thatthecampaignsignsthey
had been waving worked about as
well.
The rain continued through
Bush's 10-minutespeech.The presi-
dent turned down an offer of an
umbrella.
Bush had breakfast in
Painesville, Ohio, early Saturday
duringthe annual Oktoberfestfes ri-
val and made a stop in Greenville,
S.C before traveling to North
Carolina.
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ResidentAdviser
Join us and be a part of the team
Resident advisor applications are available
at the Office of Resident Education,
Fletcher Residence Hall.
Application deadlines
fall 1992-�Oet. 14,1992 � spring 1993- Feb. 10. 1993
fall 1993-X)ct. 13,1993 � spring 1994 - Feb. 12,1994
An equal opportunityaffirmative action university.
If interested in becoming a Resident Adviser please attend
one of the following interest sessions.
Sept21 Monday White lobby 4;30pra
22 Tuesday Fleming lobby 5:00 piu
25 Wednesday Jones lobby 6:00 pm
28 Monday Tyler lobby 7;00pm
29 Tuesday Cotten lobby 5:00 pin
"0Wednesday Green lobby 4:00 pm
it interest
on
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INTERN ATIONALBEAUTY DESIGN EASTERN N.C. REPRESENTATIVE





4 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 8, 1992
Bush campaigns in N.C over Labor Day weekend
HENDERSONVILLE, N.C
(AT) � President Bush had lunch
with a Democrat in Asheville and
got drenched during a speech in
Hendersonville on Saturday dur-
ing his Labor Day weekend cam-
paignswing through western North
Carolina.
"The major issue in this cam-
paign is that the government is too
big. It spends ttxi much and taxes
too much, and the other side wants
to spend and tax more Bush said a t
the North Carolina Apple Festival,
in a speech cut short by the rain.
Bush praised thestateforhelp-
ing out victims of Hurricane An-
drew and for its patriotism during
the Tersian Gulf War.
He also put in a word for the
state's Republican congressmen,
saying more like them would solve
the problem of a "grid-locked Con-
gress
EarlierSaturday, thepresident
and his wife, Barbara, dropped in
for lunch at the home of Roy and
Diantha Harris in Asheville.
"You never thought we'd
show up, did you?" Bush told Har-
ris, who had invited Bush to his
home during a live CBS interview
with Bush in the Rose Garden last
July 1. Harris was among a number
of White House visitors invited to
be in the audience.
Harris, an ind ustrial engineer,
told reporters he was a registered
Democrat and sidestepped a ques-
tion on whether he would vote for
Bush. "Everybody's pleased by
the first family's visit, Harris said.
A crowd of thou ands jammed
the streets in Hendersonville by
noon Saturday, awaiting Bush's ar-
rival. Among the many signs toted
by supporters of the Republican
ticket was one with the message:
"Bush: Love You to the Core
Across the street from the
courthouse where Bush was sched-
uled to speak, supporters of Demo-
crat Bill Clinton had suspended a
large Clinton-Gore banner across
the front of a two-story building.
The crowd cheered when a man
climbed to the top of the building
and cut the banner down.
The ga theri ng beca me a sea of
multi-colored umbrellas around 2
p.m. when what had been a mist
most of the day turned into heavy
rain. Some without umbrellas dis-
covered thatthecampaignsignsthey
had been waving worked about as
well.
The rain continued through
Bush's lO-minute speech. The presi-
dent turned down an offer of an
umbrella.
Bush had breakfast in
Painesville, Ohio, early Saturday
during theannualOktoberfest festi-
val and made a stop in Greenville,
S.C before traveling to North
Carolina.
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HIBALLS & DOMESTICS
Best Mix of Top 40, Dance & Rock'N'Roll
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ResidentAdviser
Join us and be a part of the team
Resident advisor applications arc available
at the Office of Resident Education,
Fletcher Residence Hall.
Application deadlines
fall 1992-�Oct. 14, 1992'spring 1993-� Feb. 10. 1993
fall 1993-K)et. 13, 1993 � spring 1994 -� Feb. 12, 1994
An equal opportunityaffirmative action university.
If interested in becoming a ResidentAdviser please attend
one of the following interest sessions.
Sept 21 Monday White lobby 4:30 pm
22 Tuesday 1 Settling lobby 5:00pra
, 23 Wednesday Jones lobby 6:00 pm
28 Monday Tylei lobby 7:00 pm
29 Tuesday Cottcn lobby 5:00 pm
30 Wednesday Green lobby 4:00 pm
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Sunday 1:30 pm until 5:30 pm
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call for an appointment
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�:
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at
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-���-� ��
h
The East Carolinian
September 8, 1992
Opinion
Page 5
Miscommunication in communication




Catherine Wickern, a professor in
the department of communication,
had some major communication prob-
lems with the chair of the department
of communication, Dr. Harrell Alien.
The ironic element in Wickern's
story is that in January she filed a
formal inquiry with the university
concerning sexual discrimination with
regards to her salary.
Allen allegedly told Wickem that
she could wait to sign her contracts
until after July 31 when the N.C. gen-
eral assembly voted on pay raises for
state employees. So while Wickern
waited for the legislature to pass, her
job went out the window. Dr. Allen
GEORGE'S IVORY TOWER
denies ever saying that Wickern could
wait.
Once again the campus is plagued
with unanswered questions that may
remain covered. This question now
falls in the laps of Allen and Wickern.
Who is lying?
Fortunately or unfortunately, we
will never know because the great big
wheels of the machinery that is ECU
will clog, twist and hide any and all
relevant information. Wickern is now
teaching at Georgia Southern, so the
debate will rest.
However, women on average earn
$6,787 less than men at ECU. Any
women feel comfortable with that?
By George Sartiano
Overpopulation felt on ECU campus
Last year when I trans-
ferred to ECU, I found the cam-
pus to be a very nice, beautiful
and relaxing place to be. The
grounds were always clean and
well kept, and although there
were 15 or so thousand stu-
dents on campus, it never
seemed to be crowded.
My experience so far has
been different. As many of us
know, there has been a serious
lack of space off campus, as well
as a shortage of on-campus
housing. The result is that many
people have been forced to com-
mute to campus. The increased
number of people having to
drive to campus has only am-
plified the parking problem
which has been plaguing ECU
for the last few years.
Even with freshmen having
to park out by Minges in the
freshman lot, there are still too
few spaces to accommodate all
of the commuting students.
You know that there is a park-
ing problem when professors
are showing up late to class
because they cannot find a place
to park. In any case, that's not
my gripe, for I have found a
place to park off-campus, even
though I have to walk for a few
extra minutes to get to class.
In any case, attrition will
begin to set in a few weeks, and
people will begin dropping out
of class. For those of us who
choose to stay in school for the
duration (oh yes, we the lucky
few), we will be able to park
closer and closer to campus
each week. To use an example,
last semester I began by park-
ing out across from the old Rose
High School building. About
halfway through the semester I
was able to park along the road
which runs down from The Hill,
and by the end of the semester
I was able to park in any loca-
tion on campus which was not
off limits to a commuter-
stickered car.
This year seems a little dif-
ferent from last in that every-
thing seems much more
crowded. It seems to be a lot
like New York City; if you want
to do something you have to
hustle to get there or you won't
make it. The movies are all full;
the line for Basic Instinct
reached all the way outside of
Mendenhall. There seems to
have been a change in the gen-
eral attitude which pervades
our fine campus.
Last year the campus was a
much more relaxed place to
visit. Now it seems to be hur-
ried and pressured. Maybe this
has something to do with the
larger number of people here.
I erhaps ECU has already found
the happy medium for the num-
ber of students it should have
enrolled here, and it has finally
exceeded it. It could be that the
admissions committee just let
too many people in this year,
and ECU's facilities just can't
handle the increased number
of students. It might be the fact
that our football team won the
Peach Bowl last year, and ev-
eryone on campus has picked
up that "I'm better than you"
attitude from it. Maybe it has
something to do with this year's
crop of freshmen, many of them
having applied here after hear-
ing about our football team.
Whatever the reason, many
things about this year are dif-
ferent from last, and in general,
the university seems different.
I'm not really sure that I like
some of the nev feelings float-
ing around the campus, but it
may still be too early in the se-
mester to be able to pass any
real kind of judgment on it yet.
In any case, our school is a
really nice place to be, and we
should afford it the respect
which we give to our football
team. Not that many of us will,
the students here have their
priorities set up aspartyingand
football are first and everything
else comes after.
Now, don't take me wrong,
I am very proud of the football
team, but as I am not on the
team, I don't'take all of the
credit for their accomplish-
ments.
But, as more zr.d more
people turn their collective at-
tention away from schoolwork
and towards football and par-
tying (and as people begin to
cut or drop classes) the number
of people parking on campus
will'grow smaller and smaller,
and I will soon be able to park
closer and closer to campus.
So, all I can say is, Go Pi-
rates!
Wolfbane
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Jennifer A. Wardrep, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shi mmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitchell, Assistant Sports Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Billiard, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Lisa Meiisauskas, Classified Ad Technician
Bill Walker, Opinion Page Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C, 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
THfc SPIN DOCTORS
DistriOuted By Tribune Media Services
JUST LEFT OF CENTER
By Kevin E. Amos
300 watts of power may cause deafness
In the distance rolling thun-
der announces their approach. As
they come closer the thunder trans-
forms itself into a rich BOOM-
BOOM-BOOM, BOOM-BOOM-
BOOM. By the time they reach
you, the air is shaking and the
ground trembles.
You all have seen them. They
perch in parking lots such as the
one behind Sharky's, the Plaza or
Carolina East Mall, especially on
Friday and Saturday nights. They
roar down Fifth and Charles streets
at all hours. You never know when
one will show up next, but you
can count on it being sooner than
later.
They usually are males 18 to
25 years old. They drive mini-
trucks that have been lowered so
much that the trucks, usually
found in the brightest colors pos-
sible with matching camper-shell
barely clear the ground. Also they
have been known to drive 1ROC
Camaros, Firebirds, CRXs, Escort
GTsand comparable vehicles. The
cars usually will be garnished with
liberal amounts of Oakley: Ther-
mal Nuclear Protection,
Bodyglove, Wave Riding Vehicles
and other sundrys decals.
No matter what they drive
they all share a love of loud music.
To satisfy their cravings for
tuneage, they often have spent
thousands of dollars on their car's
stereo. They buy Multi-CD play-
ers, amplifiers that produce hun-
dreds of watts per channel, 15-
inch woofers and bazooka tubes.
All to satisfy their need BASS fix.
It all starts out innocently
enough, they save their money
and buyaCDplayer, but the sales-
people tel 1 them that they can't get
the maximum sound quality un-
less they have at least a hundred
watt amp to drive it. This leads to
the necessity to have speakers that
can handle all that power, and if
you are going to spend that much
money you might as well go all
out and buy the bazooka tubes.
Spending vast amounts of
money on their mobile stereos,
they then must protect that invest-
ment. They do this with equally
expensive alarm systems. These
are impressive in themselves, it
probably helps that the alarms
make noise also. Some alarm sys-
tems cause horns to blow and
lights to flash, but the more com-
plex systems announce warnings
like "Protected by Viper. You are
standing too close to thecar. Stand
back
It'sa vicious self-feeding cycle.
They must continue to spend more
and more to feed the tuneage ad-
diction.
Al 1 of these technological won-
ders can cause hearing loss, and
you can't help but wonder if they
don't cause brain damage as well.
At best you have to question the
mental faculties of people who
spend so much money on transi-
tory experiences.
But the question that plagues
me the most is why must those
"thunder boomers" subject the rest
of us to this auditory assault. There
must be some law of mathemati-
cal ratio that explains the fact that
the more annoying you find their
music, the louder they will play it.
I understand why these young
men worship the gods ot stereo.
Music is wonderful; I love to listen
to it. But why must they play it so
loud? It must be for the attention-
getting factor. They're really
screaming "pay some attention to
me Could these gentlemen feel
inadequate? It makes me long for
the days when men that felt inad-
equate went to the gym and
pumped themselves up, not their
stereos. But then again, we are
living in the age of technology.
Those of us who don't have to
listen to music constantly at con-
cert level sound do, on occasion,
get some amusement from the
"thunder boomers If a "thunder
boomer" happens to be reading
this, remember we're laughing at
you, not with you. The look of
terror in their eyes when a police
officer is writing them a ticket for
excessive noise is a joyous sight
for us thatmustendure their earth-
shaking bass. One of the funniest
things I have ever seen, involving
one of those mini-trucks, was one
mat had been chopped so low that
it got stuck on a speed bump while
trying to cross. Boy, was the "thun-
der boomer" mad, but he
shouldn't have lowered his truck
so much.
As I wipe the blood from my
ears after one of their auditory
assaults, the thing that brings me
the most amount of pleasure is
knowing they will one day be deaf.
If we aren't unlucky enough to be
driven to deafness by the "thun-
der boomers then we will be able
to laugh at those wearing hearing
aids due to their own stupidity.
If we consider the amount of
money these "thunder boomers"
spend on devices that make un-
necessary noise, than the amounts
that they will be willing to spend
on their hearing should be stag-
gering. Maybe they will miss the
good old days, and put alarm sys-
tem on their hearing aids. It's not
like they will be able to hear any-
one sneaking up on them.
These hearing aid companies
should begin researching how to
provide that BOOM-BOOM-
BOOM sound for a new genera-
tion. Maybe the companies will
come out with a new neon colored
line, or maybe some gold chain
accessories for the hearing aids.
Of course, no one wants to
have a nation of deaf people. So
all you "thunder boomers please
turn the music down. If you won't
do it for us innocent bystanders,
men do it for yourself. Remember
the adage "If it's too loud, you're
too old" is a myth, and too loud
can hurt you.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Junior feels Bush is responsible for problems
To the Editor:
George Bush is a scapegoat
for the failings of the Democratic
Congress. After all, he's only the
President. He cannot possibly be
expected to absorb blame for the
sorry economic state we're in. At
least that's what The East
Carolinian's favorite right-wing
propagandist, . William Walker,
would have you believe.
Lately, Mr. Bush has been fa-
vorably comparing himself to
Harry Truman. Truman had a sign
on his desk. It read, "The buck
stops here Mr. Bush has a simi-
lar sign on his desk. It says, "The
buck stops somewhere else, any-
where else, after all what can one
man do?"
If Bush is in fact the great
leader he proclaims to be, why
does he point fingers at everyone
but himself and his own fiscal
policies? He wants us to vote for
him because he's a strong leader.
Strong leaders don't blame Con-
gress. The blame lies at the heart
of the supply-side economic
theory advanced by Reagan
BushQuayle the past 12 years.
Trickle-down economics, not Con-
gress, is "the root of all evil
Bush is now foolishly calling
for a tax cut in the face of a $400
billion deficit. He will say and do
anything to get re-elected. He said
as much himself. Voters, beware!
Don't be taken in by Bush's super-
cilious charges against Congress.
Remember the old saying, "Fool
me once, shame on you. Fool me
twice, shame on me Hopefully
voters won't shame themselves
this November.
David Pettus
junior

mm mwmwi wii�wv





f9
i.im minim I-
" �.

ll�
The East Carolinian
September8, 1992
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS
1 and 2 bedroom apartments. En-
ergy-efficient, several locations in
town. Carpeted, kitchen appli-
ances, some water and sewer paid,
washerdryer hookups. Call 752-
8915.
GRADUATE STUDENT or pro-
fessional to share 2 bedroom
house. Private room and bath.
Washer and dryer, fireplace, loft,
patio and pool. 321-2138 ASAP.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: to share 2 bedroom, 2
bath apt $235 deposit, $235 rent
12 utilities. (Heritage Village 1.5
miles from campus). Call 355-
1735.
NEEDED: 2 blocks from campus,
$160 per month plus of utilities,
phone, and cable. Available now.
Call 752-1596 for more informa-
tion.
F( )R S ALL:
SEIZED CARS, trucks, boats, 4
wheelers, motorcycles, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available your area now.
Call (800) 338-3388 ext. C-5999.
5 FT. BALL PYTHON $100 or
best offer includes cage and heat
rock. Call Darin 931-7308.
FOR SALE Pair of used 180
Rossignol skiis price negotiable.
Call (919) 753929.
IBM COMPATIBLE Computer,
640k RAM, 35 Disk Drive, high
resolution color monitor, 20 meg
hard drive -$625 or B.O. Call 758-
4135.
19" FISHER MOUNTAIN BIKE,
MANY EXTRAS 752-0392.
HELP WANTED
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT-Fisheries. Earn $5,000
month. Free transportation!
Room & Board! Over 8,000open-
ings. No experience necessary.
MALE or FEMALE.
For employment program call
Student Employment Services at
1-206-545-4155 ext. A5362.
HELP WANTED
Classifieds
HEEP WANTED
FALfe SOCCER COACHES - The
Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting for 12 to
16 part-time youth soccer coaches
for the fall youth soccer program.
Applicants must possess some
knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and patience with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-16, in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are
from 3:00 pm until 7:00 pm with
some night and weekend coach-
ing. This program will run from
September to mid-November.
Salary rates start at $4.25 per hour.
For more information, please call
Ben James at 830-4567 or Michael
Daly at 830-4550.
TOPLESS DANCERS WANTED
- Great club, Great money, unbe-
lievable tips. Work Thursday, Fri-
day, Saturday, 9 pm - 2 am. Call
Sid 919-735-7713 or Paul 919-736-
0716. MothersPlayhouse in
Goldsboro.
BRODY'S and Brody's for Men
areacceptingadditional Part-Time
Sales applications for Junior
Sportswear and the Young Men's
Department. Flexible HoursSal-
aryClothing Discounts. Apply
Brody's The Plaza Monday-
Wednesday 1 pm to 4 pm.
SPRING BREAK '93 -Sell Trips,
Earn Cash & Go Free Student
Travel Services is now hiring cam-
pus representatives. Ski packages
alsoavailable. Call 1-800-648-4849.
EMERGENCY! Expanding com-
pany needs hardworking reliable
students to mail our diet brochures
from HomeDorm! Earn up to
$200 FT or $1000 FT! Employees
needed immediately! For job ap-
plication send self-addressed
stamp envelope: Colossal Mar-
keting, Employee Processing, P.O.
Box 291140PortOrange,FL 32129.
WORKING MOTHER SEEK-
ING motivated energetic indi-
vidual to organize activities for 3
children (14,10,7) Saturdays 9:00
am - 6:00. Call Jeff Glenn 355-2350
p.m. $5hr.
CARPET BARGAIN CENTER:
Morning hours only. Apply in
person 1009 Dickinson Ave. 758-
0057.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE!
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call (800) 338-3388 ext. P-3712
"HELP WANTED" EARN $1,500
WEEKLY mailing our circulars
Begin now FREE packet! SEYS,
Dept. 164, Box 4000, Cordova,
38018000.
WANTED : Ambitious People to
sell T-shirts to college students.
Many designs to choose from.
Average $20 hour. No financial
obligations. Call for free informa-
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5pm)
GUA R ANTEED WORK AVAIL-
ABLE. Excellent pay for EASY
homebased work. Full part-time.
Rush self-addressed stamped en-
velope: Publishers (G2) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham,
NC 27705
S360UP WEEKLY. Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull-time. Set own
hours! RUSH self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers
(Gl) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS: To the
new fall pledges of Sigma Sigma
Sigma: Tracy Andersen, Caroline
Brayboy, Susan Brewer, Kristen
Cappola, Charlotte Carmichael,
Nicole Federinko, Georgia Gloyd,
Jennifer Grubbs, Sammy Jackson,
Dana Kelley, Jenn MacNamara,
Kelly Malick, Meredith Magnum,
Lorie Marco, Heide Roland, Kelly
Sapp, Jenna Sellers, Jennifer
Snyder, Kristen Stamps, Leslie
Swaner, Kim Sydes, Ryan Tho-
mas, Kristen Tillery, Mary Toley,
and Laura Underwood. We love
you, The Sisters
CONGRATULATIONS to Zeta
on their Rush, Love Sigma
GOOD LUCK with fraternity
Rush. Love the Sigmas.
CONGRATULATIONS to
Heather Lanier on getting the
Lambda Chi Alpha pin and Amy
Wiz on her KA engagement.
Thanks Chris for the show Sunday
Night. Love, Sigma
CONGRATULATIONS to the
new initiated Sigma Sisters: Mich-
elle Brooks, Camden Farmer, Mich-
elle Kallam, Jennifer Moore,
Carmella Phillips, Jill Scott, Ann
Seldon. We love you, Sigma!
SERVICE OEEERED
TYPINGWORD PROCESSING
Call Cindy after 5:30 or leave mes-
sage. Familiar with all formats 15
years experience. Low rates. Work
guaranteed.
PERSC )NALS
RUSH- SIGMA PHI EPSILON -
505 E. 5TH ST. For Info Call 757-
0487 or 757-0305
DELTA CHI SAYS GO GREEK!
DELTA CHI: Just saying con-
gratulations to the new officers
and committee heads: President,
Jason Alexander: Vice President,
Richie Epps: Homecoming, Bran-
don Conway: By-laws, Eddie
Grey: Philanthropy, Don Ornsby:
Fund-Raising, Dan Robbins: Per-
sonal Relations, Bemie: Historian,
Smitty. By the way, Kimbell says
it's time to get back to the ROOTS.
PERSONALS
ROGER MCVEY Happy 20th
Birthday! I know I can't top last
years present (Happy Anniver-
sary!) but how about dinner? I
love you! Rachel
TO THE BROTHERS OF PHI
KAPPA TAU: We had a great
time at the tailgate and game.
We can't wait to get together
again this semester. Love the Sis-
ters and Pledges of Alpha Xi
Delta.
TO LAMBDA CHI ALPHA: Pref
with Lambda Chi started off in a
limousine. 'Cuz our pledges are
the best and deserve to be seen.
The party and Carl were kickin it
live, keepin the party going until
quarter to five. Thanks for the
party since it has been a while.
But tradition goes to show
Lambda Chi's and AZD's al-
ways party in style.
CONGRATULATIONS To the
new Beta Sigma pledge class of
Alpha Xi Delta: Leslie Alexander,
Georgia Alexis, Nancy Barrett,
Misty Blalock, Sara Boswell,
Michelle Bowen, Krista Britton,
Jennifer Byerly, Holly Casey,
Kristen Cockrell, Katie Craig,
Amy Dodson, Marianne Fink,
PERSONALS
Kelly Fountain,
Kristen Gale, April Harris, Stacie
Heming, Dana King, Sally
Lackey, Stephanie Martin, Dor-
othy Matheson, Jennifer Michno,
Jill Michno, Karen Obermller,
Maria Posey, Crista Rutter,
Kiersten Sadler, Courtney
Shelton, Toni Smith.
ALONE IN NIGHT'S darkness,
save for the gate of dreams, I
long for the ethereal lumines-
cence of DAWN. Call me.
PI KAPPA ALPHA Thanks for a
GREAT time Saturday Night, We
can't wait to get married again!
The Sigma Sisters and Pledges
DELTA ZETA would like to con-
gratulate Zeta of a great rush! You
did a super job!
HEY PHI TAU - we couldn't have
asked forabetterpref night! Thanks
for a terrific time! Delta Zeta
HAPPY BIRTHDAY THOMAS
Hope you have a great day. Love
and best wishes from ECU and
Mom.
HEYSPIVEY, Canyousay"Abbra
Kadabra Cheese Whopper
Kazaam?"
ALPHA OMICRON PI BETA
RHO'S: Keep up the good work!
You guys areawesome! Love, Your
Sisters
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
You also get a FREE
HEADPHONE RADIO
just for calling
1-800-932-0528, Ext. 65
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NHWL USED CD'S
For an opportunity to
share your talents with the
ECU Campus Campaign
call Thomas Blue
at 931-8970,
or come to our meeting
Thurs. Sept. 10, at 5:00
in the 2nd
floor General Classroom
Faculty Lounge
Joseph Ira Coleman
Attorney At Law
110 Avon Lane
Greenville, NC
(919)355-7495
TRAFFIC TICKETS � WILLS � DWIs
Competent Representation For A Reasonable Fee
Announcements
EAST CAROLINA HON-
ORS ORGANIZATION
The first ECHO (East Carolina
Honors Organization) meeting
of the 1992-1993 year will be on
Tuesday, September 8, at 5:00
intheGeneralClassroomBldg
Room 2017. Please come to
find our about our exciting
year. We would love to have
you attend. Refreshments will
be sered.
BISEXUAL-GAY -
LESBIAN SUPPORT
GROUP
Social support and activities.
Meetings are closed. Call 757-
6766 11:00 - 12:15 Tues. and
Thurs. or 1:00 - 2:30 Wed. for
information on meeting time
and place.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt County
Special Olympics will be con-
ducting a Soccer Coaches train-
ing School on Saturday, Sep-
tember 19 from 9 am - 4 pm for
all individuals interested in
volunteering to coach soccer.
We are also looking for volun-
teer coaches in the following
sports: basketball skills, team
basketball, swimming, gym-
nastics, powerlifting,
rollerskating and bowling. No
experience is necessary. For
more information contact Greg
Epperson at 830-4551.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray,
study God's word, be involved
in social and service projects?
Need a refuge from time to
time? Campus Christian Fel-
lowship may be what you are
looking for. Our weekly meet-
ings are at 7pm Wednesdays at
our Campus House located at
200 E. 8th St, directly across
Cotanche St. from Mendenhall
Student Center. Everyone is
welcome. For more informa-
tion, Call Tim Turner, Campus
Minister, at 752-7199
RESUME WRITING
WORKSHOP
The Career Services office an-
nounces its workshops on re-
sume writing to be held on Sept.
10 at 3:00pm in MSC 221 and
Sept. 14 at 5:30pm in Bloxton
House. Participants will learn
about format, content and pro-
duction of a professional re-
sume. Handouts will be avail-
able. This workshop is espe-
cially designed for prospective
graduates, but is open to any-
one.
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA
Epsilon Sigma Alpha will be
having a car wash on Sun. Sept,
13 from 12:00 - 4:00 at the Shell
Station on Greenville Blvd. All
donations will go to Hurricane
Andrew victims in Florida.
ATTENTION: ALL
EDUCATION MAIORS
Wednesday, Sept. 9th at 4:30 in
Speight Room 308, S.N.E.A.
meeting. Membership drive.
Good Liability! Come and Join.
ORIENTATION TO
CAREER SERVICES
The Career Services office in-
vites seniors and graduate stu-
dents who will graduate in
December, 1992 or MaySum-
mer, 1993 who were unable to
attend the first Orientation to
Career Services meeting to par-
ticipate in one of the following
sessions which will be held in
Bloxton House. Students need
attend only one of these ses-
sions. Sept. 8,1:00; Sept. 9.5:30;
Sept.l5,3:00;andSept.24, 2:00.
The staff will give an overview
of career services and distrib-
ute registration forms. They
will discuss procedures for es-
tablishing a credentials file and
participating in employment
interviews on campus.
PHI SIGMA PI NATIONAL
HONOR FRATERNITY
Attention all students: If you
have a 3.3 or higher GPA and
32-96 completed credit hours,
you are invited to attend the
informational meeting
(smoker) of Phi Sigma Pi Na-
tional Honor Fraternity. The
meeting will be held Monday
September 14, at 7:00 in Jenkins
Art Bldg. Room 1220. Refresh-
ments will be provided, so
come and join us.
REACH HORSEBACK
RIDING
ECU RecreationalServiceswill
be sponsoring a beach horse-
back riding trip on Sunday,
Sept. 20th. Spend a thrilling day
on the sandy beaches of Cedar
Island. The cost is $45 students
and $50faculty-staff-guest.
This includes transportation,
horses, guide fee, and dinner.
Register now in 117
Christenbury at the ROC. There
will be a pre-trip meeting on
Sept. 16th at 5pm Brewster D-
101. For further information call
757-6911.
PERFORMING ARTS SERIES
The Kingston Trio will perform
on Friday, September 11, 1992 at
8:00p.m. The Trio (Bob Shane, Nick
Reynolds,andGeorgeGrove) plays
-and singsmusic including such clas-
sics as "Greenback Dollar "The
Reverend Mr. Black, "Early Morn-
ing Rain and 'Where Have All the
Flowers Gone?"
EDUCATION MAIORS
The Department of Speech-Lan-
guage and Auditory Pathology
(SLAP) will be providing the
speech and hearing screening for
all students eligible for admission
to Upper Division of Teacher Edu-
cation on Monday, September 14;
Tuesday, Sept.15; and Wednes-
day, Sept. 16,1992.
The Department will be testing
from 5:00 to 6:00 each day. NO
APPOINTMENT IS NEEDED
(first come basis). The SLAP De-
partment is located in Belk Annex
on Charles St.
PR F-PHYSICAL THERAPY
CLUB
Any P.T. to be interested in play-
ing intramural volleyball with the
Pre-Physical Therapy Club -call
Dawn at 321-G�25 before Septem-
ber 13th.
ECUTTA
If anyone is interested in partici-
pating and playing in a possible
table tennis club. Please contact Al
Hunt at 758-9562 after 6:00pm In-
terest needs to be started before
Sept. 30,1992.
ECU FOIJFSTRIAN CLUB
ECU Equestrian Club will meet
Wednesday Sept. 9th at 430 in
Mendenhall, room 14 (downstairs)
Anyone interested in horses
should be there! Beginners and
Advanced Riders are welcome.
Call Angela931-8453or Holly 931-
8760 with questions.
THE EAST CAROLINA SCI-
ENCE EDUCATION CLUB
The East Carolina Science Educa-
tion Club will have its first meet-
ing of the semester on September
9, 1992 at 4:00pm. The meeting
will be held in Flanagan 303. At
this meeting, we will discuss the
election of officers. Also, arrange-
ments for our fossil collecting field
trip to Texas Gulf on September
26,1992 will be shared. Everyone
is invited to be a part of this club so
we hope to see a lot of you on Sep t.
9th and Sept. 26.
ATTENTION PIRATE FANS
Homecoming 1992 is just around
the corner and should be the best
one ever. For those registered stu-
dent organizations interested in the
float contest, hall decoration con-
test, or competition for homecom-
ingcandidate,afewimportantdates
are approaching. September25-
5:00pm All entry forms due to Room
210 MSC. If your organization has
not received an entry form, pick one
up at Room 210 MSC. Sept 30th-
4:00pm Mandatory meeting with
contact person for each hall or float
entered in contest. Room 244 MSC
Immediately following this meet-
ing, at 4:30. Homecoming candi-
dates will meet Room 244 MSC. If
your organization is a registered
student organization and have not
received entry forms, forms can be
picked up in Room 210 MSC.
LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF
AMERICA
Pitt County would like to remind
everyone that International Literacy
Day is September 8th. Look for the
Literacy Tabloid that will be inserted
in Tuesday's newspaper, Sept. 8th.
There will be a blue ribbon taped to
an insert to be attached to your car
in honor of International Literacy
Day.
Volunteers, along with Mayor
Nancy Jenkins, will be handing out
blue ribbons atThePlaza Mall, Sep-
tember 8th, from 3:00-6:00pm One
in every four adults in Pitt County
are illiterate, so please show your
support for LVA by using these
blue ribbons.
Li teracyVolunteersof America-Pitt
County would like to remind people
that Tutor Training Workshop will
beginSeptember 10th. If you would
like to become a tutor please call
Literacy Volunteers of America-Pitt
County at 752-0439 for more infor-
mation.
ARF YOU A CLIMBER?
ECU Recreational Services will be
offering a Climbing 1 Workshop
Thursday, Sept 10th, 3:00pm at the
Allied Health Climb Tower. Come
out and enjoy the fun! The cost is $8
students and $10 faculty-staff-guest
The cost includes transportation,
dimb instructionand equipment. For
further information call 757-6911.
Ifyou need transportation-meet
in the ROC-117 Christenbury at
2:45pm.
NATIONAL COLLEGE
POETRY CONTEST
Open to all college &university
students desiring to have their
poetry anthologized. Cashprizes
will be awarded the top five po-
ems. Deadline: Oct. 31. For con-
test Rules send stamped enve-
lope to: International Publica-
tions, P.O. Box 44044-L, CA
90044.





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77e �to Carolinian
September8, 1992
Lifestyle
Page 7
Matthews
pleases Fizz
audience
By Rachel Parker
Staff Writer
Jason Matthews, making his musical debut in down-
town Greenville Sept. 3, had The Fizz bursting at its seams.
Matthews is a junior at ECU. Originally from Harolds,
N.C he moved to Kinston shortly after his senioryearof high
school.
Jason performs only his own music, which is entirely
original.
"Jason is real. His music is who he is and his music can
touch a part of everyone's soul Beth Gardner said after she
enjoyed the show.
Someone once said that a musician is great only if he or
she could make the instrument cry. Matthews proved he
possesses this talent with the touching ballad "Fairytale
"Life ain't no fairytale, and I can't be your perfect prince
proclaim the lyrics.
Matthews also stormed the stage with his upbeat song
"Dig the Knife in Deeper At the introduction, Matthews
referred to the song as a revenge song. The lyrics speak for
themselves, such as the line, "like a snake in the grass you
shake your ass and spit your venom
"I think the point I'd like to get to in my music is to give
somebody a piece of wisdom to take with them said
Matthews. "If I can touch somebody through my life, some-
thing that has happened to me or that I knew about, then I
have done my job
Matthews opened his performance with the three words
"This is great Although he was referring to the large
turnout, his words reflected the entire performance. His
smile is as sincere as his songs.
Matthews will be performing again a tThe Fizz Saturday,
Sep. 12.
Photo by Dail Read � Th� East Carolinian
ECU junior Jason Matthews performed his original music to an
enthusiastic crowd at The Fizz Wednesday night. He will return Sept. 12.
Boys II Men rock
with Hammer
By George Sartiano
Staff Writer
Showmanship.
One word is all that is needed to
describe Hammer's concert at Walnut
Creek Sept. 5. He
proved once
again that he's
more than able to
get a crowd's at-
tention and keep
it.
Neither of
his opening acts
lacked in the area
of showman-
ship. Both TLC and Boyz II Men ably
played their roles in an energetic fash-
ion.
Boyz II Men did a particularly
good job with the live renditions of
their songs sounding even better than
the album versions. Their harmonies
were superb, and kept the crowd
cheering.
Hammer's performance was more
show than concert, but nonetheless
extremely enjoyable.
The entire spectacle was too large
to absorb at once; if you watched one
part of the stage for too long, you were
sure to miss something going on else-
where.
Hammer's mixture of dancing,
lights and music was packed with en-
ergy. The crowd, constantly moving
The entire spectacle was too
large to absorb at once; if you
watched one part of the stage
for too long, you were sure
to miss something going on
elsewhere.
and dancing, was caught up in the
energy pouring off the stage.
One highlight of the show came
during the "Pray" sequence, when
Hammer made his way into the nearly
insane crowd.
The con-
cert was not
withoutcome-
dic moments
either. During
"You Can't
Touch This a
man was
taken out of
the audience
and allowed to
dance with Hammer and his dancers.
Although this was probably prear-
ranged, it was extremely amusing.
During the final song, "Too Legil
To Quit a water fight was started
stage. It began with only a few of
Hammer's dancers, but soon Boyz II
Men and TLC joined in. Scon, everyone
on stage was soaked; and dancers
were slipping and sliding. The crowi
as well as the dancers, had a blast wi
this lighthearted playfulness.
Hammer's high-energy show was
loud and exciting. He is an excellent
showman, and able to entertaina crowd
in whatever way he wishes.
Hammer, Boyz II Men and TLC all
joined in the finale and then walked off
stage escorted by cheers and screams.
The crowd seemed thirsty for more.
Water' encompasses
roots of rock with debut
By Stacy Peterson
Staff Writer
"I always wanted to be a teacher, but my
mother told me I should also be a musician so I
would have something to fall back on laughs
Steve Moos, a junior-high school teacher and
leader of the musical group Jump in
the Water.
Jump in the Water has a sound
that is basically a naturalistic folk-
blues-acoustic and sometimes elec-
tric guitar and mandolin sound. The
music reminds one of John Hiatt as if
he was performing with Woody
Guthrie.
and guitar-
istboyhood
friend Kent
Forsyth.
Moos
and Forsyth
started play-
ing together
This fresh
and unique
sound caught
the attention
of MCA
records, and
the band was
signed. Re-
corded in
early to mid
1992, jump in
the Water, the
self-titled de-
but record, is
largely a long-
time collabo-
ration of
members
Steve Moos
Steve Moos
back in "garage days"
when they jammed to-
gether as the Jungle
Band.
"Kent was the first
person I knew who
knew the names of all
the Rolling Stones,
which impressed me
said Moos. "We might have been the first punk
band in Los Angeles. The whole thing was
based on speeding up the Velvet Under-
ground
David Starns
See Water, page 8
ARTIST � PROJECT � LABEL
(Continued from Aug. 24 issue)
Gruntruck � Push � Roadrunner
Hanson Brothers � Gross Misconduct � Alternative Tentacles
Heldon � Interface � Cunieform
Iggy Pop � Live � Virgin
Ignorance � Positively Shocking � Metal Blade
Isolrubin BK � Crash Injury Trauma � Soleilmoon
Lab Report � Lab Report � Invisible
Gary Lucas � Gods and Monsters � Enemy
The Lyres � CD EP � Taang
Marvin � Bone � Restless
Mary Danish � TBA � Morgan Creek
Monks of Doom � TBA � I.R.S.
Nonomen � 7" � Sub Pop
Nation of Ulysses � Plays Pretty for Baby � Dischord
Pigface � Took � Invisible
Richard Pinhas � Iceland � Cunieform
Public Enemy � Greatest Misses � Def Jam
Red House Painters � Down Colorful Hill � 4ADWEA
Rocket from the Crypt � TBA � HeadhuntersCargo
Severin � Acid to Ashes � Dischord
Sugar (wBob Mould) � Copper Blues � Rykodisc
Superchunk � "Mower" � Merge
Swans � Cop � Sky
Swans � Greed � Sky
The Swirlies � CD EP � Taang
Tar � Teetering 7" � Touch and Go
The Muffins � Chronometers � Cunieform
Timbuk 3 � Bets of � Workshed Cargo
Uncle Sam � Will Work for Food � Restless
Undernation � Something on the TV � Brake OutEnemy
Universal Congress of � TBA � Enemy
Zoviet France � Popular Soviet Songs � DOVeSilent
Taken from Alternative Press Magazine
Available through Quicksilver Record and CD Exchange
1 j "Are you being served? "
Episcopal Student Fellowship
Invites You to Join Us Each Wednesday
Beginning September 2nd, 5:30 pm Celebration of Holy Eucharist
followed by supper and conversation
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
401 East 5th Street
(cross 5th Street in front of Garret Hall, walk down Holly Street to 4th Street)
You Are There!
Schedule of Services
Sunday, September 20: FallWinter Schedule begins
Holy Eucharist - 7:30, 9:00, 11:00
Campus Minister: Marty Gartman � 752-3482
mmmt
SEPTEMBER 8-10
Tryouts
MINGES COLISEUM
Lobby 7:00 PM
For Information Call: 757-4672
�M-MMMWMM4M
�'�I���� -MWW � �






n� i
� 111'
�-
V.
8 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 8, 1992
Thieves' sound redefines alternative
Water
By Pam Revels
Staff Writer
"We didn't want to be easily
categorized. I think we all had a
horror of being described as main-
stream lead singer Sinjin of the
group, Pleasure Thieves, explained
in a press release. And mainstream
they are not.
The group's first album, Simple
Escape, illustrates their individual-
ity. The music is a well-balanced
mix of guitar, drums, strings and
horns combined with compelling
and provocative lyrics. The result is
a sound that transcends the ordi-
na ry and sways towa rd the a I tema-
tive.
This is no wonder, considering
the five-man band's influences,
which indudeThe Waterboys, Vel-
vet Underground and The Jam. Add
to this the varied backgrounds of
the group members and the fin-
ished product is a distinctive and
different musical experience.
Itall began when Sinjin moved
from New York to California in
1982. There, he met d ru mmer Andy
GuiterrezandbassistNickFawcett.
They started a band called "Autho-
rized Personnel which was a
short-lived ensemble that split up
in 1986.
But determined not to give up,
theperseverentsingerSinjin placed
an ad in a Los Angeles music maga-
zine in hopes of finding a lead gui-
t a r i s t .
Irishman
Desmond
McClean re-
s po nd ed.
Then they dis-
covered
keyboardist
Matt Everitt.
Guitterez and
Fawcett re-
sumed their
positions, and
Pleasure
Thieves be-
came a musi-
cal reality.
After
landing a con-
tract with Hol-
ly w o o d
Records and
gaining Julian
Raymond and
Steve Madaio
as producers,
Pleasure Thieves released Simple
Escape. The string and horn accom-
paniments that appear regularly
throughout the debut have an un-
usual and imaginativeeffect, attrib-
uting a definitive and melodic aura
to the music.
"You Make Me Feel Right On
one of the 11 tracks on the new
release, is a slow and melancholy
song that could easily be classified
as a ballad. The appearance of the
strings in this song creates an atmo-
Continued from page 7
Photo courtesy Hollywood Records
The Pleasure Thieves provides listeners with a Simple
Escape in the group's debut album.
sphere of tranquility and satisfac-
tion, plus a touch of romance.
A shift from this low gear to a
higher, more energetic one is a fre-
quentoccurrence in songs like "Wild
Miracle This track is a purely up-
beat n x of carefree and uninhib-
ited antics. The powerful guitar licks,
coup led with the rhythmic bass and
drums, producea creation thatover-
flows with unbridled emotion.
The Pleasure Thieves have suc-
ceeded in creating a simple escape.
Also joining Forsy th and Moos
is multi-instrumentalist David
Stams, a professor of English lit-
erature at LSU, and veteran ses-
sion drummer Ian Wallace who
has played with Bob Dylan, among
others.
Jump in the Water was pro-
duced by Jim Cregan, who has co-
written with Rod Stewart and has
worked with everyone from soul-
singer Linda Lewis to British rock-
ers London Quireboys.
Although much different from
Moos' and Forsyths' punk rock
beginnings, Jump in the Water,
with the help of Cregan, does share
that idiom's do-it-yourself, back
to the basics, post-modem phi-
losophy.
The music of Jump in the Wa-
ter isanamalgamof Van Morrison
and Cole Porter, Lennon
McCartney and LieberStoller,
Mick Jagger and Robert Johnson.
With all of these influences.
Moos' songs are both autobio-
graphical and third person narra-
tives with strong harmony and
melody�often derived from tra-
ditional folk tunes.
Moos insists that the lead-off
track, "Illusions Of Love was
written "as if it were a Go-Go's
tune beingsungby Buddy Holly
while "Take Me To The Junkyard
(Whiskey Johnny)" is based on an
old Irish drinking tune once cov-
ered by poet Carl Sandberg.
"One of the criteria of this
record was we wouldn't do some-
thing if we couldn't perform it
live said Moos. This statement is
quite original itself considering
today's musical standards.
One of the most impressive
features of the record, besides
Forysth playing"slidemandolin
are the lyrics. All of the songs on
the record seem to tell a story vary-
ing from wide-screen epics to
Dylanesque irony, to mocking, sar-
donic refrains. For example, from
the song "Half The Story "The
judge said, son thank the Lord
You'll get all the justice you can
afford
Although not completely
original, Jump in the Water's mu-
sic does a great job of encompass-
ing the roots of rock'n'roll from
the Mississippi Delta to the back
alleys of New Orleans, from the
folk clubs of New York, to the
bluegrass jigs of Ireland.
With strong rhythms buoyed
in a rushing river of acoustic gui-
tar and mandolin, Jump in the Wa-
ter is an inventive way to listen to
the past through the ears of the
future.
"Making this record was one
of the goals I had in the back of my
mind,butIsortofknewitwouldn't
happen until I gave up on it, like
Zen says Moos.
" We felt we had something
time couldn't touch
Sam's TVophies
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Tlie East Caroliniav
September8, 1992
Sports
Page 9
Syracuse spanks
Bucs in Ficklen
By Chas Mitch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
With 14 minutes remaining in
the fourth quarter, the massive
crowd of 36,500 screaming Pirate
fans dwindled to about the normal
15,000 loyal Pirate supporters.
Having seen the total arsenal
of Head Coach Steve Logan, the
"real Pirate faithfuls" stayed until
the end of a 42-21 loss to the na-
tions ninth ranked team.
ECU dipped into their bag of
tricks for a botched fake punt and
three attempted onside kicks, one
of which was recovered. This
along with Jerry Dillon breaking
his finger and a total inability to
stop the Syracuse ground game
contributed to the thrashing Syra-
cuse put on the Bucs.
The only encouragement Pi-
rate fans could carry with them
out of Ficklen was the high-octane
offense. Sophomore Michael
Anderson, in only his fifth colle-
giate game, led the aerial assault
mat totaled a school record 521
yards in the air.
Anderson, the Independent
Football Association's offensive
player of the week, and Sean Mc-
Connell also combined for 77 pass
attempts � foirr short of the
NCAA record set by the Houston
Cougars on Oct. 20,1990 against
Southern Methodist.
"We decided early on that
there would be no bullets left in
our cartridge" Logan said. "We
threw everything we had at them,
and if they're ranked 10th then I
know we can compete with any
team in the nation
With many contributing ele-
ments during the contest, one of
the key factors was the onside kick.
"The biggest play was after
we recovered our onside kick
Logan said. "We recovered the
onside kick and then on the 3rd
down and 12 play, they sacked us
from behind and the ball came
out. They recovered it and went
down and answered our touch-
down going into the second half
Despite the loss, Logan was
pleased with the total team effort
and had strong words of support
for his troops.
"In the context of the football
game, our defense played really
well. Asidafromacouple of plays,
they did what was pretty much
expected of mem" Logan said.
"I'm really excited about what I
saw. I think it's going to be a fun,
fun thing to watch us play foot-
ball
Even with a fair showing
against Syracuse, the area of con-
cern remains on the offense. With
major opportunities to put points
on the score board, the offense
stalled and gave the Orangemen
additional chances to attack and
score almost at will.
"We had three opportunities -
with the ball on the 12,18, and 25
yard line and did not cash in
Logan said. "That's it right there
because they were taking advan-
tage of their opportunities and I
knew when they had the opportu-
nity their kids would make the
play Logan said.
As easily as the Pirate offense
chewed up the Orangemen pass
defense, the opportunity to score
were present but were not taken
advantage of.
"As you saw, I don't mink
there's any football team in the
country mat can consume a foot-
ball field faster than we can Lo-
gan said.
"We get rolling and it can be
scary. It scares me just watching
them on the sideline. We get down
the football field and put points on
the board faster than anybody in
the country, so we're never really
out of the game Logan said.
Unfortunately, dropped
passes, errant throws and key situ-
ational turnovers led to the demise
of the Pirates.
Always within striking dis-
tance, ECU remained in the contest
up until the final two minutes.
With Virginia Tech waiting in
the wings, senior signal caller Sean
McConnell made it clear that this
Pirate air attack will make heads
spin.
Oaf feyville proves to be
a welkpring of talent
The game at a glance
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
It must be something in the water. There
is some unknown characteristic about Cof-
feyville, Kan. and its junior collegethatbrings
fast football players to Division I football.
Especially to East Carolina.
Emerging from the same wellspring as
1991 Pirate sensation Dion Johnson is junior-
transfer Morris Letcher and line backer Tony
Davis. Letcher, like Johnson, is a five-foot-
nine-inch, 165-pound bundle of blazing
speed, also prepared for his entrance into
East Carolina football at Dion's old "stomp-
ing grounds Coffeyville Community Col-
lege.
According to Coffeyville coach Skip Fos-
ter, it was apparent by Letcher's play mat he
was ready to move into Division I level
football. "Morris caught two touchdown
passes in our Division II national champi-
onship game last year Foster said. "We
could move Morris around wherever we
needed him, he played at slotback and split
receiver
Foster believes that while Dion John-
son was a marquee player at ECU, Letcher
has distinct advantages over him in natural
talent. Not only is Letcher slightly faster,
according to Foster, he is a better all around
athlete with "more wiggle
In ECU's 42-21 loss to Syracuse on Sat-
urday, Letcher had nine receptions for 109
yards, one resulting in a touchdown. With
his outstanding speed and natural show-
manship, Letcher has the ability to electrify
the Pirate fans like noone since, well, Dion
Johnson.
Letcher shrugs off comparisons to his
Coffeyville predecessor, and is quite confi-
dent in his ability to become the Pirates' all-
around man. "It anyone can do it, 1 can
Syracuse-ECU, Stats
Syracuse 14 7 14 7 -42
ECU 0 0 7 14 -21
First Quarter
SU- Ismail 64-yard run (Biskup kick), 14:42
SU- Ferrell 41-yard pass from Graves (Biskup kick), 3:34
Second Quarter
SU- Walker 5-yard run (Biskup kick), 12:11
Third Quarter
ECU- Driver 28-yard pass from McConnell (Owens kick), 13:17
SU- Richardson 2-yard run (Biskup kick), 8:42
SU- Gedney 3-yard pass from Graves (Biskup kick), :39
Fourth Quarter
ECU- Batson 24-yard pass from Anderson (Owens kick), 7:32
ECU- Letcher 10-yard pass from Anderson (Owens kick), 3:03
SU- Hill 40-yard pass from Graves (Biskup kick), 2:38
A- 36,500
ECU football takes first stride
toward conference play in '92
SUECU
First Downs2930
Rushes-yards14-3761-421
Passing yards521213
Return yards416
Comp-Att36-7711-17
Sacked-yards lost2-162-16
Punts4-1773-127
Fumbles-lost2-13-1
Penalties-yards lost9-548-73
Time of possession24:5535:05
The Independent Football Alliance
makes its debut this season with five
schools participating.
Cincinnati, Memphis State, Southern
Mississippi, Tulsa and East Carolina make
up the alliance.
The main purpose of the alliance is
home-and-home football scheduling and
increased recognition for the players at
each university.
The schools involved will begin play-
ing each other on a home-and-home basis
by the 1993 season if at all possible. In
addition, the alliance will establish
weekly statistics, power ratings and
individual awards throughout the sea-
son.
In 1992, ECU will play Cincinnati,
Memphis State and Southern Missis-
sippi. Tulsa comes on the Pirate sched-
ule in 1993.
ECU's sophomore quarterback
Michael Anderson was named the IFA
Offensive Player of the week.
Individual Statistics
RUSHING- Syracuse, Dardar 6-26, Graves 6-0, Ismail 3-87, Lee 6-41, Mason 2-
17, Picucci 2-49, Richardson 12-53, Walker 14-95, Wooten 10-53. ECU, McCon-
nell 3-(-8), Smith 7-6, Van Buren 4-39
PASSING- & racuse, Graves 11-17-0 213. ECU, Anderson 24-52-1 333, Jacobs 0-
1-00, McConnell 12-24-1 188.
RECEIVING- Syracuse, Ferrell 1-41, Gedney 3-45, Hill 3-65, Ismail 1-34, Johnson
1-18, Lee 1-6, Walker 1-4. ECU, Batson 1-24, Crumpler 6-91, Driver 5-111, Hicks 3-
18, Letcher 9-103, Linville 1-22, Van Buren 3-56, Williams 2-41, Zophy 6-55.
Trivia: Who filled the left tackle slot in the front four
of the Pittsburgh Steelers' Steel Curtain Defense?
Answer: U33 ao uxay
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Photo by Dail RMd � T7w East Carolinian
Cariester Crumpler could not find the handle on this pass. The Bucs
missed several key scoring opportunities that nearly fell into their laps.
"Coach Logan installed an of-
fense that will throw the ball
McConnell said. "One that will put
points on the scoreboard in a
hurry
Ismail's
mouth
bigger
than his
game
(AP) � Don't go to the dic-
tionary to find the meaning of
"revenge
Just ask Qadry Ismail.
Syracuse's go-to guy had
taken just about all the abuse
he'd cared to hear before the
ninth-ranked Orangemen faced
East Carolina.
Then again, Ismail and his
teammates did have an ax to
grind after losing to the Pirates
23-20 at the Carrier Dome last
season.
Or did they?
"You see, revenge is when a
person is getting back for some-
body taking what was rightfully
theirs he said after Syracuse
took a 42-21 victory over the
Pirates.
"Last year, they played the
best ball game. Therefore they
won.
"This year, we wanted to go
with the philosophy of 'Now,
let's go out there and now, let us
play the best ball between Syra-
cuse and ECU
The Orangemen did, rolling
up 634 yards in offense. Ismail
did his part, opening the game
with a 64-yard touchdown run
that silenced the record crowd
of 36,500.
"I think ECU people were
thinking about last year. I don't
think the players were, but I
think the fans were Ismail said.
"The fans were thinking about
this being a big game
For Ismail, it was just like
any other game. Only with his
name, he's trying to follow in
the equally quick footsteps of
his brother, former Notre Dame
star Raghib "Rocket" Ismail,
and that means doing the spec-
tacular on nearly every play.
After the long touchdown
run, there was every indication
that Ismail was heading for the
highlight tapes after one week.
Ismail carried just two more
times for a total of 23 yards and
caught one pass, for 34 yards,
on a touchdown drive set up by
an East Carolina turnover.
Instead of being the glam-
our player, Ismail was a con-
tributor under coach Paul
Pasqualoni's rotation system.
"I'm glad about the rotation
because it helps you get your
legs back under you and see the
defense and some of the things
they might be doing and just get
right back in there and go ahead
and play ball he said.
"You basically have to make
the most of your opportunities
if you're in the whole game he
said, "because if you don't, then
they're not going to get you the
ball if you're not productive
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 8, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 08, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.892
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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