The East Carolinian, September 3, 1992






v.
Lifestyle
Concert on campus
Earth Merchants and Purple School Bus
will play from 3 p.m. to 7p.m. Saturday at
Intramural field behind Ficklin. For more
band information see 'Who's There" pg. 7.
Sports
Pirate pride in '92
Pirate football kicks off Saturday night at 7
p.m. with ECU'S opener against Syracuse.
For more football information and predic
tions, seepg. 11.
Weekend Weather
Partly cloudy, chance of showers and thunderstorms.
Highs in the 80s.
Sat.
Sun.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 3
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, September 3,1992
14 Pages
Professor leaves
in aftermath of
contract dispute
By Jeff Becker
News Editor
A professor who filed a sexual discrimination complaint against
ECU in 1991 says she was told she would have a job in the fall only
to discover that her position had been terminated.
In October 1991, Catherine Wickem, a former instructor in the
department of communication, filed a sexual discrimination com-
plaint with Mary Ann Rose, the university's equal employment
officer. Rose determined that Wickern "did not appear to be the
victim of illegal discrimination on the basis of gender However,
Rose did note that Wickern's salary was low compared to her
colleagues. In a letter marked Dec. 3 1991, Rose stated:
"I do note, however,
that despite your high per-
formance appraisal ratings
you appear to command a
low salary relative to the
other individuals with
whom I made the compari-
son. Since I am unable to
account for this fact, I would
suggest thatyou discuss this
matter with your chairper-
son. Dr. Harrell Allen
Wickern said she ap-
proached Allen when it
came time to re-negotiate
her contract in late March.
She said she asked for a pay raise for the 1992-93 school year.
According to Wickem, Allen said he could not give her a raise
until the N.C. General Assembly approved a pay increase for state
employees. She said Allen told her he would keep her job open and
she did not have to sign a contract until the state legislature voted
on the pay increase July 31.
While waiting for the General Assembly to pass the pay
increase, Marlene Springer, vice chancellor for academic affairs,
sent Wickem two separate contracts. Both contracts stated the
deadline for accep .ance was May 8.
Wickem said since Allen told her she did not have to sign the
contracts, she sent them back to Springer unsigned.
Springer wrote Wickem a letter on April 14 in response to
receiving Wickern's first unsigned contract. The letter stated that
the university could notgive pay raises until July 31,but maintained
the department of Academic Affairs would "make every good faith
effort to assist (Wickern) through proper channels in securing a
raise" if the state should authorize increases.
See wickern, page 3
Catherine Wickern
Photo courtaay Jaaon Bo�ch
The Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity and Alpha Delta Pi sorority wash cars at the Pantry on 10th Street to raise money for hurricane Andrew
victims in South Florida. The students raised more than $250 dollars.
Students help hurricane victims
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
On Monday Aug. 31, members of
Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity and Alpha
Delta Phi sorority joined forces and co-
hosted a car wash to benefit the victims of
Hurricane Andrew.
According to Joel Mauney, the
Lambda Chi Alpha brother who headed
the project, about 80 people participated in
the car wash and raised more than $250.
"Onehundred percentof theproceeds
went to the American Red Cross and will
be sent to the hurricane victims in Home-
stead, Fla Mauney said.
The money will be used for food
and clothes for the residents. The victims
mostly need money to help as they re-
cover from the costliest natural disaster in
U.S. history.
The total number of deaths has in-
creased to 44, and the cost of the insur-
ance claims that have been made in Florida
alone have been estimated at $7.3 billion.
Lambda Chi Alpha's support of hur-
ricane victims does not end with Monday's
car wash. Mauney wants to place dona-
tion buckets in stores and restaurants in
Greenville and the surrounding areas.
"We are trying to do everything we
can to help those people Mauney said.
Mauney said Lee Wertman of the
American Red Cross advised him that dur-
ing Saturday's football game against Syra-
cuse an announcement will tell spectators
where to send donations for hurricane vic-
tims.
Mauney said Lambda Chi Alpha will
continue to help the hurricane relief effort.
"As long as they are in need, we are
going to help those people Mauney said.
Getting 'em back
$800,000 spent on computers
By Karen Hassell
Staff Writer
Photo by Biff Ranaon � Tha Eaat Carolinian
Two ECU students are caught participating in the 'jock raid' that occurred around campus residence
halls Tuesday night. The event followed a panty raid that was staged by a larg group of males Monday.
University limits taiigating
By Tracy Ford
Staff Writer
Pirate fans who enjoy lei-
surely taiigating before and after
football games, without any inten-
tion of ever going to the game, will
have to change their plans for the
new football season.
Some new rules regarding
taiigating at home football games
will be in effect starting with the
season opener against Syracuse this
Saturday. The rules are a result of
meetings that began early this sum-
mer among theathletic department,
Public Safety, the chancellor's of-
fice, the SGA and the student af-
fairs office.
"Taiigating will be allowed
said Chief Ron Avery of ECU Pub-
lic Safety. "However, large groups
of tailgaters will not be allowed
He said he is referring to groups
which are too large, such as groups
who want to rope off large areas.
Avery said vandalism has
become a problem in the parking
lots during football games and
many cars were damaged lastyear.
The new guidelines that will
limit taiigating will involve offi-
cials going through the parking
lots and asking people to either
enterthestadiumtowatchthegame
or to leave. This will occur during
the first quarter of each game.
"If you come to the football
game we want you to go to the
game Avery said.
See Taiigating, page 3
Eighthundred thousand dol-
lars was spent to develop or en-
hance computer systems through-
out the ECU campus. The money
came directly from student com-
puting and technology fees, with
a minor portion supplemented by
external donations.
"This money is not equally
divided up, or equally distrib-
uted said Ernest Marshburn,
manager of academic computing.
"There are not enough funds to
distribute equally, so the best
projects are singled out each year
in order of importance
Marshburn explained that to
distribute the funds evenly would
spread the funds out so thin as to
make no lasting impact. He said
by singling out the best projects, it
will take longer to get to all areas
that need assistance. However, the
areas that are provided for will
see significant improvements.
"The idea is to take the best
projects and really improve the
level of education Marshburn
said.
According to Daniel Bishop,
comptroller, student tuition and
fees at ECU made up 9 percent of
the $230 million in current rev-
enues for the year ending June 30,
1991. This amounted to about $21
million. Within this amount, the
computingand technology fee was
a included.
There were 17 areas in which
computing and technoloev fees
were focused. Most of the new
systems became operational over
the summer.
Allied Health received
$51,264, with an additional
$46,000 given to nursing.
Among other things, these two
programs contain computer
simulation capabilities.
The computers can simulate
an experience such as an emer-
gency room event. The simulation
provides the student with the op-
portunity to make decisions, di-
agnosis and treatment.
In the end, the computer
evaluates the decisions and car-
ries through the results, including
allowing the student to inform the
simulated family of the death of
their loved one.
In the School of Art, $46,699
was spent to enhance the existing
Macintoshcomputerart showcase.
According to Marshburn,
there is not another school in the
state with the advanced facilities
of ECU'S School of Art.
The School of Music received
$46,180 for continued support of
the school's lab.
The lab consists of equip-
ment that can simulate musical
instruments and allows a conduc-
tor to develop, conduct and revise
a composition without human
musicians.
The biology department re-
ceived $46,000 to enhance its bio-
genetic lab, and the chemistry de-
partment was given $43,656 to ex-
pand its biochemistry, computers.
These labs arecapableof tak-
ing DNA strands and simulating
genetics experiments. The com-
puters can also simulate chemical
experiments that could otherwise
be dangerous.
The labs provide the same
learning result at a reduced risk.
They do not actually replace all
experiments, they only enhance
the experience.
Thebusiness school received
$72,686 to upgrade the school's
computing labs located on the
third floor of the General Class-
room Building.
"A computer, much like a
video projector, is simply a tool
Marshburn said. "It becomes a
teaching aid and a powerful vi-
sual aid
A statistics lab has been de-
veloped under the mathematics
department.
Computers help to concep-
tualize stats making this difficult
subject take on an identi fiabledefi-
nition for students.
In the School of Education,
two separate projects were devel-
oped. The first, costing $28,808, is
a special education's adaptive
technology laboratory located in
Speight 143 and 144. The equip-
ment is used to assist special-needs
students that are in some way dis-
advantaged. For example, blind
students have access to a com-
puter that would verbalize infor-
mation.
See Computers, page 3





2 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 3, 1992
v�
CRIiyiMSENE
Crime prevention tip of the week:
Lock it or lose it: Bicycle theft can be prevented by using
a high security U-lock and properly locking the bicycle to
a bike rack or other solid object. The proper way to lock
your bike to a bike rack is to lift the front tire over the top
bar and lock both the front tire and frame to the rack. An
additional U-lock, or a braided steel cable should be run
from the U-lock through the rear tire to secure the bicycle
and prevent it from being stolen. If you have a quick
release seat, a seat lock cable should be installed to prevent
theft, or the seat should be removed from the bike when it
is left unattended. Always be sure to pull on the locking
mechanism to make sure the lock is secure. Remember: It's
you and ECU together for a safe campus.
Properly securing your bicycle is not the only important
step to take to prevent crime from happening to you. As
the following statistics show, crime is increasing at ECU
and anyone can be a victim.
Master's in library science offered
By Christie Lawrence
Staff Writer
Students interested in pursu-
ing advanced studies in library sci-
ence will now be able to do so.
The American Library Associa-
tion is now offering an accredited
master's degree program at North
Carolina Central University (NCCU)
in Durham. East Carolina University
has recently joined with the North
Carolina Central University in their
Library Science Program.
Since the Master of Library Sci-
ence program at East Carolina Uni-
versity is not accredited with the
American Library Association, ad-
vancement in the field of library sci-
ence has been difficult in the past
NCCU, accredited with the
AmericanLibrary Association (ALA),
has agreed to accept transfer credit
hours from ECU's Department of Li-
brary Studies andTechnical Informa-
tion.
As a part of this agreement,
NCCU will accept three specific
courses directly from ECU's depart-
ment of Library Studies and Techni-
cal Information: Selection and Use of
Information Sources, Management of
Library and InformationSystems and
Administration of the School Media
Center.
In addition to the three classes,
nine credit hours of relevant course
work taken at ECU can be transferred
and accepted through NCCU's ac-
credited program. Students must re-
ceive permission from NCCU to en-
roll in the designated courses and
receiveapproval for the transfer of the
nine additional semester hours.
Students who are seeking an
ALA accredited Master of library
Science degree through this arrange-
ment will have to meet the admission
requirementsofbothECUand NCCU.
Dr. Lawrence Auld, chair of the
ECU Department of Library Studies
and Educational Technology, in col-
laborationwith Dr. Benjamin Speller,
Jr. proposed and implemented the
ECU-NCCU course credit transfer
agreement.
19911990
Bicycle theft8696
Murder00
Rape43
Robbery61
Aggravated assault1612
Burglary104106
Larceny445324
Motor vehicle theft104
Simple assault7144
Arson53
Totals661497
change
-10.42
0.00
33.33
500.00
33.33
-1.89
3y.3$7o
150.00
61.36
66.67
33.00
CRESCENT
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Fraternities 6c Sororities
1992 STUDENT SPECIAL
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2 room minimum 758-9128
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News writers meeting
today!
3:30 at TEC office.
All writers please
attend.
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Come join us each week for fun,
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7:00 pm Thursdays
2024 General Classroom Building
Eddie Hilliard � 830-6814
Campus Minister
WELCOME BACK PIRATES
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NOW YOU CAN MAKE THE DIFFERENCE!
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�Get to vote on issues that concern all
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�Great leadership opportunities & experience
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FITNESS CENTER
Let Your Voice Be Heard!
Become a Representative in Faculty Senate-
Don let things ride-� TAKE CONTROL!
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for application: deadline Sept. 4
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752-3880 J





I
SEPTEMBER 3, 1992
Wickem
The East Carolinian 3
Continued from page 1
The letter goes on to state:
"Should you decide to accept
this offer, please sign the enclosed
contract and return it to me by the
close of business on Friday, May 1,
1992. A decision not to accept this
offer in a timely manner constitutes
a rejection and thus renders my of-
fer null and void
Wickem said she decided in
June she would take the position
without the guarantee of the pay
raise. On June 15, she asked Allen if
she would needanewcontractsince
the last one sent by Springer had a
May 8 deadline. Allen told her he
did not know and that she should
call Springer.
On the phone, Springer in-
formed Wickern that she no longer
had a job with the university and
her position had been filled for the
fall semester.
Wickern informed Springer
that Allen told her she could wait
.past the May 8 deadline to sign a
contract. According to Wickern,
p Springer said Allen had no author-
ity to make the decision and, since
the contract was not signed, she no
longer had a job.
Immediately after getting off
the phone with Springer, Wickem
sent a letter to Allen asking him why
he told her she could wait until the
legislature passed the pay increase
before signing the contract. Allen
responded to Wickern'? note later
that same day denying he ever said
she could wait past the May 8 dead-
line.
"I never told you mat I would
hold a position for you until July
Allen wrote. "I have no authority to
hold a position beyond the contract
deadline
Wickern said she informed
Allen on at least two separate occa-
sions between March 24 and May 1
that she sent the contracts back to
Springer unsigned as he had sug-
gested.
Thenextday, June 16, Wickem
called Springer and asked if she
could re-apply for the job. Wickem
said Springer told her she "could
not stop her" from re-applying, but
the job had already been given to
someone else. Wickem received a
letter on June 19 from Springer that
stated she did not get the job.
"When your position came
open, we had to fill it, and it has
subsequently been offered to some-
oneelse. I regret to inform you, there-
fore, that you have no contract offer
or contract with East Carolina Uni-
versity
Both Allen and Springer re-
fused tocommentstating they could
not discuss personnel issues.
Wickem said she would have
signed the contract before May 8 if
Allen had not told she had a contract
extension. She also said she was
under the impression mat Allen had
the authority to give contract exten-
sions.
She said mere is no way to
fight the decision in court because,
even if she could prove Allen gave
her a contract extension, Allen has
no authority to make mat decision.
Wickern is currently teach-
ing in the communication arts
department at Georgia Southern
University.
��
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Tailgating
He said that they considered
the possibility of checking for
people's tickets as they enter the
parking lots, but it would be too
difficult to do that.
A second limit that officials
have placed on tailgating is that the
parking lots which are used by
tailgaters will now not open until
five hours prior to the kick-off of
each game.
Previously, there has been no
limit on how early tailgaters could
begin arriving for the games.
"We had people arriving as
early as Friday night before the
game and pitching tents said Lee
Workman, assistant athletic direc-
tor for ticket sales and special
events.
Workman said there is a mul-
titudeof reasons that problems have
arisen with tailgating, but that the
main root of the problem is the
growth of the university and its
Continued from page 1
athletic program, as well as the
number of people attending the
football games.
"As you grow, you create new
problems Workman said. "We
need limits on tailgating for control
purposes
The athletic department does
not want to discourage students
and other football fans from tail-
gating and enjoying the football
games.
"We encourage everyone to
come and tailgate and have a good
time, but we also encourage them
to be responsible Workman said.
He said he and other athletic
department officials hope that all
students will act in a "class man-
ner" because mere will be televi-
sion coverage of three of the games
this season � one regional, one
national (ESPN) and one for later
broadcast on pay-per-view.
Computers
Continued from page 1
The second project in the edu-
cation department is the reading
center laboratory costing $20,953.
The center is used to assist students
who have special needs in reading,
much like the math lab does for
arithmetic.
In foreign languages and lit-
erature projectisbeingpromoted
that could replace the audio lan-
guage lab. The workstation would
carry a student through a simula-
tion scene, and is complete with
audio and visual aids providing
opportunities for the student to re-
spond.
Otherareasof improvements
include: maritimehistory ($23,213),
human environmental sciences
($84,429), industry and technology
($27,000),chemlab($4685),phys-
ics ($487), communication depart -
ment($31,737),andJoyner Library
($53,149).
mm
wmm
SEPTEMBER 8-9
Learn Material and Practice
SEPTEMBER 10
Tryouts
MINGES COLISEUM
Lobby 7:00 PM
For Information Call: 757-4672
"Are you being served? "
Episcopal Student Fellowship
Invites You to Join Us Each Wednesday
Beginning September 12th, 5:30 pm Celebration of Holy Eucharist
followed by supper and conversation
St. Paulfs Episcopal Church
401 East 5th Street
(cross 5 th Street in front of Garret Hall, walk down Holly Street to 4th Street)
You Are There!
" Schedule of Services
L
Sunday, September 20: FallWinter Schedule begins
Holy Eucharist - 7:30, 9:00, 11:00
Sunday, September 13: St. Paul's "Homecoming"
10:00 am Holy Eucharist - Lunch provided following the Service)
Campus Minister: Marry Garrman � 752-3482
PERFECT IMPRESSIONS
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Located in University Center near Harris Teeter
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APPOINTMENTS & WALK-INS
HOURS:
Mon-Fri 9:30-8:00
Sat 9:30-6:00
August 1-September 30, 1992
ECU STUDENTS &
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$5.00 OFF ColorsPerms
$2.00 OFF Hair Cuts
10 OFF Nails
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�H(i
4 I The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 1, 1992
greets
By Tracy Ford
Staff Writer
New exchange students
students from the United
Photo by Dail Ftoad � The Bast Carolinian
gather in Brewster to meet one another and get a taste of the South. More than 30
States and around the world are taking classes at ECU this semester.
Festivity prevailed at the
welcome dinner for exchange
students as ECU's national and
international students ac-
quainted themselves with each
other and got a taste of the South.
About 30 exchange stu-
dents from all over the world
attended the dinner.
"1 usually try to have a wel-
come reception for all the ex-
change students so they can meet
each other said Stephanie
Evancho, coordinator of interna-
tional programs. "It gives them a
chance to know where everyone
else is from
With barbecue, hush pup-
pies, cole slaw and iced tea the
students got a good idea what
home cookin' really tastes like.
"Some drank water, but
some came back for more tea
Evancho said. "I encouraged
them to taste a little bit of every
thing
Nancy Nieves, who lives in
Puerto Rico, came to ECU this
year to experience something dif-
ferent in university life. Like
many of the students, Nieves said
it is different in some ways but
the same in others.
One of the major changes
for most students is the infamous
southern heat and humidity.
"The climate is very hot for
us said Arno Jans of Germany.
"We're not used to it. The hu-
midity is terrible
The national and interna-
tional student exchange program
started at ECU in 1988. "It's just
beginning to catch on here
Evancho said. "We have 10 stu-
dents in various locations now.
"We have an ECU student
down in Miami now that sur-
vived the hurricane and actually
went down to Homestead to help
out. He decided to stay because
they're going to open the cam-
pus on Sept. 14
The minimum GPA to en-
ter the program is a 2.75 for in-
ternational and a 2.0 for national
exchange. The GPA requirement
varies depending on the location
and the school.
Thirty-five international
universities teach courses in En-
glish for exchange students, but,
if you are fluent in a foreign lan-
guage, the choice expands to 107
universities.
"It takes (foreign exchange
students) a little longer to do the
work Evancho said. "First, they
have to read an English textbook
and then understand theconcepts
K
The Newman Catholic
Student Center
announces its
5th Annual Back to School
Open House & Pig Pickin
Wednesday, September 2,1992
4:00pm - 8:00pm
at the
Newman Catholic Student Center
953 East 10th St. (At the Foot of College Hill)
Featuring: "Get-Acquainted" Fun,
Food, Friends, Fellowship!
For more information call Fr. Paul Vaeth (757-1991)
Attention
AtPTOfi
Fans
ROAD TRIP!
$60.00
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Great Bus and Hotel Package
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� Drawings for Prizes Every Monday!
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Mon&Tues 11am-3pm
Wed 11am-3pm & 9pm-1am
Thurs&Fri 11am-1am
Sat 9pm-1am
513 Cotanche St
located across from UBE
758-0080
I O 1
I O 1
I -





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The East Carolinian
September 3, 1992
Opinion
Page 5
Now more than ever, WE BELIEVE
One can practically hear the rumble
already. The smell of barbecue waft-
ing through the air, the sight of stu-
dents stumbling through the fields,
the absolute flood of purple and gold
and the intense anticipation can all be
experienced this Saturday evening in
and around Ficklen Stadium for the
Pirates' season opener against the
ninth ranked Syracuse Orangemen.
After last year's successes, we must
all remember that the fun of Pirate
football does not require victory, but
Tather spirit. This town and this school
all pull together miraculously for foot-
ball season every year. Now it is time
ifor the students to pull together and
nshow the American TV-viewing pub-
lic that ECU is a legitimate school and
�that we do have one hell of a football
program.
UOE OF ALL TRADES
It's time once again to feel that
purple pride and revel in its magni-
tude. Let's show Steve Logan that we
have faith in his abilities by showing
up to the game nice and early. Let's
pack Ficklen so that when Orangemen
fans in New York click on their pay-
per-view, they see waves of purple
and no orange.
Remember that all eyes will be on
us this entire season. That privilege
carries many benefits, but it also de-
mands a degree of responsibility. The
'92 Pirate football team has a large
task in front of them, bu t the fans have
just as important a role: support. The
fans' job is to make enough noise so
mat the Orangemen have no idea what
they're doing.
It truly is time to show that we
believe!
By Joe tlorst
ipTruth and trust, is there still a place for them today?
: Trust.
Trust in ourselves, trust in
others, trust in the government,
4rust in God � you name it, we
inhumanity) as a whole seem to
jhave a big problem with trust in
3iny aspect of our lives.
Politicians are generally ac-
cepted as being liars, a person is
considered naive if they believe
Everything they see on television
and every person in America has
been told as a child, "Don't talk to
Strangers
I hate to sound like some 80-
year-old, wheelchair-bound senior
citizen, but "Whatever happened
to the good old days?" Better yet,
did they even exist? It seems like
people have always locked their
doors, windows and cars to keep
out that unknown, faceless
"stranger Security systems are
not just for the super-rich any
more, your average middle-class
family is likely to have one for
their suburban home. If there was
any time in our history that you
could leave your home without
unconsciously double-checking
mat doorknob, it sure as hell
Wasn't during my generation.
Not only do we not trust
strangers, we don't even trust the
people we know and see every
day. The majority of us have some
kind of secret (be it small, big or
even a life) that we would possi-
bly kill to keep. Who came up with
the idea that if you know some-
thing about someone that no one
else knows, you have some sort of
pow er over them? In the best of al 1
possible worlds, a person could
feel free to say anything they
wanted without fear of getting
laughed at. But, of course, there's
always reality.
Why can't two strangers
passing on the street look each
other in the eye? What harm could
a smile and a small "Hey, how you
doin'?" do to the average pass-
erby? The average person is not
going to jump and attack some-
one just for being friendly. But
we've been conditioned so well
(and for so long), that any unto-
ward act of kindness is instantly
looked upon with suspicion.
Our society today is built,
and has been built, upon suspi-
cion. The government allocates
billions and billions of dollars on
the possibility that we're not the
number one super power. Some
police agencies base their training
and work on the belief that the
public is out to get their officers
and the officers should take any
and all precautions against attacks.
How is the general public sup-
posed to think when their leaders
constantly propose unwavering
vigilance and suspicion?
People are basically para-
noid . (How's that for a revelation?)
The only difference between
people out in public and people in
the mental institutions is that the
people in the institutions haven't
conformed their paranoia to
society's standards. Lock your
doors, shut your windows and
make sure those kids are tucked in
tight because that's the way it's
supposed to be. But start acting
out of the mainstream (talking to
yourself, having fits) and before
you know it, you're in a room with
rubber for wallpaper. In this day
and age, it's a sad bu t true fact that
looking out for number one al-
most has to be your top priority in
life.
Hand in hand with this ob-
sessive lack of trust is an equally
scary lack of truth.
Whatever happened to that
age-old maxim, "Honesty is the
best policy?" The public is so in-
undated with news about politi-
cal scandals, falsity in advertising
and general all-around lying that
it's no wonder that our society
today puts honesty as such a low
priority.
Granted, there is such a thing
as lying so as not to hurt someone.
But this practice has been taken to
such an extreme that it's become
another tired old cliche. Sure, not
telling your parents that you actu-
ally got home at 2 a.m. instead of
midnight is OK, but what's the
point behind not telling someone
you don't want to go out with
them? It seems that the sooner
everything was out in the open,
the less pain and hurt would be
involved.
Children grow up today
learning the hard (and difficult to
understand) lesson that trusting
people can often lead to pain and
heartache. They hear so many hor-
ror stories of confidences being
betrayed and lives being ruined
thatatan early age, they stop trust-
ing and start living in fear.
The time has come to bring
back the two T's�tru th and trust.
They walk hand in hand down the
same road � have one and the
other will soon follow.
There are so many bigger
injustices going on in the world
today mat there is no need for the
petty back-stabbing and in-fight-
ing that is so prevalent. Stop being
so surprised and distrustful when
someone says, "Really, I mean it"
Accept it until they give you a
reason not to.
Only when the new genera-
tion starts following the two T's
can we ever really believe that
now-laughable statement, "trust
me.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Jennifer A. Wardrep, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danietson, Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'I, Assistant Sports Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel,
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Jamie Coins, Classified Advertising Technician
Bill Walker, Opinion Page Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
m
AMP IW A PANlft-
A VIEW FROM ABOVE
By T. Scott Batchelor
i i i
Socialized medicare will not work in U.S.
One of the big issues in mis
election season is the rising cost of
health care. Over the past decade,
prices for medicines and medical
services and equipment has sky-
rocketed.
Physicians are charging inor-
dinately higher fees today than
they did 10 or 15 years ago.
This rise is due in large part to
the proliferation of medical mal-
practice suits, which are symp-
tomatic of our increasingly liti-
gious society. In combination with
the number of suits being filed is
the astronomical monetary
amounts being awarded by juries
in these cases. Because of these
suits, doctors must pay extortion-
ate premiums to maintain satis-
factory malpractice insurance. The
cost, of course, is passed on to the
consumer.
The solution to this problem
is twofold: first, legislation needs
to be enacted to set a cap on the
amount of money awards juries
can give plaintiffs in malpractice
suits. This would bring the fees
doctors charge back down to a
more affordable level.
In conjunction with this ef-
fort, the next step would be lo pass
laws designed to regulate the
prices of medication. With intelli-
gent legislation, medicines could
be made more affordable to pa-
tients without severely paring
down the profit margins of phar-
maceutical manufacturers.
However, many Americans
seem to feel that we have passed
the point of no return on "supply
side" control of health care. Ac-
cording to a poll in The Wall Street
Journal, 69 percent of us think it is
�dime to adopt a national health
care plan.
Proponents of this system look
to our neighbor in the north,
Canada, as a model of equal ac-
cess medical care. In the House of
Representatives, 71 co-sponsors
have introduced legislation based
on the Canadian model, and Sen.
Paul Wellstone (D Minn.) has
brought forth a similar measure in
the Senate.
But according to an article in
the September issue of Reader's
Digest written by Dr. Ian R.
Munroe, a physician who prac-
ticed in Canada for several years,
Americans had better take a closer
look at the Canadian system be-
fore they leap.
Dr. Munroe writes that by the
time he left Canada in the mid-
1980s his outpatients were wait-
ing three months for CAT scans
and money for research was non-
existent. Feeling hecould no longer
do the job for which he was trained,
Dr. Munroe left Canada for the
Medical City Dallas Hospital in
Texas. Canada's national health
care system had basically driven
him out.
One of the draws to the Cana-
dian system is its appearance of
being totally free. "In fact
Munroe writes, "it is very, very
expensive
"The average Canadian al-
ready pays 46 percent of his in-
come in taxes. But Canada's
health-care spending is growing
faster than inflation, faster than its
population and faster than the
country's gross national product"
Munroe says. He points out mat
the United States has the costlies
health-care system in the world�
but Canada's is a close second.
Canada can't squeeze much
more from its taxpayers, so it keeps
up with medical costs by not de-
livering on the promised unlim-
ited care.
For instance, the state of Ten-
nessee has more Magnetic Reso-
nance Imagers than all of Canada;
the United States has three times
as many iithotriptors, machines
mat use sound to smash gall and
kidney stones, than Canada; the
United States also has about three
times as many open-heart-surgery
and cardiac-catheterization units
as Canada. Waiting lists for fairly
simple procedures such as a ton-
sillectomy are long.
In Newfoundland, the aver-
age wait for a coronary-artery by-
pass is one year.
We need to think carefully
about other reforms before we con-
sider a plan for universal health
care. As Toronto Globe and Mail
columnist Terence Corcoran says
in the same article, "You can be-
lieve that socialized medicare is
the most moral system in the world
if you want. But the fact is that
socialized medicare will not
work
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
SGA is looking for a few good people
To the Students of ECU:
Welcome Back Everyone 1
hope you all had a great summer
and are adjusting well to your new
Fall schedules. As some of you
may already know, it is once again
time for the SGA Fall Election and
there are many positions that need
to be filled: Executive VP, Class
Officers, Day Representa ti ves (off-
campus students), and Residence
Hall Representatives (on-campus
students).
If you are interested in taking
a stand on important campus is-
sues, voting on the dispet sement
of student funds to campus orga-
nizations, implementingnew pro-
grams and student services and
serving on campus and city com-
mittees, then you need to be a part
of Student Government. Don't sit
back and let others take part in the
decision-making that will directly
affect you. Get involved and show
that you can make a difference by
filing for office before 5 p.m. pn
Sept. 8. Remember that Election
Day is Sept. 23. Bring your Stu-
dent ID and VOTE.
Courtney Jones
SGA President
Quayle's family values are not universal
To The Editor:
An open letter to Danny boy
It seems these days that I
complain an "awful lot English
2000 to me was an "awful lot" of
reading, and an "awful lot" of
vocab. Not that I didn't like the
reading. It was interesting
enough and I enjoyed some of it,
but it sure was an "awful lot
That was before I read Dick
Gregory's Shame and realized
how wonderful an "awful lot"
can be. That essay taught me
more than the week's lesson, but
it solidified my hatred for the
Bush-Quayle administration.
Their so-called campaign for
"family values" is to me an "aw-
ful lot" of nonsense. I understand
the shame Dick Gregory felt as
his teacher scolded him in front
of class for "him and his kind
For although I know and love
both of my parents and they love
me, we don't fit into the scheme
of "family values
Danny boy, are you listen-
ing? My mother and father mar-
ried in youth, my dad did not
graduate from high school:
shame. They got divorced be-
cause of my dad's emotional
and drug problems: shame. My
father tried to raise us for two
years on two jobs and govern-
ment cheese, while fighting the
battle of addiction: shame. I too
went to school hungry and had
ketchup put in front of me and I
was told it was a vegetable:
shame. I struggled as I was called
"hillbilly" and beat up by the
rich kids: shame. Through it all,
however distant we remained a
family, without shame. Even in
our darkest moments when I
thought my father was dead I
never gave up hope and I feel no
shame!
P
Mr. Vice-President, when
you speak of "family values
stay out of my face! I don't con-
form to your "family values
and I should feel ashamed. But I
don't, because my family exem-
plifies what America is in your
eyes, "shame but we're proud.
We worked hard and I got to
college, and as a teacher, I'm
going to teach the children about
your hatred.
After seeing you speak the
last four months about your
white nuclear anglo-saxon male
dominated "family values I
will work an "awful lot" harder.
Work so as children, cripples,
gays, women, minorities and the
elderly have rights and feel
they're an "awful lot" to me and
do not feel shame.
Michael Preston
Sophmore
English





W '� I ll�W I
' �.
The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 3. 1992
Classifieds
PAGE 6
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS 1 and 2 bedroom
apartments. Energy-effi-
cient, several locations in
town. Carpeted, kitchen ap-
pliances, some water and
sewer paid, washerdryer
hookups. Call 752-8915.
ROOMMATE NEEDED
to share a large house in a
quiet neighborhood. Must
be neat and mature.
$200.00 and 13 utilities.
Call 355-8783.
GRADUATE STUDENT
or professional to share 2
bedroom house. Private
room and bath. Washer
and dryer, fireplace, loft,
patio and pool. 321-2138
ASAP.
HOUSEMATE
WANTED: near campus,
quiet, $162.50month, 1
2 utilities. Call 758-3311.
ROOMMATE NEEDED
to share apartment in
t?��.L-�,1. r-i en � �.i. .
ILctML'l uon. 4 uv 11IU1U1I T
12 utilities. Call 752-
1868.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: to share 2bed-
room, 2 bath apt $235
deposit, $235 rent 12
utilities. (HeritageVillage
1.5 miles from campus).
Call 355-1735.
2 ROOMMATES
NEEDED to share 4 bed-
room house 410 mile
from downtown.
$140.00month 14
utilities. Call Chris or
Harvey at 830-9267.
CONSIDERATE LAID-
BAGK- -�OMMA-Ti�
NEEDED (female pre-
ferred) Across the street
from campus. NO de-
posit. 13 utilities and
rent. 752-2968 ask for
Cathy or Nicole.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY to share 2 bed-
room apartment. $208 a
month plus 12 utilities.
Non-smoker, serious stu-
dent. Call Karen or
Monica. (919)321-3913.
SEIZED CARS, trucks, boats,
4 wheelers, motorcycles, by FBI,
IRS, DEA. Available your area
now. Call (800) 338-3388 ext.
C-5999.
TANDY 100GSL2, 512K Ram,
RGB Color Monitor, Keyboard
FOR SALE
and DM Printer, 355-7853 after
5:00 pm. $750.
FOR SALE: lamps- $10 each;
coffee table- $10; octagonal
table- $10; end table- $7; GE
Vacuum- $20; Kenmore
Vacuum-$75;guitars-$50$70;
12-speed woman's bike- $50;
CALL 756-1451.
150 WATT FISHER AMP.
with tuner and 9 band EQ. Best
offer. Can sell EQ separately.
Call Chris at 758-8461.
5 FT. BALL PYTHON $100 or
best offer includes cage and
heat rock. Call Darin 931-7308.
FOR SALE Pair of used 180
Rossignol skiis price nego-
tiable. Call (919) 753-4929.
FOR SALE- '89 Suzuki
GS500E. Excellent condition.
Never wrecked. $2000. Call
753-3922.
HELP WANTED
UtSlKt KtSl'UlNSiBLt
PERSON to care for small chil-
dren Tuesday's and
Thursday's, 7:30 a.m. -5:00
p.m. Call 756-0417.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE
! Many positions. Great ben-
efits. Call (800) 338-3388 ext.
P-3712.
ALASKA SUMMER EM-
PLOYMENT-Fisheries. Earn
$5,000month. Free trans-
portation! Room & Board!
Over 8,000 openings. No ex-
perience necessary. MALE or
FEMALE. For employment
program call Student Employ-
ment Services at 1-206-545-
4155 ext. A5362.
FALL SOCCER COACHES -
The Greenville Recreation and
Parks Department is recruit-
ing for 12 to 16part-time youth
soccer coaches for the fall
youth soccer program. Appli-
cants must possess some
knowledge of the soccer skills
and have the ability and pa-
tience with youth. Applicants
must be able to coach young
people ages 5-16, in soccer fun-
damentals. Hours are from
3:00 pm until 7:00 pm with
some night and weekend
coaching. This program will
run from September to mid-
November. Salary rates start
at $4.25 per hour. For more
information, please call Ben
James at 830-4567 or Michael
Daiy at 830-4550.
HEEP WANTED
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT
PAY! Assemble products at
home. Call Toll Free 1-800-
467-5566 EXT. 5920.
WANTED: SOCCER
COACHES-Monday
Wednesday and or Tuesday
Thursday 2:00-6;00 p.m. Will
train. Pay starts at $5 an hour.
Must have own transportation.
Call Pitt County Community
Schools at 830-4240.
TOPLESS DANCERS
WANTED - Great club, Great
money, unbelievable tips.
Work Thursday, Friday, Satur-
day, 9pm-2 am. Call Sid 919-
735-7713 or Paul 919-736-0716.
MothersPlayhouse in
Goldsboro.
CLINTON-GORE'92- For an
opportunity to share your tal-
ents with the campus cam-
paign, call: Thomas Blue, 931-
8970 or Michael Preston, 931-
8067. Paid for by Thomas Blue
on behalf of the ECU Clinton-
Gore committee.
PART-TIME GENERAL OF-
FICE for small locally owned
photography studio. Hours
flexible. Experience with
Macintosh computer a real
plus. Send info and hours avail-
able to Part-Time. P.O. Box
3715, Greenville 27836.
WANTED- The Student Union
is taking applications for the
Travel and Forum committee
Presidents. Please call 757-4715
for more information.
BRODY'S and Brody'sforMen
are accepting additional Part-
Time Sales applications for Jun-
ior Sportswear and the Young
Men's Department. Flexible
HoursSalaryClothing Dis-
counts. Apply Brody's The
Plaza Monday-Wednesday 1
nm to 4 pm.
WORK AT HOME Assembly,
crafts, typing and more! Up to
$500 a week possible. For
informationwrite: Sourcel840-
D Simonton Road, Dept. 9108,
Statesville, NC 28677.
SPRING BREAK '93 - Sell
Trips, Earn Cash & Go Free
Student Travel Services is now
hiring campus representatives.
Ski packages also available.
Call 1-800-648-4849.
EMERGENCY! Expanding
company needs hardworking
reliable students to mail our
dist brochures frott1. Horns'
Dorm! Earn up to $200 FT or
$1000 FT! Employees needed
HELP WANTED
immediately! For job applica-
tion send self-addressed stamp
envelope: Colossal Marketing,
Employee Processing, P.O. Box
291140 Port Orange, FL 32129.
WORKING MOTHER SEEK-
ING motivated energetic indi-
vidual to organize activities for
3children(14,10,7) Saturdays
9:00 am - 6:00. Call Jef Glenn
355-2350 p.m. $5hr.
CARPET BARGAIN CEN-
TER: Morning hours only.
Apply in person 1009 Dickin-
son Ave. 758-0057.
GREEKS & CLUBS.
RAISE A COOL
$1000
IN JUST ONE WEEKI
PLUS $1000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
You also get a FREE
HEADPHONE RADIO
just for calling
1-800-932-0528, Ext. 85
CLEANING- Married, female
student, cleaning personal
homes with 9 years experi-
ence. Reasonable rates and
own supplies. Please call
Cindy Myer at 752-2759.
PET CARE- in your home.
All types of animals. Reason-
able rates and quality care.
Please call Cindy Myer at 752-
2759.
PERSONALS
WRITER, PHILOSOPHER,
MUSICIAN and poetic soul
seeks friendship and corre-
spondence from like-minded
lady. Photos and letters to
MV, PO Box 8663, Green-
ville, NC 27835.
THETA CHI: Thanks for a
great time on Friday. Let's do
it again soon! Pi Delta
CONGRATULATIONS
Brothers of Pi Kappa Alpha
on a much deserved smythe!
PIKES 1 in nation.
SISTERS AND PLEDGES
OF ALPHA DELTA PI,can't
wait til SAT. TAILGATE! Go
Pirates! Brothers of Pi Kappa
Alpha.
SIGMASPREFNIGHT was
a blast. Too bad the mar-
riages couldn't last. Congrats
PERSONALS
to your new pledges. Y'all are
great! Hope to see you soon!
Love, the PIKES.
THE SISTERS AND
PLEDGES of Alpha Omicron
Pi would like to wish all frater-
nities a fun and successful fall
rush! GO GREEK
ALPHA OMICRON PI BETA
RHO'S : Rest up for the Syra-
cuse game on Saturday! TAIL-
GATE A "cake" and
boomball will be provided!
GO PIRATES! Good luck
against Syracuse! Love, the
sistprs and pledges of Alpha
Omicron Pi.
SIG EP: Pref Party was
GREAT, the pledges had a blast.
Shaggin died out, but the death
punch did last. The flowers
were nice, the bubbly was fine.
We stayed all night and had a
great time. Let's get together
soon! Love, the Alpha Phi's.
CONGRATULATIONS: to
all sororities tor an AW bbUM b
rush! Love, Alpha Phi
ZTA: Hope you had an awe-
some rush! Love, the Alpha
Ftii's.
CONGRATULATIONS to
the Beta Psi pledge class of Al-
pha Phi: Amanda Baer, Becky
Bartlett, Katy Bonney, Wendy
Bostian, Julie Breazeale, Cathy
Choate, Kim Curless, Minnie
Diaz, Tanga Dunn, Courtney
Faison, Janet Funderburk,
Shelly Gache, Mindy Graham,
T3iii; HaKooz, Wendi Hill,
Heather Joyce, Candace
Kravse, Kathy Molnar, Amy
Moss, Jennifer Perry, Jennifer
Ramsey, Jodi Ritlenhouse,Tina
Rivenbark, Amy Rogers,
KristenShiavone, Lynne Smith,
Wendy Sperrer, Candice
Sullivan, Kristen Tonn, Jonni
Wainwright, Jennifer Worley,
Sarah Zakana. We love you.
FUZZYHEAD: Times have
been rough, but remember: the
darkest hour is just before
dawn. I'm looking forward to
Joseph Ira Coleman
Attorney At Law
110 Avon Lane
Greenville, NC
(919)355-7495
TRAFFIC TICKETS � WILLS � DWIs
Competent Representation For A Reasonable Fee
PERSONALS
our next 15 months together. I
LOVE YOU. Love always,
Snugglebunny.
TUTORING: An American
Female student to teach English
to a female foreign student.
Please call 355-7624.
THE RHO ZETA chapter of
Chi Omega Fraternity wishes
to announce and congratulate
our 1992 pledges: Christie
Adkins, Michele Baritell, Beau
Beauchemin, Tricia Crotts,
Carmen Ellis, Julie Fields,
Courtney Fincher, Lucy
Goodwin, Bonnie Graves,
Tiffany Hacke, Lisa Hines,Dee
Huskey, Tina Irvin, Holly
Kearney, Margaret Kowalski,
Shana McAdoo, Howey
McAuley, Joy Newman,
Martha Peacock, Beth Powell,
Charlotte Rakowski, Gennie
Ray, Ann Ripchik, Amy Sadler,
Kathy Sare, Marni Schlifkin, j
Carole Sharpless, Robbyn �
Shulman, Kirsten Spiegel, :
Michelle Steiner, Julie Thomp-
son, Laura Uhlig, Stephanie
Withrow.
CONGRATULATIONS! Chi j
Omegas for winning THE
AWARD OF ACHIEVEMENT
at National Convention Way
to go Chi-O. We're the best!
WAY TO GO CHI-O on those I
AWESOME grades Keep it j
up ladies!
ZETA TAU ALPHA- Good !
luck with Rush. The pledges
and sisters of Chi Omega.
KAPPA ALPHA-The pledges
and sisters of Chi Omega would
like to thank you for an unfor-
gettable Pref night. We had a j
wonderful time!
PI DELTA'S - Welcome back!
Hope you all have a great se-
mester!
S Financi.il Aid Available S
Attention All Stud�nt�l
Undergradt ft CnduMa. Om �5 BfiUon to gran fc
�cholanritoi are now avaOabla nomprtvair tarter ft
govammn t wurraa far Coliagt Studam nattonwlda. All
�lud�n�iar�ellglb�"lLrtu� help ynulorato'hemunty Slat
you M eUgMt to rmive. Mfti �� now being
accepted. To receive your MM aid program call:
Shuktit Vtnattcial SrnHctn
BMBMHHitHMI
Announcements
NATIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS
Any department or school with a
viable candidate for a national
scholarship should contact David
Sanders in theHonorsOffke(6373)
bySeptemberll,1992. Inaddition
toa4.0GPAandnoteworthycam-
pus activities, the student should
have selected a project for gradu-
atestudiesandhavedemonstrated
exceptional ability and interest in
academic research techniques.
HONORS SEMINAR
Any faculty member interested in
submitting a proposal for an Hon-
ors Seminar for Spring Semester
1993 should call David Sanders
(6373) or come by the new Honors
Office (GCB 2)26) by Friday Sep-
tember 4,199Z
STUDENTS FOR I.IFF.
Areyouamongthepro-life minor-
ity on campus? If so, please join
ECU Students for Life. We offer
support, information, and many
exciting opportunities! Call
Heather or Laurie at 7587698for
more information.
EAST CAROLINA
HONORS
ORGANIZATION
The first ECHO (East Carolina
Honors Organization) meeting of
the 1992-1993 yearwillbeonTues-
day, Sep tember 8, at 5:00 in the
General Classroom Bldg Room
2017. Pleasecometofindourabout
our exciting year. We would love
to have you attend. Refreshments
will be served.
BISEXUAL-GAY -
LESBIAN
SUPPORT GROUP
Social support and activities.
Meetings are closed. Call 757-
6766 11:00 - 12:15 Tues. and
Thurs. or 1:00 - 2:30 Wed. for
information on meeting time and
place.
VOLUNTEERS FOR
RESEARCH STUDY
The Section of Infectious Dis-
easesECU School of Medicine
in conjunction with the Stucent
Health Center is conducting a
study on the sexual spread of
herpes viruses. We are looking
for men and women 18 years
and older who have never had
genital herpes. If you are inter-
ested in obtaining information,
Call Jean Askew, R.N. at 919-
551-2578.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
TheGreenville-Pitt County Spe-
cial Olympics will be conduct-
ing a Soccer Coaches training
School on Saturday, September
19 from 9 am - 4 pm for all indi-
viduals interested in volunteer-
ing to coach soccer. We are also
looking for volunteer coaches in
the following sports: basketball
skills, team basketball, swim-
ming, gymnastics, powerlifting,
rollerskating and bowling. No
experience is necessary. Formore
information contact Greg
Epperson at 830-4551.
STUDENT
ORGANIZATION
REGISTRATION FORMS
DUE
Are you an officer or member of
an ECU student organization?
StudentOrganizationsmust reg-
ister each year with the Univer-
sity to be eligible to utilize Uni-
versity facilities, receive funding
from Student Government As-
sociation,and participate in Uni-
versity sponsored events. Please
be sure to turn your forms in by
September 30,1992 so you may
continue to use these privileges.
Forms are available in 210
Mendenhall Student Center.
OMICRON DELTA KAPPA
MEETING
The first ODK meeting will be
held Thursday, September 3,
1992 from 5:15 - 5:45 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center,
Room 241. All faculty, staff,and
student members encouraged to
attend. For regrets, contact Lisa
Shibley at 757-4711. For more
information contact Lisa Shibley
at 757711.
EXCEL COURSE
The Decision Sciences Depart-
ment will offer a non-credit
course at no cost. Classes are 2-
4 pm Fridays from September 4
through October 2,1992. Enroll-
ment is limited; preference will
be given to students that received
transfer credit for DSCI2223(In-
troduction to Computers). To
register, call (919) 757-6893 by
September3,1992. EXCEListhe
spreadsheet and graphics used
in business courses.
STUDENT UNION
RECEPTION
All students are invited to at-
tend the reception of the East
Carolina University Student
Union, Tuesday September 8,
1992at7:(X)pmintheCreatRoom
of Mendenhall Student Center.
Refreshments will be served and
casual attire is appropriate. For
additional information, call the
Student Union office at 757-4715.
TRAVEL-STUDY-LEARN
It's not too late to apply for the
Nationa 1 or Interna tional Student
Exchange or for one of many
study abroad opportunities! If
you are interested in paying ECU
tuition and attending one of 107
other universities around the
nited States or one of over 40
English speaking foreign loca-
tions, investigate the many op-
portunities available to you
through the ECU exchange pro-
grams. Visit Ms. Stephanie
Evancho in Brewster A -117orcaIl
757-6769 for an appointment or
pick up a brochure and applica-
tion form soon. Visit our semi-
nar on Sept. 10 in GCB Room
1003 at 4:00 pm.
STUDY IN ENGLAND
New opportunities are avail-
able for study in England
through the International
Programs office. Find out
about the opportunities and
call to set upan appointment
to meet a representative
from a university in England
on Wednesday or Thursday,
Sept. 2 or 3, in Brewster A-
117. Please contact
Stephanie Evancho, 757-
6769 for your personal ap-
pointment to learn more
about the exciting programs
available.
CRAFTSMEN EAST
GUILD
East Carolina Craftsmen
East Guild will hold its first
meeting on Thursday, Sept-
3 in Jenkins Fine Arts Build-
ing (room 223) at 5:00 pm.1
This is an organization of
metals, textiles and woods
majors but anyone is weN
come to come. Dues, work-
shops, funding and elections
will be discusses. Be there
CATHOLIC STUDENT
CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student
Center would like to welcom
New and Returning Students
and invite you to celebrate with
us the Sunday Eucharist. Sun-
day Masses: 11:30 am and 8:30
pm at the Newman Center, 953
E. 10th Street (at the foot of Co
lege HillDriveand 2 houses from
theFletcherMusicBuilding). The
Center is open for study andot
relaxation every day from 8:30
am to 11 pm. For further inforj
mation, call Fr. Paul Vaeth at
757-1991.





10
The East Carolinian
v.
Septembers, 1992
Lifestyle
Photo courtsy Warner Broe. Entartalnrrwnt
Christopher Columbus (George Corraface) and Martin Pinzon (Robert Davi) in "Christopher Cclumbus �The Discovery The film
maintains a historically successful storyline, yet confuses the audience with unknowns and irrelevant characters.
History comes to life
'Christopher Columbus' sails into theatres
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
Five hundred years have passed since
OmstopherColunTbusniadehishistoricalvoy-
age to prove that the world is round. Now the
fattier-son production team, Alexander and
Dya Salkind, bring the story to life in the new
film Christopher Columbus - The Discovery.
Columbus (George Corraface) challenges
the beliefs of the scholars of his day by pro-
claiming that the world is not flat His dream
is to prove his theory by sailing to India by way
of the East
After being scorned and rejected by King
John II, Columbus presents his proposal to
King Ferdinand (Tom Selleck) and Queen
Isabella (Rachel Ward) of Spain. He is forced to
defend his position before the Spanish Inquisi-
tion and Thomas de Torquemada (Marlon
Brando), and again is denied sponsorship for
his voyage.
Columbusneverabandonshisdream, how-
ever, and finally wins the support of the doubt-
ful Ferdinand and Isabella.
Once at sea, Columbus faces many set-
backs. Most of his crew members rum against
him at some point of the voyage. Demanding
return to Spain, many threaten mutiny. How-
ever, true to his dream, Columbus is willing to
face his own death rather than return to Spain
unsuccessful.
Finally, the crew spots land and makes
friendly contact with the natives of the island.
The Santa Maria wrecks off shore and several
crew members are forced to remain when Co-
lumbus returns to Spain.
Once Columbus is gone, the crew members
quarrel among themselves and end up mur-
dered by the natives. Meanwhile, Columbus
arrives in Spain as a hero.
Christopher Columbus - The Discovery suc-
cessfully presents the history lesson to the
audience. Columbus proved thathecould sail
into the East and not fall off the edge of the
earth. Beyond this fact, it is difficult to under-
stand the plot of the movie.
The confusion begins immediately when
theopeningscene occurs in an unknownplace,
at an unknown time, with unknown relevance
to the movie.
The plot later attempts to address some
type of religious conflict in Spain, but begins
and ends in one scene.
A hint of sabotage and murderous intent
occursduringthevoyage,but the actual origin
is lost to the audience.
Christopher Columbus himself changes.
Before and during the voyage, he is optimistic
and heroic. During the return voyage, he
becomes a loathsome tyrant
See Columbus, page 8
Page 7
Twin Peaks carries
on with Tire Walk'
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The newest film by director
David Lynch had its beginnings
several years ago as a bizarre tele-
vision series called Twin Peaks.
That series began with the discov-
ery of the dead body of Laura
Palmer wrapped in plastic.
Twin Peaks�FireWalkmthMe
chronicles the events preceding
Laura Palmer's murder. Because
this film is a prequel, the story
stands by itself; the film can be
thoroughly appreciated without
ever having seen the television se-
ries.
Fire Walk begins with an FBI
investigation of a murder in the
state of Washington. From there
the tale travels ahead one year to
die town of Twin Peaks where an-
other murder seems imminent.
In Twin Peaks the story cen-
ters on the activities of Laura
Palmer (Sheryl Lee). Laura, ahome-
coming queen, suffers from a dys-
functional home life. Her father is
strangely attracted to, yet frighten-
ingly jealous, of Laura and her sun-
dry activities. Laura snorts cocaine,
has two boyfriends with whom she
has decidedly odd relations and
works some evenings as a prosti-
tute in a local sleazy bar.
"No one really knows menot
even (my best friend) Donna ex-
plains Laura to James, one of her
boyfriends. This film maintains
such a powerful impact because
the audience never really gets to
know Laura. Like the characters in
Fire Walk the audience feels a com-
pulsive desire to try to understand
this tragic character yet feels hope-
lessly unable to do so. The wonder-
ful magic of fiction, after all is that
the audience gets a perspective that
none of the characters in the story
are allowed.
Laura remains an enigma long
past the film's final reel. She lin-
gers in the consciousness of the
filmgoer pulling the mind in dif-
ferent directions in an attempt to
understand her and the world in
which she lived.
See Fire, page 8
Commentary
Outward Bound
teaches lessons in life
Hammer to perform at The Creek
More than 30 dancers will
help lead high impact show
By George Sartiano
Staff Writer
Saturday, Sept. 5, Hammer
makes his way onto the stage at
Walnut Creek Amphitheater.
Hammer will be coming to Wal-
nut Creek as part of his flashy Too
Legit Tc Quit
tour.
This tour
has been her-
alded as one of
the greatest
9tage shows to
come along
this decade.
"It'll be the most spectacular
live show ever presented
� Hammer, of his 'Too Legit
Too Quit' tour
Hammer himself has promised
that, "It'll be the most spectacular
liveshow ever presented accord-
ing to a press release.
The show promises to be as
explosive as Hammer's own burst
into the limelight, with large
amounts of pyrotechnics, lighting
arrangements and explosivedance
performances.
If nothing else, the show will
be very energetic. With over 30
dancers to back him up, Hammer
will lead his posse in one of the
most high-impact and rigorous
stage shows ever taken out on the
road.
Hammer has taken his posse
out on the road in support of his
latest album release, Too Legit Too
Quit, the follow up to his ex-
tremely successful Please Hammer
Don't Hurt 'Em album.
With his new album, Ham-
mer hopes to once again expand
the scope of his audience, which is
already one of the most diversi-
fied fallowings around.
The new album has taken
Hammer into new musical direc-
tions, including several jazz and
gospel
tracks. In
addition to
exploring
new musi-
cal areas,
Hammer
has also
tried to ad-
dress social issues through his
songs. Hammer has tried to ad-
dress both the lives of inner-city
youths, as well as trying to speak
out about problems that affect the
world as a whole.
As with his other albums,
Hammer has once again put one
spiritual song on his album, show-
ing again the commitment to God
which he made when he first em-
barked upon his career.
"This album is an artistic and
sociological statement Hammer
went on to say.
Hammer has promised that
this tour will be great, and if this
promise holds up as well as his
others have, it will be a spectacu-
lar show well worth seeing. If the
stage show is half as exciting as
Hammer's latest videos have been,
then this show will be a must-see.
By Dana Danielson
Lifestyle Editor
No beds, no showers, no toi-
lets. For four weeks.
This was the first thing I
thought of when the confirma-
tion came for my first Outward
Bound course two years ago.
Labeled as a "troubled
youth or "youth at risk I was
sent by my father with a heavy
chip on my shoulder to the
Voyageur Outward Bound School
in Minnesota to improve my atti-
tude.
How was four weeks battling
mosquitoes, portages, canoeing
?nd rationed toilet paper going
to teach me how to come home
before curfew? How was learn-
ing to set up camp going to im-
prove my study habits? How was
eating tons of granola and pluck-
ing off pesterous leaches going to
motivate me?
As I left the Boundary Waters
Canoe Area on the Canadian bor-
der I vowed I would never leave
the comforts of air-conditioning,
cars and fast food. But as time
passed I realized that Outward
Bound taught me a whole lot more
than outdoor skills; it taught me
about life and self, perhaps the
two most necessary things in this
world.
Achieving personal goals is
the underlying themeof Outward
Bound. Some of these goals in-
cluded making it through a mile
portage carrying a 75 lb. canoe on
my head, perfecting navigation,
learning to rappel and rockclimb
and cooking edible meals for 10
over a campfire.
When people of similar ages
but vastly different backgrounds
are removed from familiar
ground, placed in an entirely new
situation and challenged to sur-
vive with the barest essentials,
everyone's true nature is re-
vealed. Some become leaders,
some learn respect, some just
learn to work hard. But all go
back "home" changed.
In four weeks my brigade of
eight "troubled youth" and two
instructors pulled through 144
miles of canoeing and portaging.
We also completed Solo, a major
aspect of Outward Bound. Spend-
ing three days and nights corn-
See Outward, page 9
Who's There?
AtticFizz
ThursdayThursday
Billy ClubfestEric Manning
wHard CoreFriday
FridayLightning Wells
IndecisionwHis Boomers
SaturdaySaturday
Cold SweatSeven Feathers
New Deli
Friday
Sex, Love &
Money
Saturday
Queen Sarah
Saturday
O'Rocks
Friday
Killkidsw
Foley's Bridge
Saturday
Raised by Cows
Photo courtMy Capitol R�cord�
Achieving monumental goals in only a few years, Hammer is the best-
selling rap artist in history. He will perform Sept. 5 at Walnut Creek.
Pasta Works
Thursday Friday
Klee Liles Klee Liles
Walnut
Creek
Friday
Hammer
Sunday
Allman
Brothers
Saturday
Klee Liles





w
8 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 3 . 1992
Columbus Fire
Continued from page 7
Characters appear in the movie
with no warning and no explana-
tion. The audience is left to figure
out exactly who each person is and
how they relate to the movie, or even
toColumbus. Several scenesappear
to be thrown into the movie, with no
apparent purpose. The audience
must use imagination to figure out
how each scene relates to the plot
The actors and actresses per-
form their respectivepartsqui Jewell.
However, the details of the story
make little sense to the audience.
Perhaps with a more focused
plot mat does not try to address
everythinggoingon inSpain during
that time period, the movie would
be more successful.
David Lynch has proven to be
a master of the offbeat in films like
Eraserhead and Blue Velvet. In Fire
Waiikheagain transports the viewer
into an alternate world � the un-
derbelly of a society that seems
serenely peaceful at first glance.
Lynch shoots the majestic moun-
tains of the Pacific Northwest with
beautiful clarity then swings the
viewer's gaze to a corpse or an
illicit sex scene.
Twin Peaks�Fire WalkwithMe
mesmerizes the viewer with its
hypnotic mix of normal and devi-
ant behavior. The film presents
characters who have the appear-
ance of normality but every one of
them seems to hide turbulent emo-
tions inside the calm facade.
This film will upset many
people. The subject matter is ex-
tremely disturbing. Lynch pushes
grotesque scenes right at the
viewer. He holds the camera for
what seems like minutes on the
ashen face of Teresa Banks while
she lies on a table in the morgue; he
refuses to swing the camera when
Donna is being sexually molested
whileinadrunkenstupor;he forces
the viewer to watch Laura freely
give herself to various men in the
film. Lynch refuses to shy away
from controversial scenes.
Unlike the television series,
which had an ample amount of
dark humor, Twin Peaks � Fire
Walk With Me contains only dark
drama. For well over two hours the
Continued from page 7
viewer is assaulted with events that
most only read about in newspa-
pers. By being forced into the
middle of these disturbing events,
the viewer feels the need to leave
but finds himself unable to do so.
Lynch tells a story that en-
grosses the viewer. He vividly
draws his characters with broac
yet subtle strokes so that the viewe
seems to completely understanc
thecharacter, yet seems nottoknov
anything about them.
Twin Peaks � Fire Walk Wit
Me is an engrossing, disturbing filr
that deserves to be seen. Althoug
some may find its techniques ob
jectionable, none can fault the rav
power with which it holds the
viewer's attention.
LIFESTYLE WRITERS!
Meeting today at 5:30 p.m.
Mandatory attendance � new story assignments and
stylistics seminar.
If you have not Tilled out an application and are inter-
ested in writing, please join us in The East Carolinian
office, second floor of the Publications building.
Are you interested in working for Expressions
magazine? We have a position for MANAGING
EDITOR: monthly stipend of $120.00 Only those
willing to make a committment should apply.
Stop by the Expressions office in the Student
Publications Building Monday, Wednesday, or
Friday between 10-11:30 or call 757-6927 for
further information.
DOCTOR BARBER SH
WetDry Cuts $7.00
Shampoo & Cut $10.00
No Appointment Necessary
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Gas is the same low price with cash or credit at BP
Pre-Season Special
3026-A East Tenth Street
Greenville, NC
830-6152
i r
EAST CAROLINA'S MINORITY PUBLICATION:
Minority being any group of students that feel
outside the "mainstream For example: ethnic
groups, international students, non-traditional
students, differently-abled students, veterans or
women.
4t Tfawi "pCufentifiA c&ifuui
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"Wtatuaviet, $10.50
i 'PdC-0 $16.00
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ask tor Tamara or Ann
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At the intersection of Farmville Blvd.
757-1120
N.Y. CITY MIX TAPES
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Kid Capri, Ron-G and more
Also selling the latest in
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!
����-
k.
SEPTEMBER 3, 1992
The East Carolinian 9
Outward
Continued from page 7
pletely alone is something few
people ever experience and it
gave me new meaning to the term
alone.
Two years have passed since
I ran away from the Northwoods
of Minnesota and still I realize
every day how much Outward
Bound saved my life.
My father is also extremely
proud of the "new me" and as a
result of this, in a very emotional
conversation, he offered to send
roe back to the school of my
choice. In July I packed my ra-
tioned underwear and clothes
and boarded a plane for Colo-
rado for my second course. This
sounded almost like a vacation
compared to the first; two weeks
df Whitewater rafting and
hbrsetrailing.
1 had forgotten what it was
like, both the easier and more
difficult aspects of outdoorship.
1 slept under the stars every
night (sometimes atop rocks of
varied shapes and sizes) listen-
ing to the coyotes, paddling
through flat water at the end of a
long day, staying in the saddle
for 25 miles at a time, using a
bathroom facility known as a
groover (I'll tell you about that in
person if you're curious) and fac-
ing another Solo.
There were times when I cried
with frustration, but the times
when I outdid myself made every
drop of sweat worthwhile.
Halfway up a 100 foot
rockclimb, in hysterics and para-
lyzed with fear, I realized exactly
why I came back to Outward
Bound. There is a point when fear
is avalanched by determination,
and when I finished that climb
(30 minutes, an eternity, later) I
was bathed in a feeling of eupho-
ria. I knew that I could succeed in
anything I set my mind to.
Through all the challenges
and fears and exhaustion I never
cried a tear. But on graduation
day, both in Minnesota and Colo-
rado I found myself saying
goodbye to people who I prob-
ably will never see again. Those
people know me better than any-
one ever has or ever will. They
saw me through every emotion
imaginable, supported me when
I couldn't support myself. And
for this I thank and attribute a
part of my every success to those
people.
The term ou hoard bound origi-
nally refers to a ship leaving the
safety of harbor. And no one can
grow surrounded by safety. The
next chance I get I will bound
away from my harbor, pack those
three pairs of underwear,
bugspray and my journal and
sleep under the stars with a smile.
Hams Teeter
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The East Carolinian
September 3, 1992
Sports
Page 11
Pirates must control ball to beat Orangemen
Doubters will see
truth after victory
By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
There are expectations to live
up to and anything less than a sea-
son-ending bowl game will fall
short. As unfortunate as that may
sound, it is undeniably true.
ECU's first football game of
the season, against Syracuse Sept.
5 at 7 p.m will set the tone of
things to come for the Bucs' 1992
season. A Pirate victory will in-
crease the already enormous ex-
pectations (of Pirate faithful) and
increase the volume on thecries for
recognition. A loss will send even
the most devout Pirate fan into
depression, with thoughts that
maybe, just maybe last year may have
just been a fluke.
A victory over the Orangemen
will not only bring down the goal
post but senu the Bucs up in the
rankings.
Expect the defense to show im-
provement from last season de-
spite the loss of Ail-American Rob-
ert Jones and defensive back Chris
Hall.
Greg Grandison, Tony Davis
and Jerry Dillon have all improved
from last season and the Bucs are
sure to get at least one defensive
score.
They will be more than able to
handle hyped-upQadry Ismail. He
is not as good as his brother was in
college and may not be better than
former Pirate Dion Johnson.
John Jett will be more appreci-
ated now that he is gone and ab-
sence will make the heart grow
fond. Did anyone see the ad in The
East Carolinian for a punter? The
Kicking crew is lacking.
Unfortunately the Pirates will
probably need the magic they had
last year, and that left with Jeff
Blake.
Sean McConnell will do a fair
job and backup Michael Anderson
xvill see time, but turnovers will
decide the game and might sink
the Pirates'ship. Both quarterbacks'
lack of game experience is likely to
be apparent.
Lady Pirates destroy Barton
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
ECU kicked off their volley-
DalJ season I uesday night, with
a scrimmage against Barton Col-
lege. The Lady Pirates domi-
nated winning the match in
three straight games: 15-2, 15-
. ,3,15-3.
Coach McCaskill was happy
with her teams performance, but
still saw areas which needed im-
provement.
"We were hoping to access
-our strengths and weaknesses;
team and individual
McCaskill said.
"1 was pleased with our in-
tensity. There were bright spots
from everyone, including the
�"freshmen, though we showed
some errors in our execution. It
i wasn't where it needs to be. We
Z made some errors in our pass-
2 ing and serving game
The Pirates also used this
match up as a outlet to experi-
ment with the team.
"This scrimmage was an op-
portunity to play everyone and
it was an opportunity to play a
lot of player combinations
McCaskill said.
Seniors Jenny Parsons and
Wendy Schultz were two of the
main factors in the victory. Par-
sons had eight service aces, and
directed the offense as the main
setter while Schultz led the way
with five kills.
McCaskill understands the
leadership values these players
add to the team.
"They are veterans; two re-
turning starters McCaskill
said.
"1 feel they lead us tonight,
just like I expected
Junior Leigh Wilcox, and
freshman Gwynn Baber also had
very impressive showings.
Wilcox led the team with 11 ser
vice aces and assisted on fou
blocks. Along the way Babei
and Parson also registered thret
block assists apiece.
The three seniors, a strong
sophomore and junior class and
a incredible recruiting class of
five freshman form the best ECU
line up in recent years.
"For the first time since I've
been here we have all the ingre-
dients to be successful
McCaskill said. "In the past
we've put too much effort into
dwellingon the wins and losses,
and it's taken a toll on us
Now the Pirates finally have
the seniors to lead the team, the
support of the returning sopho-
mores and juniors and the new
ideas and skills of the incoming
freshman.
ECU has all the skills and
potential skills to perhaps move
up to the next level this season.
Do not expect the miracle
fourth quarter comebacks of a year
ago. � Syracuse is too talented a
team to not be prepared for a late
surge. And, once again, Blake will
not be taking the snaps to orches-
trate the comeback.
In Sum: No Jeff Blake. No
John Jett. No Robert Jones.
If McConnell and Anderson
can not keep the ball out of
Syracuse's hands the defense will
not be able to stop theOrangemen
given too many extra chances.
If ECU does not turn the ball
over, make a beeline for the goal
posts, watch out for mace and
enjoy the victory party.
ECU 28, Syracuse 27
By Chas Mitch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
As the temperature, heat and
humidity rises so does the antici-
pation for Saturday's season
opener against the Orangemen of
Syracuse.
From Brian Baily (WNCT-TV
9) to Lee Corso (ESPN), even Vegas
Vinnie (Nevada odds maker) are
predicting a Pirate loss; however,
someone forgot to tell the "New
Look" Pirates.
Aside from the obvious ab-
sence of 13 seniors, the sporting
world is expecting nothing more
than a 6-5 overall season record.
Well my Saber Slashing crew
members, here's the lowdown.
Offense: No premier offen-
sive leader in the back field. Tom
Scott will anchor and command
the line throughout the contest,
however; with the lack of "real"
game experience, McConnell &
Anderson will have their work cut
out for them. - 7
Defense:Oneofthehnestcom-
plete defensive teams as there are
in thenation, will utilize teamspeed
and depth to stop the opposition.
Unfortunately, the lack of total of-
fensive support will cause the Pi-
rate defense to remain on the battle-
field much longer than required.
8
Special Teams: The question
See Victory, page 12
ECU may boast one of their best volleyball teams ever. This season promises to better than last.
Inside Pirate Football '92
Syracuse
1991 record: 10-2-0
Primary offense: Pro-option
Primary defense: 31 Multiple, 4-3
Offensive lettermen returning, lost: 16, 6
Defensive lettermen returning, lost: 13, 8
Special teams lettermen returning, lost: 2,1
H?qd. Coach: Paul Pasqualoni (Penn State, 72)
Record at School: 10-2-0 (1 season)
Career Record: 44-19-0 (7 seasons)
General Information
Location: Syracuse, N.Y.
Enrollment: 11,600
Colors: Orange
Nickname: Orangemen
Conference: Big East
Stadium: Carrier Dome (50,000)
Srrface: AstroTurf
1992 Schedule
Sept. 5 at East Carolina
Sept. 12 TEXAS
Sept. 19 OHIO STATE
Oct. 3 At Louisville
Oct. 10 RUTGERS
Oct. 17 at West Virginia
Oct. 24 at Temple
Oct. 31 PITTSBURGH
Nov. 7 VIRGINIA TECH
Nov. Hat Boston College
Nov. 21 MIAMI, FLA.
Big East Conference game
fff
Coach Paul Pasqualoni
Coach Steve Logan
SYRACUSE
B
UNIVERSITY
18-70
Qadry Ismail
ECU
1991 record: 11-1-0
Primary offense: Pro-option
Primary defense: Multiple 50
Offensive lettermen returning: 5
Defensive lettermen returning: 6
General Information
Location: Greenville, N.C.
Enrollment: 17,760
Colors: Purple & Gold
Nickname: Pirates
Conference: Independent
Stadium: Ficklen (35,000)
Surface: Grass
Previous Results
ECU SU
1988 14 38
1989 16 18
1991 23 20
Homegame
i mmu
Jerry Dillon
Fearless Football Forecast
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Assistant Sports Editor
Courtney Jones, SGA President
Brian Kerns, AC of Belk Hall
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Tim Jones, Senior, industrial tech.
avg:
��y.
28
23
20
28
33
21
25.5
27
17
14
24
30
35
24.5
Less than 2,500 student tickets left!
"A Grandison touchdown will put ECU over the top.
"You've gotta believe
"Pirates still have a winning attitude
"Our 'D' will detonate the 'Missile
"Grandison and Anderson will have big games"
"We have to come out strong in the first half to win
(Editor's note: opinions expressed do not reflect the
views of this paper and are solely the property of the
individual. Please no wagering.)
j N.C. State's Feggins out at least until January
RALEIGH (API � Fvpn if Rnnt FQr,�;�r u� �.�
RALEIGH (AP) � Even if Bryant Feggins be-
comes eligible and regains use of his shoulder and
hand, the forward may be too rusty to help North
Carolina State this season, his coach says.
"If he made a great turnaround and got all the
use back in his hand he could conceivably play in
January Wolfpark coach Les Robinson said Thurs-
day. "But I don't think he could really be a major
factor unless something miraculous would happen.
I don't like to be negative but you have to be
realistic
Robinson said Feggins, who isn't enrolled at
N.C. State this semester, fell behind in four courses
because of an April shooting incident in Greens-
boro in which he suffered nerve damage. He will
spend the next few months completing 12 credit
hours he needs to become eligible for the second
semester.
The 6-foot-6-inch, 238-pound junior missed last
season after suffering a knee injury. Feggins aver-
aged 13.3 points and 5.2 rebounds during his sopho-
more season two years ago and was in good aca-
demic standing before the injury, Robinson said.
"It's just a matter of how they (professors)
normally handle it when a student becomes ill right
around exam time the coach said. "It will be
handled on a professor-by-professor basis that will
allow him to make the work up
Robinson said he still doesn't know when to
expect a healthy Feggins, whose inside scoring and
rebounding strength was missed last season.
"They (the doctors) have never given us any
real concrete answer � six weeks or six months i r
a vear he said. "It's just a guess, nature has to take
its course.
' We want him to get his school work back
in order and get functioning in his life and let
basketball take its course Robinson added. "It is
more important that he gets that degree. He can-
not control the arm and the injury. All he can
control is the rehabilitation
Feggins, who has seen a specialist at Duke
University Medical Center to help repair the dam-
aged nerves, is improving each day, Robinson
said.
He has his ups and downs. He just has to
work through that Robinson said.
" The doctors are pleased with the wav the
nerves have healed and are very positive about
that. I le says he feels good anil he is starting to get
sme movement back
Connors
predicts shut
out versus
Navratilova
NEWYORK(AP)�Nottobetoomalechauvinistic
about it, but Jimmy Connors flatly declared Martina
Navratilova won't win even a set off him in Battle of the
Sexes III.
"It's not going to go three sets he said Thursday as
they touted their Sept 25 tennis match in Las Vegas. "I
don' t wan t to take any chances of anything happening in
the long run, so I'm going to get in there and try to pound
it right away and get the hell out of there. I want to give
her a little discouragement early.
"I'm going to bring a few tricks along, all legal of
course
Connors offered no flowers, as Bobby Riggs once
did. Instead, Connors politely pulled out a chair for
Navratilova, and she responded graciously as she sat
down, "Thank you so much
So began thesymbolismand sounds of a match that
picks up where Riggs and Billie Jean King left off 19years
ago.
Riggs flustered Margaret Court with flowers in the
first of these scams, then got his comeuppance against
King in a match that probably did more to boost tennis'
popularity than any other in the past two decades.
Those were the days of Women's Lib, and this is the
year of women in politics. Some folks figured a few
bucks could be made on another male-female tennis
thing, and they're probably right.
Connors, never one to shy away from a high-priced
exhibition, immediately liked the idea of a $500,000
winner's prize for the 2-out-of-3-set match. Navratilova,
along with Chris Evert the only two players, male or
female, to win more titles than Connors, also readily
agreed � if she got a handicap.
They haggled a little � "She wanted the whole
court, from fence to fence he said � then settled on
giving her two feet extra on each side (half the width of
the doubles area) and limiting him to one serve.
"I know Jimmy would beat me with regular rules
Navratilova said. "Jimmy is still beating the top men's
players
Would it be 6-0,6-0?
"Close to it Connors responded. "I don't think
that's a match manv people would have taken seri-
ouslv.
See Connors, page 12






V.
12 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 1 , 1992
Victory
Hornets sign Bogues to contract
Continued from page 11
at hand is the kicking game. The
supporting cast of long and short
snappers, holders and Mockers are
more than adequate to provided
protection, but currently the ECU
special teams lack a strong kicking
unit7
In Sum: Horseshoes, four leaf
dovers,Ojibwaywindsocksorany
other good luck omens will be well
received.
ECU 23, SYRACUSE 17
Connors
Continued from page 11
Navratilova and Connors cer-
tainly are taking the money seri-
ously�they hadabrieftugof war
with a fake winner's check during
the photo op.
Some bettors apparently are
taking the match very seriously,
according to a spokesman for host
Caesars Palace Total wagering al-
ready has exceeded all the bets
taken in Las Vegas for Wimbledon,
with Connors going from an early
9-2 favorite to a current 7-2.
Navratilova's recent victory over
Monica Seles seems to have stirred
sentiment for her.
It's 300-1 in Las Vegas that
Connorsand Navratilovabothwin
the US. Open, which starts next
week.
"Ihat'sprobably290-1 forhim
and 10-1 for me Navratilova
cracked Thursday, getting in an
early zinger.
Connors, a few days shy of 40
and limping with a strained left
thigh muscle that caused him to
back out of a tuneup tourney mis
week, couldn't argue with
Navratilova onhis Openodds. But
he warned against anyone betting
that the 35-year-old Navratilova
will beat him.
"I've been getting by with one
serve for 20 years, just putting the
ball in play and getting into the
rallies he said.
"I don't think if s my serve
that'sgoingtomakethedifference.
It's the spin, the way I place it, the
way I'm going to mix it up. I don't
think she's going to be used to that
I move a little bit better than Seles
andGraf.There'salot of little things
that come into this
CHARLOTTE (AP)�Veteran
point guard Muggsy Bogues signed
a multi-year contract extension Fri-
day, giving the Cnarlotte Hornets
more room under their salary cap to
sign first-round draft pick Alonzo
Mourning.
While Bogues' numbers made
him invaluable to the Hornets, it
was the figures in his new contract
that were equally impressive to
Hornets' officials.
"Not only will this new exten-
sion keep Muggsy in Charlotte for
the years to come, but it will also
make it much easier, salary cap-
wise, for us to sign Alonzo Mourn-
ing said team president Spencer
Stolpen.
"WeappreciateMuggsy'swill-
ingness to make this possible, but
we have learned from past experi-
ences to expect no less from him
Stolpen said. "He once again has
shown his ability to make the big
assist"
Details of the contract were not
made available. Bogues was happy
with the deal, and not just for him-
self. "Signing Alonzo is a move to-
ward a higher ground Bogues
said. "I'm glad that the Hornets and
my agent were able to work out a
deal that made it possible for me to
contribute
Bogues, the NBA's shortest
player at 6-foot-6-inch, is the Hor-
nets' all-time leader in assists with
299, and steals with 584. He has
played in 325 of the franchise's 328
contests.
Last season, Bogues was fourth
in the league with 9.1 assists per
game, and eighth in steals at 2.07.
He was second in the NBA in as-
sists-to-turnover ratio at 4.76 after
leading the league in that category
in each of the last three seasons.
"Muggss been such a great
part of this organization and the
Charlotte communi ry that it's natu-
ral to want to keep him here for a
long time Charlotte coach Allan
Bristow said.
W
HELP WANTED
;ftS'
Mixed reviews for Whatizit
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) �
Whatizit played to mixed reviews
in its debut at the Barcelona Games'
dosing ceremonies. IOC president
Juan Antonio Samaranch likes the
mascot of the 19 Atlanta Olym-
pics. A designer for the 1994
Lillehammer Games doesn't.
Others still don't know
Whattothink about Whatizit, a com-
puter-generated figure with over-
sized sneakers, stars for eyes and
four-digit hands.
"Myself, I like this mascot"
Samaranch said. "And I like the
name
Says Petter Moshus, vice presi-
dent in charge of design for the
Winter Games in Lillehammer: "It
doesn't move my heart. But it does
look American without being Walt
Disney. To be honest, Idon't likeit
At Barcelona, the mascot was a
canine named Cobi, preceded by
Hodori the tiger at Seoul, Sam the
eagle at Los Angeles and Misha the
bear at Moscow.
"When Barcelona presented
Cobi, they also had some negative
comments Samaranch said. "My-
self, I like this mascot. Maybe there
could be some changes, but I like
the mascot
At the Albertville Winter
Games, the original mascot was a
mountain goat. It did not receive
good reviews and organizers
dumped it in favor of Magique, a
five-pointed star.
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IS TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR A
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FOOTBALL
mmm
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For Information Call: 757-4672
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I
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I





SEPTEMBER 3. 1992
The East Carolinian 13
1992 Pirate Sports Network
(Football Season)
Black Mountain, N.C.
Charleston, N.C.
Charlotte, N.C.
Clinton, N.C.
Edenton, N.C.
BizabethCity, N.C.
Farmville, N.C.
Farmville, N.C.
Franklin, Va.
Greenville, N.C.
Greensboro, N.C.
Henderson, N.C.
Jacksonville, N.C.
Kilmarnock, Va.
Laurinburg, N.C.
Lumberton, N.C.
Oxford, N.C.
WAYJ-1350AM
WOKh-1340 AM
WNOW-1030 AM
WCLN-1170 AM
WZBO1260AM
WCNC-1240 AM
VVGHB-1250 AM
WRQR-94.3 FM
WLQM-101.7 FM
WNCT-1070 AM
W'GLD-1320 AM
WIZS-1450 AM
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WKW1-101.7 FM
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WTSB-580 AM
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Plvmouth, N.C.
Raleigh, N.C.
Roanoke Rapids, N.C.
Roxboro, N.C.
Roxboro, N.C.
St. Pauls, N.C.
Salisbury, N.C.
Sanford, N.C.
Shallotte, N.C.
Spruce Pine, N.C.
Wallace, N.C.
Wallace, N.C.
Washington, N.C.
Washington, N.C.
Whiteville, N.C.
Williamston, N.C.
Winston-Salem, N.C.
WPNC-1470 AM
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WLGQ:97.9 FM
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WTOB-1380AM
East Carolina vs. Va Tech
Saturday, Sept. 12, 1992, Noon
Greenville, N.C.
Raleigh, N.C.
Winston-Salem, N.C.
Charlotte, N.C.
Wilmington, N.C.
Roanoke, Va.
Richmond, Va.
Harrisonburg, Va.
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Kingsport, Tenn.
SportsSouth
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Home Team Sports
WNCT-TV 9
WRDC-TV 28
WNRW-TV 45
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WWAY-TV 3
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WAP-TV 30
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Steve Logan Press Conferences
(Mondays 12:30-1 p.m.)
Greenville, N.C.
WNCT-1070 AM
Steve Logan Television Show
Greenville, N.C. WNCT-TV9
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Sundays at Noon
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Sundays at 11:30 p.m.
Thursdays at 5:30 p.m.
Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m.
Tuesdays 5:30 p.m.
Fridays 9:30 p.m.
Steve Logan Radio Call-in Show
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Washington, N.C. WDLX-93.3 FM
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 3, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 03, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.890
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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