The East Carolinian, September 1, 1992







Lifestyle
A new rule
Academic changes
could improve
University system
and make life
Page 5 easier.
Get a life
Page 7
Back to school
means moving in
and readjusting
to college life.
Sports
Line 'em up
Page 11
Pirate linebackers
get tough & ready
for Syracuse.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 2
Circulation 12,000
GreenviUe, North Carolina
Tuesday, September 1,1992
14 Pages
'Downtown is where the students want to go. You can build a nightclub
anywhere in the city and the students won't go
�Co-partner of MMB Inc.
vOK'Jlik- ' Y
jgmg �

Photo by Dait Reed � The East Carolinian
A group of investors plans to open a three-story nightclub in the Blount-Harvey Building. The Greenville City
Council voted to abolish a spacing requirement that could have kept the nightclub from opening.
City Council opens door
for more downtown bars
By Jeff Becker
News Editor
On Aug. 24, the Greenville City Council voted 3-
2 to abolish an ordinance that restricted downtown
nightclubs from opening within 500 ft. of each other.
The decision brought a group of investors one
step closer to opening a three-story nightclub down-
town.
MMB Inc. plans to open the nightclub in the
Blount-Harvey building in the Evans Street Mall. The
proposed nightclub, tentatively called New York
Times, met opposition in the city council because it
would be fewer than 500 feet from the Fizz Bistro.
According to Fred Mattox, attorney for M.M.B.
Inc several of the downtown nightclubs were estab-
lished before the adoption of the 500 ft. requirement
in 1960. He said the clubs not effected by the ordi-
nance had a monopoly on nightclubs.
"What I did vas get rid of the monopoly
Mattox said.
Council members Blanch Forbes, Rufus Huggins
and Bob Ramey voted to abolish the ordinance. ECU
employee Inez Fridley and Mildred Council voted to
keep it.
However, the eight-month battle to open the
nightclub is not over.
The city council voted unanimously to ask the
city's planning and zoning department to study the
effect of nightclubs on residential and other zoned
areas downtown. The council may decide to enact
zoning requirements on downtown nightclubs.
MMB must also obtain a special use permit
from the Pi tt County Board of Adjusters before it can
open. Eight of the 10-member board must give M MB
approval to convert the Blount-Harvey building to a
nightclub from its original designation as a retail
store. The board of adjusters will vote on the issue
Sept. 24.
A co-partner of MMB, speaking on the condi-
tion of anonymity, said the club would benefit the
community.
'Tt will bring in a lot of money, provide jobs
and give the student- a place to go the co-partner
said. "Downtown is wr.ere the students want to go.
You can build a nightclub anywhere in the city and
the students won't go
According to tne co-partner, the nightclub will
hold about 4,000 people. The first floor will have a
dance floor and be open to those under 21. He said
the second floor wiM include a balcony mat over-
looks the first floor and will be reserved for over-age
drinkers.
"Eventually we would like to donate the third
floor to the university he said. "They could do
anything they want with it. We haven't discussed it
with the university yet
The proposed opening of the club also met
See Bars, page 2
Crime on campus
Robbery increases 500 percent
By Elizabeth Shimmel
Assistant News Editor
The ECU crime statistics for 1991 show a
500 percent increase in robbery on campus,
while burglary saw a
"We actually have groups
of college students steal
bikes from here and carry
them to other campuses and
sell them
� Lt. Keith Knox, ECU Public Safety
1.89 percent decrease.
To be classified as
a burglary, the perpe-
trator must enter a
building or room that is
not his or hers to com-
mit a felony or theft.
Lt. Keith Knox,di-
rector of crime preven-
tion said that many
cri mes in these two ca t-
egories can be pre-
vented if students would take the responsibility
to help out.
"We didn't expect the number of actual
burglaries to increase Knox said. "We had
hoped students would lock their dorm room
doors more (to protect themselves)
With crime increasing everywhere, Knox
said it should not be surprising to see crime
increase on campus.
"We are living today in the most violent
society ever, and (public safety) can't be every-
where Knox said. "For us to prevent every-
thing that happens would be impossible
Major increases were also seen in motor
vehicle theft, weapons violations and stolen prop-
erty.
Bicycle theftdoes not fall under stolen prop-
erty, but is still a major crime
on campus and is most often
a result of the bicycle owner's
negligence.
Knox said that many
students do not use the rec-
ommended U-type locks,
and many that do use them
often do not check to assure
that the lock is secured.
Knox also said that stu-
� dents should not leave their
bikes attached to a bike rack on campus for ex-
tended periods of time because that is when parts
of the bicycles may be stolen or damaged.
"We actually have groups of college stu-
dents steal bikes from here and carry them to
other campuses and sell them Knox said.
While students from other campuses come
here to steal, many campus crimes are committed
by ECU students. "Not everyone that comes to
school here is as honest as we would like to think
they are Knox said.
See Crime, page 3
Laboratory provides
educational opportunities
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
The Survey Research Laboratory of East
Carolina University has a mission. Its mission is
dedicated to providing educational opportuni-
ties to organizations in the region of Eastern
North Carolina.
Located in the Willis building on the cor-
ner of First and Reade streets, the lab is a part of
the Research Development Institute (RDI). In
the fall of 1989 the staff at RDI and the social
scientists on campus created the Research Labo-
ratory.
Ken Wilson, a professor in ECU's sociol-
ogy department, is the director of the Survey
Research Laboratory. Wilson, along with Mack
Simpson, oversee RDI.
"The purpose (of the laboratory) is to fa-
cilitate research both for East Carolina faculty,
for community and non-profit organizations
around the region and even some profit organi-
zations Wilson said.
Wilson also said that students gain practi-
cal experience in social research by working at
Survey Research Laboratory. He emphasized
the importance of both classroom experience
and working experience for students interested
in social research.
Whenever an organization wants to hire
the survey services of the lab, students are brought
in and trained in the survey process and in the
background of a given project.
The first step of any survey is to create a set
of clear and unbiased questions. Each question
needs to be specific and to the point.
Next, the people to be surveyed are se-
lected. The people selected represent all parts of
the surveyed community. The Survey Research
Laboratory relies on a national firm to select the
sample to be surveyed.
The third step of the survey is to hire and
train interviewers and give them experience in
surveying. One requirement for an interviewer
is to be comfortable talking on the telephone.
Once an interviewer has been trained, he or
she is given a questionnaire so that he or she will
be familiar with the survey. Then the interviewer
is given a list of people to call.
Once all the data has been collected, it is put
into a mainframe computer. The information is
printed out and analyzed according to different
attitudes in different areas of the community.
The information gathered in the Survey
See Research, page 2
Thieves steal 1Jh-huh' women
By Tracy Ford
Staff Writer
Alexander. "We just hope students
will still buy tickets
According to Lt. Knox, director
Two of the Raylettes, Ray of crime prevention, depending on
Charles' side kicks in the Diet Pepsi the value of the display the crime
ads, were recently stolen from the could be a misdemeanor larceny. If
Mendenhall Student Center. caught, the suspect would face as
The life size cardboard figures much as two years in prison, a fine or
displayed to promote
Ray Charles' concert
were lifted during Were not sure if we
normal operation should bring in the FBI
or what
hours, according to
Rudolph Alexander,
assistant vice chan-
cellor and director of
Mendenhall.
After moving
the display to several
different locations, Ray and the re-
maining Raylette are tied down di-
rectly in front of the information desk.
"Last weekend it was incredibly
busy here, we couldn't take our eyes
off the phones said Darlene Hardy,
receptionist for the information desk
at Mendenhall. "Someone had to see
it
"We're not sure if we should
bring in the FBI or what said
�Rudolph Alexander,
Assistant Vice-Chancellor
of University Unions
probation.
The first figure
was stolen during
the summer and the
second during the
first week of class.
The figures were
taken during nor-
mal operation hours
but no one wit-
nessed the crimes.
"When the first (Raylette) was
stolen, the display was completely
roped off said Hardy. "I guess they
went out the back door
"They're basically interested in
having the display back for the con-
cert Knox said.
The concert scheduled for Oct.
16 is being promoted by Pepsi in or-
See 'Uh-huh page 4
Photo by Dail Reed � The East Carolinian
Someone stole Ray Charles' Raylettes from the Mendenhall
Student Center Public Safety has no suspects.
Minges Coliseum
to add 1,000 seats
By Shay Pierce
Staff Writer
Minges Coliseum is about to undergo a major face lift.
Henry VanSant, associate director of athletic admissions
said Minges will be totally upgraded. The new look will be mat
of a coliseum instead of a high school gymnasium.
The Minges building is currently equipped to accommo-
date 6,500 people on its bleachers. With individual seat backs
being put in their place, Minges will hold about 7,500. The
renovation will also include air conditioning installation.
The planning committee consists of representatives from
the physical education department, me athletic department and
the intramural sports department. When asked what brought
about the project, VanSant said "our facilities are inadequate for
level one conference competition The committee is currently
in the projects study phase, but foresee the cost of the renova-
tions being anywhere between $4.3 million and 9 million.
The ECU Board of Trustees has already approved the
project and the undetermined studentfee increase thatwill fund
the project. The legisla ture will meet sometime before the spring
of 1993 to determine whether or not additional funds will be
allocated to the Minges renovations.
Completion of the project will take at least one semester;
therefore changing scheduled home games as well as
some classes held in Minges.





2 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 1, 1992
TATE
EWS
Campaign focuses on AIDS
Anew government media campaign will focus on AIDS and
drugs among college-age students by using humor and clever
animation. The new "Get High, Get Stupid, Get AIDS" campaign
features two cartoon characters panicked when they awaken after
a night filled with alcohol, drugs and anonymous sex. Horrified
that they cannot recall the previous night, they wonder if they can
get AIDS. The message that officials are hoping to relay is "one
wild night can lead to AIDS Michael Chaney, vice president of
DFM INC, said, 'It doesu't sugar-coat the message
Environniental law course established
The University of Richmond Law School has added a first-
year course to acquaint aspiring lawyers with environmental law.
The school said it is the first to require such a course. "The
environment is having an impact on almost any kind of attorney
practicing any kind of law said Michael Wolf, the course profes-
sor. While some law schools teach regulatory law in the first year,
the Richmond law school has set a precedent with its required
course. The first classes started last spring and will continue to be
offered each spring.
Budget cuts tarnish system
Facing hundreds of millions of dollars in anticipated state
budget cuts, California's four-year public colleges are enacting
class and faculty reductions, and proposing a student fee hike of
as much as 40 percent. The 20-campus system has already notified
2,200 staff and faculty of impending layoffs and may cancel as
many as 5,500 classes for the year due to anticipated budget cuts
in higher education. "If the budge cut turns out to be less than
what we're planning for, we probably won't lay off this many
said Sam Strafaci, director of employee relations for the CSU
system.
Complied by Elizabeth Shimmel. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Professor criticizes Bush's economic plan
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP)
� President Bush's economic
proposals, which include spend-
ing limits on Medicare and Med-
icaid as well as deep tax cuts,
could cost the United States up to
2.2 million jobs over the next five
years, a new study says.
Attempts to control health-
care costs have already resulted
in slower growth in wages, higher
prices nd nearly 1 million lost
jobs ov. r the past decade, said
Kenneth Thorpe, associate pro-
fessor of health policy and ad-
ministration at the University of
Research
North Carolina at Chapel Hill
School of Public Health.
"The president's most re-
cent proposals to aggressively
cap the growth of Medicaid and
Medicare spending would
greatly exacerbate these prob-
lems for American families and
employers already struggling
with the economic strains caused
by rising health costs Thorpe
said. "Thechanges would require
deep reductions in health ben-
efits and care for 30 million eld-
erly and could potentially lead to
lost jobs
News writers meeting
Wednesday at
5 p.m.
Research Laboratory benefits a
wide variety of people.
"We help faculty do re-
search, and we help various agen-
cies around the region get infor-
mation that they need to make
decisions Wilson said.
The decisions made from the
surveys usually affect all mem-
bers of the surveyed community.
Some of the clients of Sur-
vey Research Laboratory include
several departments at ECU, the
College of Albemarle, Pitt Plaza
Mall, various government groups
and other non-profit and profit
organizations. By providing re-
search information to these agen-
cies, ECU is serving the region of
Eastern North Carolina.
"It's better if people who
make decisions about a county, or
about a city, have accurate infor-
mation about what their citizens
are thinking. They can make bet-
ter decisions than if they just have
to guess Wilson said.
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Across from the Elbo
752-3880
Bush has proposed a man-
datory entitlement cap for the
Medicare and Medicaid pro-
grams to reduce spending by
$261.5 billion between 1993 and
1997, the study said. Bush also
has proposed an across-the-
board 2 percent tax cut, devoting
up to 10 percent of personal in-
come tax receipts to deficit re-
duction, increasing the personal
exemption and reducing capital
gains taxes, Thorpe said.
Under current policy,
nearly 1.5 million Americans
would likely lose their jobs un-
Continued from page 1
less there were changes to con-
trol the growth of private health-
care spending, Thorpe said in his
study. Bush's latest proposals
would risk an additional 260,000
to 700,000 jobs, he said.
Under the proposal, the
number of uninsured Americans
would rise from 43 million to 60
million, Thorpe said.
A better approach would be
to limit both public and private
spending while adopting a uni-
versal health insurance program,
he said.
Bars
The laboratory tries to sur-
vey representatives of all parts of
a community, from the rich to the
poor, from the educated to the
uneducated.
Since most surveys are done
by telephone, the very poor are
not represented because of the dif-
ficulty and expense of reaching
them. However, if a client is will-
ing to pay for door-to-door sur-
veys, all parts of a community can
be represented.
Because of its educational
purpose, survey projects are rela-
tively low-cost. A small organiza-
tion could have a short survey of
Pitt County residents for around
five to $10,000.
One of the major projects of
the Survey Research Laboratory
is a series of surveys of Eastern
North Carolina.
During the summer of 1991,
The Daily Reflector, along with the
East Carolina Poverty Commit-
tee, sponsored a survey to edu-
cate people about poverty. In 1992,
The Daily Reflector and the De-
partment of Public Instruction co-
sponsored a survey on the atti-
tudes about education in the east.
In 1993, the survey will likely
be on the medical needs of East-
ern North Carolina. Again, The
Daily Reflector will probably co-
sponsor the survey, perhaps with
someone in the medical school.
The information collected in
these surveys will become party
of a database for Survey Research
Laboratory.
"My goal is that 10 years
from now, if somebody is inter-
ested in how eastern North Caro-
lina has changed, they can go back
into that file and compare Wil-
son said.
"So they can look at what
our attitudes were 10 years ago
and what they are today, and ac-
tually measure how changes oc-
curred down East
Continued from page 1
opposition fromthepublic.George
Saieed, a downtown bar owner,
said there are several vacant build -
ings downtown. He said abolish-
ing the space requirement could
result in a flood of new bars in the
downtown area.
"New bars could result in a
dangerous mix of people down-
town Saieed said. "They would
have to appeal to a different type
of crowd, like at (the county and
western bar) Hard Times. With a
mixed crowd in the parking lots,
there would be quite a bit of fric-
tion
According to Saieed, the de-
cision was bittersweet. He said he
did not want the competition, but
now he is free to expand his busi-
ness. Saieed said he has a couple
of ideas in mind, including com-
bining two of his bars, the Sports
Pad and Splash, into a single night-
club.
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�-
SEPTEMBER 1, 1992
m ii ' i�r-
The East Carolinian 3
NATIONAL
Doctor gives patients someone to hold
SAN LE ANDRO, Calif. (AP)
�Walk into Dr. Stephen Turner's
operatingroom and you'll find the
usual inventory � table, patient,
masked assistants and high-tech
machines blinking and whirring
in a surgical symphony.
But amid the well-orches-
trated routine there's a decidedly
low-tech note, a grandmotherly
woman sitting next to the operat-
ing table, holding the patient's
hand in a comforting grasp.
Meet Margaret Pickford, vol-
unteer hand-holder and proud
provider of something no sophis-
ticated equipment can supply �
the human touch.
"I think this is the most excit-
ing kind of a volunteer job says
the 83-year-old Pickford, who got
her start as a sometime medical
assistant at the age of 10, holding a
basin for her country doctor father
on house calls.
For Turner, having Pickford
in the operating room is a way to
relax his elderly cataract patients,
who remain conscious during the
operation although they feel noth-
ing.
Staying awake means a
quicker recovery and less risk, but
it also means patients have to lie
still in what can be frightening
surroundings, he said.
"They're really sort of shut
off from the outside. By having the
hand-holder, they have some con-
nection he said. "She really calms
them down quite a bit
Patients also can warn the
doctor of any incipient coughs or
sneezes � a potential disaster in
the delicate business of eye sur-
gery�with a squeeze of the hand.
In four years of working as a
volunteer hand-holder, Pickford
has developed a finely honed rou-
tine that starts with a cheery pre-
op chat.
Inside the operation room,
she takes up her station, holding
the patient's hand under a surgi-
cal cover. Turner uses a micro-
scope for the meticulous task of
tunneling into the eye to vacuum
out the cataract, a diseased lens
which has become opaque, caus-
ing partial or total blindness.
To the naked eye, it appears
Turner's hands are barely mov-
ing, but a video camera beaming a
magnified picture to a closed-cir-
cuit television reveals a myriad of
short, sharp movements.
The 21-minute operation
ends with a new lens folded over
and slipped into the tiny opening
and then unfolded on top of the
eye. The microscopic opening gen-
erally does not require stitches.
The operation ends with a
few soothing words to the patient
and a final squeeze from Pickford.
The concept of promoting
human contact is a good one, said
Dr. Walter J. Stark, an ophthalmol-
ogy professor at Johns Hopkins
University in Baltimore, Md. While
Stark doesn't have official hand-
holders, he does encourage mak-
ing contact with the patient from
the handshake at the first consul-
tation to reassuring pats from
nurses and anesthesiologists.
"The anesthesiologists in
particular are in agreement that if
you sit with the patient and you
reassure them, you can get by with
a lot less anesthesia he said.
"The patient realizes
they're being treated as an indi-
vidual and somebody cares about
mem
As a veteran hand-holder
of more than 1,200 surgeries,
Pickford has experienced every-
thing from the occasional delay
due to mechanical failure to being
surprised to find a friend on the
operating table.
But the operation that
sticks out most clearly is that of a
103-year-old man having cataracts
removed from bom eyes. He took
a lot of calming down.
"The nurses (at his nursing
home) said they had been leading
him around (before the operation)
and now he was chasing them
she said.
N.C. Marines to aid
hurricane victims
CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.
(AP) � Marines are scouting
south Florida for a site to build
camps for people left homeless
by Hurricane Andrew, a Camp
Lejeune spokesman said.
Maj. Jay Farrar said Sun-
day the camp sites were being
exa mined by a 52-man advance
team from the North Carolina
base. They were studying the
feasibility of building two
camps to house 2,500 people
each.
Deployment of Marines
from here to Florida has been
steady since President Bush or-
dered the military to help hur-
ricane victims.
About 200 Marines left
Sunday with lighting equip-
ment, mobile generators and
construction equipment. The
advance team had departed
Friday.
A medical support group
from Lejeune flew supplies to
Florida on Saturday,
There are about 1,000 Ma-
rines in the hurricane area, and
Farrar said preliminary plans
call for all Marine personnel in
the relief effort to come from
Camp Lejeune.
Crime
North Idaho standoff continues
Wounded friend of fugitive surrenders
NAPLES, Idaho (AP) � A
white supremacist whose wife and
son were shot to death during a
.standoff with federal authorities at
his cabin asked for time to pray as
he neared a decision on whether to
give up, an intermediary said.
James "Bo" Gritz, a retired
Green Beret lieutenant colonel and
Populist Party candidate for presi-
dent, said late Sunday he expected
Randy Weavertosurrender Monday.
Weaver, a 44-year-old former
Green Beret wanted on charges of
selling sawed-off shotguns, re-
mained inside the cabin overnight
with his three daughters, ages 10
months, 10 and 16.
"Randall said he needed to
pray about what he needed to do
Gritz said after meeting with
Weaver.
"I think Randall has made
some very good decisions. 1 believe
tomorrow you will see him and his
daughters
Kevin Harris, a friend of
Weaver who is charged with kill-
ing a deputy U.S. marshal at the
start of the standoff Aug. 21, sur-
rendered on Sunday to get treat-
ment for wounds he suffered in a
gun battle with authorities.
Harris,24, was hospitalized in
serious condition, authorities said.
Late Sunday night, Weaver
relinquished his wife's body, which
was taken down the mountain.
Deputy Marshal William F.
Deganand Weaver's 14-year-
old son, Samuel, were killed in a
shootout Aug. 21.
Weaver's wife, Vicki, was
slain and Harris wounded in a gun
battle tiie next night.
Harris was escorted from the
cabin by Gritz, who has been acting
as an intermediary between Weaver
and federal agents since Friday.
Gritz said he was admitted to
the cabin for the first time Sunday
after communicating by shouting
through the walls.
He said he sat inside, with
die door open, holding the baby
and talking with Weaver and his
daughters.
Continued from page 1
The overall totals for cam-
pus crimes in 1991 show a 62.3
percent increase in the 26 catego-
ries of crime designated by the
State Bureau of Investigation.
At the end of each year, the
Department of Public Safety sends
their crime reports to the SBI in
Raleigh where they are analyzed
and arranged in statistical form.
The SBI puts the crimes in catego-
ries ranging from murder to va-
grancy.
The city of Greenville crime
statistics were not available for
comparison because their reports
were not sent to the SBI.
The East
Carolinian
Simply the best
in student
newspaper.
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Student Center
announces its
5th Annual Back to School
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Wednesday, September 2,1992
4:00pm - 8:00pm
at the
Newman Catholic Student Center
953 East 10th St. (At the Foot of College Hill)
Featuring: "Get-Acquainted" Fun,
Food, Friends, Fellowship!
For more information call Fr. Paul Vaeth (757-1991)
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
ECF
Interest Meetings
September 1,2 & 3
6 pm GCB 1010
(You must attend 1 of 3 meetings)
For more information call 757-6137
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M
4 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 1, 1992
VJgJRLD NEWS
takes
MOSCOW (AP) � Hun-
dreds of Tajikistan's opposition
members surrounded the presi-
dential palace Monday in
Dushanbe, took senior govern-
ment officials hostage and de-
manded the resignation of Presi-
dent Rakhmon Nabiyev, news re-
ports said.
The opposition has criticized
Nabiyev, a former Communist
Party leader, for failing to stop a
bloody tribal conflict that rages in
two areas of the central Asian re-
public. They also accuse him of
failing to move quickly enough on
democratic reforms.
'Uh-huh'
In a local television broad-
cast, the opposition had presented
Nabiyev with an ultimatum de-
manding that he stop the fratri-
cidal war and resolve the issue of
refugees from the embattled areas
or resign. The ultimatum expired
Monday, the ITAR-Tass and Nega
news agencies reported.
The agencies said that refu-
gees from the regions of Kuliab
and Kurgan-Tiube gathered
around the presidential palace in
the Tajik capital of Dushanbe to-
day.
The protesters blocked the
palace and the government park-
Continued from page 1
ing lot and later were allowed by
police to occupy the building's first
floor, the reports said.
ITAR-Tass said the officials
were kept hostage on the palace's
first floor. But Nega said four offi-
cials were taken away by opposi-
tion members who demanded a
meeting with Nabiyev.
Nega identified the hostages
as Vice Premiers Tukhboy Gaf arov
and Jamshed Karimov, Cabinet
business manager Ramazan
Mirzoyev and presidential mili-
tary adviser Kholbobo Sharipov.
President Nabiyev's where-
abouts were unknown but he was
not in the palace, the reports said.
The opposition has de-
manded greater religious and po-
litical freedoms in the nation of 5.1
million people, 2,000 miles south-
east of Moscow on the borders of
China and Afghanistan. Some also
want to found a Muslim state.
Earlier this month,
Tajikistan's parliament stripped
Nabiyev of the power of direct
presidential rule granted him on
April 30 in response to growing
protests by Muslim opposition
groups.
The new powers were to re-
main in effect for six months.
Dog follows
master to prison
der to keep the cost down.
"We could not afford to
have a big name like Ray
Charles without Pepsi spon-
sorship Alexander said.
The tickets, on sale in the
Mendenhall Ticket office, cost
$12 for students and $25 for
the general public.
"We're treating this like
any other investigation said
Knox.
Charles Young, a Pepsi
representative, said the display
is the only one like it in
Greenville and is valued at
$100. The theft will not cost
ECU but they are not sure if
they will receive replacements
for the display.
Public Safety requests
any information on the theft
to be reported to their office at
758-7777.
Look for the 1992 Football
Preview in Thursday's edition of
The East Carolinian.
DHAKA, Bangladesh
(AP) � A dog swam three riv-
ers, walked eight miles and
then kept a week's vigil out-
side a jail where his master was
imprisoned, a newspaper said
Monday.
When Sohrab Ali was ar-
rested, Ali's dog swam behind
the boat that ferried him across
the first river to prison, said
the Sangbad newspaper.
The boatman, trying to
drive the dog away, hit him on
the head with an oar but he
kept swimming.
At the prison, the dog
waited at the gate until his
owner was released from a one-
week sentence on Aug. 21, the
paper reported.
"The dog often used to
cry outside the gate, but it
would wag its tail in joy when
his master would send it half
his prison food the newspa-
per said.
The dog, whose name was
not given, barked in joy and
licked Ali's feet when he was
freed.
Ali was jailed for critically
wounding a neighbor in a land
dispute inhis remote village 80
miles northwest of Dhaka, the
paper said.
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ATTENTION COLLEGE STUDENTS
S NEW O
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FURNITURE & APPLIANCES
BUY AND SELL
Looking for used furniture
for this school season?
Latham's Furniture carries
a wide variety of used beds,
tables, chests, sofa, chairs
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Monday-Saturday 9:00 - 5:30
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WEDNESDAYS:
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THURSDAYS-SATURDAYS:
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ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 off admission Saturday Night.
Open Tues.Sat. Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:30pm
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LAWNMOWER MAN
Thur. Frl & Sat. Sept 3-5
8 PM Hendri
WHEN? SAT. SEPT 5, 3-7:30
WHERE? INTRAMURAL FIELD
WHO? PURPLE SCHOOL BUS
&
EARTH MURCHAIMTS
WHAT? A PARTY
WHY? BECAUSE IT'S FREE
Besides, What Else Are You Going To Do?
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY'S STUDENT UNION
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
IS TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR A DAY-STUDENT
QUALIFICATIONS: .FULLTIME STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE
�RESIDES OFF CAMPUS
�INDEPENDENT
FOR THE 1992-93 TERM
DEADLINE TO APPLY: MONDAY, SEPT 7, 1992 BY 12.00 NOON
APPLICATIONS CAN BE PICKED UP AT THE STUDENT
UNION OFFICE � ROOM 236 MENDENHALL
701 West 14th Street
752-2106
Mon-Fri 7:30am-5:00 pm
Saturday 8:00am-1:00pm
GARRIS
EVANS
LUMBER CO.
:V
10 DISCOUNT

Off Regular Retail Price
With This Ad and A Valid East Carolina University Student I.D.
(excludes sale items)
Blocks, Bricks, Shelving Board, Stains, Paints,
Rollers, Brushes, Cleaning Supplies, Hardware,
Closet Maid�, Nails, Garbage Cans, Air Filters,
Light Bulbs, Cabinet Knobs, etc etc
ii w
�"�"�anpiMPw






� i in ii
V.
The East Carolinian
September 1, 1992
Opinion
Page 5
Greenville accepts growth of ECU
The City Council of Greenville finally
bowed down to the wheels of progress,
the council has allowed an anonymous
businessman to open a drinking estab-
lishment on the Evans Street mall. Prior
to this decision, Greenville employed a
500-feet rule: no new bars within 500 feet
Of an existing establishment.
It's about time Greenville finally real-
ized this school is growing and that
growth requires new entertainment fa-
cilities. Abolishing the 500-feet rule was
just the first step. What needs to be done
now is encouragement of new develop-
ment in the downtown area.
The Evans Street mall presents
Greenville with perhaps one of the most
exciting possibilities for growth. The
hiain section of the mall, between Fourth
and Fifth streets, absolutely begs for de-
velopment. Coincedentally, the ECU
population absolutely begs for more bars
arid entertainment downtown. If we cross
i

GEORGE'S IVORY TOWER
these two needs, we see that we could
easily develop downtown and ECU si-
multaneously.
Imagine a one-block avenue, closed
off to traffic with only two entances, and
I.D. checkers at either end. Now fill the
block with bars, pool halls, arcades, res-
taurants and clubs.
The result would be one of the hottest
nightspots in all of North Carolina. An
attraction that would not only pump up
comerce in Greenville, but would also
help ECU with future recruitment.
Greenville needs to answer to the
beckoning call for change, progress and
growth. The students demand it and the
town needs it.
The abolition of the 500-feet rule is
the first step in the much needed transi-
tion from a town resistent to the hands
the feed it (students) to town that listens
to the people that make this town what it
A VIEW FROM ABOVE
By T. Scott Batchelor
Bush correct in response to wrath of hurricane Andrew
is.
By George Sartiano
too much hair and not enough common sense
What makes many of the
young women of the world
tfiink that flipping their hair up
into a frontal poof and holding
itfinto place with half of a bottle
of hairspray is attractive.
While downtown this
weekend, I could not help but
notice the large number of la-
dies who used this particular
affecation as part of their daily
rdake-up. It is really surprising
to believe that a very large por-
tion of the female population
vfould actually want to stick
ttie front section of their hair
four to eight inches in the air.
Rlease keep in mind that I am
not just talking about someone
who plays with their bangs a
little bit, but rather the women
who walk around with the bul-
let proof wall of hair attached
to the top of their heads.
Granted, there are several
hairstyles which require large
amounts of hair to be riding
high above the forehead, but
many of these styles, like the
beehive, are rather attractive
when well done, and have the
lpok of at least a little class
about them.
While sitting in one of the
fine eating establishments of
downtown Greenville, several
of my friends and I ran an unof-
ficial contest, keeping track of
Which young lady had the big-
gest and tallest hair around.
Most of the competitors were
running neck in neck, with the
-verage hair height of four
inches, when along came a pair
of young ladies who pretty
much blew the rest of the com-
petition out of the water. These
two young women had hair that
must have stood at least six or
seven inches straight up. They
literally had the rest of the field
beaten by several inches.
The horror of all this gar-
gantuan hair left my friends and
I gagging, trying to hold back
our laughter as they walked by.
All we could do for the next
hour or so was sit and laugh,
and try to figure out what on
God's Earth would make some-
one put so much time into fluff-
ing the front third of their hair,
raising it up to never before
seen heights while neglecting
the back two-thirds almost com-
pletely. It was as if they tease
up the front part of their hair,
and then because they can no
longer see the back part of their
heads in the mirror, they forget
that it is there at all.
Too often do 1 see a young
lady who has completely ru-
ined her appearance by the ap-
plication of what can only be
termed a radar dish on the top
of her head. The reasoning be-
hind doing this confounds me,
but as I have put time and ef-
fort into researching the sub-
ject, I believe I have come up
with several plausible reasons
as to why young women would
want to flip up the front of their
hair.
The first reason being that
it may be some type of mating
call, similar in many ways to
peacock's and other bird's who
spread out large and colorful
displays of feathers in order to
attract a mate.
I threw out this explana-
tion because we know that no
one actually goes out looking
for a mate.
The second reason I came
up with was that young ladies
flip up their hair in order to
look taller. I don't know if this
has some deep rooted meeting
stemming from the fact that
women (on the average) are
shorter than men, and thus feel-
ing inferior, they feel that they
have to make up for their lack
of height in some way. Unfor-
tunately for them (if this is the
true reason they poof their
hair), it just does not work. The
extra six inches m height gained
form the hair just isn't fooling
anyone.
The third and final reason
I've been able to weed out is
that the hair flip is a sign of
naivete and immaturity. In gen-
eral, most of the people with
this type of hairstyle are be-
tween the ages of fifteen and
twenty.
The hair poof is almost a
sure sign that the wearer is a
freshman. I realize that I have
made use of a generality , but
keep in mind that there are ex-
ceptions to every rule, and that
generalities are just that� gross
generalizations often used for
the sake of hyperbole. Most
people with this type of hair-
style are not very worldly
people, and have not had the
time to realize that what they
are doing with their hair looks
childish, immature, and stupid.
What amazes me most is that
the style is so widespread
among the younger ladies at-
tending ECU.
I'm sure that if someone
bothered to plot out a graph of
hair heights, the average big-
ness of a young woman's hair
would decline as she moved far-
ther along in her education.
As with all fashions, they
eventually come and go,but to
be honest, I'm ready to see this
one die.
I awoke Monday morning a
week ago to television news re-
ports of the devastation wreaked
on southern Florida by hurricane
Andrew. Early estimates at the
time put the number of homes
destroyed at 63,000, leaving
180,000 persons homeless.
I can see the headlines to-
morrow, I thought cynically,
"Hurricane Andrew Leaves
180,000 Homeless, President Bush
Blamed 1 was only jesting, you
understand.
However, three days later,
George Bush was being lambasted
for "dragging his heels" on mobi-
lizing Federa I a id to the storm rav-
aged areas.
Now, don't get me wrong, I
am sympathetic about the folks
down in Florida. I hope that I or
my loved ones never have to expe-
rience anything near the destruc-
tive force of Andrew. As Florida
Governor Lawton Chiles put it,
"It's like an air bomb went off"
over a large section of southern
Florida.
But casting stones at Presi-
dent Bush and the faceless federal
government will not help rebuild
homes or ease the pain of loss.
It is understandable to an
extent why some people think the
president can wave his hand and
instantly provide all the emer-
gency relief Florida and Louisiana
need. After all, we are living in an
age when the launching of a space
shuttle (an extraordinarily com-
plex technical achievement),
WALK'S WORDS
barely rates a break in "All My
Children" or "As the World
Turns If it weren't for the all-
news channels that carry the event,
children probably wouldn't know
what a space shuttle is.
And about a year and a half
ago, President Bush in Desert
Storm undertook to mobilize and
orchestrate the largest organiza-
tion of men and material ever in
the history of the planet. Not to
mention his and James Baker's
diplomatic feat of cinching a coa-
lition of nations to respond as one
to the Iraqi threat (I hear the yawns
out there already).
I offer these examples to
point out that we take such com-
plicated operations for granted,
like they were accomplished
cleanly and instantaneously by
pushing a button. They weren't,
and neither will the cleanup of
southern Florida and Louisiana.
And while it is not fashionable to
counsel patience in today's soci-
ety, that is just what is needed,
along with an understanding of
the big picture.
It took at least 24 hours after
hurricane Andrew hit before ac-
curate damage assessments were
compiled. Up until that point, the
already huge estimates were sub-
stantially low.
Still, according to the Miami
Herald, President Bush "pledged
. an immediate $50 million in disas-
ter aid � even before setting foot
in Miami
Along with this money �
only the first of many millions to
come � Bush also instituted a di;
saster response group in Wash-
ington bringing together all 27 fed-
eral agencies charged with admirv-
istering emergency relief.
Bush also said on that same
Monday that he would send Fed:
eral troops and equipment Uj
southern Florida if � and here's
the kicker � they were requested
by Governor Lawton Chiles.
According to an Associated
Press report appearing in the,
Greenville Daily Reflector, Chiles
made this request at 1:45 p.m. on
Thursday And Bush the report
continues, "announced within
four hours he was ordering the
military intoaction Sure enough,
cargo planes and troop transports
began arriving in Florida on Fri-
day.
What was all the ballyhoo
about, then? Why was so much
attention accorded to a non-exis-
tent news story?
The reason is that the na-
tional news media, remaining pre-
dictably true to form, fabricated
from an imaginary molehill a solid
mountain to be placed in George
Bush's path to political success.
Physics tells us that some-
thing can't be created from noth-
ing, but apparently there are a lot
of journalists out there who never
took physics.
Fortunately for George Bush
and other targets of the media,
such tactics rarely achieve any last-
ing impact. ;
By J. William Walker
New rules for a school on an upswing of growth
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Jennifer A. Wardrep, Managing Editor
Arthur A. SutOlius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Lifestyle Editor
Dana Daniebon, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Assistant Sports Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel,
Richard Haselrig, Staff illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Billiard, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Jamie Goins, Classified Advertising Technician
Bill Walker, Opinion Page Editor
Woody Barnes, Adertising Production Manager
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Secretary
The East Carolinian his served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. 77k? East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. 77m? East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, 77? East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
The growth of ECU signals
a transition. Yearly increases in
enrollment have pushed ECU's
numbers over the 17,000 mark
this year. ECU will face new chal-
lenges as the years tick by and
our numbers increase. It is time
to take a look at some new pos-
sible changes. Here are J. Wil-
liam Walker's academian rule
change policies for the 1992-93
school year.
1.) Offer a quarter sistem. Not
everyone wants to switch I'm
sure, but I think it would be rea-
sonable to offer both semester
and quarter courses. The quarter
system allows students to have
an intensive five-week Monday
through Friday schedule. Semes-
ters are long arduous 13 week
adventures. I prefer quarters to
semesters. 1 have talked to many
others who agree; we pay tuition,
why can't the change be made.
After all, the university is hereto
help us, and provide us with ser-
vices that we, as students, re-
quire.
2.) Extend the drop date. U I
have signed up for PHYS 5490,
Nuclear Atstrophysiologyand its
Ramifications on a Recessive
Economy, and I do pretty well
for the first half of the class, but
I have problems at the end, 1
want to drop it, but I can't. Once
again, I paid for the course, the
university ought to let me do
whatever the hell I want to do
with it.
3.) Bag the foreign language
requirement. Certain people were
never meant to speak Spanish.
North Carolinians, in general, are
some of those people.
Kinstonians can pronounce, or
slaughter, the word hola (pro-
nounced O-la) with five syllables
and a drawl that would confuse
Mark Twain. Any way, the point
is that if you want to take foreign
language, it is availableand wait-
ing for you. If you plan on work-
ing in North Carolina and you
know you'll never need or want
Spanish-speaking skills, why
waste time on Spanish.
4.) Change the registration
system. When students have to
strap into a brand new pair of
jogging shoes and run from one
side of campus to the other just
to register and pay fees, the sys-
tem is not working. Let's try what
other major universities have
implemented, telephone regis-
tration. It's easy, quick, painless
and you can do it from the peace-
ful serenity of your own home.
Students can immediately find
out what they're tagged for, and
solve the problem before they
wait in a two hour line just to
hear "You're tagged A tele-
phone system would allow more
freedom and choice for us, the
paying student.
5.) Offer half-way summa-
ries. S ertiors at ECU go through
what is called senior summaries.
These summaries allow the stu-
dent to find out which courses
and how many hours they need
to graduate. Seniors do this a,t
the beginning of their senior year
Why not apply this to sopho-
mores? If every student had their
academic career summarized af-
ter their first two years, many
people would make it out in four
instead of five or six years.
Sophomores especially need to
know how they stand so they
can know what to take and when
to take it. All the university
would have to do is require act-
visors to perform these summa-
ries. Students would then have p
checklist for the rest of their ten-
ure here at ECU.
These five policy change;
are my ideas of what could make
this school a little more "user
friendly After all, we pay to gl
to school, they could at least try
to act like the customers are al-
ways right. With a little insight,
a little flexibility and a little com-
mon sense, ECU could set the
standard for being the student's
school.
As a major university that
is constantly growing, ECU must
accept that it will have an ever-
increasing role as mediator for
student's desires. As a matter of
fact, the very lifeblood of this
school demands that it become
more familiar with the student.
���





mmmummtmmm
iiiiTiiniimi i
�i
The East Carolinian
September 1, 1992
Classifieds
Page 6
FOR RENTIFOR SALEIHELP WANTED1HELP WANTEDIPERSONALS1PERS( )NALS
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS
1 and 2 bedroom apartments. En-
ergy-efficient, several locations in
tnwnCarpeted,kitchenappliances,
some water and sewer paid,
washerdryer hookups. Call 752-
8915.
ROOMMATE WANTED toshare
apartment l2mile from campus.
12 rent and utilities. Call Ron at
489-1090.
ROOMMATENEEDED toshare
a large house in a quiet neighbor-
hood. Must be neat and mature.
$200.00 and 1 3 utilities. Call 355-
8783.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED- $100.00month. Pri-
vate room. 14 utilities. 756-0857.
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY - a
female nonsmoking roommate to
share 1 4 rent and utilities in a 2
bedroom townhouse. $75 deposit.
For more info call 758-7184.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: Bedroom with private
bath in nice mobile home 10 min-
utes from campus. $175 includes
everything! $50 deposit. 355-7207.
GRADUATE STUDENT orpro-
fessionaltoshare2bedroomhouse.
Private room and bath. Washer
and dryer, fireplace, loft, patio and
pooL 321-2138 ASAP.
HOUSEMATE WANTED: near
campus, quiet, $16Z50month, 1
2 utilities. Call 758-3311.
2 ROOMMATES NEEDED to
share 4 bedroom house. 410mile
from downtown. $140month
1 futilities. CallChrisor Harveyat
830-9267.
ROOMMATENEEDED toshare
apartment in Eastbrook $150
month1 futilities. Call752-1868.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: to share 2 bedroom, 2
bath apt, $235 deposit, $235 rent
l2utilites. (Heritage Villiage 1.5
miles fromcampus). Call355-1735.
FOR SALE
'91TREK820MOUNTAINBIKE
- excellent condition, ridden only
one year, black, shimano 200 GS
components;askingony$225.757-
2720.
FOR SALE: Used sofa, chairs,
lamps, tables, pictures, mirrors,
vacuum cleaner, kitchen goods,
nags, electric fan. toaster oven,
blender, bedroom furniture. Call
after 5:00 PM 756-8807. Excellent
condition-low prices.
SEIZED CARS, trucks, boats, 4
wheelers, motorcycles,by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available your area now.
Call (800) 338-3388 ext C-5999.
MUST SELL! Stamp collection
$110; comic collection $240; card
collection $90. Andy 830-0714.
TANDY 1000 SL2, 512 K Ram,
RGBColor Monitor, Keyboareand
DM Printer,355r7853 after5.fl0pm.
$750.
GUITAR: 12-stringwithhardshell
case. $150.00. BICYCLE: 25" Fuji 18
speed touring bike. $90.00 756-
0931.
TWO FREE KITTENS! solid
white,3monthsold. Professionally
groomed. Suppliesprovided. Call
7584031.
FOR SALE- lamps-$10 each; cof-
fee table- $10; octagonal table- $10;
end table- $7; GE Vacuum- $20;
Kenmore Vacuum- $75; guitars-
$50$70; 12-speed woman's bike-
$50; CALL 756-1451.
150 WATT FISHER AMP. with
tuner and 9 band EQ. Best offer.
Can sell EQ separately. Call Chris
and 758-8461.
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
You also get a FREE
HEADPHONE RADIO
just for calling
1-800-932-D528.EKt.65
HELP WANTED
DESIRE RESPONSIBLE PER-
SON to care for small children
TuesdasandThursday's,7:30a.m.
-5:00 p.m. Call 756-0417.
AFTERSCHOOLCARE of9year
old, 230-6 pm, Monday - Friday.
Requires own car, references. Call
321-0833 after 6pm.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE !
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call (800) 338-3388 ext. P-3712
SPORTSWEARCOMPANY that
sells merchandise to sororities and
fraternities is looking for a respon-
sible individual to be a campus
representative. Work one night
and average $50 to $100 per week
Knowledge of retail sales and the
GreekSystemishelpful. Calll -800-
242-8104
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT - Fisheries. Earn $5,000
month. Free transportation! Room
&Board! Over8,000openings. No
experience necessary. MALE or
FEMALE. For employment pro-
gram call Student Employment
Services at 1-206-545-4155 ext.
A5362
FALLSOCCERCOACHES -The
Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting for 12 to
16 part-time youth soccer coaches
for the fall youth soccer program.
Applicants must possess some
knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and patience with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-16, in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are
from 3:00 pm until 7:00 pm with
some night and weekend coach-
ing. This program will run from
Septemberto mid-November. Sal-
aryratesstartat$4.25perhour. For
more information, please call Ben
James at 8304567 or Michael Dalv
at 830-4550.
EASYWORK! EXCELLENTPAY!
Assemble products at home. Call
Toll Free 1-800-467-5566 EXT. 5920.
WANTED:SOCCER
COACHES-MondayWednes-
day andor TuesdayThursday
2-00-6OOp.m. Will train. Pay starts
at $5 an hour. Must have own
transportation. Call Pitt County
Community Schools at 830-4240.
NEEDED. Dependable and lov-
ingchildcare for6 year old girlafter
school 230-5:30 Monday- Friday.
Transportation and references re-
quired. $45week 355-3716after 6.
TOPLESSDANCERSWANTED
- Great club, Great money, unbe-
lievable tips. Work Thursday, Fri-
day,Saturday,9pm-2am. CallSid
919-735-7713 or Paul919-736-0716.
MothersPlayhouseinGoldsboro.
BABYSriTING - Two children,
ages7and9. Every Sat. night from
5-9 pm. Faculty family. Walking
distance, 752-0306.
CLINTON-GORE '92- For an
opportunity to share your talents
with the campus campaign, call:
Thomas Blue, 931 -8970 or Michael
Preston,931-8067. Paid forbyTho-
mas Blue on behalf of the ECU
Clinton-Gorecommittee.
HOUSE CLEANING -Work for
faculty family 6 hrwk, very flex-
ible,$5hr. Walking distance. PH.
752-0306.
PART-TTMEGENERALOFFICE
for small locally owned photogra-
phy studio. Hours flexible. Experi-
ence with Macintosh computer a
real plus. Send info and hours
available to Part-Time. P.O. Box
3715, Greenville 27836.
WANTED- The Student Union is
taking applications for the Travel
and Forum committee Presidents.
Please call 757-4715 for more infor-
mation.
BRODY'S and Brody's for Men
areacceptingaddiaonal Part-Time
SalesapplicationsforJuniorSports-
wear and the Young MerisDepart-
ment. Flexible HoursSalary
ClothingDiscounts. ApplyBrody's
The Plaza Monday-Wednesday 1
pmto4pm.
MAKE A DIFFERENCE Volun-
teer for change. The CLINTON-
GORE campus campaign needs
yourhelp. CallThomasBlueat931-
8970, or Michael Preston at 931-
8067. Paid for by Thomas Blue on
behalf of the ECU Clinton-Gore
committee.
PERSONALS
KAPPA SIG: The trouble
with trouble is it starts with
FUN! We had so much fun
last Friday! Thanks for the
best Pref party EVER! Love,
Alpha Delta Pi.
ZETA TAU ALPHA: Good
luck with rush this week!
Love, Alpha Delta Pi.
THE SISTERS OF ALPHA
DELTA PI welcome every-
one back to ECU! Hope ev-
eryone has a great semester!
CONGRATULATIONS to
the new Alphas of Alpha
Delta Pi: Kelly Baker, Brette
Brewer, Catherine Brown,
Kara Buttermore, Catherine
Cameron, Katie Coley, Amy
Collins, Erin Graham,
Catherine Irwin, Jelynn
Kaplan, Sherry Lang, Joanne
Lindsey, Amy Lytle, Heather
McLaughlin, Stuart Mabie,
Patricia Marapoti, Monica
Mattox, Lee Neely, Carrie
Okson, Michelle Peach, Lisa
Pittard, Amy Powell, Cara
Powers, Tressa Schmid, Amy
BOOKTRADEK1
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NOWl USED CD'S
Seism, Jennifer Scott, Jalayne
Shelor, Rene Smallwood,
Caroline Smith, Shannon
Smith, Patricia Spove,
DeAnne Waugh and Anna
Zadeits. You guys are the
BEST! We love you! The
Deltas.
WELCOME BACK ECU fac-
ulty and students! Also, con-
gratulations to all sororities
on a great fall rush! Go Pi-
rates! Love, the sisters and
pledges of Alpha Omicron
Pi.
THETA CHI: softball,
burgers, music (most of the
time), Sharky's, bowling,
and even Boli's - all added
up to one hell of a pref party!
Even "the fox" was there!
Thanks for all of the fun, you
guys are the greatest! Love,
the sisters and pledges of
Alpha Omicron Pi.
CONGRATULATIONS to
the "saucy" new Beta Rho
pledge class- Christine
Zamzow, Mary Dombroski,
Melody Grover, Jennifer
Seigel, Holly Fleming,
Meredith Stevens, Tami
Johnson, Beth McGhee,
Bonnie Hiser, Michelle Duff,
Amanda Smith, Julie Fisher,
and Amy Johnson. Also spe-
cial thanks to Jana "the dol-
lar" Holland for a super rush
and to Kate "let's go rootin'
" Bott for an awesome pref
party. You guys are the shit!
Love, the sisters of Alpha
Omicron Pi.
DELTA ZETA would like
to welcome everyone back
to ECU!
DELTA ZETA would like
to welcome their new
pledges: Kristin Allen, Jodi-
Lynn Antonchi, Angela Aus-
tin, Brooke Bachelor, Chris-
tine Carver, Cathy Crooks,
Michell Draughn, Lori
Fenner, Amy Gilley, Susan
Gupton, Marshand Hager,
Ann Henry, Tina Hoke,
Regecca Holloman, Elisa
Ingrassia, Vanessa Jones,
Randi Jordan, Lori Just-is,
Collette Lombardo, Bettie
Lupton, Lori Martin, Allison
Misal, Brittany Olson, Anna
Porter, Heather Salter,
Pamela Schwartz, Jennifer
Seaford, Laura Williams,
Kacey Young. We love you!
The Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS! to
Marie Hooper on her lava-
Here! We're so happy for you!
Love you Delta Zeta sistefs.
CONGRATULATIONS- to
Mitzi Stumf for an outstand-
ing job as rush chair�you
were awesome! Love, your
Delta Zeta sisters.
WELCOME BACK to all of
you Teeny Boppin Slut HO's
out there. ThisMoosehead is
for you!
BAND PARTY Wednesday,
Sept.9 CREAM OFSOUL. Alpha
Sigma Phi House. $2 admission.
All welcome. For more informa-
tion call 757-3516.
THE DELTA ZETA PLEDGE
CLASS of 1992 would like to
thank the sisters for a wonderful
Rush and are looking forward to
a most excellent year.
BROTHERS, RUSHEES, SIS-
TER SORORITIES AND STU-
DENT BODY -Delta Chi would
like to welcome everyone back,
and wish you all luck in this fall
semester. We are looking for-
ward to a great end to '92. The
Bro's of D-chi, and remember
"Life is short, play hard, Delta
Chi
FOUND: Medium Sized Black
and Brown female dog. Sweet
and loving disposition. Would
make a very loyal pet. FREE to
good home. Call Colleen at 752-
7624 or 752-0761.
Joseph Ira Coleman
Attorney At Law
110 Avon Lane
Greenville, NC
(919)355-7495
TRAFFIC TICKETS � WILLS � DWIs
Competent Representation For A Reasonable Fee
Announcements
KING QF THE HILL
ECU Recreational Services is
sponsoring a "Hall of a Way to
Start the Fall The 5th Annual
King of the Hill sponsored by Rec-
reational Services in conjunction
with Resident Education and ARA
Dining Services will be held on
Wednesday,September2 from4:00
- 6:00pm. The festivities will take
place on the College Hill Recre-
ation facilities and participation is
open to everyone living in the resi-
dence halls with a valid ID There
will be a registration meeting on
September 1st at 5:00pm in Biol-
ogy 103. One representative from
each residence hall should attend.
Come on out to crown the best
residence hall of them all on Sep-
tember 2! Call 757-6387 for details.
FALL ADULT SOCCER
TheGreenville Recreation and
Parks Department is now making
preparation for the upcoming
Adult Soccer program. The orga-
nizational meeting will be held on
Thursday, August 27, 7:30 PM at
the Elm Street Gym. This program
is open to men and women ages 16
and over, and will be held at West
Meadowbrook Park. Games and
practices will be held on Sundays
from 1:00-4:00 PM beginning in
September. All coaches, managers
or individuals wishing to partici-
pate on a team should attend the
organization meeting. A small reg-
istration fee will be required. For
more information call Ben James
or Michael Daly at 830-4550or 830-
4567.
VOLLEYBALL LEAGUE
MEETING
TheGreenville Recreation and
Parks Department will be having
an organizational meeting for all
those interested in forming a team
for the 1992 Fall Volleyball Leagues.
The meeting will be held on Tues-
day, August 25, at 7:30 in the Elm
Street Gym. The league will be
divided into several divisions:
Men's, Women's, and Coed teams.
All games will be played at Elm
Street Gym with game times be-
tween 7:00 PM and 10:30 PM. For
more information, call Ben James
or dMichael Daly at 830-4550 or
8304567.
IQYNER AND MUSIC
LIBRARIES CHANGE HOURS
Joyner Library and the Music
Library will operateduring thefol-
lowinghoursfortheacademicyear
beginning on August 24,1992.
JOYNER LIBRARY
MonThurs. 8 a.m. -12 mid-
night
Fri a.m. -8 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m. -6 p.m.
Sun. 1 p.m. -12 midnight
MUSIC LIBRARY
Mon. - Thur. 8 a.m. -11 p.m.
Fri. 8 a.m 5 p.m.
Sat. 12 noon - 4 p.m.
Sun 2 p.m. -11 p.m.
During exam, break, and holi-
day periods, please phone for li-
brary hours at 757-4285.
EDUCATIONAL LOANS
AVAILABLE
Three educational loan pro-
grams for North Carolina residents
attending colleges in or out of state
and fornonresidentsattendingcol-
leges in North Carolina are avail-
able through College Foundation
Inc. These loan programs are
funded by North Carolina banks
and other investors.
Stafford Loans are for depen-
dent or independent students and
are based on financial need.
Supplemental Loans are for inde-
pendent self-supporting students
andarenot based on financial need.
PLUS Loans are to parents of de-
pendent studentsand arenotbased
on financial need.
For more information, write
College Foundation lnc2100 Yon-
kersRoad,P.O. Box 12100, Raleigh,
NC 27605-2100, or call 919821 -
4771.
WILSON STREET MA-
CHINES SPONSOR TRUCK
AND CAR SHOW TQ BENEFIT
THE GREENVILLE RONALD
MCDONALD HOUSE
The Wilson Street Machines
will hold a truck and car show
September sixth at the Wilson
County Fairgrounds from 10:00am
to 4:00pm to benefit the Greenville
Ronald McDonald House. The
event will feature eight classes of
vehicles,doorprizes,awardsanda
5050 drawing. Contact Alan
Jernigan at (919) 237-1233 for more
information.
ORIENTATION TO
CAREER SERVICES
The Career Services office in-
vites seniorsandgraduatestudents
who will graduate in December,
1992 or MaySummer, 1993 to at-
tend a program to acquaint them
with services that will help pre-
pare them for their job search. The
program will be held on August31
and Sept. 1 at 3:00 p.m. in MSC 244.
Students need attend only one of
these sessions. Dr. Jim
Westmoreland and Margie
Swartout will distribute materials
for registering with Career Ser-
vices off iceand discuss procedures
for establishing a credentials file.
They will also instruct students on
how to participate in employment
interviews that are held on cam-
pus.
BISEXUAL-GAY -
LESBIAN SUPPORT
�RQ12P
Social support and activities.
Meetings are closed. Call 757-6766
11:00 - 12:15 Tues. and Thurs. or
1:00-2:30 Wed. for information on
meeting time and place.
VOLUNTEERS FOR
RESEARCH STUDY
The Section of Infectious Dis-
easesECU School of Medicine in
conjunction with the Student
Heal th Center is conducting a study
on the sexual spread of herpes vi-
ruses. We are looking for men and
women 18 years and older who
have never had genital herpes. If
you are interested in obtaining in-
formation, Call Jean Askew, R.N.
at 919-551-2578.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray, study
God's word, be involved in social
and service projects? Need a ref-
uge from time to time? Campus
Christian Fellowship may be what
you are looking for. Our weekly
meetings are at 7pm Wednesdays
at our Campus House located at
200 E. 8th St directly across Co-
tanche St. from Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. Everyone is welcome.
For more information, Call Tim
Turner, Campus Minister, at 752-
7199.
ECU WOMEN'S SOCCFR
CLUB
The ECU Women's Soccer
Club will hold an organizational
meeting on Sept. 1 in Room 1001 of
General Classroom Buildingat5:30
pm.
This season's schedule in-
cludes UNCW, NC State and
Chapel Hill. All interested play-
ers, regardless of experience are
encouraged to attend. For infor-
mation call 752-9251.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt County
Special Olympics will be conduct-
ing a Soccer Coaches training
School on Saturday, September 19
from 9 am-4 pm for all individuals
interested in volunteering tocoach
soccer.
We are also looking for volun-
teer coaches in the following sports:
basketball skills, team basketball,
swimming, gymnastics,
powerlifting, rollerskating and
bowling. No experience is neces-
sary. For more information con-
tact Greg Epperson at 8304551.





m i m-
!�!� �
V.
The East Carolinian
September 1, 1992
Lifestyle
Page 7
Commentary
r"holo courtesy Warner Bros. Entertainment
John Ritterand Pam Dawberstar in Warner Brothers' new release, Stay Tuned. Ritter-nd Dawberare zapped
inside of their television set and find themselves in a strange and evil dimension.
'Stay Tuned' for mindless film
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Stay Tuned is a new film about
television.
John Ritter plays Roy Knable,
a plumbing-supplies salesman
whose escape from reality is to sit
for hours in front of the television.
This irks his wife Helen (Pam
Dawber) immensely.
One night Helen becomes so
aggravated when Roy would
father watch a basketball game
man talk about their marital prob-
lems that she throws a trophy
through the television screen.
The Knable's children, Darryl
(David Tom) and Diane (Heather
McComb), sense the tension be-
tween their parents. They make
plans to stay overnight at friends'
houses so that their parents will
have a night together to hopefully
patch up their differences.
Instead of discussing their
problems, Helen and Roy get
zapped into a literal television hell.
One of Satan's aides, Spike (Jef-
frey Jones), has brought Roy and
Helen to another dimension. In
the battle for souls, the devil has
made a deal with heaven to allow
all potential victims 24 hours in-
side hell's cable television. If the
victims survive, they are permit-
ted to return to their earthly life,
otherwise they must remain per-
manently in the underworld.
Roy and Helen quickly leam
that they must muster their wits
in order to survive. They get
zapped from one show to another.
They begin on a game show
called "You Can't Lose" and then
travel to a wrestling ring fighting
in the UWF (Underworld Wres-
tling Federation), then find them-
selves in the frozen tundra of
"Northern Overexposure Each
new situation provides new chal-
lenges and a few laughs.
While Roy and Helen try to
survive, their children find out
about their plight and start hook-
ing up their own system to tap
into hell's cable. Roy and Helen
are also helped by Crowley (Eu-
gene Levy),an ex-programmer for
hell's cable who is trying to sur-
vive in much the same way as
Helen and Roy. This is because
Spike has becomedissatisfied with
Crowley's work.
See Stay tuned, page 8
Alice Donut � The Untidy Suicides � Alternative Tentacles
Altern 8 � Mask Hysteria � Virgin
Asanimasa � LP � Chaos
AutoCherokee � Naked M4sic � Morgan Creek
Beat Happening � You Turn Me On � Sub Pop
Jello Biarra � No More Cocoons CD � Alternative Tentacles
Biota � Almost Ever � ReRCunieform
Bomb � Hate Fed Love � Warner Bros.
Cadillac Tramps � Tombstone Radio � Dr. Dream
Circus Lupus � 7" � Dischord
Codeine � LP � Sub Pop
Crackerbash � 7" � Sub Pop
Crash Worship � TBA � HeadhunterCargo
Curlew � The Hardwood � Cunieform
Dickless All-Stars � Sex God Tad 7" � Sub Pop
Brian Eno � Nerve Net � OpalWB
Etant Donnes � Blue � Soleilmoon
Evil Mothers � Evil Mothers � Invisible
Failure � Comfort � Slash
False Virgins � Infernal Doll � Brake OutEnemy
Five-Eight � I Learned Shut-Up � Sky
Front Line Assembly � Convergence � Third Mind
Gray Matter � Thog � Dischord
Randy Grief � Alice in Wonderland Part 4 � Soleilmoon
The list will be continued in the next edition of The
East Carolinian.
Taken from Alternative Press Magazine.
Available through Quicksilver Record and CD Exchange.
What a way to live
Living spaces � optional?
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Well, another semester, an-
other year.
Now who hasn't been looking
forward to another continuing epi-
sode of waiting in lines, cutting
classes and watching as the cam-
pus falls under the spell of "beau-
tification?"
Concrete, concrete, as far as
the eye can see.
Once again, Greenville has
been inundated with hordes of stu-
dents and their parents trying to
see just how much stuff they can
put into that tiny U-Haul camper.
The Mall has been turned into a
muddy pa rking lot and downtown
is enjoying its resurgence of
drunken revelry and money.
Instructors are back from their
vacations, looking forward to the
return of their advisees and their
endless questions and pleas for
them to open just one more space in
the class they're teaching.
Secreta ries are looking forward
to those students desperately hop-
ing to add that one class in order to
become a full-time student.
Drop-add lines will stretch out
the building, not to mention the
line ou t of Spilman to pay fees. You
know you're in for a wait when
they have a booth set up to sell soft
drinks right outside the building.
And if classesand lines weren't
enough, there is always the joy of
moving into a new place.
Djrm rooms were specifically
designed to have the least amount
of space in them for the most
amount of people. With Umstead
closing, university officials say they
may have to put up to four people
in one room. It's rough enough
with two people in the same room,
and they want to double that? Good
luck.
If you're a serious student who
wants a peaceful and quiet atmo-
sphere to study in, the dorms may
not be that idea I environment. Most
dorms can guarantee that at least
one person will be up at any hour
of the night. Get up to go to the
bathroom at two in the morning
and who knows, your next door
neighbor may be in the lobby hav-
ing a deep intellectual conversa-
tion with someone of the opposite
sex.
The one good thing about
dorm life is the amount of people
you'11 meet there. Leaveyourdoor
open for at least an hour and by the
end of that time, you'll have met
(oratleastseen)20differentpeople
pass by. For someone just coming
to ECU, the best place to live is in a
dorm.
But after one year (or at the
most two), apartment living is the
thing to do.
Moving into an apartment can
be as tough, or tougher, than mov-
ing into a dorm. All the little things
you didn't have to worry about in
your dorm�you know,likewhere
to get curtains, toilet bowl cleaner,
the whole works � now occupy
your time to the nth degree. Along
with all this wonderful new re-
sponsibility comes the advent of
all new problems you might have
the unequaled pleasure of facing.
Ever wondered exactly what
to do when you r toi let overflows at
11 o'clock at night? How about
when you wal k into your bed room
wearing socks and discover there's
a foot-long puddle soaking through
your carpet? But the topper has to
be getting back from getting gro-
ceries (to an apartment with $300
worth of new furniture) only to
find out that your water heater
shorted outand set fire to theapart-
ment. What fun.
Dorms and apartments aside,
it's always the high point of your
day sitting around waiting to find
out what your new roommate will
be like. Are they gonna mind if you
play Guns 'n Roses at level 10 on
the volume meter? What about if
they have a boyfriend or girlfriend
See Commentary, page 9
Bedlam sound proves unique
By Chas Mitch'l
Staff Writer
When bands and groups re-
lease their debut albums, the ten-
dency is to come up with their own
creative and unique style.
Bedlam, the newest group
among a long list of new releases,
seem to have hit the nail on the
head. With a "stolen sound" of
past and present rock 'n' roll and
soul, the group manages to com-
bine European club music with the
aforementioned to create that Bed-
lam sound. Bedlam bangs out an
appropriately uproarious noise
that, in the best rock and roll tradi-
tion, captures the confusion and
insanity of living in the modem
world. The songs reel with gleeful
passion and raw honesty, pro-
pelled by a stripped-down, guitar-
driven rock quartet that collides,
soars and staggers onward.
With the similar sound of "The
Boss" Bruce Springsteen on vocals
and U2 and INXS providing the
supporting music, Bedlam sounds
likeanexhilaratingclashof raucous
energy, tender motion and smart
pop craft. Listen closely, and it
sounds like an active mind unafraid
to spill its doubts and discoveries
into a band well-schooled in the
loose, rockier side of the power-pop
mountaintop.
Of the 12 tracks on this unique
.�ut listenableCD, you'll find your-
self toe-tapping and finger-snap-
ping to the Bedlam beat.
"Lucky" is one of two ballads
" on the release. With an acoustical
beginning and a soft mix of a
Stratocaster, this performance is
sure to win the hearts of its loyal
followers.
Gradually as the music plays,
the band's truesound and meaning
comes out. The sound is as strong as
RE.M.withatouchofBlackCrowes,
bu t the meaning is somewhat theirs.
"Upside Down" is another track
which will propel you to the dance
floor.
Bedlam sings of their past trav-
els and relationships in a manner
when you can relate toand understand
However, the only drawback
to this fairly well-produced debut
album is the time frame of each
song.
Though the majority of the 12
songs range from good to outstand-
ing, they're all short on time. Ten
songs are under three minutes,
therefore relaying a sense of
unfulfillment to the CD.
Aside from the shortness of
their songs (which may be their
gimmick), Bedlam will make a sud-
den impact on the music world.
New bowling center opens to full house
By Tommy Murphy
Staff Writer
Excitement best describes the air surrounding
the brand new AMF East Carolina Bowl, located on
Red Banks Road, which opened in August
The new bowling facility has plenty to offer the
public including40 lanes, a well-equipped snack bar,
an arcade and a Pro-shop.
"We have had a fantastic response so far and we
ha ve had a full house every night since opening sa id
John Janusz, E.C. Bowl's manager.
AMFFstCarolinaBowlisopenSundaythrough
Thursday from 9 a.m. until 12 a.m. On Friday and
Saturdays E.C. Bowl is open from 9 a.m. until 2 a.m.
Prices per frame run $2.25 Monday-Friday 9 a.m.
until 5 p.m. The weekend price is $2.65 per game.
"1 amreally excited about the future said Janusz.
Saturday and Sundays are open bowling days.
This fall leagues will be open for everyone.
Nicholson shines in IVIan Trouble'
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Once in a while a film ap-
pears that leaves the viewer won-
dering.
Not wondering why five dol-
lars was wasted: just wondering
in general. What motivated the
characters in the story? What hid-
den implications were missedOr
was the movie truly appealing?
Man Trouble poses just such
an enigma.
Starring Jack Nicholson and
Ellen Barkin, the film weaves an
entrancing web because it violates
every comfortable cliche that the
average moviegoer expects.
The story centers on Joan
Spruance (Ellen Barkin), a classi-
cal vocalist, who has recently di-
vorced the conductor of the oper-
atic orchestra in which she sings.
The opening shot of a re-
hearsal snags the viewer's atten-
tion immediately. Abird'seyeshot
of the room is followed by a close-
up of Joan singing beautifully.
For a film that advertised it-
self by focusing on attack dogs
and Jack Nicholson, this opening
sequence jolts viewers, quickly
forcing them to drop all precon-
ceived notions.
Jack Nicholson plays Harry
Bliss, whose real name is Eugene.
Harry trains attack dogs. In actu-
ality, Harry is more a con-artist
than a dog trainer.
Joan's apartment has been
burglarized and she continues to
receive threatening phone calls.
She decides to invest in an
attack dog and calls "House of
Bliss Harry's dog business.
Harry first appears in the film
seated across the table from his
wife as the two undergo marriage
counseling. Harry's wife is bitter
about almost everything concern-
ing Harry. Afteralongtiradeabout
Harry's faults, Harry shares his
side of the story.
"She never believes anything
1 say says Harry disinterestedly.
"That's a lie shoots back his
wife.
Harry, clad in a loud plaid
sports coat, reservedly moves
closer to the counselor and says,
"See, see
Little scenes like this pepper
the film. The darkly comic timing
is perfect.
A running bit continues
through several counseling ses-
sions concerning Harry's nick-
name for his wife. Hecalls her Iwo
Jima because of her Oriental de-
scent.
This moniker infuriates his
wife.
These counseling sessions
provide only one sm.ill part of the
complex tapestry of this film.
One of the reasons Joan fears
for her life is because her sister,
Ande (Beverly D'Angelo), has
been kidnapped by her ex-hus-
band Red Lails (Harry Dean
Stanton plays this magnificently
controlled menace).
Ande has written an expose of
her marriage to Red. Red cannot
allow the book to be published so
he drugs Ande and puts her in a
desolate institution.
Meanwhile, Red's lawyer has
contacted Harry to pay him to find
the manuscript.
Harry's job is to find out if
Joan knowswherethemanuscript
is hidden.
Just to add spice to the olio,
Joan is being followed by a ma-
niac who wants to kill her.
Harry eventually confronts
the maniac in a hilarious scene
near the end of the film.
If this synopsis sounds con-
fusing, wait until you see the film
See Man Trouble, page 8
Auditions
East Carolina Playhouse will hold
auditions Sept. 8, 9 and 11 for the
December performances of "Amahl and
the Night Visitors
Needed (approx.):
23 Adults, ages 18-50
1 child, age or look 12
Dancing roles:
8 adults
4 children
A) 1 auditionees should come with 2-3 minute prepared vocal selection either from
Amahl orsome comparable pieceof music. Please bring yourmusican accompanist
will be provided, but you may bring your own. Dancers need to come dressed
comfortably and prepared to move as instructed by the choreographer.
Singing Auditioas: Sept. 8-9, 7p.m. in the A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall at The School
of Music.
Call-backs, if necessary: Sept. 11,7p.m
Dance audihons: same days as above, 7p.m. in Dance Studio 114 of the Messick
Theatre Arts Center.
Further info: 757-h.VH, 757-4279 or 757-6325 ,





��
The East Carolinian
September 1. 1992
Lifestyle
Page 7
t hoto courtesy Warner Bros. Entertainment
John Ritter and Pam Dawber star in Warner Brothers' new release, Sfay Tuned. Ritter nd Dawber are zapped
inside of their television set and find themselves in a strange and evil dimension.
'Stay Tuned' for mindless film
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Stay Tuned is a new film about
television.
John Ritter plays Roy Knable,
a plumbing-supplies salesman
whose escape from reality is to sit
for hours in front of the television.
This irks his wife Helen (Pam
Dawber) immensely.
One night Helen becomes so
aggravated when Roy would
father watch a basketball game
than talk about their marital prob-
lems that she throws a trophy
through the television screen.
The Knable's children, Darryl
(David Tom) and Diane (Heather
McComb), sense the tension be-
tween their parents. They make
plans to stay overnight at friends'
houses so that their parents will
have a night together to hopefully
patch up their differences.
Instead of discussing their
problems, Helen and Roy get
zapped into a literal television hel 1.
One of Satan's aides, Spike (Jef-
frey Jones), has brought Roy and
Helen to another dimension. In
the battle fcr souls, the devil has
made a deal with heaven to allow
all potential victims 24 hours in-
side hell's cable television. If the
victims survive, they are permit-
ted to return to their earthly life,
otherwise they must remain per-
manently in the underworld.
Roy and Helen quickly learn
that they must muster their wits
in order to survive. They get
zapped from one show to another.
They begin on a game show
called "You Can't Lose" and then
travel to a wrestling ring fighting
in the UWF (Underworld Wres-
tling Federation), then find them-
selves in the frozen tundra of
"Northern Overexposure Each
new situation provides new chal-
lenges and a few laughs.
While Roy and Helen try to
survive, their children find out
about their plight and start hook-
ing up their own system to tap
into hell's cable. Roy and Helen
are also helped by Crowley (Eu-
gene Lew), an ex-progra mmer for
hell's cable who is trying to sur-
vive in much the same way as
Helen and Roy. This is because
Spike has becomedissatisfied with
Crowley's work.
See Stay tuned, page 8
Alice Demur � 771? Untidy Suicides � Alternative Tentacles
Altern 8 � Mask Hysteria � Virgin
Asanimasa � LP � Chaos
AutoCherokee � Naked Music � Morgan Creek
Beat Happening � You Turn Me On� Sub Pop
Jello Biafra�No More Cocoons CD � Alternative Tentacles
Biota � Almost Ever � ReRCunieform
Bomb � Hate Fed Love � Warner Bros.
Cadillac Tramps � Tombstone Radio � Dr. Dream
Circus Lupus � 7" � Dischord
Codeine � LP � Sub Pop
Crackerbash � 7" � Sub Pop
Crash Worship � TBA � HeadhunterCargo
Curlew � The Hardwood � Cunieform
Dickless All-Stars � Sex God Tad 7" � Sub Pop
Brian Eno � Nerve Net � OpalWB
Etant Donnes � Blue � Soleilmoon
Evil Mothers � Evil Mothers � Invisible
Failure � Comfort � Slash
False Virgins � Infernal Doll � Brake OutEnemy
Five-Eight � f Learned Shut-Up � Sky
Front Line Assembly � Convergence � Third Mind
Gray Matter � Thog � Dischord
Randy Grief � Alice in Wonderland Part 4 � Soleilmoon
The list will be continued in the next edition of The
East Carolinian.
Taken from Alternative Press Magazine.
Available through Quicksilver Record and CD Exchange.
What a way to live
Living spaces � optional?
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Well, another semester, an-
other year.
Now who hasn't been looking
forward toanother continuing epi-
sode of waiting in lines, cutting
classes and watching as the cam-
pus falls under the spell of "beau-
tification?"
Concrete, concrete, as far as
the eye can see.
Once again, Greenville has
been inundated with hordes of stu-
dents and their parents trying to
see just how much stuff they can
put into that tiny U-Haul camper.
The Mall has been turned into a
muddy parking lot and downtown
is enjoying its resurgence of
drunken revelry and money.
Instructors are back from their
vacations, looking forward to the
return of their advisees and their
endless questions and pleas for
them to open just one more space in
the class they're teaching.
Secretariesarelookingforward
to those students desperately hop-
ing to add that one class in order to
become a full-time student.
Drop-add lines will stretchout
the building not to mention the
line out of Spilman to pay fees. You
know you're in for a wait when
they have a booth set up to sell soft
drinks right outside the building.
And if classes and lines weren't
enough, there is always the joy of
moving into a new place.
Dorm rooms were specifically
designed to have the least amount
of space in them for the most
amount of people. With Umstead
closing, university officials say they
may have to put up to four people
in one room. It's rough enough
with two people in the same room,
and they wanttodoublethat?Good
luck.
If you 're a serious student who
wants a peaceful and quiet atmo-
sphere to study in, the dorms may
notbethatidealenvironment. Most
dorms can guarantee that at least
one person will be up at any hour
of the night. Get up to go to the
bathroom at two in the morning
and who knows, your next door
neighbor may be in the lobby hav-
ing a deep intellectual conversa-
tion with someone of the opposite
sex.
The one good thing about
dorm life is the amount of people
you' 11 meet there. Leaveyourdoor
open for at least an hour and by the
end of that time, you'll have met
(or at least seen) 20different people
pass by. For someone just coming
to ECU, the best place to live is in a
dorm.
But after one year (or at the
most two), apartment living is the
thing to do.
Moving into an apartment can
be as tough, or tougher, than mov-
ingintoadorm. All the little things
you didn't have to worry about in
your dorm�you know, like where
to get curtains, toilet bowl cleaner,
the whole works � now occupy
your time to the nth degree. Along
with all this wonderful new re-
sponsibility comes the advent of
all new problems you might have
the unequaled pleasure of facing.
Ever wondered exactly what
todo when your toilet overflowsat
11 o'clock at. night? How about
when you walkintoyour bedroom
wearing socks and discover there's
a foot-long puddle soaking through
your carpet? But the topper has to
be getting back from getting gro-
ceries (to an apartment with $300
worth of new furniture) only to
find out that your water heater
shorted out and set fire to theapart-
ment. What fun.
Dorms and apartments aside,
it's always the high point of your
day sitting around waiting to find
out what your new roommate will
be like. Are they gonna mind if you
play Guns 'n Roses at level 10 on
the volume meter? What about if
they have a boyfriend or girlfriend
See Commentary, page 9
Bedlam sound proves unique
By Chas Mitch'l
Staff Writer
When bands and groups re-
lease their debut albums, the ten-
dency is to come up with their own
creative and unique style.
Bediam, the newest group
among a long list of new releases,
seem to have hit the nail on the
head. With a "stolen sound" of
past and present rock 'n' roll and
soul, the group manages to com-
bine European club music with the
aforementioned to create that Bed -
lam sound. Bedlam bangs out an
appropriately uproarious noise
that, in the best rock and roll tradi-
tion, captures the confusion and
insanity of living in the modem
world. The songs reel with gleeful
passion and raw honesty, pro-
pelled by a stripped-down, guitar-
driven rock quartet that collides,
soars and staggers onward.
With the similar sound of "The
Boss" Bruce Springsteen on vocals
and U2 and INXS providing the
supporting music, Bediam sounds
likeanexhilaratingclashof raucous
energy, tender motion and smart
pop craft. Listen closely, and it
sounds like an active mind unafraid
to spill its doubts and discoveries
into a band well-schooled in the
loose, roc kier side of the power-pop
mountaintop.
Of the 12 tracks on this unique
but listenable CD, you'll find your-
self toe-tapping and finger-snap-
ping to the Bedlam beat.
"Lucky" is one of two ballads
on the release. With an acoustical
beginning and a soft mix of a
Stratocaster, this performance is
sure to win the hearts of its loyal
followers.
Gradually as the music plays,
the band's true sound and meaning
comes out. The sound is as strong as
R.E.M. witha touch of Black Crowes,
but the meaning is somewhat theirs.
"Upside Down" is another track
which will propel you to the dance
floor.
Bedlam sings of their past trav-
els and relationships in a manner
uhenyoj can relate to ardirdsstand
Ffowever, the only drawback
to this fairly well-produced debut
album is the time frame of each
song.
Though the majority of the 12
songs range from good to outstand-
ing they're all short on time. Ten
songs are under three minutes,
therefore relaying a sense of
unfulfillment to the CD.
Aside from the shortness of
their songs (which may be their
gimmick), Bedlam will make a sud -
den impact on the music world.
New bowling center opens to full house
By Tommy Murphy
Staff Writer
Excitement best describes the air surrounding
the brand new AMF East Carolina Bowl, located on
Red Banks Road, which opened in August
The new bowling facility has plenty to offer the
public including 40 lanes, a well-equipped snackbar,
an arcade and a Pro-shop.
"We have had a fantastic response so far and we
havehadafull house every nightsinceopening'said
John Janusz, EC. Bowl's manager.
AMF EastCarolina Bowl isopenSunday through
Thursday from 9 a.m. until 12 a.m. On Friday and
Saturdays EC. Bowl is open from 9 a.m. until 2 a.m.
Prices per frame run $225 Monday-Friday 9a.m.
until 5 p.m. The weekend price is $2.65 per game.
"I am really excited aboutthefuture said Janusz.
Saturday and Sundays are open bowling days.
This fall leagues will be open for everyone.
Nicholson shines in "Man Trouble'
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Once in a while a film ap-
pears that leaves the viewer won-
dering.
Not wondering why five dol-
lars was wasted: just wondering
in general. What motivated the
characters in the story? What hid-
den implications were missedOr
was the movie truly appealing?
Man Trouble poses just such
an enigma.
Starring jack Nicholson and
Ellen Barkin, the film weaves an
entrancing web because it violates
every comfortable cliche that the
average moviegoer expects.
The story centers on Joan
Spruance (Ellen Barkin), a classi-
cal vocalist, who has recently di-
vorced the conductor of the oper-
atic orchestra in which she sings.
The opening shot of a re-
hearsal snags the viewer's atten-
tion immediately. Abird'seyeshot
of the room is followed by a close-
up of Joan singing beautifully.
For a film that advertised it-
self by focusing on attack dogs
and Jack Nicholson, this opening
sequence jolts viewers, quickly
forcing them to drop all precon-
ceived notions.
Jack Nicholson plays Harry
Bliss, whose real name is Eugene.
Harry trains attack dogs. In actu-
ality, Harry i� more a con-artist
than a dog trainer.
Joan's apartment has been
burglarized and she continues to
receive threatening phone calls.
She decides to invest in an
attack dog and calls "House of
Bliss Harry's dog business.
Harry first appears in the film
seated across the table from his
wife as the two undergo marriage
counseling. Harry's wife is bitter
about almost everything concern-
ing Harry. Aftera long tiradeabout
Harry's faults, Harry shares his
side of the story.
"She never believes anything
I say says Harry disinterestedly.
"That's a lie shoots back his
wife.
Harry, clad in a loud plaid
sports coat, reservedly moves
closer to the counselor and says,
"See, see
Little scenes like this pepper
the film. The darkly comic timing
is perfect.
A running bit continues
through several counseling ses-
sions concerning Harry's nick-
name for his wife. He calls her I wo
Jima because of her Oriental de-
scent.
This moniker infuriates his
wife.
These counseling sessions
provide only one small part of the
complex tapestry of this film.
One of the reasons Joan fears
for her life is because her sister,
Ande (Beverly D'Angelo), has
been kidnapped by her ex-hus-
band Red Lails (Harry Dean
Stanton plays this magnificently
controlled menace).
Ande has written an expose of
her marriage to Red. Red cannot
allow the book to be published so
he drugs Ande and puts her in a
desolate institution.
Meanwhile, Red's lawyer has
contacted Harry to pay him to find
the manuscript.
Harry's job is to find out if
Joan knows where the manuscript
is hidden.
Just to add spice to the olio,
Joan is being followed by a ma-
niac who wants to kill her.
Harry eventually confronts
the maniac in a hilarious scene
near the end of the film.
If this synopsis sounds con-
fusing, wait until you see the film
See Man Trouble, page 8
Auditions
East Carolina Playhouse will hold
auditions Sept. 8, 9 and 11 for the
December performances of "Amahl and
the Night Visitors
Needed (approx.):
23 Adults, ages 18-50
1 child, age or look 12
Dancing roles:
8 adults
4 children
All auditiortees should come with 2-3 minute prepared vocal selection either from
Amahl or some comparable piece of music. Please bring yourmusic; an accompanist
will be provided, but you may bring your own. Dancers need to come dressed
comfortably and prepared to move as instructed bv the choreographer.
Singing Auditions: Sept. 8-9, 7p.m. in the A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall at The Schxl
of Music.
Call-backs, if necessary: Sept. 11, 7p.m
Dance auditions: same days as above, 7p.m. in Dance Studio 114 of the Messick
Theatre Arts Center.
LFurther info: 757-6331. 757-4279 or 757-6325.
i �





8 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 1, 1992
Stay tuned
Continued from page 7
Most of the humor in Stay
Tuned centers around the various
shows in which the Knables be-
come trapped. Many of the titles
sound fairly funny, but would be
better suited to a comic strip or
perhaps a Saturday Night Live
sketch. "Sadistic Hidden Video
"Driving Over Miss Daisy "I
Love Lucifer" and "Duane's Un-
derworld" arefairly inventive, but
most high school sophomores
could have done as well.
Since these titles propel the
film, and since most of them are
not that funny, not much in Stay
Tuned is worth watching.
The one inventive sequence
succeeds because of the genius of
animator Chuck Jones, who
helped to create Bugs Bunny,
Daffy Duck, Porky Pig and a host
of other Warner Brothers' ani-
mated characters. Jones super-
vised a segment in which Roy and
Helen find themselves in an ani-
mated short called "RoboCat
This three minute section of Stay
Tuned looks great and generates
more enjoyment than the other 80
minutes combined.
Seeing Roy and Helen as mice
and watching them argue in their
animated states really tickles the
funny bone. At one point, Roy
must think of a way out of a jam
and thinks back to all the cartoons
he has watched to help him plan
his attack.
The actors in Stay Tuned are
likeable enough, especially Pam
Dawber, but they are trapped in
roles mat give them no depth or
width. They must fit into strictly
defined one-dimensional stereo-
types that leave the entire film
flat.
Eugene Levy adds some lev-
ity with his role, but even his hu-
mor is not broad enough to score
with the audience.
For a comedy, the theater in
which 1 watched Stay Tuned was
suspiciously quiet.
Peter Hyams, the director of
ST, began as a cinematographer.
His tenure as a d irector proves the
Peter Principle, that everyone rises
to theirown level of incompetence.
Hyams has made some modestly
successful films, like Running
Scared and Telefon, but his style is
very workmanlike; his films never
approach the art that is necessary
It is on your cornflakes box
Now Shortly it will be on your skin.
Find out what "they" have planned for
you next.
A Slide Presentation
Mendenhall Room 248
7:15 pm
Tuesday, September 1 &
Wednesday, September 2
(Refreshments)
Apostolic Campus Ministry
1412 W. 14th Street
At the intersection of Farmviile Blvd.
757-1120
NY. CITY MIX TAPES
Reggae, Rap, GO-Go-featuring
Kid Capri, Ron-G and more
Also selling the latest in
T-Shirts (Malcolm X)
Short Sets �Jean Sets
Drill BootsShoesHatsEtc,
"RUSH"
DOWN TO
CHICO'S
and Bring Your Amigos!
12 PRICE APPETIZERS
Sunday-Wednesday
(After 9 PM Dine-in Only)
12 Price Pitchers of Beer!
WE "PLEDGE" TO DO THE BEST!
i
to make memorable films.
Here Hyams again falls back
on cliched characters and stories.
He seems afraid to venture be-
yond the tired standards of Holly-
wood. He refuses to make the
viewer think and consequently
usually only does a moderate job
of entertaining.
Stay Tuned may play better on
video because video is much closer
to television.
The broad, trite humor of this
film may not fall so flat because
the same works on most sitcoms.
This film should have been a TV
movie, or better yet, reduced to a
segment on the aforementioned
Saturday Night Live. As a feature
film, Stay Tuned only prompts the
viewer to tune out.
Catherine Wheel releases
music with blistering lyrics
By Chas Mitch'l
Staff Writer
Make no bones about it,
Catherine Wheelsiswhathardcore,
heavy metal rock and roll used to be
years ago. Many new bands arrive
on the scene bearing the unenviable
label, "Afraid to Rock Not
Catherine Wheel. This group's
churning white-heat meltdown de-
serves a tag all of its own: Play it
loud!
This British band from the sea-
side town of Great Yarmouth has
been slamming hard chords and
blistering lyrics since 1989. The band
toured Europe with the likes of the
Replacements, Echo and the
Bunnymen, Slowdive and Blur.
Catherine Wheels has paid its dues
and now is looking to fill the vnid
on the American hard rock scene.
Progressive is not quite the word to
describe this group. With such tities
as Texture, Tumbledown, Black
Metallic and Ferment(the tide track),
Catherine Wheels rocks hard and
long.
Unlike American groups such
as The Cult and G'n'R, Catherine
Wheels dabbles back and forth be-
tween hard rock and European "go-
go" music. The release of Ferment
brings back a mature dimension to
the band's raw energy, layering its
trademark guitar with a rich har-
monic density. Singer Rob
Dickinson delivers his disarmingry
honest lyrics with a vulnerability
which perfectly counterpoints the
sonic maelstrom around him.
The true standout track on this
stellar debut release has to be the
eight minute epic, "Black Metallic
an astonishingly assured statement
on intent from a band just begin-
ning to explore the depth of its own
potential. The track has been de
scribed by one British critic as the
"Hurricane of the '90s generation"
and will doubtless playa key part in
establishing Catherine Wheels as a
major force in the new music.
WELCOME BACK ECU
DELIVERY FAMOUS
16"
LARGE PIZZA
1 Topping
of Your Choice
5,50
Campus Delivery Only
or
6.75
Other Areas
Plus Ta�
Expires 83192
SINCE 1980
Open 7 Days a Week
757-1278 or 757-0731
Under New
Management
Sun. - Wed. 11 a.m. - 1 a.m.
Thurs. - Sat. 11 a.m. - 2 a.m.
100 E. 10th St. & Evans St.
We Deliver Items That Others Don't
Hot Oven Subs- Steak & Cheese- Pepper Steak
Meatballs- Speghetti- Lasagna-
Burgers & Sandwiches
MEDIUM PIZZA
1 Topping
of Your Choice
Plus 2 Cokes
5.50
Plus Tax Delivered
r,
Expires 83192
SPAGHETTI
DINNER
INCLUDES SALAD
AND GARLIC
BREAD
ASK ABOUT OUR 2 FOR 1 PIZZA SPECIAL - ALL AT REDUCED PRICES
5.50
Plus Tax Delivered
Expires 83192
LARGE PIZZAS I
1 - 8 toppings your choice!
& 1 - 2 toppings your
choice
Plus 4 Cokes
14.99
Plus Tax
Pick-up or Delivery
Expires 83192
LASAGNA
DINNER
8" Garlic Bread,
Salad & Free Drink
6.75
Plus Tax Delivered
Expires 83192
PIZZA MANIA1
3 PIZZAS
1 TOPPING
3 Smalls
7.99
3 Mediums
11.99
3 Large
14.99
Pick-up Only
Expires 83192
tilQB STJin tlUU HHQQ !icenSo nlatec available
license plates available
The divisions of motor ve-
hicles for North Carolina
and Virginia are offering
license plates emblazoned
with the East Carolina Uni
versitylogo. The
North Carolina colle-
giate plate will be
manufactured on the
"First in Flight" blank.
The cost of the collegiate
plate is S25.00 plus the
state's annual registration
fee.
The N.C. Division of
Motor Vehicles will begin
manufacturing the plates
when they have received 300
requests. The Virginia plates
will be made once the DMV
has received
150
requests.
To request your North
Carolina collegiate plate,
write: DMV, Vehicle Regis-
tration Section, Collegiate
License Plates Dept 1100
New Bern Ave Raleigh,
NC 27697-0001, or call
919-733-7510. Include
your name, address and
telephone number, and
state your request for an
ECU license plate. Do
not send payment at
this time.
For details on
how to order your 'Virginia
collegiate plate, write: Don
Leggett, Office of Alumni
Affairs, Taylor-Slaughter
Alumni Center, ECU,
Greenville, NC 27854353.
Student
Leaders
COSOL brings a multitude of opportunities for you on
ikwmHVMSuiiwiiiu
Mendenhall Student Center Multipurpose Room.
The Council of Student Organization Leaders
is about networking sharing ideas discussing
organization issueslearning about important events
promoting organizations meeting other leaders
making a difference as a student leader.
521 CotancheSt. � 757-1666
Sponsored by
Student Leadership Development Programs, 757-4711

l�





��
SEPTEMBER 1, 1992
The East Carolinian 9
Kingston Trio performs music for a wide range of listeners
By Michael Harrison
Staff Writer
Folk music will be an antici-
pated smash here at ECU when vo-
cal group The Kingston Trio per-
forms at Wright Auditorium Sept.
11.
The Kingston Trio is a folk mu-
sic group made up of three principal
singers, acoustic guitars and banjos.
ECU'sChairrnanofthePerform-
ing Arts Series Committee Rudolph
Alexander said those on the com-
mittee wanted to have a concert that
both parents and students would
enjoy.
'It looks like a really positive
addition to the parents' weekend
activities Alexander said. Ticket
sales are selling briskly, he added,
quickly approaching the sell-out
point.
Bob Shane, Nick Reynolds and
David Guard formed the group
around Palo Alto, Calif, in 1957.
Their unique sound helped spark a
rising popularity of folk music, a
style that would soon be associated
with Dylan, Baez and Peter, Paul
and Mary among others.
Reynolds recently came back to
the band after a 25-year absence. "It
was time Reynolds said. "I've
missed the camaraderie and the fun
of singing in the Trio. Who says you
can never go home again?"
"We now have the nucleus of
the original Kingston Trio sound
Bob Shane said. "It was always Nick
areilthatrealrydefinedTheKingston
Trio's vocal sound, with me singing
lead and Nick harmonizing. So now
tfiat Nick has joined me and George
Grove, this Trio sounds very much
like theoriginalgroupwithone major
difference � this one sounds bet-
ter
Commentary
Continued from page 7
who likes to stay the night? Take
heart, go see Single White Female
and realize that there's always
somebody worse off than you are.
Well, you're here now and
there's no getting out of it. Give
yourself about a semester before
you decide whether you're going
to stay or not. It takes at least that
long to get accustomed to a new
place and the people around you.
And who knows? You may find
out that the best decision you ever
made was to stay and continue
that wonderful experience called
education (or was it getting rid of
that old roommate? or changing
that awful wallpaper in the bath-
room? ).
October, 1958 brought the
Kingston Trio's first single "Tom
Dooley" out to the public. The
Kingston Trio eventually became
the top vocal group worldwide, re-
garded by many as a "musical and
cultural phenomenon For a time,
only the Beatles matched the Trio's
record sales and concert draws.
The Trio's success was capped
with two Grammy Awards, as well
as their numerous gold records.
Guard left the group himself in 1961
and was replaced by John Stewart.
The group broke up in 1967.
Shane, Reynoldsand Guard wanted
to pursue separate career interests.
Reynolds became a theater
owner, cattle rancher and antique
dealer in southern Oregon.
Shane and Guard regrouped
fiveyears later with newcomer Roger
Gambill, achieving success compa-
rable to before. Gambill died in 1985.
PBS aired a Kingston Trio re-
unionspecialin 1981. Reynolds, who
performed periodically on stage,
joined the group for the show, but
never came back full-time until now.
"Having Nick Reynolds back in
the Trio brings it back full circle
Grove said, "which just shows you
the power and longevity of our kind
of music
Grove is a music graduate of
Wake Forest University and arranges
the Kingston Trio's music for sym-
phony orchestra. Thisallows the Trio
to perform at 20 symphony concerts
every year.
Shane recently said in a maga-
zine interview: "With more story
songs, I think we could attract listen-
ers even among very young chil-
dren. All the people want is for us to
sing a song, tell a story and make it
good
Some of the Kingston Trio's hits
have included "Greenback Dollar
'Tom Dooley "Where Have All
the Flowers Gone? "The Reverend
Mr. Black" and "Early Morning
Rain
Tickets are now on sale at the
central ticket office at Mendenhall
Student Center. The prices are $7 for
ECU students and anyone 18 and
under, $10 for ECU faculty and staff
and $15 for the public. Tickets can
be ordered by credit card by calling
the central ticket office at 757-4788,
or just call 1-800-ECU-ARTS.
The concert begins on Sept. 11
in Wright Auditorium at 8 p.m.
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10 Tlie East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 1, 1992
Man Trouble
Continued from page 7
� then you will be truly confused
and left wondering.
The magnificent part of this
intricate plot is that it never be-
comes predictable. Red Lails never
quite lives up to his nefarious repu-
tation and Harry never quite lives
down to his. Every time the film
seems to be headed into familiar
territory, something odd occurs to
confound those expectations.
In one scene, Joan is attacked
by the maniac stalking her. She
calls to the dog for help.
Instead of rushing to help Joan,
the dog affectionately attacks the
maid's calves while Joan is left to
fend for herself.
Nicholson clearly steals the
show. His timing, his smug atti-
tude and his flawless delivery
make him one of the finest actors
working in Hollywood.
Nicholson slides completely
into Harry. He seems to know ex-
��-
actly how a con-artist like Harry
would operate.
Nicholson has several incred-
ible lines. While talking to Joan,
who pontificates about her trouble
with men and her view of them,
Harry says sophisticatedly: "Hook
upon a womnn ?s a whole The
line hangs there f ' an instant with-
out any remark and then the film
continues.
Barkin adds quality support.
She dresses in beautiful clothes
and utters phrases like "the prince
of prevarication
She is completely believable
as a highly educated, wealthy pro-
fessional who suffers the same
problems as most poorer, less edu-
cated people.
The rest of the cast tickles one's
fancy with their quirks and idio-
syncrasies.
Bob Rafelson directed a simi-
lar film 22 years ago called Five
Easy Pieces.
Although this film does not
quite merit the same accolades as
thai one, it does deserve high
marks.
Any film that can break the
heatofsummerwithaquirkychar-
acter study deserves acclaim.
Man Trouble is not for all tastes
but anyone who sees it will want
to talk about it, so drag that reluc-
tant friend or relative with you.
Wondering about the film is
much more fun for two.
N.C Museum of Art Calendar for September
4 Friday & 5 Saturday
Film: Raiders of the Lost Ark
Steven Spielberg's roost thrilling
big-screen adventure. Who
knows? Maybe you'll decide to be
an archaeologist. Rated PG (115
minutes).
8:30 p.m.
Series ticket or $3
11 Friday
Film: Beauty and the Beast
Some think this is the best
animated film of all time. Disney
tells this classic story with a
modern leading lady. Rated G
(84 minutes).
8:30 p.m.
Series ticket or S3
12 Saturday
Children's Workshop: Sun
and Seascapes
Participants in this workshop will
be able to make the summer last
a little bit longer. After a look at
the collection to see how artists
have depicted lakes, rivers and the
ocean, students will create pictures
of their favorite weekend getaways
near the water.
10 a.m. - 12 noon, Ages 7-9
$6
Children's Film: FernGully: The
Last Rainforest
Set in the coastal rainforests of
Australia, this newly released
animated musical feature tells the
story of the jungle creatures who,
with some help from sprites and
fairies, try to save the rainforest
from destruction. (76 minutes)
10 a.m. - 12 noon
Free
Children's Workshop: Pastel
Portraits
A look lit portraits in the collection
with a focus on the use of light
and shadow to create form will
introduce students to techniques
in drawing their own self-portraits
using oil pastels.
1-3 p.m Ages 9-11
$6
Film: Beauty and the Beast
8:30 p.m.
Series ticket or $3
13 Sunday
Symposium: Design Education
Tlie i.indamental importance of
design problem-solving as a way of
seeing and knowing the world is
the subject. Teachers, administra-
tors, architects, designers and the
interested public are invited to
discuss this topic with special
guest panelists. Programs promot-
ing design education for kinder-
garten through 12th grades
currently implemented nationally
will be discussed as well. No
registration is necessary.
1-4 p.m.
Free
For tickets and more info contact
the N.C Muieum of An at (919)
8331935.

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TRACKS
Tired of being a face in the crowd?
NOW YOU CAN MAKE THE DIFFERENCE!
Become a
Student Representative in Faculty Senate
�Get to vote on issues that concern all
of ECU students
�Be a real participant in behind-the-scenes
action
�Take part in the formation and revision
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�Great leadership opportunities & experience
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Let Your Voice Be Heard!
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Don t let things ride- TAKE CONTROL!
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for application: deadline Sept. 4
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August 31 - September 2
August 31 - Open House 5:15 - 6:15
September 1 - Skit Night 5:15 - 6:15
September 2 - Pref Night (Invitation Only)
Casual Dress
Designated Meeting Place for rides are located outside of
Mendenhall and Belk Dorm at 5:00
508 West 5th Street
For more information:
752-8490 758-1898
757-0344 757-1811
Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority offers Leadership, Sisterhood, Scholarship,
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�. mm ��"�" ����






��
The East Carolinian
September 1, 1992
Sports
Page 11
Return of the bonecrushers
By Chas Mitch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
When you think of a line-
backer, one conjers up images of
Brian "The Bozz" Bosworth (Se-
a$tleSeahawks),Lawerence"L.T
Taylor (New York Giants) or
rriaybe even Matt Millen (Wash-
ington Redskins). Now take a com-
bination of all three and you would
have what is considered a pre-
miere defensive threat.
Senior outside linebacker
Ernest Lewis and junior inside
backer Anthony Davis are the keys
to the Pirate search and destroy
defense. The two along with se-
nior standout Jerry "J-Dog" Dil-
Iibn and Ryan Clayton are that
premier defensive threat and will
be called upon to led the defen-
sive charge this season.
; Lewis, who hails from
Sanford, Flo. has the grace and
speed of one-time great Ernie "The
Gat" Ladd, who was noted for his
size, speed and strength at the
outside linebacker position. In
addition to his many talents, he
has stepped up and taken the lead-
ership reigns for the Bucs.
"As a senior, it has been a long
time coming Lewis said. "With
other opportunities to attend
larger Division I schools, I wanted
to come to ECU (then a small
school) and help put it on the
map
And on the map it is, for the
'92 Pirates are coming off one of
the most successful seasons in ECU
history.
"It has been many years in
the making to achieve the level of
last year's status, however; that
season is behind us and we must
continue on as Lewis was quoted
as saying. But when asked about
the many head coaching changes
during his Pirate years he had this
to say.
"Well, coaching is like a busi-
ness and I'm sure that Coach (Bill)
Lewis did what he had to do
Lewis said. "But when the deci-
sion was made to leave and then
Coach Logan was appointed, we
didn't miss a beat at all, thanks to
Dave Hart
Davis, who,at6feetandl inch,
will be assuming the duties of in-
side linebacker which was vacated
by All American Robert Jones.
Even though no pressure is placed
in the linebacking unit, ihe image
of old number 44 will always be in
the minds of the many ECU faith-
ful.
"Robert played extremely
well and left us with his sports-
manship and ethics of teamwork
Davis said. "This year all 11 guys
will be flying to the ball, with a
strong emphasis placed on
hustle
Davis, a product of Lexington
High School in Boston, Mass. has
come to ECU with the attitude
See Linebackers, page 13
Photo by Dail RMd � 77�� East Carolinian
The New Look defense of Steve Logan's Pirates will be smashing through the ninth ranked Syracuse
Orangemen Saturday in Ficklen Stadium.
ECU to direct lights,
cameras, action
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
East Carolina University is prepar-
ing to undertake its largest media pro-
duction ever with a live broadcast of the
Virginia Tech game on Sept 12.
This will mark the first time that
ECU has aired a football game live.
Fosstone Productions, of Washing-
ton, D.C will produce the game in con-
junction with ECU's electronic media
department Electronic media director
Jeff Charles will handle play-by-play du-
ties, and said the broadcast will be trans-
mitted live by ten television stations in
North Carolina, Virginia and Tennes-
see. Charles said the broadcast would
afford ECU the opportunity to obtain an
unprecedented amount of exposure for
recruiting players in those areas.
SportSouth of Atlanta will also carry
the games and help showcase the Pirate
team to nearly three million cable sub-
scribers in Georgia, South Carolina, Ten-
nessee, Alabama, Mississippi, and West-
em North Carolina. Home Team Sports
of Washington, DC will delay the tele-
� � �
cast for 4:30p.m. on Sunday, September
13.
"This idea started back in the
spring said Charles.
"As East Carolina is an indepen-
dent, they are not guaranteed the televi-
sion exposure that a conference pro-
vides. By producing our own show, we
are given an unbelievable amount of
exposure. You can't put a price tag on
�mis sort of thing
Charles said that the exposure pro-
vided to potential recruits would make
East Carolina very attractive in mis mar-
ket.
Compiled with ESPN's national
broadcast of the Southern Mississippi
game on Oct. 29, this production will
give East Carolina the ability to reach
viewers nationwide, concentrating on
the states surrounding the university.
Dave Hart, Jr athletic director said,
"with two li e television opportunities
on contractwe are afforded consider-
able visability for our university and
athletic program as weprogress through
the 1992 football season.
Not just your average walk in the park
By Chas Mitch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
They came from every crack and crev-
ice. They came through the holes in the ivy
fence of the varsity football practice field,
from the gate opening of the adjacent tennis
courts.
There were tall ones and short ones,
there were large ones as well as small ones.
There were young ones and mere were old
ones, (why hell, one of them had to have
been at least 30), but they continued to
come.
With approximately 50 individuals
running around and stretching, it seemed
obvious as to the primary reason why they
were there. For some, the visions of past
high school stardom danced in their heads,
whileothers were there to maybe just prove
to themselves that they still had it. For
whatever reason which brought these zom-
bie like participants to the practice field at 6
a jn they were there and waiting.
Finally the moment had arrived in the
form of Assistant Coach Chuck Pagano.
With his clipboard and stop watch in hand,
the time had arrived for the drills to begin.
Rugby is a clash of the titans
By Richard Hooton III
Staff Writer
It takes leather balls to play rugby. The '92 ECU Rugby team knows
this all too well. The season starts Sept. 12 at home.
During a soccer match in 1823, William Ellis
helped give birth to a new sport. He picked up the
ball and began to run with it towards the opponent's
goal. The opposing team labelled him a cheater and
quickly tackled him with great force. He was said to
havea"finedisregard for the rulesofthe gameThe
imagination of a very sore Ellis had created the sport
of rugby.
Rugby is an exci ting blend of the aggressiveness
of football and the skill of soccer. The teams are
made up of 15 players and are divided into two
groups, the forwards and the backs. The forwards
are almost equivalent to the offensive and defensive
line in football, and the backs can almost be com-
pared to the running backs and soccer players. One
key difference between rugby and other contact
sports is that there are no protective pads.
The East Carolina Club, who are the returning
statechampion for thefall season, has the reputation
in the North Carolina Rugby Union as the hardest
hitting team in the state. East Carolina virtually
returns an entire squad of starters but must work on
some key positions that were left vacant if the team
wants their third consecutive state title.
The forwards returning this year will be the
biggest the team has seen in two years. They will
look to Jay Keller and Chris "the rototiller" Camey
to control the loose play. The backs will be equally
tough returning everyone to the lineup. They will
look to Richard "Opie" Moss and Scott Major to lead
the explosive wing.
East Carolina's first match will be an intrasquad
scrimmage on Sept. 12. Their home opener is on
Sept. 19 against Clemson. Any students interested
in playing for the ECU Rugby Club are invited to
practice with the team on Tuesday, Sept. 1. Practices
begin at 4 p.m and the matches begin at 1 p.m.
behind the Allied Health Building across from the
baseball field.
After a few brief minutes of small talk and
answering questions, the massive group of
50 or so armchair quarterbacks stretched
for about 10 minutes and embarked on
their quest to become a ECU Pirate walk-
on.
Once the warm-up drills and stretch-
ingexercises were complete, Coach Pagano
and his staff divided up the group in their
respective sections to begin the morning.
As their lifeless bodies ran the agility
drills of the zigzag cone touch, the ever
faithful high stepper (the tire drill for you
old timers) and then the enviable 40-yarr1
dash (all of which took no more than 20-
minutes)they weresentontheirway. With-
out throwing a spiral pass or even running
an ou t pa ttern, for the non-kickers the morn-
ing was over before it even started. There
were some looks of disbelief as well asa few
sighs of resentment and anger, for their
ti me had come and gone so quickly that the
feeling of disappointment was in the air.
Now with the preliminaries out of the
way, the primary focus and "real reason"
for this early morning round-up was at
hand. Of the 50 participants, roughly 15
were present for the kicking session. Many
different styles and unique punters and
kickers had graced Coach Pagano with their
presences. From the sidewinder to the
soccer style, even the legendary barefoot
kicker was there. After about 10 kicks from
each punter and place kicker, the end had
come to this field of dreams.
With a sincere thank you from Coach
Pagano and directions as to where the list of
selected individuals will be posted, the
would be Jan Stennerudsand MarkMoselys
were dismissed.
Even though life as a college athlete is
anything but easy, for this reporter it was
refreshing to see such a large turnout Of
the masses that ventured out to try their
hand in making the '92 SaberSlasher roster,
only a handful will be chosen. This year's
team has the depth of many NFL teams
except in the position of kicker. With the
unexpected absence of Anthony Brenner,
young kicker Deke Owens will have to
handle the bulk of die kicking duties this
fall. Hopefully, this student body tryout
produced some help tor the defend ing Peach
Bowl Champions, not only in the area of
kicking but in the areas where any addi-
tional help would be well received.
Photo by Dail Reed � Tha Eaat Carolinian
No need to hang from the rafters and bring down the goal post, Pirate football ticket
information is here.
Student ticket information
Sports Information Reports
The 1992 ECU football season is right
around thecorner and many ECU students
have questions concerning tickets.
Each student has the opportunity to
get a free student ticket by showing their
ECU ID when picking up tickets at the
MendenhallStudentCenter(l 1 a.m6p.m.)
and the Athletic Office (8 a.m5 p.m.) in
Minges Coliseum.
Students may present their ID and one
other valid ID when picking up student
tickets during the designated student
pickup days. Student tickets are distrib-
uted on a first-come, first-serve basis until
student allotments are exhausted.
Student guest tickets are available at
half-price on a first-come, first-serve lim-
ited basis. Once the half-price guest ticket
supply is exhausted, all purchased tickets
will be available at full price.
Regular student pickup days for the
Syracuse, Virginia Tech, Cincinnati and
Arkansas State games will be Tuesday
through Thursday. Monday will be group
pickup day for these games.
For the nationally televised (ESPN)
Southern Mississippi game on Thursday,
Oct. 29, regular student pickup is Friday,
Oct. 23 and Monday-Wednesday, Oct. 27-
29. Group pickup is Thursday, Oct. 22.
Any student tickets not picked up dur-
ing these designated days will be available
to be purchased by anyone beginning on
the following day.
See Tickets, page 13
�ym





w
12 The East Carolinian
SEPTEMBER 1 , 1992
I
APTop25
The Top 25 teams in the Associated Press 1992 college football poll, with first-place votes In parentheses, records
through Aug. 29, total points based on 25 points for a first place vote through one point for a 25th place vote, and ranking
in the preseason poll:
Photo by Dall Reed
The men who make it happen on the field, members of the ECU Field Maintenance Department.
Re-game heroes: ECU grounds crew
By Chas Mitch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
With the last summer session
complete and the start of the Pi-
rate football season on the hori-
zon, the long, hot hours in a blaz-
ing sun have only just begun.
For the ECU Field Mainte-
nance Department, having to
trim, cut, fertilize, water, (the list
goes on) results in many man-
hours in allowing the entire cam-
pus to continue its well nurtured
status.
According to Doug Cadwell
the Grounds Superintendent, a
lot of love and attention is given
to all of the Pirates fields.
"From 14th Street to Ficklen
Stadium, it's a year round job
maintaining and beautifying the
grounds" Cadwell said.
With a special emphasis
placed on Central Campus,
Harrington Field and Ficklen, it's
easy to see the pride and the care-
ful attention placed on these par-
ticular areas.
"Turf quality is our main con-
cern when it comes to the football
field said Cadwell.
"Lem Wallace, Tim Williams
and the rest of the grounds crew
do an outstanding job in prepar-
ing the fields for game day
According to Cadwell, the
Athletic Department and the ECU
Paint Shop are responsible for the
field markings and with the paint-
ing ot the end zones.
"After we cut the turf and
bag the clippings, then Jeff (Davis,
Assistant Athletic Director of Op-
erations and Equipment) goes out
and starts to paint. Normally it
takes two sprayings' in order for
the design to stick and standout
Cadwell said.
While it's no big secret as to
the amount of work that goes into
preparing for game day.
Many individuals and orga-
nizations have lend a helping
Tonight Come Celebrate
The GRAND OPENING of the
NEW
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Tuesday Night
$1.75
HIBALLS & DOMESTICS
Best Mix of Top 40, Dance & Rock'N'Roll
PPT
Pizza, Pasta & Tacos from 8-9 pm
No Cover Prior to 9:30 pm
Doors Open at 8:00
Wednesday, September 2
Fan begins at 4:00pm on College "
Valid ECU ID rtquirri to iarHei�att.
ttansarri ty Riertatitnal Sinrieii � Ruidtrrt Education � Campus Dining
hand in reaching the common
goal of teamwork.
As long as we have a dedi-
cated staff such as the mainte-
nance operations department,
game day '92 will be just that
much more special.
Record
1. Miami (43) 0-0-0
2. Washington (9) 0-0-0
3. Notre Dame (5) 0-0-0
4. Florida St. (1) 0-0-0
5. Michigan (1) 0-0-0
6. Florida 0-0-0
7. Texas A&M (1) 1-0-0
8. Penn St. (1) 0-0-0
9. Alabama (1) 0-0-0
10. Syracuse 0-0-0
11. Nebraska 0-0-0
12. Colorado 0-0-0
13. Clemson 0-0-0
14. Georgia 0-0-0
15. Oklahoma 0-0-0
16. UCLA 0-0-0
17. Ohio St 0-0-0
18. N. Carolina St. 1-0-0
19. California 0-0-0
20. Stanford 0-1-0
21. Mississippi St 0-0-0
22. Tennessee 0-0-0
23. Iowa 0-1-0
24. Georgia Tech 0-0-0
25. Virginia 0-0-0
Pts
1,516
1,458
1,404
1,274
1,260
1,241
1,163
1,125
1,096
957
857
798
751
727
676
553
465
434
379
354
315
155
143
129
Pvs
1
2
3
5
6
4
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
18
19
20
17
22
21
16
23
Others receiving votes: Brigham Young 116, Texas 111, Southern Cal 97, San Diego State 53, Texas Tech 38, Arkansas 32.
Baylor 31, Michigan State 25, Tulsa 23, Illinois 16, Arizona State 14, Memphis State 14, Auburn 12, North Carolina 12,
Pittsburgh 10, Boston College 9, Rutgers 8, Air Force 7, Iowa State 7, Arizona 5, Bowling Green 4, Indiana 4 Kansas 4
East Carolina 3, LSU 3, San Jose State 1, Vanderbilt 1.
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� �
SEPTEMBER 1, 1992
77ie East Carolinian 13
it.
Rec Services presents
King of the Hill Games
Lewis on to new terrain, season
Along with the beginning of
classes and the first football game
comes the 5th Annual King of the
Hill. This widely renowned event
among all Residence Hall students
will takeplaceonWednesday,Sept.
2attheCollege Hill Recreation Area.
The event, sponsored by Resi-
dence Education, ARA Dining Ser-
vices and Recreational Services will
boast games, prizes, refreshments
and a live broadcast with WZMB.
This year's array of exciting
events includes our all-time favor-
ites such as 3-on-3 Basketball, Clas-
sic Volleyball, Twister and Putt-Putt
Other non-traditional events in-
clude the Caterpillar Crawl where
teams of three will use wooden
"crawlers" to reach the finish line,
Earthball Volleyball�a twist on an
old favorite, Hoop the Human
where participants receive an op-
portunity to actually "Hoop" their
teammates while blindfolded,
bucketball and Whiffle Wipeout.
This year, there will be three
divisions for competition�Men's,
Women's and Co-Ed. Winners of
King of the Hill will be determined
by the total number of points scored
from the activities. For example, the
men's residence hall with the most
points will be crowned King of the
Hill, the women's residence hall
with the most points will be
crowned Queen of the Hill and the
co-ed residence hall will be the
Crown Jewels.
There will also be a Tug-of-War
for the participation winners. This
will be based on registration by par-
ticipants at the beginning of King of
the Hill (participants must show
their ECU ID and register for their
residence hall before playing any
events).Winners will receive a T-
shirt. In addition, participants may
also win T-shirts by participating
anddoingwell insomeof theevents
There will be an information
meeting today at 5 p.m. in BIO-N
102 for representatives from each
hall. For more information, call 757-
6387.Besurenottomissoutonallof
the fun.
Thompson appoints
her first assistant
ATLANTA (AP) � Coach Bill
Lewis of Georgia Tech says repeti-
tion is the key to learning a new
offense.
Lewis said he put in all of Geor-
gia Tech's option offense during the
seven practices when his team was
required to work out in shorts.
Once the pads went on, he out-
lined the first seven drills to coin-
cide with what they did while in
shorts.
"We planned our offensive in-
stallation over a seven-practice pe-
riod Lewis told members of the
media during the Atlantic Coast
Conference Tour stop in Atlanta
Thursday.
"That's an awful lot to throw at
them he said. "We knew we were
going to have some guys confused.
As we finished that phase of it, we
thought we had accomplished an
awful lot.
"Educators will tell you that is
one of the most successful ways for
people to learn. We try to throw itat
them, that whole situation, then go
back and repeat go back and re-
peat. We are pleased because mere
is a great willingness to learn what
we've thrown at them
Lewis is in his first season as
Georgia Tech's coach, coming off
an 11-1 season at East Carolina,
where he steered the Pirates to a
Peach Bowl victory over the ACC's
North Carolina State.
Georgia Tech had been work-
ingwithaprosetattack under Bobby
Ross, who resigned to become an
NFL coach with the San Diego
Chargers.
Lewis said repeating the prac-
tice routine shows the staff justhow
much of the offense was learned in
shorts.
"Full speed is when the flaws
begin to show up he said. "Where
are the flaws, where are the defects
we need tocontinue to work with?"
Shawn Jones is the leader for
the Yellow Jackets.
The senior quarterback already
owns most of the school's passing
records, having thrown for 6,044
yards in three years. He also has
7,012 yards of offense.
Lewis said that although Jones
is theobvious leader,he won'thesi-
tate to use two other quarterbacks
� senior Jeff Howard and redshirt
freshman Donnie Davis, who is des-
tined to become the starter when
Jones and Howard depart.
Lewis said mat at East Carolina
last year he often used his second
team offense in the first quarter of
games.
He plans on doing the same
thing at Tech.
"Wewanttomakesurewehave
fresh people on the field in the fourth
quarter he said.
Lewis said his offense will be
one that keeps all of the skill players
happyI think it's an exciting of-
fense for players to be a part of,
especially if you're a skill player
Lewis said. "If I'm a running back or
a quarterback or a receiver, mis of-
fense will be fun, so that has been
easy for mem to adjust to
He said he would use six run-
ning backs each game.
"Last year we averaged eight
people carrying the football and 11
people catching the ball he said.
"So there is enough to go around.
They recognize that"
Linebacker
Continued from page 11
that so many players leave behind
� unity.
"I can't ask for anything more
Sac, J-Dog and Greg Grandisor
has become more intense as tht
season draws closer. They are i
great senior crew and all I do is
learn from them
Lewisontheother hand states
mat "our senior defensive leaden
are setting a precedence for Ton
so he can carry the torch. He has
all the qualities needed to com-
mand the middle and keep the kil
zone locked and closed
As for the ACC, Lewis hac
these words to say, "If you get tht
job done, you'll get your rewards
Tickets
Wblfpack kicks Buckeyes in opener
Ellen Langhi has been named
as assistant coach for the ECU
women's basketball team an-
nounced Head CoachRosieThomp-
son on Tuesday.
Langhi, whoseprimary respon-
sibilities will be as recruiting coor-
dinator, comes to ECU after serving
two years as assistant women's bas-
ketball coach at Radford Univer-
sity. During Langhi's two seasons
at Radford, the Highlanders won
two Big South Tournament Cham-
pionships and were the regular sea-
son champions last year.
"Ellen will be a real asset to the
Lady Pirate program saidThomp-
son. "She is familiar with our re-
cruiting area because it is basically
the same area she has worked with
for the past two years. She will also
beverystronginrecruitingbecause
of her national and overseas con-
tacts
A1985 graduate of Duke Uni-
versity, Langhi was a two-year
starter for the Blue Devils who par-
ticipated in the 1987 NCAA tourna-
ment
Prior to coaching ?t Radford,
Langhi played one year in Contern,
Luxembourg in the European Pro-
fessional women's league.
Langhi played her high school
ball at Towson Catholic which was
ranked 1 in me nation in 1985 after
posting a 37-0 record.
Langhi, 25, is single.
North Carolina State's first vic-
tory left coach Dick Sheridan with
an especially satisfying feeling, and
not ; . because it was the
Wolfpack's season-opener.
The 24-14 victory over Iowa in
the Kickoff Classic on Saturday
night pushed N.C State into the
first regular-season Associated
Press college football poll. The
Wolfpack, unranked in the pre-
season poll, moved into the 18th
slot while Iowa fell seven spots to
No. 23.
"Obviously it's always great to
start the season with a win, espe-
cially against me team the quality of
Iowa Sheridan said. "The fact that
it was in the Kickoff Classic made it
more satisfying.
"There really isn't much to say
about our standing in the polls be-
cause we cannot control that at all
except to play well each week.
"I now look at the rest of our
schedule as the start of our season,
except mat we have a bonus win
already
Texas A&M remained No. 7
after defeating Stanford 10-7 in the
season-opening Pigskin Classic at
Anaheim, Calif. Stanford fell three
places to No. 20.
There were no changes at the
top of the poll, where Miami, Wash-
ington and Notre Dame continued
to hold down the first three spots.
Miami received 43 first-place
votes and 1,516 points from a na-
tionwide panel of sports writers and
broadcasters. Washington got nine
first-place votes and 1,458 points,
while Notre Dame received five.
Continued from page 11
If student allotments are ex-
hausted during student pickup
days, students may have the op-
portunity to obtain a free ticket
with a valid ECU ID on the morn-
ing of the game if any unsold tick-
ets remain available.
For away games, tickets can
also be purchased at the Athletic
Ticket Office. However, tickets for
the Duke game are presently on
sale to the students at the Athletic
Ticket Office. A limited number of
tickets are on sale for this game.
Each student, with valid ECU ID,
will be allowed to purchase two
tickets while supplies last. Tickets
for the Duke game are $16 each.
All students are reminded that
ECU IDs will be checked at the
stadium on game day. Ficklen Sta-
dium will open one and one-half
hours prior to the scheduled kick-
off.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
"Areyou being served?"
��'�i'v
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Positions Available:

SGA Executive Vice-president
All Class Offices
(Graduate Students Welcome)
Dorm Representatives
Day Representatives
Episcopal Student Fellowship
Invites You to Join Us Each Wednesday
Beginning September 12th, 5:30 pm Celebration of Holy Eucharist
followed by supper and conversation
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
401 East 5th Street c
(cross 5th Street in front of Garret Hall, walk down Holly Street to 4th Street)
You Are There!
r�Schedule of Services "
Sunday, September 20: FallWinter Schedule begins
Holy Eucharist - 7:30, 9:00, 11:00
Sunday, September 13: St. Paul's "Homecoming"
10:00 am Holy Eucharist - Lunch provided following the Service)


Requirements:
Full-time Student
Good Standing
2.0 GPA
(Freshmen & Transfers are Eligible to Run)
Executive Vice-president Candidates
must have successfully completed 48 hours
& have been previously enrolled
for 2 consecutive semesters at ECU.
CAROLINA
IMPRINTS,nc,
GREENVILLE.NORTH CAROLINA (919)830-19Z9
Days To File:
September 1-8
before 5:OOpm in SGA Office Mendenhall
$10.00 returnable filing fee
Mandatory candidates meeting September 8, 1992
in the Mendenhall Social Room
Professional
Quality
Personal
Service
Fast
Delivery
Any Questions Call 757-4726
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 1, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 01, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.889
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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