The East Carolinian, August 26, 1992






�iJC '
�VsVu-JI -
iapalooza '92!
DStS
Getting
warmer
Page 29
Pirate football
team practices,
looks to opener
against Syracuse
Weekend Weather
Mostly cloudy, ch, �' �s to 90s.

Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.
he East Carolinian
Vol. n7 No. 1
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesda) August 26,1992
40 Paces
Tuition increases,
ECU's budget cut
Standing room only
Enrollment record set
By Karen Hassell
st.itt Writei
By Tony Rogers
i Sovemor im Mai tin
b) impo
�lit si hool's budget.
fterthreati rtii ,
$1.8 million ti
pri ft o.l ,i 6.2 pel
with minor hud
it r blow to 1 I 5� o-
' tuitii n; im reases and i uts to
ii mb lOpen entwhile utting
: state legislatures ap-
� � in state students along
edi ti
"In 11 imi � it we ei
miii. i
ti.urs. "At th i st.it-
huge tuition in reasi
Broun said in-state tuition im
) towevei on � : on to
$6,390.
"The out-oi sta
Carolina resident pays alb
important th.it tuition is kept a
residents
NorthC arolinapro idi
residents in the nation
Fc I receivedanin-
crease in financial-aid
funds that, according to q
Brown, will offset u
tuition increase foi
needy students.
"The most need)
students' packages are
adjusted with air, tu
ition hike Brown said.
According to
Joanne Latham,deputv
director of communica-
tionsforC lovemorMar
tin, the mi rease in revenue will remain at ea h
"Universities can use I iwever they wish
Latham said therefore, it will offset many ol thebudget uts
Bruce I larringta in, i Joverro �r Martin's budget administra-
tor, siid a tuition increase is neces arj to ai commodate enroll-
ment increases across the state
"( Hirtop priority was to take care of expected additions in
been a major i ontributor to the growth.
A. ording to lerrylavton, Assis-
tint director of undergraduate Admis-
Ihe number of students enrolled at sions, the university has begun intense
E U grow i ery eai and this year will recruiting in areas such as New jersey,
be no exception with projected enrollment Maryland and Virginia.
figures tor the fall of lt,g2 already over 17, Clayton also noted that name rec-
4iH students. ogn ition due to the 11 football season
'Every yeai we have an increase in helped ECU to become more visible.
students said Ken 1 owe of Planning and He stressed that people do not nor-
Institutional Research. mally choose a school based on its foot-
"This is quite a jump. It will mean ball team. However, publicity due to
about 800 more students ���
ited the wererelatheh
ii . I Business
n'l be hurt hv a
ised $42to$718a semi ster.
115 percent, or i), to
what a North
n said. "But it is
�ssible to North Carolina
ilc- these ond lowest tuition rate to its
"Theout-qf-stateincrease
almost equals ivhat a North
Una resident pays alto-
gether. But it is important
tiiat tuition is kqi accessible
residents
�Richard Brown,
vice chancellor of
Business Affairs
i hi ml
I he influx of out-of-state students has
See Enrollment, page 2
KUKI: ICU OPKI Of PUfcNNINO AND INsmiTTIONAl RCSIAKCH
ADAM �Of . IK
University addresses housing shortage
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
enrollment Harrington said
Instead of Liking general fund
dollars, a tuition in. reasecan pay for tins growth
Harrington said universities and community colleges across
the state request budget increases to ai commodate student
body growth. An increase in tuition was chosen over a tax
increase.
Brown agreed the tuition in rease would support an)
enrollment growth, but said a workload increase that accompa-
nies it will not be made up fi r.
"Whatever increase we get will not bike care of added
expenses that go along with an enrollment increase Brown
said. "And a tuition hike will i inly offset budget cuts to a small
degree Brown explained SI million was utfrom ECU'S health
affairs budget as a reimbursement to the state for a loan to the
medical schxl. He also said E I received an $86,000 cut in
utilities.
Brown said increases in money are funds ECU must pav
back to the state act as "hidden budget cuts
The state has raised the amount an employer must pay into
state retirement, which will cost E( U about $1 million.
he legislature also forced E I administrators to cut the
salary at each position from which an employee retires by 30
percent. The mt will result in the loss of one position for every
three non-faculty retirements Brown said.
'The state does rw 1 ategorize these payback im teases as
budget cuts, but they an i cut into our budget consider-
ably, " Brown said.
Resideru e halls may be a bit crowded at the
beginning of this semester, but hopes are that
within a few weeks everything will settle down
into the normal routine.
The biggest change from this summer is the
re openmgofSlav Hall foran unspecified period
of time and Umstead Hall being used as a tempo-
rary housing facility.
"We started with half of Umstead being
occupied,and (attheslartofthesemester)we re
down to half of the first flixr s.iui Manny
Amaro, director of University Housing.
Umstead Hall will shut its doors after all the
students presently living in it have been moved
to other residence halls
Amaro also said if there are any new open-
ings in the residence halls on campus bex auseof
students leaving, present Umstead residents will
tv given top priority.
Along with Umstead's temporary situation,
Slav Hall Ivis been re-classified as an open resi-
lience hall.
"I'm hoping there won't be m problem
later on in the year with students being in Slay
dorm Amaro said. "We won't meet with the
contractors for work on Umstead until Marc h, so
Slav shouldn't be affected until sometime next
summer
Another major change in the operations of
student housing will be the process of nxm
changes this semester.
he process before (waiting in line in front
of Whichard) was just tix awkward Amaro
slid. "Students were waiting in line forever,
missing classes, it was just not very service-
oriented
Amaro will start a new process of filing for
room changes by changing the location from
Whichard to various spots on the campus.
Beginning Sept. 1 and running through the
fourth, room changes can be made at certain
residence halls throughout the campus. Room
changes will beheld at the following locationson
the following days:
� Sept 1 � Slay lobby from 9 a.m. to noon.
� Sept. 1 �Cotten hall from 1 p.m. to 4:30
p.m.
� Sept. 2 - I yler Ii hby from 4 a.m. to nixin
and 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
� Sept. 3 � Fletcher lobby from 4 .m. to
See Shortage, page 4
Photo by Dail Reed � The East Carchmar,
A mother-daughter team struggles to move trunks, boxes and bags into a university residence hall.
With the opening of the halls name the confusion, heat and frustration of moving in
The agony of de heat
Legislature delays library expansion
By Tony Rogers
SiMiinr �v s Writei
Photo by Bill Ransom Tha t asl Carolinian
i '� ii rat frental Res
E( U's growing library needs
have been put on hold with the
dismissil ol a $300 million Capital
Improvements Bond
Ihe state legislature dropped
the proposed bond referendum
which would have allowed thegen-
eral public to vote to begin con-
struction on all 16 campuses in the
UN( system through the s,ile of
bonds
I ui Iuded on the proposed bond
referendum was the $26 million
'iisitle i'ws
expansion of loyner Libraiy ,the$5
million acquisition of Rose High
School ik the $7 million animal
research (vivarium)addition to the
life-si ience complex.
,V cording to state Senator Ed
Warren,chairmanof theEdui ation
Oversightommittee, loyner Li-
brary was the top priorirv n the
bill.
"ltisessential that wefind funds
tor loyner I ibrarx Warren said.
"Right now, loyner i an accommo
dateaboul ! Ol KJstudenbcomfort
ably, but there are 17,0tXl students
, urrenth ei milled at E I
Kenneth Mark director of
lovner Library, agreed that the
building cannot mtvt the needs ol
the students without some sort of
expansion.
"Wehaveabuildingthatholds
OOOpiecesofliterature " Marks
said but our collei tion is ai und
� KJ
Marks said the onl way to
keep the maximum number o(
bix'ks on me sheb es is to renie e
chairs .ini, tables
We must decide to move more
ibrary, page 2
ml Other CampiiNe-
;iius
State Ne 6
Opinion
National News
World News
8
10
13





b mmmmmmmm
2 The East Carolinian
AUGUST 26, 1992
Students help homeless
A program launched at the University of Pennsylvania last year
aimed at training students to work with the homeless has now
expanded to Atlanta and San Francisco. "Empty The Shelters" is
giving students the skills and know-how to combat homelessness in
theircommunities. Philip Wider, whodirectsthePhiladelphia project,
said, "We want to show America that college students can act
constructively to solve the problems plaguing our cities
College seeks Native Americans
The General Mills foundation in Minneapolis recently gave
Dartmouth College a $155,000 grant in an effort to increase the
number of Native American students who attend the school. The
"Full Circle Program" will address academic issues facing the stu-
dents and is open to all Native American students at Dartmouth.
Stungun causes outrage
By soliciting parents of University of Florida students to pur-
chase a 60,000-volt stun gun, a Miami shop owner says he is provid-
inganecessaiyprcKluctformestudents'pereonalprotection.Through
an illegal mailing, John Katon said he has already received hundreds
of orders for the guns. However, most parents are outraged mat
Katon is using the deaths of seven students in the past two years to
scare people into purchasing the guns.
ISU receives grants
Indiana State University recently received two grants mat were
awarded to the music department and the Turman Art Gallery. The
grants wiil be used for an upcoming Contemporary Music Festival
and an art exhibit titled: "Context Image with Text'Theexhibitwill
consist of eight shows ranging from science and art combinations to
English and art combinations.
HIV rate high for students
The International Conference on Aids recently released fig-
ures showing that university students show a higher incidence of
HIV infection than military recruits. Officials fear that college stu-
dents do not admit to hazardous sexual practices, such as not using
condoms, whileneariyrudfofUS-Armysoldieredoadmittothese
practices Studies show that one in 500 university students is HP
positive said Carolyn Parker, executive director for the Texas
AIDS Network. Parker said that AIDS education needs to be dis-
cussed in all campus areas, not just through student health services.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Welcomes
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ECU Students
and Faculty
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m
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7" Solid Rope Diamond Cut $156.00
8" Solid Rope Diamond Cut $159.00
14 KT Adjustable Cuff 159.00
ECU Pirate Jewelry
14 KT Charms $44.95
14 KT Earrings $99.95
14 KT Collar Pins $44.95
Sterling Silver Charms $9.95
Sterling Silver Earrings $24.95
"We Believe in ECU
Getting Engaged?
Large Selection of Loose
Diamonds Now on Sale n
Reg.
.25 CT Round $895
.33 CT Round $1195
.33 CT Oval $1295
.50 CT Round $1195
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ALL ECU STUDENTS RECEIVE AN ADDITIONAL 10 OFF
Revolving Charge Arlington Village Student
355-5090 Accounts
Welcome
University settles with whistleblower
By Jeff Becker
News Editor
In an out-of court settlement on
July31,ECU awarded $27,000tothe
employee in the Public Safety de-
partment who filed a lawsuit alleg-
ingmisfreatmentafterinformingthe
FBI of possible illegal wiretapping
incidents at the school in 1990.
Capt. Stanley Kittrell filed a suit
on Sept. 7,1991 claiming university
officials retaliated against h:m after
he informed the FBI that he had
discovered transcripts of a wiretap
involving ECU employee Brooks
Mills. In the lawsuit, Kittrell claimed
thatuniversity officials stripped him
of his 42-officer staff, moved his
office to a remote building across
campus, and demoted him from a
plain-clothed to a uniformed offi-
cer.
University officials have main-
tained that changes in Kittrell's du-
ties resulted from a re-organization
of Public Safety and his relocation
stemmed from overcrowded con-
ditions in the Public Safety office.
"Although thedefendantsagree
that Mr. Kittrell's working condi-
tions did change after he informed
the FBI of the wiretap, the defen-
dants asserted that they had legiti-
mate administrative reasons for all
thrirdedsicmsregardingMr.Kittrell
and denied mat their decisions of
Mr. Kittrell's employment were
motivated by a desire to retaliate
against him for the disclosure
Chancellor Richard Eakin said in a
prepared statement
James Vosburg, Kittrell's attor-
ney, and Tom Ziko, special attorney
for the state, have discussed pos-
sible settlements since September
1991. "There were not any serious
negotiations Vosburg said. "They
offered and we settled
Although Vosburg originally
Library
asked fora settlement totalingmore
man $40,000, he said Kittrell was
relieved the matter was resolved
and pleased with the terms of the
settlement
Chancellor Richard Eakin said
Ziko recommended thatECUagree
to the out-of-court settlement.
"Despite our personal confi-
dence in the university's defense,
the uncertainties of litigation and
the threat of treble damages led the
university to agree to settle its dif-
ferences with Mr. Kittrell out of
court Eakin said.
In accepting the settlement,
Kittrell dropped all claims against
the university and can no longer
hold any ECU employees liable in
thecase. Thrxseoriginally named in
Kittrell's lawsuit were the univer-
sity; Eakin; Richard Brown, vice
chancellor for Business Affairs;
James Depuy, director of Public
Safety and Ron Avery, ECU Police
Chief.
The $27,000 Kittrell settlement
combined with the 15 settlements
with employees who had their voice
unknowingly recorded brings the
total amount of damages paid by
the university from alleged wire-
tapping incidents to $240,687.
Sources estimate as many as 50 more
civil suits may be filed against the
university.
The two former employees in-
dicted by theU.S. AttomeyGeneral's
office, Teddy Roberson and John
Burrus, have been formally served
papers. Bom men face a maximum
of 23 years in prison if convicted of
all five counts of federal wiretap-
ping violations. According to some
sources, more indictments are ex-
pected to be released from the grand
jury.
The state Attorney General's
office will not represent Roberson
or Burrus in the federal case.
books into storage or remove more
seating Marks said. "But seating is
cut to a minimum right now
According to Marks, the
$300,000 appropriation given to the
library by the state will be used to
pay planning debts.
Marks also said ECU would not
see any money for construction be-
fore late 1993.
"It would then be 30 months
after ground is broken before con-
struction would be complete
Marks said. "So in the best of cases,
it will be 1996 before the addition is
Enrollment
the team's success did help to
make the school a viable choice to
some.
Incoming freshmen will
amount to about 2,850 to 2,900
students, according to Skip Kirby
of Planning and Institutional Re-
search. Kirby estimated that new
transfer students would be
around 1,350.
Out-of-state students total be-
tween 23 to 24 percent of the in-
coming freshmen and 16 percent
of the transfer students. The cap
placed on out-of-state enrollment
Continued from page 1
even usable
Marks said this addition would
allow for the re-organization of the
entirelibrary.Heexplainedthatpoor
planning for additions in the past
have "made Joyner unorganized
and confusing
Marks also said an addition to
the building is not the only con-
struction necessary.
"A litue over a year ago, the
entire roof on the west tower was
redone'hesaid. "We are now hav-
ing similar problems with the roof
on the east side
Richard Brown, vice-chancel-
lor of 2u3iness Affairs, said the dis-
missal of the bond referendum is
the legislatures way of postponing a
decision on the issue.
"My impression was it got
caught up in the politics Brown
said. "Other groups were trying to
jump on the bond bandwagon, so
the whole thingwasjustdismissed
Brown said the difficult eco-
nomic times and conservative ideas
of the state legislature planned a big
role in the bonds failure.
Brown also said in past years
money remaining at the end of each
year was appropriated for capital
improvements. However, that
money is now being used to cover
the deficit
"If s very disappointing, but
that's the reality of the financial situ-
ation Brown said.
Brown said he thinks the bond
issue will return to the legislative
floor for debate in January.
"I think the growing capital
needs both in repairs and expansion
will bring the bond idea backagain
Brown said.
Continued from page 1
by state legislators is 18 percent.
According to Kirby, it is not
easy to determine the number of
students coming in from outside
of North Carolina.
After enrollment, numbers
can be compared to the limits tat
have been proposed.
During the fall of 1991, out-
of-state applicants made up
around 13 percent of the incom-
ing students. Although estima-
tions are not yet available, gradu-
ate school officials are hoping for
a 4 to 5 percent increase in enroll-
ment
An enlarged enrollment has
lead to an increase in admission
standards for perspective fresh-
men. The minimum SAT score,
now at 700, has increased 50
points.
Over the last three years, the
minimum grade point average
rose one-tenth of a point each year.
It now stands at a 2.0.
Clayton stressed a combina-
tion of the two minimums will
not get an applicant admitted.
In copjunction with increased
standards for admission, the
make-up of the student body has
improvedTor the first time in
20 years, the average SAT will be
around 900 Clayton said. "We
have both raised standards and
increased students
The enrollment for fall of 1991
was 16,500. There were 14,000 un-
dergraduates and 2,500
graduates.The numbers from
1991 broke down into a 0.6 per-
cent increase in the undergradu-
ate school and a 4 percent in-
crease in graduate school.
hi-lites
Juniors, Misses, and Plus sizes
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Memorial Drive
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Near K-Mart

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1 lit lUM UI CUK.u;
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CAMPUS NEWS
Career services begins registration
By Tony Rogers
Senior News Writer
Career Services, ECU's career
planning and placement depart-
ment, has begun its fall drive to
increase student registration with
the release of a workshop schedule
for the month of September.
Thisyear'sschedulebeginswith
two orientation meetings on Aug.
31 and Sept. 1, each at 3 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center, Room
244.
According to Career Services
' Director James R. Westmoreland,
early September is the recom-
mended time to register because
many businesses do their recruiting
in the fall.
"We tell people to register the
September before they graduate
Westmoreland said. "Although we
don't want to create any anxiety,
since it's never too late to register
Westmoreland estimated be-
tween 1,500 and 1,600 students reg-
isterwithCareerServices each year.
"Wetry to stayawayfromnum-
bers, since they can be mi sleading
Westmoreland said. "I'mconcemed
with helping the people that come
in
Westmoreland said students
should register early for a number
of reasons. Someorganizations,such
as accounting firms, do their recruit-
ing for the entire year during the
fall, he said.
Westmoreland also said the
sooner a student registers, the sooner
they will begin receiving the
monthly job guide published by
Career Services.
"The job guide is a list of avail-
able jobs. We mail itouteach month
to everyone registered with us,
whether they be undergraduate,
graduate student or alumni
The job guide is not the only
service provided by Career Services.
Along with orientation meetings,
resume writing workshops and in-
terview skills workshops are also
scheduled.
Personal interview and resume
writing help are also available at the
Career Services office located in
Bloxton House, across from
Mendenhall.
"We si t down and coach people
through the interview process
Westmoreland said. "We try to
make the whole thing less intimi-
dating
After some instruction, students
are then videotaped in a mock inter-
view and are then allowed to watch
the tape and make any necessary
improvements.
"In order to prepare for an in-
terview, we suggest the person
know about the company's busi-
ness dealings and history
Westmoreland said.
Therefore, Career Services pro-
vides extensive information on ma-
jor companies and government
agencies in the area and nationwide.
For students who are unsure of
which career path to follow, a ca-
reer-decisions room is made avail-
able. Included in the career deci-
sions room is a book outlining dif-
ferent jobs and a similar computer
program called Sigi Plus.
"Sigi can give you a basic job
description including career oppor-
tunities, average salaries and neces-
sary education background for any
job you can think of
Westmoreland said.
These services are available to
any student or alumnus who turns
in 10 copies of their resume, fills out
three information cards and re-
quests three references from pro-
fessors or former employers.
'Td like students to understand
how easy it is to register
Westmoreland said. "Just fill out
the information packet, turn in your
resume and we do the rest
Three career days scheduled
over the next six months are open to
both registered and unregistered
students.
Business Career Day will be
held Sept. 22 in the General Class-
room Building. All business, in-
dustrial technology and liberal
arts majors are welcome to attend.
Health CareerDaywillbeopen
to allied health, nursing and social
work majors on Nov. 5 in the Carol
Belk Building. Education majors
may find job opportunities at Edu-
cation Career Day on Feb. 16,1993
in Mendenhall StudentCenter Great
Room.
Smoking restricted in campus buildings
By Michael Martin
Special to The East Carolinian
' - � The ECU Board of Trustees ex-
tinguished the rights of smokers re-
cently by voting to restrict smoking
in all campus buildings.
As a part of the trustees' sum-
mer meeting, thegroup voted 11-2 in
- -favorofacampuscleanairactwhich
-will prohibit smoking in all campus
buildings that are poorly ventilated
- - or not ventilated at all.
"The resolution was proposed
v:by the Faculty Senate Welfare Com-
mittee after a number of faculty com-
b -plainedaboutthequalilyofairinthe
General Classroom Building said
� Dr. John Moskop, president of the
- faculty Senate.
"Theresoluriondirectsthechan-
cellor to develop a clean air policy
which includes designating smok-
ing areas in certain buildings
Smokers will be permitted to
light up in designated areas of build-
ings that are either currently venti-
lated, or can bevenrilatedatareason-
able cost. University officials have
begun tosrudythecosteffectiveness
of installing ventilation in classroom
buildings.
Trustee William Furr and SGA
President Courtney Jones were the
two dissenting voters, citing the cost
of installing a ventilation and the
lack of student input for their deci-
sions.
Jones added that student safety
was not taken into consideration by
other members of the board.
"My concern with the policy is
that females in classroom buildings
that are open all night � like the
music building and the art building
�will have to go outside to smoke a
cigarette Jones said. "Safety of the
students should also be taken into
consideration
The only immediate building to
be affected by the ban is the General
Classroom Building. Board members
felt it would cost too much to estab-
lish a ventilation system in the new
building.
Residence halls will not be af-
fected by the measure.
Chancellor Richard Eakin could
not be reached for comment
"As I look at the policy, there are
no specifics Jones said. "They want
to puta smoking area where itcan go
� where there's a good ventilation
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Wednesday 2K MINI TACOS
Friday $1.25 HIGHBALLS
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Tuesday & Thursday $13MARGUARITA PITCHERS
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Call us for details
(919)355-8200
The
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Arlington Blvd. and Red Banks Rd.
Member FDIC
system, but there are no regulations.
There's not even a penalty for those
who ignore the policy
The policy will take effect Sept
1. Dr. Alfred Matthews, vice chan-
cellor of Student Life, said a study
last year showed mat no other uni-
versity intheNorthCarolina system
had a clean air policy.
However, Board of Trustees
chairman Bill Dansey said in the
meeting that North Carolina State
University was looking into a clean
air policy, but that ECU would be
the first in the state to adopt one.
"This was entirely initiated by
faculty Jones said. "If thefacultyin
the General Classroom Building
hav? such a problem with (the
smoke)intheofficespace,whydon't
they do away with it in the offices?"
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355-9500 Blockbuster Video
University allows
condoms in dorms
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
Let's see, do I want a Milky
Way, Fritos, a toothbrush, a con-
dom or all four? This fall in the
ECU dorms, these could be your
choices. The idea about making
condoms available in the dorms
is part of the AIDS awareness
campaign.
"We are exploring the idea
of having condoms included as
one of the items in
the vending ma-
chines rather than
condom machines
in the bathroom
said David
Emmerling, dean
of studentdevelop-
ment. "If it is fea-
siblewe would like
to put them in the
vending machines like any other
health care product
The idea of condoms in the
dorms has been turned down
twice by the SGA until theSpring
of 1992 when a resolution en-
couraging AIDS awareness by
having condoms easily accessible
in the residence halls was passed.
"This is the biggest step
we've made said SGA Presi-
dent Courtney Jones. "SGA has
been active in the past in trying to
get condoms in the dorms, this
time the administration listened
and has done something about
if
One of the ideas in having
the condoms in the dorms is to
include accompanyingliterature
about AIDS and other STDs. The
idea of the literature is to educate
students on the pressing idea of
safer sex.
"This generation of college
students needs to realize that
"Having condoms
in the dorm is a good
idea, but you can get
them cheaper at stu-
dent health
� William Gessaman,
Senior
AIDS is real and serious
EmmerlingsaidTheissueneeds
to be addressed, people need to
understand how decisions about
sex can be irresponsible,and now
AIDS is a matter of life and death
Currently Emmerling and
others are exploring the idea and
hoping to have the condoms
available in the dorms this fall.
"We're justnow laying down the
groundwork Emmerling said.
There are plenty of vending ma-
chines available, now the pack-
aging and the
actual trial run
through the ma-
chines must be
tested.
The word
around campus
spreads rapidly
about the new
items in the
vending ma-
chines. "I think having condoms
in the dorms is a really good idea
because it's more convenient
said senior Tasha Price. "People
will use them more when they're
easy to get
"Having condoms in the
dorms is a good idea, but you can
get them cheaper at student
health said senior William
Gessaman. "It helps in an emer-
gency situation, it's better than
saying forget it
Theopposingsideof the idea
of having condoms in the resi-
dence halls has moral implica-
tions.
"The moral issue becomes
the spotlight, many people do
believe that sex today is taken for
granted, many don't engage in
sex and shouldn't be exposed to
sex said a male sophomore. "I
do not agree with having con-
doms in the dorms. It creates
chaosordistractsfromone'smor-
als or beliefs
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olinian
AUGUST 26, 1992
CAMPUS NEWS
International house converted to offices
Shortage
Continued from page 1
er
multi-nabonal environment, but
use to residents may
problems in keeping inter-
national students at ECU once they
arrive.
The university established the
International House in 174 as a
dorm that would specialize in ad-
dressing the need ot students from
other countries. David Watkins,
associate vice chancellor for Aca-
demic Affairs, said the chancellor's
Space Allocation Committee deter-
mined that converting the house to
the headquarters of International
Programs would help internation-
alize the campus.
"If you want to attract qualirv
international students, in numbers,
ou must ha ea solid international
program with real identity
Watkins said. "We needed a place
where we can give International
Programs an identity of their own.
We found that the International
House may be the ticket
Umesh Gulati, chair of the
university's Committee on Inter-
national Students, said the univer-
sity made a mistake in closing the
International House.
inappropriate and
sighted policy to abolish a
common residential house tor in-
tional students Gulati mi.
"I belieeinternationaistudentsare
a � atal) St for internationalizing the
campus, lust having an interna-
tional center or a few more courses
in international studies will not be
enough to internationalize thecam-
pus
"The international student is
very important, and the Interna-
tional House provides a great at-
traction for choosing ECU or, once
thev have chosen, then staving at
East Carolina University
According to Gulati, some in-
ternational students experience a
culture shock when thev arrive. He
said ECU needs to make their tran-
sition as easy as possible or stu-
dents will either go home or trans-
fer to another schxl.
"We are not s j ing we need a
big International House for every
international student to stay
Gulati said. "Wearesaingwenetvl
to look after those students who
would not live comfortably in a big
dormitory for the first couple of
years
Watkins said the lack of build-
ingspaceat ECU created a dilemma
� either concentrate on recruiting
international students to ECU bv
strengthening International Pro-
grams or accommodating them
once they are here through the In-
ternational 1 louse.
"Dovoik reate an environment
where you don't have the bodies,
like the International Hcuisestrictly
set aside for international students,
but not have any coordinated cen-
tralization for the development of
an international program Watkins
said. "Then, what you can conceiv-
ably have, is this nice situation over
here for students who are on cam-
pus, but in fact thev are not on
campus because vou haven't been
able to attract them
The International House re-
mained open year round toaccom-
modate international students who
could not travel home during
breaks. The House also provided a
kitchen that enabled students to
cook ethnic meals. Gulati said the
university cannot provide these
facilities without a dorm similar to
the International House, and these
conveniences are what keep inter-
national students at ECU.
Watkins said the issue of ac-
commodating international stu-
dents needs to he addressed bv the
department oi Student Life. Dur-
ing the breaks, he said a w ing oi a
dorm mav remainopen ear-round
or facultv members amid invite
students to stay in their homes. He
also said arrangement could pos-
sibly he made to house the students
on i� vi) motels.
Chancellor to remain at ECU
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
Chancellor Richard Eakin decided recently
to take his name from consideration for the
presidency at the University of Akron in Ohio.
"I have notified officials at the University of
Akron that it is my intention to remain at East
Carolina University as chancellor Eakin said
in a prepared statement.
"Over the past week, my wife and I have
concluded that we wish to continue our work at
ECU. Expressions of concern and support from
throughout Eastern North Carolina plaved an
important role in our d
Eakin was one of the top three choK- I i
the position In Akron, Eakin received sur
from the untver- ly's -ment head and
deans when he traei-il -kron to interview
with university
The Universit - enrollment is
28,000, making ;t the third - t state-as-
university in Oh.
Before coming t n 1987, Eakin s
2? years at BowlingGrern in Ohio as the-ch
vice president. Eakin sa��J m a telephone
view "I'm read I ith mal
Carolina Lnier- I in ever
MUg
mm ia
1
I " ' ' 1 1i
1 1 1 i 1 i , , . j 1
,1; � !� f
3P' AM
ISN'T IT TIME
FOR A CHANGE?
1�

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3140 Moseley Dr.
758-2306
(Behind Parker's BBQ, Greenville Blvd.)
Muffler � Brakes
2 g aaaai
HOURS
MonThur. 8-7
Fri. 8-5 Sat. 8-1
Slav Hall closed fur renova-
tions at the end of summer, anil
Umstead Hall will also close at the
end of spring. The two dorms will
then reopen as a single residence
hall in two years. Inez Fridlev, as-
sistant director of housing, said a
wing of the new dorm mav be set
aside for international students.
Watkins said theSlay-Umstead
complex mav address some of the
special needs of international stu-
dents. However,iulati said he was
concerned becausenodefiniteplans
have been made to reserve a wing
in the Slav-Umstead complex.
The International Households
a maximum of ten students.
Watkins said the small size of the
dorm also contributed to closing
the house.
"There have not been manv
students dispelled from the houe
he said. "We felt we were not tak-
ing on an issue that was of such
magnitude that it was going to cause
major problems. In the end the uni-
versitv would benefit
noon and 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
� Sept. 4 � Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center Organizational
Booth from 9a.m.tonoonand
1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
All room changes are within
the specified area covered by that
specific dorm. For instance, Gotten
will handle all room changes on
central campus, Tyler will handle
rwm changes on the Hill, etc. Slay
and Umstead residents may move
to any residence hall on campus on
Sept 1 and to the designated areas
(Central campus, the Hill, etc.) on
the corresponding days.
On Sept.4, University Housing
will handle all changes from one
area to another area on campus
Students should remember that
when asking for a nnmi change all
residents involved in the change
must acknowledge the request and
sign the room change form. This
means that though one person might
stay in the room and not move, he
she must still sign the form in order
for it to be accepted.
The roomchange form will have
multiple lines so that it may accom-
modate room changes involving up
to three rooms.
Only after all signatures have
been obtained can the form be re-
viewed bv the University housing
staff.
Upon approval from the Uni-
versity Housing staff, students
should contact their residence hall
coordinator's office to finalize the
room change.
After Sept. 4, the Department of
University Housing will not accept
any room changes until Sept. 21.
News writers meeting TODAY 4
p.m. at TEC office, 2nd floor
publications building. Please attend!
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AUGUST 26, 1992
The East Carolinian 5
Communication
department begins
work on yearbook
By Tony Rogers
Senior News Writer
After a two year absence, a
yearbook is finally returning to
ECU's campus. Instead of the tra-
ditional Buccaneer, the student
body will get a glimpse at tech-
nological advances as only the
second video yearbook in the
state will begin production in the
fall semester.
The Advanced Broadcasting
Production class, which will pro-
duce the yearbook for the com-
munication department, will fol-
low in the footsteps of Duke Uni-
versity as the only other video
yearbook in the state.
"We're ahead of the game
said Dr. T. Harrell Alien, chair of
the communication department.
"Our due date is April 1, and we
have already begun filming at
last May's graduation cer-
emony
The 10-15 member class,
comprised of juniors and seniors,
will be supervised by a new pro-
fessor, Dr. Xue-mei Zhang. Dr.
Zhang and her students will be
working with new equipment
purchased by the Media Board,
inagreementwirh the communi-
cation department.
"In order to avoid having to
retrain a new class in the spring
semester the samegroup will con-
tinue production in a special
seminars class and receive a total
of six hours credit over bom se-
mesters Allen said.
The video will be edited in a
documentary format giving a
chronological history of the past
year at ECU. Music and colorful
commentary will be added to the
highlights and uniqueevents that
take place concerning ECU and
its faculty and students.
"We will stay fairly conser-
vative in our first year Allen
said.
"This new equipment allows
us to work in 3-D and animation,
so we will get more and more
complex in the future
The equipment was pur-
chased at a one time cost of
$5236. The only other produc-
tion costs will be a $2 charge for
each copy of the VHS tape.
With a predicted demand of
5,000 tapes, the total production
cost for this year will be justover
$60,000.
"Butthepricefornew equip-
ment is one time expenditure
said Allen. "Therefore, over a
five year period, the average cost
of production will be much
cheaper than a printed version
According to Allen, produc-
tion costs for a print yearbook
range from $60,000-$80,000 an-
nually. The 30-minute tape will
be sold at cost, unless the Media
board chooses to raise the price
in the future.
"The Media Board may de-
cide to raise the price in a couple
of years in order to make money
for new equipment Allen said.
"But it was student money
thatbought this new equipment,
so we see no need to make a
profit from students
After five years, the new
equipment becomes the prop-
erty of the communication de-
partment At that time, Allen
expects to enter into a new pro-
duction contract with the Media
Board. "The Media Board may
wanttobuynewequipmentwith
updated technology Allen said.
"With a five-year contract, the
Media Board is not saddled into
equipment mat may eventually
be obsolete
The most exciting thing
about a video yearbook produc-
tion class, according to Allen, is
the opportunity for other video
productions that will open up.
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CAMPUS NEWS
University bans WZMB from bars
By Tony Rogers
Senior Staff Writer
After a legal debate that dates
back from February 1992, WZMB is
no longer permitted to affiliate itsel f
with nightclubs downtown or any
events where alcohol is served.
University Attorney Ben Irons
said there is risk of a lawsuit against
ECU with respect to the radio sta-
tion sponsoring an event where al-
cohol is permitted.
"The potential for a lawsuit is
too great, if anyone is injured, to
allow WZMB to sponsor any events
where alcohol is served Irons said.
Under Irons' advice, Tim John-
son, the general manager of WZMB,
was told the morning of July 21 to
cancel a WZMB promoted concert
at the Attic that evening.
Johnson did not cancel the
event, saying the last minute notice
made it impossible.
In a letter signed by Mary Beth
Morde, media board chairperson,
Johnson was told the advice "is
based on the conclusion WZMB is a
co-sponsor of the event and there-
fore shares any liability
Irons said the notice should not
have been necessary at all.
"We had discussions about a
similar situation with WZMB in
February Irons said. "Since our
position has remained the same, this
was not anything new to WZMB
According to Greg Brown, stu-
dent media advisor, the university
attomey'sofficeadvised Mordethat
activities at the Attic may bring up
the issue of liability again.
"The university attorneys con-
tacted us (at the media board office)
to get in touch with Ms. Morde
Brown said.
"She was then asked to notify
WZMB about the potential for a
lawsuit if anyone is injured
According to Greg Hassler, as-
sistant university attorney, Brown
contacted him in regard to the pos-
sible liability issue.
"We got notification from Greg
Brown that WZMB intended to en-
gage in an activity at the Attic simi-
lar to the situation that occurred in
February Hassler said. "Since the
situations were so similar, I advised
Mr. Brown to issue an updated ver-
sion of the letter we sent Mr. John-
son earlier
Brown said a written opinion
from the attorney's office would
need to be reviewed by the media
board before an official policy could
be drafted.
Until then, the media board has
a verbal understanding with the
radio station.
"WZMB has been told they
shouldn't have anything to do with
the bars downtown Brown said.
Johnson said the university's
attorneys have no basis for their
advice.
"As far as they (the university's
attorney and the media board) can
tell me, there is no legal precedent
for this decision Johnson said.
Johnson also said WZMB's re-
lationship with bars in the down-
town area has been beneficial to the
radio station.
"The only way people will
know about us is if we get out and
promote ourselves Johnson said.
"One way of promoting the sta-
tion is by having promotions at
clubs
Johnson also said the restric-
tion may hurt the financial benefits
of keeping a cooperative relation-
ship with downtown bars. Accord-
ing to Johnson, the Elbo donated
$400 to the radio station last year,
the Attic donated $700 and
�'Rockefeller's made a $900 dona-
tion to WZMB in February.
"Because the bars are a major
contributor to WZMB's trust fund, I
feel like if s a slap in the face to the
bars and unfair to WZMB Johnson
said.
Johnson proposed a contract
stating the bar owners are fully li-
able for any injuries during WZMB
sponsored events. The owners of
the Attic, O'Rockefeller's and the
Elbo agreed to sign such a contract.
"That may be helpful, but our
advice would remain the same
Irons said.
Irons said if a lawsuit were filed,
ECU would be the party most able
to pay since many private organiza-
tions are not financially able to com-
pensate the victim.
"In these situations, the univer-
sity is the deep pocket Irons said.
"The injured party will seek
compensation from those directly
and indirectly involved
Trustees re-elected, name campus facilities
ECU News Bureau
D. Wayne Peterson of
Tarboro was elected for a second
term as chairman of the ECU
Board of Trustees during the
board's July 9 meeting on cam-
pus.
Also elected for second terms
were J. Craig Souza of Raleigh,
vice chair, and Robert A. Ward of
Greensboro, secretary.
Resolutions naming a large
lecture hall in the General Class-
room Building and a new Uni-
versity guest house for trustee
benefactors were also approved.
GCB 1031 was named in
honor of W. Howard Rooks of
Alexandria,Va and ECU alum-
nus and major supporter of the
School of Business and the Uni-
versity Scholar Awards program.
The new guest house at 1201
E. Fifth St. is to be named for
trustee secretary Ward and his
wife Margaret, who donated the
house to ECU last year. Both are
ECU alumni.
A total of 32 campus streets
were named, among them
Chancellor's Way (the street be-
hind Spilman), Faculty Way (the
long, straight street beside the
campus mall), Founders Drive,
Alumni Circle, Student Plaza and
Pirates' Walk.
The names College Hill Drive
and Wright Circle formalize
names already in current use.
Most of the new names honor
individuals who are significant
in East Carolina history, such as
Beckwith Drive, for Kate
Beckwith, first dean of women;
Busbee Drive, for early patrons
Jaques and Juliana Busbee;
Oglesby Drive, for first male
graduate Henry Oglesby; and
Leary Court, for Laura Marie
Leary, first black graduate.
In other matters, the trustees
voted to adopt the proposed
Comprehensive Facilities Master
Plan and to pay for repairs to
Ficklen Stadium ($2,222,200)
with long-term bank loans and
student fees.
They also authorized the use
of $270,900 of the reserves from
the Medical Faculty Practice Plan
and form Parking and Traffic Ser-
vices to pay for paving, curbing,
lighting and landscaping of a 266-
space parking lot near the Brody
Medical Sciences Building.
vu�v;n
� t at
ssai2Sb
�189
� PlifUE'R.
Pizza.
With classes, studying, food, dates and football keeping you busy, where does a bank fit into your life
right now? The fact is, your bank shouldn't be another thing to add to your busy schedule. Your bank should be
something thai makes life easier.
So take a minute to stop by and talk to a Personal Banker With several checking accounts to choose
from, an ATM on campus and a branch nearby, we can help you stay on top of all your financial responsibilities.
Even the ones with pepperoni and extra cheese Welcome to Wachovia.
Branch Locations: Main Office. Fourth & Washington Streets, Greenville, NC 27858 (919) 757-7111
Pill Plaza Office Pill Plaza Annex. Greenville. NC 27835 (919) 757-7121
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Campus Teller II Locations: Mendenhail Student Center and University at 802 East Tenih Street
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6 The East Carolinian
AUGUST 26. 1992
TATE
EWS
New TB strain threatens N.C.
GREENVILLE, N.C. (AP) �
The chances of keeping a new strain
of tuberculosis out of North Caro-
lina aren't good, considering an in-
crease in AIDS and the state's his-
tory of TB, a health official says.
"Thesame things thathavehap-
pened in New York and Miami
could very well happen here said
Harry Adams, chief of infectious
diseases at the University Medical
Center of Eastern Carolina in
Greenville. "It's only a matter of
time before we see drug-resistant
TB
That strain of TB has struck in
large cities in New Yorkand Florida.
So far the new strain has not
mademuchheadwayin North Caro-
lina, Stephen Martin of the state's
TB control branch, told The News &
Observer of Raleigh.
The ECU medical school's hos-
pital, Pitt County Memorial, is get-
ting a growing number of AIDS
patients, whose weakened immune
systems make them susceptible to
TB.
Some are North Carolina na-
tives who move home a fter living in
large cities and are more likely to
bringthe dangerous strain back with
them.
Unlike AIDS, which is prima-
rily transmitted through sex or in-
travenous drug- use, TB can be
spread through the air when an in-
fected person coughs or sneezes.
Patients develop thedrugresistance
whentheyfail totakemedicineprop-
erly or when they catch the strain
from someone else.
In 1991, North Carolina had the
17th highest TB rate in the country,
with the highest rates in the coastal
plain. The state's TB rate has re-
mained steady at about 650 cases
per year since 1980, with only be-
tween two and five serious cases
annually.
Staffers at the Durham County
Health Departmenthavetreated one
drug-resistant case in the past year.
The patient was never cured of TB
and died of an AIDS-related illness.
Irving Hoffman, Durham
County's clinical coordinator, said
the agency now watches patients
take their medicine and routinely
gives each patient a combination of
drugs to ensure that at least one will
work.
Health care workers�particu-
larly in hospitals and prisons�said
they are making efforts to prepare
for the new strain.
Man arrested in tampering case
SEATTLE (AP) � The North
Carolina manufacturer of Sudafed
12 Hour cold capsules has reached
an out-of-court settlement with the
relatives of two people who died
after swallowingpoisoned capsules
from packages that had been tam-
pered with.
As is common in product-li-
ability cases, all parties have agreed
to keep terms of the settlement con-
fidential.
Kathleen Daneker, 40, of
Tacoma, and Stan McWhorter, 44,
of Lacey,died in February 1991 after
taking capsules that had been laced
with cyanide, tucked back into
Sudafed packages and placed on
store shelves.
Another victim, Jennifer Meting
of Tumwater, lapsed into a coma
after takinga contaminated capsule,
but recovered.
Meling was not a party to the
civil suit filed by the relatives of
Daneker and McWhorter against
Burroughs Wellcome Co. of Re-
search Triangle Park, N.C.
The poisonings led to a nation-
wide recall of Sudafed capsules. The
producthas since been reintroduced
as a solid-coated tablet, regarded as
less vulnerable to tampering.
The suit, filed in U.S. District
Court in Tacoma, accused
Burroughs Welicome of negligence
in not removing Sudafed from store
shelves earlier.
Plaintiffs said the company
should have recalled the product
immediately after it was notified
that Meling was stricken, which was
days before either Daneker or
McWhorter took the capsules.
Burroughs Wellcome officials
have said law-enforcement agen-
cies had told them the Meling poi-
soning appeared to be an isolated
incident.
The suit did not mention a spe-
cific dollar amount sought by tine
families. It was scheduled to go to
trial next month.
Brad Fulton, an attorney for
Daneker's widower, Kenneth D.
Daneker II, confirmed Friday that a
settlement was reached within the
past few weeks.
He said the settlement included
a "gag order" barring parties from
discussing the case.
An attorney for Burroughs
Wellcome declined comment, say-
ing'a statement may be released this
week.
The FBI, the U.S. Attorney's Of-
fice and the Food and Drug Admin-
istration are conducting a criminal
investigation of the poisonings. No
arrests have been made.
In a separate product-tamper-
ingcase,thernakersofExtraStrength
Excedrin in 1988 paid $300,000 to
settle a wrongful-death suit filed by
relatives of Sue Snow.
The Auburn woman died in
1986 after ingesting a cyanide-laced
Excedrin capsule.
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Wet weather plagues state
Andrewturns
away from
N.C. coast
(AP) � Flood waters in
southeastern North Carolina
are beginning to recede, but
hurricane Andrew brings new
threats.
"If we were to get any more
rain or wind from Andrew,
that's just going to compound
the problem and make more
residences flood said Twig
Rollins, emergency manage-
ment coordinator for .Pender
County.
In Pender County alone,
Rollins said, the flooding caused
by a series of torrential thun-
derstorms in the Sandhills ear-
lier this week has caused about
$500,000 in damage to 147
homes along the Northeast
Cape Fear River.
State damage assessment
crews have been dispatched to
several counties in the area to
determine the extent of dam-
ages.
It will be next week before
any damage estimates are avail-
able, said state Division of
Emergency Management
spokesman Graham Wilson.
Wilson said he wasn't look-
ing forward to another storm.
"We couldn't take another
series of rains like we've had
the last week Wilson said Fri-
day.
"Obviously, if we got an-
other period like that extended
period like we had or some-
thing like a tropical storm, that
could cause a lot of problems
At 8 a.m. EDT Tuesday,
Artdrew'scenter was located near
272 norm latitude and 88.4 west
longitude, or about 210 miles
Photo by Dull H�a Th Eut Carolinian
Wet weather found this mother and child "under the umbrella
south-southeast of New Orleans,
moving west-northwest at 17
mph.
Wilson said his division's at-
tention hasn't turned squarely
to the storm yet We're going
to monitor it, and until we have
a little better idea of what it might
do, that's all we're going to do at
this point Wilson said.
Meanwhile to the north of
Pender County, the water was
beginning to recede.
"It's looking a little bit bet-
ter for us said Dorothy
Cavenaugh, Duplin County's
assistant emergency manage-
ment director.
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AUGUST 26, 1992
The East Carolinian 7
N.C. firefighters battle wildfires
CHARLOTTE (AD � Firefighters and forest rangers from
North Carolina and South Carolina flew out of Charlotte on Satur-
day, bound for wildfires threatening thousands of residents in
Northern California and Idaho.
About 130 volunteers from the North Carolina Air National
Guard, the U.S. Forest Service, the National Park Service and other
agencies will relieve Western firefighters exhausted by more than a
week of battling huge brush and timber fires.
Two planes are carrying MAPS � modular airborne fire-fight-
ing systems�thathaul pressurized tanks of fire-retardantchemicals
and drop them on the flames.
Lt. Col. Mike Swope, air operations officer in Charlotte, said the
MAFS-equipped planes are among only eight in the country.
Campbell student abandons infant
BU1ES CREEK, N.C. (AP)�A 20-year-old Campbell University
student gave birth to a premature baby in a secluded part of her
dormitory and then abandoned the infant near a dumpster.
The identity of the woman has not been released.
The woman gave birth by herself in a secluded part of the dorm
on the north side on campus. The 4-pound 16-ounce infant was left
on the ground bundled in a towel behind thedormitory, officials said.
The woman said that she did not know that she was pregnant.
And she had notappeared seven month pregnant when she reported
for classes, said Phillip Melvin, dean of student life at Campbell.
The woman and her daughter were in stable condition Sunday
at Betsy Johnson Hospital in Dunn.
Citizens support police chief
WINSTON-SALEM (AP) � A group of about 300 people garn-
ered at a rally in support for Winston-Salem Police Chief George
Sweat and his department.
Two city aldermen said earlier this month that Sweat should
consider resigning in the wake of a woman's death this summer.
Sheila Epps McKellar died in July after she was arrested on
assault charges. Officers bound her hands and legs and gagged her.
She stopped breathing on the floor of a holding cell and died two days
later.
The police department has been criticized for not releasing
information on her death until more than a week later. It has also
received criticism regarding the handling of other cases, including a
fatal stabbing death in May.
The rally was held Sunday in Winston Square Park.
Maxine Sergeant demoted
for sexual harassment
PENSACOLA, Fla. (AP)�The
parties are over at a school where die
Navy tries to turn future pilots into
officers and gentlemen, or ladies.
Parties that included dancing
and beer-drinking figured promi-
nently in the court-martialing of two
Marine drill instructors�including
one from North Carolina�accused
of sexually harassing and fraterniz-
ing with women trainees and re-
cently graduated officers.
The celebrations "put a lot of
people in compromising positions
Marine Master Sgt.Charles Ryan tes-
tified during one of the trials. "We
found out we had to get rid of beer
parties
Ryan, a witness in bom cases, is
chief drill instructor for the Aviation
Officer Candidate School at the
Pensacola Naval Air Station.
Elimination of parties is one of
several changes made at the school
to prevent a repeat of events that led
to the convictions of the two gunnery
sergeants in separate non-jury trials
last Thursday and Aug. 12.
"We don't dance with candi-
dates. We don't accept alcoholic bev-
erages from candidates Ryan testi-
fied. "We don't have nothing to do
with candidates now, other than in
the working environment
The accused, Clifton W. Ford,
33, of Orrum, N.C, and Michael E.
Wallace, 34, of Miami, were found
guilty of violating various regula-
tions and demoted two ranks to ser-
geant. Wallace also was fined $750.
While the two Ma rines still were
under investigation, the school's as-
sistant director was accused of danc-
ing with a woman trainee and hav-
ing too much to drink at a class party
Mayl.
That was the final straw forCapt
Vann Goodloe, commanding officer
I of the Aviation Schools Command.
It was the last class party.
"I determined at that time it
would be best for all to remove that
type of environment so we do not
have any potential in the future for
! anything that might be perceived as
being out of the ordinary Goodloe
said in an interview.
The assistant director was reas-
signed.
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Last November, before the in-
vestigation began, Goodloe elimi-
nated victory parties, held aftermost
training is completed, because they
were costing the students too much
money.
Wallace had been accused of
putting his hands and a piece or ice
down thepantsof a femalestudentat
a victory party last year.
Ensign Sheila Diaz testified that
a couple weeks after she graduated
she returned for such a party where
Ford propositioned her as she was
leaving.
She said he told her: "You're a
smart girl. You're a pretty girl. You
know what I'm talking about"
Ford was found guilty of failing
to maintain a proper instructor-
trainee relationship by kissing a fe-
male student after one of the parties.
Witnesses said the drill instruc-
tors also danced with and in one case
Ford gavean unwanted kiss tooneof
the womenata nightclub in Chicago.
The trainees had gone to Chicago to
put on a pageant about the history of
the US. flag.
New school regulations prohibit
drill instructors from going on such
trips.
They also limit social contact
between instructors and students to
a single event. If s called the "Hi
Moms" reception with family mem-
bers just before graduation, said
Cmdr. Chuck Lewis, who took over
as the school's director six weeks
ago.
Other rule changes prohibit in-
structors from touching students and
require an additional instructor or
naval officer to be present during
physical and other high-risk train-
ing.
Drill instructors have lost au-
tonomy to the officers in charge of
eachclass,and they are getting addi-
tional trainingonsexualharassment.
The entire Navy is receiving
more sexual harassment training as
the resultofwhathas become known
as the Tailhook scandal. Last Sep-
tember, dozens of Navy and Marine
pilots molested at least 26 women,
many fellow officers, during the
annual Las Vegas convention of the
Tailhtxk Association.
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The East Carolinian
August 26. 1992
Opinion
NEW YEAR, A NEW LOOK
Page 8
THE WOMEN SPEAK
By Jennifer Wardrep fie Chantal Weed man
TEC welcomes students, changes 'Bitch factor' on the rise in election year
Traditionally, the editorial for The East
Carolinian "Welcome Back" issue is just that
� a welcome � to students, faculty and
staff. But as you can see, this is not a tradi-
tional paper. Not only has the look of this
paper changed, but our goals have changed
as well.
In the past, The East Carolinian has held
an "our paper" attitude. That is, we seem to
have cared more about what we would like
to see in a student newspaper, and not
thought much about what you, the readers,
would like to see. With a new staff of moti-
vated individuals, we have become a new,
updated, more reader-friendly paper.
At the helm of our editorial ship, we find
a new leader in Jennifer Wardrep, our man-
aging editor. She has worked diligently to
see that this 40-page behemoth has run
smoothly, and she will apply the same hard-
workingattitudetoeverypaper,everyweek,
all year long. Fresh from an internship with
The Carter Presidential Center in Atlanta,
Jennifer has terrific ideas, and the knowl-
edge to put them to work for you.
The replacement of the Entertainment
section with Lifestyle will allow more diver-
sified coverage. Lewis Coble and Dana
Danielson, the Entertainment team from last
year, will be making the transition to Lifestyle.
The section is no longer limited to record,
film and band reviews, so look for more soft
features, light columns, special events, book
releases and theater reviews.
Jeff Becker and Elizabeth Shimmel, the
new News force of The East Carolinian, will
keep you informed of campus goings-on.
Look for comprehensive public safety, city
crime and student government coverage as
well as election news both at the national
and state level.
With Rob Todd and Chas Mitch'l head-
ing up the Sports section, you can look for-
ward to interesting and insightful coverage
of ECU sports. You will see more statistics,
standings and information about all the
sports around campus and around the na-
tion. Expect to see stories and features about
not only the big sports like football and
basketball, but also intramural, club sports,
and other fun events going on around cam-
pus.
Bill Walker has taken on the task of
putting together the Opinion section. With
the presidential elections just around the
corner, Bill will bring you insightful opin-
ions from a variety of columnists. He en-
courages your opinions as readers in the
form of letters to the Editor.
Along with the content changes, you
will also see many visual changes in the look
of the paper. Our layout manager, Chantal
Weedman, has taken on the tiresome task of
completely redesigning The East Carolinian
to give it a new, fresh look. Expect to see
more information boxes, lists, scores and
graphics to accompany stories and features.
With suggestions and help from graphic
artist Adam Roe and the entire staff, she has
tried to find the best way to present the
Nexvs, Lifestyle, Sports and Opinion sections
to you.
With Blair Skinner and Sean Herring,
our copy editing kings, we will be striving to
give you the best, most complete and error-
free presentation of all you like to see in a
student newspaper.
Each week this staff will work hard to
put together The East Carolinian, not for our-
selves and each other, but for all our read-
ers. We are at your service, so if you have
suggestions, comments, criticism or praise,
we want to hear from you. We need your
help to meet the needs of all the students,
faculty and staff of East Carolina Univer-
sity. Welcome Back and have a great year!
She's an attractive, well edu-
cated woman. She loves her hus-
band and her family. She is In-
volved incivicorganiza tions,char-
ity groups and dabbles in politics.
She even advises her husband
about his job and helps him make
important decisions pertaining to
his work. She is a wife, a mother
and a working woman. Some
people would call her theaverage,
well-rounded wife.
Pat Buchanan called her a
radical feminist.
Hillary Clinton possessesall
of the positive qualities listed
above. As for beinga radical femi-
nist, well, if being a well-read, in-
volved woman of the' 90s makes
her a radical feminist, then she
would probably take on that title,
too.
Leslie Mclntyre once said,
"Nobody objects to a woman be-
ing a good writer or sculptor or
geneticist if at the same time she
manages to be a good wife, good
mother, good-looking, good tem-
pered, well groomed and
unagressive People object to
Hillary for that reason � she's
aggressive.
The American Heritage Dic-
tionary defines "feminism" as "a
doctrine that advocates or de-
mands for women the same rights
granted men, as in political and
economic status So, what is a
"radical" feminist, Mr. Buchanan?
Is it someone who advocates more
extreme equal rights? There are
no degrees of feminism; we are
eitheror equal rights or we're not.
Hillary obviously is for equal
rights � that makes her a femi-
nist, but it does not make her radi-
cal.
Mr. Buchanan attaches the
label to Hillary Clinton simply
because she is female, she is in
touch with her own opinions and
beliefs and she ain't scared to ex-
press them. Actress Sharon Stone
once said sarcastically, "A vagina
and a point of view are i danger-
ous combination Mr. Buchanan
must believe that. Or maybe he's
not in touch with his own opin-
ions. Or may be M r. Buchanan feels
threatened by a strong, decisive
woman such as our sister Hillary.
Whatever Buchanan's prob-
lem, he brings to our attention an
important issue in this campaign
year � women in politics.
There is no denying that Bill
Clinton and Al Gore have come to
this election year with their re-
sumes in hand. Though there are
no female candidates for the top
two offices in our country, the
candidate's wives bring to the cam-
paign their own experience-
packed resumes filled with cre-
dentials. Tipper Gore, with her
record-labeling crusade to protect
children from explicit song lyrics,
jumped on the "family values"
bandwagon long before Dan
Quayle even knew there was a
wagon. Or is it wagonel
And what about Hillary? Her
stand on education and children's
rights is at the forefront of the
family values issue. She too has
supported equal rights, higher
standards in theeducation system
and several other family-oriented
issues. She supported thesecauses
long before Bill Clinton's hat was
in the ring. Before Bill Clinton was
acandidate,Hillary'sconcemsand
causes made her a good wife and
an excellent working woman.
Now they seem to have made her
a threat in the eyes of Buchanan
and his cohorts. Hillary is no more
radical, feminist or a bitch than
any other concerned woman in
this country. Hillary may be the
next first lady. And that scares
people.
She isn't the first to frighten,
though. When Jimmy Carter was
running for president in 76, his
wife Rosalynn was the object of
fear. She, like Hillary, was active
in politics. Like every first lady,
she had her pet issues � her most
prominent one being mental
health. What were people scared
of? People were scared she would
become an adviser to the potential
president, giving him ideas, ex-
pressing her opinions to him and
advising him on major political
decisions.
Soon after Carter was
elected, Rosalynn set up her office
in the White House, just a few
doors down from her husband's.
She insisted on attending Cabinet
meetings; she pulled up a chair by
the door (but never spoke up be-
cause she didn't feel it was her
place as a non-member; she spoke
to the president after hours). She
became honorary chair of the
President's Commission on Men-
tal Health. She often found deci-
sion-making memos in her in-box
directed from the president with
notations on the side: "What do
you think, Ros? � J"
Just like Rosalynn wanted to
be involved in politics, both be-
fore and after the election, so does
Hillary. If Bill Clinton is elected,
Hillary will probably set up camp
dow the hall, so she can work on
her pet projects. She may even
attend Cabinet meetings, but she
won't speak up either � she has
already said she would not accept
a Cabinet position because she
didn't think it would be appropri-
ate. There is nothing scary (or
thereshouldn'tbe) aboutawoman
who wants to utilize her talents in
her position in order to service us.
In a Presidential election
year, everything the candidates
say and do is scrutinized and ana-
lyzed in the media. This election
year, more than ever, the wives of
the cand idates have been subjected
to the sa me types of scrutiny. "The
Bitch Factor" is ever-present.
If believing in real issues and
supporting them makes Hillary,
Tipperoranyother womana bitch,
then let "The Bitch Factorrise.
If believing in equal treat-
ment for all people: men, women,
children, minorities, makes them
radical feminists, then stamp
"RADICAL" on their resumes.
Like them or not, these
women are smart, active wives
who won't just plan presidential
tea parties. They are more likely to
plan a rally in support of an im-
portant cause. They won't sit
around reading books about is-
sues; they wi 11 be getti ng involved.
Don't expect to hear about
Hillary's great fashion sense, ex-
pect to hear about her political
sense.
Above all, keep an eye on
these 90's women who just may be
setting up shop in the White
House; they are strong, involved,
smart and active. They hold the
reigns on the future of women in
politics.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Smoking ban long overdue for ECU buildings
The East Carolinian
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Am. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Lifestyle Editor
Dana Danielson Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Assistant Sports Editor
Blalr Skinner, Copy Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Jennifer A. Wardrep, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Richard Haselrig, Staff illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Billiard, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Jamie (Joins, Classified Advertising Technician
Bill Walker, Opinion Page Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
To the Editor:
Smoking in the boys room,
the ladies room, the hall, the caf-
eteria, the stairwells
The banning of first and sec-
ond hand smoke inside all ECU
buildings was long overdue. Sta-
tistically the majority of the
school population does not
smoke and they confront clouds
of smoke daily on our campus.
The Surgeon General in-
forms us thatfirstandsecondhand
smoke kills thousands of people
every year. Yet we have thou-
sands of students attending ECU
addicted to smoking and facing
shorter lives, and no one does
anything to help them or the non-
smokers who are forced by lack
of appropriate school policy to
breathe the smoky air inside of
school buildings. Allowing ev-
eryone to smoke in the buildings
is an open endorsement of en-
dangerment to those same stu-
dents who have come to ECU for
an education. Smoking outside
of thebuildings should be looked
at as responsible behavior from
the people who do smoke. While
we cannot force people not to
smoke, nor should we, we can
require that smokers do not force
others to breathe their smoke.
Leadership is a sign of the
final step in the metamorphosis
of EZU to ECU. A deserved meta-
morphosis, for the administra-
tion, students and faculty that
have worked so hard in making
ECU into a serious academic in-
stitution. An institution that in
the future we can be proud to
have said we attended.
J.R. King
junior at ECU not EZU
P.S. In all fairness this re-
sponse should be printed in the
same size type that was used in
the Opinion column of the July
I5th issue. The type in the col-
umn was enormous compared
to the rest of the type size in the
newspaper.
(Editor's note: The Opinion
column in each edition of The East
Carolinian is printed in 12 point
palitino typeface. This size is larger
than the rest of the paper as that
column is the opinion of the entire
editorial board. Other editorial col-
umns and letters to the editor are
now printed in W point type, con-
sistent with the rest of the newspa-
per, including the July 15th article
on smoking Mr. King refers to.)
Anthony Kennedy shifts from right to left
lie ha.uCarolm.an has served .he East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
K U studnis. llic Lut Larolmian publishes 12.000 cop.es every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead edttorial in each
edit.on is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolmian welcomes letters expressing all points of view I c.ters
should be l.rrutcd to 250 words or less. I-or purposes of decency and brevity, The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The Fast Carolinian. Publications Bkii; ECTI
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353 For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
To The Editor:
I guess "congratulations"
should be sent to Anthony
Kennedy for being awarded the
1992 Strange New Respect
Award. The award is given to
conservatives who betray con-
servative values after moving
to Washington, D.C. Liberals
who present the award say these
people have "grown Kennedy
was honored for jumping to the
left in recent abortion and school
prayer decisions.
Kennedy was also pre-
sented with the Taney Medal,
an award named after former
Chief Justice Roger B. Taney
who presided over the 1857
J
Dread Scott decision. In this case,
the Supreme Court ruled that
Congress could not outlaw sla-
very because that would consti-
tute the taking of private prop-
erty. In upholding Roe v. Wade
in the recent Pennsylvania abor-
tion law case, Kennedy insti-
tuted this same reasoning. In
1857, slaves, like the unborn are
now, were considered property
of their owners (mothers).
While the D.C. liberals
praised Kennedy, true conser-
vatives real ized wha t happened.
Robert Bork remarked that up-
holding Roe v. Wade was prob-
ably very popular with the
people Justices care most about:
The New York Times, the three
network news programs, law
school faculties, and at least 90
percent of the people Justices
may meet at Washington dinner
parties. Maybe Kennedy has
decided that his new liberal
friends are more important than
the constitution.
I guess, in the time since
Reagan left office, we conserva-
tives should have gotten used
to being betrayed by so-called
conservatives. But I truly never
thought Anthony Kennedy
would be one of them.
Billy L. Biggs
Sophmore
Accounting
�M,
feW' :






X
AUGUST 26 . 1992
WALK'S WORDS
The East Carolinian 9
By J. William Walker
Bush: scapegoat or genuine failure
I iii' t'tiil ol thf Republican
National i onvention signals tin'
beginning ol the 70-da sprint to
election day. henexl two months
will provide an interesting arraj of
gossip, name-calling and general
muckraking.
We, the oters, must deter-
mine who will be the best leader
for our country. In doing so, many
things mustbe ta ken intocon.sider-
ation.
President Gerald Ford pre-
sented a chilling look to the past in
his introduction toQuayle'saccep-
tance speech Thursday night. He
asked us to recall the 1976 election.
For those who can't recall the elec-
tion of '84 much less 76, this elec-
tion pitted Jimmy Carter, a one-
term Democratic Governor from
the South who had little foreign
affairs experience and Democratic
dreams of a huge National Gov-
ernment, against Gerald Ford, a
President seeking re-election after
serving one term as president and
two terms under Nixon.
The upcoming election
matches Bill Clinton, a one-term
Democratic Governor from the
South who had little foreign affairs
experience and Democraticdreams
of a huge National Government,
against George Bush, a President
seeking re-election after serving one
term as president and two terms
under Reagan.
Theopinionof America, tired
ot a stagnant Republican govern-
ment, leaned to Carter's side. The
outcome was horrible. Four years
of hyper-inflation, piss-poor eco-
nomic ideals, crappy foreign rela-
tions, disco dancing and a general
lack of esteem by all Americans.
Let's be careful not to pass
the golden halo to Bill and Al with-
out meticulous consideration.
Granted thecurrentadministration
is not exactly the most effective
machine out there, but remember
that George Bush, if elected, has no
need to listen to special interest
groups. He would be on his last
stint as head-exec, and would not
have to worry about conflicting
interestsi.e. N.R.A E.R.A
N.E.A.). This capacity alone would
allow dramatic changes.
In the field of foreign affairs,
Bush is moving in the right direc-
tion. The end of the cold war, the
unification of Germany, the most
decisive military victory ever and
Mid-East peace talks do not spon-
taneously occur. Su rely Americans
can see the long-term benefits of
these accomplishments.
We have heard a lot from Bill
Clinton about Bush's lack of ac-
tions as President, and we have
heard from George Bush all about
the stubborn congress. So who is to
blame?
Consider the problem logi-
cally. Can we blame one man for
the lack of progress. One man who
exponentially inflated the deficit?
One man whodestroyed thousands
of jobs? One man who stole the
homes of the poor and pumped
HIV into their blood? Or can we
point the finger at the 368 check-
bouncing, ind ustry-regulating, tax-
increasing, wasteful-spending, red
tape-stretching, bureaucratic
stalwort idiots?
The answer should be clear.
The president can not single-
handedly change taxes, jobs or
other demands of the ardent politi-
cal critics. No single person can.
The congress, however, can
easily laugh at progress, thwart
competition wherever it rears its
ugly head,bounce checks through
thestratosphere and offset the bud-
get by leaps and bounds never be-
fore imaginable. Yes my friends,
congress is therootof all evil. With-
out the support of congress, a good
president is about as effective as a
car without an engine.
Voters beware, the election
this year matches the do-nothings
with the did-nothings and any re-
sult will produce an unsatisfactory
result in the minds of the never-
pleased American political fans. It
is time to size the options, and care-
fully consider the impact of our
choices. Think wisely and remem-
ber: There was never as biga fool as
the man who thought he was too
small to make a difference VOTE.
A VIEW FROM ABOVE
By Scott Bachelor
Procrastination, destroyer of enthusiasm
I began attending ECU in
the fall of 1985. Back then, many
people told me I had a modicum
of writing talent and suggested I
write for The East Carolinian. 1 fully
intended to apply at the newspa-
per then, but I never got around to
it. I'm twenty-four now, and 1 have
been going to school here off and
, on, (actually more off than on), for
the past seven years.
However, this is only my
sixth column for The East Carolin-
ian. The reason for that is, 1 started
writingfor the paper justsix weeks
ago. Talk about procrastination!
Like many of you reading
this column today, I came to ECU
brimming with enthusiasm, en-
ergy and anticipation. I had a posi-
tive attitude, I was eager to learn,
and I wasa world-class "will prob-
ably be late for his own funeral"
procrastinator.
Nothing will extinguish the
flickering fire of enthusiasm like
. procrastination.
I remember well one of the
first classes I took at ECU. The
name of the course is not impor-
tant. Suffice it to say 1 had a genu-
ine interest in the subject matter.
On the first day of class our
professor handed out a course syl-
labus. Right there on the syllabus,
in bold-face type, underlined and
asterisked, was the following: "A
five page, double spaced, type-
written paper discussing (I forget
the topic) will be due on the last
day of class
Mind you, I had this infor-
mation on the first day of the se-
mester. So when did I complete
this less-than-gargantuan assign-
ment? You could not guess in a
hundred years so 1 will tell you. At
about 4:00a.m. on the morning of
the last day of class!
Many mornings on my colle-
giate odyssey have been spent just
this way.
In phone conversations with
my parents I would sometimes slip
up and reveal that I had stayed up
until the wee hours of the morning
the night before preparing an as-
signment.
Their refrain?
"Well, Scott, it's your own
fault. How long have you known
about this assignment?"
"What was that , Mom?" 1
would say. "I can't hear you, the
connection's breaking up guess
I'll go now love you send
money Click.
But you know what? They
were absolutely right. It was my
own fault, and a destructive one at
that. "Never do today what you
can putoff until tomorrow" sounds
witty until the grade reports come
back.
Still, many students turn this
inadvisable practice into a game, a
sort of academic beat the clock,
with players taking great pride in
how close to thedead line they come
before beginning an assignment.
A friend of mine who gradu-
ated from a university in western
North Carolina once pushed the
game to its limit.
Typing frantically at 11:30
p.m Tim (not his real name), real-
ized he would barely make the
midnightdeadlinehis teacher had
set for accepting the student's pa-
pers.
With his completed assign-
ment in hand, he hurried down
the hallway where his professor's
office was located. To his surprise,
(and horror), Tim found the door
to the office closed and locked. It
was fiv e minutes to midnight. Tim
said a quick prayer and slid the
paper under the office door.
Three days later, as the
teacher returned the graded pa-
pers to the class, he handed Tim
his with a knowing, reproachful
glare. Looking down athis paper,
Tim saw the faint image of the
word "EKIN" in reverse letter-
ing, outlined by the shadow of a
shoe print. He looked at the
professor's tennis shoes. Su ?
enough, they were Nikes.
Tim never played the .ie
again.
Most opportunities at am
real value occur only once. There
will be many parties to attend in
one's lifetime, as well as Thurs-
day nights downtown.
Similarly, those gorgeous
summer days, when the sunshine
seems to penetrate and warm the
soul, will come around again next
year just like clockwork.
But mostof us will haveonly
one shot at a freshman year in
college. If you don't believe me,
check the statistics. Now, I've got
to go. This column was due over
half an hour ago.
Old habits die hard.
�Bunt MM.t S�'viCM
Of AS SEZ
By Chas Mitch 1
Voters must decide the fate of our country
An ardent wish or desire is
how Daniel Webster defined the
word vote. To wish upon a coin
and then toss it in a wishing well
or to have the foundest desire to
possess a new car. NOT!
Given the degree of change
in the United States since its earli-
est beginnings, change is the battle
cry on today's political agenda.
There's no doubt that change is
needed; however, thequestion lies
as to where the changes will be
made. In a time where nearly 72
percent of the communist world
has given way to Independent or
Democratic reform and the threat
of globalnuclear war has nearly
been wiped away, the word
change continues to weigh heavy
on the minds of the voting masses.
With topics suchasabortion,
AIDS, unemployment, the home-
less, race relations etc what type
of changes are Mr. Bush and Mr.
Clinton trying to "sell" us? The
fact remains that if the United
States continues on its current path
of policing the world and con-
stancy giving billions of United
States dollars to foreign aid while
neglecting its own homefront, we
will end up with figures too dis-
heartening to imagine. The power
that we the citizens of America
have to make changes is to vote.
Apathy is out and action is in.
While the political correct-
ness debate rageson ("You People"
- H. Ross Perot, physically handi-
capped versus physically chal-
lenged and NAACP or NAAAA),
the voting populace needs to take
this time to decide where their one
simple-but-all-so-important vote
will go.
So while you're sitting back
in your comfortable brown and
orange plaid couch watching the
tellie with a big bag of Doritos
within reach, you are continually
being bombarded with news
sounding like it's straight out of
Cold War-era Russia: Record store
owners arrested forsellingalbum9,
a you th arrested for wearing (gasp!)
a "smutty" Van Halen t-shirt, a
museum crator being hauled
away for splaying homo-erotic
art, women being denied their right
to control their bodies, motorist
Rodney King viciously beaten by
four policemen who breezed
MAXWELL S SILVER HAMMER
through a trial and a final verdict
of "not guilty But as you gasp,
sputter and express open-
mouthed shock, as you talk about
it at the office, express your out-
rage and quite often wear your
anti-censorship flags, pins and
burtons to show support and unity
� it's still not enough!
However, when it's time to
vote, we as a nation nestle back in
our sofas, grab the bigbagof chips
and elicita small burp. Thepeople
passing these types of "morality"
laws didn't just materialize in of-
fice like some warped Star Trek
beam-me-up-Scotty episode: We
put them there. Or worse yet,
they are elected because of mea-
ger voter turnout.
So the easy yet simple solu-
tion proposed by this musical ar-
rangement is plainly stated �
register and vote!
Ourforefathersensured that
no ruling body would have com-
plete control in this country. But
the laws of the land are only effec-
tive if we all participate in the
voting process. See you at the
polls in November.
By Scott Maxwell
Libertarian party offers alternative choice
The instant Ross Perot dropped
out of the presidential race, everyone
wanted to know whether his former
supporters would vote for Bill Clinton,
George Bush or neither.
Those of you who, like me, find
neither of those alternatives appeal-
ing ought to know mat you still have
a third choice.
Actually,youhavelotsof"third"
choices, among them comedian Pat
Paulson and his running mate, Tiny
Tim. But a more serious alternative is
the Libertarian Party, whose presi-
dential candidate is Andre Marrou.
Marrou's running mate is named
Nancy Lord.
Let me note up front mat I don't
endorse the Libertarians. There are
lots of things about them I don't like.
But there are also lots of things about
them that make them worth consid-
ering as a third choice. As a sort of
public service, because 1 believe the
media shamefully ignore third par-
ties in general, I offer the foltowing
intioduction to the Libertarians.
One of the first things you notice
about Libertarian beliefsishow main-
stream most of them are. (Ignore
George Will, who recently did a
d umsy job of painting Andre Marrou
as a latter-da) enin.) The Libertar-
ians' guiding principle is a simple
one, drawn directly from documents
like the Declaration of Independence
and the Constitution: government
should keep the hell out of your life,
period.
Libertariansbeliwethatgovem-
ment has exactly two purposes: to
protect our rights and to protect
against invasion. That's it (And, for
what it's worth, that s precisely the
kind of government tne oft-invoked
Founding Fathers had in mind.)
Consequently, Libertarians be-
lieve in small government. And un-
like certain presidents I could men-
tion, they really mean it Libertarians
visualize government as a provider
of services, and, in their opinion, pri-
vate industriescould provide most of
those services for less money. Typi-
cally, only people who actually used
the services would pay for them.
Libertarianswouldeliminatethe
personal income tax (Don't scoff. I 've
tookedatthenumbers.Itcanbedone.)
Libertarians favor the right to
choose abortion, but they oppose tax-
payer funding of abortions.
Libertarians would ceaseall over-
seas militaryexpenditures,saving(by
their estimates) $150 billion per year
� about half of the present military
budget.
Libertarians would end the
govemment'shugesubsidiesofbusi-
nesses such as farms and railroads; in
their opinion, a business that can't
make it without government help,
shouldn't make it.
Libertarians would end govern-
ment-funded welfare. Private chari-
ties areexpected to fill in. Libertarians
believe strongly in the free market.
However, they oppose monopolies
� including government monopo-
lies such as the Post Office � and
polluting, which they consider, in a
broad sense, an infringement on oth-
ers' rights.
Libertariansopposeguncontrol.
Some oppose waiting periods and
other such measures and some don't;
however, all support the right of an
individual to own a firearm.
Libertarians oppose the war on
dnigs, since, in their view, no one has
a right to control what substances
another person may ingest. They're
also concerned that the drug war is
turning America into a police state.
Libertarians seek to end govern-
ment licensing of most professions,
including doctoi s and day care pro-
viders. Licensingisoneofthe services
Libertarians think should oe
privatized: let private rating services
like Consumer Reports duke it out,
they say.
Libertarians would end govern-
ment-subsidized housingand would
sharply curtail housing regulations.
In fact, Libertarians would end most
regulations, not just in the housing
industry. They see regulation as a
counterprodudivegovernmentintru-
sion into the market. Fraud is another
matter: Libertariansdecryregulation,
but they don't believe that mat gives
businesses the freedom to lie to con-
sumers about what they're getting.
While I don't endorse the Liber-
tarian Party, I can'thelp thinking that
they'd do our government a tot of
good. For Libertarians, small govern-
ment and low taxes are matters of
principle, not political expediency. In
a year when principle seems singu-
larly lacking, even by America's al-
ready low standards, that's a big plus
for them.
I wouldn't want to see Libertar-
ians running things. 1 have funda-
mental disagreements with them. But
a strong Libertarian presence in the
government�let us say a quarter to
a third of Congress, and perhaps an
occasional Libertarian president �
would help keep the Democrats and
Republicans honest, if nothing else.
Keep Libertarian candidate
Andre Marrou in mind when you
head to the ballot box this November.
(Er, you me registered, aren't you?)
As Eugene Debs said, "It is better to
voteforsomethingyouwantandtose
than to vote for something you don't
want and win
V �'
j. -�� i I
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12 The East Carolinian
AUGUST 26, 1992
AROUND THE NATION
Bell Atlantic, workers reach agreement
WASHINGTON (AD � Bell Atlantic aid unions representing
52,0X1 of its workers have reached agreement cm a three-year contract
that includes an 11.74 percent wage increase.
"This bargaining has been very intense, but we have reached
agreement and resolved ou'differences Bell Atlantic assistant vice
president Regina Novotny said Sunday.
Philadelphia-based Bell Atlantic was the last of the seven Baby
Bell regional telephone companies to reach a contract agreement.
Employees represented by the Communications Workers of America
and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers had been
working without a contract since Aug. 8.
Under the proposed contract, which must be approved by union
members, workers would get an immediate4percentpayraise,a3.74
percent increase next year and a 4 percent raise the third year.
Three killed in train wreck
WALLINGFORD, Conn. (AP) � An Amtrak passenger train
carrying about 100 passengers slammed into a car at a crossing
without signals, killing three people in the car, police said.
No one on the New Haven-bound train was injured Sunday,
police said.
Amtrak spokesman Patrick Mead said the engineer saw the car
cross the tracks on a private access road leading to a cemetery,
sounded the horn and used the emergency brakebut couldn't stop in
time.
Mead said the average speed for a train in that area is about 80
mph, but the train wasn't going that fast because it had just stopped
in Wallingford, about 15 miles north of New Haven.
Police director defends officers
NEWARK, N.J. (AP) � Two off-duty police officers returning
from a bachelor party were justified in shooting two teen-agers to
death because the officers thought their lives were in danger, Police
Director William Celester said.
"You're not going to take any chances with your life Celester
said Sunday.
Police said Barry Shelton, 18, pointed a pistol at Officer Darnel
White early Saturday after driving the youths' car nearly into the
officers' vehicle at an intersection. White identified himself as an
officer, but Shelton continued raising the gun and White shot him
once in the chest, police said.
White and Officer Arnold Bell then fired after the fleeing car,
shooting Michael Chapman, 16. The officers said later they thought
they saw the youths in the car reach down for weapons.
Celester said the officers had had at least one drink each at the
bachelor party, but were not drunk.
Gas prices increase
LOS ANGELES (AP)�Gasoline prices roseslightly nationwide
during the past two weeks, an industry analyst said.
The average price for all grades of full- and self-service gasoline
was $1.1957 a gallon as of Aug. 21, Trilby Lundberg said Sunday.
At self-service stations, regular unleaded was $1.1378 a gallon.
President unveils job-training program
UNION, N.J. (AP)�President
Bush Tuesday proposed about $10
billion in new federal spending for
job-training programs for laid-off
workers, people in danger of losing
their jobs and young Americans.
The programs would take ef-
fect in 1994.
"It is bold, innovative and it is
loyal only to the future and to the
American worker Bush sa id in an-
nouncing the proposal duringa cam-
paign stop at a vocational training
center in Union.
The plan would combine both
new and formerly proposed pro-
grams with several existing ones
under an umbrella grouping to be
known as the New Century
Workforce. It incorporates about $4
billion in spendingthatalready was
planned over the next five years.
Speaking to about 700 students
and faculty members inside a
cinderblock mechanics shop at the
Lincoln Technical Institute, Bush
said his plan was designed to make
American workers more capable of
adapting to shifting job markets.
"We know the global economy
is changing, and we must change
with it he said.
Bush said priority for inclusion
in the youth training program �
including people providing the
training�would go to former mem-
bers of the U.S. military, which is
layingoffthousandsof people. That
brought rousing cheers from his
audience.
Bush took a jab at Democratic
nominee Bill Clinton. He accused
his opponent of an economic pro-
gram that would "destroy jobs He
said Qinton has proposed $60 bil-
lion in defense budget cuts beyond
those already proposed by the Bush
administration, and that this would
throw 1 million defense industry
employees out of work.
Bush's expanded plan is part of
the administration response to criti-
cism that its recent North American
Free Trade Agreementwith Canada
and Mexico would cost American
jobs.
Agents surround cabin of white supremacist
NAPLES, Idaho (AP) � Au-
thorities Tuesday said they hoped
for a peaceful ending as they main-
tained their cordon around the re-
mote mountain home of a fugitive
white supremacist where a U.S.
marshal was killed.
At least 100 federal agents, state
police and sheriff's deputies were
posted around Randy Weaver's
cabin. Police surrounded it imme-
diately after the marshal was fatally
shot Friday.
Weaver, 44, and his family have
been at the log home in northern
Idaho, 40 miles south of the Cana-
dian border, since February 1991,
when he failed to appear for trial on
a federal weapons charge.
"They're still hoping for a peace-
ful negotiation on this thing. They're
holding their positions" around the
cabin, Marshal Service spokesman
TomConnorsaid today from Wash-
ington, D.C.
Officials disclosed Sunday that
shots were exchanged Saturday
night. Nobody was hurt, said Mar-
shal Service spokeswoman Joyce
McDonald.
Meanwhile, federal arrest war-
rants issued in Boise named Kevin
Harris, 24, as the person believed to
have killed U.S. Marshal William F.
Degan. Weaver was accused in a
second wairant of assaulting a
deputy marshal
Harris is a longtime friend of
Weaver's and has lived at the cabin
for several years.
Degan, of Quincy, Mass was
shot while conducting surveillance
on the cabin. Officers have kept the
cabin under surveillance on and off
for about a year.
Agents were reluctant to storm
the cabin for fear of harming others
believed inside,includingWeaver's
wife, Vicki, and their four children,
ages 8 months to 14 years.
Officials believed the cabin was
well-stocked withfood,supplies and:
weapons. It has neither electricity
nor a telephone.
Federal agents have said that
Weaver, an avowed racist, has ties
to the Aryan Nations, a white su-
premacist group based in northern
Idaho.
Dozens of Weaver's neighbors
and friends, some wearingswasrika
patches and pins,stageda vigilSun-
day at a roadblock to protest the
siege.
Husband saves wife's life by donating kidney
MAYWOOD, 111. (AP)�Robert
Moberly knew when he wed his wife
11 years ago that they were the perfect
match-Ittumedouttheir kidneys were,
too.
Doctors last week transplanted
one of Moberhs kidneys into his ail-
ing wife, Corinn, who suffered from
renal disease brought on by diabetes.
Doctors said the chances that a
married couple would have biologi-
caDy compatible kidneys wereoneina
niillkxvbuttreMoberrysbeattoeodds.
"They called us up four months
ago to let us know that I was compat-
ible and said, These things don't hap-
pen" said Moberly, 45. T said, 'Yes,
they do
Compatibility depends on com-
binatkraofantigens,proteinsthattrig-
ger a disease-fighting response when
identical ones don'talready exist That
can result in a transplanted organ be-
ing rejected by a recipient's body.
The Moberrys shared four of six
antigen combinations�a better rate
than most siblings, doctors said.
TretransplantoccurredatLoyola
University Medical Center on Thurs-
day. Moberly was in good condition
Sunday, while Mrs. Moberly, 40, was
in serious condition, said spokesman
MikeMaggio.
The chances her body would re-
ject the kidney were less than 10 per-
cent, said Dr. Gordon Kinzfer, whq
helped with the operation.
Without tf�e transplant, Mrs
Moberly, who will continue taking
insulin, probably would have died
within five years, said Linda Lisk- .
Skuba, a post-transplant coordinator
at Loyola.
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AUGUST 26, 1992
The East Carolinian 13
Chinese gangs operating triad in the U.S Canada
HONG KONG (AP) � A gang
of former Chinese soldiers that spe-
cializes in drugs, smuggling and
credit card fraud is the latest ex-
ample of a troubling migration of
criminals from Hong Kong and
China to North America.
In testimony before the U.S.
Senate Subcommittee on Investiga-
tions in June, the loosely knit gang,
called the Big Circle Boys, was said
to be active in Canada, New York
Gty, Washington, D.C Los Ange-
les, Hong Kong and Communist
China.
According to the testimony, the
gang imported 800 to 1,200 pounds
of heroin into the United States be-
tween 1988 and 1990 for an esti-
mated profit of $72 million. In 1990,
the Drug Enforcement Administra-
tion arrested several gang members
in New York with $8.6 million in
casn.
American law enforcement of-
ficials believe the gang is led by a
naturalized American citizen, a
woman who was born in Vietnam
and was once married to a retired
high-ranking Hong Kong police of-
ficer.
The gang traces its roots back to
Hong Kong in the mid-1970s when
out-of-work Chinese immigrants�
veterans of the People's Liberation
Army and the Red Guard, the shock
troops of the late Mao Tse-tung's
ultra-leftist Cultural Revolution �
began pulling off violent robberies.
"Many of the Big Circle Boys
were wanted men in China, hard-
ened criminals who had sneaked
into Hong Kong as illegal migrants,
or ex-Red Guards with a history of
violence and frustration behind
them historian Lynn Pan wrote in
"Sons of the Yellow Emperor: The
Story of the Overseas Chinese
"Some of them had even had mili-
tary training in China, and are adept
at handling firearms and at hand-
to-hand combat"
InHongKong, law enforcement
officials blame the gang for a string
of jewelry shop robberies in which
they used grenades issued by
China's People's Liberation Army.
The gang has recently begun mus-
cling in on the movie industry, the
traditional bailiwick of the Sun Yee
On, a triad, or Hong Kong-based
criminal organization with roots in
the 19th-century movement to over-
throw China's Qing dynasty.
In this century, however, the
triads have degenerated into crimi-
nal organizations.
In China, the gang has formed
alliances with the 14K triad to oper-
ate prostitution rings and karaoke
bars in the southern provincial capi-
tal of Canton. "Big Circle" is Chi-
nese slang for Canton.
Canadian police say the Big
Grcle Boys were responsible for a
large proportion of the $50 million
in credit card fraud in that country
last year. Bogus credit cards, cour-
tesy of the gang, have also surfaced
inNewYorkary,WashingtoaD.G
and Los Angeles.
"A great many of them are, in
my opinion, criminally brilliant, es-
pecially when one considers they
are currently progressing through
their criminal infancy in North
America said Detective Kenneth
Yates, head of the Strategic Intelli-
gence Section of Canada's Asian
Investigative Unit
In 1990, Canadian police broke
up an alien smuggling ring led by
the Big Circle Boys. The ring, which
brought 1,200 illegal Chinese aliens
into Canada and the United States
overa two-year period�atacostof
about $20,000 a head � was linked
to theFukChing,orFukienese Youth
gang, one of the most violent street
gangs in New York City.
Asian-Americans were the fast-
est-growing group in the United
States between 1980 and 1990, in-
creasing from 15 percent to 2.9 per-
centof the population,or 7.3 million
people. In Canada, Hong Kong is
the No. 1 source of immigrants.
TheU.S.Immigrationand Natu-
ralization Service estimates that
30,000 illegal aliens from mainland
China have been smuggled into the
United States since the mid-1980s.
Manyof them end up as indentured
servants for gangs such as the
Fukienese Youth. If they can't pay
offthesmugglingcosttheyareoften
kidnapped and sometimes killed.
"As time goes by, the
kidnappings aspecthasdoubled and
tripled said Lt JosephPollinLwho
heads the newly created Asian
Crime Investigation Unit of New
York's policedepartment "Theonly
difference is now the violence seems
to be a little bit more intense. In the
last two cases they've killed the vic-
tims in both kidnappings
The traditional view holds that
the BigCircle Boys, along with other
Hong Kong-based criminal organi-
zations,arefleeingthisBritish colony
in the run-up toCommunistChina's
takeover in 1997.
But actually, law enforcement
officials say, the criminals are only
diversifying their operations. Tak-
ing a cuefrom the territory's big
business,thegangsarekeepingtheir
interests in Hong Kong while they
expand to China and overseas.
Unlike the Mafia, Asian crimi-
nal organizations are generally de-
centralized, operating in small cells
of 10 to 20 men. That facilitates di-
versification abroad.
Neither the United States nor
Canada has enacted tough legisla-
tion against alien smuggling, a spe-
cialty of tf�e Asian gangs.
InSeptemberl990,forexample,
the Immigrationand Naturalization
Service sold two leading Hong Kong
alien smugglers 10 bogus "green"
cards, which give an immigrant the
right to reside permanently in the
United States.
The men were convicted of
fraudulerttuseofimmigrationdocu-
ments and were sentenced to 60
days and fined $60,000 each. They
are now back in Hong Kong and
back in business, American law en-
forcement agents said. To add in-
sult to injury, the men sold the bo-
gus cards for a net profit of $680,000.
Deportation of foreign crimi-
nals�acomrnonwaytofightcrirne
�is apparently not an option with
criminals from mainland China.
Neither Canada nor the United
States has ever deported anyone to
China, because of the political rami-
fications of sending someone back
to a communist country. t
INS sources say several Chi-
nese-bom triad members in the
United States have turned in their
British-Hong Kong passports for
Chinese passports to avoid poten-
tial deportation.
WASHINGTON (AP) �
Five Mideast delegations are
gathering here for a sixth round
of peace talks that likely will
include the issue of Palestinian
self-rule in Israeli occupied ter-
ritories.
Delegations from Israel, Jor-
dan, Lebanon and Syria were in
Washington on Sunday for talks
scheduled to begin today.
A Palestinian delegation was
en route after being delayed by
a two-day dispute with Israel
Palestinian self-rule
over travel restrictions for six
delegation aides.
The Palestinians arrived
Sunday in Amman, Jordan, and
were expected to arrive in Paris
early today for their flight to
Washington.
The senior Palestinian nego-
tiator, Haidar Abdul Shafi, al-
ready is in Washington and met
Friday with Assistant Secretary
of State Edward P. Djerejian,
who will handle day-to-day U.S.
strategy.
The talks are the first under
Israel's new prime minister,
Yitzhak Rabin, who has slowed
Jewish settlements on the West
Bank, one of the major issues in
the talks.
They also are the first with-
out Secretary of State James A.
Baker III, who resigned to be-
come chief of staff and chief cam-
paign adviser to President Bush.
One key question in these
talks is whether the Palestinians
would be willing to accept iim-
ited self-rule for the time being.
Rabin's plan for Palestinian
self-rule involves electing an ad-
ministrative authority through
which the Palestinians would
run their day-to-day affairs. Is-
rael would still maintain order
in the territories, where some
115,000 Jews live among 1.7 mil-
lion Palestinian Arabs.
Israel will propose forming
subcommittees to negotiate
which responsibilities Palestin-
ians would assume under in-



terim self-rule, the respected Is-
raeli daily Haaretz reported to-
day.
And, the newspaper said, Is-
rael will announce its readiness
to negotiate on the basis of U.N.
Resolution 242, which calls for
Israeli withdrawal from occu-
pied land in return for peace.
Israel's previous hardline
government told Syria the reso-
lution didn't apply to the Golan
Heights, which Israel captured
in the 1967 Middle East War and
later annexed. Syria wants the
Golan returned.
Sunday, Rabin announced a
series of measures to encourage
the latest round of negotiations.
They included releasing 800
Palestinian prisoners who are
nearing the end of their sen-
tences, easing travel restrictions
into Israel for Arabs from occu-
pied territories and unsealing
rooms in houses shut as punish-
ment for activists.
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� -





14 The East Carolinian
AUGUST 26, 1992
Fighting in Yugoslavia intensifies as peace talks begin
SARA1EVO. Bosnia- TVicnia'cotkrrCJ,r ki C�� .i . . i . .i . . � .
SARAJEVO, Bosnia
Herzegovina (AT) � The capital's
defenders suffered heavy casualties
in what appeared to be a last-ditch
attempt to gain ground before peace
talks begin. Bosnia's president
vowed that "Sarajevo shall survive
President Alija Lzetbegovic told
reporters Sunday that his forces had
made headway on the west side of
the city, where they were trying to
reach Sarajevo's airport, now under
U.N. control. But government mili-
tary officials gave mixed signals.
U.N. peacekeepers closed the
airport to aid flights after shells hit
the runway.
Zaim Hakovic, deputy com-
mander of Bosnian government
forces, said his men were trying to
break out west of the airport to link
up with their comrades outside
town.
Dr. Arif Smajk c, head of the
Bosnian Ministry of Health, said
Sunday that 46 people were killed
and 303 wounded in the previous 24
hours of fighting in Bosnia, includ-
ing 22 dead and 100 wounded in
Sarajevo.
Smajkic said the city's main
hospital had no water or electricity.
Many wounded, mostly soldiers
with serious wounds, were being
brought in.
"It is very critical at this mo-
ment he said. "We need water for
operations, and we don't haveany
The president said that even it
the new offensive failed, his forces
would fight on.
"Sarajevo shall survive he
said. "We shall fight many, many
months more
Bosnia'sethnic Serbs, who want
to remain part of Serb-dominated
Yugoslavia, rebelled after the
republic's majorityCroatsand Mus-
lims voted for independenceon Feb.
29. Serbs now control two-thirds of
Bosnia-Herzegovina.
At least 8,000 people have been
killed, but recent estimates by U.S.
Senate investigators put the total at
up to 35,000. About 1.3 million
people have become refugees, many
in "ethnic cleansing" campaigns to
empty regions of unwanted ethnic
groups.
ThroughoutSaturdaynightand
Sunday, explosions and heavy ma-
chine-gun fire could be heard
throughout Sarajevo. Shells landed
near the main Kosevo hospital in
the city center, around government
offices and on the west side.
A mortar crashed into the sec-
ond floor of a student hostel in the
old city, killing at least two people
and wounding several others.
lzetbegovic planned to attend
the peace conference set for today in
London, organized by the European
Community and the United Nations
to find a solution to conflicts in
Bosnia and other former Yugoslav
republics.
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' -
HMNfipfcMMM"
MHMII Ml IMIMttMl Ml I
The East Carolinian
August 26, 1992
Lifestyle
Page 17
Photos by Dail Reed � The East Carolinian
The Red Hot Chili Peppers headlined Lollapalooza this year. The band proved and, furthermore, increased
their reputation as one of the hottest bands on the music scene during their hour and a half set.
The apple of our eyes
By Dana Danielson
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Dancing, music, singing
and sporting are allways North
Carolinians will celebrate the
Red Delicious, Rome Beauty
and Golden Delicious apple in
September.
The 46th annual North
Carolina Apple Festival will be
a four day celebration honor-
ing the apples and apple-grow-
ers in the state.
The activities will be lo-
cated in Hendersonville, which
is in the sixth largest apple-pro-
ducing county in the nation.
The celebration .will be held
Sept. 4 -7.
The highlights of the four
day event should keep every-
one entertained.
Seven blocks of Main Street
will be packed with crafters,
food, apple products and con-
tinuous free entertainment on
two stages.
Western Carolina will come
to life as a locomotive replica
chugs through the area's most
interesting depots and land-
scape.
Hendersonville's Model
Railroad Club will be proud to
show off their new home in
Hendersonville's restored de-
pot.
Check it out!
Tickets to the Apple Festival, applications and
further information is available at the Visitors
Information Center, 739 North Main Street,
Hendersonville, or call 704-693-9708 or 800-
824244.
Programs, craft demon-
strations, display exhibits,
micromounts, refreshments
and merchandise for sale will
be a part of the 11th Annual
Gem and Mineral Spectacular.
Two of the weekend morn-
ings will feature apple break-
fasts from a hearty country
menu.
They will be hosted by the
Kiwanis and Lions Clubs.
The Apple Festival Art
Show will offer new and cre-
ative ideas for any collector's
gallery or home.
Also, the Opportunity
House Arts & Crafts Fair will
feature traditional exhibits in
an air-conditioned building.
An Open Softball Tourna-
ment will be open to the Ama-
teur Softball Association sanc-
tion team in any division. Ad-
mission is free.
Start or add to your trad-
ing card collection from the
Apple Festival Sports Card
Show. Admission is $1.
Enter a favorite apple
recipe or see the winning en-
tries �ttheold-fashioned Apple
Recipe Contest. Participate in
the auction or take home one of
the recipes.
General Johnon and the
Chairman of the Board will per-
form at the Shaggin' Under the
Stars dance. The event is free.
The Apple Festival Kiddie
Carnival will entertain kids
with carnival games, creating
art, food, clowns, puppeteers
and more.
A Mountain Music Jambo-
ree will include Appalachian
style clogging and mountain
folklore storytelling.
To top off the Festival, the
King Apple Parade will light
up the streets with floats,
clowns, fire trucks, bands, dig-
nitaries and plenty of fun.
The sounds of the Big Band
Era will end the apple festival
with a dinner dance.
Inside Lifestyle
Theatre
Movies
B(H)ks
IKMusk
20,26IV
22Video
25
24
26
Chili Peppers and others rock at
Lollapalooza '92!
By Bill Walker
Staff Writer
My mission was to define
Lollapalooza.
This was a simple-sounding
task, or so 1 thought. All 1 had to do
was go toa music festival in Raleigh
Aug. 18 and report the happenings.
No problem.
Lollapalooza is a celebration of
the counter-culture evolution.
Thirty years ago, when Woodstock
rocked the world with visions of
hippies, acid, sex, music and other
deviantactions,thecounter-culture
was recognized. Lollapalooza con-
tinues the tradition.
Perry Ferrell, founder of the '91
event, designed Lollapalooza '92 to
be bigger and better than the year
before. The idea was to provide
those who attended with total en-
tertainment all day long.
The first Lollapalooza '92 band
on stage was Lush, female rock 'n
roll at its finest and simplest. The
ladies warmed the stage and set the
tone for the events to come.
When Lush finished their set, I
went out to wait in the long beer
line. Two old acquaintances and 20
minutes later, I was rewarded with
a fair-priced $3.75 draft treat. Thun-
der rumbled, peoplebegan to panic
and sound boomed out of the the-
ater asl realizedPearlJamhad taken
the stage.
Running towards my seat with
beer dribbling over the edge of my
cup, 1 fumbled for my ticket stub.
On the way, my ticket was checked
by three ushers (nosecurity breeches
at this show), and I felt the multi-
decibel hootenany of Pearl Jam.
Eddie Vedder and his bad bovs
They members of Jesus and Mary Chain
looked too stoned to be in a McDonald's
drive-thru much less a major music festival.
of alternative rock sent the crowd
into a frenzy of head-banging and
hootin Pearljam'ssoundwaspure,
loud, clear-pumping rock 'n roll.
Vedder was responsible for
perhaps the crux of Lollapalooza.
During an instrumental jam,he took
a stage dive into the crowd and
pulled a black man with dreadlocks
onto the stage. The man held up his
shirt which read "Racism Sucks
The crowd roared and I saw more
peace signs go up than an anti-war
demonstration.The feelingwasofa
re-birth and generational hope.
Anyway, the man (Mike Pinns
or Pitts or something) proceeded to
take up a seat behind the drummer.
Vedder and the rowdy boys of Pearl
Jam sen t a message across the stage
of Lollapalooza that will not soon
be forgotten.
Pearl Jam finished up with a
bang so I headed out to the barrage
of info-tainment attractions.
Lollapalooza's main distin-
guishing feature is its diverse array
of activities. Stage 2000 was one
such time killer. Stage 2000 was
smaller and hosted local talent at
Lollapalooza. By the time we made
it to the Stage the third band, Crush-
Fest, had begun. Imagine a Zulu
chief, a Jackhammer man, a
flamethrower, two oversized drum
sets, a guitar player (barely) in a G-
string, and a skinhead lead singer
screamer wearing candy-striped
slacks. Having a hard time? So was
listening to Crush Fest's noise.
I walked away from Stage 2000
with a loud ring in my ears and a
nauseating sensation in my rummy.
I returned to my seat via one of the
sprinklers provided for sweaty
Lollapaloozers. Jesus and Mary
Chain had taken the stage.
Every member of theband wore
sunglasses. They looked too stoned
to be in a McDonald's drive-thru
much less a major music festival.
But as usual, looks proved deceiv-
ing as Jesus and Mary Chain shared
their innovative approach to alter-
native rock.
I got up to walk around and
investigate all of Lollapalooza's of-
ferings. A large tent on the theater's
west side presented different gov-
ernmentalpublic freedom-type
booths.
I walked over to the High Times
booth. The folks from HT dis-
playedvended articles from pure
hemp bracelets to T-shirts with "Free
the Weed" on them. 1 headed out to
find the essence of Lollapalooza:
the Lollapaloozer.
People-watching was popular
and widely practiced at
Lollapalooza '92.Thecrowd seemed
to represent the evolution of the
counter-culture hippies at
Woodstock. I concluded that 30
years of hippie evolution produced
Lollapalooza.
The noise from Soundgarden
reminded me of the main event. I
See Lollapalooza, page 19
ECV Summer Theatre:
Wit darkness, terror and mystery, Dracula takes the stage in ECU's
Summer tlieatre presentation ofBram Stoker's chilling work.
Photo courtesy J. D. Whitmire
The East Carolina Playhouse's Summer Theatre closed its season with the presentation of Bram Stoker's
dark and mysterious "Dracula The superb performance ended a spectacular season for this year's theatre.
Vampin' it:
Summer Theatre continues
vampire tradition with 'Dracula'
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Forhundredsof years, themyth
of vampires has persisted through
the oral tradition and written word
handed down from generation to
generation.
The East Carolina Playhouse's
Summer Theatreopened its lastrun
wi th a modern and compell ing look
into this age-old superstition.
Based on Bram Stoker's infa-
mous novel, Dracula, William Kelly
has written a script that brings all of
Stoker's literary expertise and turns
it into a suspenseful production.
John Shearin, director of
"Dracula has worked together
with lighting designer lay Herzog
and set designer Bob Alpers to cre-
ate a somber and threatening atmo-
sphere.
Justin Deas, whom most will
remember from his television days,
chilled audiences with his aristo-
cratic, yet superbly erotic Lord
Dracula. Though only 5'8" in real
life, Deas' stature on stage is unri-
valed and reigns supreme through-
out the entire play.
Donn Youngstrom comple-
mented Deas perfectly as the Ger-
man doctor, Van Helsing, in their
ying-yang, good-vs-evil relation-
ship. Youngstrom's accent is flaw-
less (right down to the click of
bootheels) and his spirited perfor-
mance as the diametrical opposite
of evil serves to leave the audience
with the vision that good can tri-
umph.
Tom Spivey, as the straight-
laced real estate assistant turned
into an insect-earing lunatic, steals
many a scene with his insane but
meaningful dialogue.
Kelly deHaas rounded out the
major characters with her consis-
tent performance as Dracula's
would-be queen, Mina Harker.
DeHaas once again portrays an act-
ing stabilitv and versatility that
should ensure that audiences will
see her again in the near future.
Stageeffects abound in this pro-
duction and for the most part leave
the audience's heart pounding
in anticipation.
For those who were unfamiliar
with this horror classic, this pro-
duction served as a superblv sus-
penseful introduction.
I-





18 The East Carolinian
AUGUST 26 . 1992
ECU
UPCOMING
EVENTS
FOR
PLAY
:�use
"Skin of Our Teeth" will run
Oct. 15-20, with a Sunday mati-
nee at 2 p.m. Two stand-outs for
this production are a new cur-
tain time of 8 p.m. and a set
designed by student Matt
Genezco.
"Amahl and the Night Visi-
tors" will run Dec. 3-8 with mati-
nees on Saturday and Sunday (in
addition to the Saturday evening
performance). This holiday play
is guaranteed to delight any and
all audiences.
"Monday After the Miracle"
will run Feb. 11-16, with a Sun-
day matinee. This sequel to The
Miracle Worker' is guaranteed
to be an emotional lookatHelen
Keller's life.
Directed by Ced ric VVinchell,
"Romeo and Juliet" wili run
April 22-27. Along with a Sun-
day matinee, there will be two
additional matinees geared for
highschool students the follow-
ing Monday and Tuesday.
Playhouse takes on Wilder and Shakespeare and guarantees
A season full of exciting drama
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
For ticket prices and more information, call the
Messick Theater Arts center at 757-6390.
Drama has lasted throughout
the years because of the quality of
the plays that have served as both
past and contemporary classics.
Playwrights such as Thorton
Wilder, William Shakespeare and
Arthur Millerhavegivenhumanity
realistic glimpses intoitself time and
rime again.
In the 1992-93 season, the East
Carolina Playhouse will use Wilder
and Shakespeare as bookends to
open and close their mainstage sea-
son, with the famous Dance The-
ater as an addend.
Opening up the season is
Thorton Wilder's "Skin of Our
Teeth Set in 1942, the play "deals
with the conflict of man's potential
for self-destruction and his urge to
build and rebuild said director
John Shearin.
The play has often been de-
scribed by critics as "turning hand-
springs through human history A
comedy with its fair share of dark
humor, "Skin of Our Teeth" ex-
pounds on the universal theme of
humanity as a driving force in the
world.
Just in time for the holidays
will be Jian Carlo Menotti's Christ-
mas piece, "Amahl and the Night
Visitors With music and libretto
by Menotti, this play centers around
"lessons about unselfishness and
altruistic behavior in the faceof pov-
erty said Shearin.
Along with "Skin of Our Teeth"
and "Amahl and the Night Visi-
tors the curtain time has been
changed to 8 p.m. for all night per-
formances.
In cooperation with the School
of Music, Gary Byrd will direct the
stageaspectsand Clyde Hisswillbe
directing the music of this seasonal
musical theater piece.
To start the spring semester,
the Playhouse will host a run of
"Monday After the Miracle writ-
ten by Will Gibson. An ostensible
sequel to "The Miracle Worker
this play chronicles Helen Keller's
emergence into sexuality and as a
woman. Described as a "hot, pas-
sionate play" by Shearin, "Monday
After the Miracle" is sure to grab the
audience's emotions.
The last play of the 1992-93 sea-
son (though not the last mains tage)
will be WilliamShakespeare's time-
less classic, "Romeo and Juliet
The well-known and age-old
story of star-crossed lovers and all
their trials of being together is one
that has delighted audiences for
years. The Montague-Capulet feud
is one that has made the history
books and is sure to serve as an
excellent finale to the schedule.
Rounding out the season, the
renowned Dance Theater will once
again play to packed houses its en-
tire run.
Instructors from the Dance
Department will choreograph stu-
dents in dance numbers, combin-
ing dance and music with grace and
beauty, promising a night to re-
member.
m
COUPON
Our Gift To You-Now Thru Sept. IS, 1992
Must
present
this
coupon
20 OFF
ANY ONE ITEM IN OUR STORE
(excluding videos)
Christian Bookstore
. 300 Plaza Drive - Behind Peppi's Pizza ,
Ride With ECU Pride N,�Z2r
license plates available
Faculty & Students
WELCOME BACK
EAOTC
Wellington B. Gray Gallery
EAST CABaLINAUmVERSITY
L OF ART
in
We have a full season of activities
planned for you!
Monday - Saturday 10 AM - 5 PM
Thursday evenings until 8 PM
The divisions of motor ve-
hicles for North Carolina
and Virginia are offering
license plates emblazoned
with the East Carolina Uni-
versity logo. The
North Carolina colle-
giate plate will be
manufactured on the
"First in Flight" blank
The cost of the collegiate
plate is $25.00 plus the
state's annual registration
fee.
The N.C. Division of
Motor Vehicles will begin
manufacturing the plates
when they have received 300
requests. The Virginia plates
will be made once the DMV
has received
150
requests.
To request your North
Carolina collegiate plate,
write: DMV, Vehicle Regis-
tration Section, Collegiate
License Plates Dept 1100
New Bern Ave Raleigh,
NC 27697-0001, or call
919-733-7510. Include
your name, address and
telephone number, and
state your request for an
ECU license plate. Do
not send payment at
this time.
For details on
how to order your Virginia
collegiate plate, write: Don
Leggett, Office of Alumni
Affairs, Taylor-Slaughter
Alumni Center, ECU,
Greenville, NC 27854353.
r ?-
WELCOME BACK ECU!
llJH7iY4
Rave
CLASSICS NIGHT
$3.00 Members $4.00 Guests
0 DRAFT ALL NIGHT!
$2.50 Teas & Bahama Mamas � 504 Jello Shots � 754 Kamikazes
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$1.00 16 oz Cans � $2.50 Pitchers � $2.50 Teas Sc Bahama Mamas
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FREE Admission for All 7 til 9:00
$2.50 Teas, Bahama Mamas & Pitchers � 50$ Jeib Shots � 75c Kamakazes � 75$ 100 M.P.H.
TOEeKE�d DRNoE paRTY
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COUNTRY NIGHT
04 DRAFT
The Best in Country & Country Rock Music All Night!
GREENVILLE
FUN PARK
GO KART RIDES
ARCADE GAME ROOM
PARTIES
GROUP RATES
New Minimum Height Requirement: 52 Inches
DOUBLE KARTS Available for the Little Ones
Located 1 mile north of the new Pitt County Fairgrounds
on Hwy. 264 and Old Creek Road
COMING SOON
Miniture Golf � Slick Tracks
Bumper Boats
For Hours and more info, call
757-1800
�PniniiiMiruqwim
�MMHBi MMf
Mwiji�l.iPM' ii.i �





AUGUST 26, 1992
The East Carolinian 19
Lollapalooza
Continued from page 17
Photos by Dail Used � The East Carolinian
The strange sights and
rockin sounds of
Lollapalooza '92
thrilled thousands
at Walnut Creek�
Lush (lower left), a female rock 'n'
roll band, opened the music festival.
Pearl Jam (upper left) then came
crashing onto the stage, sending
waves of enthusiasm through the
already-frenzied crowd. Jesus and
Mary Chain (lower right) came next
and provided their own innovative
approach to alternative music.
Soundgarden, a Seattle-based
band, cranked out hard rocking
tunes. Bringing musical diversity,
Ice Cube really brought the crowd
together. Finally, the Red Hot Chili
Peppers danced their way onto the
stage and brought the music festival
to a spectacular climax.
tixk mv seat as they dove into their
first song. The fans ni this hard-
edged Seattle rock band went wild.
The banging of heads produced a
mesmerizing wave of enthusiasm.
Soundgarden rolled on through a
long, loud set of adrenaline-based
rock.
I headed out for another fair
priced beerand a reasonably priced
gvro (S3). By this point, the Miller
Brewing Company had taken its
tol I on the 21 and older crowd. Bod-
ies were randomly strewn across
the area purging, belching, sleep-
ing and otherwise enjoying the cel-
ebration.
1 meandered through thecrowd
and found mvself in front of thejim
Rose Circus of Freaks.
This entourage of oddities and
illusions contained many freakish
people. Lifto was a man who lifted
cinderblocks and irons on his
nipples, nose, tongue, ears and
other pierced sections of his
anatomy.
Other peculiarities included the
human dartboard (self-explana-
tory), What-is-it-man, Mr. Torture,
and other carefully assembled
freaks of nature. The audience
oohed, aahed, vucked and some
even fainted. The Jim RoseCircus of
Freaks delivered just what it prom-
ised fre.ikr-
The ground shook with vulca-
nic magnitude announcing the ar-
rival of Ice Cube. He took several
polls to see whether the right side
was louder than the left, women
louder than men, North Carolina
louder than South and so on. What
Ice Cube did bring to the stage was
the much needed variety that is the
essenceof Lollapalooza. In addition
hebroughtoutsomeof theold NWA
antics with his aside into "Gangster,
Gangster IceCube's popularity of-
fered hope in this generation's abil-
ity to overlook racial differences.
By far the loudest thing at the
festival was the grungy-sounding
hard-rockof Seattle-based Ministry.
This industrial group set the crowd
off. The psychedelic set complete
with video compliments and ani-
mal skeletons looked great with the
setting sun. When Al Jourgensen
left the stage with his band, the an-
ticipation mounted for the Red Hot
Chili Feppers.
A blackcurtain totally obscured
any visionoftheChiliPeppers while
they pumped out a loud jammin'
sound check. The crowd was ec-
static and the tension mounted.
Finally, a few popping bass
notes began their set. The curtain
split and revealed Anthony Kiedi-
dressed in a black and white check-
erboard suit with a white hat and
sunglasses. "Give it Away" was
the first tune.
The Chili Pepper's style and
rep u ta tion ca n (n Iy be preceded by
their outrageous stage presence.
Thev give more life to their music
with jumping and dancing than
they do with lyrics or music. How-
ever, their talent becameevident as
they improved their way through
several oxygen breaks for Mr.
Kiedis.
The Chili Peppers ended their
hour and a half set with a rendition
of Jimi Hendrix's Crosstown Traf-
fic, Chili Pepper style. Each mem-
ber wore a safari hat with a lit torch
affixed at the top, proving that the
Chili Peppers are the hottest act of
present day rock 'n roll.
After it was all seen and done,
1 had completed my mission.
Lollapalooza is a celebration
and evolution of the youthful
counter-culture and its continuing
directive � to live by learning and
learn by living.
Save Time
save stamps, too!
Pay your utility bill at the following banks:
BB&T
CENTURA
EAST CAROLINA BANK
FIRST CITIZENS
NEW EAST BANK
LCB
WACHOVIA. X
11 1Z 1
8 4
7 6 5.
Call GREENVILLE UTILITIES
at 551-1539 for more information.
PLAZA BP SERVICE
Complete Automotive Service
CAR WASH
with this coupon only
expires October 3 i, 992
701 E, Greenville Blvd.
756-7616





�-��� �fc :eww
20 The East Carolinian
AUGUST 26. 1992
�v
Playing at Buccaneer Movies, 756-3307:
Unforgiven (R) - Clint Eastwood, Morgan Freeman, Gene Hackman, Richard
Harris. Brings back the old Westerns in a way that hasn't been seen recently
Eastwood stars, directs and produces the film.
Mo' Money (R) - Damon Wayans, Marlon Wayans. The star of TV hit "In
Uving Color directs this romance-comedy about two brothers scammine and
having a good time. One nightly performance only.
a .WhisPers in ?" Dark (pG) - Alan Alda plays a good supporting role in this
thriller about a psychiatrist who gets involved with a man who is dating one of her
patients. One nightly performance only.
Rapid Fire (R) � Brandon Lee, Powers Boothe. Lee, son of Bruce Lee stars
m this action-adventure of a murder witness hunted by the FBI and the mob.
Playing at Carolina East Cinemas, 756-1449:
Single White Female (R) - Bridget Fonda, Jennifer Jason Leigh. Fonda
invites Leigh to live with her and discovers everyone's worst nightmare about
new roommates.
A League of Their Own (PG) - Tom Hanks, Geena Davis Madonna. Two
sisters leave their dairy farm to play major league baseball during World War II
Hanks and the rest of the cast provide a home run comedy. i
3 Ninjas (PG) � Three young boys train with their grandfather in martial
arts and are then called upon to help their father capture a bad guv Familv
entertainment guaranteed to please the most discriminating kid '
Boomerang (R) - Eddie Murphy, Robin Givens, Martin Lawrence, David Alan
Gner. Murphy plays a Cassanova who gets his just desserts by Givens
Diggstown (R) � Louis Gossett, Jr James Woods. Gossett plays a middle-aeed
boxer who teams up with Woods to pull a scam on a small-town businessman by
boxing ten guys m 24 hours. One nightly performance only.
Playing at Plaza Cinema, 756-0088:
A�2i!a�h BDeCvme HeriPG"113) -Goldie Hawn, Bruce Willis, MerylStreep. Special
effects by Robert Zemeckis highlight this film. �����
Raising Cain (R) -John Lithgow, Lolita Davidovich. Lithgow stars in Brian
DePalma latest thriller. One nightly performance only
Stay Tuned (PG) - John Ritter, Pam Dawber. The story of a suburban couple
who get sucked into a hellish version of cable TV. One nightly performance oSy
Christopher Columbus (PG-13) - Marlon Brando, Tom Selleck George
rK5are' ?eJ Ward- Me�6 �d nya snd produce this lavish masterpiece
chronicling the famous explorer's epic trip and his discovery of the New World.
Playing at Park Theater, 752-7649:
Lethal Weapon 3 - Danny Glover, Joe Pesci, Mel Gibson. Glover and Gibson
team up once again in the third sequel to their box office hit of the '80s. Special
effects and chemistry between the actors are the draws to this action-adventure
75617202
422 Arlington Blvd - Greenville, N.C.
JAMS
Full Line of P�t Supplies
Marine & Tropical Fish
Reptiles & Small Animals
Pond Fish & Supplies
Birds & Supplies
Live & Frozen Food
Hills Science Diet
Aquatic Plents &
Tank Decorations
We Support
ECU Students
Death'misses the grave
Special effects outclass script
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The man who brought the sil-
ver screen some of its most memo-
rable special effects in recent years
does it again in Death Becomes Her.
With Death Becomes Her, a com-
puter is used to create horrific spe-
cial effects. A head turned back-
wards, a gaping hole in a stomach
and several limbs twisted in un-
thinkable positions are a few of the
irKTecUbleimagesfhatZemeckisand
the team at Industrial Light and
Magic have created.
The story in Death Becomes Her
centers around the animosity be-
tween Madeline Ashton (Meryl
Streep) and Helen Sharp (Goldie
Hawn). In the past, Madeline and
Helen have been friends but as the
story opens, Madeline is in the pro-
cess of stealingHelen'scurrentboy-
friend, Ernest (Bruce Willis).
After two flash forwards of
seven years each, the story arrives
in the present to tell the tale of
Helen's revenge on Madeline.
Madeline and Ernest have been
married for fourteen years, but their
union teeters on the edge of failure.
Helen arrives back on the scene
looking radiantly young. Madeline
becomes jealous and seeks the help
of a mysterious woman (Isabella
Rossellini) who gives her a potion
to keep her eternally young. The
unfortunate part of the deal is that
the potion does not protect the body
fromaccidents. Madeline breaks her
neck after a fall down a flight of
stairs.
Once Madeline's neck breaks
thesensoryinputstothescriptseem
to stop as well as the ones to
Madeline'shead-Thestory becomes
so garbled after this point in the film
that to try to synopsize the plot
further would be impractical.
Death Becomes Her must have
initially seemed like a fine idea. The
conceptof eternal life was not origi-
nal but, with the advent of com-
puter generated images, the realm
of possibilities probably seemed lim-
itless.
While working diligently to
impress the audience with these
effects, the filmmakers neglected to
sharpen the storyline. Instead of
adding to a well-crafted script, the
effects are the focal point for merest
of the story. The film seems to have
been written around the effects.
Death Becomes Her containsno
memorable characters and a sorrier
script than either of the other two
films.
Streep, Hawn and Willis are all
wasted. None of the roles contained
any real depth. The script keeps the
audience fairly detached from the
incidents of the story, almost as if
the filmmakers were telling the au-
dience to pay attention to the effects
and never mind the story.
For a film billed as a comedy,
very few laughs are elicited by Death
Becomes Her.
While the effects add a selling
point to Death Becomes Her, they
cannot save the film. Fuller charac-
ters in a less sadistic script may have
improved this film. The vicious-
ness and the lack of story crafts-
manship are a disappointing mix.
Death would become this movie
except it is sure to havea new lifeon
the video shelf.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
The NEW Recreational Services Climbing Tower opens this fall. Sign-up for one of these workshops:
September 10
Climbing I
For beginners
3:00pm
September 24
Climbing II
3:00pm
October 1
Climbing
For beginners
3:00pm
October 15
Climbing II
3:00pm
You must be pre-registered. Registration begins August 24. For details call 757-6911.
1 he official)p
MHIM win. lit" 111 Kl
eptt-nitn-r I I .11 2:)pm .idj.utni to ilv Allied rk.i
V.
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CD
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B&W Photography, Art Reproductions, Contemporary European Images, Gallery Prints
POSTERS �JB"
��r-
B0rdOfrhe
Gr,
ings
eat
LAST 2 DAYS!D
Wednesday & Thursday �
August 26 & 27 D
Outside the Bookstore 1 1
in the
Wright Building
(Rain: Bookstore Lobby)
I
CD
CO
0)
3
o
3
O.

O
Q
I

3
CD
�n
O
Q
9:00 am - 5:00 pm
up to $2.99 value!
Buy one fish
get one fish
FREE of equal
or lesser value
up to $2.99
�Either fish.
)ires 9-30-92
One
Pound
Bulk
Food
With purchase
of same at
regular price.
expires 9-30-92
Comet
Goldfish
or
Tropical
Fish
Flakes
No ourchase
necessary!
12
Dozen
Feeders
With purchase
of one dozen
at equal or
lesser value.
OFF
Power
Head or
Power
Filter
Good on
regular price
only.
LasirsjjstejKuusBtJSS- LrL92- Leipis 9-30-92 J
CD
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Sponsored by ECU Stores
2L
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SHOW AND SALE
Q Georgia O'Keeffe, Art Deco, Art Nouveau, Renoir. Travel Posters, Fantasy, Dance
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ANTI-KE.MPLE Boy - -�
LEAGUE CSICRITS OF THE K"CAR)
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What's The Difference? whiskers fry jo� s�
�7764
SCIENTISTS
DISCOVER
THAT STONE
WALLS DO
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MAKE.
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? The 1st Fall '92 ?
� PLAN N I NG PA RT Y
Tomorrow (Thursday, August 27,) at 5:30pm. in the East Carolinian office.
(2nd floor Publications Bldg In front of Joyner Library)
Requsted Guests:
Chris Kemple, Sean Parnell, Eric Manning , Adam Roe,
Jeff Parker, Micah Harris,George Sartiano,
Marc Hodge, Kubeai, Eric Sullivan,
New Talent, and curious admirers of comic art
COME and see what we're doing this year! You'll have a wonderful time!
There are six detail differences between drawings 1 and 2 Can you find them? Try it and
check your answers with those listed below
Differences Window ledge is different. 2. Spots on dog are gone 3. Dogs eyes are closed.
4 Inside of window is different 5 Hydrant base is different 6 Dog's nose is black.
I
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mmmmmmm�m!mm





.�
22 The East Carolinian
AUGUST 26, 1992
nHiiTTlill
tttwSaMHHttMM
M -
I ��. II I -
Oleta Adams. Richie Sambora, etc.
Soundtrack excels movie's standing
Upcoming Book Releases
September
� Tangled Vines � Janet Dailey
� Way Things Ought to Be� Rush limbaugh
� Are You the One For Me?� Beverly DeAngelis
October
� Tale of the Body Thief� Anne Rice
� Stars Shine Down � Sydney Sheldon
� Driving Force � Dick Frzncis
� It Doesn't Take A Hero� Norman Schwartzkopf
� Magic Johnson: My Life � Magic Johnson
� Lincoln: III � Philip Kunhardt
Just Released By ECU Professors
� Binding Cultures: Black women writers in
Africa and the Diaspora � Gay Wilentz, English
Dept.
� Herbal and Magical Medicine� Karen Baldwin,
English Dept James Kirkland, English Dept Holly
Matthews, Anthropology Dept Chip Sullivan, English
Dept.
By Chas Mitch'l
Staff Writer
What do the movies Footloose,
Good Morning, Vietnam and Mo'
Money have in common? They ail
have had a soundtrack that ex-
celled the movie's standing.
Red Shoe Diaries is yet another
movie which can be added to mis
long and impressive list.
Music plays a critical role in
most movie projects by setting the
tempo and the beat.
In doing so, writers and direc-
tors can measure the viewers'
heartbeat and hypothesize their
every action and reaction.
Zalman King is one of the best
when it comes to the manipula-
tion of music in order to mesmer-
ize the viewers of his films. With
such works as 9 12 Weeks, Two
Moon Junction and Wild Orchid
under his belt, Red Shoe Diaries is
perfect in creating the sensual and
erotic moods for which he is
known.
Featured on the soundtrack
are Oleta Adams, James Brown,
Geoffery Oryema and Zucchero.
Of the 13 tracks, Richie
Sambora (of Bon Jovi fame) con-
tributes two songs that set the pace
of the movie. "You Never Really
Know" was exclusively made for
this film.
Adams sultry and sexually
provocative voice adds to the well
rounded soundtrack with theGod-
father of Soul banging out cords of
"The Big Pay Back
Surprisingly Brown's song is
the only high-tempo song found
within this musical collection.
Zalman used the calypsoCar-
ibbean sound of Zucchero and
Geoffery Oryema to relay that
Latin message of love, lust and
dance. Often drifting back and
forth from Desi Amez to Los Lo-
bos, Zalman ensures that all in-
tended audiences would not be
disappointed.
With a smattering of jazz and
a touch of classical intervention,
Red Shoe Diaries has what all mov-
ies should have; a well blended
soundtrack that will keep the
viewerlistener begging for more.
ATTITUDE FITNESS CHECK
The following questions explore your
attitude and self-image and how well you
are coping with life and stress.
"1
OPEN HOUSE
Wednesday, September 2
5 to 7pm
Methodist Student Center
501 E. 5th Street
(across from Garret Dorm)
Free Snack Supper
Door Prizes
Register far Activity Groups
Meet New Friends
HAIR DESIGNS
is backing the Pirates with
a $1.00 DONATION
for every man s and woman's haircut
during the month of September!
Full Service Haircare
Sculptured Nails
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Located behind Pizza Inn
on services by: Beverly, Tammy, Jennifer, or Karen
1. Do you have a positive self image, more happy
thoughts than negative or critical?
2. Do you wake up each morning feeling eager to
get the day started?
3. Do you meet each task as a problem to be solved,
as a lesson to be learned, or as a challenge?
4. Do you keep your sense of humor when life gets
stressful?
5. Do you seldom become irritated with those
around you even when things do not go your way?
6. Do you take responsibility for your behavior
rather than blame others when things go wron�,?
7. Do you feel that your life experiences are valu-
able and fun rather than feeling like your life is the
pits?
8. Do you think through what you need to accom-
plish each day and then prioritize these tasks?
9. Do you have long term goals that are realistic and
within your reach and are your daily activities
related to those future goals?
10. Do you have the energy to be involved with
others and complete your day to day activities?
If you answered the questions positively (all "yes")
then you are in good condition. If you responded to
two or three questions negatively, then your degree
of coping is less and you may be experiencing some
mild stress or discomfort. If you had more than three
negative answers, you may find it helpful to meet
with a cbunselor to establish your priorities and get
going on a positive track again. Call 757-6661 or stop
by the Counseling Center in 316 Wright Building for
information on programs and services
The Macintosh
Student Aid Packa
4 tttMetftjMKi
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Apple Macintosh Classic' II
Apple Macintosh LCII
Apple Macintosh Ilsi
Get over $400 worth of preloaded software when you buy one of the
Apple Macintosh computers shown above at our best prices ever.
And if you are interested in financing options, be sure to ask for
details about the Apple Computer Loan. But hurry, because student
Welcome back students!
aid like this is only available through October 15,1992 - and only
at your authorized Apple campus reseller.
�CORRECT
IGRAMMAR
ECU Student Stores: More than just books - your dollars support student scholarsl
Wnght Building Telephone: 757-6731
Store Hours: Monday - Thursday, 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
!�S I),skwn,ll,nnlmanualsJrlnu,��lu,lol,n,h,offu
Dii iirun I rank Thesaurus, and
names are the trademark
-�u. �






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"I J�III �iWlllll III ��gliHftllTlllllllll
" 24 The East Carolinian
AUGUST 26. 1992
Commentary
Switching places:
Exchange program leaves student
with knowledge, fond memories
By Dana Danielson
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Iguess it would be the waterfall
in the middle of the jungle that 1
remember most.
Or maybe it was watching the
flying fish swim with the barracu-
das,orholdinga baby squirrel mon-
key, or the daily afternoon rain,
or eating rice and beans twice a
day or even struggling to absorb
enough Spanish to converse with
my family.
But how can 1 sum up a six-
week exchange program to Costa
Rica?
When my plane touched down
May 11 in the Central Valley and I
was surrounded by lush green scen-
ery and mountains and fields and
small hut-houses I was over-
whelmed. And my adventure be-
gan here as I waited for the rest of
the 22 students toarrive from North
Carolina.
The following day we went to
UniversidadNacionaldeCostaRica
in Heredia. Here we were intro-
duced to our host families and
whisked away to our new homes.
My introduction proved memo-
rable; I spoke no Spanish and my
"mom" spokeno English. We smiled
a lot at each other and with the
help of pantomime agreed to sit
outside.
I was welcomed "home" by the
introduction tofivesistersandbroth-
ers ranging in age from nine to 21
(quite an adjustment for an only
child). All except one spoke mini-
mal English, so they were my life-
line for the first week.
School began our third day in
Costa Rica. I attended marine ecol-
ogy, taught by a professor from NC
State, and Spanish classes at the
Universidad. We had formal class
between two and five days a week
depending on the length of each
weekend excursion to the Pacific
beaches.
The first weekend our group
traveled to the volcano Irazu, two
miles above sea level. It is said that
on a clear day both Caribbean and
Pacific oceans are visible. One of the
three craters is still active, even
though the last time it exploded was
1963. In that crater, neon-turquoise
water bubbled, and dusty-black
abrasive ash covered everything.
The next weekend took our
group to Manuel Antonio National
Park, nearQuepos. My Marine Ecol-
ogy class did rocky and sandy beach
transects,aswellasa tide pool study.
In the jungle itself we saw a variety
offlora,fauna,birds,iguanas,howler
and white-faced monkeys. And we
neverstopped swearingorswatting
mosquitoes.
Following Manuel Antonio we
traveled to Golfito, near the Pana-
manian border. This weekend
proved to be my favorite because
we did off-the-beaten-track things.
Rather than stay in cabinas as usual,
we were housed by an American
man and his Costa Rican wife.
Upon arrival we were escorted
by our house-host on a 30-minute
hike through the jungle, half of it
through a shin-high stream. We
found ourselves at a waterfall in
which we swam, hiked and played,
to cool off and refresh ourselves
from the 8-hourdrive. The fall was
five tiers high and were climbable
with the proper foot gear. I felt iso-
lated from the rest of the world as I
sat being massaged underneath the
powerful current of water. The af-
ternoon rainshowerbegan while we
explored, though we were oblivi-
ous to it, sheltered underneath a
canopy of trees.
The second day our Marine
Ecology class took two commercial
fishing boats into the middle of the
Dulce Bay to snorkel around a vol-
canic rock-turned-reef. Upon enter-
ing the water, I noticed tiny things
biting me all over, and found out it
was crab or shrimp larvae.
That afternoon our group took
two taxi boats to a mangroveswamp
to snorkel and study the different
specimens of life. 1 was quite appre-
hensive of seeing what lived among
the mangrove roots, due to fabrica-
tions of horror stories of black wa-
ter, viscous barracuda, arm-length
mosquitoes and poisonous snakes
that had adapted to saltwater. What
I found was murky green-blue wa-
ter, snails and crabs and small ma-
rine worms. On the return trip from
the mangroves, a girl sitting on the
edge of the boat was smacked on
the back by a man ta ray that jumped
out of the water.
In addition to marine learning,
we visited theChiquita banana plant
to observe the growing, harvesting,
picking and packing of bananas.
Following thiswewenttoour house-
host's palm-oil plantation where he
picked a variety of local fruit and
plants for us to taste, touch and
smel 1. Some things inci uded an aloe
plant, a cacao fruit, a lipstick fruit
(used as a dye for certain dishes), a
yucca vegetable, and the blossom
from which Qianel No. 5 perfume
is made.
The fourth weekend took us to
Tamarindo, in the Guanacaste
(northwest) region of thecountry. It
was a low-impact weekend as far as
classes went, but for Marine Ecol-
ogy we had to choose a final paper
topic and do the research while at
Tamarindo.
1 studied the behavior of ghost
crabs at night which lead to a whole
other world of discovery; a tide pool
in the dark and feeding patterns on
the sand.
Of course, I did go through a
minor case of what is affectionately
knownofascultureshock.Onecon-
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tribution to this�my "fami!y"did
not have running hot water so cold
showers were a way of life.
The diet I experienced, in con-
trast with what 1 had expected, was
not varied and quite bland.
The language barrier reared its
ugly head until 1 picked up basic
necessary words such as necesito, no
me giista and yo voy. It was only
when I could sit down and converse
with my family that I felt more at
ease.
By the time my six-week stay
was over I was confident enough to
shop at the local market, take the
bus into San Jose, figureout a menu,
order food at restaurants and con-
verse with people on the street.
Therestofmygroupflewhome
June 16 but 1 elected to stay until
June 25. I spent my last week doing
some bonding with my "family
mastering the art of washing dishes
without hot water and perfecting a
speedy, icy shower.
Costa Rica lives up to its name
as the Rich Coast. 1 have added rick
country to that title. I have found a
second home and look anxiously
forward to the next chance I will eat
rice and beans with my five siblings
and two loving parents, struggling
to speak splotchy Spanish in my
breezy Heredian house.
This week on the tube:
Wednesday
� Republican and Democratic
Conventions. �8 p.m. on PBS
� Texas A&M and Stanford kick
off the college football season
when the SWC champion Aggies
and the Cardinal clash at Ana-
helm, Cal. �9 p.m. on ABC.
� Joe Pescl is this week's big-
name star on a creepy Tales From
the Crypt. In "Split Personality
he plays a twisted con man who
gets into double trouble when he
talks wealthy twin sisters Into
marrying him and his twin brother
�who doesn't exist. �10 p.m. on
HBO.
� Unplugged: Annie Lenox Is
featured on this half-hour all-
acoustic set which Includes "Why"
and "Little Bird" from her debut
solo album "Diva Eurythmlcs
favorites "Her Comes the Rain
Again" and "Its Alright (Baby's
Coming Back)�10 p.m. on MTV.
Thursday
� Joe Frazler has an audio cameo
on a Simpsons episode featuring
Danny DeVito's return as Homer's
stepbrother Herb. �8 p.m. on
FOX.
fBest Bets v Jm � �
Friday
� Golf: The U.S. Men's Amateur
moves into the quarterfinal round
with matchplay from Jack
Nicklaus' Muirfleld Village G.C. in
Dublin. Ohio. �3 p.m. on ESPN.
� For Better or For Worse: A little
romance, some adventure, plenty
of laughs and a touch of wlstlul
sentimentality mark The Last
Camping Trip the first in a series
of six animated episodes based on
Lynn Johnston's comic strip. �
7:35 p.m. on Disney.
� An emotional 2020 report ex-
amines the February 1991 inci-
dent when British soldiers were
mistakenly attacked by two U.S.
fighter planes during the GulfWar.
The "friendly- fire" incident left nine
dead and 11 wounded. �10 p.m.
on CBS.
Compiled from TV Guide
�$���
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I
AUGUST 26, 1992
Zoo brings back riff-oriented rock
The East Carolinian 25
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Ever wonder what happened
to good, old-fashioned rock and
roll? You know, the kind that you
can listen to without having to
worry abou t going deaf or spend-
ing hours deciphering some in-
comprehensible lyric?
Well, Mick Fleetwood (of
Fleetwood Mac fame) has brought
back the simple, yet entertaining
back-beat of rock-n-roll with his
new band, The Zoo, and their first
album, Shakirt' The Cage.
Fleetwood describes The Zoo
as being totally opposite of
Fleetwood Mac. "It's like chalk
and cheese. The Zoo is very
much full ahead, basic rock 'n
roll, very riff-oriented
According to Fleetwood, the
band first existed as "basically a
party band
In March of 1991, the group
came together when they were
offered a one-nighter in Tasma-
nia, Australia. Ultimately play-
ing for six weeks in Australia,
Fleetwood and his two lead vo-
calists, Bekka Bramlett and Billy
Thorpe, decided that the arrange-
ment was working so well they
should cut an album.
Lead vocalists Bramlett and
Thorpe are two of the leading
forces behind this group's mega-
hit destiny. Bramlett, daughter of
Delaney and Bonnie Bramlett, has
the sultry voice and range that
alone would make the vocals a
hit.
But with Thorpe, one of
Australia's best known singers,
the two of them have a blend that
seems too good to be true.
Along with bassist Tom Lilly,
guitarist Gregg Wright, Brett
Tuggle on keyboards and of
course, Fleetwood on drums, The
Zoo combines such diverse talent
into such an easy sound that their
success is virtually guaranteed.
The title track, "Shakin' The
Cage blends guitar riffs with
hard-hitting percussion to create
one of the best rock and roll songs
of this decade. Running four and
a half minutes, the song starts
rocking right off and ends even
better, if that's possible.
"Voodoo" jumps the spec-
trum from classic rock all the way
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to an almost-reggae
type of theme. The
longest song on the
CD, a lmost seven and
a half minutes, "Voo-
doo" leaves the listener
feeling light-headed
and disoriented with its
breathy and
otherworldly style.
The Zoo debuts
its U.S. tour in show-
case clubs and small
halls beginning in
August. They will
also premiere in
North Carolina at The
Longbranch Saloon,
Raleigh Sept. 11;
Rocky's, Charlotte
Sept. 'l2; The Flam-
ing Mug, Fayetteville Sept. 15
and atZiggy's,Winston-Salem
on Sept. 16.
Shakin' The Cage mixes virtu-
ally all types of music to create
an album that will hold its own
in any market.
As Bob Seger's classic "That
Old Time Rock 'n Roll" states,
"That kind of music just soothes
the soul
Last Gentlemen debuts with style
By Chas Mitch'l
Staff Writer
From the first beat to the last tune,
Last Gentlemen just simply goes off.
With a sound so easy to relate to but
not often imitated, The WorldBehind Your
Back lends 11 well-written and outstand-
ingly performed tracks to the industry.
Takingtheirnamefrom the 1966
S Walker Percy novel, Last Gentle-
men singer-guitarist Brian Leach,
drummer Tommy Garza, bassist
Tom Broeske and keyboardist
Greg Manuel manage just this
kind of breadth.
Wi th their debut release, Last
Gentlemen offer their unusual
abilities to people who love pop
music's rugged reaches and intelli-
gent sensations.
Last Gentlemen's new release pre-
miers the music of gifted collaborators
from Champaign, 111.
They see no important distinction
between theenduring tunesof the Beatles,
Badfinger, Aerosmith and Elton John on
the one hand, and the vigorous currency
of today's edgiest pop, rock and hip-hop
on the other. So with equal parts heart
and skill, Last Gentlemen embraces the
triple threat of rhythm, melody and lan-
guage.
To leave no gray area for misunder-
standing, the impressive musical ar-
rangement and sound of Last Gentle-
men seems to take the listener back to the
musical time frame of the mid to late
1980s. American dance music at its fin-
est, with a touch of London hip-hop is
what you'll get.
The lyrics truly complement the
music and vice versa throughout this
cohesive group of 11 songs.
The musical arrangement will
rumble hard and rise magisterially
through thesurge-and-restraintof "Miss
Sympathy or worry with an Eastern air
and then find cause for gospel-tinged
celebration in "Never Been Away
The music will then transform the
intrigue of exploration into the ceriainty
of arrival with well-unified melodies,
like those that anchor "Waiting for the
Sun" or "Gently Let You Down" � a
passionate, hedged break-up song done
with the total beauty of late Big Star.
And then, with no strain, Last
Gentlemen's rhythms will toughen and
quicken, takingoutall overseas beatcom-
petition with tunes like "Hypnotic" or
the free-spirited "Loveology
With their ChicagoLondon style
dance music, it's just a matter of time
before Last Gentlemen will be burning
up the charts.
j
I
Wfe're Giving Avvay Free
Beach Towels At First CitLzens Bank
Don't Get CaughtWthout One.
-
If you think that most student
checking accounts are all wet, you need
to check out our Quicksilver account.
With Quicksilver, you get free
unlimited access to all of our
ATMs, no-minimum-balarice
checking (limit 12 checks per
month), a student credit card
FIRST
CTIZENS
BANK
(VISA or MasterCard) check safekeeping,
plus your first order of 50 duplicate checks
free. And you get it all for just a $3 monthly
service charge. That kind of service,
for that kind of price, plus a really
big, plush beach towel thrown in
to boot? Why you'd feel down-
right naked without it.
Membir FD1C
Offer good August 3 through September 18,1992. Towels available while supplies last. Limit one towel per account.
?Subject to credit approval. Freshmen, sophomores, and juniors require co-signer. No-fee credit card as long as cardholder is a student.
Available only at First Citizens Bank offices in these cities: Asheville. Boone. Buies Creek. Chapel Hill, Charlotte. Durham. Favetteville. Greensboro,
Greenville. Hickory, High Point. Jacksonville, New Bern, Raleigh. Rocky Mount, Statesville. Sylva. Wilmington. Wilson.Winston-Salem.

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mmmmmmmmmmmm






26 The East Carolinian
AUGUST 26, 1992
New on Film
In the video store
Rugged, rough and ready to shoot 'em
up, Clint Eastwood stars as outlaw
William Munny in 'Unforgiven, the
newest release from Warner Brothers.
Clint Eastwood starred in, produced and directed Hollywood's
latest western, Unforgiven. Eastwood appears in the film
along side Gene Hackman, Jaimz Woolvett, Richard Harris
and Morgan Freeman in one of the year's best films.
Photo Courtwy of Warner Broth�r� , Inc.
Eastwood is back
Released in August
The Prince of Tides
Body Chemistry 2
Killing in a Small Town
Wayne's World
Eye of the Storm
Wild Orchid 2: Two Shades of Blue
Highway to Hell
Mark Twain and Me
Medicine Man
Memoirs of an Invisible Man
Rock A Doodle
Under Suspicion
Strangers in Good Company
White Men Can't Jump
Martial Law 2: Undercover
The classic western returns to theatres
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The Western has always been a
fertile genre for Hollywood. Al-
though few have been produced in
the past two decades, a new West-
em called Unforgiven proves that
the genre still lives.
Clint Eastwood, who directed,
starred in and produced Unforgiven,
adds one more impressive creden-
tial to his already 'ncredible list of
accomplishments.
Unforgiven unfolds in 1880near
the fictional town of Big Whiskey,
Wyoming. Eastwood plays William
Munny, a retired assassin who is
now sober and raising a family. As
the story opens, Munny's wife has
been dead three years. He is desper-
ately trying to raise two children
while working a farm.
A young gun named The
Schoefield Kid (Jaimz Woolvett)
wants Munny to join him in killing
two cowboys who knifed a prosti-
tute. The prostitutes have pooled
their money to put a price on the
heads of the two assailants.
At first, Munny refuses the of-
fer, but then changes his mind when
he fully considers how much his
family could use the money.
Throughout the story, his troubled
mind wants him to forget about the
killing, but harsh reality forces him
onward.
Munny enlists his old partner
Ned Logan (Morgan Freeman) to
join him in the bounty hunt Even-
tually the two catch up to The
Schoefield Kid and the three ride
together toward Big Whiskey.
While Munny rides, another
hired gun, English Bob (Richard
Harris), arrives in Big Whiskey to
claim the bounty money. Bob's plans
are spoiled by an ex-gunman named
Little Bill Daggett (Gene Hackman),
the sheriff of Big Whiskey. He hu-
miliates English Bob in the middle
of the town by taking his weapons,
beating him mercilessly, then lock-
ing him in prison until he can be put
on a train.
Eventually,Munny, Logan and
The Kid arrive in Big Whiskey, but
Daggett is there to try to foil their
plans.
Unforgiven contains the best el-
ements of Westerns and the greatest
elements of film.
The most obvious attribute of
this film is the extremely talented
cast Eastwood,Freeman, Harris and
especially Hackman make theaudi-
ence believe tnat their characters
exist Each role seems custom-made
for each actor.
The leads are not the only cast
members worth commending. Ev-
ery role is expertly filled, from the
women who work at the brothel, to
the hunted cowboys, to Daggett's
deputies. An especially memorable
supporting player is Saul Rubinek
who plays W. W. Beauchamp, a
writer trying to record some of the
history of the Wild West.
To Be Released
WWF's 1992 World Tour
American Me
Thunderheart
The Cutting Edge
Split Second
Iron Eagle 3
Beethoven
HEY
The fact that you
saw this is proof
that advertising
works. Call The
East Carolinian
at 757-6366 and
let advertising
work for you.
Sam's Trophies
COMPUTERIZED
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expires September 15, 19921 expires September 15, 1992
ATTENTION COLLEGE STUDENTS
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USED
FURNITURE APPLIANCES
BUY AND SELL
Looking for used furniture
for this school season?
Latham's Furniture carries
a wide variety of used beds,
tables, chests, sofa, chairs
and more!
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FREE CONSULTATION IN MOST MATTERS
401 W. First Street - Suite 1-G - Greenville, NC 27834
752-9959
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Sunday 1pm - 6pm
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LOOKING
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North Greene Street
758-1515





��
Tlie East Carolinian
August 26, 1992
Classifieds
FOR RENT1FOR SALEHELP WANTED1HELP WANTED1�
Page 27
HELP WANTED
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS 1 and 2 bedroom
apartments. Energy-efficient,
several locations in town. Car-
peted, kitchen appliances,
some water and sewer paid,
washerdryer hookups. Now
taking applications for Fall.
Call 752-8915.
ROOMMATE WANTED to
share apartment 1 2 mile from
campus. 12 rent and utilities.
Call Ron at 489-1090.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share a large house in a quiet
neighborhood. Must be neat
and mature. $200.00 and 13
utilities. Call 355-8783.
ROOM FOR RENT- female
only. Near campus in nice
neighborhood. $150.00
monthly plus 12 utilities.
Available August 14th. No
pets. Non-smoker preferred.
758-4789.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED- $100.00month.
Private room. 14 utilities.
756-0857.
A Bcaunfu! Plaos 10 Live
�All New
�Aw! Rod? to Rent-
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2�9E.5tb Street
�Looted Near ECU
� Near Major Shopping Ceoen
� Across from Highway Patrol Station
Limited Offer-$330 month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Wilhimi
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office Open- Apt. 8 i2-5:30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean an quiet one bedroom furnished apartments,
energy efficient, free water and sewer, washers,
dryers, cable TV. Couples or singles only. $243
a month, 6 month lease. MOB1IE HOME
RENTALS-couplea or single. Apartment and
mobile homes in Azalea Gardens near Brook
Valley Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
goods, rugs, electric fan.
toaster oven, blender, bed-
room furniture. Call after
5:00 PM 756-8807. Excellent
condition-low prices.
286 COMPUTER: IBM com-
patible. 20 mg hard drive.
Color monitor 360K an 1.2 mg
51 4" drives. 1 mg memory.
Call 756-3618. Leave message.
WOMAN'S 26" 10-SPEED
BICYCLE. Almost new. Call
756-3618. Leave message.
SEIZED CARS, trucks, boats,
4 wheelers, motorcycles, by
FBI,LRS,DEA. Availableyour
area now. Call (800) 338-3388
ext. C-5999.
FOR SALE: One Weider
weight bench with weights.
Bench press, leg extension, leg
curl, butterfly etc. $50. Call
830-0551.
FOR SALE: VCR- $100.
Nearly new comforter $15,
electric heater-fan $10. Call
758-8090.
FOR SALE: Twin mattress
and boxsprings. Call Mich-
elle at 757-1065.
AFTER SCHOOL CARE of 9
year old, 2:30-6 pm, Monday -
Friday. Requires own car and
references. Call 321-0833 af-
ter 6pm.
HELP WANTED POSTAL
JOBS AVAILABLE ! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call
(800) 338-3388 ext. P-3712.
COMMUNITY BIBLE
STUDY, a women's interde-
nominational Bible study,
meeting at Oakmont Baptist
Church, Thursday mornings,
9am to 11:30 am needs several
young women to work in our
nursery area to provide pa-
tient, loving care to our young-
est participants. Church nurs-
ery experience preferred, ref-
erences requested. Must pro-
vide own transportation and
be able to make commitment
through Dec. 10. Call Mrs.
Baker, Assistant Class Coor-
dinator, 355-8368.
HELP WANTED
mm�
needs a
NEWS DIRECTOR.
Must be a
Broadcasting major with
at least a 2.5 G.P.A.
Apply in person at WZMB
in the Mendenhall
Student Center.
mm&
gtbJBTHE EAST CAROLINIAN
pi
POSITION AVAILABLE FOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER APPLY AT THE EAST CAROLINIAN SECOND FLOOR OF THE STUDENT PUBS BUILDING DURING BUSINESS HOURS
PERSONALS
PROUD TO BE A PIRATE?
THE ECU AMBASSADORS
are looking for enthusiastic
and dedicated new members
to provide service for the uni-
versity. AMBASSSADORS
work with the chancellor and
his wife, Alumni Leaders, give
tours, usher, and act as
telemarketers. Stop by our
membership booth in front of
the student store Aug. 26-Sept.
2 from 9-3.
MAP TO
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
MQffll USED CD'S
WANTED:
PUNTER
for
ECU
FootIallTei
TRYOUT:
iFrrmavTuT
CALL 757-4570
For Further Information
FOR SALE
t '91 TREK 820 MOUNTAIN
r- BIKE - excellent condition,
r ridden only one year, black,
� shimano 200 GS components;
asking only $225. 757-2720.
"3
� FOR SALE: Used sofa, chairs,
b lamps, tables, pictures, mir-
rors, vacuum cleaner, kitchen
HELP WANTED
DESIRE RESPONSIBLE
PERSON to care for small
children Tuesday's and
Thursday's, 7:30 a.m. -5:00
p.m. Call 756-0417.
LICENSED, EXPERIENCED
DRIVER needs help to drive
car to LA area. 355-1399 be-
fore 10 pm. Will pay all gas.
SPORTSWEAR COMPANY
that sells merchandise to so-
rorities and fraternities is look-
ing for a responsible indi-
vidual to be a campus repre-
sentative. Work one night and
average $50 to $100 per week.
Knowledge of retail sales and
the Greek System is helpful.
Call 1-800-242-8104.
ALASKA SUMMER EM-
PLOYMENT-Fisheries. Earn
$5,000 month Free transporta-
tion! Room & Board! Over 8,000
openings. No experience neces-
sary. MALE or FEMALE. For
ernploymentprogramcallStudent
EmploymentServicesatl-206-545-
4155 ext A5361
FALLSOCCERCOACHES-The
Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting 12 to 16
part-time youthsoccer coaches for
thefallyoufhsoccerprogram. Ap-
plkantsmustpossesssomeknowl-
edge of the soccer skills and have
tiieabiliryandpatiencewithyoum.
Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-16, in soccer
fundamentals. Hours are from
3:00 pm until 7:00 pm with some
nightand weekendcoaching. This
program will run from Septem-
bertomid-November. Salary rates
start at $425 per hour. For more
information,please call Ben James
at8304567orMichaelDalyat830-
4550.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT
PAY! Assembleproducts athome.
CallToUFreel-800467-5566EXT.
5920.
WANTED: SOCCER
COACHES-Monday Wednes-
day andor TuesdayThursday
Z-00-6;OOp.m. Will train Paystarts
at $5 an hour. Must have own
transportation. Call Pitt County
Community Schools at 8304240.
NEEDED: Dependable and lov-
ing child care for 6 year old girl
after school 2:30-5:30 Monday-
SERVICES OFFERED
CLEANING- Married,
female student, cleaning
personal homes with 9 years
experience. Reasonable
rates and own supplies.
Please call Cindy Myer at
752-2759.
PET CARE- In your home.
All types of animals. Rea-
sonable rates and quality
care. Please call Cindy Myer
at 752-2759.
PERSONALS
WRITERPHILOSOPHER
MUSICIAN AND POETIC
SOUL seeks friendship and
correspondence from like-
minded lady. Photos and let-
ters to MV PO Box 8663,
Greenville, NC 27835.
MENDENHALL
STUDENT
CENTER
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
You also get a FREE
HEADPHONE RADIO
just for calling
1-800-932-0528. Ext 65
S Financial Aid Available S
Attention All StudMs!
Undegmd�& Graduate Over $5 Baikal in grant &
echolantttosare now mMH from prink tenor &
govminmtnacBioraikpSnjdmanttanwide.AI
students are digiblei Let uthdp you locate the money that
you ire ehgMe to receive. Applications are now being
accepted. To receive your financial aid program cad:
SlxaVa FaumcM Strvtcn
aoa(B-Oa�Eyt.FM�
FAMOUS FROZEN YOGURT
Welcome Back Students
Come to Zack's,
show us your Student I.D.
and get 10 off any purchase over $2.00
Come to think of it, why not bring a friend!
1898-A Greenville Blvd. 752-9440
Announcements
KING OF THE Hill.
ECU Recreational Services is
sponsoring a "Hall of a Way to
Start the Fall The 5th Annual
King of the Hill sponsored by R. h
reational Services in conjunction
with Resident Education and ARA
Dining Services will be held on
Wednesday, September 2 from4:00
- 6:00pm. The festivities will take
place on the College Hill Recre-
ation facilities and participation is
open to everyone living in die resi-
dence halls with a valid ID. There
will be a registration meeting on
September 1 st at 5:00pm in Biology
103. One representative from each
residence hall should attend. Come
on out to crown the best residence
hall of them all on September 2!
Call 757-6387 for details.
FALL ADULT SOCCER
TheGreenville Recreation and
Parks Department is now making
preparation for the upcoming
Adult Soccer program. The orga-
nizational meeting will be held on
Thursday, August 27, 7:30 PM at
the Elm Street Gyrn. This program
is open to men and women ages 16
and over, and will be held at West
Meadowbrook Park. Games and
practices will be held on Sundays
from 1:00-4:00 PM beginning in
September. All coaches, managers
or individuals wishing to partici-
pate on a team should attend the
organization meeting. A small reg-
istration fee will be required. For
more information call Ben James
or Michael Daly at 830-4550or 830-
4567.
VOLLEYBALL I FACUF
MEETING
TheGreenvilleRecreationand
Parks Department will be having
an organizational meeting for all
those interested in forming a team
for the 1992 Fall Volleyball Leagues.
The meeting will be held on Tues-
day, August 25, at 7:30 in the Elm
Street Gym. The league will be
divided into several divisions:
Men's, Women's, and Coed teams.
All games will be played at Elm
Street Gym with game times be-
tween 7:00 PM and 10:30 PM. For
more information, call Ben James
or Michael Daly at 830-4550 or 830-
4567.
IOYNER AND MUSIC
LIBRARIES CHANGE HOURS
Joyner Library and the Music
Library will opera te during the fol-
lowing hours for the academic year
beginning on August 24,1992.
JOYNER LIBRARY
MonThurs. 8 a.m. -12 mid
night
Fri.8a.m. -8 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m. -6 p.m.
Sun. 1 p.m. -12 midnight
Music Library
Mon. - Thur. 8 a.m. -11 p.m.
Fri. 8 a.m 5 p.m.
Sat. 12 noon -4 p.m.
Sun 2 p.m. -11 p.m.
During exam, break, and holi-
day periodsplease phone for library
hours 757-4285.
EDUCATIONA1 LOANS
AVAILABLE
Three educational loan
programs for North Carolina resi-
dents attending colleges in or out
of state and for nonresidents at-
tending colleges in North Carolina
are available through College
Foundation Inc. These loan pro-
grams are funded by North Caro-
lina banks and other investors.
Stafford Loans are for de-
pendent or independent students
and are based on financial need.
Supplemental Loans are for inde-
pendent self-supporting students
and arenotbased on financial need.
PLUS Loans are to parents of de-
pendentstudentsand arenotbased
on financial need.
For more information,
writeCollegeFoundationInc2100
Yonkers Road, P.O. Box 12100, Ra-
leigh, NC 27605-2100, or call 919
821-4771.
WILSON STREET MA-
CHINES SPONSOR TRUCK
AND CAR SHOW TO BENEFIT
THE GREENVILLE RONAL D
MCDONALD HOUSE
The Wilson Street Machines
will hold a truck and car show
September sixth at the Wilson
County Fairgrounds from 10:00am
to 4:00pm to benefit the Greenville
Ronald McDonald House. The
event will feature eight classes of
vehicles. Door prizes, awards and
a 5050 drawing. Contact Alan
Jemigan at (919) 237-1233 for more
information.
ORIENTATION TO CA-
REER SERVICES
The Career Services office in-
vites seniorsand graduate students
who will graduate in December,
1992 or MaySummer, 1993 to at-
tend a program to acquaint them
with services that will help pre-
pare them for their job search. The
program will beheld on August 31
and Sept. 1 at 3:00 p.m. in MSC 244.
Students need attend only one of
these sessions. Dr. Jim
Westmoreland and Margie
Swartout will distribute materials
for registering with Career Ser-
vices office and discuss procedures
for establishing a credentials file.
They will also instruct students on
how to participate in employment
interviews that are held on cam-
pus.
BISEXUAL-CAY-LES-
BIAN SUPPORT GROUP
Social support and activities.
Meetings are closed. Call 757-6766
11:00 - 12:15 Tues. and Thurs. or
1:00-2:30 Wed. for information on
meeting time and place.
VOLUNTEERS FOR
RESEARCH STUDY
The Section of Infectious Dis-
easesECU School of Medicine in
conjunction with the Student
Health Centerisconductinga study
on the sexual spread of herpes vi-
ruses. We are looking for men and
women 18 years and older who
have never had genital herpes. If
you are interested in obtaining
information, Call Jean Askew, R.N.
at 919-551-2578.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray, study
God's word, be involved in social
and service projects? Need a ref-
uge from time to time? Campus
Christian Fellowship may be what
you are looking for. Our weekly
meetings are at 7pm Wednesdays
at our Campus House located at
200 E. 8th St directly across
Co tanche St. from Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. Everyone is welcome.
For more information, Call Tim
Turner, Campus Minister, at 752-
7199.
CATHOIC STUDENT
CENTER
The Newman Cathol ic Studen t
Centerwould like to welcome New
and Returning Students and invite
you to celebrate with us the Sun-
day Eucharist. Sunday Masses:
11:30 am and 8:30 pm at the
Newman Center, 953 E. 10th Street
(at the foot of College Hill Drive
and 2 houses from the Fletcher
Music Building). The Center is
open for study andor relaxation
every day from 8:30 am to 11 pm.
For further information, call Fr.
Paul Vaeth at 757-1991.
ECU WOMEN'S SOCCER
CLUB
The ECU Women's Soccer
Club will hold an organizational
meeting on Sept. 1 in Room 1001 of
General ClassroomBuildingat530
pm. This season's schedule in-
cludes UNCW, NC State and
Chapel Hill. All interested play-
ers, regardless of experience are
encouraged to attend. For infor-
mation call 752-9251.
ECU EQUESTRIAN CLUB
Horses interest you? The ECU
Equestrian Club and Team will be
holding our first meeting of the
year on Wednesday, August 26 at
5:30pm, Room 221 MendenhallStu-
dentCenter. Beginner through ad-
vanced riders welcome. Trainer,
horses,and newstablewithindoor
ring near campus available for our
use. Call Angela at 931-8453 or
Debbie at 752-4915 for details.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt County
Special Olympics will be conduct-
ing a Soccer Coaches training
School on Saturday, September 19
from 9am-4 pm for all individuals
interested in volunteering to coach
soccer. We are also looking for
volunteer coaches in the following
sports: basketball skills, team bas-
ketball, swimming, gymnastics,
powerlifting, rollerskating and
bowling. No experience is neces-
sary. For more information con-
tact Greg Epperson at 830-4551.
w
S-T !
V





758-2616
for less at UBE
516 South Cotanche Street Cireenville, INJC





'� �
m �r-
The East Carolinian
August 26, 1992
Sports
Page 29
ECU Baseball
Bucs slip after 3 CAA crowns
By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
There are very few baseball
teams in the country that could
took upon a winning season as a
disappointment. ECU is one of
them.
Head coach Gary Overton is
unaccustomed to losing � he can
currently boast one of the best win-
ning percenta ges among active col-
lege baseball coaches. In 1990, ECU
claimed the best record in the na-
tion at 47-9.
Taking home theColonial Ath-
letic Association championship
had become habit. Until last year.
The Pirates bowed outof lastyears'
tournament with two straight
tosses. ECU had never lostback-to-
back tournament games in their
CAA history.
It might seem Overton would
have a hard time dealing with the
Pirates posting the worst record in
school history, at 25-24, and the
school's first losing season in con-
ference play, finishing at 7-10. But,
somehow, Overton seems to find a
way to shrug it off, knowing things
will get better.
"Let's just say it was disap-
pointing our record was not as good
as we hoped Overton said. "We
knew it would be tough to win a
fourth consecutive CAA crown
Johnny Beck, a rising junior,
echoed the same feelings.
"We were expecting more he
said. "Some of the breaks didn't go
our way
A weak bullpen, poor fielding
and a lack of offense hurt ECU
throughout the season.
The lack of a consistent closer
contributed to several losses, many
that the Pirates were leading until
late in the game. A strong man in
relief may have salvaged three of
the biggest games of the season for
"Our biggest disappointment oftlieyear was our offense.
Not only did we fail to produce runs, we didn't generate
enough offense to get us in scoring positicm.
�Coach Gary Overton
the Bucs. Twice the Wolfpack of
N.C. State rallied to overcome defi-
cits late in the game. As if that were
not enough, a heart-breaking loss
to another Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence opponent, UNC-Chapel Hill,
exemplified the frustration ECU
felt all season trying to hold onto a
lead.
The shoddy glove work of in-
fielders Chad Triplett, Glynn Beck
and Pat Watkins resulted in 59 of
ECU's lOOerrors. Along with those
free passes, ECU catchers failed to
keep the opposition from running.
The Bucs let their opponents take
extra bases almost at will. The men
wearing the tools of ignorance
gunned down 20 runners in 100
attempts.
Despite the defense, "Our big-
gest disappointment of the year
was our offense Overton said.
"Not only did we fail to produce
runs, we didn't generate enough
offense to get us in scoring posi-
tion. Our pitching was solid, al-
though our bullpen failed to hold
onto leads
The picture seems very bleak.
Success is usually expected from
the Bucs on the baseball diamond.
The Bucs were not only shooting
for their fourth straight champion-
ship, but their fifth in the last six
seasons. Fortunately, one bad sea-
son could never tarnish such a ster-
ling record.
For most of the Pirate faithful,
the expectations of another banner
slipped away before thestart of the
season. Juniors Tommy Eason and
John Gast signed professional con-
tracts with the Philadelphia Phillies
and the Cincinnati Reds, respec-
tively.
Eason and Gast, the core of the
Pirate attack, were both named to
the All-C A A team in 1991. In addi-
tion, Gast took home Co-Player of
the Year honors.
"The loss of those two was
great in nature Overton said.
"Both of them had a chance to sign
professional contracts, which is cer-
tainly what we wish for all our
players
One of the few bright spots for
the Bucs this past season was the
emergenceof LeeKushner,a trans-
fer from Rice University. Kushner
bettered both Eason and Gast with
the bat, but could not make up for
the loss of both.
"When we recruited Lee, we
were hoping for some power
Overton said. "He gave us more
than an ample amount (of offense)
from one person. Reluctantly, the
rest of the team did not comply
Unfortunately, Kushner may
be lost by the time players pull up
their stirrups and lace their cleats
for the start of next season.
"I would have to be drafted in
the first ten rounds and be guaran-
teed of educationafterl finishplay-
ing Kushner said earlier in the
year. "I love Greenville, and they
would have to make mea hell of an
offer
Kushner placed eighth in the
conference in batting at .353, sev-
enth in RBI with 42 and third in
home runs, launching 13 over
fences around the CAA.
Photo by Dall R�ed � The East Carolinian
A lack of offense and shoddy defense haunted the Bucs all season.
Fortunately, the Pirates will be back into the swing of things soon.
"I would be surprised if Lee
Kushner does not get a chance to
play professional baseball
Overton said. "He's certainly a hit-
ter the professional peopleare look-
ing for�he has a knack for setting
pitchers up. He'san intelligent hit-
ter
Kushner is spending his sum-
mer with the Norm East Collegiate
League�a wood bat league spon-
sored by Major League Baseball.
Scouts will have an eye on him
while he plays in New York and
may choose him high enough in
the draft to lure him away from
Harrington Field.
The disappointments of this
season should fade away with re-
alization of the potential for next
year's team. The possible return of
Kushner, the return of the staff's
See Baseball, page 37
Preparation key
to fall success
By Chas Mitch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
With a sis, boom,bah and a
rah, rah, rah it's Pirate football
season once again. Still riding
high on their 1991 come-from-
behind Peach Bowl victory
over the Wolf Pack, the pride
of the Emerald City is back for
more.
Packing an awesome offen-
sive aerial assault unit and a
search & destroy defensive
team, the 1992 Saber Slashers
are primed and ready to take
on any and all challengers.
First year Head Coach
Steve Logan is anxiously await-
ing the start of his debut sea-
son. With Jerry Dillon, Tom
Scott and Greg Grandison pro-
viding the senior leadership
and experience, this year
promises to be a barn burner.
As the Pirates open their
season on Sept. 5 against the
nationally ranked Orangemen
of Syracuse, the local weather
has been anything but coop-
Inside Sports
erative.
With constant rain and
little sunshine, the threat of
injury was present.
"Every injury is an oppor-
tunity for someone to step up
said Logan. "To be competi-
tive, you have to withstand in-
juries
As for the weather, mother
nature b essed coach Logan
with two days of sunshine be-
fore dousing the area with an
additional inch of rain.
"We got something done
today. The kids worked hard
Logan said. "They have done
great. There has been a lot of
distractions, but they have
worked in every session we
have put them in. We don't
have any control over the rain.
We've got to do the best we
can
So as time closes in on
opening day and the final
preparations and adjustments
are being made, Pirate football
will once again shine bright in
North Carolina.
Comrnentary
Pirates,
underdog;
not the ,
same
anymore
By Michael Martin
Special to The East Carolinian
Underdog accolades, as most
sports enthusiasts know, are accom-
panied by serious doubters. These
long-shot big winners are dubbed
"Cinderella teams one in a million
winners or down right lucky.
Sometimes these names are ap-
propriate. Take Chimanade'sbasket-
ball team in theearly 80s for example.
Theno-namehostof a basketball clas-
sic upset the No. 1 Virginia Cavaliers
and mighty Ralph Sampson.
ButwtatabouttheUSA'shockey
upset of the Soviet Union in the Gold
Medal round of the Lake Placid
games? Or the Soviets upsetting the
U.S.basketball team in Munich? Were
those luck? They are still etched in
everyone's memory.
When do teams with outstand-
ing talent, superior coaching and the
desire to excel get the credit they
deserve?
These teams, or individual play-
ers, often become lost in the minds of
fans only to be brought up by a com-
mentator during the big event the
next season. It's true. Think for a
minute Who wort the Peach Bowl
in 1988? 1990?
It's a fact. Peopledon't care when
there's not a major underdog or their
favorite team playing in the post-
season.
Here at home, ECU was the
Cinderella of North Carolina in 1991.
Critics knew where Greenville, N.C,
was on New Year's Day this year, but
they seem to forget in time.
Under thesupervision of former
head coach Bill Lewis and new head
coach Steve Logan, the ECU football
team finally climbed out of the cellar
following a decade of mediocre, sub-
par play. With talented players, a
schedule compatible with major Di-
vision I teams and a tot of pride, the
1991 Piratefootball teamended ECU's
post-season bowl drought, and
brought home a Peach Bowl victory
over long-time foe N.C. State.
NomatterwhatthecriticsinNew
York or California say, the 1991 Pi-
rates were for real. The team me-
thodically beat every opponent �
withtheexceptionoflllinois.Butthere
should be no crying about a bad call
Pirate fans. Everyone gets them at
one time or another.
One team's mistake is another's
gain. The Pirates celebrated on the
field, and Illinois was able to capital-
ize. But the pendulum swung the
other way for ECU later in the season.
Pittsburgh's inability to score in the
fourth quarter, N.C. State's collaps-
ing defense, Syracuse's disbelief in
Jeff Blake and the Pirate offense all
were mistakes by Pirate opponents
that the team took advantage of.
The"whatifs"ofthel991season
will never be. ECU got the shot to play
with the big dogs, and the team
jumped off the porch into the middle
of the pack. The Pirates won the fight,
the battle and the war. In the process,
victoryat war got the Pirates recogni-
tion of a Cinderella team living a
Cinderella season.
N.C. State's Sebastain Savage
recentlycalled thePirate's Peach Bowl
win a "fluke To those who were
there and follow Pirate football, they
know it was no fluke. That was the
same hard-nosed, air assault, all-the-
way Pirate football the team played
all season. Come-from-behind wins
were the heart and soul of Jeff Blake
See Underdog, page 37
an

H&1
i
�$
Photo by Dail Heed � The East Carolinian
The Pirates' starting defensive unit will be anchored by All-American Greg Grandison and Jerry Dillon.
Football Schedule
Soccer
Golf
Basketball
Track
Softball
34,36
36,38
39





30 The East Carolinian
AUGUST 26 , 1992
Former ECU stars shine bright in NFL 1992 Football schedule
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
Former ECU linebacker Rob-
ert Jones, now ensured the start-
ing job in Dallas, leads a class of
five ECU players who were se-
lected in the NFL draft.
Jones was selected as the 24th
pick overall. The Dallas Cowboys
added Jones to their large group
of talented players. Jones will be
lining up along side Vincent
Smith, also an ECU graduate, at
the linebacker position for the
Cowboys.
"I feel greataboutthis, "Jones
told The Charlotte Observer. He
settled on a four-year contract less
than two days after the draft, of
which the terms were not dis-
closed.
It wasn't until the next day
that quarterback Jeff Blake was
picked in the sixth round by the
Where are they now?
Robert Jones � Dallas Cowboys
Jeff Blake � New York Jets
Luke Fisher � Minnesota Vikings
Chris Hall � Dallas Cowboys
Dion Johnson � Houston Oilers
Hunter Gallimore�New York Giants
David Daniels � Pittsburgh Steelers
New York Jets. He responded
positively to his situation.
"They're bringing in a new
offense this year Blake told The
News and Record in Greensboro.
"It's one that I will fit into. That's
why they picked me
Tight end Luke Fisher, a
Medford, N.J. native was picked
in the eighth round. The Minne-
sota Vikings drafted Fisher and
have preliminary plans to use him
as a halfback.
Defensive back Chris Hall
earned an opportunity to play
alongside Jones in the Cowboy
organization as a ninth round
choice.
Bob Sloic, a former defensive
coach for ECU was recently hired
by Dallas.
The Cowboys and Head
Coach Jimmy Johnson are using a
defensive scheme similar to that
of the Pirates.
The Houston Oilers used
their 10th round choice to draft
ECU's multi-purpose wide re-
ceiver Dion Johnson.
His flashy moves and quick
nature fit in well with the Oilers'
style of play. He plans on trying
out with Houston as a return spe-
cialist.
Hunter Gallimore and David
Daniels were also picked up by
NFL teams, as free agents.
The New York Giants
scooped up Gallimore and his
receiving prowess, while Pitts-
burgh signed Daniels.
"People knew we were
good Blake said, referring to his
teammates.
"They just didn't know how
good we were. Now we're going
to have to prove ourselves again
Date
Sept. 5
Sept. 12
Sept. 19
Sept. 26
Oct. 10
Oct. 17
Oct. 24
Oct. 29
Nov. 7
Nov. 14
Nov. 21
Opponent
SYRACUSE (Pirate Club Weekend)
VIRGINIA TECH (Parent's Day)
at South Carolina
at Bowling Green
at Duke 130p
CINCINNATI (Homecoming)
at Pittsburgh
SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI (ESPN)
at West Virginia
ARKANSAS STATE
at Memphis State
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I he East Carolinian is an equal opportunity employer
Carryout foodstand - 'hot' dogs, 16 oz. drinks, chips,
all items 650 including sales tax
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v.
AUGUST 26. 1992
The East Carolinian 31
Soccer team may find first conference win in '92 season
By Bob Owens
Staff Writer
1991 was not a memorable
season for East Carolina soccer or
for first-year head coach Scooty
Carey.
The Pirates posted 5-14-0
overall record and were 0-7-0 in
Colonial Athletic Association
play. The season was marred by
injuries to key starters, including
scoring leader Justin Finck, who
totaled five goals and one assist
in 11 games before going down
with a knee injury.
With 12 letter men returning
and an outstanding recruiting
class, the team is planning to turn
it around in 1992.
The strong point for the Pi-
rates will likely be defense. Se-
nior back Craig Turnbull and jun-
ior goalkeeper Bryan DeWeese
lead one of the most talented de-
fenses in ECU history.
DeWeese, a starter for two
years, stopped more shots than
Bonnie and Clyde last season,
amassing 121 saves. He recorded
a .742 save percentage in 19
games. Turnbull, named team
captain as a sophomore, is the
most experienced player on the
squad with 47 starts since 1990.
Juniors Chris Embler, Bryan
Harpole, Chris McCrea and
Michael Patterson are the core of
an imposing defensive line. Look
for Patterson to move up on the
attack during games and pose a
serious scoring threat.
Mike Stansbury, a sopho-
more, will also be a key player,
often marking up against the
opponent's leading scorer.
Stansbury may be the future of
the Pirate backfield.
Juniors Justin Finck, Mike
Beck and Jason Short like to call
the midfield home. Roughly
equivalent to guards in basket-
ball, Finck, Beck and Short will
join up with St. Francis Junior
College transfers Gery Boucher,
Sean Gray and Zack Fine in the
ECU transition game. Sopho-
more Cory Miller and junior
Andy Miller played well before
being injured last season, and
should return to battle for a spot
in the starting lineup. With 10 of
17 goals coming from the Pirate
midfield in 1991, the success of
the unit could make or break the
team in 1992.
The weakness of past Pirate
teams has always been offense�
actually, the lack of it. Theeffects
of Coach Carey's first recruiting
class will immediately be seen in
the Pirate attack. Freshmen
Michael Belk, Marc Mullin, An-
drew Racine and Dan Staton look
to add bite to an East Carolina
offense that averaged less than a
goal per game last season and
was held scoreless nine times.
All are touted as quick, ag-
gressive players with a history of
being able to find the back of the
net: Mullin, a semi-local product
from Jacksonville High School
may be the best of the frosh, and
holds great promise as a offen-
sive star.
Racine and Staton are fastand
should be able to beat opposing
defenders.
The Pirates open the 1992 sea-
son hosting Mount Olive College
at ECU Field on Sept. 7 in a 3 P.M.
start. The Pirates lead the series
3-0 and hope to start the season
with a win. ECU then travels to
Chapel Hill on Sept. 9 to battle
the Tarheels in a 7 p.m. contest
under the lights.
Other non-conference oppo-
nents include Virginia Common-
wealth (Sept. 16), Methodist (Sept.
22), Barton College (Oct. 24) and
North Carolina State (Oct. 28).
The Pirates open up Colonial
Athletic Association play on Sept.
19 in Greenville against the Uni-
versity of Richmond, which
posted a 2-4-1CA A record in 1991.
ECU then plays UNC
Wilmington, William & Mary,
George Mason, James Madison,
Old Dominion and American be-
fore the CAA Tournament, Nov.
5-8.
The tournamentpits the eight
Colonial teams against each other
in a three-round, single-elimina-
tion title chase. The winner of the
tournament receives an auto-
matic bid to the NCAA Division
I Tournament.
In 1985, the first year of CAA
play, American advanced
through the field before falling
to UCLA in the National Cham-
pionship game, 1-0, in overtime.
WELCOME BACK ECU STUDENTS
Spoil's
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Personalized Service To Meet Your Needs
Let me try to meet or beat any locally advertised sale
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18 Tarheel Drive For Appointment Call
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Would like to Wei ome
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Newman's Version of "Mass at Camelot"
Fall Semester Campus Mass Schedule
Sundays at 11:30 am and 8:30 pm at the Newman Center
Wednesday 5:30 pm at the Newman Center
followed by a meal
953 East 10th Street (at the foot of College Hill Drive)
757-0376 757-1991
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain and Campus Minister
For more information about these and other programs sponsored by the Newman Center
call or visit the Center daily between 8:30 am & 11 pm.
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0
ifriNlllWlll I 111 III
32 The East Carolinian
AUGUST 26. 1992
Golf team 'robbed1 of NCAA Division I bid
By Bob Owens
Staff Writer
Season doesn't continue in national tourney
"We wuz robbed
Never vocalized, these must
be the thoughts of an East Caro-
lina golf team that finished in the
top three in five out of seven tour-
naments in 1992, only to be passed
over in the selection of teams for
the 1992 NCAA Division I Golf
Tournament.
ECU started off the 1992 sea-
son March 6-8 at the Ben Hogan-
Fripp Island Intercollegiate and
finished first behind Pirate golfer
Andrew Anderson, who shot a
104-116220, good for second
place in the individual standings.
The Pirates then hosted their own
Sheraton-Emerald Intercollegiate at
the Emerald golf course in New Bern,
N.C. EastCarolina won the event in
1991, but had to settle for third in
1992.
Trey Jervis was the individual
leader for ECU, finishing with a
76-72-72220.
The team had a weak show-
ing at the Furman Intercollegiate,
coming in a disappointing 10th
place. Anderson finished in 22nd
with a seven-over-par 223.
The Pirates hosted the 1992
Colonial Athletic Association
Championships for the second
consecutive year at the Wilson
Country Club, April 10-12.
East Carolina had won the
league title four of the last five
years, and was hoping to repeat
once more.
Coach Hal Morrison's squad
came through once more, this ti me
behind senior Jeff Craig. Craig,
who had been having problems
with consistency throughout his
career, put together a tournament
record four-under-par perfor-
mance (70-72-68-214) to win indi-
vidual medalist honors.
Morrison's Pirates then went
on to win the Super District Tour-
nament in Charlotte, N.C.
The Super District, designed
as a NCAA qualifying match, put
the third victory of the season un-
der the pirates' collective belt.
Craig, red-hot and still on a roll
from the C A A Championship, led
the team with a one-over-par 216,
good for second overall.
The Pirates then competed in
the Cavalier Intercollegiate and
the John Ryan-Iron Duke Invita-
tional while waiting for what was
almost a certain bid for the 1992
NCAA Division I Golf Champi-
onships.
The team finished a distracted
11th at the Cavalier and tied for
third at the John Ryan before learn-
ing the shocking news: they didn't
qualify.
East Carolina qualified for
the 1991 NCAAs with only two
first place finishes and only five
top-five finishes for the season.
The team was forced to sit and
watch as other teams from Dis-
trict III - teams with coaches on
the NCAA Team Selection Com-
mittee found their way into the
NCAA Regionals with much infe-
rior records.
Feeling cheated and angry,
look for the 1991-92 team to come
on hard in the 1992 fall season.
The team is returning seniors are
Andrew Anderson, Keith
Hadelman and Mike Teague in
1992-93. Anderson and Teague
both have top-two finishes indi-
vidually since 1991. Andersonand
Hadelman, both JUCO transfers,
were on the Central Alabama
Community College team that
won the National Junior College
Athletic Association National
Championship in 1990.
Other expected starters for '92-
'93 are sophomores Dave Coates
and Derek Royster. Coates played
in four tournaments in the spring
of 1992and should farewell in the
fall. Royster and red-shirt fresh-
man Trey Wilson each played in
onetournamentduringthespring.
Welcome Back Pirates
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s.
34 The East Carolinian
AUGUST 26, 1992
Payne's recruiting class helps ease pain of nightmare season and three blown knees
By Robert S. Todd &
Chas Mitch1
Sports Editors
It has been said that you can't
know where you're going if you
don't know where you've been.
While this old cliche still holds
true, ECU's men's basketball sea-
son may best be forgotten. The
"nightmare season Head Coach
Eddie Payne once described,
ended in Richmond at the hands
of American University, 76-69.
"We had to shuffle our line-
ups and our rotations constantly
Payne said. "We never, really, got
our chemistry set. The team was
always in flux �people's roles
were changing and they never re-
ally got a chance to get comfort-
able
Payne's first season at the
helm of the Bucs' ship began
smoothly. Excluding losses to
Duke and Cincinnati, both nation-
ally ranked and on their home
courts, ECU played .500 basket-
ball through their first 12 games.
Then they had their legs swept
out from under them�literally.
Ike Copeland, described by
Payne as the heart and soul of the
team, went down with the first
anterior cruciate ligament tear.
Then Kevin Armstrong. Then Jeff
Whitaker. All three on the right
knee (so much for starting things
out on the right foot).
Without Copeland at center
the Pirates lost eight of their next
ten games. With Copeland in the
line-up, ECU took conference co-
champion James Madison to over-
time.
Pirate faithfuls should not be
too disappointed, however. With
42 player games lost to injury, it
would be unfair to Payne and the
entire team to expect much more
that their 10-18 record, and sixth
place finish. The 10-18 record ties
the ninth worst record in school
history.
ECU played in a team record
fiveovertimegames, winning two,
while losing six games by five
points or less. If Copeland, Arm-
strong and Whitaker are worth six
points extra per game, the Bucs'
record would have been 16-12.
That may be a little optimistic
but, "We lost eight ball games in
the last 30 seconds Payne said.
"When you look
at it from that
perspective you
know, or believe
you could have
done a little bet-
ter
To bring up
any more of the
disappointment
and losing streaks (the longest be-
ing eight games) of this season
would not be therapeutic.
The season is over and no one
can give us a chance to take away
the mistakes that were made, the
free throws that were missed, the
knees that snapped and the hearts
that broke.
A glimmer of hope still shines
through in the thoughts of next
year's basketball season. Lester
Lyons will be trying to improve to
first team all-C A A from this year's
second team honor, and be, per-
haps, the premier guard inthecon-
ference as a junior.
Ike Copeland will be back at
full strength, hopefully. "(If Copel-
and) spends all his time working
on his knee, he doesn't have any
time to work on his game Payne
"We never, really, got our chemistry
set. The team zvas always influx -peoples
roles were changing and they never really
got a chance to get comfortable
�Coach Eddie Payne
said. With Copeland's work ethic
and optimism, he is likely to be
ready for the challenge of next sea-
son. However, he may have to
share time with James Lewis.
"I think (playing Lewis more)
really helped him Payne said.
"As a senior I expect him to be a
really solid performer. He defend s
so well. The seven-footers he plays
against. He gives all those guys
problems
The Bucs will also employ the
service of Don Douglas and Ber-
nard Cooper, both standing a le-
gitimate 6-feet-10-inches tall and
220 plus pounds. Cooper, one of
the Twin Towers, attended the
alma mater of Lyons, Bertie high
School.
"They have good bodies and
can be physical Payne said of the
recruits. "They are not great play-
ers, but they could be good play-
ers. We don't have anybody 6-10,
230 and they can help us
"We need (our recruits-signed
and unsigned) to come in here and
be impacts on our program and
make our program better he
added.
After inking Cooper and Dou-
glas, Payne added a premier guard
to the Pirate program. Kareen Ri-
chardson offered his oral commit-
ment to ECU in April. Richardson
wanted to sign in the presence of
his coach, who was out of town on
vacation.
The 5-foot-l 1 -inch point gua rd
from Rantoul, 111 was named the
area Player of the Year. He aver-
aged 24.5 points per game and led
his team in rebounds, assists, steals
and scoring.
With three prospective re-
cruits, Payne set his sights on a
South Carolina "Tittlebig man
Greg James, a 6-foot-4 and one-
half inch forward from Eau Clair
High School in Columbia, S.C.
James will bring a lot to the
ECU program. He was named hon-
orable mention All-America in sev-
eral publications, including Hoop
Scoop and Cage Scope.
Wilber Hunter, a 6-foot5-inch
forward from Chowan College and
Simpson "Bump" Toliver of
Hargrave Military Prep School in
Chatham, Va were the final pros-
pects to sign their national letters
of intent to play basketball for
coach Eddie Payne.
Hunter averaged 16.4 points
and 6.7 rebounds per game for
Chowan last season. The Raleigh,
N.C native was voted Chowan's
MVP and named All-Carolina's
Conference last season. He was
named all-tournament in the Coal
Classic in Jasper, Ala. and
Chowan's own NBC Classic.
Hunter was also instrumental in
the Braves' run towards the 1992
NJCAA National Championship.
The Bucs should have their
first winning season since Blue
Edwards' departure with the blue
chip signees.
ECU has failed to put together
back-to-back winning seasons
since the 1974 and 1975 seasons
and have never had a wining
record in the CAA. Tradition may
be around the comer.
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Greenville
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Corner of 10th & Dickinson Ave. Greenville
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BACK
STUDENTS

PIRATE RIDE
Your answer to Late Night Campus Travel!
Hop on the silver van for safe and convenient
transportation throughout the ECU Campus
IS PARKING A
RIDE THE BUS!
ECU Transit provides bus
service for ALL fee paying
students to and from campus
Schedules and maps are
available at the Information
Desk in Mendenhall Student
Center
COMMUTER SHUTTLE
Can't find a Parking Space near Main Campus?
Try the Commuter Shuttle
Park in the lower Minges Parking Lot and catch
the silver van to Mendenhall
Operating Hours are:
MONDAY - FRIDAY 7:45am - 2:00pm
every 10 minutes
PIRATE RIDE SCHEDULE
(Sunday - Thursday, 8:00pm- 12:15am)
"Mendenhallon the hourCotten26 after the hour
Fletcher1 after the hourSchool of Nursing28 after the hour
Greene2 after the hourCroatan29 after the hour
Jarvis3 after the hourFletcher Music Bldgon the half hour
Joyner4 after the hour10th & College Hill29 til the hour
General Gassroom Bldg5 after the hourTop of the Hill.28 til the hour
Cotten6 after the hourMciiclcnhall 20 til the hour
School of Nursing8 after the hourFletcher19 til the hour
Croatan9 after the hourGreene18 til the hour
Fletcher Music Bldg10 after the hourJarvis17 til the hour
10th & College Hill11 after the hourJoyner . ,16 til'the hour
Top of the Hill12 after the hourGeneral Classroom Bldg15 til the hour "
Mendenhall20 uftcr the hourCotten14 til the hour
Fletcher21 after the hourSchool of Nursing12 til the hour
Greene22 after the hourCroatan11 til the hour
Jarvis23 after the hourFletcher Music Bldg10 til the hour
Joyner24 after the hour10th & College Hill9 til the hour
VGeneral Classroom Bid)?25 after the hourTop of the Hill8 til the hour
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL ECU TRANSIT AT 757-4724






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36 The East Carolinian
AUGUST 26, 1992
Lady Pirates moving to next level
By Chas Mitch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
After a 21-8 season and the
graduation of five seniors, ECU'S
women's basketball recruiting
goals were set.
First, a road trip to North-
west High School in Georgia was
needed to pay a visit to Belinda
Cagle.
Cagle, a 5-foot-10-inch guard,
who averaged 20 points a game
along with seven rebounds and
six assists, was the first recruit in
the Pierson stable.
"Belinda is the type of stu-
dent athlete we were looking for
to further the success of Lady Pi-
rate basketball said former
Head coach Pat Pierson. "She ex-
cels in athletic competition and is
also an outstanding student
Cagle, as team captain,
helped lead her high school squad
to a 19-8 record and to the Geor-
gia 2A Regional Championship.
In addition, she was named to the
Georgia Athletic All-Star Team
and to the Georgia-Tennessee All-
Star Team.
"She is a strong perimeter
shooter and, most of all, a very
versatile athlete Pierson said of
her first recruit.
Next, Pierson was on her way
to the state of Virginia. There she
had her eyes set on a jewel of a
player. Kisha Redcross would be
the next signee for the 1992-93
Lady Pirates team.
edcross, a 5-foot-ll-inch
four-year starting forward at
Gloucester High School, plays
Pierson's style of basketball.
"Kisha plays a similar game
to Tonya Hargrove and is the type
of recruit we were looking for to
replace her Pierson commented.
Hargrove was a two-time Lady
Pirate MVP and the 1990-91 Co-
lonial Athletic Association Player
of the Year.
Redcross averaged 15.2
points a game, nine boards and
shot 52 percent from the field.
She was also named to the Vir-
ginia High School All-Star team
and the All-District unit'
As to style and ability, Coach
Pierson said this of her second
recruit: "She is very physical and
goes hard to the basket. She defi-
nitely fits the description of a
power forward
With two recruits signed,
Pierson was still working for an-
other. As expected, she signed
her third recruit in 19 days.
Latesha Sutton from Green
Central High School, in Eastern
North Carolina, signed her letter
ofintent.Inhersenioryear,Sutton
was second in the eastern Plains
Conference in scoring (18.5 per
game), first in rebounding (12.9
per game) and fifth in steals (2.7
per game). As a 5-foot-9-inch
guard, she was a Daily Reflector
All-Area and East-West AH Star
selection.
"Latesha is an exceptional
athlete who can do a variety of
things on the basketball court
Pierson said of her latest signee.
Irvin leaves legacy in ECU Track History
By Chas Mithch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
Brian Irvin earned his sixth All-America
honor during his Pirate career over the week-
end at the 1992 NCAA Outdoor Track and Field
Championships, held in Austin, Texas.
Irvin, now the most decorated athlete in
ECU track and field history passes former Pirate
Lee Vernon McNeill with his most recenthonor.
McNeill (1986-89) earned five All-America
honors and was a member of the 1988 United
States Olympic team.
Irvin finished fifth at the NCAAs in the 400-
meter dash with a time of 45.45, setting a new
ECU mark. Irvin held the previous record of
45.72, which he set in 1991. Last year, Irvin
finished fifth at the NCAAs with a time of 46.46.
The Pittsburgh native's five other All-
America honors have been in the 400 meters and
as a member of ECU'S record-breaking 4x400-
meter relay team.
His first individual honor came in the 400
meters at the 1990 Outdoor Championships.
That same year, Irvin and the 4x400 meter
relay took All-America honors in the indoor
championship.
In 1991, Irvin earned three honors � two
with the relay team in the indoor and outdoor
NCAA championship and one individual in the
400 meters at the outdoor meet.
Having competed in the 1991 U.S. Track and
Field Championships and in the 1991 World
University Games, Irvin went on to compete in
the 1992 Olympic Trails.
Sprinting against the best in the nation, Irvin
finished seventh in his respective heat. Compet-
ing against the likes of Quincy Watts, Charles
Jenkins, Jr and Timothy Simon, Irving turned in
a 46.46 time and missed the Olympic Team by .75
of a second.
So the book is closed on the greatest track
and field athlete in ECU history and with Irvin
goes another Pirate success story.
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THE CITY OF GREENVILLE
WELCOMES BACK
ALL ECU STUDENTS
AND WISHES YOU A
SUCCESSFUL FALL SEMESTER!
HELPFUL HINTS
FROM THE CITY OF GREENVILLE
Want up-to-date information about
t City events and services?
Watch the government Access Channel
(Cable Channel 9) or call CITY-24 at
830-LNFO (4636).
tf�
v
Did you know that the City
of Greenville has a noise
ordinance? For details,
call 830-4426 or 830-
4331.
All City Council meetings are open to
the public. Call 830-4422 for meeting
dates and times, agenda information,
or to find out the name of your City
Council Representative.
��� 4fe The City's leash law
� requires (hat dogs be
J M kept on the owner's
W premises at all times
& unless on a leash.
Call 830-4387 to report dogs
running at large.
Share your knowledge and
expertise! All Greenville residents
are invited to apply to serve on one of
the City's Boards or Commissions.
Call 830-4423 for details.
Is your organization
looking for a community
service project? Help
keep Greenville clean'
and beautiful by
adopting a City street.
Call 830-4523 for details.
City ordinances prohibit the
posting of handbills, fliers, and
political signs on poles and
City rights-of-way.
Let's recycle today for a
greener tomorrow!
For the latest recycling
information,
call 830-4527.
The City has an ordinance which
limits the number of unrelated
individuals per residence.
Call 830-4507 for information.
City ordinances restrict
parking in front yards $
and the length of time fc "
persons may park on W��
City streets. For details
on parking regulations,
call 830-4525 or 830-4420.
September 7
October 24
November 3
November 11
November 18
November 26-27
December 5
December 24-25
DATES FOR YOUR FAT.T. r at.fmtap-
City offices closed for Labor Day
International Festival on the Evans Street Mall
Election Day
City offices closed for Veterans Day
"Caring is Sharing" Canned Food Collection Day
City offices closed for Thanksgiving
Holiday Parade and Festival of Lights
City offices closed for Christmas
For additional information about the City of Greenville, call 830-4420 or
refer to the City's Code of Ordinances on file in Joyner Library.
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Includes a Buttermilk Biscuit
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2 PIECE
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Includes a Buttermilk Biscuit �
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911 S. MEMORIAL DRIVE 757-3456
O O OO OOOO O O OOOO o 00000 0000c?





k
AUGUST 26. 1992
Baseball
Continued from page 29
Underdog
The East Carolinian 37
Continued from page. 29
ace, Beck, outfielder David Liesten,
who finished fifth in the confer-
ence in batting and third baseman
Glynn Beck, who hit .327 for the
season.
Beck will be sharpening his
tools in me Cape Cod League this
summer.
"(Playing with wood bats) re-
ally helps a pitcher a lot Beck
said. "You can pitch inside more�
there is more pop
Beck may already have enough
"pop He finished second in the
league in strike outs, with 91. Beck
was only eight off the lead despite
pitching 15 less innings than league
leader Stephen Lyons of Old Do-
minion University.
Playing in the summer leagues,
Beck said, will give him a chance to
work on his pitching and get expe-
rience from players from all over
the country.
"(Next season) I expect to be a
lot better than 7-7 Beck said. "I
feel like a ten win pitcher
"Johnny Beckhad two fine sea-
sons Overton said. "Wehad very
little run production for him. If we
can get from Johnny as we have the
previous two years, then he will
have done an excellent job
Immediate help for next sea-
son will be readily available if all of
next season's commitments come
through.
"We haven't released our re-
dlining listyet, but wehavesigned
a freshman who can hit and prob-
ably play right away Overton
said. "We've also signed a JUCO
transferwhowasaprettyhighdraft
choice out of high school
"In a nutshell, we're very
happy with the recruits we've had
this Spring
The idea thatawinningseason
seems dismal, as well as being the
worst in school history, says a lot
about the overall strength of the
program.
The Pirates will not suffer
through another "disappointing"
winning season next year. Should
the Bucs hold onto Kushner and
their recruits, they may bring home
one more flag for Harrington Field.
and the ECU offense.
N.C. State, Pittsburgh, Virginia
Tech and Syracuse � all wins com-
ing from heart and soul. Then again,
all 11 Pirate victories ca me fromheart
and soul.
But by-gones will be by-gones.
The 1991 season is over. All the glory
and celebration of winning the Peach
Bowl and being ranked No. 9 by the
Associated Press is finished. Atlanta
is no longer purple and gold and the
criticsarehavereturned to theirtradi-
tional no-belief status of the Pirate
program.
As the 1992 season starts, so does
a new era of ECU footba U. The Pirates
have the opportunity to become a
power-house�aMiami,NotreDame
or Florida State. But it will take one
game at a time, one season at a time.
Everyone in Greenville knows
ECU has the abil i ry. The team has the
talent, they have the coach and they
have the heart and soul.
Losingagamedoesnotmeanthe
season is a failure. All teams lose, but
reboundingfromlosingiswhatmakes
a good team.
It's time to silence the critics once
and for all. Be a part of the 1992 Pirate the making.
season in what ever capacity you can. Seeing is believing.
You just may be a part of a legend in
Like sports? Can you write? The East
Carolinian needs sports writers. Call
757-6366 or drop by the Student
Publication building for an application.
Greenville Grand Slam
�Indoor BasketballSoftball Batting Range
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Gas is the same low price with cash or credit at BP
ATTIC
752-7303 I 5091.3th St
WELCOME 1 BACK ECU!
Attic's 0 Fall Line-Up
IoikI;i. Aiiinist 24
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Starti� September 7 - Cowboys vs. Redskins
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The
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Sunday. August 29
PROGRESSIVE DANCE NIGHT
$4 COVER � 0 DRAFT
FREE Jumps on the Attic Volcro Wall
starting September 13

WELCOME BACK '92
HEY ECU
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m -� .�-
V.
38 The East Carolinian
AUGUST 26. 1992
ECU Track and Field News
Men's track team receives national relay honors
By Bob Owens
Staff Writer
Faster than a speeding bullet.
The East Carolina men's track team
might not be that fast, but they were
close enough to send relay teams to
the NCAA Indoor and Outdoor
Championships and get six AU-
AmericahonorsforseniorBrianlrvin.
Irvin earned his sixth and final
All-America award at the 1992
NCAA Outdoor Track and field
Championship in Austin, Texas. He
finished third in his preliminary heat
and finished fifth overall with a time
of 45.45 in the 400 meters.
The award gives Irvin the ti tie as
the most decorated athlete in East
Carolina Track and Field history. He
passes former Pirate Lee Vernon
McNeil (1986-89), who was a five-
time All-American and a member of
the 1988 United StatesOlympic4x400
meter relay team.
The 4x400 squad of Irvin, Junior
Davis, Fred Owensand Corey Brooks
were NCAA provisional qualifiers
after running away from the field
with a blistering 3:06.94 at the Sun
Angel Track Classic in Tempe, Ari-
zona. East Carolina failed to ad-
vance in the qualifying round s when
Irvin, suffering from a leg injury in-
curred earlier in the meet, came up
short on the anchor leg of the race.
The Pirates finished sixth with a time
of 3:08.11.
The 4x200 meter relay team,
made up of Irvin, Damon DeSue,
Danny Allette and Charles Miles set
a new ECU and Mobile One Invita-
tional record with a time of 1:26.93.
ECU Head Coach Bill Carson
hopes that the depth and determina-
tion that was the hallmark of last
season's squad will carry over into
this year. All-Americans Corey
Brooks and Junior Davis return ex-
perience to a powerful 4x400 meter
relay team that may include 4x200
meter relay star Damon DeSue.
The 4x200 meter relay will fea-
ture DeSue, Allette, Miles and junior
ErikDillard.
The Pirates will do well in the
100 and 200 meter events behind
DeSue, Allette and Brent Gibson.
DeSue rana21.21 in the 200 metersat
the Colonial Athletic Association
Track Championship in 1992 to set a
new conference record. Allette fin-
ished a respectable sixth in theevent.
Gibson, only a sophomore, was
the Georgia State 100 meter cham-
pion when at Warner Robbins high
school and shows great promise as a
sprinter.
The Pirates will open the spring
indoor track season in January,
though the exact meets and times
have yet to be decided.
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Ladies burn track for 18 first place finishes
By Bob Owens
Staff Writer
The Lady Pirate track squad re-
turned several familiar faces in 1992,
enough to take 18 first place finishes
in seven spring meets.
The team started off with a bang
in 1992, capturing seven first place
finishes in the UNC Wilmington
Seahawk All-Comers meet Feb. 22.
Susan Shram, a senior, got
enough on her throw in the discus
competition to qualify her for the
EC ACV Championshi psand win the
event with a distance of 132'2
Not bad for die first meet of the
season. Shram also did well in the
shot put, winning that with a dis-
tance of my.
She struck again in the shot put
in Wilmington three weeks later, this
time at theSeahawk Invitational, and
won yet again at the UNC Five-Way
meet in Chapel Hill. Shram broke
her own ECU school record of 44T
4" with a throw of 44'45
It was March 27 before Shram
finished anywhere other man the
front of the pack, finishing a dismal
sixth in the shot with a distance of
42'65
The senior from High Point went
on to grab two more firsts and a third
in the shot, and broke her own record
for the second time in the season
with a distance of 44T1.2" at the
season-ending Gamecock Invita-
tionalattheUniversityofSouth Caro-
lina.
Speedster Danita Roseboro, a
junior from Winston-Salem, led the
Lady Pirate effort in the 100 and 200
meter sprints. Like Shram, Roseboro
struck early, winning bom the 100
and 200 meters at the Seahawk All-
Comers meet at UNC Wilmington.
Sheranawayfromthefieldagain
three weeks later at the same venue,
winningboth the 100 meters and 200
meters at the Seahavc Invitational
for the second year in a row.
In the Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion Championships Roseboro set a
new meet record with a timeof 24.60
in the 200 meters. She also captured
the 100 meters crown with a wind-
assisted 12.14 effort. Overall she cap-
tured three firsts in the 100 meters
and four in the 200 meters races. She
also placed second in the St.
Augustine's meet and placed third
at the Raleigh Relays.
The tea m inked seven in the 1992
signing period, including a local
product in Darlene Vick, a discus
thrower from FarmvilleCentral Hi gh
School. Jennifer Kalanick, Christy
Rogers, NicoleCrews,Shantel Carter,
Megan McGruder and Stephanie
Stoner also signed with the Lady
Pirates.
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u
AUGUST 26, 1992
The East Carolinian 39
Lady Luck casts evil spell on Softball team
By Chas Mithch'l
Assistant Sports Editor
At the start of the 1992 Lady
Pirate fast pitchsof tball season, Head
coach Sue Manahan was sitting
pretty. Not only did she return with
each player from the 1991 Colonial
Athletic Association championship
team, but, she added an additional
player (Sheri Allen) to help fill the
catching duties behind the plate.
As the season began, senior co-
captains Chanel Hooker and Laura
Crowder led the Lady Bucs into a
year which would place ECU fast
pitch in the spotlight of the nation.
Pitchers Jenny Parsons (38-13),
Georgeann Wilke (4-3) and Tammy
Newman (3 appearances) turned in
outstanding pitching performances,
while seniors Christy Kee and
Mechelle Jones added to the defen-
sive scheme with their aggressive
style of play.
The Pirates jumped to a quick
11-0 start averaging seven runs a
game while only allowing the oppo-
sition one run a game.
Defense played a crucial part in
the Pirate winning sty le, wi th sopho-
mores Stephanie Hobson, Lisa
Coreprew, Laume Farrington and
Michelle Ward steppingupwithcali-
ber defense. The pitching staff was
able to keep the heat on the opposi-
tion.
Juniors Cammie Smith and
Cherly Hobson sparked the Pirate
offense, as ECU picked up big wins
against Wright State, Drake Univer-
sity and North Carolina.
Now witha42-16overall record,
several prestigious tournament win-
nings under theirbelt and numerous
school and national records set, tied
or broken, the moment of truth had
arrived.
Among other accomplishments
this season, Manahan recorded her
300th career win and is now 314-171
(.647) in just her 11th season as ECU
head coach.
Although the sun continued to
shine on the Lady Pirates, darkness
was on the horizon. ECU received a
post-season invitation from the NIC
committee to take part in the 1992
National Invitational Championship
to be held in Illinois.
But as the champagne flowed
and happiness was abound, reality
set in. ECUdid not receive a bid from
the NCAA to play in the 1992 Na-
tional Championship in Oklahoma;
however, the NIC host team, Uni-
versity of Chicago at Illinois, did re-
ceive a NCAA bid and was forced to
postpone the tournament.
So this record breaking season
ends at 42-16 and says good-bye to
fiveseniors that will be sorely missed.
Whether for their contributions in
the defensive field or at the plate,
Crowder, Hooker, Jones, Newman
and Keepaved theway fornextyear's
team to carry on the winning tradi-
tion.
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1992 Pirate Football Preview
Inside'Preview'
Football Schedule
Profile: Greg Granriison s
Profile: Jerry Dillon





1992 FOOTBALL PREVIEW
The East Carolinian 2
The East Carolinian
1992 Football Preview Staff
James R. Knisel Manager
Jennifer A. Wardrep,Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius , fAdvertising
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Chas Mitch I, tant Sports Editor
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
1992 Football Schedule
DateOpponent
Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept. Oct.5 12 19 26 10SYRACUSE (Pirate Club Weekend) VIRGINIA TECH (Parent's Day) at South Carolina at Bowling Cireen art Duke
Oct. Oct.17 24CINCINNATI (Homecoming) at Pittsburgh
Oct.29SOUTHERN MISS (ESPN)
No7at West Virginia
Nov.14ARKANSAS STATE
Nov.21at Memphis Slate
Time
7:00 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
1:30p.m.
1:30 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m. �
Nocontroveisy, just competition for 1992 QB rositiorT
Bv Warwn C�m� W" "��3�
By Warren Sumner
Sports Writer
He is the l(f the teamHt
be responsibility f
tht' team ell, ht
algod until the nextSaturda
tea mfunctions poorh, he n
be;a great deal of tlie ridiciIeHis
�rmance is alwaysinqueston,�
mbyhim.Heeithr gainsmostot

ime. "We're trying to
HI m stress to everyone
the football . , -
quarter- lt s notdfight, it's
And a competition.
this is ,im- ti i' i i
i fiat s what people
need to realize
�Sean McConnell,
ECU quarterback
candidate
ply the na
ture
position.
aretwovol
unteers t.
bear this responsibility for Eastaro-
lina. Two men who want their �
to be tested, to be given the opportu-
nity to walk the tightrope between vic-
tory and defeat once-a-week in the
monthsahead.Botharequalified.both
are ready, but only one of them can
gain the position they so eagerly an-
ticipate. Only one can emerge as the
recognized leader of thePirate football
team.
Sean McConnell and Michael
Anderson, twoclosefriends,havebeen
competing to be that leader for the
entire pre-season.Theoutcomeof their
competition will be decided i n Sept. 5,
at EC U'shomegameagainst Syracuse
With memories of the 19V I ast
( arolina offensive assault still fresh on
the minds of Pirate football faithful,
many eyes are watching the race for
this year's starting quarterback very
closely. One of the two participants,
senior Sean McConnell or sophomore
Michael Anderson, will beexpected to
Senior Sean McConnell and sophomore Michael Anderson will h� c Ph.u8by Da" Reed ECaro"�"
step from the shadow of 1991 Pirate
star quarterback Jeff Blake, and take
over leadership of the 1992 Pirate of-
fense. Both are competing fiercely to
seize the position, and are preparing
for the pressure of living up to the
Blake legacy. Many would say such
pressure would set these two friends
at odds with each other, but McConnell
and Anderson don't seem to agree
"We're trying to stress to every-
one it's not a fight, it's a competition
McConnell said "That's what people
new! to realize He said that the recent
competitiveness between him cnd
Anderson has strengthened their
friendship.
Andersonagreesandisquiteada-
rnant about how close he and
McConnell are. "Sean is like a brother
to me he said. "If he gets the position,
that's fine. Anything he does I will
tongratulate him
While personally similar, these
two athletes are very different physi-
cally, and in their style of play
Mc( onnell is a precision passer, well
suited tor standard quarterback of-
fense. Anderson is more mobile, better
suited for an option game. McC onnell
has the temperance of maturity and
age, while Anderson has height and a
strongarm. Both saw action asa backup
to Blake but both have question i arks
astorheirexperience.McConnelI prob-
ably stacks up more favorably in that
category, but still must prove he can
handle runningEastCarolina'soffense.
Someone meeting Sean
McConnell for the first time, may have
no indication that he plays Division 1
football. Heis strictly "Joe Average" at
6'2"and 192 lbs. Hecould just as easily
be the "bud" that you may be sitting
beside in the library. Anderson,how-
ever,does not share that characteristic.
At h'4" and 227 lbs hecould bea kgiti
mate candidate for linebacker
Anderson's height will be quite effec-
See QB's. page 6





3 The East Carolinian
1992 FOOTBALL PREVIEW
Player profile: Greg Grandison
Grandison top candidate for Thorpe Award
m
& I

if
i.
By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
His typical summer day
was started with the intermit-
tent buzz of an alarm, early
enough to get him into the
weightroomby 5:30a.m. Class
from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. and
then to thepractice field a half-
hour later. Five or six hours of
physical torture and Greg
Grandison finds himself back
in his room debating over
books or the comforting arms
of his blankets.
His room in Jarvis was
crowded with two beds, and a
table that supports a large tele-
vision, VCR and game tapes.
Sunshine from the window of-
fered relief from the yellow
light in the ceiling, but made
thecracked walls'need of paint
more apparent. A large ESPN
banner, signed by ECU's foot-
ball team, covered most of the
wall next to his bed.
The television flickered
and gray lines rolled up the
screen. His library of game
tapes have been worn from
constant use. "It helps me read
offenses and notice other
player's tendencies Grandi-
son said in his naturally soft-
spoken vjice. "That's my big-
gest asset. I know how to read
offenses and patterns
All the blood, sweat and
time he has given has started
to bring rewards. His name is
on the cover of the Sporting
News' 1992 College Yearbook
and, inside, a list of the leading
candidates for the Thorpe
award (given to the top defen-
sive back in nation) is headed
with his name. Grandison car-
ries 218 pounds on his quick,
6-foot-2-inch frame, prompt-
ing the Sporting News to de-
scribe him as the prototypical
NFL strong safety. His mother
describes him as a Blow Pop
and calls him Pop, for short. "I
was a little, bitty boy with a big
head Pop explained.
The University of Horida
had no room for, what they
Greg Grandison shows he does not carry his hard-core attitude off the field
mistakenly felt, was a person
with a big head. After starting
three games as a freshman for
the Gators, he sat on the bench
becauseof personal differences
with the coach.
When Steve Spurrier
took over the coaching duties,
Grandison was asked to leave.
"I guess I got labeled a
bad guy Grandison said. "1
guess he was trying to get rid
of all the bad apples ECU's
football team has had no prob-
lems with his alleged attitude.
Bad apple or not (he is
more of a diamond in the
rough), Grandison, who hails
from football juggernaut
Booker T. Washington High
School in Pensacola, Fla was
rated one of the top 20 high
school players in the nation at
defensive back and All-Area
as a wide receiver. When the
UF coaching staff wanted to
move him to linebacker be-
cause of the presence of defen-
sive back Will White, Grandi-
son said he knewitwas time to
leave.
"It was a personal duel
between me and Will White
Grandison said. "I knew I
See Grandison, page 7





4 The East Carolinian
1992 FOOTBALL PREVIEW
��
Jerry "J-Dog" Dillon on the prowl for ECU
By Bob Owens
Sports Writer
The speed of a greyhound, the power of a
great Dane and the tenacity of an English bulldog.
Beware � "J-Dog Jerry Dillon, is on the prowl.
DiUoa 6-4,215 lbs has always loved sports.
At Lake Placid High School in Lake Placid, Fla he
earned three letters in football, track and basketball.
Football, however, was always his game.
Playing both ways, Dilloneamed recognition
as a tight end, kicker and linebacker. His status as an
All-Heartland Conference, all-state and all-county
choice brought him to the attention of then East
Carolina Head Coach Art Baker.
Redshirted his freshman year in 1988, Dillon
became the heart of the Pirate special teams in 1989
under a new and little known head coach named
Bill Lewis. He played in all 11 games during the
season, backing starter Anthony Thompson and
servingonthespecial teams unit. Dillon recorded 30
tackles on the year, including three behind the line
of scrimmage for a total of 11 yards lost He was
named Special Teams Player of the Week in the 40-
10 loss to Miami. For Pirate faithful, it was a hint of
things to come.
Hissophomorecampaign broughtopposing
teams to their knees�90 times, 51 of which were
unassisted tackles. It was his firstyear as a starter, a
duty Dillon didn't take lightly. Against Northern
Illinois, he recorded a career-high 17 tackles, the
final one on the last play of the game to preserve the
Pirates' 24-20 victory.
1991 was the Year of the Pirate in North
Carolina, with the Pirates putting together a season
that saw 100 school records fall on the way to a 11-
1 season thatended with a come-from-behind 37-34
win against N.C. State in the Peach bowl on Jan. 1.
Dillonstartedall 12 games atdefensive end and was
credited with 75 tackles on the season, 36 of them
solo and one of them for a seven yard loss in the last
minutes of the Peach Bowl that wilted State's last
chance to win the game. The "Dream Season" was
over, with the only blemish on the Pirates' record a
season-opening 38-31 loss to Illinois. To some, the
loss was uj i rgettable.
"1991 io gone Dillon said. "The Peach Bowl
is gone. We have to concentrate on this season A
preseason All-America candidate,Dillon begins his
senior campaign under the reins of his third head
coach in five years, ECU's former offensive coordi-
nator Steve Logan. The grin and anticipation in his
voice tells you that the 1992 defense and their new
defensive schemes fits his style of play very well,
thank you.
'Talent-wise, we(theteam)havejustasmuch
ability as we did last year he said. "We've got a
really good scheme. It's wide open, first come, first
served � totally different from what we did last
year
Dillon figures to do some head-hunting in
1992. "It's a one-on-one, go-to-the-ball kind of de-
See Dillon, page 3
"J-Dog" will be terrorizing opposing offenses and may ease
the pain of losing Ail-American Robert Jones to the NFL.
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Ii
5 The East Carolinian
1992 FOOTBALL PREVIEW
Pirate's conditioning credit goes to Conners
By Warren Sumner
Sports Writer
The Werewolf, Dr. Jeckyl and Mr.
Hyde, The Incredible Hulk. We have all
heard the stories of mild-mannered men
who transform into insane beasts, s'k-
ing terror into the hearts of mortal men.
We have all seen and heard the tales of
horror when the vampire controls the
peasant countryside, or when the mad
scientist tortures his helpless victim.
But little does the university town
of Greenville know that there is a resi-
dent split-personality lurking in its col-
lege athletic department. On the surface
heappears to bea mild-mannered coach,
but on the practice fields of EastCarolina
University, he inflicts a living hell on the
players of the Pirate football team. In his
black cauldron, he stirs up his brew of
torture, his agonizing spells guaranteed
to bring sickening groans of pain from
any athlete under their effect More sick-
ening than this torture, however, is the
frightening knowledge that his victims
are willing to endure this pain, that they
asked font And Jeff Connors,directorof
Sowgtii and Conditioning, is more than
willing to oblige them.
VVhenthesentorsofthePiratefoot-
ball team informed head coach Steve
Logan thatthey
wanted to in-
crease their
level of physi-
cal condition-
ing, theydidn't
know exactly
whattheywere
asking for.
Connors, and
his assistant
Tom Howley,
immediately
began work
that the Pirate
players have
been shaking
their heads about over the entire pre-
season.
"We're setting out to increase
toughness said Connors. "We'd like to
achieve a balance between nutrition,
agility and speed.
"Our kids took pride in our fourth-
quarter success and conditioning he
said. The 1991 East Carolina football
team out-scored its opponents in the
second and fourthquarters,adirect indi-
cation of their outstanding physical con-
dition. In the fourth quarter, the Pirates
out-scored their opponents nearly 2-1.
Pirate players were so pleased with
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"I do not enjoy
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winning is the
grind of prepara-
tion
�Jeff Conners,
director of strength
and conditioning
Connors'work thatthey gavehim stand-
ing ovations after many of the games last
season.
Pirate players are not clapping for
Connors after practices, however. Prob-
ably because they are too fatigued to lift
their arms.
Connors runs the players through
a strict regimen of aerobic exercises dur-
ing eveiy practice. Theplayersalsomust
do sprints, bear crawls, and five 300-yd
runs after each practices. Connors' ses-
sions this year are an upgrade from last
year's strenuous practices.
Connors has implemented his
philosophiesofccrKditioningtraininginto
ECU's program He manipulates three
variables of training: frequency, volume
and, most importantly, intensity. "This
is the number one factor for athletic suc-
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Connors laughsathis playerscom-
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like 'lunatic descriptions like "crazy
he even laughs off his characterization
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Connors isnotawellhumanHe smiles,
perhaps in defenseof his alter-ego. "I do
not enjoy punishment" he said, "but
will do whatever it takes. Part of win-
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Perhaps Connors expects people
outside of the football program to be-
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perf ectry calm, sane coach simply doing
his job. Maybe he even expects his play-
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But what aboutSyracuse? Or Pitt?
Or Virginia Tech? Connors' condition-
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1992 FOOTBALL PREVIEW
QB'S
tive for reading defensive schemes.
Head Coach Steve Logan feels that
Anderson's ability to move in the
pocket is one of his stronger points.
This ability will help Anderson avoid
contact with opposing linebackers.
Anderson, however, was weaned
on contact by his brother, Willie, who
plays for theNBA'sSan Antonio Spurs.
"My brother got me interested in
basketball Anderson said. "There is
usually some contact in that From
there, Anderson moved to other sports,
participating through high school in
track and basketball, as well as his
current sport of football. Anderson, at
the urging of his family, excelled in
football, playing quarterback and set-
ting a school record of 2500 yards
passing in his senior year at Crim High
School in Decatur, Ga.
Anderson was very involved in
extracurricular activities in high school
and started civic work there which has
carried into his college years. Ander-
son devotes some time to the Boy's
Club, stressing education to under-
privileged youths. "The work I do
makes me really proud he said. "If I
could get one child to stay in school it's
worthwhile
Similarly, McConnell also was
active in his high school, but more on a
The East Carolinian 6
Continued from page 2
"Michael is definitely a better ath-
lete. All he needs is a little matu-
rity and experience. He's going to
break Jeffs Blake records in these
next three years
�Sean McConnell of teammate
Michael Anderson
social level, with deep involvement in
clubs, and a nomination as Homecom-
ing King, in addition to lettering in
football. "I
guess I was a
popular
guy he
said. "I guess
I still am,
here. I feel
like a lot of
theguyslook
up to me as a
role model.
Sometimes I
don't like being in that position
Involved with his church as a
youth leader, McConnell brings a
strong religious background to his ath-
letic and personal life. "It keeps me in
line he said. "It shows me there is a
right way and a wrong way to live
your life. It plays a big part in my
head
McConnell, like Anderson, was
blessed with a close family. He has a
younger sister and calls his parents as
his friends. "When I go home, I do
more with my parents and their friends
man I do with mine
Anderson and McConnell sup-
port each other in the race for quarter-
back, but both are set on being the
"number-one man
"In my own mind, I don't think
I'm that great of a quarterback
McConnell said.
"Michael is defi-
nitely a better
athlete. All he
needs is a little
maturity and ex-
perience. He's
going to break
Jeff's records in
these next three
years
McConnell said
that he thinks the team may have a
li ttle more respect for him than Ander-
son, solely due to his age and experi-
ence, but he shares their confidence in
Anderson's ability.
"I'd choose Mike if I didn't think
I was getting the job done McConnell
said. Anderson is equally complimen-
tary of McConnell, but is still focused
on his goal of starting this season. "If I
didn't want to be the starting quarter-
back I'd have no reason to be out on the
field Anderson still harbors the goal
of starting in all 11 games this season,
even though the word from the Pirate
camp has McConnell starting the game
against Syracuse, with Anderson see-
ing equal action.
McConnell and Anderson are
both bracing for the onslaught of Jeff
Blake comparisons that will inevitably
rain from Pirate faithful.
"Jeff and I were a lot alike
McConnell said. "We both joke around
a lot on the field. I feel like it is impor-
tant to keep your team loose and con-
centrating on the play. If I ever see
someone too tight and keyed up to the
point where they may make a mistake
I will immediately crack a joke,or make
a face, anything to bring about that
release McConnell has a strategy for
dealing with the fans' high expecta-
tions from Blake's success: "Just forget
about it. Jeff did great things here, but
he's gone; no one can bring him back
McConnell is prepared to accept
whatever role he is assigned this year
to the best of his ability. He said he
would understand if Anderson was
given the starting position, and would
do anything to help his friend get
through the season.
McConnell is already talking to
Coach Logan about coming back to
East Carolina as a graduate assistant
coach of quarterbacks. Regardless of
who starts this season that would pro-
vide Pirate fans the chance to see these
two friends work together for a few
years to come.
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7
The East Carolinian
1992 FOOTBALL PREVIEW
Grandison
Continued from page 3
could play free safety Now the entire
nation knows it.
Like two gunmen at high-noon,
Grandison has drawn his gun first.
According to the Sporting News, Whi te
has lacked consistency and is ranked
six places behind Grandison at defen-
sive back. Grandison is aiming for the
heart.
"I felt bad because I was leaving
real close friends I had played with in
high school Grandison said But, in
a way, I think I really benefited from
it
ECU's football team also reaped
benefits. After playing only six games
at Pearl River Junior College, Grandi-
son was ruled ineligible by the NCAA.
ECU was lucky to sign him.
'It was between Ole Miss and
EastCarolina Grandison said. "1 com-
mitted to Ole Miss, bu t then, on my trip
up there, they had this gathering and
pulled out all these Rebel flags and it
kind of set me off. If I had never seen a
flag,I'd probably be an Ole Miss Rebel,
although the name does not fit me
ECU owes Ole Miss a favor for
pulling out those flags. Grandison will
be indispensable m thecomingseason.
"Grandison is one of the team's
hardesthitters'said MikeCassity, de-
fensive back coach. He is not only one
"I don't want to be remembered for anything, really. If
someone brought my name up I would just want them to say,
'he was a good guy you know, friendly, a hell of a football
player�he did what it took. A guy who gave his all and just
tried to be the best person he could be
of the hardest hitters, he is one of the
most prolific. Grandison led the sec-
ondary in tackles, while placing sec-
ond in total stops, behind All-Arneri-
can linebacker, Robert Jones, with 100.
Until he gave up a touchdown
against Tulane, last season, Grandison
said he had never been beaten on a
play. "People may not believe it, but
never in high school or at Florida or in
JUCO Grandison said.
"When 1 put my helmet and
shoulder pads on, 1 feel like it's my
show Grandison said, with a fur-
rowed brow. "I try to put it in their
minds mat 'Hey, this guy means busi-
ness or 'He's going to knock the s-t
out of me' and I make the game easier
for myself. Ill never forget Eddie Miller,
who plays for South Carolina. He said
he had no respect for me because (he
said) I play the game cheap. It really
made me chuckle Grandison said he
feels he only gives what he takes.
If someone tries to hurt him they
should expect retaliation. "I'm going
to have to play dirty then Grandison
said. "I may intentionally go after a
knee or tackle him and give a little
punch to the chin or poke 'em in the
eye. I think, though, if you get to the
point where every time you go out on
the football field you're trying to hurt
somebody, you shouldn't play the
game. Butif some guy isafter you, you
may need to take some evasive ac-
tions
Football has done more for Gran-
dison than give him the opportunity to
make millions of dollars. Football has
taught him about himself.
"This year I really learned a lot
Grandison said "At time: I would
carry my on-the-field manner off the
field I think I kinda needed to be a
good guy. I was trying to simmer my
game down, while, off the field, be a
nice guy
Football has also given him an
opportunity to go to get an education.
The educational environment he grew
up in was one of silent desperation.
Athletics offered the only guarantee of
an education after high school � the
only way to avoid the thankless mo-
notony of a nine-to-five. Sports was
the way to elevate your station above
the glass ceiling.
"There was no way (my mom)
would be able to send me to college
Grandison said.
"So I just looked toward talent to
get in, being the best I could, so, hope-
fully, college scouts could recognize
me and pay my way through college.
And, if not, I'd probably be at home
working at the post office. That's the
big thing back home
Grandison maynothavetoworry
about being hired by the U.S. Postal
Service. The NFL is less than a year
away.
"I just want to slide on out of here
and moveonGrandisonsaidI don't
want to be remembered for anything,
really. If someone brought my name
up I would just want.them to say, lie
was a good guy you know, friendly, a
hell of a football player�he did what
it took. A guy who gave his all and just
tried to be the best person he could be
us
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1992 FOOTRATJ. PREVIEW
Dillon
The East Carolinian
8
fense. You've gotta be a man to play it"
The new defense will take some pressure
off of the Pirate offense. Though the team
finished ranked ninth in both the CNN
Coaches and Associated Press polls, the
1991 defense was ranked 82 in thenation.
Blessed with outstanding physical
tools in the form of a 64,215 pound body
that boasts a 4.740 yard dash, a bench
press of 335 pounds and a 37nand-a-half
inch vertical leap, Dillon wants to be
known as a student of thegame. Though
studying game films and paying close
attention during coaching sessions may
helphispenbrmariceDilk)nisbestknown
as the fiery emotional leader of the Pi-
rates.
"I talk a litde Dillon said, in what
maybe the understatementofthedecade.
"I wave my arms a little and try to get the
crowd into the game. I try to make plays.
WhenIdo,IwantthecrowdtoknowIdid
it, and maybe I wave my arms a little
Diltanisn'tarxveusmgpsychologi-
eal warfare on the field. "I want the other
team to think, 'We've got to worry about
stopping him Dillon said. "I want to
make itso that they think thatjustoneguy
can'tbk)ckn�.VVhentheydo,itjustopens
up the field form somebody else
Off the field, Dillon wants to be
known as "just a guy "I've got my
(Nintendo) GameBoy, I like to hang out
with my friends. You know, just one of
the fellas he said. "I like to mink I'm
pretty laid-back After seeing his per-
sonality on the field, the transformation
from a fiery, out-spoken pass-rusher to a
reJaxed,take-it-as-it-comesstudentseems
unlikely.
Dillon'sgoakfortrieupcomingsea-
son are twofold. First, he wants to help
lead the Pirates to their first back-to-back
winning season since 1982-83.
The other is a diploma. A Criminal
Justice major at ECU, Dillon first wants to
think about graduation before a possible
career in the National Football League. He
"understands that the average career in the
NRisashortoneand thatJhere is life after
football.
Nevertheless, Dillon is fired up and
ready to come out swinging in the home-
opener against the tenth-ranked
OraremenofSyraoiseinFicklenStadium
Sept5.Thegamemaybethetoughestof�he
year for the Pirates, whose 23-20 win in the
final quarter of thegame sticks out as a sore
spcinthe(angen�n'sarmorinanother-
wise successful 10-2 season.
like trie rest of the team, Dillon is
leaclytoshateofftheCinderellacrowntihat
ev�yonegaveEastCarolinaaftermeDream
Season and prove that last season's success
Continued from page 4

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was no fluke. He knows that ECU is in the
sightsofmany teams this season, butthinks
the Pirates can handle the pressure
"Itfeelslikethereisabull's-eyeonour
crtsandeverybodstiyingtoshootusin
our hearts Dillon saidButIthinkwecan
handle it"
Dillon expects to catch most of what
he hopes to be an eventful year on film A
camcc�derhisconstantoomrjanion, Dillon
is producing his own version of a video
yearbook.
Everything'sgonnabethere.VVhere
Igo,itgoesThe imposing linebacker soft-
ens a litde, and goes on. "You know, they
saythefriendsyrjumakemcollegeareyour
friends for life. I wantto keepa pieceof that,
so even when we aren't together I can still
have the memories
This future All-America has learned
that the most valuable tilings in life aren't
learned in the classroom or on the field,
but in the relationships you have with
others.
In that, college football may have
given him the greatest education of all.
I
Pre-Season Football Honors
Jerry Dillon
Honorable Mention All-American, Street & Smith's
1st Team AU-lndependent, The Sporting News, Peterson's
2nd Team All-Independent Pro Football Weekly
Initial Watch List, Butkus Award
Greg Grand ison
1st Team Ail-America, Lindy's
No. 1 safety in the nation, NCAA Football Preview
No. 1 candidate for Jim Thorpe Award, The Sporting News
Ranked 2nd best safety in the nation. The Sporting News
Honorable Mention All-American, Street & Smith's
Tom Scott
Listed by The Sporting News as a future Pro Bowl performer
SSIL?! Strttt Sm5' G'4' Pro Too,ban Ntwsweekiy
4th best off. tackle m the nation. Pro Football Weekly
5th best off tackle in the nation, The Sporting News, NCAA Football Preview
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J5 1
9 The East Carolinian1992 football preview
Success puts Pirates under pressure to perf
By Warren Sumner rates are one of seven teams game in many instances. We'll schools into great collegiate
soon. wrif� that could go undefeated this play anybody who wants to athletes. "A lot of our kids are
orm in '92
By Warren Sumner
Sports Writer
Duringan August 16press
conference, Head Coach Steve
Logan told the local sports
media that he was aware of
some national sentiment that
the Pirate football program
would "fall off the map" this
year.
Despite positive reports in
The Sporting News that the Pi-
rates are one of seven teams
that could go undefeated this
year, and a pre-season NCAA
ranking of 24th in the nation,
Logan will not make any pre-
dictions publicly. "I'm not a
prophet he said. "If I was, I'd
get out of coaching, work as a
bookie and become a million-
aire.
"Weplayanexcitingbrand
of football here, that comes
down to the last play of the
game in many instances. We'll
play anybody who wants to
play us, and play as competi-
tively as we can
Logan said that the direc-
tions his football team is travel-
ling in were not decided by
him, but were set by his senior
class of players. Logan also
said one of the stronger as-
pects of the ECU football pro-
gram was its ability to mold
players overlooked by other
schools into great collegiate
athletes. "A lot of our kids are
told they can't play .tnywhere.
We thrive on that
Logan's off-field style will
differ from Bill Lewis in his
approach with his players. "I
fully expect an 18-year-old to
be smart enough to know the
difference between right and
wrong. If they don't know that
difference, I tell them they're
too stupid to play for me
Logan will also shift a way
from an emotional style of
coaching, instead preferringto
teach football on Saturday.
"Emotion doesn't win football
games he said. "Standard of
performance and execution
win football games
Logan said he believes
experience is the biggestques-
tion of the team, not prepara-
tion. "We'reready for anybody,
anywhere

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!
1992 FOOTBALL PREVIEW
The East Carolinian
10
Tam-inatoi" noLynn Swarm, yet still terrorizes defenders
By Bob Owens
Sports Writer
Literally, one of the biggest things
to ever happen to Pirate football al-
most never came about.
"I was tired of playing. 1 wasn't
getting any playing time Tom Scott
says about events his freshman year,
when he was redshirted under men
head coach Art Baker.
"I was just a team scout player,
getting beat up, and it was getting to
the point where I was going to quit
Thankfully, thatnever happened.
"Offensive line coach Steve
Shankweiler and (strength coach) Jay
Olmos called me up when I didn't
report to practice, talked to meaboutit,
and convinced me to come back and
give it a try
"When 1 got back up here with
the guys I couldn't let them down, I
couldn't let my mom down The rest,
as they say, is history.
Scott returned to the 1989 team
and played nine games as a backup to
Grant Lowe. He then started every
game from then on except for the
Tulane game in 1991 which he missed
with a minor knee injury.
A senior, standing six feet and
seven inches
and weighing
in at 338 lbs
the "Tom-
inator stuck
with the pro-
gram and has
become one of
the best offen-
sive linemen in
the nation.
Scott was an
integral part
for the success
of the 11-1,
1991 Peach
Bowl Cham-
pion team that finished ninth in the
country. Against Memphis State in
1991, the Pirates lined up in the same
formation and ran behind Scott nine
consecutive times to kill the clock and
preserve a 20-13 victory. The average
gain was 4.7 yards.
His sizeand speed (Scott has been
timed with 5.06 in the 40 yard dash)
have turned Scott into the master of the
"pancake" block � he simply
steamrollsoverdefensive linemen and
linebackers in his path. Often, as the
last quarter draws to a close, defensive
linemen react a step slower, and some-
Tom Scott
times give up the idea
of getting past Scott.
Scott grins and
says hedoesn't remem-
ber anyone giving up
when against him.
When confronted with
the evidence from
game films, however,
he does concede it oc-
curs once in a while.
Hejustdoesn'tremem-
ber doing it as it oc-
curred.
"During the
game I'm in 'the zone
I feel like I'm playing
above everybody else. You can't really
explain it. Everything just sort of hap-
pens in slow motion Scott said.
After the ga me, opposing coaches
or players may say something about
his dominant style of line play, but
Scott only sees how he did several days
later during team meetings, when re-
viewing game films.
"Itisa good feeling, Igetaglow
Scott says of seeing himself plow
through defenders. "Sometimes you
have to try not to laugh. You can't
laugh or that would be like patting
yourself on the back
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He doesn't need to pat himself
on the back when the national sports
mediaisallreadytodoitforhim.Atop
contender for the Outland and
Lombardi awards and named Second
Teampre-season All-America by Foot-
ball Digest and College & Pro Football
Newsweekly, Scott doesn't let the me-
dia attention go to his head.
"It just makes me play harder
Scott said. "I want to live up to these
honors and not be one of the guys who
gets the honors and doesn't work to do
anything from then on
That doesn't seem to be a worry.
His daily routine during the season
starts at 5:30 a.m when he hits the
weight room three times a week. From
there he goes to class from 8 a.m. until
2 p.m.
Football team meetings start at
2:30 p.m. and run until 3:30p.m when
the players take the field until roughly
6:30. From there, it's dinner, home-
work (Scott is majoring in industrial
technology) and bed by a decent hour
so he can do it all again the next day.
Jugglingclass work, practice and
his personal life sometimes poses a
problem. Often an extended practice
See Scott, page 11

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11 The East Carolinian
1992 FOOTBALL PREVIEW
Scott
has caused him to be late for a date
with his girlfriend, and as a result,
Scott says I spend more time in the
doghouse than the dog. It is difficult
sometimes No-
body ever said life
at the top would be
easy.
His goal for
his senior year mir-
rors that of last
year's senior class
� a winning sea-
son. Higher aspira-
tions, such as a re-
peat of last year's
dream season may occur to him, but
right now it's just one down at a time.
One of the things he does miss is
the tight bond formed between last
year's starting linemen. After months
oryearsofspendingfiveormore hours
a day together, strangers develop into
a team, and later into close friends.
"It is hard to explain to someone
unless you'vebeen in thehuddle. Keith
(Arnold, last season's starting center)
would bend over and groan about
something, Nick Wilson would cuss
himself out for missing an assignment,
then Mike McCalop would mumble
something � and everybody would
look at me because I was the only one
Continued from page 10
"l was tired of playing. I
wasn't getting any playing
time and it was getting to
the point where I was going
to quit
� Tom Scott, Offensive Tackle
who could figure out what he was
saying Scott said. When McCalop
and Arnold graduated, it was almost
like losing members of the family.
Younger
players step up
this season to
take the placeof
Arnold and
McCalop, in-
cluding sopho-
more center
Derrick
Leaphart, who
moves over
from his tackle
position of a year ago. Scott doesn't
think the inexperience of the Pirate line
will have a detrimental effect. "Experi-
ence may be a factor for the first five
plays or so, maybe the first series. After
that, it shouldn't be a problem he
said.
The season opener against Syra-
cuse in Ficklen Sept. 5 very much in his
mind, Tom Scott still has enough time
to think about the future. With the
National Football League and the
world of multi-million dollarcontracts
in the background, you have to ask if
football is still a game to Scott, or has it
becomeabusiness?Chicago Bears cen-
ter Jay Hilgenburg recently signed a
Tenth Street BP
J. Faulkner - location manager
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Shop Hours:
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$l-plus million dollar-a-year deal and
blurred an already shaky line.
"It is still a game, at least at this
point Scott said. "I want to make
enough to take care of my family, but
after that I'll have to decide from there
You get the impression he means what
he says, and that he doesn't have to be
filthy rich to be successful.
Would Scottquitif football ceased
to be fun?
"That is a tough one he says. "I
wanted to quit a couple of years ago,
but I stuck in there, and look where I
am now
With a future in the National
Football League looming in the future,
you might think Scott is living out
every little boy's fantasy. Close, but
not quite.
Recruited from Rose Hill's Union
High School as a 6-6,309 pound tackle,
he dreamed as a child of following in
the footsteps of Pittsburgh Steeler great
Lynn Swan � a wide receiver.
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Bring in this ad & receive $25 off any order
offer ends September 30, 1992
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Title
The East Carolinian, August 26, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 26, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.888
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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