The East Carolinian, July 22, 1992






The Undead live at Summer theatre 4
'Dracula' performance to be held at ECU Summer Playhouse.
ECU alumni begins pro career
Cowboys find Robert Jones c.n asset.
IS
�ije lEaat (Earaltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.66 No.38
Wednesday, July 22, 1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5,000
6 Pages
State cuts, federal increases student aid
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
LT alleges sex discrimination
Sever women .it the University of
Texas have filed a sex discrimination law-
suit against the school, saving that they
ha ebeen denied ,i hance to participate in
some varsit inter-collegiate sports, Ine
suit states that there .ire 304 male athletes
and 90 women athletes at a school with an
undergraduate student btxiy that is47 per-
cent female
Scientists view AIDS virus
Yale Universirv btochemists have de-
termined the three-dimensional structure
it a kc AIDS virus protein through a
process called X rav irvstallographv. The
process enables s ientists to "see" how the
virus intern ts w ith a promising new drug
said tii h,ie fewer toxk side effects than
AZT. The discov erv provides the first de-
tailed it a of the protein responsible tor
transcribing the AIDS irus's genetic mate-
rial.
Access widens for journalists
Student journalists are expe ted to get
w ider access to campus se uritj intorma-
tion through the compromise legislation
m rw in fn mt of President Bush. lhe Higher
Education -V t removes crime records as
part ot the Buckle) Amendment, a 1974
law that prohibits release of student educa-
tional records without the permission of
the student
Panel endorses abortion bill
lhe senate Labor and Human Ke-
soun es C ommittee voted 12-5 to endorse
rhel reedomofClwicebiUprotectingafeor-
bon and prohibiting manv state restric-
tion one day after similar action took
place in a House panel, rhebill will estab-
lish ,i woman's right to an abortion and
prevent states from restricting abortion in
most circumstances.
Compiled by JeH Becker. Taken from CPS and
other campus newspaper.
lhe State Board of Com-
munity Colleges approved a
15.2 percent tuition hike man-
dated bv the .C. General As-
sembly, increasing full-time
tuition for in-state community
college students from$lM per
quarter to185.50 per quarter.
The tuition increase, the
fourth consecutive and the
seventh in ID years for com-
munity colleges, raised credit-
hour costs from11.50 per
hour to (13.25 per hour.
" I he tuition increase will
effect some people, how manv
people we .io not know and
will not ever know said Dr.
Charles Russell, president of
Pitt Community College.
"A number of people may
never come because of money
Those people mav have come
if scholarships were avail-
able
At the same time, the
board was forced to decrease
the number of state-funded
scholarships from 50 to 503
because of low interest rates
and increased tuition.
In the past, the State
Board authorized 950 scholar-
ships at $3n0 per year said
Mate Board C hairman William
Simpson.
"But, with interest rates
down and tuition rates up. we
had to decrease the number of
scholarships or decrease the
amount of each one. We chose
to offer fewer scholarships �
503 scholarships at $556.50
eaih but keep the amount
high enough for full tuition
According to Bob Scott,
community college system
president, out-of-state tuition
will remain at $1,505 per quar-
ter for full-time students and
$107.50 per credit hour; fees
? Congress expands financial aid to
college students, but there may not
be enough money in the budget to
meet current funding levels.
Fila Photo
Students paying tuition at Pitt Community College will have to cough
up a little more this fall as tuition increases to $185 50 per quarter
for occupational extension
courses will increase from $30
per course to $35 per course
"Needless to sav, no one
was happv with the choices
they had to make, Scott said
"Both decisions have a
negative impact on our stu-
dents
Simpson said the General
Assembly had some hard bud-
get decisions to make.
"They had to find a way to
fund our increasing enroll-
ments which were up more
than 6 percent over the previ-
ous year Simpson said.
"Unfortunately, that
meant another tuition increase.
I'm sorrv the burden is falling
on our students. After all, they
are the ones our community
colleges were created to serve
Simpson said he is alsocon-
cerned that the decrease in state
svholarship funds will add to
the burden. However, he said
the 38 colleges in the C. Com-
munitv College System have
strong UKal scholarship pro-
grams and students who need
help can still get it.
WASHINGTON (CPS)�
After two years of debate, Con-
gress has approved a massive
bill to expand student financial
aid and other higher education
programsdespite warnings that
the nation's budget woes could
undermine many of its key ob-
jectives.
"It's a bittersweet victory
for students said Selena Dong,
legislative director for the
United States Student Associa-
tion. While the bill permits a
major expansion of Pell Grants,
for example, congress may have
trouble just maintaining current
funding levels, she said.
The Higher Education Act
reauthorization bill would raise
the maximum Pell Grant from
$2,400 to $3,100 next yeac and
permit more aid to middle-in-
come and part-time students.
But Congress still must appro-
priate Tell funds based on pro-
jected revenue and budget tar-
i'ets Already, Done said, mem-
bers are talking about a cut from
$2,400 � not an increase � to
meet 1593 budget targets.
White the HEA bil. contains
manv laudable goals, "we may
be talking about pie in the sky"
when it comes to financial aid,
Dong said. She also chided con-
gress for defeating a plan to
make Pel! Grants an entitle-
ment. "Many poor students
won't be helped by this bill
she added.
President Bush was ex-
pected to sign the HEA bill in
late July.
Overall, one measure allows
for nKxlest growth in manv stu-
dent aid programs�again, bar-
ring budget constraints -and re-
flects considerablecompromise
between separate House and
Senate bills debated during the
past two vears.
The bill recommends mod-
erate growth for Pell Grants
through 1997, when the maxi-
mum grant could reach as high
as $3,700.
Middle-income students
with family income up to $42,000
ayearcould receive aid, and the
government also would remove
home or family equity as a fac-
tor in eligibility.
For student loans, the bill
increases maximum Stafford
loan amounts from $2,625 to
$3,fW for second-yea r students,
$4,1X10 to $5,006 for third- and
fourth-vear students and $7,500
to $8,500 for graduate students.
The HEA bill also contains
a controversial direct loan pro-
posal in which schools would
begin to replace banks in the
loan process. Up to $500 million
will be available for the first vear
of a five-year experiment
Capitol Hill aides say as
manv as 400 schools could par-
ticipate in the direct loan ex-
periment.
Sponsors of the direct loan
concept say it will save money
bv eliminating the subsidies
paid to banks as well as the
banks' own administrative costs
in handling the loans. But the
White House balked at the idea
See Financial, page 2
Grads find job market tough
By Tony Rodgers
Staff Writer
Photo by Bift Rinioin � 77i� Eaat Carolinian
Stealth bomber
Area residents celebrated the 50th anniversary of Cherry Point Marine Base on Sunday An air show and
other exhibits like the stealth bomber were a hit with the crowd
College graduates are en-
tering a job market unable to
accomrrKxjate them for the sec-
ond consecutive year.
According to Employment
Security Commission Chairman
Ann Q. Duncan, the 0.8 percent
increase in the state unemploy-
ment rate from Mav to June re-
sulted from the influx of college
graduates.
"A lot of young folks get-
ting out of schxil are finding it
tough to get that first job
Duncan said. "The job opportu-
nities that are normally avail-
able this time of year justhaven't
been there
The North Carolina unem-
ployment rate increased from
5.7 percent to 65 percent from
Mav to June. Don Carrington,
deputy director of labor
marketing's information divi-
sion, also attributed the increase
to college graduates.
"Normally, there is an in-
crease in jobs to accommodate
graduates Carrington said. "In
this particular year, job seekers
increased but job openings
didn't
Carrington said theextended
slump in the job market puts ad-
ditional stress on students.
"Many graduates put off en-
tering the job market last year by-
going to graduate school he
said. "Most can't afford to do
that two years in a row
James Westmoreland, direc-
tor of ECU's Career Services, said
an important part of his job is
"keeping students from getting
discouraged
Westmoreland said students
graduating in May of 1993 should
register with Career Services by
Sept. 1. Students graduating in
December should open a fi le as
soon as possible.
"We keep a file on hand
with 10 copies of a students'
resume, three registration cards
and a list of faculty and job
references he said. "We offer
resume and interview work-
shops and make referrals to
possible employers for stu-
dents
Westmoreland said the in-
crease in unemployed college
graduates is not a new trend.
"People don't realize that
the job market has been getting
more and more competitive for
the last few years he said. "A
lotofpeopleareregistenngwnth
us, but we'd like to see even
more
According to Carrington,
the June unempkwment rate
for males age 20 to 24 was 9.4
See Unemployment, page 2
Student vegetarians find campus dining, proper diet hard
AUSTIN, Texas (CPS)�A
vegetarian life-style isn't easy �
especially on campus. Without
planning a proper diet, vegetar-
ians mav have trouble getting ad-
equatenourishment,and students
who eat at campus dining halls
may not be able to get enough
options in their daily menus.
"Many people don't realize
how difficult it is to be a vegetar-
ian, "said Jeanne Freeland -Graves,
a professor of home economics.
Cutting out red meat is not only requirement
An informal survey at the Uni-
versity of Texas' four dining halls
indicated that between 10 percent
and 15 percent of students don't
eat red meat or chicken.
Melvyn Stiriss, who teaches
an informal class on vegetarian-
ism, said new vegetarians needs
to be especially careful because
there are many things that they
should know before they stop eat-
ing meat.
"Some people feel like they
can just quit eating meat and eat
what's left. Itdoesn'texactly work
like that Stiriss said.
Even if they know what they
should eat, students can have a
hard timepursumgvegetarian life-
styles if they eat at university fa-
I
cilities that can't provide the foods
they need.
Harley Fisk, chef of the Divi-
sion of Housing and Food, said
the university's dining halls pro-
videalternative vegetarian entrees
in slightly more than two-thirds
of all the meals they serve.
But he also said that variety in
vegetarian menus was limited be-
t
cause many dining-facility patrons
do not like non-meat dishes.
Because there are varying de-
grees of vegetarians � ranging
from lacto-ovo vegetarians, who
eat eggs, dairy products and plant
foods, to vegans, who eat only
plant foods,�those in the stricter
categories may find their choices
narrowed.
"We provide a large number
of items mat vegetarians can eat,
depending on the typof vegetar-
ian you're trying to reach Fisk
said. "Vegans are among those
more difficult to be satisfied. We
have options, but they're not as
varied.
"It's difficult to feed any very
small group of people he added.
"You have to understand, if I put
out a pan of stir-fried tofu and it
sat untouched for about two hours,
you can imagine what it would
look like





2
�be East (Carolinian
July 22, 1992
Financial
Continued from page 1
Unemployment
Continued from page 1
and threatened to veto the entire
bill, which prompted lonress to
scale b.n k the experiment.
Even during flooi debate l.iu
makers continued to debate the
merits of thedirecl loan plan Sen.
dward Kennedy,D Mass ,Vltl
it oneof the most inruw ativeideas
in higher education while N'ti
cnn ll.iuh K Utah countered
that it could turn eJiuation.il in-
stitutions into banks am not at
all certain that this is,) good idea
I l.iti h said
In addition c ongress at
tai hed a pro ision allow ing an)
family, regardless ol income, to
ret ei e ,i g pen ent loan tor ediu .1
tion expenses Higher-income
households however wouldhave
to begin repav ing the loans imme-
diate!) rather than w aiting until a
student finishes ollege
I Isewhereinthebill ' ongress
would create tow new progran -
toidontit and recruitUhv-income,
disach antaged students attending
college fheseprograms identih
at risk students earlv in the edu-
cational pipeline and make fund-
ing available for earlv interven-
tion programs to keep them in
school Kennedy said.
in addition, the bill would au-
thorize a new Teacher Corps in
whii h prospective teachers wou Id
receive financial aid in return for a
pledge to teach in under-served
areas after graduation.
She measure also would au-
thorize a varietv of antic rime mea-
sures designed to promote cam-
pus safety. I orexarnple, Congress
would require colleges to adopt
more consistent policies on sexual
ass.Hilt Lawmakers also set aside
$10 million for campus rape pre-
vention education programs.
lor institutions, the bill ex-
pands federal aid to historically
black colleges and universities
($135 million) and creates a new
program (4 million i tor institu-
tions serving a large number o�
I lispank students.
percent, compared to h.2 percent
for males of all ages. The unem-
ployment rate for 20 to 24 year-old
females was 10.2, percent almost 3
percent higher than the rate for fe-
males of all ages.
Hating & l)rinkingxvr Saloon
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Daily Drink and
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if
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North Carolina's increase in
first-time job seekers, corresponds
to national averages.
Ihere was a nationwide in-
crease in first-time job seekers in
uneC arnngtonsaid. "A surge in
job seekers at the beginning of the
summer is expected. Most years,
there is usually an in tv.w m job
openings as well
Although orth Carolina un-
emplovment rate increased OX per
cent last month, the state's (obis
rate remained 1 3 perc ent bel w the
national averaget then,m m's 11
largest states, North Carolina
the only state to maintain an un. n
ployment rate below 7 pert ent
r,wj
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READ THIS
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Several units for sale at Below Market prices
look at these before you rent anything!
Extra Great Buys Parents will love it
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Joan Hopper
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SILVER J,
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WEDNESDAYS
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re
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FOR RENT
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oessnearbyalffimat758-
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RT1 � 77 '
'Ql rOYOTA

� -
�� �
Announcements
CATHOLIC STUDENT -matt
CENTER
The Newman L
Student G i '� i invites you STL DEN
to worship with them. Empl
Sunday Masses 11 am ti
& 8:30pm at the Nev n ai
Center, 953 E 1 th
Greenville. Weekdays
Rich s Nuthouse
Wgv
The Adventuies of Kemple Bo
WhUkprs 'n' Chubs
W0W?AN INSAN
WIN GAMECARLlSc: 1
vT-S IT SAT?
� sorry! tcu are t
not n instant
DINNER. rsTtfl
PLEASE TRY 5
AGAIN.





&hc tnat Carolinian
Jay 22. 7592
Financial
Continued from page 1
Unemployment
Continued from page 1
,n�.l threatened to veto the entire
bill w liu h prompted i ongress to
s,(t' Kn k tht- experiment
l' end urine, flooi debate law
makers continued to debate the
mentsot the direct loan plan Sen
EdwardKennedv D-Mass called
it oneol the most innovative ideas
in highei education while Sen
Orrin I lat� h R I tah iunt(
that it could turn oviiiv.Uu-n.il in
stitutions into hanks ! am not .it
.ill certain that tin- is ,i �ihx1 i
Hatch said
In .nUiituMi .
it
ta� hed a provision �i i in
t.miiK regardless ot incom I
r� ri (� .i u ner� i foi t-viiu a
tin expenses Hiel
cliateh r
stud
�.
,it u-k students f.irU m the edu
v ,itiin.il pipeline and make fund-
ing available tor earl) interven-
tion programs to kvp them in
v hool Kenned) said.
In addition the bill would au-
thorize .1 new reacher Corps in
which prospective tea hers would
its i c tin.uii ialaid in return for a
pledge to teach in undei served
areas .hut graduation.
"he measure also would an
thomea .uu't of anti-crime mea
sures designed to promote cam-
pussatet Forexample - ongress
would recjuire cc�lleges t .nlnpt
more onsistent polk ies on sexual
�uilt 1 .us makers also Mt aside
nilhon tot campus rape pre-
ition education pngrams.
! oi institutions the bill ex
pand � '� ' il .iut to historit,ill
ick . i - and uni ersities
i million I and i reates a new
-1 million tor institu
� .� a I,nee numbei ol
hs . �. dents
percent, compared to n.2 percent
tor males of all ages, he unem-
plovment rale for 20 to 2A year-old
females was 10.2, percent almost I
percent higher than the rate for fe-
males of all ages.
ortharolina s increase in
first time job xvkers corresponds
to national averages
There was i nationwide in
crease in first-time job seekers in
uneCarrington said. " surge in
XJjxBTJjXJ
JjJdjajB
JULY
23,24,
& 25
INDIANS
vs.
I Prince William
I Cannons
ECU SPECIAL
THIRSTY THURSDAY
75c for all 12oz. beverages
GAME TIMES 7:00 PM
1-800-334-5467
$1.00 OFF
Admission
Thursday Night
job seekers at the beginning ol th�- cent last month the stati
summer is expected Most years, rateremainedl Jpercentb
there i- usually .in increase in job national average ���� i
openings as well. largest states, Northai
Mthough otth Carolina un theonbystatetomaintaii �
employment rate increased 0.8 per pfoyment rate bekw :�� ���
I READ THIS
Housing is best at Ringgold rowers
Several units for sale at Below Market pri i
I ook at these before you rent anythii
Extra (. iiv.it Buys?! Parents will love it
irk-Branch Realty
J55-2000 off ice
. 12 hoi
r
Fating c imnkinv.ry,
CATCH THE OLYMPICS HERE!
C S
Id tO t ' �� I
� .r.l
Daily Drink and
- Food Specials
including
250 each Buffalo Wings
4-7pm Everyday
SILVER
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
A.
i t nterta imt
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's
Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for
Female Dancers
CASH PRIZE
SCOTT
Silver Bullet 9J
. :
� � �. Samel
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female Exotic" Dancers
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2 00 OFF Admission Saturday Night
Open Tuesday-Saturday Doers Open 7:3.
leculE Stage Time 9:00pm
H�IJANTED
The F�'lomnQ PnQ�
sports S ED,T�R
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MRlTERs
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y (N t
DISCOVER
FOSDICK'S
IS90 SEAFOOD
.GREENVILLE
AQUARIUM
?fe
4
:
REDISCOVER
FOSDICRS
See our
coupon on
page 6
Sunny Days
Cool Down
and
Relax
with a
Margarita
your choice
Lime, Peach, Strawberry,
& Raspberry
mean Cantina Nights
"Flash-Blended'
1Z PRICE
FISH SALE
BUY ANY FISH, GET
THE NEXT ONE AT
PRICE
J-
r-i
�� ' jf-
4 ml
SATURDAY & SUNDAY
JULY 25 ONLY JULYZ6
Frozen
L
Rocks
MexicanReslauianl
521 Coiachc Street � 7S-1666
i University Center
14th and Charles St. � 757-0056
M-F 11-9 Sat 10-9 Sun 12-6
"FISH OF EQUAL OR LESSOR PRICE.
Classifieds
FOR RENT
KIM.s Kls PART-
MENTS �
-
latch - - �

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Announcement
( I HOLIC blLPfcM
CENTER
Th(
ILL
. -

Rich s Nuthouse
VP22L-

J.of.
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1LN
The dventuies ot Kemple B
Whiskers n Chubs
� - �; Ht�
IHNEF ri'J
EASE " I
L
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Classifieds
2Hie East (Earoltnian
JULY 22, 1992
Continued from page 1
grating ot the cent last mMnth. the state's jobless
Most yean ialgrem�ned 1.3 percent below the
k rease in pb national awr.eAMthenation's 11
lar&est states North Carolina was
arolina in Iheonly stateto maintain an unem-
sexi S pei plmment rate K'low 7 percent
1
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I - besi at Ringgold lowers
sale at Below Market prices
v before you rent anything!
Bu) - Parents will love it
loan 1 lopper
12 homo
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F���ng Positions Are
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WRITERS
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1LLE
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ULY 26
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tun 12-6
R PRICE.
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�AZALEA GARDENS-
CVin �ti quiet one bedroom furroibed �puimrnu. en-
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momn leue MOBIE HOME REVTALS-coupta or
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L
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I OR RIM
student, but fun-bving. $200
monrent,l 2utilities.CallLaura
or Mark at 752-4201.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: $150 rent$150 de
posit One block from campus,
13 utilities and bills. Call 830-
6893, ask for Nell or Josh
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 2
bedroom, lbath2-$105,1-$165
utilities, rravsmoker, 1 mile from
campus, ECU bus route, fully
furnished. Please call 752-5070.
ROOM FOR RENT: Female
only. Near campus. $150mon
plus 12 phone and utilities.
Available Aug. 1 (nonsmoker
preferred). 75&4789 (no pets).
FOR S A LI
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cass, 46K, light green metallic,
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III I PWAVILI)
Announcements
EASY WORK Excellent pay!
Assemble products at home.
Call toll free 1-800-467-5566 ext.
5920.
BUS DRIVERS NEEDED for
part-time employment with
ECU Transit System. Flexible
hoursgoodpay.757-4724orvisit
SGA office.
HELP WANTED: Part-time re-
ceptionist needed for surgical
practice. Hours from 2:00pm to
7:0C)pm,threetofivedaysaweek.
For more information, call Vicky
at 7584300.
TOPLESS DANCERS
WANTED: Great club, great
money, unbelievable tips. Work
Thursday, Friday, Saturday,
9pm-2am. Call Sid 919-735-7713
orPaul919-736-0716.Mother's
Playhouse in Goldsboro.
NOW HIRING STUDENTS:
ARA Services is looking for
students to work with ECU's
Campus Dining Service. En-
joy a fun work atmosphere, free
meals,andflexibleschedules. Full
and part-time positions be-
gin August 19th. Apply now
at the Wright Place or Croatan
III LPWAMI 1)
JOB ANNOUNCEMENT:
TheSchoolofEducationis seek-
ing a Peace Corps Campus Re-
cruiter to conduct recruitment
activities on East Carolina
University's campus and in
surrounding communities. The
positionis for 20 hours perweek
and will start August 1,1992.
Returned Peace Corps Volun-
teers and graduate students are
encouraged to apply. For more
information contact Belinda
Blinkoff at 757-6061 or Jean
Garris at 757-6172.
DOES OWING YOUR OWN
business interest you? Want to
be your own boss? Earn extra
income on a part-time or full
timebasis. Start here at school or
at home. Call 758-2030, morn-
ings only, leave message for
Mike.
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING: Error-free, quick
and dependable at reason-
able cost. Excellent typing
and proofreading skills
(grammar, punctuation,
sentence structure, etc.)
Call Pauline at 757-3693.
WORDPROCESSING:
Resume term papers, the-
sis, psychological assess-
ments. Fast service, rea-
sonable rates. Call 321-
2522.
PERSONALS
WRITERPHILOSOPHER
MUSICIAN AND POETIC
SOUL seeks friendship and cor-
respondence from like-minded
lady. Photos and letters to MV
PO Box 8663, Greenville, NC
27835.
HAPPY 22ND BIRTHDAY
John Vecchione Youarethebest
friend and bovfriend anvone
could ask for Thank you for all
the smiles you've given me! I
Love You Natalie. P. S. See you
in a couple of days!
Classified Ad Rates
Students (25 words or less) $2
on-students (25 words or less) $2
Each additional word $1 million
Deadline
Tuesday at 4 p.m.
ATTENTION STUDENTS
REGISTER YOUR VEHICLES HOW!
Register your car now
before you leave school for the summer!
We are now registering student vehicles
for the 1992-193school year
Avoid the fines heat!
The fee for the
1992-1993 Student Parking Decai is $70
Night Parkins Decals are $30
Don't be surprised!
Make sure you check on the status
of any outstanding citations
CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT OF PARKING & TRAFFIC
SERVICES IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS CONCERNING
VEHICLE REGISTRATION BV PHONING 757-6294
CATHOLIC STUDENT
CENTER
The Newman Catholic
Student Center invites you
to worship with them.
Sunday Masses: 11:30am
& 8:30pm at the Newman dents who are interested
Center, 953 E. 10th St in becoming personal care
Greenville. Weekdavs: attendants to students in
Rich s Nuthouse
Sam at the Newman Cen-
ter.
STIinFNT SERVICES
Employment opportuni-
ties are available to stu-
wheelchairs, readers and tu-
tors. Pastexperience is desired
but not required. Applications
will taken for employment for
fall semester, 1992 and spring
semester, 1993. If interested,
contact: HANDICAPPED
SERVICES Brewster A-114 or
A-l 16 at 757-6799 or 757-6729.
BISEXUAL-GAY-LESBIAN
ALLIANCE
Social support, activism and ac-
tivities. All interested and caring
people welcome. Call 757-6766
from 11:15-1230 Mon-Thurs. for
information on time and place.
Friends and family of gays-lesbi-
ans4?isexuals, and heterosexu-
als who support civil nghts re-
gardless of sexual orientation,
are welcome to attend the Bi-
sexual-Gav-Lesbian Alliance.
PLAY PAlll
Pete's Softball in Washing-
ton, NC is sponsoring a men's
open tournament scheduled
by Haselrig
Rex, The Wonder Pu
for August 1 and 2. First, sec-
ond, and third place team
and individual trophies as
well as other individual
awards. Deadline to enter is
72992. For additional in-
formation contact: Pete Wil-
son (946-1314) or Chas
Mitch'l (757-0763).
Bv Mason
DOC DOC JuiCK
ANOTHER. tc!m





�Ire lEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sltorius, Director of Advertising
Maxwells Silver Hammer
Libertarians: the ignored alternative
Julie Roscoe, Him Editor
Jfff Becker, Ant. Htm Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Joseph Horst, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Robert Todd, Assistant Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Copy Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Adam Roe, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Locke Monroe, Classified Advertising Technician
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Bill Walker, Opinion Page Editor
By Scott
Maxwell
Editorial
Column is
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Ihe East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925. emphasizing information that affects ECU
stihlents During summer sessions, The Fast Carolinian publishes once a week with a circulation of 5,000. The masthead
editorial in each edilion is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of
view I etters should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the
right to edit or reject letters for publication, letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg
Id. Greenville. N.C 27858 4353 For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, July 22, 1992
Removing ordinance good idea
Controversy erupted last week at the
local town council meeting when propo-
nents of a new downtown bar went to
battle against an old city
ordinance.
An unnamed business
owner decided he wanted
to start a new nightclub in
the downtown section of
town; however, a city ordi-
nance prohibits the place-
ment of any new bars
within five-hundred feet of
any current drinking establishments.
The question is: Why?
No city council has the right to pro-
hibit any tvpe of establishments as long
The council acted
correctly in voting
to eliminate the
troublesome 500-
feet requirement.
Such an ordinance also adds to the
problem of drunk driving. If bars are
prohibited from opening downtown,
more will open away from
downtown. Most likely
those new bars will be out-
side of walking distance of
most ECU students. Thus,
more students will likely
drive while intoxicated.
Obviously the ordi-
nance is both unfair and
dangerous. The council
acted correctly in voting to eliminate the
troublesome 500-feet requirement.
Because of the absence of an at-large
representative, the issue must be re-voted
The instant Ross Perot dropped
out of the presidential race, everyone
wanted to know whether his former
supporters would vote for Bill Clinton,
George Bush, or neither.
Those of you who, like me, find
neither of those alternatives appeal-
ing ought to know that you still have
a third choice.
Actually, you have lots of
"third" choices, among them come-
dian Pat Paulson and his running
mate, Tiny Tim But a more serious
alternative is the Libertarian Party,
whose presidential Candida te is Andre
Marrou Marrou's running mate is
named Nancy Lord.
Let me note up front that I don t
endorse the Libertarians There are
lots of things about them I don't like
But there are also lots of things about
them that make them worth consider-
ing as a third choice As a sort of
public service, because I believe the
media shamefully ignore third par-
ties in general, F offer the following
introduction to the Libertarians
One of the first things you no-
tice about Libertarian beliefs is how
mainstream most of them are (Ignore
George Will, who recently did a
clumsy job of painting Andre Marrou
as a latter-day LeninThe Libertar-
lans'guiding principle is a simple one,
drawn directly from documents like
the Declaration of Independence and
the Constitution: government should
keep the hell out of your life, period
Libertarians believe that gov-
ernment has exactly two purposes: to
protect our rights and to protect
against invasion That's it (And, for
what it's worth, that w precisely the
kind of government the oft-invoked
Founding Fathers had in mind )
Consequently, Libertarians be-
lieve in small government And un-
like certain presidents I could men-
tion, they really mean it Libertarians
visualize government as a provider of
services, and, in theiropinion, private
industries could provide most of those
services for less money Typically, only
people who actua lly used the services
would pay for them
Libertarians would eliminate
the personal income tax (Don't scoff.
I've looked at the numbers It can be
done.)
Libertarians favor the right to
choose abortion, but they oppose tax-
payer funding of abortions
Libertarians would cease all
overseas military expenditures, sav-
ing (by their estimates) $150 billion
per year � about half of the present
military budget
Libertarians would end the
government's huge subsidies of busi-
nesses such as farms and railroads, in
their opinion, a business that can't
make it without government help,
shouldn't make it
Libertarians would end govern-
ment-funded welfare Private chan-
ties are expected to fill in
Libertarians believe strongly in
the free market However, they op-
pose monopolies � including gov-
ernment monopolies such as the Post
Office � and polluting, which they
consider, in a broad sense, an infringe-
ment on others' rights
Libertarians oppose gun con-
trol Someoppose waiting periods and
other such measures and some don't,
however, all support the right of an
individual to own a firearm.
Libertarians oppose the war on
drugs, since, in their view, no c?ne has
a right to control what substances an-
other person may ingest They're also
concerned that the ug war is turn-
ing America into a police state
Libertarians seek to end gov-
ernment licensing of most professions,
including doctors and day care pro-
viders Licensing is one of the services
Libertarians think should be
privatized let private rating serices
like Consumer Reports duke it out, they
say
Libertarians would end govern-
ment-subsidized housing and would
sharply curtail housing regulations.
In fact, Libertanans would end
most regulations, not just in the hous-
ing industry They see regulation as a
counterproductive government intru-
sion into the market Fraud is another
matter Libertarians decry regulation,
but they don't believe that that gives
businesses the freedom to lie to con-
sumers about what they're getting
While I don't endorse the Liber-
tarian Parry, I can't help thinking that
they'd do our government a lot of
good For Libertarians, small govern-
ment and low taxes are matters of
principle, not political expediency In
a year when principle seems singu-
larly lacking, even by America's al-
ready low standards, that's a big plus
for them
1 wouldn't want to see Libertar-
ians running things 1 have funda-
mental disagreements with them But
a strong Libertarian presence in the
government � let us say a quarter to
a third of Congress, and perhaps an
occasional Libertarian president �
would help keep the DerruHrrats and
Republicans honest, it nothing else
Keep Libertarian candidate
Andre Marrou in mind when you head
to the ballot box this November Er.
you are registered, aren't you1) As
Eugene Debs said, "It is better to vote
for something you want and lose than
to vote tor something you don't want
and win "
A View From Above
Look at facts concerning AIDS
as they are legal under the law. To do so at an upcoming meeting.
would propagate monopolies. Let us hope they act correctly as well.
Letters To The Editor
Animal activist
clears up issue
To the Editor:
As I long time animal rights
activist, 1 take strong issue with re-
cent articles by T. Scott Batchelor
and Tracy Roberts. The two express
disdain for animal rights philoso-
phy, yet clearly do not understand
that which they criticize. Let me
clear up a few points.
While no one can speak for all
animal rights activists, 1 believe I do
speak for the mainstream. We do
not, by any means, place baboons
above humans, or even equal.
We do believe that the feel-
ings of non-human animals count,
and that animal suffering shouldn't
be ignored. The philosophy that
"animais are ours to use" is, we
argue, the product of human arro-
gance.
The protests over the baboon-
to-human liver transplant are fu-
eled by fear that it may lead to large-
scale imprisonment of primates in
"spare part" farms, something that
stinks of Auschwitz. That is the is-
sue.
Batchelor's and Roberts' pre-
sentation of the issue as being one
human versus one baboon shows
they haven't gathered much infor-
mation before running their pens.
Of course one human matters
more that one baboon. It is the pre-
cedent that the protestors find de-
plorable.
I also must comment on Rob-
erts' charge of hypocrisy over some
"activists" enjoying a pig picking. I
agree that there can be no rational
discrimination between "food" and
"non-food" animals.
That is why the more commit-
ted activists, such as I , adopt veg-
etarianism and discontinue buying
leather products. However, most
omnivorous humans have cut-off
points on the evolutionary scale and
do not eat animals who are consid-
ered "higher
It is not hypocritical for these
people to protest an event that could
open the flood gates to a new cat-
egory of animal exploitation � one
involving primates and imprison-
ment.
Animal rights philosophy,de-
spite a lot of hard work by activists,
is still poorly understood.
Unfortunately, media cover-
age of animal rights activities shows
footage or pictures of protestors and
listsgrievancesbut seldom explains.
Thus Batchelor and Roberts
are not totally to blame for their
ignorance (most blatantly exposed
by their statements that the philoso-
phy puts non-humans before hu-
mans).
However, as a journalist,
Batchelor ought to consider it a re-
sponsibility to gather information
before editorializing.
Craig Spitz
Senior
Psychology
Former President, ECU Stu-
dents for the Ethical Treatment of
Animals
By T.Scott
Batchelor
Editorial
Columnist
It would seem almost impossible
to watch television,read a newspaper or
magazine, visit a physician's office, or
wal k across campus without encounter-
ing matenals concerning AIDS There
are pamphlets, booklets, news stones,
posters, public service announcements
� you name it � counseling the public
cm the nature of this disease. Yet nation-
wide the infection rate continues to ns
This is perplexing
Imagine for a moment that you
have just been through your annual
medical physical Your doctor sits you
down in his office and tells you that at
your age, with the foods you consume
and the limited level of physical activity
in which you engage, you are a pome
candidate for heart disease. Or worse,
your doctor miorms you that some block-
age of your arteries has already set in,
and that your cholesterol level is ex-
tremely elevated
With this information you now
have a personal choice You can either
begin a healthier diet and start exercis-
ing regularly to decrease the probability
of developing heart disease, or continue
your unhealthy life-style and take your
chances Which would you do? Logi-
cally, you would take the risk-reducing
course of action.
Now back to AIDS As you may
be aware, the eighth International Con-
ference tin AIDS opened Sunday in
Amsterdam, Netherlands The Raleigh
Sews and Obsenrr reported Mond ay that
there were "conflicting visions" at the
conference of how to stop the spread of
the disease
Conflicting visions7 Incredible'
The answer to this question is simple:
the rate of transmission of the virus
could be decimated by refraining from
or modifying those behaviors which p ut
individuals at high risk. What are some
of these behaviors and nsk gn ups? Let's
look at some of the statistics
According to data compiled at
the end of 1989, 60 percent of AIDS
victims were homosexual, 21 percent
were intravenous drug users, 7 percent
were homosexual or bisexuals who use
intravenous drugs, and 5 percent of the
cases were contracted through hetero-
sexual con tact. Th us, a pproxima te ly 93
of AIDS cases are related to behavior,
either engaging in unprotected sex or
using infected hypodermic needles The
remaining 7 percent of the cases ac-
count for blood transfusions, infants bom
to infected mothers, hemophiliac and
"other
In other words, AIDS is largely
(but not completely) a disease of life-
style. For example, it is estimated that
over 50 percent of homosexuals in San
Francisco have AIDS or havetested posi-
tive for HTV. This is by no means an
indictment of the gay and lesbian com-
munity as a whole. Yet it does point to an
inordinate and tragically unnecessary
amount of irresponsibility inextricable
linked to sexual behavior And ief s face
it, having unprotected sex, especially
promiscuous unprotected sex, is like
gambling with your life
Many people who read this col-
umn will agree with me and then say,
referring to these victims of AIDS, "they
deserve it. they got what they asked
tor " Wrong Absolutely no one "de-
serves" to contract the disease That
many at tnose infected with the virus
willingly and knowingly exposed them-
selves to harm should not in the least
diminish the sympathy and compas-
sion we feel for them Why, then, do I
make the distinction7 The answer is
simple Prevention.
Oftentimes the educational ma-
terials on AIDS I mentioned earlier dis-
seminate conflicting or diluted messages.
This is because our arduous efforts are
mollified by the new strictures of politi-
cal correctness, or by the tear of being
labeled homophobic or insensitive to
this group or that Ads tell us that any-
one can get AIDS. This is true. But real-
isbcaUy speaking, if you are a sexually
active gay, an intravenous drug user
with little or no access to clean needles,
or a heterosexual having unprotected
sex with multiple partners, then you
have an overwhelmingly greater chance
of contracting AIDS than if you refrained
from or altered these behaviors
Therefore, until a cure for AIDS is
found, (and even after), we would do
well to follow Benjamin Franklin's wise
admonition thatan ounce of prevention
is worth a pound of cure Lef s take off
the kid gloves, tell the truth, and save
some lives
Campus Spectrum
Pro-life students speak against abortion issue, ruling
Kevin Brown
Campus Spectrum
I was disturbed by a recent edi-
torial that responded to the recent
Supreme Court decision giving states
the right to place restrictions on abor-
tion I happened to be very opposed to
abortion and I disagree with a lot of
things mentioned in the article. Abor-
tion kills an unborn child, but we have
cheapened and devalued life to the
point where individual tights mean
more than anything, even life.
Abortion is so easily justified in
our society, because of our attitudes
towards the unborn. As the article
stated, we don't see unborn children
as human life, but as "parasites" or "
blobs of tissue We devalue and
cheapen life just by the words we use,
whkh is nothing new In Nazi Gat-
many, Hitler spread all kinds of pro-
paganda to get the people to see the
jews as "subhuman" or as "rats to be
exterminated In slave times, Mack
�laves weren't seen as human beings,
but as property.
The point is that it doesn't bother
us to get rid of rats, property or para
sites. Therefore when we begin to see
human life in mis way, it makes it easy
to justify their elimination
The article devalues life again
by trying to equate an unborn child
with an appendix. The fetus has no
more right to live than my appendix
Again, when we start to see an unborn
baby as nothing more than an organ
of our body, its easy to justify abor-
tion.
There's nothing wrong with
having an appendix removed, so
what's wrong w ith removing a fetus?
Also, if it's ail right to kill an unborn
fetus because it is "totally and un-
questionably dependent on ita
mother then why not kill infanta or
new boms? Aren't they totally and un-
questionably dependent on their
mother?
All of us wan fetuses at on
time, product of sperm and egg. None
of us came from storks Until we leam
that there a re better ways to deal with
unwanted pregnancies, ways benefi-
cial to mother and child, we will con-
tinue to destroy ouraetvea.
Kevin Brown kutudmUn ECU'$
of tht artt.

Billy L. Biggs
Campua Spectrum
Congratulations to Heather
Lockey for her wonderful editorial on
the Supreme Court's decision on abor-
tion and to TV East Carolinian for sur-
prisingly giving space to the "politi-
cally incorrect" like myself. But in or-
der to really have an in depth debate
on abortion, we need to look at the
dark history (what Tht American Spec-
tator called "A White Lie") of the
world's largest supplier of abortions,
Planned Parenthood.
Planned Parenthood was
founded in 1923 by Margaret Sanger,
a woman who to this day la a hero to
the pro-choke (or anti-life) crowd. In
her book. Pit of Cnnlixatian she de-
scribes theobjeetiveof birth control as
being "Morechikiren from the fit, less
from the unfit According to her, the
unfit were "all non-Aryan people "
The tinge of Nazism in her ideas
should not be surprising. An article
on eugenics in the April 1933 issue of
her magazine Birth Centre Masts
was written by Ernest Rudin, Hitler's
director of genetic itsrllliaHnn and
founder of the Nazi Society for Racial
Hygiene.
While the abortion righ ts people
claim to be protecting "poor blacks
very few blacks attend their rallies.
Also, a 1988poll by the National Opin-
ion Research Center showed that 62
percent of blacks believe abortion
should be illegal in all circumstances.
Seeing that almost half of pregnancies
by black women end in abortion, it
hardly seems a matter of "choice
Even a liberal like Jesse Jackson
realized the racism of ebortion In 1977,
he referred to abortion as "genocide
against the black race It was not
until 1984, when Jackson wanted to
enter the liberal elite of the Demo-
cratic Party, mat he adopted a pro-
choke attitude.
I am sure Margaret Sanger
would be proud to know that 70 per-
cent of Planned Parenthood dinks
ant operated in Black and Hispank
neighborhoods. And they call conser-
vatives, who oppose the use of federal
hmdstoperfonnabortk�ui,Naziaand
-to ftes& � ��sorrr
�pris cflu ft �� SAP
r
AOtyLBfeptja
faring in accounting.
Entertainment
KJ
1
s.
I
V
Santa Choudhury and Denzel Washington star in the i I
centers around the difficulties inherent in a racially mixec
Washington
Mississippi
By Robert S. Todd
Assistant Sports Editor
Being a black man in Missis-
sippi i and ha ne er been easy
Being African-American in
todavS vn irld bnot ea anywhere
and crossing the tracks can be
dangerous.
Mississippi Mosak b a won-
derfully conceived story on a
topic that ha been addressed
much over the la-t decade, most
recently (and off target hv Spike
Lee's unglt Fever
"Racism, or like thev say
nowadays � tradition � is
passed down like recipes
Demetrius, plaved by Denzel
Washington, notes. "The trick is
you got to know what to eat
Demetrius' recipe is a hot
little Indian dish named Mina,
plaved hv newcomer Santa
Choudhurv. Their relationship
begin- with a chance meeting �
Mina rams into the hack of his
van while arguing with her
mother. Mina runs across
Demetrius again that night at a
club and the fire is ablaze.
Mina is a true Masala (a col-
lection of hot and colorful spices
but the title is a misnomer. The
movie continually and perhaps
unintentionallv, drai
son? with the Indian
American culture-
light on how bas � I
cultures' attitudes ai
mixing. Demetnu
out to Mina s d
" our skin is just i
lighter than mini :
in America being
the a me to the white
ture
Denzel Washi
mands attention �
all of his films �
laden with untappe
Joe Seneca, wl
Cros ads with Ra
plavsWiUibenDeml
With a limited n
most of his pre J
much as Lawreno
with the part. Rostv
father lav. turned
performance als
role.
While their
nearly ends Demt
cleaning business
he feels from the
could have been c
thing braking tror
tion"orbygoingagJ
etal norms of Smal
Thev love each l
Vie East
Carolinian:
The best news, sports,
and entertainment
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sta writ us long after jraduafion For
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toBowwvg aao'ess
AMERICAN PASSAGE
NETWORK
1-800-487-2434
215 Weal Mtrnto
Scam WAMm-410?
D
vv
Vintage Clot
417 Evans
Downt
752-1!
There's plei
ATTENTION RETUR1
If you plan to live off-campus, yo
arranging your utility service in advance. Bj
time - and possibly money. The f
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parent's request, your utility
service may be put in their name. Just
pick up a "Request for Utility Service"
application from room 211 in the Off-
Campus Housing Office, Whichard
Building or at Greenville Utilities' main
office at 200 W. 5th Street.
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized)
and mail to GUC, PO Box 1847,
Greenville, NC 27835-1847, attn:
Customer Service.
'Remember to attach a "letter of credit" from your
parents power company.





er Hammer
)red alternative
Kiwi) th� . . d thai tti�- 1rig WiU is turn
� invoked m Amcih.i into a paiict ittM
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in,in pmmenl lKn"�ingif miMprntv�i�iions.
�rid un including doctors and dn) cartpffO
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rovtd�rof ed let private rating MrvkM
lw private hk . i-nw. rfsdukeitout,thejy
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tubsidied housing and would
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In fact I ibertanans would Mid
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m ins decry regulation
butthei elkrvi ttuit that gtvea
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good. Foi � ' ins small gen em
i expediency In
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I . � i . s ti-
lt's a big phis
I wou � tVi mi toseel ibertar-
iva funda-
ththem But
rong 1 �� esence in th
- quarter to
-�maps .m
in president �
the I v rats and
est � � thing else
Candtdfttt
head
� nthis v-ember 11
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I lose than
� a iu don t want
Above
erning AIDS
i d se especially
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W.r pei ni�' ho read lha col
mv with me .tii then S.1V,
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v Absolutely no on' "de-
i is sui . � tn� disease Th.it
� led � ith the � irus
ts innandknowingh exposedthem-
irm should not in the laaal
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forth, n '� �� then, do 1
� � i he answer is
the educational ma-
UU! ned earlier dts-
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� � ti arduous efforts are
i strictures of politj-
� " the fear oi being
� i � insensitive to
V toil us that any-
"� rhis is true Hut roal-
- � . � . ire a sexually
c-i. an intravenous drug uscf
access to lean needles,
� I he rosexual having unprotected
m witi multiple partnerv then vou
� elmingl) greaterohanca
olcontj � ting Ml ISthari ifyo irefrained
r stored these behaviors
Therefore until a cure tor All is
we would do
� m Benjamin Franklin's wise
rutkn that an ounce oi prevention
I of ure let's takeofl
the kui gloves tell the truth and saw
some lives
u
i point �
sin
I
of
i k iywt iV
e�-rvp Kt fern days

fel

38

Entertainment
(Bite Sast (Earolintan
Thacula' puis bite on audience
Photo CourtMy Simuii Goldwyn Company
Strita Choudhury and Denzel Washington star in Ihe romance story, "Mississippi Masala The movie
centers around the difficulties inherent in a racially mixed relationship.
Washington shines in
Mississippi Masala'
By Robert S. Todd
ssistjnt Sports Fditor
IV-ing i bl.uk man in Missis-
sippi is and has never been easy.
Being African-American in
today's world is not easy anywhere
and crossing the tracks can be
dangerous.
Mississippi Masala is a won-
derfully conceived story on a
topic that has heen addressed
much over the last decade, mot
recenil) (and off target) by Spike
i ee s lungle lever.
kn ism or like thev "n
nowadays tradition i
passed down like recipes,
Demetrius played by Denzel
Washington, notes "The trick is
you got to know what to eat
Demetrius' recipe is a hot
little Indian dish named Mina,
played by newcomer Sarita
Choudhury. Iheir relationship
begins with a chance meeting �
rvfina rams into the hack of his
van while arguing with her
mother Mina runs across
Demetrius again that night at a
club and the fire is ahlae.
Mina is a true Masala (a col-
lection oi hot and colorful spices)
but the title is a misnomer. The
movie continually, and perhaps
Tlw East
Carolinian:
The best news, sports,
and entertainment
unintentionally, draws compari-
sons with the Indian and African-
American cultures and shines
light on how hasically similar the
cultures' attitudes are about race
mixing. Demetrius astutely points
out to Mina's disgruntled father,
"Your skin is just a few shades
lighter than mine implying that
in America being "colored" is all
the same to the white power struc-
ture.
Denzel Washington com-
mands attention � as he does in
all of his films yet the cast i
laden with untapped talent.
joe Seneca, who stared in
Crossroads with Ralph Machio,
plavsWilliben, Demetrius'father.
With a limited role he makes the
most oi his presence and does as
much as Lawrence Olivier could
w ith the part. RoshanSeth, Mina's
father Jay, turned in a fantastic
performance, also in a limited
role.
While their relationship
nearly ends Demetrius' carpet
cleaning business, the aftershock
he feels from the community
could have been caused by any-
thing braking from any "tradi-
tion " Off bv going against the soci-
etal norms of Small Town, USA.
Thev love each other and Di-
rector Mira Nairdecided this was
a love story, not the definitive
work on interracial problems and
solutions.
Nair avoids the weight of
deep contemplation and focuses
on capturing the beauty of
Uganda and the Bavou while
drawing the surprising similari-
ties between the two. She suc-
ceeds magnificently with the aes-
thetics but fails to put the magni-
fying glass on Mina and
Demetrius.
Thev fall in love and the au-
dience is left wondering how.
Nair manages to loop her sub-
plots around the theme of the
movie with very little distraction,
allowing focus to fall on the lithe
relationship of Mina and
Demetrius. She also, perhaps in-
tentionally, does not force the
questions that were raised in
Jungle FrTtT.
Do not expect to leave the
theatre questioning the injustices
of society. Mississippi Masala is
not social revolution or wisdom
from above. It is simply a delight-
ful love story that, with stark re-
alism, gives insight into life in
Greenwood, Mississippi which
may as well be Greenville, North
Carolina.
By Joe Horst
Asst. Entertainment Editor
You see (at the very least) one
every Halloween, countless mov-
ies have been made about them and
too many myths and superstitions
to count have been laid at their feet.
Who are these mystical and
fantastical beings?
Vampires, Walpurgisnacht,Vad
the I mpaler, creatures of the undead
� call them what you will, their
timeless ability to raise the hairs on
the back of our necks remains as
strong today as it was when Bram
Stoker wrote his modem horror clas-
sic, Dmcula.
The East Camlina Playhouse
continues this time-honored tradi-
tion with their last installment in
the 1992 Summer Theatre season,
William Kelly's "Dracula
In 1927,Stoker's novel wasdra-
matized in the Lyceum Theater in
London. Following this new twist
in the history of vampires,
"Dracula" enjoyed huge success on
Broadway in 1973, starring Frank
Langella as Dracula. The play has
gone on to simultaneously terrorize
and delight audiences around the
country.
John Shearin, director of
"Dracula"
and who has
adapted the
original script
for this run,
has once
again
brought var-
ied and admi-
rable talent to
this produc-
tion.
Justin
Deas will
play the se-
ductive, yet
horrible
Dracula.
Deas has
worked on
stage and in
television,
most notably for his work in the
classics and winningthree Daytime
Emmys for his soap opera work.
Veteran Summer Theatre actor Tom
Spivey will make a drastic switch
from his Southern gentleman in
"Kiss Me, Kate" to play the fly-
eating lunatic Renfield. Also, Donn
Youngstrom will move from "Kiss
Me, Kate" honors to plav the stake-
wielding vampire hunter Van
Helsing.
"Dracula"
runs from July
22 to August 1,
with matinee
performances
on July 25 and
29 with no
shows on Sun-
days. Perfor-
mances start at
8:15 p.m. every
night, with the
matinee shows
starting at 2:15
p.m .Ticket
prices for
"Dracula" are
$17.50 for
adults, $13.50
for senior citi-
zens and $7.50
forchildren un-
der the age of 12. A special ECU
student price is being offered �
$750, with a valid I.D if the ticket is
bought fifteen minutes before that
night's performance only. Tickets
bought for ther nights are subject
to the adult price.
"Dracula" promises to be the
perfect capper on an honorable
Summer Theatre season. So bring
vour stakes and cloves oi garlic, and
prepareyourselfforachilling night.
Pholo by Bl� Ransom � 7h� Eamt Liroiiman
I'm Crashing and I Can't Pull Up!
Spectators enjoy the Bud Light stunt plane Saturday at the Cherry Point MCAS Air Show.
iBudwelserl
?mf Sh�v
V!
The Amphitheatre At Carowinds
HELP WANTED
Wuidyu Melon � ' �
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Closed Wed & Sun
There's plenty of FREE parking at our rear entrance
off of Cotanche.
ONSAmNOW.ONEF
j
ATTENTION RETURNING STUDENTS!
If you plan to live off-campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by
arranging your utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable
time - and possibly money. The following options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parent's request, your utility
service may be put in their name. Just
pick up a "Request for Utility Service"
application from room 211 in the Off-
Campus Housing Office, Whichard
Building or at Greenville Utilities' main
office at 200 W. 5th Street.
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized)
and mail to GUC, PO Box 1847,
Greenville, NC 27835-1847, attn:
Customer Service.
Option B: No Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put
in your name, a deposit will be required.
Deposits are as follows:
urith dectnc or gas
spocthmting
without electric or
gas space hatting
Electric only $100 $75
Electric & Water $100 $85
Electric, Water, & Gas $110 $85
Electric & Gas $100 $75
You can save time by mailing the deposit in
advance. Be sure to include your name, where ser-
vice will be required, when service is to be cut on,
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prior to your arrival at the service address.





Sports
QU?e lEast (ilnrultntan
July 22, 1992
Jones makes impact in Dallas
(AD When the Dallas
Cowboys lost Jack Del Rio to the
Minnesota Vikings via Han B tree
agency, there was concern they
would be hurting at middle line-
backer in 1W2.
After Sunday's performance
bv nxkie Robert Jones of East
Carolina, coach Jimmv Johnson
isn't worrying one bit.
Jones, the Cowboys' second
pick in the first round of the NFL
draft, impressed Johnson and the
7,500 fans at St. Edward's Univer-
sit in Austin, Texas, watching the
annual Blue-White scrimmage.
Jones returned an intercepted
pass 58 yards for a touchdown off
Trov Aikman And he made sev-
eral other plays that had lohnson
in a buoyant mixxl after the 60-
plav scrimmage
"You can see why we drafted
him in the first round lohnson
said. "He made plays a normal
player couldn't make. He made a
great tickle on a screen pass and
madea tremendous plaj on a side-
rinesweep, (heontywayyoumake
those plays is if you have instin ts
and speed
Linebacker MauriceC rum re-
turned a Ste e Beueriein intercep-
tion 5() yards for a touchdown in
the second defensive touchdown
of the day.
fortes came into camp I istedas
the starting linebac ker but ud he
doesn't expect anyone to hand him
the job.
"It's not up to me to S3) that 1
start he said. It was an exciting
day. I showed the fans anil the
coaches that 1
can play the
pass
On of-
fense, Tony
Jordan scored
on a 3-yard
run, Darryl
Johnston
scored from a
yard out and
Kelvin Martin
caught a 62-
vard scoring
pass from
Beueriein
Beueriein,
who led the
Cowboys to
five victories
after Aikman
Former ECU consensus All-Amencan Robert Jones
Greenville Comparisons to Lawrence Taylor of the
got hurt last year, hit S of 12 passes
for 169yards. Aikman was lOof 18
for 81 yards.
Oilers
Warren Moon, attempting to
resolve a dispute over bonus
money from 1990,orficially became
a holdout when he failed to report
to Houston's camp bv the dead-
line.
44ers
Safety Dana Hall, San
Francisco's top draft choice, was
signed to a three-year contract
worth $2.7million. Earlier, theclub
signed second-round pick Amp
Lee, a running back, and ninth-
round pick Danan Hagan, a re-
ceiver
The club has It) unsigned vet-
erans, including all-pro receiver
lerrv Rice.
Jets
Right guard Dwayne White
has been told by coach Bruce Coslet
to lose weight.
The 315- pound, 6-foot-2of ten-
sive lineman, who reported tocamp
about 20 pounds over his ideal plav-
ing weight, was given a more rruxi-
est 10 pounds to loseor be subjected
to a fine. White's deadline was not
revealed
Steel ers
Defensive end Aaron lones is
back with Pittsburgh onlv because
coach Chuck Noll isn't.
Jones, one of a recent run of
disappointingSteeier s first-round
draft choices, said he asked to be
tradedafter last season and returned
when Noll resigned.
Raiders
The team signed running back
Photo Courtesy ECU Sports information
is picking up where he left off in
New Giants have already begun.
TerrenceFlagler.a former 49ers first-
round draft pick, to a free agent
contract.
Hagler,27,San Francisco's first-
round pick in 1987, saw little action
in three seasons with the49ers, car-
rving the ball only 42 times. After
being traded to the Dallas Cow boys
and released, he signed with Phoe-
nix, playing 13 games in 1990 and
carrying the ball ust 13 times.
Rams
Jim Everett reported two davs
early and bxk part in LA's second
practice. The seventh-vear quarter-
Kick wanted to arnve to start learn-
ing the system of new coach Chuck
Knox. "1 just wanted toget in and get
comfortable with the program
Everett said. "1 think we're all ex-
cited about how camp is going to go
under Coach Knox
Faldo takes British Open title home
GULLANl Scotland (API
The ball disappeared and the hole,
like a vortex, sucked the breath
out of him a long with it His shoul-
ders sagged, his head slumped for
the briefest moment and when he
turned to face the rest of the world.
Nick Faldo was sobbing uncon-
trollably.
We want heroes with spines
and nerves fcrgil from steel, but
with hearts that break easily
enough so the rest of us recognize
in them some part of ourselves.
No one ever doubted Nick
Faldo's mettle. But until he stood
on Muirfield's LSth green Sunday
with tears streaming down his
ruddy cheeks, Faldo seemed onlv
slightly more human than the Tin
Man from the "Wizard of Oz
Before he got his heart.
"1 don't really know what it
means right now, to be honest
Faldo said, his voice still quiver-
ing a half-hour after a roller-
coaster round of 73 ended with his
third British Open championship.
" I just think the horrible pres-
sure of it, you know, having a
four-shot lead, and if it had all
ended up wrong, I've lost he
paused, "and what the hell would
that have meant to me f"
Plentv. as it turns out. It has
already taken much longer than it
should have for Faldo to be uni-
versallv acclaimed as what he is
� by far the greatest plaver in
championship golf on the planet
right now.
Even before he carved two
birdies out oi the unyielding turf
Of Muirfield over the final four
holes to win Sunday, Faldo's
record and the way he compiled it
certainly spoke for itself:
A first British Open title in
187 in the wet and wind of an
even-more treacherous final day
at Muirfield; a second, in a run-
away, at surprisingly docile St.
Andrews, in 1990; back-to-back
Masters wins, both after playoffs,
in 1989 and 1990.
But the more Faldo won, the
more the character of those wins
seemed to tarnish his brilliance.
His first Open title came as he
sat in the scorer's hut after 18
straight pars and watched on a TV
as Paul Azinger self-destructed
behind him. What most people
remembered about his two Mas-
ters wins was the Scott Hixh-as-
m-choke debacle in NHM and how
Raymond Floyd bogeved the 17th
the following year. Those same
people conveniently forgot that
Faldo shot 65 on the final dav at
Augusta to force Hcxrh into the
playoff and that he birdied three
of the final ix in 19) to make
Floyd do the folding-chair rou-
tine.
Here, though, Nick Faldo let
the rest of the world in. Here, over
the course of four courageous
rounds, he revealed himself to be
made of the sternest stuff, but also
funny and imprecise and, most
important perhaps, vulnerable.
No evebrows were raised
when Faldo followed up an open-
ing-round 66 with a 64 on Friday
10 reach the 36-hole juncture with
the lowest score ever recorded in
the 121 British Opens. Or when he
widened his lead over the field to
four strokes with a very work-
manlike M on Saturday.
But the manner in which Faldo
arrived at the 18th Sundav, and
then walked off it in tears, should
prompt everyone to take another
Icxik.
He was frightened and then
brave at different turns as the lead
dwindled and then disappeared.
And he was drained, finally, at the
last hole of every emotion but re-
lief.
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IOC,UN review
volatile situation
Yugoslavian athletes may compete
BARCELONA, Spain (AP)
� The IOC Executive Board
told the United Nations on
Sunday that it prefers to allow
Yugoslavs to compete in team
as well as individual competi-
tions, saying there should be
no distinction between the
two.
"At this stage, this option
remains open said Francois
Carrard, director general of the
International Olympic Com-
mittee. "The IOC has kept and
is keeping the same line
The U.N. Security
Council's sanctions commit-
tee was expected to meet in
New York todav to review the
IOC's position. The IOC board
will recoveneTuesdav to make
a final decision on the statusof
athletes from Yugoslavia and
two of its former republics.
The IOC has proposed that
the Yugoslavs compete under
the Olympic flag and anthem
without officially representing
their homeland. The athletes
would wear white uniforms
and be called the Independent
Team.
But the U.N panel ques-
tioned whether the formula
would go against the sanctions
on Yugoslavia, a former six-
republic federation now con-
sisting of Serbia and
Montenegro. The Secuntv
Council sanctions, includinga
sports boycott, were adopted
May 30 to punish Serbia for
fomenting violence in the
former Yugoslavian republic
of Bosnia-Herzegovina.
The sanctions committee
asked the IOC for clarifications,
saying the Yugoslavian ath-
letes would still be perceived
as representing their country
if they compete as a team. The
panel suggested the Yugoslavs
compete strictly on an indi-
vidual basis � meaning thev
would be unable to take part
in any team events.
But the IOC insists there
should be no restrictions.
Carrard said the Yugosla-
vian team would be "de-po-
liticized" since the athletes
would formally declare that
they represent onlv them-
selves, not a state or country
"They are coming as indi-
vidual athletes under the au-
thority of the IOC he said.
"Weconsiderthatathlete- mav
take part in team events as in-
dividuals. This line Iv.s been
confirmed
However. Carrard did not
rule out the possibility of lim-
iting the Yugoslavs to indi-
vidual events if the U.N. com-
mittee rejects the IOC's terms
Carrard confirmed the IOC
has alerted national Olympic
Committees to be ready to re-
place any Yugoslavian teams
that might be barred
The Yugoslavs have quali-
fied to compete in men's water
polo and handball and
women's handball and basket-
ball.
Yugoslavia was planning
to send a team of about 160
athletes and officials, Carrard
said.
"t





Title
The East Carolinian, July 22, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 22, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.886
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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