The East Carolinian, July 15, 1992






Jones wins the gold
SGA President Courtney Jones gets an A.
4
Laughing your way down the aisle 5
'Lend Me a Tenor' leaves audiences standing in approval.
Stye �nBt (Hut alMutx
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.66 No.37
Wednesday, July 15, 1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5,000
6 Pages
Smoking restricted on campus
Candidates debate at UNC
Officials at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill a re making plans
to bring Ross Perot, George Bush and Bill
Clinton to UNC for a debate. The Bicen-
tennial Observance Office said the de-
batewill beheld sometime in the fall, but
no plans are definite because the com-
mittee has not yet found a sponsor.
Student wins lawsuit
A former University of Southern Cali-
fornia student who was raped outside of an
off-campus residence hall four years ago
was recently awarded $1.6 million in com-
pensatory damages. The Superior Court
jury found the university guilty of provid-
ing inadequate security and insufficient
information about the high crime area in
the neighborhood where the resident hall
was located.
Stalking becomes crime
The Department of Public Safety and
Security at Middle Tennessee State Uni-
versity recently passed legislation that
ma kes sta Iking a mi sdemeanor on the first
offense and a felonv on the second. The
campus police will now be able to arrest
people who harass, follow or threaten oth-
ers, providing a safer and more secure
environment for students.
Confuted by EMatwti SNmmrt. Trtwn from CPS M
&tm campu rwwipapsr.
By Michael Martin
Sports Editor
ECU Board of Trustees
extinguished the rights of
smokers Thursday by voting
to restrict smoking in all cam-
pus buildings.
As a part of the trustees'
summer meeting, the group
voted 11-2 in favor of a
campuswide clean air act
which will prohibit smoking
in ail campus buildings that
are poorly ventilated or not
ventilated at ill.
"The resolution was pro-
posed by the Faculty Senate
Welfare Committee after a
number of faculty com-
plained about the quality of
air in the General Classroom
Building said Dr. John
Moskop, president of the Fac-
ulty Senate.
"The resolution directs
the chancellor to develop a
clean air policy which in-
cludes designating smoking
areas in certain buildings
Smokers will be permit-
ted to light up in designated
areas of buildings that are ei-
ther currently ventilated, or
can be ventilated at a reason-
able cost. University officials
have begun to study the cost
effectiveness of installing
ventilation in classroom
buildings.
Trustee William Furr and
SGAPresident Courtney Jones
were the two dissenting vot-
ers, citing the cost of install-
ing a ventilation and the lack
of student input for their de-
cisions.
Jones added that student
safety was not taken into con-
sideration by other members
of the board.
"My concern with the
policy is that females in class-
room buildings that are open
all night � like the music
building and the art building
� will have to go outside to
smoke a cigarette Jones said.
"Safety of the students
should also be taken into con-
sideration
The only immediate
building to be affected by the
ban is the General Classroom
Building. Board members felt
it would cost too much to es-
tablish ventilation system in
the new building.
Residence Halls will not
be affected by the measure,
Moskop said.
Chancellor Richard Eakin
could not be reached for com-
ment.
"As I look at the policy,
there are no specifics Jones
said.
"They want to put a smok-
ing area where it can go �
where there's a good ventila-
Ptwxo by DaH nad � Tha Eat Carolinian
Soon this picture will not be as common. Only currently ventilated or easily ventilated areas wiM be
designated as smoking. Hopefully, the Student Stores will continue to allow smoking.
tion system, but there are no
regulations. There's not even
a penalty for those who ig-
nore the policy
The policy will take effect
September 1,1992.
Dr. Alfred Matthews, vice
chancellor of Student Life, said
a study last year showed that
no other university in the
North Carolina system had a
clean air policy. However,
Board of Trustees chairman Bill
Dansey said in the meeting that
North Carolina State Univer-
sity was looking intoa clean air
policy, but that ECU would be
the first in the state to adopt
one.
"This was entirely initiated
by faculty Jones said. "If the
faculty in the General Class-
room Building have such a
problem with (the smoke) in
the office space, why don't
they do away with it in the
offices?
"I'm just not so sure that
students are going to be in
favor of this
Clinton makes MTV debut
Ptmto by DaN RMd � 77m Eaat Carolinian
LOS ANGELES (CPS)�Bill Clinton
wanted, and got, his MTV.
TheEtemocratic presidential contender,
speaking to 18- to 24-year-olds on MTV, let
it slip that he's a Leo. (George Bush is a
Gemini.) That he went "nuts" over Elvis
Presley. (There's no accounting for taste.)
That if he could try it again, he may inhale,
and not Just puff, marijuana. (Not legal,
remember?)
Heady stuff, but the stuff presidential
campaigns appear to be made of this year.
Clinton, governor of Arkansas and
Democratic presidential candidate, ap-
peared on an MTV "Town Hall" meeting
that was broadcast June 16.
President Bush was invited by MTV to
host such a meeting, as was Ross Perot, an
un-announced candidate for president.
Neither has accepted the invitation, but
they "are taking it seriously ar MTV
spokeswoman said.
New York-based MTV extended the
hour-long show by a half an hour when
audience members kept asking questions
about Ci in ton's stands, policies, political
views and rock 'n' roll preferences. About
200 young people attended the taping,
which was held in Los Angeles.
An MTV spokeswoman in New York
said having Clinton on the video channel
was "part of a campaign to bring our view-
ers things they're interested in
Qinton apparently likes to make un-
conventional appearances on television; he
also appeared on the Arsenio Hall show
and played his saxophone.
But MTV?
"It was a great way to reach young
voters. We were definitely pleased said
Clinton campaign spokeswoman Max
Parker.
"It seemed that the audiences enjoyed
it, and he enjoyed it
The old Blount-Harvey building is 500 feet away from The Fizz Bistro and according to a city ordinance is too close to allow another
club serving alcohol to open The meeting held last week inspired a debate between SGA President and a city official.
New bar sparks war between city, s chool
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
At the recent city council meeting to
discuss the addition of a new club down-
town, city officials began blaming ECU for
the area's crowded streets until SGA Presi-
dent Courtney Jones stuck up for the school
and asked the city council to stick to the issue.
An unnamed businessman has plans to
turn the vacant Blount-Harvey building on
Fourth and Greene streets into a nightclub.
During the meeting, city council mem-
ber Mildred Council, who voted against the
new d ub opening, began to blame the city's
previous problems with thedowntown area
on ECU students.
Council said that more bars would not
be needed if ECU provided proper enter-
tainment
SGA President Courtney Jones, after
earlier giving a speech about how ECU has
moved in a more positive direction was
outraged by Council's remarks.
lamshockedthatMs.Counril had that
kind of attitude Jones said. "As a 21-year
resident of Greenville, I'm embarrassed
that a representative of our community
has such a negative and narrow-minded
view of ECU and its students
Jones attended the meeting and re-
minded the council that the crowd down-
town is not fust ECU students. She asked
Council to stick to the city zoning issue at notneed another club. Prop nents said thearea
hand after Council spoke at length about the would benefit from the business.
city's problems with ECU students. The current alcohol-serving establish-
"ECU is getting bigger and better and ment within 500 feet of the Blount-Harvey
Ms. Council needs to learn how to deal building is The Fizz Bistro restaurant and night-
with the students because we're not going dub, whose owner has no complaints with
away Jones said.
Council mem-
bers Rufus
Huggins, Blance
Forbes and Bob
Ramey voted to ap-
prove the ordi-
nance. Whereas,
Council and Inez
Fridley voted
against it
the proposed com-
"I'm embarrassed that a rep- potion.
, , . "If approved, I
resentahveofthecommunity don't think the new
has such a negative view of " wouU hurt my
ECU and its students.

SGA President Courtney Jones
business saidowner
of The Fizz Bistro,
Abdul Kamalpasha.
"The club would be a
� privateclub,soitmay
hurt the other private dubs in the area
In a split vote on Thursday, it was tenta- "I see no reason why a bar or a dub should
tiveJy agreed to delete the 500-foot spacing not be opened because of an antiquated rule
Splash dance
requirement between nightclubs in
Greenville, but the city council must vote
again Aug. 24 because of a temporary ab-
sence of an at-iarge representative.
Without all the members necessary,
designed to . prevent even more entertaining
nigh tdubs simply because they choosetoserve
liquor said former employee of The Fizz and
senior Johnray Fuller.
"Weneed new life down there, we need to
the council must take two votes on the pro- stimulate downtown in any way we can
posal. Mayor Pro-tern Rufus Huggins said to TV
Attorney Fred Mattox represents the Daly Rtjlector.
unnamed client who wants to renovate the
Blount-Harvey building and open a dub. Mattox said thetitscorriprehensiveplan
"There is literally noplace in the downtown cailsforthecfowntrjwnareatoserveasthecity's
area that can meet these requirements he entertainment center and yet the number of
told The Daily Rtfector. bars downtown has stayed the same while the
enrollment of ECU has i
� , r mr
� w - 21 �MK'
&iJsjjJL . �1
.HgC' Lb kcilfc�� iME mmfr-�ms
H
i jW
pfe. ' T7" "J
i� nan
The rising heal index put most students in a �Mtfclstth�jsj�tWOfounAws�
to coot off. Current temperature are in the hundreds win lots of!





Jones wins the gold
SGA President Courtney Jones gets an A.
4
Laughing your way down the aisle 5
'Lend Me a Tenor' leaves audiences standing in approval.
�1je �uBt (Karultman
Vol.66 No.37
Wednesday, July 15, 1992
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5.000
6 Pages
Smoking restricted on campus
By Michael Martin
Candidates debate at UNC
Officials at the University of North
Carolina al Chapel Hill are making plans
to bring Ross Perot George Bushand Bill
Clinton to UNC tor a debate. The Bicen-
tennial Observance Office said die de-
bate will beheld sometime in the fall, but
no plans are definite because the com-
mittee has not vet found a sponsor.
Student wins lawsuit
A former University of Southern Cali-
fornia student who was raped outside of an
off-campus residence hall four years ago
was recently awarded $16 million in com-
pensatory damages. Ihe Superior Court
jury found the university guiltv of provid-
ing inadequate security and insufficient
information about the high crime area in
the neighborhood where the resident hall
was Kvated.
Stalking becomes crime
The Department of Public Safety and
Security at Middle Tennessee State Uni-
versit recently passed legislation that
makt stalkinga misdemeanor on the first
ot tense and a felony on the second. The
campus police will now be able to arrest
people who harass, follow or threaten oth-
ers, providing a s,)U'r and more secure
environment for students.
Compllvd by EHzafcatrt Sttfmmal Taksn from CPS id
o&mr campu nw�pap�rt.
Sports Editor
ECU Board of Trustees
extinguished the rights of
smokers Thursday by voting
to restrict smoking in all cam-
pus buildings.
As a part of the trustees'
summer meeting, the group
voted 11-2 in favor of a
campuswide clean air act
which will prohibit smoking
in all campus buildings that
are poorly ventilated or not
ventilated at all.
"The resolution was pro-
posed by the Faculty Senate
Welfare Committee after a
number of faculty com-
plained about the quality of
air in the General Classroom
Building said Dr. John
Moskop, president of the Fac-
ulty Senate.
"The resolution directs
the chancellor to develop a
clean air policy which in
eludes designating smoking
areas in certain buildings
Smokers will be permit-
ted to light up in designated
areas of buildings that are ei-
ther currently ventilated, or
can be ventilated at a reason-
able cost. University officials
have begun to study the cost
effectiveness of installing
ventilation in classroom
buildings.
Trustee William Furr and
SGAFresident Courtney Jones
were the two dissenting vot-
ers, citing the cost of install-
ing a ventilation and the lack
of student input for their de-
cisions.
Jones added that student
safety was not taken into con-
sideration by other members
of the board.
"My concern with the
policy is that females in class-
room buildings that are open
all night � like the music
building and the art building
� will have to go outside to
smokea cigarette Jones said.
"Safety of the students
should also be taken into con-
sideration
The only immediate
building to be affected by the
ban is the General Classroom
Building. Board members felt
it would cost too much to es-
tablish ventilation system in
the new building.
Residence Halls will not
be affected by the measure,
Moskop said.
Chancellor Richard Eakin
could not be reached for com-
ment.
"As 1 look at the policy,
there are no specifics Jones
said.
"They want to puta smok-
ing area where it can go �
where there's a good ventila-
Soon this picture will not be as common Only currently ventilated
designated as smoking Hopefully, the Student Stores will continue
tion system, but there are no
regulations. There's not even
a penalty for those who ig-
nore the policy
The policy will take effect
September 1,1992.
Dr. Alfred Matthews, vice
chancellor of Student Life, said
a study last year showed that
no other university in the
North Carolina system had a
clean air policy. However,
Board of Trusteeschairman Bill
Dansey said in the meeting that
North Carolina State Univer-
sity was looking intoa clean air
policy, but th.it ECU would be
the first in the state to adopt
line.
"This was entirely initiated
Photo by Dall Rmcj � Tha Eaal Carolinian
or easily ventilated areas will be
to allow smoking.
by faculty Jones said. "If the
faculty in the General Class-
room Building have such a
problem with (the smoke) in
the office space, why don't
they do away with it in the
offices?
"I'm just not so sure that
students are going to be in
favor of this
Clinton makes MTV debut
Photo by Oail RMd � Th� Eaat Carolinian
LOS ANGELES (CPS)�Bill Clinton
wanted, and got, his MTV.
The Democratic presidential contender,
speaking to 18- to 24-year-olds on MTV, let
it slip that he's a Leo. (George Bush is a
Gemini.) That he went "nuts" over Elvis
Fresley. (There's no accounting for taste.)
That if he could try it again, he may inhale,
and not just puff, manjuana. (Not legal,
remember?)
Heady stuff, but the stuff presidential
campaigns appear to be made of this year.
Clinton, governor of Arkansas and
Democratic presidential candidate, ap-
peared on an MTV "Town Hall" meeting
that was broadcast June lfv
President Bush was invited by MTV to
host such a meeting, as was Ross Femt, an
un-announced candidate for president.
Neither has accepted the inv itatiort, but
they "are taking it seriously an MTV
spokeswoman said.
New York-based M TV extended the
hour-long show by a half an hour when
audience members kept asking questions
about Clinton's stands, policies, political
views and rock 'n' roll preferences. About
200 young people attended the taping,
which was held in Los Angeles.
An MTV spokeswoman in New York
said having Clinton on the video channel
was "partof a campaign to bring our view-
ers things they're interested in
Qinton apparently likes to make un-
conventional appearances on television; he
also appeared on the Arsenio Hall show
and plaved his saxophone.
But MTV?
"It was a great way to reach young
voters. We were definitely pleased said
Clinton campaign spokeswoman Max
Tarker.
"It seemed that the audiences enjoyed
it, and he enjoyed it
The old Blount-Harvey building is 500 feet away from The Fizz Bistro and according to a city ordinance is too close to allow another
club serving alcohol to open The meeting held last week inspired a debate between SGA President and a city official.
New bar sparks war between city, s chool
By Marjorie Pitts
Stiff Writer
At the recent city council meeting to
discuss the addition of a new club down-
town, city officials began blaming ECU for
the area's crowded streets until SGA Presi-
dent Courtney fanes stuck up for the school
and asked the city counci ItosticktO the issue.
An unnamed businessmanhasplans to
rum the vacant Blount-Harvey building on
Fourth and Greene streets into a nightclub.
Dunng the meeting city council mem-
ber Mildred Giuncil, who voted against the
new club opening, began to blame the city's
previf his pn blems with thedowntownarea
on ECU students.
Giuncil said that more bars would not
be needed if ECU pmvided proper enter-
tainment.
SGA President Courtney Jones, after
earlier giving a speech about how ECU has
moved in a more positive direction was
outraged by Council's remarks.
"lam shocked that Ms. Council had that
kind of attitude Jones said. "As a 21-year
resident of Greenville, I'm embarrassed
mat a representative of our community
has such a negative and narrow-minded
view of ECU and its students
Jones attended the meeting and re-
minded the council that the crowd down-
town is not iust ECU students. She asked
Giuncil to stick to the city zoning issue at
hand after Giuncil spokeat length about the
city's problems with ECU students.
"ECU is getting bigger and better and
Ms. Council needs to learn how to deal
with the students because we're not going
Jones said.
notneed another club. Proponents said thearea
would benefit from the business.
The current alcohol-serving establish-
ment within 500 feet of the Blount-Harvey
build ing is The Fizz Bistro resta urant and night-
club, whose owner has no complaints with
'z the proposed com-
"I'm embarrassed that a rep-
resentative of the community
has such a negative view of
ECU and its students.

� SGA President Courtney Jones
away,
Giuncil mem-
bers Rufus
Huggins, Blance
Forbes and Bob
Ramey voted to ap-
prove the ordi-
nance. Whereas,
Council and Inez
Fridley voted B
against it
In a split vote on Thursday, it was tenta-
tively agreed to delete the 500-foot spacing
requirement between nightclubs in
Greenville, but the city council must vote
again Aug. 24 because of a temporary ab-
sence of an at-Iarge representative.
Without all the members necessary,
the council must take two votes on the pro- stimulate downtown in any way we can
posal. Mayor Pro-tem Rufus Huggins said to The
Attorney Fred Mattox represents the DaHy Reflector.
unnamed client who wants to renovate the
Blount-Harvey building and open a club. Mattox said thedtscomprehensiveplan
"There is literally no place in the downtown calls for thedowntownarea to serveas theory's
area that can meet these requirements he entertainment center and yet the number of
MM The DaHy Reflector. bars downtownhas stayed the same while the
Opponentssaki thedowntownareadoes enrollment of ECU has increased.
petition.
"If approved, I
don't think die new
bar would hurt my
business said owner
of The Fizz Bistro,
Abdul Kamalpasha.
"The club would be a
BS privateclub,soitmay
hurt the other private dubs in the area
'1 see no reason why a bar or a d ub should
not be opened because of an antiquated rule
designed to prevent even more entertaining
nigh tclubs simply because they choosetoserve
liquor said former employee of The Fizz and
senior Johnray Fuller.
"Weneed new life down there, weneed to
Splash dance
The rising heat index put most students in a sweat but these two found a way
to cool off. Current temperatures are in the hundreds with lots of fcurrodjfy





Jones wins the gold
SGA President Courtney Jones gets an A.
4
Laughing your way down the aisle 5
'Lend Me a Tenor' leaves audiences standing in approval.
(Btft �uBt (Hutoixtxmn
Vol.66 No.37
dnesdav, July 15, 1992
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Greenville, North Carolina
Candidates debate at UNC
Officials at the I niversity of North
Carolina atnape! Hill are making plans
to bring Ross Perot, George Bush arid Bill
Qinton to UNC tor a debate. Ihe Bicen-
tennial l ibservance Office said the de-
batewill beheld sometime m the fall, but
no plans are definite because the com-
mittee ha- no! vet found a sponsor
Student wins lawsuit
A former University of Southern Cali-
fornia student whowas raped outside of an
off-campus residence hall four years ago
was recently awarded $1.6 million in com-
pensator) damages. Ihe Superior Court
i jurv found the university guilty of provid-
ing inadequate security and insufficient
information about the high crime area in
the neighborhood where the resident hall
was located.
Stalking becomes crime
Ihe Department of Public Safety and
Securit) .it Middle Tennessee state Uni-
versity recently passed legislation that
makes stalking a misdemeanor on the first
offense and a felony on the second. The
campus police will now be able to arrest
people who harass, follow or threaten oth-
ers providing a safer and more secure
em ironment tor students.
ComplKd by EMn�Bi SKmiwI Tuki from CPS �xl
ClRCUl ANON 5.000
6 Pages
Smoking restricted on campus
By Michael Martin
Sports Eil itor
LC U Board of Trustees
extinguished the rights of
smokers Thursday by voting
to restrict smoking in all cam-
pus buildings.
As a part of the trustees'
summer meeting, the group
voted 11-2 in favor of a
campuswide clean air act
which will prohibit smoking
in all campus buildings that
.ire poorly ventilated or not
ventilated at all.
" 1 he resolution was pro
posed bv the Faculty Senate
Welfare Committee after a
number oi faculty com-
plained about the quality of
air in the General Classroom
Building said Dr. John
Moskop, president of the Fac-
ulty Senate
"The resolution directs
the chancellor to develop a
clean air policy which in
eludes designating smoking
areas in certain buildings
Smokers will be permit-
ted to light up in designated
areas of buildings that are ei-
ther currently ventilated, or
i an be ventilated at a reason-
able cost. University officials
have begun to study the cost
effectiveness oi installing
ventilation in classroom
buildings
Trustee William Furr nd
si A President Courtney Jones
were the two dissenting vot-
ers, citing the cost of install-
ing a ventilation and the la k
of student input for their de-
cisions.
Jones added that student
safety was not taken into con-
sideration by other members
of the board.
"My concern with the
policy is that females in class-
room buildings that are open
all night � like the music
building and the art building
� will have to go outside to
smoke a cigarette Jones said.
"Safety of the students
should also be taken into con-
sideration
The only immediate
building to be affected bv the
ban is the General Classroom
Building. Board members felt
it would cost too much to es-
tablish ventilation svstem in
the new building.
Residence Halls will not
be affected by the measure,
Moskop said.
Chancellor Richard Eakin
could not be rea hed for com-
ment.
"As 1 look at the policy,
there are no Spe itics Jones
s,ild.
" I hey want to puta smok-
ing area where it can go �
where there's a md ventila-
Soon this picture will not be as common Only currently ventilated
designated as smoking Hopefully, the Student Stores will continue
tion system, but there are no
regulations. There's not even
a penalty for those who ig-
nore the policy
The policy will take effect
September 1, 1992
Dr. Alfred Matthews, vice
chancellor of Student Life, said
a study last year showed that
no other university in the
North Carolina system had a
clean air policy. However.
Board of Trustee-chairman Bill
Dansey said in the meeting that
North Carolina State Univer-
sitywas looking intoa clean air
policy, but that ECU would be
the first in the ' ite to adopt
one.
This was entirely initiated
PtKrto by Dan R��d � Th� E�t Csmttnian
or easily ventilated areas will be
to allow smoking
by faculty ones said. "If the
faculty in the General Class-
room Building have such a
problem with (the smoke) in
the office -pace, why don't
they do away with it in the
offices?
"I'm just not so sure that
students are going to be in
favor of this
Clinton makes MTV debut
Photo by D�il RMd � Thm Eatt Carolinian
LOS ANGELESPS) Bill Clinton
wanted, and got, his M IV.
The Democratic presidential contender,
speaking to IK- to 24-year-olds on MTV let
it slip that he's a Leo. (George Bush is a
Gemini.) That he went "nuts" over Elvis
Presley. (There's no accounting for taste.)
That if he could try it again, he may inhale,
and not just puff, manuana. (Not legal,
remember?)
Heady Stuff, but the stuff presidential
campaigns appear to be made of this year
Clinton, governor of Arkansas and
Democratic presidential candidate, ap-
peared on an MTV "Town Hall" meeting
that was broadcast lune lb
President Bush was invited by M TV to
host such a meeting, as was Ross Temt, an
un-announced candidate for president
Neither has accepted the invitation but
they "are taking it seriously, ar MTV
spokeswoman said.
New York-based MTV extended the
hour-long show by a half dn hour when
audience members kept asking questions
about Clinton's stands, policies, political
views and rock 'n' roll preferences. About
2(H) young people attended the taping,
which was held in Los Angeles.
An MTV' spokeswoman in New York
said having Clinton on the video channel
was "part of a campaign to bring our view-
ers things they're interested in
Clinton apparently likes to make un-
conventional appearances on television; he
also appeared on the Arsenio Hall show
and plaved hi saxophone.
But MTV?
It was a great way to reach young
voters. We were definitely pleased said
Clinton campaign spokeswoman Max
� ker.
It seemed that the audiences enjoyed
it, and he enjoved it
The old Blount-Harvey building is 500 feel away from The Fizz Bistro and according to a city ordinance is too close to allow another
club serving alcohol to open The meeting held last week inspired a debate between SGA President and a city official
New bar sparks war between city, s chool
By Marjorie Pitts
Stiff Writer
At the recent city council meeting to
dis. uss the addition of a new club down-
town, city officials b"gan blaming ECU for
lie area's crowded streets until St �A Presi-
;� � irtney Jones stuck up for the school
and asked the city council to stick to the issue.
An unnamed businessman has plans to
turn tlie vacant Blount-Harvey building on
Fourth and Greene streets intoa nightclub
I ninng the meeting, ntv council mem-
ber Mildred Council, who voted against the
new club opening, began to blame the city's
prevx us problems with thedi nvnti wn area
on L( U students.
Council said that more bars would not
be needed if ECU provided proper enter-
tainment.
SGA President Courtney Jones, after
earlier giving a speech about how ECU has
moved in a more positive direction was
outraged by Council's remarks.
"lamshocked that Ms.Council had that
kind of attitude Jones said. "As a 21-year
resident of Greenville, I'm embarrassed
that a representative of our community
has such a negative and narrow-minded
view of ECU and its students
Jones attended the meeting and re-
minded the council that the crowd down-
town is not iust ECU students. She asked
Council to stick to the city zoning issue at
hand after Council sp ike at length about the
city's problems with ECU students.
"ECU is getting bigger and better and
Ms. Council needs to leam how to deal
with the students because we're not going
awav Jones said "MI � MTr �
Council mem "Tm embarrassed that a rep-
hers Rufus �
Huggms, Biance resentativeofthecommunity
has such a negative view of
ECU and its students'
Forbes and Bob
Ramey voted to ap-
prove the ordi-
nance. Whereas,
Council and Inez
Fridley voted ��
against it
In a split vote i m Thursday, it was tenta-
tively agreed to delete the 5004oot spacing
requirement between nightclubs in
Greenville, but the city council must vote
again Aug. 24 because of a temporary ab-
sence of an at-large representative.
Without all the members necessary,
the council must tike two votes on the pro-
posal.
Attorney Fred Mattox represents the
unnamed client who wants to renovate the
Blount-Harvey building and open a club.
There is literally no place in the downtown
area that can meet these requirements he
kid The Daily Reflector.
Opponentssaid thedowntown area does
SGA President Courtney Jones
notneedanotherclub.Pnipinentssaidthearea
would benefit from the business.
The current alcohol-serving establish-
ment within 500 feet of the Blount-Harvey
buiklingis The FizzBistxo res taurantand night-
club, whose owner has no complaints with
the proposed com-
petition.
"If approved, I
don't think the new-
bar would hurt mv
business saidowner
of The Fizz Bistro,
Abdul Kamalpasha.
"The club would be a
SSSS� privateclub,soitmay
hurt the other private clubs in the area
"I see no reason why a bar or a club she uld
not be opened because of an antiquated rule
designed to prevent even more entertaining
nigh telubs simply because they choose to serve
liquor said former employee of The Fizz and
senior Johnray Fuller.
"We need new li fe down there, we need to
stimulate downtown in any way we can
Mayor Pntem Rufus Huggms said to The
Daily Reflector.
Mattox said the city's comprehensive plan
calls for thedown town area to serveas therity's
entertainment center and yet the number of
bars downtown has stayed the same while the
enrollment of ECU has increased.
Splash dance
i
by Biff I
"M EMf CMtfrMfl
The rising heat index put most students in a sweat but these two founda way
to cool off. Current temperatures are in the hundreds with lots of hMmtfrfv





Jones wins the gold
SGA President Courtney Jones gets an A.
4
Laughing your way clown the aisle 5
kLend Me a Tenor' leaves audiences standing in approval.
u �aat (Eartfltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since I
Vot 66 N 17
W
Mv, Jiu y 15, 1992
Gm f NVIl 1, N( HUM Cah- K INA
� N r).0O0
6 Pages
l andidates debate at UNC
: � l niversitv o( North
ipel 1 ii!l are making plans
;Ross Perot,( ieorgeBushand Bill
' . for a debate Ihe Bm en-
tennial v bservance Office said the de
held sometimeinthefall,but
no plans are definite because the com-
mittee has net et ton nil a sponsor
Student wins lawsuit
formei I morsit ot Snithorn C ali-
fomia student who was raped outside of an
ofl campus resi til t� ujr years ago
was recenth awarded $1.6 million in com
I pensaton damaja i Superior Court
I jury found the universih guilh ofprovid-
n t and insuffk ienl
information about the high crime area in
horhtxxi here the resident hall
.itod
Stalkinu becomes crime
Smoking restricted on campus
By Michael Martin
Sports I il lint
I rustee William i urr and
S iAPresidentourtney ones
w ere the tw o dis .enting . I
E I Board of Prustees ers, citing the cost of install
extinguished the rights of ing a ventilation and the lack
smokers fhursday by voting of student input tor their i!�-
to restri t smoking in .ill cam- � isions.
mis buildings ones added that student
As a part of the ti ustees safety was not taken into mmv
summer meeting, the group sideration by other members
voted 11-2 in favor et a of the board,
campuswide clean air acl "My concern with the
w hi( h will prohibit smi 'king poli V is that females in i lass-
in all campus buildings that room buildings th.it are open
are poorly ventilated or not .ill night like the music
� of I'ublit Safet and
Setee State I ni-
ersnslation that
mak�moron the first
� �Mil Ihe ible to arrest
iss fothreaten oth-
,ing , afise� ure

'� - o � .f urrtfr fx-ir� � nt"l
L,r�. �� � -
ventilated at all.
1 he resolution w ,is pr i
posed b the Faculty Senate
Welfare I ommittee .itter a
number ol faculty com
plained about the quality ol
air in the leneral C lassroom
Building said lr ohn
Moskop, president of the 1 ai
ultv Senate
I he resolution dire t -
the i ham ellot to de elop a
i lean air polh w hi h in
eludes designating smoking
areas in i er tain buildings
Smokei - w ill be peimil
ted to light up in designated
areas of buildings that are ei
ther currently ventilated, or
i an be enti lated .it a reason
able i ost Univi iffit i.il -
ha e begi in I i study the i
� ; fe I � � fii tallii
venti la t n mi ii sroom
buildings
building and the art building
will have to go outside to
smoke a cigarette I ones said
'Safety of the students
should aUo be taken intoon
sideration
Ihe only immed iate
building to be affec ted by the
ban is the c lenerallassroom
Building Board members felt
it would tost too much to es
tablish ventilation system in
the new building
Residene 1 I,tils will not
be affe ted b the measure
Moskop said.
( hancellor Ri( hard i akin
i ould not be reai bed torom
nient
s I look at the poli
there are no specil i s (one �
said
. � ' ' nta smok
u i where it can .
ere there i i ventila
Ptiolo by D�H Rd � Tht Eft Csroitman
Soon this picture will not be as common Only currently ventilated or easily ventilated areas will be
designated as smoking Hopefully, the Student Stores will continue to allow smoking
tion system but there are no rl arnhna system had a
regulations "here's not even clean air policy H iwevet
a penalty for those who ig- Board of Trustees chairman Bill
nore the poli y 1 anse .aid in the meeting that
rhe policy will take effeel North � � �tate I niver-
September 1, 1992 I . i � toacle in air
Ufred Matthews, vice policy, but I I �uld be
i ban. ellorol tudent Life aid the fii l
i -Mi ed that
no iversity in the lb hated
-aid. "If the
� i ult in the General Class-
m Building have such a
problem with the smoke) in
the office paci w hy don't
�. with it in the
ire that
lents ai g ng to be in
fax �
Qinton makes MTV debut
Photo by Dill HMd � Th Emm! Cni)imsn
LOS AN . . . ton
wanted, and got, his M I
heDemocratk presidential contender,
speaking to 18- to24 year-olds on MTV, let
it slip thai he's ,1 Leo. (George Bush is .1
v iemini.) I "hat he went "nuts o er i Ivis
Presley 1 there's n- ,n (ounting fi �r ta ;te I
Ihat it he Could tr it again, he mav inhale,
and not ust putt marijuana (Not legal.
remember?)
Head) stufl but the stuff presidential
campaigns appear to be made of bus year
( linton governor of rkansas m
Democratic presidenti.il candidate, p
peared on an MTV I own I lall" meeting
that was broadcast lune 16
President Bush was in ' . I
host such .i meeting as was Ross I'eiot, ,n
un annoum �s.i and id it foi .
Neither has accepted
thev "are taking it ?ri usl) MT
sKke-wonvin said
Ni rork based MT extended the
hour-long show b a halt .in hour when
audience memrvrs kept asking questions
atut Clinton's stands, policies, political
lews and nvk 'n' roll preferences. About
Tn; young people attended the taping,
which was held in Los Angeles.
An M I spokeswoman in New York
said ha ing Clinton on the video channel
was part of a campaign to bring our view-
ers things they're interested in
Clinton apparent)) likes to make un-
con en th nal appearances on television; he
also appeared on the Arsenio Hall show
m played his saxophone.
but MTV?
It was a great wa) to reach young
voters We were definitely pleased said
Clinton campaign spokeswoman Max

� eemed that the audiences enjoyed
wt he enjoved it
The mt-Harvey building is500fee1 away from The Fiz Bistro and according toa city ordinance is too close to allow another
club hoi to open The meeting held last week inspired a debate between SGA President and a city official
New bar sparks war between city, s chool
B) iVfarjorie Pitts
SUI1 WmI.m
recent cit) ouncil meeting to
discuss the addition of a new club down
towi ' ffidals began blaming E( I I �
�I � ) mwdei I '� � � until SGA l 'resi
denl ' � ,
� - ouih ilt.i -tii ktothei .sue
n unnamed busines .manha
turn the vacant Blount I lare buildii �
Rmnh and Greene streets into a nig) I il
�'�-��� ty un men
ber Mildredour il, who voted against the
im "a lub opening, began to blame thei ity's
pi problems with the downtown area
I students.
rM I said that more bars would not
eeded if E I provided proper entei
tunnxtit
� President Courtney ones, after
earlier givtog a speech about how H l has
nuni m 1 more positive direction was
outraged by mux ii's remarks.
lamshockedthatMs.( ouncil had that
land of attitude fanes said. "Asa 21-year
resident of ' .reenville, I'm embarrasstl
that a representative i our community
ha- such a negative and narrow-minded
view ot iU and its students"
ors attended the mtn-ting antl n
minded the council that the crowd down-
town is not rust BCU shMitnts She askeil
1 ounol to sth k to the city zoning issue at
handaher wav il spokeat length about the
at) s problems with B I students
K I is getting bigger mm Ix'tter ami
Ms.ouncil needs to team how to deal
w ith the students because we're not going
away Jones said ��������
( ouih il mem-
bers Rufus
1 luggins, Blance
I orbes and bob
Ramey voted toap
prove tht (�rdo
nance. Whereas,
l OUn il Mm Inez
Fridley voted ��������
again -t it
In a split vote on (hursday, it was tenta-
tive!) agreed to delete tin' 50D-fbot spacing
requirement between nightclubs in
i IreenvUle, but the city council must vote
again Aug 24 because of a temporary ab-
sixeit an at -large representative.
Without all the members necessary,
the Council must take two votes on tiie pnv-
pos.ll
Attorney Fred Mattox npresent the
unnamed client who wants to renovate the
Blount-Harvev buikling and open a club
"There is litiTallv no place in the downtown
am tlat can meet these nuiniments he
told The Doty Reflector.
Opponents said thedtTwntown area does
not need another dub. Proponents said thearea
would benefit from tin- business.
Irn1 current alcohol-serving establish-
ment within rxi) loot of tlie Blount-Harvey
building is rheRzzBistrorestaurantandnight-
club, whose owner has no complaints w ith
, proposed com-
"I'n 1 embarrassed that a rcp-
resen tati ve o f tlic com mu ni ty
has such a negative view of
ECU and its students
� SGA President Courtnoy Jones
petition.
I
It approved, I
don't think the new
bar would hurt my
bu iness said owner
ot the Fizz bistro,
Abdul Kanvilpasha
"The dub would be a
�������� pnateclub,soitmay
hurt the other private clubs in thearea
"I s v 1x1 reason why a bar 1 r a club should
not be opened because oi mi antiquated rule
designed to prevent even more entertaining
nightclubs simply because they chooseto serve
licuor slid former employee of lhe Fizz and
senior lohnrav Fuller
"Weneixl rx-w lifedown tlvre, wentwl to
stimulate downtovsii in any way we can
Mayor rVivtem Rufus Huggias saki to Th?
Daily Ri-fltxhv.
Nttox said the city's comprehensive plan
calls for the down town area to serve as the city's
entvrtamnvnt center and yet the number of
bars downtown has stayed the same while the
enmllment of ECU has increased.
Splash dance
Ptxrto by Biff Rmntom � Th� E�t Csiwnn
The rising heat index put most students in a sweat but these two founds wa
to cool off. Current temperatures are in the hundreds with lots of rmidffy
h





2 �ht East (Earolintan
July 15, 1992
The Eastern Carolina Multicultural Center is presenting film festival
focusing on Asian Indian culture. For more information contact Dr.
Mohammed Ahad at K30-0521 or Dr. Prabha Khazanie at .355-2540.
Wednesday, July IS: An Indian Language (Hindi) film, Thodasa Romani
Ho Jayen ('Let There Ik' a Wee Bit of Romance") will be shown on wide-
screen TV at the School of nursing ECU nxm 2W at 1 p.m. No Charge.
Thursday, July 16: A Hindi language film, "Ek Din Achanak ("Suddenly
One Day") will be shown on wide scnvn TV above the cafeteria in the
Conference Room of the Titt County Memorial Hospital at 7 pjn. No
charge.
Friday, July 17: The latest Indian travel film will be shown, with the movie
"Samgam" or "Saalm Bombay" in the Conference Room of Pitt County
Memorial Hospital. An Invitational Travel Seminar will be held at 4:30
pjn. in the Hilton. Travel agents, public relations officers and media
representatives are encouraged to attend. No charge.
Saturday, July 18: Two films will be shown at the Park Theater in
downtown Greenville. At 1 pan. Sarvajit Rev's Oscar-winning film,
"Ganastru" ("Peoples' Enemy") will play and at 3 p.m. Mira Mair's
"Mississippi Masala starring Academy Award-winning Denzel Wash-
ington. The main event of the week will be a short program held in the
Evans St. Mall at 5 p.m. Guests will be a representative of the Indian
Embassy, Mayor Nancy Jenkins and an actor from the film "Mississippi
Masala
1993 Miss North Carolina USA applicants now Tune until Sept. 1 to get
their entries in to the board. Anyone who has been a resident of N.C. for 6
months, is single and at (east 17 years old should apply if interested to: Miss
North Carolina USA Pageants, 541 Holley Like Road, Drawer NP, Aiken
S.C 2981)3 or telephone 813-b48-fc220. Include your name, address, tele-
phone number and birthday along with a brief biography and snapshot.
WATERMELON
F EAST
WEDNESDAY, JULY 15
12:30 P.M2 P.M.
ECU CENTRAL CAMPUS MALL
I Ok, t MA
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Productions Committee
iBudweiserj
fatfinfShrtJ
The Amphitheatre At Carowinds
ONLY CAROLINAS APPEARANCE!
ON SALE NOW! ONI!
Aquarium Rescue Unit Bela Fleck,
Blues Traveler, Spin Doctors i Widespread Panic
TppN MIGRATION r�c "����AN
EASTE JJNOF THE Qreat AMEBlCA"
Saturday, August 8 at 4:00 pm
'Ti.tr.
Charge by-phone
I 704 52? 6500
MfWM Oil an CWtrfc o(w�fal.ny a .
Ho Mfltt fevd'UfHp Fo more
information cati 800 ft?? 4478
e1 7678
Prtartty Mnaaea S�r�ic
(704) 57� 7078
��
�� � .� 4 �"
�XHIXCL
Spat Mi room Im tpf
MlkjU JVd.iHMP
r.ait 04 &?7 9650
: j ' , � r rhrtfhartotlfiftMfrifr
.IMmrtl
Aind-i Sms"1 Piss HnitlPs can pufhasp tickets In all Paladmm concerts and events lor only $8 (g6&
im,inn . r�vn,nds Season Pass -all 7Q4 5882600 HKKITV
Racial check policy dropped
CHAMPAIGN, III. (CPS) �
The city of Champaign dropped a
2-year-old policy of requiring mer-
chants to record the race of check
writers after some University of Illi-
nois students and local citizens ex-
pressed outrage about the practice.
The Champaign Police Depart-
ment sud that the practice helped
them identify people who wrote
worthless checks.
The university's Student Legal
Service had received six complaints
during spring semester about the
enforcement of the policy at a
Champaign bookstore, said Tho-
mas Netz, an attorney for the legal
service.
Stephen David, a graduate stu-
dent, s.iid he filed a complaint be-
cause "the practice is extremely sus-
picious
Ihe policy stated that police
would investigate bounced checks
only if the check-writer's race, sex
and birth date and the type of iden-
tification used-were written on the
check.
"Students deeply object to the
racial classification being used. Plac-
ing a racial classification on the face
of a check strikes many as insulting
and reminiscent of apartheid laws
Beta said.
"I find it appalling that a coun-
try that's supposed to be a bastion
of human rights and dignity still
uses race as a category for identifi-
cation David said before the city
rescinded the policy.
At i me bookstore, clerks used a
two-letter code to record a check-
writer's race, David noted.
Before the city voted 6-1 to drop
the policv, bookstore owner Bob
Tichenor said merchants felt they
had no choice other than record the
race of the check-writer's.
"We do what the police require
us to do. The policy is repugnant to
me, but 1 have to follow it if 1 want
to collect mv money" Tichenor
said he tries tncollect $2X I) b i S3,( 11
in worthless checks each year
Champaign Mayor Dannej
McCollum and Deputy Chief John
Gnagey defended the policy, sy.
ing it speeded the investigation of a
bounced check by narrowing the
search for the check-wnter
Champaign Police Chief
Donald Hanna told the Daily Dlini
that the state attorney neede
racial identification in order t
sue a warrant for an arrest.
But State's Attorney Th �
Difanis said he "never required
merchants Like down the racef a
person on checks
"My only requirement i
mere is some identification of a
photo ID presented and th ��
merchant can identify the
tomer Difanis said. "1 didn't ex-
pect the merchants to provide in-
formation like race to me
The Champaign City Council
approved the policy in January is .
GREENVILLE
AQUARIUM'S
ill1
WHISPER
BIO-BAG
8-PACK
i $
SftOnt�la'�
Whisper
Bio-Bag
Fttr
C�rlrM�0ft
PACK
6.99
COUPON EXPIRES 73192
BUY ANY
FISH GET
ANOTHER
12 PRICE
MAGNUM 350
CANISTER
FILTER
79.99
COUPON EXPIRES 73192 �
����������������I
ANY !
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OFF !
'
�s

m L
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ft
-
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I COUPON EXPIRES 75191
ANY i
� WHISPER �
� POWER �
� FILTER ;
� 25 OFF ;
j
COUPON EXPIRES 7119 �
COUPON EXPIRES 7319 '
BUY ONE
DOZEN
FEEDERS GET
ONE
DOZEN
FREE
COUPON EXPIRES 731w �
Classifieds
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS 1 and2bedroomapart-
ments Energy-efficient, several
locations In town Carpeted,
kitchen appliances, some water
and sewer paid, washerdryer
hookups. Now taking applica-
tions for IalL Call 752-8915
WANTED: Roommate for Fall
Semester to share a fully fur-
nished apartment BCU bus ac-
cess nearby. CallTimat758-5207.
FEMALE, NON-SMOKER
ROOMMATE needed for Aug.
1, Tar River, S115mon,
call 830-0443.
ASK ABOUT OUR
SUMMER RATES!
� Mid Rent b
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
�1 � -r ' W- t I 1
� Actom ft arc Higlwiv piffj suoao
Uance' On B v � mcoit
Coouci 1 7 of Tjmmv ihimi
TS6.7I ' i �
�� t Opta H�-�ll-5 VJfKL
�AZALEA GARDENS.
aMl r i � piM M r.fjet onN J � �
MM �k iBII- HOME HTITdl 1 i��iwi i
mr.gjtt ApvttmvaSmdbklttwnieni. AikxKmGtm
ucti Br jek V i. untn Gab
Contact JI. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
ROOMM
Completelv
ment, 2 bio
available for
responsible,
student, bu
monrent, 1
or Mark at'
ROOMM
Fall and 5j r
ing August
7487.
ROOMM
bedroom, ltj
utilities, nom
campus, EC
furnished P
ROOM FC
only. t-
mon plui
utilities.
(nonsmok
4789 (no p
MATURE
WANTED
room hou;
Central ai
dryer I
utility rate
7-2-53
Announcemem
CATHOLIC STUDENT 8am at t
CENTER ter
The Newman Catholic
Student Center invites you STUDE
to worship with them. Employ
Sunday Masses: 11:30am ties are al
& 8:30pm at the Newman dents wh
Center, 953 E. 10th St inbecom:
Greenville. Weekdays attend i
Rich s Nuthouse
v�7
I �� AN Ct
- �- ?
11
Ouamt
LAWN AND ORCHARD
TURN AROUND. �
I toun HANDS UP
-a!
W
fT
JL
HURRY UP AND GRADUATE
� SUV - wovao � ,
jT HI
JUST SOME BASIC BUSINESS Cl
��NCl FLOO UMTIL. v
gMXEFC- 5t�A
TT.
L-
.
4





licy dropped
��� �
tten in the
t b(t t to the
ngused.Ptac-
bn on the tat e
is insulting
Irtheidlaws
that acoun-
i be .1 bastion
Irop
felt the
�cord the
I I want
u honor
said he triestoallect $2,000 to$3,000
,n v mlhtew duds each year.
Champaign Mayor Dannel
McCoQum and Deputy Chief John
(inagey defended the policy, say-
ing it speeded the investigation of a
bounced check bv narrowing the
search tor the check-writer.
Champaign Tolice Chief
Donald Harma toM the Daily lllini
that the state attorney needed the
i identification in order to is-
sue a w arrant tor an arrest
State's Attorney Thomas
is said he never required that
merchants take down the race of a
person on checks
My only requirement is that
some identification of a
photo ID presented and that the
merchant can identify the cus-
mis said. "1 didn't ex-
pei t the merchants to provide in-
� -nation like race to me
rhe C'hampaign City Council
roved the policy in January 199Ql
VILLE
IUM'S
MAGNUM 350
CANISTER
FILTER
7999
COUPON EXPIRES 731
I
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25 OFF
4
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Classifieds
ZUie East Carolinian
JULY 15, 1992
I OR KIM
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS 1 and 2bedroom apart-
ments. Energy-efficient several
locations in town. Carpeted,
kitchen appliances, some water
and sewer paid, washerdryer
hookups. Now taking applica-
tions for FalL Call 752-8915.
WANTED: Roommate for all
Semester to share a fully fur-
rushed apartment ECU bus ac-
cessnearby.CallTimat758-5207.
FEMALE, NON-SMOKER
ROOMMATE needed for Aug.
1, Tar River, $115mon,
call 830-0443.
ASK ABOUT OUR
SUMMER RATES'
A Beautiful Placr 10 lj�
� And Readv to Kroi �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
28�E. MhSoaw
� Locard Nar ECV
� Near M�i Sboppot Oam
� Aim tram Mglmy Patrol Suaon
Limited Offer - S3� a mooUi
Contact J T. or Toomv WiMinM
7S6-78l5ar�CM937
Office Oaro- Apr S 12-VMpm
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean in qiuel one beAoom fumiihfd aptrtmenta, en-
ergy efficient, free waier and aewer. waanera. dryera.
car TV' Cooptra ot untjra only 1240 a month. 6
monOi leaae MOBIE HOME RENTALS-oonpan or
alnfjra ApaitinrtiiaodinoolkbarneaioAxaata Gavdaoa
near Brook Valley Country Club
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
l OR KIM
ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Completely furnished apart-
ment, 2 blocks from campus
available for Fall. Must be neat,
resrxnsiblenorismoker,serious
student, but fun-loving. $200
monrent, 1 futilities. CallLaura
or Mark at 752-4201.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for
Fall and Spring semesters, start-
ing August 1, call Kevin at 752-
7487.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 2
bedroom, lbath2-$105,1-$165
utiUties,r�rhsmoker,l milefrom
campus, ECU bus route, fully
furnished Please call 752-5070.
ROOM FOR RENT: Female
only. Near campus. $150
mon plus 12 phone and
utilities. Available Aug. 1
(nonsmoker preferred). 758-
4789 (no pets).
MATURE HOUSEMATE
WANTED to share nice six
room house near campus.
Central airhearwasher
dryerfrig.stove. $300 low
utility rate. Barbara Benson,
752-8553.
I OR Rl VI
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Special introduction toour wide
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FOR SALE: Jamis Women's
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year old, Excellent Condition
Must sell! $100 CaU 752-2427.
CRUISE: 7 day 6 night Ft Lau-
derdale, Bahamas, and Cruise
Vacation 2 tickets for $250. Call
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FOR SALE Double bed frame
and mattress, desk and chair,
medium sizedormrefrig. Please
call 752-5070.
IIILrUAMIi)
EASY WORK! Excellent
pay! Assemble products at
home. Call toll free 1-800-
467-5566 ext. 5920.
HELP WANTED: House
painting, occasional and
part-time work, to continue
through fall. Ladder experi-
ence helpful. Call Roger
Goins 752-2881.
I OK S A I.I
BUS DRIVERS NEEDED for
part-time employment with
ECU Transit System. Flexible
hoursgccdpay.7574724orvisit
SGA office.
HELP WANTED: Part-time re-
ceptionist needed for surgical
practice. Hours from 200pm to
7:00pm,threetDfivedaysaweek.
For more informatiorvcall Vicky
at 7584300.
si:r k
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iiiirwami i)
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Pauline at 757-3693.
WORDPROCESSING: Re-
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IM RSONALS
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respondence from like-minded
PERSONALS
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27835.
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BUTCH! Ihope your 22nd is the
best ever! Well celebrate in a
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rd see you on Wednesday?.
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YOUR VEHICLES NOW!
Register your car now
before you leave school for the summer!
We are now registering student vehicles
for the 199fctf� school year
Avoid the tines heat!
The fee for the
1992-1992 Student Parking Decal is $70
Night Parking Decafs are $30
Don't be surprised!
Make sure you check on the status
of any outstanding citations
CONTACT THE DEPARTMENT OF PARKING & TRAFFIC
SERVICES IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS CONCERNING
VEHICLE REGISTRATION 1Y PHONING 757-6294
Announcements
CATHOllC STUDENT
CENTER
The Newman Catholic
Student Center invites you
to worship with them.
Sunday Masses: 11:30am
& 8:30pm at the Newman
Center, 953 E. 10th St
Greenville. Weekdays:
8am at the Newman Cen-
ter.
STUDENT SERVICES
Employment opportuni-
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dents who are interested
in becoming personal care
attendants to students in
wheelchairs, readers and tit
tors. Past experience is desired
but not required. Applications
will taken for employment for
fall semester, 1992 and spring
semester, 1993. If interested,
contact: HANDICAPPED
SERVICES Brewster A-114 or
A-l 16 at 757-6799 or 757-6729.
B!SFX1IAIGAY-LESBIAN
AJJJAN�E
Social support, activism and ac-
tivities All interested and caring
people welcome. Call 757-6766
from ll:15-1230Mon-Thurs. for
infonrvation on time and place.
Friends and family of gays-lesbi-
ans-bisexuals, and heterosexu-
als who support civil rights re-
gardless of sexual orientation,
are welcome to attend the Bi-
sexual-Gay-Lesbian Alliance.
PI AY BALL!
Pete's Softball in Washing-
ton, NC is sponsoring a men's
open tournament scheduled
for August 1 and 2. First, sec-
ond, and third place team
and individual trophies as
well as other individual
awards. Deadline to enter is
72992. For additional in-
formation contact: Pete Wil-
son (946-1314) or Chas
Mitch'l (757-0763).
Rich s Nuthouse
ait- i�U Mirr
HURRY UP AND GRADUATE
BY BULLEM HEAD MASON
uy Joey and Steve
IL U�T5�4.L g, TMj mj, CWWLlailMi
ITTit X 15 IMC





�Jje l-aat Carolinian
Smnng tte East Carolina campus community since 1925
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Julie Roscoe, News Editor
Jeff Becker, Asst. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Joseph Horst, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Robert Todd, Assistant Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Copy Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Adam Roe, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Locke Monroe, Classified Advertising Technician
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Bill Walker, Opinion Page Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The Fast Cawltnian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students During summer sessions. The East Carolinian publishes once a week with a circulation of 5,000. The masthead
editorial m each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of
view 1 etters should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the
nght lo edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg
ECU, Greenville. N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, July 15, 1992
Courtney Jones proves her dedication
Despite the dark shadow cast on
the SGA by secretary Sherry Smith's
resignation, Courtney Jones has man-
aged to turn the ship around.
With her bold stature displayed at
two public meetings last
week, Jones proved that
she holds the determi-
nation and will to per-
form her duties as presi-
dent.
At the Board of
Trustees meeting, Jones
voted with only one
other member against
the proposal to ban
smoking on campus.
She demanded an
end to the ECU
bashing and a
solution to the
real problems
between
Greenville and
the University.
Jones, a non-smoker, demonstrated
her dedication to the students by stand-
ing up for smoker's rights.
Our president also voiced the stu-
dents' opinion at the local city-council
meeting. Under attack by two mem-
bers who said that ECU is responsible
for over-crowded streets in the down-
town area, Jones stood up to the coun-
cil. She demanded an end to the ECU
bashing and a solution to the real prob-
lems between Greenville and the Uni-
versity.
Past leaders have
failed in this area while
Courtney Jones now suc-
ceeds. Truly, this is testi-
mony to her strength as a
leader.
Actions such as these
prove Jones' true dedica-
tion to the needs of the
students. Although Jones
acted as all SGA presidents
should, she nonetheless deserves lauda-
tions for her staunch resistance to the
would-be abuse of students.
A summer that began with a con-
fusing scandal, now continues with
Jones' perseverance to real issues con-
fronting ECU students.
A View From Above
Music industry or McDonald's
By T.Scott
Batchelor
Editorial
Columnist
meretricious: ad) 1 I Vitamin g to
or resembling a prostitute 2a Attracting
attention m a vulgar manner b Lacking
sincerity see MADONNA
As vou can tell bv the above bit of
sardonic humor, I recently had occasion
tisee Madonna 'smovie, "TruthorDare
an unflinching, hdimd-the-scenes look at
promiscuity.braiKnlicentiousnessvand
wart a minute, I was thinking about the
Democratic National Convention
Anyway, "TruthorDare" gives us
an uncercorad and irreverent glimpse
Bitothehve-spunedlite-styieofAinehca's
most successful female pop star. Ma-
donna Before I saw this movie I had a
pretty strong idea that Madonna wasn't
exacth acandxlatetrrbeau&ncaaoabut
I never guessed how tawdry she and her
cohorts could be
In one scene alone, we watch
voyeunstkally as two male dancers
French kiss each other for about ten min-
utes, another dancer exposes his genitals,
and Madonna demonstrates feUabo on a
bottleot mineral water (And DanQuayie
picks on Murphy Brown Go figure.)
Madonna's behaTor proves that
her name, with its connotations of purity
and holiness, is one of'the best examples
of verbal irony ever displayed
But Madonna is not alone. There
exists m the musk business a veri table sea
of such acts, albeit of lesser magnitude,
butot: similar composition Many of these
people are bunched into stardom from
glitzy, high-production talent shows.
I was watching one of these ultra-
hip "You Too Can Become A Star" pro-
grams the other night when I couldn't
sleep I'd like to say my rernotecontrol ot
stuck on Wat channel but I'd be tying.
Like skmrogdown to knkatacar wreck,
I just couldn't turn away.
Andy Warhol is the one to blame
tor this type of programming Television
producers see themselves as the rulnllers
or Warhol's ill-adisedproclamatxT( that
everyone will be famous for fifteen min-
utes. They hastily round up some buxom
babes, a celebrity emcee, and a few hun-
dred wanna-be's to sing and dance their
hole hearts out, and Voia you've got
yourself a show.
What bothers me most about these
offerings may at first seem a bit neurotic
but upon doser examination, I'm sure
you wiD agree with me I'm talking about,
microphones.
Remember the good old days?
Roger Dal try of The Who would come
out on stage holding his bjg, metal nuke
like a rock-and-roll scepter, swinging the
thing around lasso-fashion and catching
it perfectly (well, almost) every time
If you were lucky, the cotd would
break in mid spin, sending the micro-
phone into a low-earth orbit over We
heads of the raptaucbence. Now that was
aconcert
And let's not forget the late Tun
Morrison Jim seemed to have a special
relationship with his microphone stand.
He would caress it canngry, pick rt up in
a chrome embrace, and dance around on
stage with it, like two krvers on a ballroom
floor
I'm certain there are laws against
that in most states.
But today things are different In
order to be able to sing and dance simul-
taneously, performers wear state-of-the-
art Radto Shack lootdng axttrapttons an
their heads- These artists, (and I use that
term in the broadest sense), look like
McDonald sdn ve-thruattendants. I keep
expecting one of them to stop m themiddle
of a song tided "Papa Don't Sermonize
and ta ke an order for a Big Mac and fries.
Or equally frightening is the
thought that, given another air traffic
controller's strike, these singer-dancers
could be directing air traffic while bounc-
ing about the stage like a bunch of randy
Hopefullylwon'tbeanxindwhen
it happens. I'm hopping the next Magic
Bus the hell out of here
Letters To The Editor
Batchelor correct on animal rights
To the Editor:
Thumbs-up to T. Scott
Bstchelor's thoughts concerning
animal rights This well-written
article serves two important pur-
poses: to expose the truth and to
offer hope. Let me explain.
First of all, it underscores the
hypocrisy that exists within the ani-
mal rights community. Just let
�ome of these fanatical "animal lov-
ers" suffer from a deadly malady
e.g. kidney or liver disease, and
�at how favorably they would re-
ceive the potentially life-saving
contributions of a pig's heart or a
baboon's liver. I am sure their per-
spectives would change once such
a situation affected them directly.
It's as if other animals lower
in nature's hierarchy take priority
over Man as long as it's some other
man suffering and not themselves.
Also I personally know sev-
eral of these so-called "activists"
who enjoy a good pig-picking and
seafood dinner just as much as the
hunters and fishermen enjoy gath-
ering these animals for our con-
sumption.
Maybe it's just that these
hyper-sensitive individuals don't
really know what they believe. I
believe they are confused.
Secondly, Batchelor's article
brilliantly articulates the conser-
vative side of this controversial is-
sue. Did you readers out mere catch
that buzz word: conservative. Yes,
it's true. A conservative point of
view isn't often given in The Ernst
Carolinian. Perhaps, in this regard,
even our newspaper deserves a
thumbs-up!
Tracy Roberts
Senior
Geography and Planning
EM'iS6'0Ms festiUj )Wj& o MeW BWcs.
tfefcDP
hw
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
'92 Election plagued with non-issues
By Scott
Maxwell
Editorial
Columnist
Oh, great 1992 is shaping up to
be another election year packed with
non-issues
A non-issue is anything that
politicians and the press pretend is a
serious matter worthy of your ex-
tended consideration, but which is in
fact a silly, time-wasting diversion
Most recently, thanks to Repub-
lican operative Floyd Brown � the
charming fellow who brought you the
Willie Horton commercial in 1988 �
Clinton'sallegedaffairhas resurfaced.
Apparently not convinced he has
stooped low enough. Brown also of-
fers voters a chance to hear Flowers'
doctored tapes of conversations with
Clinton
Assuming it even happened,
Clinton's affair is a non-issue. (And a
recycled non-issue, at that.) There ex-
ists no evidence that Clinton has had
an affair, only rumors and altered
tapes
If we will convict a man on the
strength of rumors, let's convict
George Bush for his role in the "Octo-
ber Surprise Iran-Contra, his own
alleged affair, and so on Then worry
about Clinton. Otherwise, bury the
story.
While we're on the subject of
Clinton, we may as well consider the
other two non-issues surrounding
him: draft dodging and drug use
Despite Clinton's on-again, off-
again draft registrabon, he's nght that
he did fairly enter his name for the
draft. And, when he did, he really
didn't know whether he would be
drafted. Given the Nixon
administrahon's unpredictability and
dishonesty, no one knew wha t would
happen Clinton was in the dark Just
like everyone else. End of non-issue
Now, as fbrClinton'sdance with
thedevilweed after thinking about
it, I actually believe Clinton's curious
tale of trying marijuana without in-
haling Clinton seems like exactly the
sort of person who would have given
in to peer pressure enough to pretend
to smoke the joint. And he seems like
exactly the sort of person who
Non-issues work to
the benefit of all
politicians, even the
ones on the receiving
end. That way they
can postpone
admitting that they
don't really know
what the heck
they're doing, or
how to solve our
country's problems.
wouldn t have the courage to really
rry it
In any event. Clinton's make-
believe "experiment" with reefer
seems to have degraded neither his
mental functioning nor his antipathy
toward others who do today essen-
tially wha t he did a couple of decades
ago. He's parroted the anti-drug line
as much as anyone else. So. End of
non-issue
On the Republican side, the big-
gest non-issue of the year has been
Vice President Quayie's spelling.
Quayle's incorrect spelling of
"potatoe"�er, "potato"�was amus-
ing, but also a non-issue.
Quayle's "family values" silli-
ness is also a non-issue Everyone's
for family values, and everyone's for
families Once you get into specific
definitions of "family values dis-
agreement may anse, but Quayie has
avoided specific definitions for pre-
cisely that reason As long as he does,
it's a non-issue Ignore it.
Quayle's inability to lead the
country is basically a non-issue, too.
Senously The president isn't as im-
portant as we make him out to be.
We'd get along fine without one Bet-
ter, perhaps. If Quayie became presi-
dent, we could all ignore him and
thereby render him harmless End of
non-issue
Perot on gays non-issue Read
what he said Perot claimed only that
he would not appoint a homosexual
toa high post if the nomination would
become divisive and counter-produc-
tive That may be the nght approach,
or it may be (as I thmk) the wrong
approach In neither case is it evi-
dence that Perot has anything against
gays
What is an issue here is that
Perot apparently would discriminate
against politically unpopular people,
whatever the reason they were politi-
cally unpopular But to accuse him of
homophobia is unjustified
Non-issues work to the benefit
of all politicians, even the ones on the
recaving end. That way they can post-
pone admitting that they don't really
know what the heck they're doing or
how to solve our country's problems.
They can also spend lots of time say-
ing "Let's get back to the issues" with-
out actually having to get back to the
issues
We deserve better, but we must
take the responsibility for making
things better To make things better,
we must identify and ignore the non-
issues and pay attention only to what
candidates say on the issues. And if
they say nothing, vote for Mickey
Mouse. It may take them a while, but
they'll get the point
Campus Spectrum
Court's abortion decision on target
By Heather Lockey
Plrerident ECU Student for Life
When I opened my East Carolin-
ian yesterday, I was slapped in the
face with yet another editorial com-
plaining about the Supreme Court's
ruling in the Pennsylvania Case. I feel
the ruling was long overdue.
Abortion is the third most com-
monly performed operation today.
However, until last week, the abor-
tion industry was virtually unregu-
lated.
Let's suppose you decided to
have elective surgery. There are con-
siderable risks to your physical and
psychological well-being involved in
the operation; however, the doctor is
under no obligation to tell you of these
risks unless you ask. Suppose you
(XKeCstJOWlAWtT.
ulsdWoiMiaa W
don't ask, and the doctor, afraid you
might change your mind, doesn't tell
you. You go ahead with the surgery
and, due to complications, you lose
your foot
This is how abortion has been
for twenty years. Abortion, contrary
to popular belief, is not without risks.
It is a disservice to women not to
inform them of this.
Why shouldn't women be in-
formed about fetal development and
alternatives to abortion? Many do not
know that the unborn child's heart
begins to beat at twenty-four days.
They are unaware that by eight weeks,
the fetus is a tiny, completely formed
human being with all the organs and
systems necessary for life. The only
things it needs are nutrition and time
to grow.
Many women are unaware that
there are families willing to pay tor
their expenses, including prenatal
care, so that they may adopt the child.
What is unconstitutional about
a woman using her freedom of choke,
armed with all the facts and alterna-
tives, to decide whether or not to have
an abortion?
Doesn't she deserve twenty-
tour hours, without the pressure of
being in the abortion clinic, to make
this unalterable decision?
As for parental consent, a mi-
nor can not take an aspirin at school
without parental permission A doc-
tor can not set a minor's broken bone
without parental consent
Abortion is certainly a bigger
decision than these.
The court was correct to restrict
abortion.
Hopefully, next time it will over-
turn Roe v. Wade and restore every
person's right to lire.
Art? fiKTttC ecoiHHkM
WC�T-ro
-THtUttU
-TDtret
Entertainment
ta
�j�
Paris Peet and Kirsten Olson team up in the bug
the closet and mistaken identities all converge to U
'Lend Me A Tei
By Joe Horst
Assistant Entertainment Fditor
What makes a farce greaT
Slapstick, an ear for cornedv,
mistaken identities, bodies in the
closet � all these are needed if the-
ater goers are to leave the hi
laughing.
"Lend Me A Tenor the Ea?t
Carolina Playhouse's second
ma instage in their Summer Theater
season, uses these � and more -
to perform a wonderfully enter-
taining piece guaranteed to bring
the house down.
"Lend Me A Tenor" is the tor.
of a theater-owner's assistant wh. i
is pressed into playing the lead in
their performance of Verdi's Otdk
When the real tenor shows up to
play the part, the fun goes into high
gear and the laugh are non-stop.
Flying fruit, mistaken identities be-
tweei " �
recap of the wl
ail combine to
on their feel
ing,
StevenGi)
au-r owner,
show with his i
deal character
lent comic timir
the best lines in
better lines is
Max, played I
that Max st j
Gilbom pal
hty, liKiks at Pa
delivers the'
"You Otheii
Feet also
liam McNuJty,
ian tenor, 11 St
the accent do
honestly cunfui
. into hi: t
msmj?
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub'
Adult
t Ent0rts vnertt
Center
i
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's
Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for
Female Dancers
CASH PRIZE
Coeaotamts meed to he t here . �
THURSDAYS -SATURD
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotr
ECU STUDENT SPECI
Open Tuesday-SaturdayDoors Oc
jcoj� Stage Time 9:00pn
Call 756-6278
Dickinson Ave
: -wss.5.5wSa�s-a�s.e-5as-s-s-�-ss�e-5-S-S-s.s
WEDNESDt
Canoe Pa
OC DRAI
$1.25 Tall Boys
$1.00 Kamikazes
THURSDi
Studentfi)(HJMMl
$1.00 Domestic
$1.50 Imports!
$2.50 Pitchers
$2.85 Ice Teas
�LADIES FREE'





s
s
�-
ro
VeW BWs
-v H V
nth non-issues
n�ss i ssue Everyone's
es uid everyone's for
jet into specific
- values dis-
. ine, butQvuvlehas
definitions tvr pre-
- long as he does,
�su Ignore it
. - inability to lead the
. ! � m-issue, too.
, resident isn't as im-
. nake him out to be.
p� � � �� thoutone Bet-
. . :w,ime presi-
gnore him and
- � ess End of

pelhne
ue Read
-n!y that
.1 homosexual
linahon would
.� vr-produc-
e right approach,
iO the wrong
�. - case is it evi-
�s anything against
-sue here is that
� u riminate
I ular people,
is they were politt-
� � ac( a� im of
ostifted
work to the benefit
even the ones on the
it way they can post-
g �� a1 they dor. I really
k they're d ungor
ur country's pr blems
� .i lots of time say-
� � get back totheiwues" with-
v having tti get back to the
We deserve better, but we must
� u trw responsibility for making
- : . tter To make things better,
we must identify and ignore the non-
issues and pay attention only to what
candidates say on the issues And if
they sav nothing, vote for Mickey
Mouse It may take them a while, but
they'll get the point
-trum
ision on target
I : vou
�tell
w surgery
vou lose
has been
, contrary
fchout risks
en not to
len be m-
ment and
any do not
kild's heart
Hour days
pght weeks,
;ly formed
�rgans and
The only
In and time
haw-are that
to pay for
their expenses, including prenatal
care, so that they may adopt the child
What is unconstitutional about
a woman using her freedom of choice,
armed with all the facts and alterna-
tives, to decide whether or not to have
an abortion7
Doesn't she deserve twenty-
four hours, without the pressure of
being in the abortion clinic, to make
this unalterable decision7
As for parental consent, a mi-
nor can not take an aspirin at school
without parental permission A doc-
tor can not set a minor's broken bone
without parental consent
Abortion is certainly a bigger
decision than these.
The court was correct to restrict
abortion
Hopefully, next time it will over-
turn Roe v. Wade and restore every
person's right to life
l
Of TnOun I
fMVe sow we ma tt
THAT 00 ft
Entertainment
(Tire lEast (Earnltnian
July 15, 1992
KISS holds up honor in album
Photo by J.D. Whitmir
Paris Peet and Kirsten Olson team up in the laugh-a-minute farce, "Lend Me A Tenor Flying fruit, bodies in
the closet and mistaken identities all converge to leave audiences on their feet, clapping and applauding.
'Lend Me A Tenor laugh riot
By joe Horst
Assistant Entertainment Editor
VVh.it makes a farce great?
Slapstick, an ear for comedy,
mistaken identities, bodies in the
closet � all these are needed if the-
ater goers are to leave the house
laughing.
"Lend Me A Tenor the East
Carolina Playhouse's second
mainstage in their Summer Theater
season, uses these � and more �
to perform a wonderfully enter-
taining piece guaranteed to brin
the house down.
"Lend Me A Tenor" is the sioty
of a theater-owner's assistant who
is pressed into playing the lead in
their performance of Verdi's OtcUo.
When the real tenor shows up to
plav the part, the fun goes into high
gear and the laughs are non-stop.
Flying fruit, mistaken identities be-
tween the sheets and a hilanous
recap of the whole play at the end
all combine to leave the audience
on their feet, cheering and applaud-
ing.
Steven Gilbom, playing the the-
ater owner, Saunders, steals the
show with his neurotic and egotis-
tical character. Gilbom has excel-
lent comic timing and has many of
the best lines in the play. One of his
better lines is when his assistant,
Max, played by Pans Peet, suggests
that Max should play the tenor.
Gilbom pauses with incredu-
lity, lwks at Peet in disbelief and
delivers thefollowingline perfectly:
"You Othello? Big black guy?"
Peet also teams well with Wil-
liam McNulty, who plays the Ital-
ian tenor, Stupendo. McNulty has
the accent down to a tee and looks
honestlv confused when the hi jinks
roll into high gear
McN'ultv's best scene is the in-
nuerklivfilled conversation w'ithhis
co-tar Diana, played by Elizabeth
Towmend Diana wants Stupendo
ID introduce her to his pnxJucer
friends; he thinks she's a member
of the world's oldest profession.
This duet runs for five minutes
and leaves the audience roanng
with laughter.
Last, but not least, Peet gives a
consistent performance as the
bumbling assistant He has thedead-
pan ability to play the perfect
straight-man; his scenes with
Gilbom remind one of the old Ab-
bot and Costello mu tines.
"Lend Me A Tenor" provides
the perfect antidote to these dog
davs of summer: laughter. That
tried and true aphorism of it being
the best medicine is proved once
again in this hilarious and zany
mmp in the backstage world.
By Mike Martin
Sports Editor
In the Orient, one's honor is
considered to be more important
than life itself. Ancient Samuri war-
riors would rather face the blade of
their own sword than to have the
family name disgraced.
Times have changed and it ap-
pears that people still honor names
like they use to � none more spe-
cifically than KISS. The former face-
painted rock 'n' roll warriors have
recaptured their control of their
musical senses after jumping on the
Chicago-style band wagon of releas-
ing album after album after album
with moderate success.
The latest in a line of 22 albums
is Revenge, a 12-track release that
contains a tribute to former drum-
mer Eric Carr. The two-minute track
features Carr in a 1981 drum solo�
the only one he ever recorded. While
the solo is moving in its memory of
Carr, the highlight of the track �
and quite possibly the whole album
� was the solo's lead-in that
brought back memories of "Para-
site" and "Shout It Loud" (even
though Bruce Kulick's guitar was
dubbed in on the original track).
Gene Simmons, the only re-
maining original KISS member,
combines with Paul Stanley on the
lead vocals, bass and rhythm gui-
tar, respectively, to produce a
work that may be as successful as
thel975tripleplatinumAfir album.
Simmons' harsh, melodic voice
immortalizes "Unholy" and
Argent's song, "God Gave Rock 'N'
Roll To You 11 The tongue-wield-
ing madman serves as a link be-
tween the KISS of old and new, and
his continued presence in the band
allows the KISS faithful to hope for
a return of the paint and costumes.
"Unholy" headlines the new
release with questionabl e lyrics and
a crashing sound. Taken as a flip-
Photo court��y Mercury EnUrtainmant
KISS's new album, Revenge, brings back their legendary 1970s sound
to delight their fans with a "modem outlook
side to Bible-weilding extremists,
the track features Simmons singing
from an anti-Christ point of view.
He sings that he is the
"incubuslaying the egg in
youbut you are the beastyou
created me on the day that you
were bom
But the biggest surpnse about
the album is how the members
molded together to recapture the
group's legendary 1970s xund.
Eric Singer assumed the drum
duties followingCarr's unfortunate
demise. While his style is not like
Carr's or Nikko McBrain's of Iron
Maiden, Singer adds his own touch
to a new era of old KISS-style rock
'n' roU.
KISS is definitely looking for
the Revenge album to spark a new
fire toward their grass roots with a
"modern outlook The group's
members have changed, but the
ageless KISS style lives on � with
great honor.

"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
Adult
ft Entertainment TUESDAYS
" Center Silver Bullet's
"bullet
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MAD HATTER & WSFL Invites you to Join the
MAD HATTER TEA PARTY
Friday, July 17 8am-5pm
in celebration of
CUSTOMER APPRECIATION DAY
10 OFF any regular price serice
5 OFF any sale or coupon service
$9.95 Oil & Lube
P�r1orm�no�. Pro��obon. OuaMy
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(SB)
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car visors, frisbees
ice tea
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$1.00 Domestics
$1.50 Imports
$2.50 Pitchers
$2.85 Ice Teas
�LADIES FREE
DRAWINGS FOR
8 Richard Petty collectors bottles
4 Igloo coolers(compliments of CarQuest of Greenville)
5 Big Mouth sports bottles(compliments of Action Advertising, Inc.)
7 FREE Ice creams (compliments of Dairy Queen, Greenville)
WINNERS WILL BE ANNOUNCED LIVE FROM MADHATTER 3-5 PM
MAP HATTER
AMTnARE CENTER
3140MoseleyDr.
758-2306
Muffler � Brakes
(Behind Parker's BBQ.
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r i





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Entertainment
51ie lEaat (Earolintan
July 15, 1992
KISS holds up honor in album
By Mike Martin
Sports Editor
Photo by j D Whitmir
i Peet and Kirsten Olson team up in the laugh-a-minute farce, "Lend Me A Tenor" Flying fruit, bodies in
ioset and mistaken identities all converge to leave audiences on their feet, clapping and applauding.
'Lend Me A Tenor laugh riot
Bv Joe Horsf
Assist an I ntertatnment Editor
What makes ,i farce great?
Slapstick, an ear tor comedy,
mistaken identities bodies in me
lose! all tht- are needed it me-
iter goers are to leave the house
laughing.
"Lend Me A Ienor the East
( arolina Playhouse's se ond
mainstagein their Summer rheati r
season uses these and more
h perform a wonderfull) enter-
taining piece guaranteed to I
the house down
"Lend Me.A Ienor"isthe
of a theater-owner's assistant
is pressed into playing the lead in
their performance of Verdi -
When the real tenor shows up to
play the part, the fun goes into high
gear and the laughs are non-stop.
H ing fruit, mistaken identities be-
tween the sheets and a hilarious
re ap of the whole play at the end
M combine to leave the audience
on �heirfeet, I leeringand applaud-
ing.
StevenC Iilbom,playingmethe-
ater owner, Saunders, steil the
show with his neurotic and egotis-
tical character. Gilbom huis excel-
lent comk timing and lias many oi
die best lines in the play.Oneof his
betti t lines is when his assistant,
Max, played by Paris Peet,suggests
that Max should pl.n tht- tenor.
Gilbom pauses with incredu-
lity, looks at Peet in disbelief and
delivers the following line perfectl)
Othello? Bigblackguy?
Peel also team- well with W il-
ium McNulty, who plays the Ital-
ian tenoi McNuItyhas
the accent down to a tee and looks
honestly confused when the hi jinks
into high gear
McNulty - best scene is the in-
nuendo-tilled conversation with his
co-star Diana, played bv Elizabeth
rbwnsend. I Hana wants I! Stupendo
to ritroduce her to his producer
friends; he thinks she's a member
of the world's oldest profession.
Ihis duet runs tor five minutes
and leaves the audience roaring
with laughter.
List, but not least Ivt gives a
consistent performance as the
bumbtingassistantl lehasthedead-
pan ability to play the perfect
straight-man; his scenes with
(iilborn remind one of the old Ab-
bot anilostello routines.
"Lend Me A Ienor" provides
toe perfect antidote to these dog
days of summer: laughter. Ihat
tried .nut true aphorism of it being
the best medicine is proved once
again in this hilarious and zany
romp in toe backstage world
In the Orient, one's honor is
considered to be more important
than life itself. Ancient Samun war-
riors would rather face the blade of
their own sword than to have the
family name disgraced.
Times have changed and it ap-
pears that people still h inor names
like they use to � none more spe-
cifically than KISS. The former face-
painted rock n' roll warriors have
recaptured their control of their
musical senses after jumping on the
Chicagivstylebandwagonof releas-
ing album after album after album
with mixlerate success.
The latest in a line of 22 albums
is Rnvnge, a 12-track release that
contains a tribute to former drum-
mer Eric Carr. The two-minute track
featuresCarr ina 1981 drum solo �
the only one he ever recorded. While
toe solo is moving in its memory of
Carr, the highlight of the track �
and quite possiblv the wholealbum
� was the solo's lead-in that
brought back memories of "Para-
site" and "Shout It Loud" (even
though Brace Kulick's guitar was
dubbed in on the original track).
Gene Simmons, the only re-
maining original KISS member,
combines with Paul Stanley on the
lead vocals, bass and rhvthm gui-
tar, respectively, to produce a
work that may be as successful as
the 1975tnpleplaunumUn album.
Simmons' harsh, melodic voice
immortalizes "Unholy" and
Argent's song, "C kxt Gave Rix'k 'N'
Roll To You 11 The tongue-wield-
mg madman serves as a link be-
tween the KISS of old and new, and
his continued presence in the band
allows the KISS faithful to hope for
a return of the paint and costumes.
"Unholy" headlines the new
release with questionable lyrics and
a crashing sound. Taken as a fiip-
Pholo courtesy Mercury Entertainment
KISS's new album, Revenge, brings back their legendary 1970s sound
to delight their fans with a "modern outlook
side to Bible-weilding extremists
toe track features Simmons singing
from an anti-Chnst point of view.
He sings that he is the
"incubuslaving the egg in
youbut you are the beastyou
created me on the day to.it you
were born
But the biggest surprise about
the album is how toe members
molded together to recapture the
group's legendary l47iS sound.
Eric Singer assumed the drum
duties followingCarr's unfortunate
demise. While his style is not like
Carr's or ikko McBrain's of Iron
Maiden, Singer adds his own touch
to a new era of old KlSS-styte rock
'n' roll.
KISS is definitely lookil I I
toe Revenge album to spark a new
fire toward their grass roots with a
"modern outlook The group -
members have changed, but tot
ageless KISS style lives on - with
great honor.
SILVER v
Tbgllet
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
DISCOVER
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's
Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for
Female Dancers
CASH PRIZE
I
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
I $2.00 OFF Admi on Saturday Night j
I Open Tuesday-SaturdayDoors Open 7:30pm
' UHBW Stage Time 9:00pm
I �-�IEEEE3p Call 756-6278 j
IV. I)ii?kini�im Avt� mii-i��
��r,n a 5���� Y li
!r TTmr. r.Tssa
MM
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College Night
99c Admission
before 10 pm
ATTIC
5 th St-
Wednesday. Juh 15
The
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The
CoMedt R K'n9 CoMedt
ZONE &Davld Dan�l ZONE
Thursdav. July 16
THE GRAPES
99(2 52 oz Dnin -99 c ADMISSION � 99 Il.ghb.ii
before 10 pm
Friday, July 17
CARVER
Rock Rock! Rock!
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1?
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AMM
U��
Rockm'Reggae
S2 7 oz Draft
Thursday, July 23
DREAMS SO REAL
M
MAD HATTER & WSFL invites you to join the
MAD HATTER TEA PARTY
Friday, July 17 8am-5pm
in celebration of
CUSTOMER APPRECIATION DAY
ana 0i
sss
WEDNESDAY
Dance Party
OO DRAFT
$1.25 Tall Boys
$1.00 Kamikazes
s�xo!i�D�eoec�je8�xo?
THURSDAY
StudentffoOQiAIl Night
$1.00 Domestics
$1.50 Imports
$2.50 Pitchers
$2.85 Ice Teas
� LADIES FREE
FREE
Pizza,
bumper
stickers,
Pepsi,
Coke,
concert
tickets
10 OFF any regular price service
5 OFF any sale or coupon service
$9.95 Oil & Lube
Pertocnanoe. Protection. Quality
WSFL
Live
Mobile Unit
from 3-5 pm
Mad Hatter is giving away
FREE
Maxx race cards
car visors, frisbees
ice tea
DRAWINGS FOR
8 Richard Petty collectors bottles
4 Igloo coolers(comphments of CarQuest of Greenville)
5 Big Mouth sports bottles(compliments of Action Advertising, Inc.)
7 FREE Ice creams (compliments of Dairy Queen, Greenville)
WINNERS WILL BE ANNOUNCED LIVE FROM MADHATTER 3-5 PM
MAP JT HATTER
AUTO fARF CENTER
Muffler � Brakes
(Behind Parker's BBQ,
Greenville Blvd.)
3140Moseley Dr.
758-2306
�� Fo,l0wing Position
N�Available.
WRITERS
APPly at
- � The Eas Carolinian





-
(Zttie East dTarolintan
July 15, 1992
Desire to excel in athletics pushes teens toward violence
RALEIGH (AD � Pressures
on teenathletes tosucceed can some-
times lead to violence or abnormal
behavior on the playing field, ex-
perts on sports behavior say.
"Everybody sees sports now as
a potential avenue to enhance their
economic and social status said
John Silva, a professor of sports sci-
enceat the University of North Caro-
lina at Chapel Hill.
"It starts early and most people
realize that by 11 or 12 years old the
selection process becomes very hos-
tile he said. "That's when kids
start getting cut f mm teams and the
parents start feeling the pressure of
mavbe their son or daughter not
playing a sport in high school.
"There is a real domino effect
here he said. "That age of 11,12or
13 is a very, very significant win-
dow. There is more than emotional
investments. There is also the social
prestige of why 1 want my child to
be successful in sports. That's a
prettv volatile equation
Rick Strunk, a spokesman for
the North Carolina High School
Athletic Association, said the orga-
nization representingmore than 300
schools statewide tries to guard
against such thinking.
"One of the things that we have
tried to hammer home (to the ath-
letes) is that less than 1 percent go
on to play college Strunk said.
"That window is extremely nar-
row . The thing that hurts me is when
1 see a 12-year-old kid mat is 4-foot-
8 and he says he's going to play in
the NBA
Two violent acts surrounding
North Carolina baseball games the
past two months may resulted from
such pressures, behavior experts
said.
In May, a Whiteville man was
charged with cutting the throat of a
rival youth league coach. Officials
said the two coaches had argued
over a baseball game their teams of
8- and 10-year-olds had played.
Richard Blackwell, 45, pleaded
guilty to an assault charge. He won't
spend any time in jail but, as part of
his punishment, a judge banned
Blackwell from coaching youth
league baseball until 1994. pick on just sports said John Wil-
Last month, a Harnett County son, a professor of sports sociology
teen-ager was arrested on assault at Duke University. "These are
charges after he was accused of hit- trends that are occurring in society.
"One of the things we have to
hammer home (to the athletes)
is that less than one percent go
on to play college
Rick Strunk
NCHSAA
ting an umpire in the chest with a
bat over a strike call made during
an American Legion baseball game.
Timothy B�Mmmmmmmmmm
Daurity, 17,
of Buies
Creek is
scheduled to
appear in
court Aug. 6.
His father is
the head
baseball -
coach at
Campbell University. Both have
declined to discuss the incident.
"When it comes to violence it
has gotten way out of hand said
Glenn Barham, the veteran umpire
who was hit by the bat. "1 don't
know what their (teens) mind set is.
1 don't know where they get their
opinions. I don't know if it comes
from poor coaching or what
"We have to be careful not to
The readiness in which people
will resort to violence to resolve
arguments is probably increasing.
mmm Sports is not
immune to
these
trends
Silva
said abnor-
mal baseball
behavior is
often
learned by
"� youths who
watch managers and their favorite
players on television kick dirt on
umpires or stand inches apart, jaw-
ing about a call.
"I think there is a problem with
the erosion of respect for author-
ity said Silva, who has done ex-
tensive studies of violence in hockey
and basketball. "Not only are these
acts viewed as legitimate, but they
are expected (in baseball). You have
passive acceptance of this behav-
ior. You have role models that will
act out this behavior and receive
minimal punishment This is no
deterrent whatsoever.
Someone actingoutagainst
a sports official was abnormal 20
years ago he said. "You got la-
beled by the media as being a bad
sport"
But Silva and Wilson feel that
today increased salaries for profes-
sional athletes and changing social
values have skewed behavior for
youths and their parents.
"Money is certainly an issue
Silva said. "Being successful in
sports professionally can totally se-
cure you and several other mem-
bers of your famiiy for life. There is
greater economic pressure involved
here.
"The fabric of society has also
changed over the last 20 years he
added. "I think we have more situ-
ations where children are being
brought up under less structured
environments
"People tend to focus on the
money issue Wilson said. "But I
think a lot of it has to do with the
creation of a labor market for pro-
fessional athletes. There has been
an expansion of sports opportuni-
ties, and this has created pressures
on colleges, high schools and even
little leagues to function as farm
teams
Sportsmanship also is being
taught less and less by parents, they
said.
Silva is optimistic recent poor
sportsmanship will change.
"It is going to come back
around Silva said. "People realize
we have to provide some structure
and guidance. We have to have
positive socialization experiences
In May, the high school asso-
ciation raised the fine for on-the-
field brawls to $500 � largest in
NCHSAA history and a hefty price
for a school to pay, Strunk said.
Strunk said no particular inci-
dent led to the increased fine, but
fighting had been a problem re-
cently in other states.
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Everything Else is the Samel
IOC overrules U.N Yugoslavia gets nod for Barcelona
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia (AT)
�Yugoslav athletes haveachieved
a small Olympic victory even be-
fore the games begin: They will be
allowed to participate despite strict
United Nations sanctions that have
barred them from most interna-
tional sporting events.
But the European and world
champion men's basketball team
will not compete, having been
banned from the trials because of
the international sanctions aimed at
pressuring the truncated country to
end the ethnic warfare.
Other Yugoslav athletes will
compete under the neutral Olym-
pic flag and anthem. That compro-
mise was accepted by the Yugoslav
Olympic Committee, the Interna-
tional Olympic Committee,
Barcelona organizers and the Span-
ish government.
While the decision to allow
Yugoslav athletes to compete was a
welcomediversion for Yugoslavia's
avid sports fans, the inability of the
basketball team to compete was a
bitter blow.
"WeCanOnly Feel Sorry read
theheadlineoftheVecemjeNovosti
daily Saturday. But "basketball will
not die in this country it quoted
Zeljko Obradovic, the team'scoach,
as saying.
Al though many of the best bas-
ketball players now play for the
former Yugoslav republic that has
become independent Croatia, Yu-
goslavia was expected to field a
strong team.
It can now expect the best re-
sults in water polo and handball for
men and in basketball for women.
In Barcelona, Yugoslav athletes
also will compete in track and field,
table tennis, women's handball,
wrestling, cycling and shooting.
The agreement to allow
Yugoslavs to compete in the Olym-
pics ended weeks of uncertainty
caused by theU.N. sanctions against
Yugoslavia, a former six-republic
federation now reduced to just
Serbia and Montenegro. The sanc-
tions, designed to punish Serbia for
fomenting violence in Bosnia-
Herzegovina, included a sports boy-
cott.
IOC director-general Francois
Carrard said the IOC wants to en-
sure that other parts of former Yu-
goslavia not yet recognized by the
Olympic movement � Bosnia-
Herzegovina in particular � can
also send athletes to Barcelona.
Bosnian athletes would be af-
filiated with the Independent Team,
he said.
But the Bosnian news agency
BH Press reported Friday that offi-
cials in the besieged capital of
Sarajevo protested over the deci-
sion to allow Yugoslav athletes to
enter the Barcelona Olympics.
"Being a host to the Winter
Olympics in 1984, Sarajevo has a
right to express its bitterness and
DAPPER DANS
"Where Lost Memories Are Found"
There's plenty of FREE parking at our rear entrance
off of Cotanche.
issue a strong protest over the deci-
sion thatallowed the country which
is committing a genocide over our
country to participate in the Olym-
pics Sarajevo officials said in a
letter to IOC president Juan Anto-
nio Samaranch.
Macedonia, another former
Yugoslav republic, will decide Mon-
day whether to enter the Olympics
along with Yugoslavs, according to
published reports.
Under the terms brokered by
Samaranch, the Yugoslav athletes
will not be representing Yugosla-
via. They will be represented by the
Olympic flag and be known as the
Independent Team.
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 15, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 15, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.885
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
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