The East Carolinian, July 1, 1992






Truth or Fiction 4
Review of Public Safety raises more questions than answers.
Kiss me Petruchio 5
Summer Playhouse offers Porter's twist to Shakespeare.
Qttlt i�mt (Earulmtttt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.66 No.35
Wednesday, July 1,1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5,000
Future waits for legislature
Dartmouth ends tradition
The graduates of Dartmouth Uni-
versity decided not to include "peace"
pipes in this year's grad uation ceremony,
endinga 121 year tradition. The students
thought the pipes might offend Native
Americans so they left the pipes out of
their Class Day activities.
Police change policy
The city of Champaign, 111 has
dropped a 2-year-old policy of requiring
merchants to record the raceof bad check
writers after an outrage from some Uni-
versity of Illimnsstudenrs.Throughcom-
plaints from the university's Student
Legal Service, as well as from local citi-
zens, the Champaign Police Department
dropped the policy.
Students help newspaper
Several students at KansasState Uni-
versity recently organized and prod uced
a local small-town newspaper. The edi-
tor of the paper had not had a vacation in
twelve years, so the team of students put
out the publication in his absence, with
gixxi reviews from the community.
Chinese students lured home
Thegovernment of China is offering
a new incentive program to the 100,000
students who fled the country after the
9H9 crackdown on dissenters. Peter
Chen, a student at the University of Cen-
tral Florida, said the situation at home is
not as good as the government would
like them to think it is, and it is not worth
leaving the United States.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmot. Taken from
CPS and other campua nawapapara.
Building, improvements
sit until money arrives
By Jeff Becker
Assistant News Editor
Increased enrollment and
reduced statefundinghavemade
space an almost priceless com-
modity around campus.
ECU administrators plan to
expand library facilities, office
space and research laboratories
in the next five years, but devel-
opment cannot begin until the
state allocates more than $39
million to the university. State
legislators will put a $300 million
referendum on the November
ballot that will allow voters to
decide if ECU and the other 15
schools in the UNC system can
begin critical construction
through the sale of bonds.
According to Richard
Brown, vice-chancellor of busi-
ness affairs, ECU's agenda in-
cludesaS26 million expansion of
Joyner Library, a $5 million ac-
quisitionof Rose High sclvxil and
a $7 million vivarium (animal
research) addition to the life-sci-
ence complex.
Brown said the Joyner Li-
brary expansion i the top prior-
ity. Seating at jovner Library
meets only 40 percent of the esti-
mated need, and space for new
reference materials has reached
a dead end.
"Rose High �s our second
largest priority next to the Joyner
Library addition Brown said.
"It is the linchpin in our future
plans for campus expansion. We
need a location to move opera-
tions into while other buildings
are being renovated and new
buildings are being built
Brown said the acquisition of
Rose High is also important be-
cause ECU has little room to ex-
pand in other areas.
"It is the only large, continu-
ous piece of property to the cam-
pus he said. "There will be no
movement of the campus north
of Fifth Street. We have thecity on
the west side and limited oppor-
tunity to go in that direction. We
our bounded on Tenth Street by
Greenmill Run (apartments) on
the south side. There is a small
community on the east side that
has long-term potential in 2(V30
years down the road for us. Re-
ally there aren't many directions
for going other than Rose High
Accord ing to Robert Thomp-
son, chairman of the political sci-
ence department, ECU cannot
move into Rose High for three
years.
"Even if the university is able
to purchase Rose High, it really
isn't an answer in the immediate
future because the (Greenville)
school system wants to use for at
least three years he said. "They
are going to use it as a middle
school, so we wouldn't have it to
put people in anyway
Thompson chairs the com-
Budget cuts and increased
tuition hurt ECU
By Tony Rogers
Staff Writer
See Bond, page 2
The fateof ECU's budget con-
tinues to sit on the floor of the
General Assembly during the on-
going debateover a proposed $1X
million cut in the school's state
funding. The proposed cutbacks,
as illustrated in Governor Martin's
1992-93 budget, will come from
academic affairs arwi hpalth af-
fairs of our university.
According to Bruce
Harrington, budget administra-
tor for Governor Martin, no uni-
versity was singled out during
the budget cutting process.
"We did not cut a percentage
from each school Harrington
said. "We were looking at pro-
grams where funds could be cut.
I didn't realize ECU's cuts were
higher than anyone else's
In comparison to ECU's bud-
get decrease, UNC is second in
the state with $1.4 million in cuts,
and N. C. State is third with
$950100 in cutbacks.
Harrington said SI million
wascut from ECU's health affairs
budget as a reimbursement to the
state for money loaned to the
medical school. He also said ECU
is one of six schools who had their
utilities budget cut
"So it was not in our interest
to cut ECU's budget more than
anyone else's Harrington said.
"We madethesecuts by program,
not by university
Harrington said the budget
cuts will not be feltheaviry around
state campuses.
"Compared to billion dollar
budgets, the cuts are really mi-
nor he said.
Contrary to the state's assur-
ance, Vice-Chancel lor of Business
Affairs Richard Brown said he
believes the cuts wi 11 be felt at our
university.
" After two tprrihleeconomic
years in a row, ECU will suffer
from any degree of cuts passed
this year Brown said.
Harrington said one reason
the cuts will not hurt state uni-
versities is the 10 percent tuition
increases at all universities will
make up for most of the budget
cuts, as well as make up for an
increase in enrol lment
"Our top prionty is to take
care of expected enrollment
growth Harnngton said.
An increase in tuition would
be substantial for accomrrxxjat-
ing more students at ECU and
would allow the school to avoid
increases in taxes and other fees,
Harrington said.
Brown said he agreed that
the tuition hike will support an
enrollment increase, but he said
it will not have a great effect on
any budget cuts.
'To some degree it may off-
set cuts, but with an increase in
enrollment comes a increase in
See Budget, page 2
Court ruling takes
abortion into capitals
Photo by Biff Ranson � Tha Fast Carolinian
The destruction of the sidewalk by General Classroom Building is actually for a good cause. The 1992
senior class helped pay for a bench and the bricks.
A present for ECU
1992 senior class gives gift of
$4,000 for new sidewalk, bench
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
Thanks to the 1992 senior class, ECU stu-
dents will no longer have to walk in the mud.
The senior class donated $4,000 to help
build a new sidewalk between Grahm and Gen-
eral Classroom. The remainder of the money
will go to widening the sidewalk between Grahm
and the bookstore and the building of a new
bench.
These additions are badly needed because
of the increase of the flow in traffic.
"This is a big addition, and we appreciate
the donation from the senior class said build-
ing consultant Mike Vandergen.
Work on the new additions is two weeks
behind because of rain, but the final project
should be completed by July 15.
Katie Carstens, former SGA secretary,
helped form a committee to decide what kind of
gift their class would like to donate.
Carstens said several ideas were explored
before deciding to help build the sidewalk. Some
of the ideas included building a stone entrance
on Fifth Street in front of the Chi Omega and
Alpha Delta Pi sorority houses, build ing a bronze
statue of a pirate, and building a permanent
stage on the mall.
These ideas, plus the idea of the sidewalk,
were discussed with Chancellor Richard Eakin.
Ea kin and the senior committee decided that the
donation of $4XXX) to help build the sidewalk
would be the best gift.
"Budget wise, this idea was the best, and we
were able to get started immediately Carstens
said. "The gift of $4,000 is the most money spent
by a senior class in a long time
Next homecoming weekend the 1992 senior
class hopes to have a rtbbon-curting ceremony
so they can get together and celebrate the new
addition.
(AP)�The Supreme Court's abor-
tion rulingappears to haveshutthe court-
room door on abortion bans in Louisiana
and Guam, while opening the way for
abortion debates in legislatures and at the
ballot box.
Activists on both sides said the ruling
will make abortion even more of a politi-
cal issue � at the state and national level
� than it has been since the court's 1989
Webster ruling gave states more author-
ity to restrict abortion.
"I think you are going to see the
politicization of women likeyou'venever
seen before said Robin Rothrock, an
abortion clinic operator in Shreveport,
La who heads Louisiana's League of
Women Voters.
In its ruling in a Pennsylvania case,
the Supreme Court on Monday upheld
some abortion restrictions but explicitly
reaffirmed the basic right to an abortion,
which it established in 1973 in Roe vs.
Wade.
That appeared to doom the laws in
Louisiana arid Guam, which have banned
abortion in nearly all cases. Both laws
have been blocked by the courts, and
neither has ever been enforced.
The high court upheld provisions
requiring that women requesting an abor-
tion wait 24 hours, that doctors inform
them of the alternatives and risks, and
Those laws, most of which have been
tied up in court, will now presumably be
declared constitutional.
Ohio Attorney General Lee Fisher
said the decision strengthens Ohio's law,
which was found unconstitutional bv a
state judge last month. It establishes a 24-
hour waiting period and requires women
to be given information on fetal develop-
ment and al-
ternatives to ,
abortion.
An ti -
abortion
forces in
Utah saw the
Supreme
Court ruling
as a valida-
tion of a law
there that
bans most
abortions,
with more
exceptions
than in Louisiana or Guam.
The law, which also has been tied up
in court, makes exceptions for abortions
that are necessary to save a woman's life
or preventgravedamagetoher health, or
in cases of grave fetal defects, rape or
incest.
"You 're going to
have a lot of
activity in the
states but far
surpassed by
activity at the
voting booths
�Pro-Life
spokeswoman
"I think it's a very good sign said
that unmarried minors get consent from SusanRoylance,directorof UnitedFami-
a parent or a judge. A requirement that lies of Utah. "I think it shows the court is
women seeking an abortion inform their willing to accept reasonable approaches.
husbands was struck down.
"You'regoingtohavea lot of activity
in states replicating Pennsylvania's law,
but I think mat's going to be far surpassed
by activity at the votingbooth said Helen
Ahare, a spokeswoman for the Pro-life
Secretariat of the United States Catholic
Conference.
The most immediate effect of the rul-
ing will be felt in a small number of states,
including Ohio, Alabama, Kansas, Maine,
Norm Dakota and Utah, that have laws
wimrestrictkxissiiruIartoPenrayrvania's.
andUtah'scaseisareasonableapproach
Ms. Ahare of the Catholic Confer-
ence agreed, saying the Utah law might
pass muster with the Supreme Court
because of the health exception.
However, some abortion rights ad-
vocates disagreed.
"We think this means Utah's law
will be thrown out as unconstitutional
after a million dollars wasted on a wild
goose chase said Michele Parish, ex-
ecutive director of the American Civil
Liberties Union in Utah.
4
6 Pages
Marc Washington
Pirate
football
player
arrested
By Robert S. Todd
Assistant Sports Editor
A defensive end on last
season's Peach Bowl champi-
onship team has been arrested
for armed bank robbery.
Marc Andre Washington,
24, is in the Wake County Jail
on $10,000 bond pending the
outcome of his July 13 trial.
"We are shocked and sad-
dened by the incident involv-
ing Marc Washington Ath-
letic Director Dave Hart, Jr.
said in a prepared statement.
"This is obviously a very seri-
ous matter which is appropri-
ately being handled by the law
enforcement agencies
At 6 p.m Friday, June 26,
the bank manager of Raleigh
Federal Savings & Loan was
letting his last customer out
when Washington allegedly
forced his way in with a gun.
Washington left the bank
in an Oldsmobile Cutlass and
was spotted by a Raleigh po-
lice officer a short time later.
After nearly six miles of
pursuit, Washington was
forced into a gas station by an
18-wheel truck that was block-
ing New Bern Avenue.
The driver of the truck said
he heard about the incident
over his citizens band radio
and intentionally blocked the
street. Washington's Cutlass
caused damage to the gas sta-
tion and two patrol cars.
A search of Washington's
vehicle revealed $7371 in cash.
Washington's brother was
conv icted of a rmed robbery af-
ter holding up a bank in Ra-
leigh two years ago and is cur-
rently in prison. Marc Wash-
ington had been implicated in
the acquisition and disposal of
the gun his brother used.
According to a teammate
who wishes to remain anony-
mous, Washington had access
to a large amount of money
during the season and prob-
ably borrowed it expecting to
sign a professional contract
this summer.
Washington told friends
his agents were talking to rep-
resentatives in the World
League of American Football.
"He bought a camcorder,
a VCR, four pairs of Air
Jordans and always had
money the teammate said. "I
heard he had been planning
this (the robbery) for a while
Washington wasattending
summer school and living in
Jarvis dorm. He is nine hours
short of graduation with a de-
gree in Industrial Technology.





2
uU?e Eaattflarolinian
July 1, 1992
'Safe Sex' begins grassroots campaign
DURHAM (AH � Walk into
John's Barber Shop on Alston Av-
enue and the first thing you no-
tice, besides John, is the big jar he
he keeps by his chair.
It's one of those 2-gallon
pickle jugs barbers used to stuff
wth gumdrops or combs soak-
ing in a blue antiseptic soup.
But John's is different: It's
filled with small foil packets and
carries the label "FREE CON-
DOMS
It makes some people laugh
and others squirm, but it never
fails to grab their attention.
To John Segars, the shop's
owner and a newly appointed
apostleof AlDSawareness, that's
the whole point.
Segars is oneof about a dozen
barbers and beauticians recruited
by the Durham County Health
Department to spread the word
about a disease that's now the
county's No. 1 killer of adults
from 20 to 39.
Alarmed by a sharp rise in
AIDS cases among young blacks,
the department has begun train-
ing black hairstylists to distrib-
ute condoms and preach safe sex
in what could be termed a hands-
on approach to AIDS prevention.
"We'renot in thecommunity
all the time, and we're not around
on date night said kathryn J.
Kerr, the county's AIDS preven-
tion cwrdinator.
"We have to work with
people who are leaders and role
models, people who can be there
when public health educators
cannot
Kerr savs each trainee attends
a seminar on AIDS and is re-
warded with a framed certificate,
a stack of pamphlets and a big jar
ofcondoms that usually has to be
replenished every two weeks.
Most take to their new role
with an evangelist's zeal, and
none more so than Segarv Last
week the 53-year-old barber tried
one of hisbestanti-AIDS sermons
on a teen-ager who popped in for
a trim.
"This stuff will kill you! It
will take you out quicker than
Mike Tyson he thundered while
tapering the youth's 2-inch-high
"fade" hairdo.
"This isn't a casual thing. It's
not gonorrhea that's going
around
At the Tlaza Beauty Salon on
Avondale Drive, owner Esther
Caesar Hayes proudly displays
her condom jar and says she now
deliberately looks for wavs to
bring up AIDS during conversa-
tion.
"When there are a lot of
people in here I find myself talk-
ing louder and louder she said.
"It's like the E.F. Hutton com-
mercial When I talk, people stop
what they're doing and listen
The barbers and beauticians
encourage patrons to help them-
selves to free condoms, and now
others have gotten the word, too.
At Cox Barber Shop on East
Main Street, it's mostlv women
who come in for condoms.
Among them are some of the pros-
titutes who hangout regularly on
the corner a few yards away.
Street girls walk in here ev-
ery dav and pick them up said
owner Bennie Segers Ir. "They
mostly take what they're going to
use � they're not selfish about
it
Segers says he has no qualms
about giving the condoms to pros-
titutes, who at least are taking
steps to protect themselves and
their customers. Many men, on
the other hand, are too macho to
use them, he says.
Glancing through the plate-
glass window at the human bar-
ter going on outside, he notes
that the AIDS threat has done
little to change behavior in his
part of town.
"1 don't see that business has
slowed down one bit Segers
said.
"Some of the women have
died of AIDS. The men know that,
and still they go.
"The only difference now is
that the girls carry condoms
Th Folk
SUg�
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Bond
Continued from page 1
mittee that will decide what to do
wi th Rose Hi gh when ECU acquires
the 20 acres of property. He said the
battle has heated up among those
jockeying to get the space, and a
number of departments have al-
readv submitted requests to move
into the area. He said no decision
has been made on who will move
into the space.
Projected enrollment at ECU
tops 1700 tor 1992-93, a 4 percent
increase from last vear. According
to Thompson, ECU's enrollment
plans are pmjected on a 2 percent
increase annually, and faculty in-
creases usually lag two years be-
hind student increases. He said the
crunch will be in office space for the
new facultv coming in and not in
classroom space.
Brown said ECU will have ad-
equate classroom space for the next
five years.
"We will need to expand our
scheduling of classroom space for
better efficiency, but we have
enough total seats he said.
According to a survey con-
ducted by Louis Harris, a New-
York based public-opinion analyst,
North Carolina voters would sup-
port the $300 million referendum
by a margin of three to one. Brown
said if the referendum passes, con-
struction on Joyner Library and the
vivarium could begin as early as
next spring. If the referendum fails,
the issue goes back to the legislature
and will further delay the projects.
WEDNESDAY
Dance Party
OO DRAFT
$1.25 Tall Boys
$1.00 Kamikazes
The East Carolinian:
Simply the best
REDISCOVER
FOSDICRS
See our
coupon on
page 6
THURSDAY
Student POLLAR Night
$1.00 Domestics
$1.50 Imports
$2.50 Pitchers
$2.85 Ice Teas
�LADIES FREE
WATERMELON
FEAST
WEDNESDAY, JULY 1
11:30 P.M2 P.M.
ECU CENTRAL CAMPUS MALL
ySvrfodt ' � ft -
PRICES DO NOT INCLUDE TAX
11
OIL FILTER & CHANGE FRONT BRAKE SERVICE
Budget
Continued from page 1
workload to balance out the in-
crease in revenue Brown said.
The increase in state revenue
that will be brought on through the
cuts in universities' budgets will go
towards salary increases for teach-
ers and other state employees.
"These cuts will allow us to
increase teacher's salaries by 2 per-
cent'Harrington said. "Itwillalso
free up funds for a $522 flat increase
in pay for other state employees
Harrington said the total
money saved by the cuts will equal
$153 million, and salary increases
will take up $106 million of that.
Harrington said the budget
should "pass through the House
and Senate conferees committee
sometime within the next two or
three days
I
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AUTO CARE CENTER
Muffler � Brakes
3140Moseley Dr.
758-2306
(Behind Parker's BBQ,
Greenville Blvd.)
HOURS
MonThur. 8-7
Fri. 8-5 Sat. 8-1
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FEMALE ROOMMATE
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DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
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Announcements
CATHOLIC STUDENT
CENTER
The Newman Catholic Stu-
dent Center invites you to
worship with them. Sunday
Masses: 11:30am & 8:30pm at
the Newman Center, 953 E.
10thSt,Greenille. Weekdays:
8am at the Newman Center.
B1SEXLAL-G
BIAN ALLlI
Social suppor
and activities
ested and canj
welcome C I
from 11:15
Thurs. for infol
time and place
IF YOU
CANT
TELL
GIRL CALLED LEIGH
"how?
SURVIVE
miTAJ.ON CHECKLIST
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�hc Cautdarolinian
July 1, 1992
'Safe Sex' begins grassroots campaign
1H RHAM (AP) Walking
lohn - BarberShopon Alston Av-
enue .mJ ihe first thing you no-
tice besides John is the big far he
he keeps b his chair
,i s one oi those 2 gallon
pickle jugs barbers used to tutt
with gumdrops or combs soak
ing in .i blue antisepti soup
But John's is different It s
filled v ith small foil pen kets and
carries me label FR1 1 CON-
DOMS
makes some people laugh
and others squirm but it nevei
� to grab their attention.
ro ohn Segars, the shop s
vnei and .i newly appointed
ip stle of AIDS awareness that s
the whole point.
Segars isone of about a dozen
and beauticians re ruited
. urham C ounty Health
� tment to spread the word
� a disease th.it - nov the
mt - No 1 killer oi adults
i a sharp rise in
h . rises among oung bla k
vent 'i.i- begun train-
i v airstvlists to distrib-
� rtsa I preach safe sex
termed a hands
� : a� h :� '�� . S pre ention
V re not in the community
ind v e re not around
: � , night said Kathrv n 1
e counts s - i I S pre en
tion . oordinator.
V e have to work with
pie v ho art1 leaders and role
pie who can be there
.� �� public health edu� al � -
� � ivseacl trainee attei d
� r�n Mi S and is re
.si- 'Ma tranit I erl ficate
a sta k oi pamphlets and a big jai
ol condoms that usuall) has m be
replenished every two weeks
Most take to their new role
with .n evangelist's zeal and
none more so than Segars I as!
week the 53-year oldbarbei tried
one of his best anti Ml 6sermons
ona teen-agei who popped in for
a trim
I his stuff w ill kill you! It
will take you out quu kei than
Mike I yson, 'hethundered while
tapering the outh s 2 in h hig
fade hairdo
1 his isn t a asual thine. It s
not gonorrhea that s going
around
At the Plaza Beauty Salon n
Mondalr 1 rive ownei 1 sthei
i aesai Haves proudly displays
her condom jar and says she now
deliberately looks tor ways to
hnnv: up Ml,v duringon ersa
tin
When there are a lot oi
people in hen I find my sell talk-
ing louder arid louder
It s like the 1 F Mutton
mercial When i talk pe
w hat the �� ng and listen
1 he bai bers and beauti ians
encourage patrons to help " �
-t-l es to tree i ondims
others ha e gotten the v rd I
tox Barber Shoi n I ast
Mam Street it s mosth won ei
, � c nit' i n tor i ondoms
ng them are some of thepro
tes ho hangout regularly on
the i orner a few ards aw av
Street girls wall re
� . i and pi k them u;
owner Bennie Segers ir
mosth t.ike w hat the ro .
use the re not selfisl
it
Segers says lie ha n.i qualms
about v:n ing thee ondoms to pros-
titutes who at least are taking
steps to protect themselves ami
theii customers. Many men, on
the other hand, are too m,ii ho to
i:s� thom he says
(. ilan ing through the plate-
glass window at the human bar
tor going on outside, he notes
that the AIDS threat has lon-
little to change behavior in his
part ot town
1 don't see that business has
slowed down one hit, Segers
said
"Some of the women have
died of AIDS. 1 he men know that
and still they go.
" Ihe only difference now is
that the girls carry condoms
CATCH YOUR FAVORITE MAJOR
LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM HERE!
Daily Drink and
Food Specials
including
25$ each Buffalo Wings
4-7pm Everyday
Located behind Qutncy
355-2946
Everything Else is the
DISCOVER
w 111�i
Bond
Continued from page 1
mittee that will decide what to do
wim Rose High whenECU acquires
the 20 acres oi property. He said the
is heated up among thost
jockevii b get the space, and ,)
� imbei ot departments have al
iubmitted requests to mofe
: (he area He said no decision
eei n ad on who will moe
�.x1 enrollment at 1I
' � � r 1992-93, a 4 percent
� . �� �m last ear. According
. ti pson, ECU's enrollment
ire projected on a 2 percent
increase annually, and faculty in-
� usually lag two years -
� � im reases. 1 te s,ik1 the
: will be in office space for the
now faculty coming in and not in
� - m space
� � � lid IL will havead-
� - �� .pace for me next
- will need to expand our
- ' eduling of classroom space tor
tter efficiency hut we have
ugh total seats " he said.
ccording to a survey con-
lucted by Louis Harris, a ew-
: rl based public-opinion analyst,
Northarolina voters would sup-
; ;� �: i $300 million referendum
p. a margin of three to one Brown
said if the referendum passes, con-
strucrJonon joyner Library and the
vivarium could tx'gin as early .is
next spnng. If the referendum fails,
the issuegoes hack to the legislature
and w ill further delay the projects.
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WEDNESDAY
cance Party
OC DRAFT
$1.25 Tall Boys
$1.00 Kamikazes
1l.ll
Student
aDaTSKS
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THURSDAY
DOLLAR
Night
SM
ja.jiijS.Ji!
$1.00 Domestics
$1.50 Imports
$2.50 Pitchers
$2.85 Ice Teas
�LADIES FREE
www
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FEAST
WEDNESDAY, JULY 1
12:30 P.M2 P.M.
ECU CENTRAL CAMPUS MALL
Budget
Continued from page 1
workload to balance out the in-
i rease in revenue Brown said
The increase in state revenue
that will behroujht in thnugh the
v lib. in universities' budgets will go
towards salarv increases for teach-
ers and other state emplovees.
"These cuts will allow us to
inc rease teacher s salaries bv 2 per-
cent Harrington said. "It will also
free up funds fora S522 flat increase
in pay for other state emplovees "
Harrington said the total
money saved bv the cuts will evual
$153 million, and salarv increases
will take up $10H million of that.
Harrington said the budget
should "pass through the House
and Senate conferees committee
sometime within the next two or
three days
PRICES DO NOT !NCluDE TAX
11
I OIL FILTER & CHANGE FR0NT BRAKE SERVICEj
; �SLUBE ! $72.50 '
i S $16.50 i
' 5B &ID.0U
I PertwiHiw. Pfotection. Quality I
5 Up lo Sqls o( Pennjal 10W30o� Caarot '
I ?0WS0 Other Bianda 4 WeigM Si'Ufiv g"�'
Moat raft and Hit �uck� Oflar valid with
coupon ttvu t-10-92.
I m � aaai aaai aaai aasi aavi a
I
I
I
I
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I
I
CV JOINT SERVICE
$50.00
h
Limited Warranty Pads
$62.50
1 Year Warranty Including
Semi-Metallic Pads
Moat cart and Hght truck. Offer valid with
coupon ttvu (-10-92.
Remove axle ota outer boot, otean &
�epack o�it a. natati new outer oo:j laoet
�r. and Mcast trucke. Offer vaMd with
coupon thru a-10-2.
I
I
I
I
I
LIFETIME WARRANTY
MUFFLER
$60.50
Most � md Mght trucks Off�r vattd wtth
coixm thru t-10-82
MAD M HATTER
AUTO CARE CENTER
Muffler � Brakes
3140 Moseley Dr.
758-2306
(Behind Parker's BBQ,
Greenville Blvd.)
HOURS
MonThur. 8-7
Fri. 8-5 Sat. 8-1
VISA
Jt
ADMISSION IS FREE
with a Student ID. Card &
Current Activity Sticker
Sponsored by the
ECU Student Union Films Committee
MONDAY,
JULY 6
9 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
Classifieds
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS PAR1
MINIS
FOR REN
-
GRADLI
FEMALI R( IMATI SITED
DISPLAY CLASSinEDS
FOR REN
��L'j�iiLJHHHI
'�11 N lv
I. F . K 1 1 - V
NEEDED:
Announcements
rHOLICSTLDLNT
LiVTER
BISEXLA
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fVr YOLP m CANT M TELL i
GIRL CALLED LEIGH
SURVM
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ahc Cast Carolinian
July 1, 1992
'Safe Sex' begins grassroots campaign
l RHAM l' Walkinto
' Shop on Mston
i stack of pamphlets �ind a big )ar Segers says he has no qualms little to change behavior in his
ift ondoms that usual Iv has to be about gn ingthec ondomsto pros )rt ()j tun
first thing you no replenished even rwt� weeks titutes who .it least are t.ikm "I don't see that busines
ohn isthebigjarhe Most take to thru new role steps to protecl themselves and slowed down one bit Segei
us chair with .in evangelist's mI .it d their cust mei Mai nei n s,n,i
r hand aretoi i I "Some of the women have
� ;ays diedol Ml S "hemenknovi th.it
oneofhisbesl I i ugh the plate ami still they go
on a teen-ager wh ' lov at the hui "The on! difference now is
.i trim on i utside he note that the girls carry condoms
fhis stutt will kill you! It thai the MDS threat has done
H ill t.lkt' VOU OUt
t those 2 gallon none mon tha
bei - used tn stutt week the53 v
Professor
, imbs s.ik
antisepti soup
lohn s is different It s
nail foil p.u kets .mil
i abel FRI E CON
Mike Tyson hethi
ikes some people laugh tapering the outh
itiuirm but it ne ei
. ; attention
lohn Segars th� 'hop's
ev l appointed
�� ,nareness th.it s
fade hail
I his S1 t ,1 1 .isu.i
� . ; nrrhea thai
I
t the I laa oeaut Salon on
uited
adults
�JP
Are
OPKIONG�GCJ�TOR
Kati�g& Drinking
CATCH YOUR FAVORITE MAJOR
LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM HERE
Daily Drink and
Food Specials
including
25$ �k Buffalo Wings
4-7pm Everyday
CLSStFiED
�S?�
DISCOVER
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
EAST
s
-J
Bond
Continued from page 1
mittee that will decide what b
with Rose Higjt when E( I acquires
the 20 .k res oi prnptrt 1 le said the
pace
rce-
Tho 3sl C arolinian:
Simply the best
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rs rv
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� ill have ad
ei rthe next
eed ' expand our
i - .room -pa i
� ' en v hut e ha e
� � aid
ling t �. �ur e i �
ouis I larris. a t'
: ibl� -opirw m analyst,
! . riers ���. uld up
- j 0 million referendum
argii I thrtt' ti i one I i ��� i
� the referendum passes, i on
� �� n lynei Library and the
anum could begin as earfy as
� � � : ring. If the referendum fails,
. gt �?�shai k to the legislature
ill further delav the proie� ts
YiYiYiVrtYiiiiiYi � � m m m
WEDNESDAY
cance Party
OC DRAFT
$1.25 Tall Boys
$1.00 Kamikazes
tow'
rax
Lw
SSfo
j j w
Stoii
Sot
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THURSDAY
Student DOLLAR
Night
$1.00 Domestics
$1.50 Imports
$2.50 Pitchers
$2.85 Ice Teas
�LADIES FREE
WATERMELO
FEAST
Ssft
avis
to
i v � �
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PRICES CK
N
H�Ji7
Budget
Continued from page 1
� - i : I balai � out thr in
� � Bnavn said
fhe increase in state revenue
that ��� ill be brought on thr 'ugh tl'
its m universities'budgets will go
towards salary m reases tor te h
ei umI other tat1 empkiyees
Ihcsc uts will ,lll( V Us 0
increase teacher s salaries b) 2 per-
cent I larringtons,ud "It will also
free up funds for a S522flat in nw-
in pa) tor other state employees "
Harrington said the tot
mimcv saved bv thee uts will equal
S153 million, and salary increases
will take up $li8 million of that
Harrington said the budget
should "pass through the House
and S�Tiate conferees (ommittee
sometime within the next two or
three days "
r-
OIL
I
I
I
I
I
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i
i
i
FILTER & CHANGE
PLUS LUBE
$16.50
�i1
F RONT BRAKE SERVICE
- � MM j"s .� . �
r�r� �d HgW ruc.�� (MM �tta �nm
$72.50
ranry Pads
$62.50
CV JOINT SERVICE
$50.00
h
1 Year Warranty including
Semi-Metallic Pads
u �l � m � �gW �uckt OHM ��l MM
coupon ttiru � 10 �J
, LIFETIME WARRANTY J
MUFFLER
� , . -si� �w �' tool Mfl
�rt � 1 M truck Olt� .� i wrtr.
coupon ttvu I 1ft 2
$60.50
loM MM �r 1 �� frurka CfT�r valid wrtth I
MAD JtT HATTER
AUTO CARE CENTER
Muffler � Brakes
3140 Moseley Dr.
758-2306
(Behind Parkef s BBQ,
Greenville Blvd )
HOURS
MonThur. 8-7
Fn. 8-5 Sat. 8-1
wsf
ADMISSION IS FREE
with a Student I.D. Card &
Current Activity Sticker
Sponsored by tms
ECU Student Union Films Committee
MONDAY,
JULY 6
9 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
(Classifieds
FOR RENT
FOR REN
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
"iiiti.it '
nnouncenients
IF YOU
CAN'T
TELL
V
GIRL CALLED LEIGH
H0 10 B
t ML
SURVM
UWUTldN CHcCICLIST
?0UlY
i
m
aft11
b)SST,
;h s Nuthouse
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J in East (Carolinian
, . � �
Safe Sex' begins grassroots campaign
Irolcssor
� �
Y
I "
s,tk��i
,
hating & lnnikiii
CATCH YOUR FAVORITE MAJOR
LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM HERE
Daily Drink and
Food Specials
including
25� each Buffalo Wings
4-7pm Everyday �
DISCOVER
FOSDICK'S
IS90 SKAKOOS
Bond
�'nued from page 1
1
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WEDNESDAY
canne Party
00 DRAFT
$1.25 I Boys
S1.00 Kamikazi
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REDISCOVE!
FOSDICKS
See our
coupon on
page 6
THURSDAY
Student
DOLLAR
Night
$1.00 Domestics
$1.50 Import
$2.50 P s
S2.85 Ice 1
LADIES FREE
�jTjirripwrwfww www
. I1 IJ l hI I II � � � . � � � � l � ta- . H fe fctf M �
WJ
WEDNESDAY, JULY 1
12:30 P.M2 P.M.
ECU CENTRAL CAMPUS MALL
Budget
mtinued from page 1
I
i � � �
� '
" .w.il
.il.ir irx red � ��
I H million of that
mi n ��
$16.50
Moil art a I � j� �� � Mi � ��m �
-� m Vhrv � 10 s:
. I iN I ER
$50.00
UMI trwv. � 10 �
I1
FROI
! $72.50 !
I I
I S62.50
ling
I I
u �� art �-�! RflM �!�� �"�" �MM �th
. v� t '0 �:
1
Ml AARRANT
Ml IFFLER
$60.50
I
i�n tl�v. I 10 �
� - with
MAD
MHATTER
AUTO CARE CENTER
.Mi the I Ii hh'
- � iti nferees o immittef
� itlmi thi' next two i
thi lavs
Muffler � Brak
HOURS
3140 Moseley Dr. MonThur 8-7
758-2306 hlW in 8-5 Sat 8-1
(Behind Parkei s BBQ
Greenville Blvd )
vtsa
ADMISSION IS FREE
with a Student I.D. Card &
Current Activity Sticker
ECU Student Union f-iirns Con-
MONDAY,
JULY 6
9 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
( lassifieds
FOR RENT
DISPlAYCLASSmEDS
nnouncemen
M.LED LEIGH
?
SURV
ItUUEMN CHECKLIST
?0W
4

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V-
KSakxin
OUR FAVORITE MAJOR
BASEBALL TEAM HERE!
ally Drink and
ood Specials
including
och Buffalo Wings
4- 7pm Everyday
jnd � cenville Blvd.
sthe Same!
DISCOVER
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
DISCOVER
OSDICKS
See our
coupon on
page 6
AELON

tee
L L I A M
KJe their lives extraordinary.
D
ED
TY

IONDAY,
JUT
9 p.
nenartx
-8we:V;
Classifieds
Sfje �a0t (Earniinitm
JULY 1, 1992
lOK Kl l
Kl I
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS 1 and 2 bedroom
apartments. Energy-effi-
cient, several locations in
town. Carpeted, kitchen
appliances, some water
and sewer paid, washer
dryer hookups. Now tak-
ing applications for Fall.
Call 752-8915.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED for apartment
12 block from campus, 2
DISPLAY Cl ASSIFIIDS
ASK ABOUT OUR
SUMMER RATES!
A ftnuuful Place to Ljw
�All New
� And Ready to Raw �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
28WE Mb Street
� Located Near BCU
� Near Mix Shopping Omen
� Acrou froni Highway Patrol Station
limited Offer - C� month
Contact IT. or Tommy William
7Sfr?�l5��30-lW7
Office Open - Apt. 112-J Worn
�AZALEA GARDENS-
Oan an quirt one bedroom ftanistard apartmenu. en-
ergy rffiariu. Ire water and atwei, vaabm. dryen.
cable TV. Couple or itntje only 120 a mcixn. 6
�norm true MOBIE HOME RENTALS-cosptr. or
aVngiea ArworamtiodinoMlebomeslo Attkra Cardeo
net- Brook Valley Country Ctab.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
blocks from downtown
and supermarket. Rent in-
cludes utilities, phone and
cable bills. Call 758-6418.
ACT NOW!
GRADUATE STUDENT
or professional to share 4
bedroom house with hos-
pital resident. Separate
entrance, 3 bathrooms,
fireplace, woodstove,
dishwasher, washer
dryer, and more. 804-358-
9457.
FOR RENT: Available in
June and July one and two
bedroom apartments, lo-
cated 4 12 miles West of
the hospital on
Stantonsburg Road. Quiet
location, great for gradu-
ate students. Please call
756-4587 and leave mes-
sage.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: 2bedroom apt.
1 12 bath. Nonsmoker.
$180mo plus 1 2 utilities.
Close to campus. On ECU
bus route. Furnished, w
d, dw. Avail. Aug. 1st.
Call 321-0977 or 757-2489
(leave message).
WANTED: Roommate for
Fail Semester to share a
fully furnished apartment.
ECU bus access nearby.
Call Tim at 758-5207.
WOULD YOU LIKE TO
LI VE in a nice house near the
university? Female housemate
wanted immediately. Lovely
homeonHardingStreet. Cen-
tral Air, dishwasher, washer
dryer hookups, extra storage
space. $26750 plus 12 utili-
ties. Call 551-2261 (days) or
752-9685 (evenings) Ask for
Pat.
FOR RENT: 2bdrm mobile
home. Call (919) 231-8540.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED to share 2br apt w
2 other girls. Own room. Rent
$124 mo plus 13 utilities.
Avail July 15. Call Beth 758-
6729. Leave Message.
Announcements
CATHOLIC STUDENT
CENTER
The Newman Catholic Stu-
dent Center invites you to
worship with them. Sunday
Masses: 11:30am & 8:30pm at
the Newman Center, 953 E.
10thStGreenviIle. Weekdays:
Sam at the Newman Center.
BISF.XUAL-GAY-LES-
B1AN ALLIANCE
Social support, activism
and activities. All inter-
ested and caring people
welcome. Call 757-6766
from 11:15-12:30 Mon-
Thurs. for information on
time and place.
KISS ME. KATE
June 24-July 4, Matinees: June
27 and July 1 McGinnis
Theater.USHERS NEEDED
AND GET IN FREE. If you're
going to usher you must sign
up at Messick Theater Arts
Center located at 5th St. and
Eastern St.
I()k si i
SEIZED CARS trucks, boats,
4wheelers, motorhomes, by
FBI, IRS, DEA. Available in
your area now. Call (800) 338-
3388ext.C-5999.
THREE FREE CONDOMS!
Special introduction to our
wide selection of high qual-
ity, name brand Condoms at
low prices. Order today!
KBA, Box 13001, RTP, NC
27709.
FOR SALE: 1991 Kawasaki
EX D and D competition
pipe, twin cam, 8 valve. 830-
0832.
FOR SALE: Jamis Women's
Earth Cruiser Bike. Less than
1 year old, Excellent Condi-
tion. Must sell! $100 Call 752-
2427.
Ill I.l� W 11 �
EASY WORK! Excellent
pay! Assemble products at
home. Call toil free 1-800-
467-5566 ext. 5920.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW
HIRING: Earn $2,000
month and world travel
(Hawaii, Mexico, the Car-
ibbean, etc.) Holiday,
summer and career em-
ployment available. No
experience necessary. For
employment program call
1-206-545-4155 ext. C586.
ALASKA SUMMER EM-
PLOYMENT: Fisheries.
Earn $5,000month. Free
III ll'WWII n
transportation! Room &
board! Over 8,000 open-
ings. No experience nec-
essary. Male or Female.
For employment program
call Student Employment
Services at 1-206-545-4155
ext. 1649.
POSTAL JOBS AVAIL-
ABLE! Many positions.
Great benefits. Call (800)
338-3388 ext. P-3712.
FREE TRAVEL: Air cou-
riers and cruiseships. Stu-
dents also needed Christ-
mas, Spring, and Summer
for amusement park em-
ployment. Call (800) 338-
3388 ext. F-3464.
GIRL CALLED LEIGH
HOW m
SURVIVE
IRRITATION CHECKLIST
BIE ADAM ROE
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was our static caitmm.r axr�
'M THE CRIME CWf&. o c(TY?
PIP ibJR BATTERIES DIE 1 (�r
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By Kampl�





(Bite lEast Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Julie Roscoe, News Editor
Jeff Becker, Asst. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Joseph Horst, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Robert Todd, Assistant Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Copy Editor
Bill Walker, Copy Editor
Adam Roe, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Locke Monroe, Qassified Advertising Technician
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Ihe Fast Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students During summer sessions. The East Carolinian publishes once a week with a circulation of 5,000. The masthead
editorial :n each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of
view Letters should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the
right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg
ECU. Greenville. N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
I
Opinion
Page 4, July 1, 1992
Public Safety review questionable
The university appears to have taken an-
other step in their never-ending quest to sweep
its skeletons under the big state-supported rug.
Under allegations concerning the mis-
treatment of students in the 1989 Public Safety
drug campaign, the university was asked to
review its public safety department with an
external law enforcement agency.
The report, compiled by two "inde-
pendent" police officials, contains numerous
contradictions. The review states that no nega-
tive comments were made regarding Public
Safety except from Dean of Students, Ronald
Spaa. I lowever, one of the state auditors, Ray
Mozingo, noted several complaints from vari-
ous sources.
The review questioned Public Safety offic-
ers and entirely left ovit all students and attor-
neys involved in the mistreatment allegations.
Once again the ethics of our fine aclministration
have tangled the issue.
The external law enforcement consult-
ants may have been completely objective, but a
conclusive review must include all sides of an
issue. Leaving out the very root of the allegations,
the mistreated students, is like not having a
review.
Is it so hard to find an agency to administer
an objective review questioning all involved par-
ties? In fact, in light of the initial review by the
North Carolina Justice Academy, which was
aborted following an apparent lack of coop-
eration from the university, ECU's actions
seem even more questionable. Allowing a
school under review to pick their own consult-
ants is like allowing a defendant to screen the
prosecutor's questions.
This questionable review is another link in a
massive chain of events that cries incompetency.
Whether the review regards allegations of mis-
treatment or the pervasive wiretapping of our
campus, ECU is still under a negative light by
being subjected to constant outside analysis.
The skeletonclosetat ECU is facing die same
dilemma as the dorms; too many with too little
space.
Walks Words
Constitutional freedoms eroded
ByA
J.WilliamJ fI
Walker
Editorialrvirf
ColumnistTK
You must eat at McDonald's to-
night You can'teatat Wendy's, Burger
King or Hardee's You will drive a
Chev rolet Civalier, own a cocker span-
iel, and live in a three bedroom, two-
and-a-half bathcondoon Ninth Street
Any questions7 Contact the Supreme
Court
Fortunately, Monday'sSupreme
Court re-affirmation of Roe vs. Wade
does not step on our freedom of choice
to this extreme, but its implementation
of the "undue burden" method of de-
ciding is clearly unconstitutional and a
step in this direction The supremecourt
has provided a wedge by which states
will be able to contort rights funda-
mentally granted in our constitution.
The majority opinion, by Justice
Sandra Day O'Connor, stated that it is
a woman's constitutional right to have
an abortion. However, O'Connor said
that this nght is not so unlimited that
states "cannot show concern for the life
of the unborn, and at a later point in
fetal development the state's interest
in life has sufficient force so the right of
the woman to terminate the pregnancy
can be restricted
O'Connor copped out The deci-
sion simply grants states the ability to
so closely restrict abortion rights that
the constitution practically holds no
position in the matter anymore.
In its re-affirmation of Roe , the
court wishy-washed its way to per-
fect stalemate. It awarded pro-lifers
their restrictions while granting pro-
choice advocates their fundamental
nght In such a landmark decision
shouldn't the supreme court, the legis-
lative reviewers of this nation, make a
final decision rather than re-distnbute
a hot potato to states already tom on
the issue?
The court has eroded a funda-
mental right by blurring the basis of
that tight. Requiring parental consent,
a 24-hour waiting period, informed
consent (a license for pro-life badger-
ing at abortion clinics), and detailed
doctor's reports for each abortion per-
formed is not a fair compromise The
restrictions are the kinetic energy
needed to begin closing the door on
abortion rights
States will now be able to use the
restrictions of the court to their prefer-
ences, interpreting them freely to ac-
complish whatever ends the political
demands of the state call for. Obvi-
ously, abortion rights are worse off
now then they were before the re-evalu-
ation.
This decision, while correct in its
re-affirmation, reflects on America's
current fad, the right not to be offended
(Maxwell TEC 62492). The underly-
ing issue often dodged by pro-life zeal-
ots is whether or not state or federal
government can make such a basic
decision for a citizen.
Just because the thought of an
unborn fetus being terminated offends
someone, does not mean that the court
must say all abortions are illegal be-
cause they're offensive. If you don't
want an abortion, have a child, but
don't tell me what to do.
An unborn fetus, to me, is totally
and unquestionably dependent on its
mother. The umbilical cord provides
�11 sustenance by which the fetus
"lives " That fetus has no more nght to
"live" than my appendix If the mother,
the supplier, has any reason to want to
remove the parasite (which by defini-
tion it is a mammal living in another
organism at whose expense it is main-
tained), she should have thatrightwith-
out any restrictions or consent from
Uncle Sam.
The other side of this coin, sup-
ported by irate pro-lifers, is to ban
abortions. Hell, let's declare a war on
abortions. That's usually our answer
toanyproblem,declarewar And with
that war will come what? A victory?
Get real! Attempts made to stop abor-
tions will be as effective as the attempts
to stop drug use. I think we're are
seeing someparaUelisms here. America
declares war on drugs, and drug users
clearly send the message that we can
not stop them. If we outlaw abortions
outright, are we naive enough to be-
lieve that we will stop them?
The United States is a society
founded on the premise that the gov-
ernment should not control our lives.
People will find a way to do what they
want, usually regardless of govern-
ment law. Illegal abortion? will only
produce unsafe abortions.
As a male, the issue will never
confront me personally However, toe
restrictions act as a harbinger to a cen-
trally controlled government Any tres-
pass by the government into such a
personal realm as abortion is one step
too far. Next, the court could review
our freedom of speech rights, and that
could put me out of a job.
Our government needs to re-
commit itself topublic service and fade
away from public control. Any regula-
tion on personal, self-con tamed deci-
sions is completely wrong. "Don't tell
me what to do
Letters To The Editor
To The Editor
I must say that I am surprised
but pleased to be able to write a letter in
favor of an editorial 1 read in the East
Carolinian . Mr. Batchelor's editorial
entitled "Bush Makes Right Choice at
Summit "hit the nail right on the head.
The mass media of this country
is passing on as fact a bunch of dooms-
day predictions mat are far from being
proved.
In fact, there is much informa-
tion that has bean collected that goes
toward disproving much of environ-
mental dogma.
Scientists win teQ you that i t will
take at least twenty years before arty-
thing can bepfoven. Theenvironmen-
tattsts ask, "Can we afford to wait V
That question neids to be answered
with another question
Can our economy afford to
have a bunch of left-wing environ-
mentalists dictate policy in order to
fix something that is not even bro-
ken?
Billy L. Biggs
Sophomore
Accounting
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Welcome to Maxwell's phone service
By Scott
Maxwell
Editorial
Columnist
Thank you for calling The List
Caroltnian's opinion pae All of our
editorial columnists are busy nght
now However, as a convenience to
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will be answered in the order in which
it was received You may cancel your
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Scott Maxwells are busy nght now
However, as a convenience to you,
many of Scott Maxwell's opinions are
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Maxwell's opinion of a political issue,
please press 1 now If you would like
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press 1 now To hear Scott Maxwell's
opinion of parent and copynght laws
as they apply to computers, please
press 2 now To hear Scott Maxwell's
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depersonalize social relationships,
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please press 4 now
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To hear Scott Maxwell's opin-
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please press 1 now To hear Scott
Maxwell's opinion of the use of elec-
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Please hold for Scott Maxwell's
opinion of electronic menu systems.
They suck.
A View From Above
Legal branch grants right to kidnap
Media exaggerates environmental hype
T. Scott Batchelor
Editorial Columnist
The United States Supreme
Court, Washington, DC
Just down the street from the
Library of Congress and, apparently,
just on the other side of the looking
glass.
In a puzzling 6 to 3 vote last
week, the court that the US Govern-
ment may forcibly remove individu-
als from foreign countries to stand
trial here, even if the other country
has an extradition treaty wifh the
United States.
The ruling was made in the case
of Humberto Alvarez Machain, a
Mexican doctor accused of participat-
ing in the 1985 death of D.E.A. agent
Enrique Camarena Salazar Machain
was captured in Mexico by individu-
als working for the US. government
and brought to the United States,
where he was arrested by DE.A. offic-
ers. A US. District Court concluded
that this kidnapping was orchestrated
and funded by agents of theU.S. Gov-
ernment. And the Supreme Court says
it's all legal.
Well, the Supreme Court is
wrong.
The United States of America is
a nation of laws. We traded the rule of
men for the rule of law over 200 years
ago, at the cost of thousands of lives
and inconceivable hardships.
Chief Justice WilBa m Rehnquist,
writing for the court, seems to have
ignored, or at least overlooked, mis
important precept of the American
system of jurisprudence. He acknowl-
edges mat kidnappings such as the
one described violate international
law But according to a doctrine laid
out in 1900, international law is a part
of American law. Thus, Machain's
abduction was a violation of Ameri-
can law. Quite simple
Chief Justice Rehnquist, how-
ever, doesn't view things the same
way I do. He contends that because
the extradition treaty between the
United States and Mexico does not
specifically prohibit kidnapping, then
the U.S. was well within its rights to
do so.
Using Rehnquist's twisted logic,
if it were more expedient to execute a
person instead of attempting extradi-
tion, this option would be equally vi-
able, because it is not explicitly pro-
hibited in the treaty.
Such pharisaical application of
the law betrays the spirit of comity
conveyed by the establishment of ex-
tradition treaties.
The court based much of its
opinion on a case heard in 1886. In Ker
v. Illinois, a man charged with larceny
was kidnapped from Peru by a pri-
vate messenger rather than obtained
through the extradition treaty the U.S.
had with mat country. Unlike Mexico,
Peru did not object to this action, and
the Supreme Court held that Ker could
be tried in the U.S.
Chief Justice Rehnquist cited Ker
vs. Illinois, as a precedent for the rul-
ing in last week's case. However, as
pointed out by Justice Paul Stevens,
who wrote the dissenting opinion,
Rehnquist's assertion is critically
flawed.
It makes no distinction between
a private citizen kidnapping, and
I
1
agents of the government doing the
same The former represents no treaty
violation, whereas the latter does. Jus-
tice Stevens' point is well taken.
The Supreme Court's decision
is also disturbing on another, less in-
tellectual level If the United States
can violate the sovereignty of a coun-
try to kidnap an accused criminal,
what's to stop another country from
doing the same to us'
One can easily imagine the out-
rage if an American were snatched off
the streets of Greenville by agents of a
foreign country and taken away to
answer criminal charges.
It's a scenario that should have
been abandoned with the end of the
Cold War
That is why last week's ruling
was charactenzed as "monstrous" by
the three dissenting members of the
court. Perhaps the word is a bit too
harsh, but it exemplified the degree of
emotion felt by our nation's highest
judges.
It means they care, and I am
glad they do.
Still, a rather egregious error
has been made, and the ramifications
of that error do not terminate at the
US. border. The US. Supreme Court
is seen as a paragon of ethical, moral,
and judicial excellence, not just by
Americans, but by many nations
around the Globe.
We mustn't, however, make the
mistake of saying that the court is bad,
because it isn't It is just wrong in this
I only hope the other countries
with which the United States has ex-
tradition treaties can muster the same
compassion.
Entertainment
A
:rom left to nght, Russell Garrett, Judith Bruno. Ten Fu-
East Carolina Playhouse with 'he wonderfully entertaini:
Kiss Me, Kat
?hakespeare
Play "tj
leav
By joe Horst
Assistant Entertainment Editor
To paraphrase Shakespeare,
"All the worlds a stage, and the
men and women merely players
If the Eat Carolina Playhouse's
Opening night of "Kiss Me, Kate
is anv indication, than good oY
Will hit the nail right on the head.
The plav revolves around the
reunion of an ex-marned theatri-
cal couple and the ensuing hijinks
during their revival of
Shakespeare's, "The Taming of the
Shrew As "Petruchio' tames
"Kate the Shrew the couple be-
gin to fall in love all over again.
Compounded by gangster
hounding "Fetruchio" and mis-
haps on-stage and off, the cast re-
solves the plot amidst laughter
and applause to the delight oi the
near-capacity audience.
C Ronald Campbell, playing
Fred Graham and "Petruchio
teams wonderfully with ludith
Bruno, plaving Lilli Yanessi and
"Katherine to form the duo who
love to hate each other.
Campbell's Ivric baritone
voice hit its peak m "W underbar"
and complemented his swagger-
ing attitude perfectly
Bruno proved to be the per-
fect cast for the "Shrewish kate
working perfectly in tandem with
Campbell. Her sharp facial fea-
tures contrasteo beautifully with
magnificent lyric-coloratura
m rano voice. Songs like T Hate
Men" and "Women Are Simple"
were ust a -amp
wide rane - - :i
ties.
Ten Furr and
aiso team up to gjrv
version of unrequil
played the part oi a
beautiful actress
aplomb. Her teair
ish behavior dro e
acter � and the ai
with anticipation.)
like "Tom, Dick
"Why Cant Yon
audience sweat
solved tension
Garrett shmt
the roguishJv ct
love with Fun s
Lane. His boyish
straight-forward
as the perfect cj
Campbells swagf
ous manner Cant
with his piece
dancing up a stor
audience's breathj
Last, but n
McCuBoch and U
manv a scene as tr
gangsters
VVithphonv
and polyester
proved to be onel
la nous mnbos
een Their facial
especially rVrso
If you're reading this message, it proj
advertising works.
CallThe East Carolinian at 757-6366
advertising work forvou.
i.iiMklMlMKV'KMK��
rcssg.ra
5J.
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THE BIGGEST BURFUTO YOU'VE EVJ
Stuffed with beef, rice, lettuce, beans, t
sour cream, and covered with enchilac
Guaranteed to fill you up!
521 Cotanche St. 757-1666





Slje fEaat Carolinian
Screfag fto" East Carolina campus community since 1925
James R. Knisely, Gmerrt Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Julie Roscoe, Nciik Editor
Jeff Becker, Asst. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Joseph Horst, Ami. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Robert Todd, Assistant Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Cofiy Editor
Bill Walker, Copy Editor
Adam Roe, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Locke Monroe, Classified Advertising Technician
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
IV East diroliman has served the Hast Carolina campus community since 1925. emphasizing information that affects ECU
students Ounng summer sessions. The East Carolinian publishes once a week with a circulation of 5,000. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of
tew I ctti-rs should he limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the
right to edit or reiect letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg
! (T. C.recnville.N.C. 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.

Opinion
Page 4, July 1, 1992
Public Safety review questionable
The uitiversitv appears to have taken an-
other step in their never-ending quest to sweep
i ts skeletons under the big state-supported rug.
Under allegations concerning the mis-
treatment of students in the 1 89 Public Safety
drug campaign, the university was asked to
reiev its public safety department with an
external law enforcement agency.
Hie report, compiled by two "inde-
pendent" police officials, contains numerous
contradictions. The reiew states that no nega-
tive comments were made regarding Public
Safet) except from Dean of Students, Ronald
Speier. 1 lowever, one of the state auditors, Ray
Mozingo, noted several com plaints from vari-
ous sources
The review questioned Public Safety of Be-
ers and entirely left out all students and attor-
nevs involved in the mistreatment allegations.
Once again the ethics of our fine adrninistration
have tangled the issue.
The external law enforcement consult-
ants mav have ren completely objective, but a
conclusive review must include all sides of an
Issue. Leaving out the very root of the allegations,
the mistreated students, is like not having a
review.
Ls it so hard to find an agency to administer
an objective review questioning all involved par-
ties?Infact, in light of the initial review by the
North Carolina Justice Academy, which was
aborted following an apparent lack of coop-
eration from the university, ECU's actions
seem even more questionable. Allowing a
school under review to pick their own consult-
ants is like allowing a defendant to screen the
prosecutor's questions.
This questionable review is another link in a
massive chain of events that cries ineompetency.
Whether the review regards allegations of mis-
treatment or the pervasive wiretapping of our
campus, ECU is still under a negative light by
being subjected to constant outside analysis.
The skeleton closet at ECU is facing the same
dilemma as the dorms; too many with too little
space.
Walk's Words
Constitutional freedoms eroded
By
J.William
Walker
Editorial
Columnist
You must eat at McDonald's to-
night You can teatat Wendy's, Burger
Kjnc, or Harriot's You will drive .i
iThevrpletCivalier.ownacockerspan-
iel. and live in a three bedroom, two-
and-a-half bath condoon Ninth Street
ny questions' Contact the Supreme
Court
Fortunately, Monday's Supreme
Court re-affirmation of Roe m. Wade
does not step on our freedom of choice
to this extreme, but its implementation
of the undue burden" method of de-
ciding is clearly unconstitutional and a
tepm misdirection The supreme court
has provided a wedge by which states
will be able to contort rights funda-
mentally granted in our constitution.
The majonty opinion, by Justice
Sandra Day O'Connor, stated that it is
a woman's constitutional right to have
an abortion However, O'Connor said
that this nght is not so unlimited that
states "cannot show concern for the life
of the unborn, and at a later point in
fetal development the state's interest
in life has sufficient force so the rightof
the woman to terminate thepregnancy
can be restricted
O'Connor copped out The deci-
sion simply grants states the ability' to
so closely restrict abortion rights that
the constitution practically holds no
position in the matter anymore.
In its re-affirmation of Roe, the
court wishy-washed its way to a per-
fect stalemate It awarded pro-lifers
their restrictions while granting pro-
choice advocates their fundamental
nght In such a landmark decision
shouldn't the supreme court, the legis-
lative reviewers of this nation, make a
final decision rather than re-distnbute
a hot potato to states already torn on
the issue'
The court has eroded a funda-
mental right by blurnng the basis of
that nght Requinng parental consent,
a 24-hour waiting period, informed
consent (a license for pro-life badger-
ing at abortion clinics), and detailed
doctor's reports for each abortion per-
formed is not a fair compromise The
restrictions are the kinetic energy
needed to begin closing the door on
abortion rights
States will now be able to use the
restrictions of the court to their prefer-
ences, interpreting them freely to ac-
complish whatever ends the political
demands of the state call for. Obvi-
ously, abortion rights are worse off
now then they were before the re-evalu-
ation.
This decision, while correct in its
re-affirmation, reflects on America's
current fad, therightnot to be offended
(Maxwell TEC 62492).The underly-
ing issueoften dodged by pro-life zeal-
ots is whether or not state or federal
government can make such a basic
decision for a citizen.
Just because the thought of an
unborn fetus being terminated offends
someone, does not mean that the court
must say all abortions are illegal be-
cause they're offensive. If you don't
want an abortion, have a child, but
don't tell me what to do.
An unborn fetus, to me, is totally
and unquestionably dependent on its
mother The umbilical cord provides
all sustenance by which the fetus
"lives " That fetus has no more nght to
"live" than my appendix If the mother,
the supplier, has any reason to want to
remove the parasite (which by defini-
tion it is a mammal living in another
organism at whose expense it is main-
tamed), she shexdd havethatrightwith-
out anv restnetions or consent from
Uncle Sam
The other side of this, coin, sup-
ported by irate pro-lifers, is to ban
abortions Hell, let's declare a war on
abortions That's usually our answer
to any problem, declare war And with
that war will come what? A victory7
Get real! Attempts made to stop abor-
tions will be as effective as the attempts
to stoo drug use I think we're are
seeing someparalleusms here. America
declares war on drugs, and drug users
clearly send the message thai we can
not stop them If we outlaw abortions
outright, are we naive enough to be-
lieve that we will stop them?
The United States is a society
founded on the premise that the gov-
ernment should not control our lives.
People will find a way to do what they
want, usually regardless of govern-
ment law. Illegal abortions will only
produce unsafe abortions.
As a male, the issue will never
confront me personally. However, the
restrictions act as a harbinger to a cen-
trally controlled government Any tres-
pass by the government into such a
personal realm as abortion is one step
too far. Next, the court could review
our freedom of speech rights, and that
could put me out of a job.
Our government needs to re-
commit itself to public service and fade
away from public control. Any regula-
tion on personal, self-contained deci-
sions is completely wrong. "Don't tell
me what to do
Letters To The Editor
To The Editor
I must say that I am surprised
but pleased to be able to write a letter in
favor of an editorial I read in the East
Carolinian Mr Batchelor's editorial
entitled "Bush Makes Right Choice at
Summit" hit the nail right on the head.
The mass media of mis country
is passing on as fact a bunch of dooms-
day prediction mat are far from being
proved.
In fact, there is much informa-
tion that has been collected that goes
toward disproving much of environ-
mental dogma.
Scientists will tell you that it will
take at least twenty years before any-
thing can be proven. The environmen-
talists ask, "Can we afford to wait V
That question needs to be answered
with another question.
Can our economy afford to
have a bunch of left-wing environ-
mentalists dictate policy in order to
fix something that it not even bro-
ken?
Billy L Biggs
Sophomore
Accounting
ONE LOS AM&fUs Disaster,
(sm HWt PREVENTED 4M0THB?,
Entertainment
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
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Maxwell
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They suck
A View From Above
Legal branch grants right to kidnap
Media exaggerates environmental hype
T. Scott Batchelor
Editorial Columnist
The United States Supreme
Court, Washington, DC
Just down the street from the
Library of Congress and. apparently,
just on the other side of the looking
glass.
In a puzzling 6 to 3 vote last
week, the court that the U S Govern-
ment may forcibly remove individu-
als from foreign countnes to stand
trial here, even if the other country
has an extradition treaty with the
United States.
The ruling was made in the case
of Humberto Alvarez Machain, a
Mexican doctor accused of participat-
ing in the 1985 death of D.E.A. agent
Enrique Camarena Salazar Machain
was captured in Mexico by individu-
als working for the U.S. government
and brought to the United States,
where he was arrested by D.E.A. offic-
ers. A U.S. District Court concluded
that this kidnapping was orchestrated
and funded by agents of the U S. Gov-
ernment. And the Supreme Court says
it's all legal.
Well, the Supreme Court is
wrong.
The United States of America is
a nation of laws. We traded the rule of
men for the rule of law over 200 years
ago, at the cost of thousands of lives
and inconceivable hardships.
Chief) ustice Willia m Rehnquist,
writing for the court, seems to have
ignored, or at least overlooked, mis
important precept of the American
system of jurisprudence. He acknowl-
edges that kidnappings such as the
one described violate international
law But according to a doctrine laid
out in 1900, international law is a part
of American law. Thus, Machain's
abduction was a violation of Ameri-
can law Quite simple
Chief Justice Rehnquist, how-
ever, doesn't view things the same
way I do. He contends that because
the extradition treaty between the
United States and Mexico does not
specifically prohibit kidnapping, then
the US. was well within its rights to
do so.
Using Rehnquist's twisted logic,
if it were more expedient to execute a
person instead of attempting extradi-
tion, this option would be equally vi-
able, because it is not explicitly pro-
hibited in the treaty.
Such pharisaical application of
the law betrays the spirit of comity
conveyed by the establishment of ex-
tradition treaties.
The court based much of its
opinion on a case heard in 1886. In Ker
v. Illinois, a man charged with larceny
was kidnapped from Peru by a pri-
vate messenger rather than obtained
through the extradition treaty the U.S.
had with that country. Unlike Mexico,
Peru did not object to this action, and
the Supreme Court held that Ker could
be tried in the U.S.
Chief Justice Rehnquist cited Ker
vs. Illinois, as a precedent for the rul-
ing in last week's case. However, as
pointed out by Justice Paul Stevens,
who wrote the dissenting opinion,
Rehnquist's assertion is critically
flawed.
It makes no distinction between
a private citizen kidnapping, and
agents of the government doing the
same The former represents no treaty
violation, whereas the latter does Jus-
tice Stevens' point is well taken
The Supreme Court's decision
is also disturbing on another, less in-
tellectual level if the United States
can violate the sovereignty of a coun-
try to kidnap an accused criminal,
what's to stop another country from
doing the same to us7
One can easily imagine the out-
rage if an American were snatched off
the streets oi Greenville by agents of a
foreign country and taken away to
answer criminal charges
It's a scenario that should have
been abandoned with the end of the
Cold War
That is why last week's ruling
was characterized as "monstrous" by
the three dissenting members of the
court Perhaps the word is a bit too
harsh, but it exemplified the degree of
emotion felt by our nation's highest
judges.
It means they care, and I am
glad they do.
Still, a rather egregious error
has been made, and the ramifications
of that error do not terminate at the
US border The US. Supreme Court
is seen as a paragon of ethical, moral,
and judicial excellence, not just by
Americans, but by many nations
around the Globe
We mustn't, however, make the
mistake of saying that the court is bad,
because it isn't. It is just wrong in this
case.
I only hope the other countries
with which the United States has ex-
tradition treaties can muster the same
compassion.
-
-
:rom left to right, Russell Garrett Judith Bruno. Ten Ft
East Carolina Playhouse with the wonderfully entertair
'Kiss Me, Kat
Shakespeare
By Joe Horst
Assistant Entertainment Editor
To paraphrase Shaki : � ae,
"All the world's a stage, and the
men and women merelv players
If the East Carolina Playhot
opening night of' Kiss Me, Kate"
is anv indication, than goH.1 ol'
Will hit the nail right on the head.
The plav revt h es around the
reunion of an ex-married theatri-
cal couple and the ensuing hijinks
during their revival of
Shakespeare's, "The Taming of the
Shrew As Tetruchio' tarrx
"Kate the Shrew the couple be-
gin to fall in love all over again
Compounded by gangsters
hounding 'Tetruchio" and mi
haps on-stage and off, the cast re-
solves the plot amidst laughter
and applause to the delight or the
near-capacity audience.
C Ronald Campbell, playing
Fred Graham and 'Tetruchio'
teams wonderfully with Judith
Bruno, playing Lilli Yanessi and
"Katherine to form the duo who
love to hate each other
Campbell's lyric baritone
voice hit its peak in "Wunderbar"
and complemented his swagger-
ing attitude perfectly
Bruno proved to be the per-
fect cast tor the "Shrewish Kate
working perfectly in tandem with
Campbell. Her sharp facial fea-
tures contrasted beautifully with
her magnificent lyric-coloratura
soprano voice Songs like 1 Hate
Men" rtnd "Women Are Simple"
Play "t
J
leav
were ust a samp
wide rar
ties
Teri Furr a no
a - vamup I
version of unrequi
played the par' li
beautiful actres
aplomb. Her beasirj
ish behavior dro el
acter � and rJ j
with anticir
like "Torn, Dick
"Why Can't
audience -
solved tension
Garrett shine
the roguishly ci
love with Furr 5
Lane. His boyish
straight-forward
as the perfect c
Campbell's swas
ous manner
with his piecr
dancing up a Stonj
audience's breath
Last, but n
McCuil -
manv a
gangsters.
With phony N
and polyester -1
proved to be onel
tarious coml
een. Their facial
especially Piers
It vou're reading this message, it pro
advertising works.
CallThe Fast Carolinian at 757-6366
advertising work for you.
J
HUNGRY Pll
THE BIGGEST BURRITO YOU'VE EVI
Stuffed with beef, rice, lettuce, beans, fj
sour cream, and covered with enchilac
Guaranteed to fill you up!
521 Cotanche St





�Ic lEaat CHarolinian
Serving the Eiist Carolina campus community since 1925
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director cf Advertising
Jiiifc Roscoe, News Editor
Jeff Becker, Asst. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
JOSEPH Horst, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Romri Todd, Assistant Sports Editor
Ch s Mitch'l, Copy Editor
Bui Walker, Copy Editor
Adam Roe, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Locke Monroe, Classified Adi'ertising Technician
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Union has served the llast Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students During summer sessions. The T.asi Carolinian publishes once a week with a circulation of 5,000. The masthead
editorial ia each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of
te 1 oners should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the
editoi reject leiiers for publication letters should be addressed to 1 he Editor, The Fast Carolinian, Publications Bldg
!(T, Greenville, N C . 2785S-4353. l:or more information, call (919) 757 b3ob.
Opinion
Page 4. July 1, 1992
Public Safety review questionable
The university appears to have taken an-
other step in their never-ending quest to sweep
;t skeleton under the big state-supported nig.
Under allegations concerning the mis-
i atment ot students in the 189 Public Safety
drug campaign, the university was asked to
review its public safety department with an
t xtemal law enforcement agency.
The report, compiled by two "inde-
t p.dent" police officials, contains numerous
trad tions. The review states that no nega-
ments were made regarding Public
� except from I Van of Students, Ronald
I lowever, one of the state auditors, Ray
Vlozingo, noted several complaints from van-
. - orces
The review questioned PublkSafety offic-
and entirely left out all students and attor-
neys involved in the mistreatment allegations.
C )nce again the ethics of our fine admintsu-ation
have tangled the issue.
The external law enforcement consult-
ants mav have been completely objective, but a
conclusive review must include all sides of an
issue. I eavingout the very root of the allegations,
the mistreated students, is like not having a
review.
I it so huu d to find an agency to administer
an objective review questioning all invoked par-
ties? In fact, in light oi the initial review bv the
North Carolina Justice Academy,which was
aborted following an apparent lack oi coop-
eration from the university, ECU'S actions
seem even more questionable. Allowing a
school under review to pick their own consult-
ants is like allowing a defendant to screen the
prosecutor's questions.
This questionable review is another link in a
massive chain of events that cries incompetency.
Whether the review regards allegations of mis-
treatment or the pervasive wiretapping of our
campus, HCU is still under a negative light bv
being subjected to constant outside analysis.
The skeleton closet at ECU is facing the same
dilemma as the dorms; too many with too little
space.
Walk's Words
Constitutional freedoms eroded

Bv
J.William Walker 1 ditorial C olumniM
rtiucteat at MDonald's ttv
1 Ig' � 1 �eatat Wendy's, Burner
K. '�!�v SYouwill drive a
r et( ivaierown.i cocker span-
iand In� ini thret" bednxim, rwo-
mi�: atri-OIdo onNinth Street
. . .�-�-i Ccintactthe Supreme
FoTunately, MondaySSupreme
Court re-affirmation of Roe z-s. W'jJe
k �. not step on our freedom ot choice
to this extreme, but its implementation
i f the "undue burden" method of de-
iding is clearly unconstitutional and a
tep in thus direction The supreme court
has provided a wedge by which states
will be able to contort rights funda-
mentally granted in our constitution.
The majority opinion, by Justice
Sandra Day O'Connor, stated that it is
a woman s constitutional right to have
an abortion. However, O'Connor said
that this nght is not so unlimited that
states "cannot show concern for the life
of the unborn, and at a later point in
fetal development the state's interest
in life has sufficient force so the right of
the woman to term mate the pregn an cy
can be restricted "
O'Connor topped out The deci-
sion simply grants states the ability to
so closely restrict abortion nghts that
tiie constitution practically holds no
fxsihon in the matter anymore
In its re-affirm a tion of Roe , the
court wishy-washed its way to a per-
fect stalemate It awarded pro-lifers
their restrictions while granting pro-
choice advocates their fundamental
nght In such a landmark decision
shouldn't the supreme court, the legis-
lative reviewers of this nation, make a
final decision rather than re-distnbute
a hot potato to states already torn on
the issue7
The court has eroded a funda-
mental right by blurring the basis oi
that nght Requinng parental consent,
a 24-hour waiting period, informed
consent (a license for pro-life badger-
ing at abortion clinics), and detailed
doctor's reports tor each abortion per-
formed is not a fair compromise The
restrictions are the kinetic energv
needed to begin closing the door on
abortion nghts
Stateswillnow be able to use the
restnctions of the court to their prefer-
ences, interpreting them rreely to ac-
complish whatever ends the political
demands of the state call for Obvi-
ously, abortion nghts are worse off
now then they were before the re-evalu-
ation
Thisdecision, whilecorrect in its
re-affirmation, reflects on America's
current fad, theright not to beoffended
(Maxwell TEC 62492). The underly-
ing issueoften dodged by pro-life zea 1-
ots is whether or not state or federal
government can make such a basic
decision for a citizen.
Just because the thought of an
unborn fetus being terminated offends
someone, does not mean that the court
must say all abortions are illegal be-
cause they're offensive If you don't
want an abortion, have a child, but
don't tell me what to do
An unborn fetus, to me, is totally
and unquestionably dependent on its
mother The umbilical cord provides
all sustenance by which the fetus
"lives " That fetus has no more nght to
"live than my appendix If the mother,
the supplier, has any reason to want to
remove the parasite (which by defini-
tion it is a mammal living in another
organism at whose expense it is main-
tained), she should havethatnghtwith-
out any restnctions or consent from
Uncle Sam
The other side of this coin, sup-
ported by irate pro-lifers, is to ban
abortions Hell, let's declare a war on
abortions. That's usually our answer
to any problem, declare war And with
that war will come what7 A victory?
Get real' Attempts made to stop abor-
tions will be as effective as the attempts
to stop drug use 1 think we're are
seeing someparallelisms here. America
declares war on drugs, and drug users
clearly send the message that we can
not stop them If we outlaw abortions
outnght, are we naive enough to be-
lieve that we will stop them?
The United States is a society
founded on the premise that the gov-
ernment should not control our lives.
People will find a way to do what they
want, usually regardless of govern-
ment law Illegal abortions will only
produce unsafe abortions
As a male, the issue will never
confront me personally However, the
restnctions act as a harbinger to a cen-
trally con trolled government Any tres-
pass by the government into such a
personal realm as abortion is one step
too far Next, the court could review
our freedom of speech nghts, and that
could put me out of a job
Our government needs to re-
commit itself to public service and fade
away from public control. Any regula-
tion on personal, self-contained deci-
sions is completely wrong. "Don't tell
me what to do
Letters To The Editor
To The Editor
I must say that I am surprised
but pleased to be able to write a letter in
favor of an editorial I read in the East
Carolinian Mr Batchelor's editorial
entitled "Bush Makes Right Choice at
Summit" hit the nail right on the head
The mass media of this country
is passing on as fact a bunch of dooms-
day predictions that are far from being
proved
In fact, there is much informa-
tion that has been collected that goes
toward disproving much of environ-
mental dogma.
Scientists will tell you that it will
take at least twenty years before any-
thing can be proven. Theenvironmen-
talists ask, "Can we afford to wait ?"
That question n�eds to be answered
with another question.
Can our economy afford to
have a bunch of left-wing environ-
mentalists dictate policy in order to
fix something that is not even bro-
ken?
Billy L Biggs
Sophomore
Accounting
Entertainment
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Welcome to Maxwell's phone service
By Scott Maxwell Editorial Columnistvi
T
Thank � foi c The .� I
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�siai relati. � thips, . ease press J
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� answering macb : �-s used to
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Thev suck
A View From Above
Legal branch grants right to kidnap
Media exaggerates environmental hype
T. Scott Batchelor
Editorial Columnist
The United States Supreme
Court, Washington, IK
Just down the street from the
Library of Congress and, apparently,
just on the other side ol the looking
glass
In a puzzling 6 to 3 vote last
week, the court that the U S Govern-
ment mav forcibly remove individu-
als from foreign countries to stand
trial here, even if the other country
has an extradition treaty with the
United States
The ruling was made in the case
of Humberto Alvarez Machain, a
Mexican doctor accused oi participat-
ing in the lsK3 death of D E A agent
Enrique Camarena Salaar Machain
was captured in Mexico by individu-
als working for the U S government
and brought to the United States,
where he was arrested by D E A. offic-
ers. A U.S. District Court concluded
that this kidnapping was orchestrated
and funded by agents of the U S Gov-
ernment. And the Supreme Court says
it's all legal.
Well, the Supreme Court is
wrong.
The United States of America is
a nation of laws. We traded the rule of
men for the rule of law over 200 years
ago, at the cost of thousands of lives
and inconceivable hardships
Chief Justice William Rehnquist,
writing for the court, seems to have
ignored, or at least overlooked, this
important precept of the American
system of jurisprudence He acknowl-
edges that kidnappings such as the
one described violate international
law But according to a doctrine laid
out in 1900, international law is a part
of American law Thus, Machain's
abduction was a violation of Ameri-
can law Quite simple
Chief Justice Kehnquist, how-
ever, doesn't view things the same
way I do. He contends that because
the extradition treaty between the
United States and Mexico does not
specifically prohibit kidnapping, then
the US. was well within its rights to
do so.
Using Rehnquist's twisted logic,
if it were more expedient to execute a
person instead of attempting extradi-
tion, this option would be equally vi-
able, because it is not explicitly pn-
hibited in the treat;
Such phansaical application of
the law betrays the spirit of comity
conveyed by the establishment of ex-
tradition treaties
The court based much of its
opinion on a case heard in 1886 In Krr
V. Illinois, a man charged with larceny
was kidnapped from Peru by a pn-
vate messenger rather than obtained
through the extradition treaty the U.S.
had with that country Unlike Mexico,
Peru did not object to this action, and
the SupremeCourt held that Kercould
be tried in the US
Chief Justice Rehnquist cited Ker
m. Illinois, as a precedent for the rul-
ing in last week's case However, as
pointed out by Justice Paul Stevens,
who wrote the dissenting opinion,
Rehnquist's assertion is critically
flawed.
Itmakesnodistinction between
a private citizen kidnapping, and
agents of thi government I mg the
same Theft rmerrej reset rs no treaty
violation whereas th latter does Jus-
tice Stex ens' j � taken
"Die Supreme Court's decision
is also disturbing on another, less in-
tellectual level It the Ihited States
can violate the sovereignty oi a coun-
try to kidnap an accused criminal
what to stop another country from
doing the same to us'
One can easily imagine the out-
rage it an American were snatched off
the streets ot Greenville by agents of a
foreign country and taken awav to
answer criminal charges
I s ,i scenario that should have
been abandoned with the end of the
Cold War
That is why last week's ruling
was characterized as "monstrous" by
the three dissenting members of the
court Perhaps the word is a bit too
harsh, but it exemplified the degree of
emotion felt by our nation's highest
judges.
It means thev care, and I am
glad they do
Still, a rather egregious error
has been made, and the ramifications
oi that error do not terminate at the
US border The U S Supreme Court
is seen as a paragon of ethical, moral,
and judicial excellence, not iust by
Americans, but by manv nations
around the Globe
We mustn't, however, make the
mistakeofsayingthatthecourtisbad,
because it isn't. It is rust wrong in this
case
I only hope the other countries
with which the United States has ex-
tradition treaties can muster the same
compassion.

From left to - .
East Ca:
'Kiss Me, Kat
Shakespeare ar
By Joe Horst laY
Assistant Entertainment Fditor
: l6cl
"A
men a:
If th.
Opens'
is anv indi. i
Will hit �� � tail right on the I
Th. .
reum i ex-mai
cal couple and th
during their
Shaki-
Shrew
"Kate the Shrew
gin to fall in i.
Compounded bv
hounding "Petrui
haps on stagi and
solves the plot amidst la
and applause to the delight or :ne
near-capaatv audience
C. Ronald C ampbell, playing
Fred Graham and "Petruchi
teams wortderfull) ludith
Bruno, plav inc Lilli Van ssi and
"Katherin.
love to hate ther.
Camr nc
voice hit its peak
and complenru" I
ing attitude p. i
Bm:
feetca
working perto I
Campbell Her
rure-
her magnifi
soprano voia -
Men" and �
the roguisl
love with I
Lane. H
straight
dan
-
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If you're reading this message it pr
advertising
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advertising work tor vou
.a. �, wr� ������ ��
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HUNGRY PIRA
THE BIGGEST BURRITO YOU'VE EV
Stuffed with beef, rice, lettuce, beans. t
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Guaranteed to fill you up!
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Entertainment
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To hear Scott Maxwell s opin-
ion ai l oinputer trviom :ssues, please
press 1 pom To hear Scott Maxwell's
opmio lent and copyright laws
as the apply to computers, please
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� � . m oA computers to
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Beep
Welcome to the Non-computer
Technologies Suhuh-menu of the
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vher Soda) lv-ues menu
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ion of the use of broadcast media to
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Thank you tor selecting Scott
Maxwell's opinion of electronic menu
Ae hope your experience
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has been a pleasant one, and that you
have enjoyed and benetitted from the
improved and streamlined access to
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llws hold tor Scott Maxwell's
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Thev suck
m Above
right to kidnap
nten
Machaii -
of Amen-
�hncjuist, how-
ngs the same
. that because
between the
lexico does not
Idnapping, then
Ihm its rights to
It s twisted logic,
lent to execute a
iptingextradi-
be equally vi-
exphcitly prcv
kl application of
ppint of comity
lishment of ex-
much of its
I in 1886 InJOr
led with larceny
Peru by a pn-
r than obtained
i treaty the US
I. Unlike Mexico,
I this action, and
Id that Ker could
inquistcited Krr
lent for the rul-
However, as
Paul Stevens,
iting opinion,
n is critically
iction between
jnapping, and
vcti ment doing the
rmerre resents no treaty
ereas the latter does, hss-
' � � ' well taken
The Supreme Court's decision
is also disturbing on another, less in-
tellectual level If the United States
can violate the sovereignty of a coun-
try to kidnap an accused criminal,
what to stop another country from
doing the same to us1
One can easily imagine the out-
rage if an American were snatched off
the streets uf Greenville bv agents of a
foreign country and taken away to
answer criminal charges
It's a scenario that should have
been abandoned with the end of the
Cold War
That is why last week's ruling
was characterized as "monstrous" by
the three dissenting members of the
court Perhaps the word is a bit too
harsh, but it exemplified the degree of
emotion felt by our nation's highest
ludges
It means they care, and I am
glad they do
Still, a rather egregious error
has been made, and the ramifications
of that error do not terminate at the
US border The US Supreme Court
is seen as a paragon of ethical, moral,
and judicial excellence, not just by
Americans, but by many nations
around the Globe.
We mustn't,however, make the
mistake of saying that thecourt is bad,
because it isn't. It is just wrong in this
case.
I only hope the other countries
with which the United States has ex-
tradition treaties can muster the same
compassion.
Stye 3Eat (Carolinian
July 1, 1992
en
Harrison Ford plays Tatriof
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Pholo by J.D. WMtmira
From left to right, Russell Garrett, Judith Bruno, Ten Furr and C. Ronald Campbell all combine to grace the
East Carolina Playhouse with the wonderfully entertaining "Kiss Me, Kate
'Kiss Me, Kate' combines
Shakespeare and Cole Porter
Play "tames the Shrew" and
leaves audience smiling
By Joe Horst
Assistant Entertainment Editor
To paraphrase Shakespeare,
All the world's a stage, and the
men and women merely players
If the East Carolina Playhouse's
opening night of "Kiss Me, Kate"
is any indication, than good oT
Will hit the nail right on the head.
The play revolves around the
reunion of an ex-married theatri-
ical couple and the ensuing hi jinks
during their revival of
Shakespeare's, "The Taming of the
Shrew As "Fetruchio" tames
"Kate the Shrew the couple be-
in to fall in love all over again.
Compounded by gangsters
rounding "Petruchio" and mis-
ips on-stage and off, the cast re-
solves the plot amidst laughter
d applause to the delight of the
�r-capacity audience.
C Ronald Campbell, playing
Graham and "Petruchio
wonderfully with Judith
io, playing Lilli Vanessi and
stherine to form the duo who
e to hate each other.
Campbell's lyric baritone
cehit its peak in "Wunderbar"
complemented his swagger-
; attitude perfectly.
In a summer filled with se-
quels, Patriot Games stands apart
from the rest by acting completely
unlike a sequel.
Patriot Games has been billed
ostensibly as a sequel to The Hunt
for Red October. The main charac-
ter, Jack Ryan, appears in bom
films but in Patriot Games he domi-
nates the screen.
Patriot Games begins with the
Ryan family enjoying a vacation
in London. The tranquility
quickly erupts into chaos when
an attempt to kidnap the royal
family occurs. Ryan, played by
Harrison Ford, acts out of rage, he
claims, when he plunges head-
long into the middle of the foray.
He saves the prince and the
prince's family by killing one of
the assailants. Another assailant
is captured but the others escape.
In the battle, Ryan gets shot in the
shoulder.
Only later does Ryan learn
that he killed the captured
assailant's brother. When the pris-
oner escapes, Ryan fears for his
life and his family's safety. After
a foiled attempt on Ryan's life, he
decides to rejoin the CIA to help
brack the responsible terrorist fac-
tion of the IRA.
Patriot Games reminds the
viewer of what a great espionage
film can do for the pulse rate.
Though only a few isolated in-
stances of violence are contained
in this film, tension permeates its
every scene. The action sequences
provide much palpitation, espe-
cially the knock-out finale.
Unlike Red October, the hero
in Patriot Games is a man, not a
machine. The reasons for Ryan's
actions are personal. No threat of
war hangs in the balance. The tag
line for Patriot Games expresses
the atmosphere succinctly: "Not
for honor. Not for country. For
his wife and child
Patriot Games provides a hero
whose reasons for action are very
clear and very understandable.
One split second heroic decision
threatens to destroy Jack Ryan's
life. This decision garners the
viewer's admiration. Ryan's con-
templative decision to fight back
proves that he is man of strength.
Thedecision gamers the viewer's
empathy.
Harrison Ford proves once
again to be one of the great action
heroes of the past fifteen years.
Here he gives Ryan just the right
amount of compassion to aug-
ment his intelligence and
strength. Ford hesitates just long
enough before he undertakes he-
roic action to express his indeci-
sion. By doing so, he proves he is
human.
The supporting cast in Patriot
Games deserves a medal. James
Earl Jones and Richard Harris are
two big names with important
roles. Jones, as an Admiral, brings
Ryan back into the CIA and Har-
ris, as an IRA representative, tries
to meet with Ryan. Anne Archer
plays Ryan's strongand able wife,
Catherine. The rest of the cast,
down to the smallest roles, all fit
perfectly into place.
Only a few flaws keep this
film from becoming a classic. One
is the filmmaker's decision not to
expound on the impetus for the
terrorists' action. Their reasons
for kidnapping never become
clear.
Another problem is a scene
with Ryan and his wife. Ryan re-
ceives a threatening call from the
terrorist who escaped from
prison. After the phone call,
Catherine tells Jack to "get him
The dialogue does not ring true.
Catherine, a prominent eye sur-
geon and an intelligent woman,
needs to say more than "get him
A few extra minutes of screen
time could have been devoted to
a discussion about the possibili-
ties of Jack reentering the CIA.
The overall effect of Patriot
Games exhilarates the viewer. This
is a top-notch espionage thriller,
artfully crafted and expertly
acted.
On a scale of one to ten, Pa-
triot Games rates an eight.
were just a sampling of Bruno's
wide range of singing capabili-
ties.
Teri Furr and Russell Garrett
also team up to give a more sedate
version of unrequited love. Fun
played the part of a not-too-bright
beautiful actress with admirable
aplomb. Her teasing and coquett-
ish behavior drove Garrett's char-
acter � and the audience � wild
with anticipation. Furr's songs,
like "Tom, Dick or Harry" and
"Why Can't You Behave left the
audience sweating with unre-
solved tension.
Garrett shined admirably as
the roguishly charming actor in
love with Furr's character, Lois
Lane. His boyish good looks and
straight-forward manner worked
as the perfect counterpart to
Campbell's swagger and boister-
ous manner. Garrett stole the show
with his piece, "Too Darn Hot
dancing up a storm that took the
audience's breath away.
Last, but not least, Matt
McCulloch and Jay Pierson stole
drafted into the production were
expressive almost beyond belief.
McCulloch and Pierson stole
the second act with their song,
"Brush Up Your Shakespeare
Showing Cole Porter's unequaled
talent for lyrics, this one proved to
be the song that the whole audi-
ence was humming or whistling
as they left the theater.
David Wanstreet's choreog-
raphy, Jay Herzog's lighting and
Bob Alpers'setsall combined won-
derfully to create one of the most
well-rounded musicals this cam-
pus has ever seen. The sixteen-
piece orchestra � minus the
conductor's waving hands�also
lent the final touch to cement the
evening's enjoyment.
"Another op'nin another
show With this statement and
song starting the play, the actors'
enthusiasm matched the play's
level of excellence. "Kiss Me, Kate"
proved to be the best decision to
start the new Summer Theater sea-
son.
'Sunfesf to offer family entertainment
By Lewis Coble
Entertainment Editor
Atlantic Beach, NC is known as
one of the top recreation and beach
spots around the country, but be-
cause of deterioration and negative
publicity, tourism is heading on a
downward trend.
To counteract this slide, the city
has begun an annual major music
and entertainment festival. With the
first festival being held July 18-19,
Sunfest '92 promises to be "fun, fun,
fun against a musk backdrop
Sunfcst '92 will consist of a con-
cert on the Beach and a festival in
the streets of Atlantic Beach Circle.
Paid admission is required for the
concert, while festival goers are al-
lowed in free of charge. The concert
bers, Mr. Potatohead, theSuperGrit
Cowboy Band, The Voltage Broth-
ers, Blackwater and Midnight Ex-
press.
Also featured on Saturday is a
free street dance, including island
reggae music by the Awareness Art
Ensemble. On Sunday, Kitty West
a local performer and Sunfest's fes-
tival entertainment director, will
perform her own brand of musk.
The res tival will tea hire a carni-
val-like atmosphere, striving for a
"family atmosphere" where people
of all ages can enjoy. The event
will contain wandering musicians,
comedians and artists. Food con-
cessionaires, rides and merchandise
vendors also compromise the rest
of the "streetscape
Youngsters can enjoy various
will feature two afternoons of live
local, regional and national bands different activities at Sunfest '92,
from several musk categories.
Ferdinand" (Sunfest's version of
"Where's Waldo?") and getting
face-painted.
Festival activities will officially
begin at9fl0a.m. both days and end
at midnight and 7:00p.m Saturday
and Sunday respectively.
Concert area opens at 9:00 a jn.
each day with Saturday's entertain-
ment starting up at 11:00 a.m. and
ending at 6:00 p jtl Sunday's enter-
tainment will start at 1:00 p jtl and
end at 6:00 p.m.
According to the president of
Sunfest Festivals, Inc, Fred Fletcher,
Jr Sunfest '92 is expected to draw a
crowd reaching over 20 ,009 people.
Daily admission prices are $12
per person. Single admissions for
both concert events can be pur-
chased for $20 each
Advance tickets will go on sale
Some of the bands featured in
the all-star lineup include The Em-
Bruno proved to be the per- many a scene as the two bumbling
:t cast for the "Shrewish" Kate,
forking perfectly in tandem with
impbell. Her sharp facial fea-
lres contrasted beautifully with
ier magnificent lyric-coloratura
oprano voice. Sons like "1 Hate
len" and "Women Are Simple"
gangsters.
With phony New York accents
and polyester suits, these two
proved to be one of the most hi-
larious combos East Carolina has
seen. Their facial expressions �
especially Pierson's � as they're
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advertising works.
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advertising work for you.
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Sports
�fte iEaat (Earolinian
July 1, 1992
O'Brien misses vault, Barcelona Tream team' rolls
over Cuba, 136-57
M W ORLEANS!AP)�What
VMM to be settled at Barcelona"
was settled at New Orleans.
It's Dave, not Dan.
The battle tor the title as "The
World'sOreatest Athlete between
Dave lohnson and Dan O'Brien,
expected to be decided in the de-
manding decathlon next month at
Barcelona, became academic Satur-
day
O'Brien's chance for a spot on
the US. Olympic team and a world
record in thedecathlon ended when
he failed to cleara height in the pole
vault.
O'Brien, 25, the American
record-holder and the 11 world
champion, was rollingalongon pace
tii break the world record of S,847
points, set by Daley Thompson of
Britain at the 1984 Olympics, before
encountering unexepected difficul-
ties in the ault at the I � Olvmpic
tnak
lhat opened the way for the
more experienced Johnson, 29, who
was trailing badly in second place,
lo go onand win thedecathlon with
a meet-record 8,649 points, and lead
the three-man IS. de atWon team
(into Barcelona.
'If s Dave, not Dan'
The heartbroken O'Brien fin-
ished 11th with 7,856 points, his
worst performance since 1988.
OBrien's shocking failure put
a serious crimp in Reebok's $2l)-$25
million "Dan and Dave" television
ad campaign featuring the two pre-
mier decathletes.
When it was determined that
O'Brien had no chance to make the
team after his disaster in the vault,
NBC, which was televising the tri-
als, pulled theTVcommercials, said
lohn Gillis, director of marketing
and communications for Reebok.
"Thecampaignisdefinitelynot
dead Gillis said. "The campaign
continues. It just needs a slight ad-
justment.
"We're devastated, devastated
tor Dan in particular. We always
knew there was a risk in this
After seven events, O'Brien had
compiled 6167 points, 71 ahead of
hi American record pace in the
World Championships at Tokyo
and 34 ahead of Thompson's world
record pace. Healso was 512 points
ahead of Johnson, the runner-up
with 5,955.
OBrien had the best first-day
score in decathlon history Friday,
compiling 4,698 points, 504 more
than Johnson, who was in fifth place.
O'Brien started brilliantly, pro-
ducing the top marks in each of the
fi rstthree even ts,witha trials-record
10.50secondsinthe UKVmeterdash,
25-11 in the long jump and a career-
best 54-512 in the shot put. Healso
high-jumped 6-10 1 4 and ran the
400 meters in 47.92.
Saturdav, he continued his
sparkling performances in the first
two events, running 14.23 in the
1 10-meter hurdles, the fastest in the
23-man decathlon field, and threw
the discus 156-9.
After the crushing setback in
the pole vault, O'Brien threw a ca-
reer-best 199-2 in the javelin and ran
the 1,500 meters in 4:4653, his slow-
est in two vears.
His failure to score in the vault
was Uxi much to overcome.
Meanwhile, in another stun-
ning development, Jackie Joyner-
Kersee, the former American record-
holder in the women's 100-meter
hurdles, failed to qualify for
Sunday's final.
, Joyner-Kersee, bothered by a
swollen knee, finished fifth in her
semifinal heat.
Gail Devers, the silver medalist
at the 1991 World Championshbips,
took her semifinal heat in 12.67, the
fastest by an American this year.
Gwen Torrence, already win-
ner of the women's 100 meters, ran
the fastest time by an American this
vear in winning her semifinal heat
in the 200 in 22.27.
Michael Johnson, the 1991
world champion in the men's 200
and ranked No. 1 in the world in
1990 and 1991, beat Carl Lewis, the
1984 Olympic gold medalist and
co-American record-holder, in their
first two meetings ever.
Ibnv Dees, the world leader in
the men's 110-meter hurdles, led
the advance to Sunday's final, win-
ning his semifinal heat in 13.36.
Among those joining him in the
final were twcvtime Olympic gold
medal is t Roger Kingdomand three-
time world champion Greg Foster.
Stockton breaks leg; U.S. breaks Canada
PORTLAND, Ore (AP)
lohn Stockton' broken leg and a
lackluster first half against Canada
proved that the I S Dream I earn
will not he a smtvoth-run ning ma-
chine all summer
X-rays showed that Stockton,
originally diagnosed as having a
bruised calf, has an undisplaced
fracture ol the lower leg. Stockton
will ama the rest ot the lourna-
ment ot the Americas and prob-
ably the Olympus.
Rosters for the Games in
Barcelona must be set by July 15.
Stockton was injured while the
DreamTeam was struggling in the
first half of a 1115-61 victory over
the Canadians.
While a 44-point decision
hardly can be called a cliff-hanger,
it's clear that the U.S. team plays
better with a little motivation.
Si what will it take to get the
Americans going tonight against
Panama, who beat Cuba on Mon-
day to get back in the race for the
Olympics?
We're going to take back the
canal said Charles Barkley, who
had 1� points Monday night and
has been the leading scorer for the
United States in each of its two
victories.
Whatever happens against
Panama, the Americans may have
to plav without Larry Bird (sore
back) as well as Stockton. Fortu-
nately for coach Chuck Daly,
Tatrick Ewing came back earlier
than expected from a dislocated
right thumb.
"We'll alternate Scottie
Tippen, Magic Johnson and
Michael lordan at point guard
Dalv said. "But inuries are taking
atoll
The Dream Team outshot the
Canadians 53.3 percent to 34 4 per-
cent for the game, but the Ameri-
cans managed only 47A percent
h(xting in the first half and had
just a 50-33 lead, 23 fewer than
Sunday's halftime margin against
the Cubans.
"1 expected us to not be as
sharp Dalv said. "We weren't as
emotional, Canada's size inside
gave us trouble and wedidn'tsrnxit
as well
Karl Malone scored 15 points
before fouling out with 5.10 left.
Jordan scored 14 points and Chris
Mullin and Johnson had 13 each.
Former Los Angeles Laker
Mike Smrek had 14 points and Al
Kristmanson 11 for Canada, which
was outrebounded 54-32.
' 'We battled them pretty hard
and had the game pretty close in
the first half, "Canadian coach Ken
Shields said. "We tried desper
atelv not to give them transition
opportunities. But the biggest dif-
ference with their team is that all
their guvs are runners. If vou take
a step in the wrong direction,
you're not getting that step back
The United States t(xk con-
trol early in the second half with a
15-0 run capped bv Pippen's 3-
pomter and dunk that made the
score 7146 with 14:05 left.
The Canadians played on
even terms with the Dream Team
for the next six minutes before the
Americans spurted again, taking
a 101 -59 lead with 2:48 remaining.
From Larry Bird's opening
fadeaway jumper to Clyde
Drexleysgarne-endingslamdunk,
the US. Dream Team's debut was
the overwhelming performance
everyooe expected it to be.
Wantanevenscarierthought?
David Robinson feels this team
can play better.
"We're not very familiar with
each other he said.
After just fivedays of practice,
the U.S. team played its first game
on Sunday. Game maybe is too
kind a word. There was never a
whisp of doubt about how the
contest would end.
The US. team's crushing 136-
57 victory overCuba should be the
first of a series of mismatches. To-
night it's Canada. Tuesday ifs
Panama. Next month, Barcelona.
"We're just trying to build
something now Robinson said.
"Thisis justthestartof a kmgtrek
Once Michael Jordan warms
up, the blowouts should get even
bigger.
Jordan, the consensus choice
as greatest basketball player in the
world, was just 2 for 6 from the
field and was theonfy American to
finish below the do percent mark.
Stm,theUS. won by 79 points.
The team simply is unbeat-
able in intemabonal competition,
said an awestruck Cuban coach
Miguels Calderon Gomez.
"If we speak honestlv, I think
that anvbody other than another
NBA team has nochance he said.
"As we say in Cuba, you can't
oner the sun with vour finger.
There were plenty of spec-
tacular rmments as the greatest
plavers in the world's best league
showed their stuff.
On the Americans' third pos-
session. Bird grabbed a rebound
and tossed the ball underhand to
Magic lohnstm, who made a no-
look pass to Robinson for a layup.
Four minutes into the contest,
Jordan saved the ball from going
out of bounds with a half-court,
behind-the-back pass to Bird, who
sank an 18-footer.
At the 13:45 mark, Johnson,
who was so excited at the start he
came out three players too early
during the roster introductions,
rifled a half-court pass to Charles
Barkley for a stuff.
By the time the starting lineup
of Johnson, Bird, Jordan, Barkley
and Robinson left thecourt with 12
1 2 minutes to play in the half, the
Dream Team led 27-9. It only got
worse, or better, depending on the
perspective.
In the second half, 22 of the
Americans' 25 field goals were ei-
ther dunks or layups.
'cnikindtiffeelbad'Barkley
said, "especially when ifs against
brothers of the African race
There was no sympathy from
Karl Malone, who is talking more
likeasoWiOTthanabasketball player
as the United States competes in
this week's Olympic qualifying
tournament.
"We have to win the goki and
we have to set the tone now he
said. "We're at a point now where
we can't afford to feel sorrv for
anybody. It the shoe was i n the
other f�t,vvfuchit'sbeen for years,
thev never feel stwry for us.
"How many oxmtriesever feel
sorry for the USA about anything?
So I'm at a point now where I'm
representingmvcountryarxi I sure
as hell don't feel sorry for any-
body
"1 ahvavs wanted to be in the
army he said, "and this is the
closest I 'm going to get .1' m going to
take advantage of it"
Robinson savs it is incredible
to be on the receiving end of passes
from plavers like Johnson and
Stockton "You play with gu-s who
are talented normally Robinson
said, "but these guys see through
little holes in the wall and they get
the ball to you through those little
holes in the wall
Fore!
Photo by Dall Rd � Tha Baal Carolinian 3
Golfers from all over Pitt County get valuable practice time at Big Splash. One of the goals of some golfers
is to hit the ball to the other side of the pond � which is not easy. Give it a try sometime.
NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
Would like to
Welcome The Summer Students
and
Invite You to Join Us In Worship
Campus Mass Schedule
Summer Sessions May 19-July 28
Sunday: 11:30am and 8:30pm at the Newman Center
Weekdays: 8;00am at the Newman center
Wednesdays: 8:00am and 5:30pm
For More information about these and other programs, call or visit
the Center daily between 8:30am and 11:00pm
953 East 10th St. (At the Foot of College Hill)
757-0376757-1991
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain & Campus Minister
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 1, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 01, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.883
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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