The East Carolinian, May 27, 1992






Had credit � a big problem 4
Should the government denv student's right to an education?
Cavedogs
No label is better than Alternative.
5
SJje i�uBt (ftamittuatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Voi .66 No.29
Wednesday, May 27. 1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5.000
8 Pages
Graduations
around the nation:
The Cos'does stand-up
. Bill (!osb) set a
� . � iduation at the Univer-
sity ' indat( 'ollegePark by tell
ing .�� ites the) should getarefund
education because the univer-
� prepare them for the bad oh
ket the) are up against
s unconventional speech to
graduates earned him laughs
eers as well as an honorary
dH legree in tine arts.
Mister Rogers live
Rtigers spoke to graduates at
tli' iversityot Pennsylvania
i beautiful dav in this
neighborhooi I
ites thai the real
ista iand oi make-
believe and that the job market is grim
tor r. ent graduates'
UNC-G bre.iks record
Ihe University ot orth I arolina at
eensbon i record number ot
luates participating in their hHHh
comment ement this vear with 1,750 un-
dergraduate and 601 graduate students.
V re than 9 500 people (oined the
2,300 graduates in listening to a retired
universit) presidentg vea movingand
hope-filled speech.
laettner comes up short
Duke university basketball i.r
stjan Laettner was allowed to par-
. ite in this ,ear s spring commence-
ment, he did not have enough academic
hi lurs to complete his degree.
Officials said Laettner was one dass
short of (ompleting hi decree program.
Laettner was not available tor com-
ment, hut university officials said it is
quite normal tor students who are only
within, a few hours of their degree to be
allowed u partk ipateinconvnencernent
ceremonies
International house ousts students
By Jett Becker
Assistant Sews 1 ditoi
Editor's Not � I . i
ing is a two part artu le ' he
continuatit n will run in next
week's e titi m )
At the end ot the first
mer sessii in ECU's Interna-
tional House will permanently
Close Its doors to residents t,
make room tor administrative
ottu es
Since 1974 the Intemati
1 louse has sen ed asbotha dorm
and a muitii ultural ei
where students from around the
world tome togethi i ti earn
live eat and sleep Because of a
shortage oi space, the building
will be i onverted to the hi
quarters ot the department of
International Programs.
�V ording to Inez Fridle
director of student services, in-
ternational students now must
live in the dorms or off-campus.
She said the department ot Resi-
dent Housing has already re-
ceived 5( I1 more applications tor
on-campus housing than thev
in.u commodate, and theshort-
age nt dorm rooms has caused
pn hlems in dealing with inter-
national students.
"1 think tor the next two
vears it is going to he difficult
because we are going to have
international students coming
in, but weare reallv not going to
have anv place to house them
Fridlev said. "We have resen ed
sime suites in IMk to provide
temporary, over-night housing
until thev find a place to live "
Slav and Umstead dormito-
ries closed last spring for reno-
vations. Fridlev said the dorms
will reopen as a single residence
hall in two vears, and a wing of
the new Slav I mstead complex
mav he dedicated to interna-
tional students.
e have talked about pro-
gramming the building so that a
portion it it might be reserved
tor those students v ho want to
live in .n international erw lron-
ment, both students form North
Carolina and the States as well
as international students
Fridlev said.
According to Lucy Wright,
assistant dean of students, the
International House closed be-
cause the division of Academic
Affairs wanted to designate a
place tor International Pro-
grams, currently located in
Brewster. She said the offices
will bring together several in-
ternational programs including
International Studies, Interna-
tional Affairs and the Stud)
Abroad program. These pro-
grams will then come under the
supen isionofa single director
I he director will reportdt-
rectlv to the vice chancellor of
a ademic affairs Wright said.
! hree people have been inter-
viewed for the job, and the po-
sition should be tilled by the
end of the summer
Wright said there will be
offices upstairs, and the large
reception area downstairs will
remain open for studentand fac-
ulty functions that were carried
out at the international House
However, she said the entire
building mav become offices if
space for the various interna-
tional programs becomes
sparse
Wright, who has worked
with the house since Wni, said
the house also gae the interna-
tional student community an
identifying space on campus.
"Down the road it would be
a very heaithv thing to have a
designated space tor interna-
tional students on our campus
Wrieht said, "l think there is
some interest in doing that, but
right niw weareo pressed with
space while the two dorms are
closed we cannot do that until
we get past this point '
Chancellor
will stay in
Greenville
By Marjorie Pitts
Stiff Writer
photo by Di
Th� Eat: Carolinian
Another day in the life
The beginning of a school session has begun with the sure signs ot students paying for parking tickets Get
it done now before records are tagged
Chancellor Richard Eakin decidedMonday to take
his name from consideration for the presidency at the
University of Akron
"I have notified officials at the University of Akron
that it is my intention to remain at Last L arouna Lniver-
sify as chancel-
lor Eakin said in
a prepared state-
ment. "Over the
past week, my
wife and I have
concluded that
we wish to con-
tinue with our
work at FCL Ex-
pressions of con-
cern and support
trom throughout
Eastern North
Carolina pla ed
an important role
in our decision.
Chancellor Richard Eakin
Mulitcultural center opens to
bring ethnic understanding
Over 40 cultures represented
Financial aid
credit check
raises student
controversy
Bv Tony Rogers
Staff Writer
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
A center dedicated lo promot-
ing ethnic understanding opened
last month in Greenville.
More than 350 people at-
tended the East Carolina
Multicultural C enter's opening
ceremony on April 13 in the
Greenville Hilton. The purpose
of the ECMC is to bring informa-
tion dealing with all the different
cultures that exist in this region
to one central location. In Titt
county, more than 40 different na-
tionalities are represented, imply-
ing that information dealing with
another persons native customs
can always be expressed.
Mohammed Ahad, founder of
the ECMC, began the ceremony
by addressing ways in which the
ECMC can benefit students in col-
lege, high school, and even grade
school Ahad also mentioned how
the ECMC would be useful to the
business community regarding
EASTERN
CAROLINA
information relating to interna
tional trade
Barry Gaskins,
a Public Informa-
tion Director,
supports Ahad -
views dealing
with educational
issues.
"Cultural di-
versity can only
accent the educa-
tion process by
making each and every student
more informed and aware about
the world in which they live
Gaskins said.
Javier Castillo expressed
ways in which businesses could
profit from the system offered.
"The Eastern Carolina
Multicultural Center can be a re-
source for businessmen where
they can find information about
countries in which they are inter-
ested in conducting business
Mayor Nancy Jenkins said
the ECMC would create harmony
TETURAL
CENTER
within the community. "Such
an understanding is conductive
to peace, progress
and happiness of
the people of the
region she said.
Jenkins cut
the ribbon and
congratulated
Ahad and the
board members.
She also pro-
claimed the week
of April 27-May 1 as
Multicultural week and encour-
aged the city to participate in
the week's activities.
The ECMC will sponsor
events that are taking place in
upcoming months.
Anlndian Eilm Festival will
be held on July 10 at the
Mendenhall Student Center, and
an educational program titled
"Multicultural Knowledge Im-
plications for the Future" will
be shown in September.
Students rece: v mg financial aid suffered
a major set back when a provision passed
through Congress requiring all students re-
ceiving federal financial aid to pass a credit
check before receiving any money.
The controversial provision, which
passed in the Emergency Unemployment
Act last fall, went into effect last October but
the Department of Education has yet to set
up regulations to enforce the new law.
"I hope thev are not going to be too strict
about what will pass said Erin Becker, a
senior art educahon major, "lean see coming
down on someone who doesn't pay their
bills, but denying money for every bad check
will put a lot of people in jeopardy. It scares
me to know that a mistake I made years ago
could still hurt me tixiay
"It depends on what they're looking
for said Josh Lesniak, a junior art major.
"I'm not really worned about it, though
Steve Baxley, a senkr in the communi-
cation department, agrees with the
government's nght to investigate any pos-
sible credit risks.
"If you're 21 and you have a history ot
bad credit, the government has a right to
know about it he said. "As long as you
See Financial, page 3
Eakin was
cine of the top
three choices tor the position. In Akron, Eakin received
support from the university's department heads and
deans. He traveled to Akron Mav 1S and 1 to intjerv lew
with university officials.
The University oi Akron's enrollment is 28,00ft
making it the third largest state-assisted university on
Ohio.
Before coming to ECU in 1987, Eakin spent 23 years
at Bow ling C.reen in Ohio as the school's vice president.
Eakin said in a telephone interview cm Tuesday,
"I'm nvidv to get on w'lth nuking Fast Camlina Univer-
sity better thaneer
Textbook costs
continue to rise
Who is to blame?
By Kimberly Williams
SUH Vnt�r
ou spent $180 cm your tethcxk for spnng se-
mester. Now, as vou leave the Kvkstore buvback line,
you are hokl ing $27 and three txxks you will never use
again. You want to know who to blame for this
The dilemma over the high pnees and the inability
to sell back college textbooks rages on here on this
campus, as well as on campuses all over the country.
Students blame the bookstores, bookstores blame the
publishers, and publishers want to make a profit
"1 bought a book for summer school for $60, and I
already know I'm going to have buy the new edition in
the fall' said Pauline Swan, a junior majonng in nurs-
ing. "I feel like 1 just threw away $60
Liz Veytia, textbook manager for University Book
Exchange, said the blame should not fall on the book-
stores. "We are not responsible for setting the pnees;
See Books, page 3





She EaatOIaroltnianMay 27, 1992
2 tXbe fcaatiiaronntan may, wv
First-term drug offenders could lose financial aid
C- . . , , . t. norrait were receiving i
Books
No mo
B Karen Neustadt
m Diana Smith
(GPS) Smoking dope could
, ost college students in more ways
than one mw Under a new gen
ernrnent polio tiu' couldbebarred
from receiving federally financed
loans and grants if convicted crfdrug
possession 01 traffu king
rhe Denial o( Federal Benefits
ram unvnth beingpublkized
�n L S college campuses, gives
es the discretkn of putting stu-
Iruf iers or tr.ittu kers in a
� i�� in list that excludes them
r, more than 450 ben-
� tnclud ng loans or grants from
� federal government
What c re hoping to do is
ii .��� drug use said Polly
Williams a spokeswoman tor the
t partment of Justice We rehop-
mg it will act as a deterrent
However, some student advo-
cates argue that the program son. es
no purpose by denying drug users
an education Ihev also i riticized
the effort as President Bush's at-
tempt h present a tough, anti-drug
image without doing anything sub-
stantial about the problems of
chemicaJ dependency.
It is me ultimate contradiction
to deny people who need rehabili-
tation funding for tneir education'
said Erk C oppohno, editor ot the
Suite L ruversity ot New Nork Stu-
dent Leader, an activist student
new s sen ice. " R r i me thing, it sim-
ply allows rich kids to take all the
drugs they want.
rhe United States Student As-
sociated in Washington has lobbied
against the program, said Selena
Dong, legislative director.
"We're on a slippery slope
siitl IXuig, who noted that an anti-
drug use waiver now accompanies
all Pall t Irani applications.
"What's next? You'll be denied
benefits if you engaged in premari-
tal sex?" she asked.
Ihe program was part of the
Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988. After
bush gave Ihe department the go
ahead in 1990, the Justice Depart
ment established guidelines and
informed statecourtsabout the pro-
gram With a system m place, the
lustice Department has launched a
national awareness campaign
In fact, the government has
hired a New York public relations
tirm to target campuses through-
out the nation, said Brenda Bur-
rows, an account manager for
Saatchi &Saatihi
"We'll use direct mail and pub-
licity Burrows sa id. "We'll be work
ing with the SChools,alsoon and
radio to let everybody know about
it"
Among the federal benefits that
could be jeopardized by a drug con-
viction are student loans and grants,
federal aircraft and maritime li-
censes, the nght to prescribe medi-
cineor contract with the federal gov-
ernment, Benefits such .is Soda! Se-
curity, retirement and for long-term
drug treatment are exempt
"Most drug offenders never
serve prison terms and simple pro-
bation of fines are often not suffi-
cientas punishment Assistant At-
torney General Jimmv Gurule said
in announcing the program.
"We'reconvinced that thedrug
user is an important link in the
nation's drug problem C.urule
said. "All users must be held a
countable for their actions if the
problem is to be eradi. at�-d " Jhis
program is part of the
administration's national drugcon-
trol Strategy, which is designed to
attack thenation'sdrugprobtemon
multiple tn nts, in a comprehensive
manner
Williams said the names of
people who were convicted of felo-
nies sluh as rape or robbery prob-
ably could be ,Mt to the deter-
ment list, but she didn't think it was
,i common practice. Ihe denial of
federal benefits is aimed primarily
at first-time offenders in lieu ot
prison terms, she said.
I Hiring the 1989-90sch n i year,
4 s. million undergraduates, or 29.2
percent were receiving tin.ii I Continued from page 1
according to the most recent .
bytreNationalCerrteriorl I �
statistics
Because this is nearly
ery three undergraduate �
live is expected tohave.
on L s campuses
Dong said the prograj
Dt unfairness
"ltis unfair to low-im mi . �
and hurting people who need
rial aid Dong said, ad linj
cation is me lifeblood of pi
futures
rhe program allows for
nial of benefits for drug user I
tn li I years I ?rugtraffk b i
could be suspended up to :
for the first offense, 10 yeai i
secortd offense and perrnana dy for
a fhird conviction
I ra
DISCOVER
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
Black 'cro-J
box
The
CoMedY
ZONE
i
Incsda)
NYhi
ATiTIC
7S8 7J03 I S0� I. Jth it
Thursday, May 28
The '
CoMedY
ZONE
v
�0
5 HIGo,
M4�11'
EVERYTHING
lo 2oz i'i.iiiC !hyl.iill)c MciuK-i Wuv-
Friday. May 29
�. � AST POWERH
S2-32 O l Hull
Saturday. May 30
i
Nil
758-4251
09 CHARLES BUZD
NOW OTtN TO MIPNICtfT FIUP4Y AND TJPAV
ThE
rEMBERS
� . . I Music'
S2-32 tw Draft
Friday, June 5
S E X
POLICE
S2-32 oz Draft
Greenville
Aquarium's
MEMORIAL DAY SALE
DESSERT
rrrrm
CANASTER FILTERS
MODEL 220
$79.99
MODEL 350
$99.99
i
Whisper
Power Filters i
L "
Make-Your-Own
ICE CREAM
. SUNDAES
musics
W���$90�cW
ON SALE
��!?
.ndet3'
lAettf
Sponsored h the ECU Student Union Inductions ton
MARMBAM)
MAGNUM
s
PlantaStlCS aquarium plants
SUPER
SPECIALS
THRU-OUT
6' REG 1 89 NOW .99 THE
9-REG 2.99 NOW 1.49 STORE
. . 12- REG 4 59 NOW 2.29
15-REG 5 99 NOW 2.99
18-REG 6 59 NOW 3.59
CLASSICS NIGHT
LADIES $1.00
.����� � � �
V
Ptantastics
SALE ENDS SUNDAY MAY 31st
pXfc��-W
HOURS
M-F 11-9
UNIVERSITY CENTER SAT 10-9 77-0056
14TH& CHARLES STREET SUN 1-6 ' �
$3.00 Admission
$2.50 Ice teas &
Bahama Mamas
75c Jello Shots
75c Kamikazes
$2.50 Pitchers
$1.00 Domestics
50c jello Shots
75c Kamikazes


n

- . .

� in charge of the
im said about 200 books were
thesvstemattheendof
Get it ri I
Get itstra
Get it toll
Get it sol
Get it
Get it i
Get it a
Gct-
Jlic Eat
Carolini
Financial
'inued from page 1


e i-I
i



-

th.n -� eive


, . IP
cracl :in in
StAldi
problem is thai sow
nent
Kesaid i amattei m-
dinatiwoftrx I i ,�nt
. � said " -
iempkyment c
credit checks dkw tsa
heckof a lot ot money she said
� u the provision will kv
repealed b) the Higher Education
Reauthorizatksn Act this summer
Both houses oi the Senate
passed the Highei Education
ReauthoriationActearlierttibyeai
an unless Preskkwt Bush follows
foioughctr��atetovetothebiU,H
should go mto effect sometime be-
fore uh 4. 1992.

30d





May27. 1992 ullje �ast (TarDlinian 3
icial aid
Books
No more graduating in four years for students
tandalaid,
�. iiit survey
duacation
'tif initia-
� it impact
stm ka
me people
Ht tirun-
g Edu- I
� people s
w - k� the de-
-i rv tor one
benefits
five years
. ears tor a
lenth fot
firmed from page 1
tfcjrf
e
Medt
; :one
,My28
Vl
Friday, May 29
THE
TMBERS
musics
THURSDAY
LADES 51.00
S2.50 Pitchers
SI.00 Domestics
50c Jello Shots
75c Kamikazes
� - , ublishers are sh said
tia said the bookstores re
u inc !im prices and
� I I prk es and then the
i es its books a nrd
- rr to bin as man
iook as possible so ttv sru
possible
'�hi- �aid the pet usl
m iiMi Kxk. w htilesalers
� buvbacks
e tia said she think- theprob
th the professors
uldtalktotheprofes
thi said
� � b able to change
semestei
i udingY'evtu
should implement a
tou text
three i
.in, - '
rudentStxres said

hatv hen: � ool
� s on the m -

s.thooks thereby
. the new text-
By Iracy lord
sutt Writer
With more classes to choose
from and the rising costs ol tuition,
it i- becominghardei for students to
graduate in tout e,rs
1 ighteen percent of the 1I
students who entered as freshman
in 1987 graduated in tour years
according to Claudia McCann se-
nior associate of the planning anil
institutional research department
Forty-three percent graduated in
ti e vears
' lot ol people tune trans-
ferred to other unh ei sities
Mc ann said, rransfei students
andnon traditional studentsarenol
figured into tte pen entage
Forh threepen tudents
wl d publk uni ersities in
SOgra uated h lW Main fa
tribute to this figure.
U guess is a lot of it has tod i
u mge of majoi said
Uv ann - ire look
� at a five veat y
! lucked out getting a
needed
itedin
� . . , Ms
ami I
usually took IS to 1" hours each
semester
Summer school and heavy
course loads are the answer for
many -tudents wanting to gradu-
ate in the traditional tour vears.
1arv lllen lanham, a recent
graduate, said " 1 he only reason 1
graduated on time i- because of
summer school
Students often comptainabout
the problems with the ability ot
receh ingthe lassestheyneedeach
semester during registration, so
they putott taking those classes for
a semester or two.
Senior Chris FeUds said that he
would probably graduate in five
vears. "The first two years I had
trouble getting thei lasses I needed,
then 1 got a job
Another problem with gradu-
ating in four vears is the schools
such as music, art, theater and edu-
cation. "Generally it's the rule ot
thumb that it takes five vears to
graduate from music said Mich-
elle Shular, a voice education ma or
who is graduating in tour years
with IS hours of summer school
and at least lh hours a semester.
"At mv first advising sess:on,
thev told me 1 had to take IS hours
a semester to graduate in four
vears Shularsaid. I know people
who took 21 hour- .i semester
It a student does not enter
schools like musu when they are
freshmen, they have no chance of
getting out on time
� 1 don t think a lot o schools
count in years anymore, there's so
man options Md ann said.
( Hherunn. ersities tun ehad the
,me low graduation rates
According to Thel "���� � � d,the
l ni versify of New frleans-Louisi-
ana student paper, 25.9 penent ot
1984 freshman graduated in five
ears, 37 b percent at Arizona State,
47 4 percent at Florida State and 65
percent at the University off alifor-
nia at lierkle
r
JraNSTjlNIfANS!
k finite trend toward
� boons coming out
- . used
�; ovit e
more
� very
(text
� bO k
j
Get it right,

MAY
28
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Concessions � Pro shop � Video games
Bring this coupon for:
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00 E. 14th St Greenville, NC 830-17 59
Peninsula Pilots j f
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igb
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� who is in v harge of the
� d ih ut2D0bookswere
� thesvstemattheend of
Get it straight,
Get it told,

Get it sold,
Get it said,

Get it read,
u
Get it all,
Get-
TJieEast
Carolinian
m
NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
Ascension Thursday, May 28, Mass Schedule
Wednesday, May 27, Vigil Mass 5:30 PM
Ascension Thursday, May 28
8:00 AM 12 NOON 5:30PM
m
This Summer at THE FIZZ
Get Upside Down with
$1 Upside Down Margaritas
$1 Domestics
Every Wednesday S1 House Highballs Evry Thursday
10 pm until 1 am 50c and S1 Dratts C00KJ�V?
PERCUSION JAM Wednesday 11 am-2am 0WN STEAK
bring your own drum & on the Patio
join in
m
Regular Summer Session Schedule
Sunday: 11:30 AM and S:30 PM
Weekdays: 8:00 AM
Wednesdays: 5:30 PM
All Masses are at die
Newman Center, 953 E. 10th St
For more infurmiuion about tbese nd otbe programs, call
or visit the Center daily between 8:30 am and 11:00 rm
1 r. Paul Vuelb. Chaplain and Campus Minister
953 East 10th St (at the foot ot College Hill)
757-3760 757-1991
At the FIZZ,
on the Patio
$2.95 f�r�T��gs (
ngf ext'3
$2.50 Pitchers (Mon-Thurs.)
110 E. 4th St. �752-5855
Financial
SPEND SUMMER SCHOOL IN MEXICO
� nued from page 1
��
- reai
eceivedsome
�i-tinu' Roi(
. ial aid di-
� about a quar-
21oroldei
teima, the de
m arJon lus given
the finan ial .iul i I
. with business as
� dil ta students
think will be eligible for
she s.mi ' ov
.t have to t.kf .i chance
ts will receive federal
ither th.m penalize every-
Murphy, .i spokesman
. partment of Edu a-
� . �llege Press Service
emment is attempting to
. town on the $3 billion in
, loan defaults in 1991.
-problem is that somestu-
ents will not pro kierepayment
. iaid It'sallairatterolecononv
t a Dong, legislative coor
� fthel rutedStatesStudent
. said the credil -b.nk
yvas added because the
Unemploymeni Ad
� pass throughongress
I payed for il �
Fhe credit t h ksck m't sa e .i
. .i ,i lot of money she said,
erully the provision will be
repealed by the Higher Education
riatioo Act this summer
th houses of the Senate
passed the Higher Education
Ke.tuthonatuHiAitearlierthisvear
and unless President Bush follows
through on threats ui veto the bill, it
Should go into effect sometime he-
tore lul' 4, 1992.


n8
o
CTQ

djt� KK
-Qt
7p tA'
The East Carolinian
For More Information Call:
(919)757-6356
I-
I
I
I
I
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Dairq
Queen
WELCOME TO THE NEW
DAIRY QUEEN
OF GREENVILLE
located behind Blockbuster Video
321-0119
SMALL BLIZZARD
offer good until June 30, 1992
one coupon per customer, per visit
Cool Down cV Relax
with an ice cold
Margarita
or enjoy these
Drink Specials
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M nday
Draft 95
Tuesday
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Thursday
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May27, 1992 ultje East (Carolinian 3
icial aid
Hvialaid,
- nt urvev
duacauon
on in ev-
�s the iniha-
� it impact
tm smacks
� people
i tinan-
g Edit-
� people's
for the de-
rs tor one
kers benefits
five wars
, ears for a
anentiv tor
The
Co VedY
May 28
,Miy�
THE
DtSStR
s. mmitiee
THURSDAY
LADIES $1.00
S2.50 Pitchers
ST.00 Domestics
50c Jello Shots
75c Kamikazes
Books
No more graduating in four years for students
Continued from page 1
Kxk publishers are she said
evtia said the bookstores re
� w mg list prices and
tail prk es and thenthe
be kstore prices its books .u cord-
We ilso tr to hu as man)
as ptssible so trv stu
- besl pri f-ihlt1
Shi iaid the get ued
lesaters
� uvbacks.
. . thii iks theprob-
tiie profess
d talk I the profes-
rhe jhesaid
!hc In t be able to change
. sfcer
e,ii �cluding evtia
lement .i
� fessorstousetext
ist three vears
irne texl
dentSti res
.� i iuses problems
. �
lid that when the!
Bv Tracy Ford
SUtt Writer
With more classes to choose
from and the rising costs of tuition,
it is be, oming harder tor students ti)
graduate in tour iir
Eighteen percent ot the EC I
students who entered as freshman
in 1987 graduated in tour vears,
according tolaudia Mc ann, se
nior associate ot the planning and
institutional research department
Fortv three percent graduated in
tiv e years
� lot ot people have trans-
ferred to other universities
Mc ann said, rransfer students
andnon traditional students arenot
figured into the percentage
Fort threepercenti fstudents
wb ed public uni ersities in
graduated b lSti M.in fac-
i ontribute to this figure.
M truess is .i l 't i 1 it has to do
u f majoi
V lot of people ai
it ,i five vear graduation rate
1 lu( ked i ' l the

ated in
tool i e Mm rrx
usually took 15 to 17 hours each
semester
Summer school and heavy
course loads are the answer for
many students wanting to gradu-
ate in the traditional four vears.
Man. Ellen Linham, a recent
graduate, said, "Ihe onlv reason I
graduated on time is because of
summer s�.rux4
Students often complain about
the problems with the ability of
rei eivingmei lassestheyneedeadh
semester during registration, so
they put off taking those classes for
a semester or two
Seniort hrisFeilds said that he
would probably graduate in five
vears. "The first two years 1 had
trouble getting thee lasses 1 needed,
then 1 got a job
Another problem with gradu-
ating in four years is the schools
such as music, art, theater and edu-
cation. Cenerallv it's the rule of
thumb that it Likes five vears to
graduate from music said Mich-
elle Shular, a voice education maor
who is graduating in four vears
with H hours of summer school
and at least lb hours a semester.
"At mv first advising session,
thev told me 1 had to take 18 hours
a semester to graduate in four
years Shular said. "1 know people
who took 21 hours a semester
If a student does not enter
schools like musii when thev are
troshmen, thev have no chance of
getting out "on time "
"1 don't think a lot of schools
count in years anymore, there's so
manv options, Mc ann said.
( Hherunivervitieshavehadthe
same low graduation rates
Acci niing to The Driftwomi, the
University of Mew rteans-Louisi-
,ina student paper, 153 penent of
lsH4 freshman graduated in five
years, 37.6 percent at Arizona State,
47 4 percent at Honda state ,ind 66
penent at the University of Califor-
nia at Berkley.
KINSTCNjINDIANSl
I ne
and I
the i lew text
- -
� �� � ard

ms come out e
more
ver
fessor in
� i text
. -
not
! the


the
�the high
v ampus
. . , .
t is m charge oi the
.� I about 200 books were
� �� . tern at the end of

Financial
Continued from page 1
� nothing
caved
al aid di-
� uta quar-
I
ma, the de-
m tia given
� nam taJ aid of-
� vvith busmess as
Get it right,
Get it straight,
Get it told,
Get it sold,
Get it said,
i Get it read,

Get it all,
Get-
UteEast
Carolinian
l
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ECU SPECIAL1,
THIRSTY THURSDAY I
; for all 12 oz. beverages �
MAY
28
INDIANS
vs. i
Peninsula Pilots j
GAME TIME 7:00 PM
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1-800-334-5467 I
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Indoor BaseballSoftball Bating Range
Full Court Basketball with Slam Goals
Concessions � Pro shop � Video games
Bring this coupon for:
Buy one get one FREE or
10 DISCOUNT on Slam Ball
100 E. 14th St Greenville, NC 830-17 59
$1.00
ADMISSION
Thursday Night
wth this coupon
r
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Daily Special $3.60
complete meal
sent ad for free dessert with meal
� I Kckinson and k.ilcigh Ave
ti'l N M N-FRJ 6:30 am-7 -
mil
NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
Ascension Thursday, May 28, Mass Schedule
Wednesday, May 27, Vigil Mass 5:30 PM
Ascension Thursday. May 28
8:00 AM 12 NOON 5:30 PM
m
Regular Summer Session Schedule
Sunday: 11:30 AM and 8:30 PM
Weekdays: 8:00 AM
Wednesdays: 5:30 PM
All Masses are at the
Newman Center, 953 E. 10th St
r:or more tnfurmauon aboot these and otter programs, call
or visit the Center daily between 8:30 am and 11:00 pm
It. Paul Vaelb. Chaplain and Campus Minister
953 Fast 10th $L (at the foot ot College Hill)
757-3760 757-1991
This Summer at THE FIZZ
Get Upside Down with
$1 Upside Down Margaritas
Si Domestics
Etwy Wednesday Sl House Highballs EwryThuray
10 pm until 1 am 50c and S1 Drafts CCX)K YOUR
PERCUSION JAM Wednesday 11 am-2am OWN STEAK
bring your own drum & on the ai
join in j $2.95 f
At the FIZZ,
$2.50 Pitchers (Mon-Thurs.)
110 E. 4th St. �752-5855
SPEND SUMMER SCHOOL IN MEXICO
a

OQ
. redit to students
�ink will be eBga tor
� ihesaid "Now
tke a chance
trwt rudente � ; re eive ksdeai
ither than penalize evety-
-
Murphy, a p-ke-man
' �� partment of Edu i
. tilege Press Service
femment us attempting to
the $3.6 hilhon in
t loan defaults in 1991.
he pn hlem is that some Stu-
dents will n 't pn v iderepayment
hesaid "It's alia matter of econom-
s
. lena I long, legislative coor-
atorofthel nitedStatesSrudent
�id the credit checli
r was added because the
. Unemployment Ad
I not pass throughongress
i . payed fcw itself.
rhe credit checks don'tsavea
eel a a lot of money, she said
Hopefully, the provision will be
repealed bv the Higher Education
in. .n,ition Ai t this sumrrv-r
Both houses ot the Senate
passed the Higher Fdutation
Reauthi riA�tn n Aitearlierthis year
and unless President Rush follow-
through on threats to veto the bill, it
should go into effect sometime be-
fore lul- 4.1�W2.

5
Q
'ir
p A"

4
The East Carolinian
For More Information Call:
(919)757-6366
��
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Dairq
Queen
WELCOME TO THE NEW
DAIRY QUEEN
OF GREENVILLE
located behind Blockbuster Video
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(K OFF SMALL BLIZZARD
offer good until June 30,1992
one coupon per customer, per visit
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or enjoy these
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Monday
DaH9St
Tuesday
SaiignaSl 2s
Wednesday
Mexican imports SI 25
Thursday
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vou're not thirsty,
let's Munch Out!
Bu One Appetizer
Get Second
of equal or lesser vatm
tor 12 price
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Buy One Lunch
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ot equui or tesser �a.r
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Cotanche Street, 757-1666





�lje Saat Carolinian
Smmg fte East Carolina campus community since 1925
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Julie Roscoe, News Editor
Jeff Becker, Asst. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Joseph Horst, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Robert Todd, Assistant Sports Editor
Chas Mitch'l, Copy Editor
Bill Walker, Copy Editor
Adam Roe, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Locke Monroe, Classified Advertising Technician
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925. emphasizing informauon that -ActaECU
students The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 cop.es every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view JLetters should be
UntdUowordsorl
for publication Letters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian, Publication. Bldg ECU. Greenville. N.C
27858-4353. For more information, call (919)757-6366
Opinion
Page 4, Wednesday, May 27, 1992
New aid retrictions hurt students
One thing that college graduates have
been notoriously good for in recent years
pertains to paying back college loans. They
don't do it.
The government has taken a step they
hope will curtail the non-return rate, in the
form of a credit check. Prospective students
with a bad history of paying debts may find
themselves denied an opportunity for edu-
cation.
Or perhaps any history will be held
against the student. Though the provision
passed through congress in the Emergency
Unemployment Act in October, the Depart-
ment of Education has still set no guide-
lines. This evinces a typical problem of our
legislative system and the state of education
in America today. Solutions are constantly
proposed without being thoroughly con-
sidered, examined or tested. Any measure
taken is considered an answer.
Energy would be better spent finding
ways to enforce delinquent repayment than
casting strikes against a teenager who had
trouble balancing a checkbook, or whatever
criteria may be employed. Even an incom-
ing student with a clean record will be
branded with an inquiry, and that is cer-
tainly no help.
Our entire financial aid program needs
serious restructuring and revamping to func-
tion smoothly. Hassles and red tape are too
regular for the student needing assistance,
and this is very often the student who wants
the education the most. Tacking on a credit
check to a thoroughly flawed system can
not make it suddenly work.
Graduates have a responsibility to re-
pay what got them there, with money or
perhaps preferably service that befits their
education. But let us not judge the college
scholar by the novice high-schooler.
Entertainment
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Bush: Not gonna speak correctly
By Scott
Maxwell
Editorial
Columnist
ANt FlaJAUV, A SVSTEAA &mAN7��t
To fNSHRE RETURM OF
COLLEGE. LOANS
Esse Quam Videri
guments
By
Parker
Editorial
Columnist
As if the newly recharged ten-
sions concerning civil rights weren't
fun enough, this year also offers the
impending overturning of Roe r.
Wade And with each confrontation
between pro-life and pro-choice
groups, angers flare more and the
country divides further.
Many of the pro-lifers have in-
genious rhetoric One nationally aired
commercial shows a group of happy
adopted kids, the results of
unplanned or unwanted pregnancies.
What the commerci-l doesn't show
is the much larger number of un-
wanted children who live in severe
poverty and look forward to a life of
mental and physical abuse. The self-
proclaimed moralists don't do much
in the way of defending mem.
Most pro-choice advocates
have an equally effective but skewed
argument for their cause. Often
fronted by groups like NOW, the
prime defense is usually for a
"woman's right to choose turning
the debate into more of a civil rights
issue. It's not. Women would have to
be asexually reproducing creatures
and an outside doctor not be involved
for that to be accurate.
The actual issue, which people
used to discuss before it became a
defining point for extremist political
ideologies, is whether a person is be-
ing killed. That philosophical ques-
tion is what makes thechoice so hard,
and what may make our court opt for
the easier out of putting the decision
in the state courts' hands.
When is consciousness
achieved? Does it come when a new-
born is technically "bom or during
some point of conception? Is the po-
tential for individuality the same
thing as being an individual? Catho-
lic orthodoxy traces the potential all
the way back to the sperm (hence no
condoms), which still oddly allows
for the "deaths" of millions even in
fertilization. Pro-life advertisements
often show visuals of fully formed
fetuses to dissuade abortionists, and
there is no apparent physical differ-
ence between the embryo and result-
ing baby (though incidentally, very
few abortions are actually performed
at that point).
In other words, the issue is far
more complicated and deserving of
actual discussion than the billboard
generalizations of "baby-killing" and
"its my body" auow. With the re-
moval of special interest groups, the
divided public might discover it has
more common ground than is appar-
ent. A majority of both groups may
be mostly opposed to abortion as
mere birth control, and can take steps
towards preventing that. Perhaps
abortion could be forbidden only in
the third trimester, where the call
becomes toughest to make.
What? A compromise on this
fundamentally dividing issue? Surely
1 can't be suggesting such a thing.
Well yes, I am. Without more toler-
ance and at least a semblance of un-
derstanding between the hostile par-
ties, our nation faces an unending
inner conflict that will continue to
pull apart our leadership, our fami-
lies, and to some extent, our society.
On a purely legislative note,
the expectation of our current con-
servative Supreme Court to overturn
the ruling destroys the "room for ide-
alism" notion that comes with per-
manent appointment of judges. If an
untouchable judicial body isn't free
from political struggle, then our na-
tional aspiration for a common jus-
tice has a bleak future.
One thing is a certainty: if tile
Rehnquist court throws the ball back
in the hands of state government
now after twenty years of the stand-
ing law, "unrest" will not qualify as
a description for the localized battles
to come. X
I don't normally complain in
print about abuses of the English lan-
guage, for two reasons First, it's like
shooting fish in a barrel, these days,
the English language is so badly
abused by so many people that it's
actually embarrassingly easy to write
a column on the subject.
Second, mere's always some-
thing of more immediate importance,
something mat needs to be written
about this week. People will still be
saying "incidence" instead of "inci-
dent" next week; but who knows
whether they'll remember Adnan
Kashoggi that long?
But I read a book this weekend
that concentrated a lot of language-
mangling in one place, and so here I
am, complaining in printabout abuses
of the English language The book is
Bushisms, compiled by the editors of
The New Republic. It's a collection of
some of President Bush's unscripted
comments, many of them made at
press conferencesand campaign stops
A "Bushism for those of you who
don't read the magazine, is one of the
president's characteristic mutilations
of the language. Examples will fol-
low
Used properly, language evokes
strong visual images, often through
the use of metaphors, which sharpen
and clarify our thinking. Used slop-
pily, language simply sounds impres-
sive and means nothing at all, or means
something different from what one
speaker intends, or even, in many
cases, means two contradictory things
at once. Sloppy speech indicates
sloppy or duplicitous thinking.
George Bush has an unparal-
leled ability to use language in this
way, to seem to say something with-
out actually saying anything. For ex-
ample, he almost invariably mixes his
metaphors, indicating that he has no
clear mental image to convey. Those
metaphors he doesn't mix, he mis-
uses, much like the infamous Ms.
Malaprop. No one can be expected to
speak perfect English, but Bush's
speech is awful beyond belief. Let me
give you some examples:
"Please don't ask me to do mat
which I've just said I'm not going to
do, because you're burning up time,
the meter is running through the sand
on you, and 1 am now filibustering "
'The Democrats want to ram it
down my ear in a political victory
'1 don't want to get, you know,
here we are close to the election �
sounding a knell of overconfidence
that I don't feel
"You've got to sha ke them (ca n-
bou) away with a stick
All of these quotes, by the way,
are directly from the book, which also
gives dates and contexts for the state-
ments. Since our concern here is only
with the language use, I have omitted
the contextual information.
More often, Bush is simply in-
comprehensible: "High tech is potent,
precise, and in the end, unbeatable.
The truth is, it reminds a lot of people
of the way I pitch horseshoes. Would
you believe some of the people7 Would
If these were isolated
incidents, mere
occasional slips of the
tongue by a man
otherwise noted for his
clarity and precision,
they would not be
especially troubling
But they're absolutely
typical of Bush.
you believe our dog? Look, 1 want to
give the high-five symbol to high
tech
But the most disturbing quotes
in the book are the ones in which Bush
flatly contradicts himself, sometimes
making his contradictory statements
within days or even minutes of each
other. He can't evtn keep his own
stories straight.
"I don't want to just sit here
blamingCongress. I mean, we're all in
this together Bush said to one news-
man. A few minutes later, he told
another: "I think the Congress should
be blamed
Over a three-month period,
Bush made the following statements
about his emotions: "I'm just not an
emotional kind of guy "If I show
some emotion, that's just the way 1
am" "I'm not too good at the emo-
tional side " "We Bushes cry easily '
And, last but least: "If occasionally 1
do go up in smoke, it's not related to
this line of work His series of com-
ments about the recession was only
slightly less hilarious.
Listen in on this exchange, as
Bush defended breaking his "no new
taxes" promise:
Bush: "Let me be clear, I'm not
in favor of new taxes I'll repeat that
over and over and over again. And
this one compromise that � where
we begrudgingly had to accept rev-
enues, revenue increa ses, is the excep-
tion that proves the rule
Reporter: "The exception that
proves the rule?"
Bush: "Therukthatl'rn strongly
opposed to raising taxes
Well, that clears that up. His
agreement to raise taxes proves that
he opposes raising taxes.
If these were isolated incidents,
mere occasional slips of the tongue by
a man otherwise noted for his clarity
and precision, they would not be es-
pecially troubling, and making fun of
them would be both unfair and child-
ish.
But they're absolutely typical
of Bush. You wouldn't know it from
listening to his speeches, which are
about all mat most people ever hear
from him, but his speeches don't re-
veal anything about how he thinks.
He doesn't write them.
Listen, instead, to a press con-
ference with the president � not just
the ten-second ex jerpt on the evening
news, but the whole sorry affair, start
to finish. I've done it more than once,
and I usually have to lie down after-
wards until the headache goes away.
He speaks, but he does not communi-
cate, and he thereby cheapens the
value of language.
The same day I read Bushisms, I
read that the Bush Administration is-
sued an executive order permitting
the CoastCuard to return Haitian boat
people to Haiti. The White House de-
fended the action by saying it was
protecting thelives of Haitians, whose
boats aren't equipped to make the
600-mile sea journey to this country.
If it was anyone other than Bush
who came up with that transparently
false justification for the policy shift,
I'd be surprised. Or perhaps I should
be worried: it would mean his disease
is spreading.
Letters to the Editor
Students support
Enrighf s view
To the Editor:
We would like to commend Dr.
Enright for his insightful May 20th
letter regarding abortion. In ithe states,
The toleration of such moral mon-
strosity diminishes us all noamount
of perfume poured on 'tissue' can dis-
guise the fact that we are killing our
own young As pro-life students on a
campus where pro-abortion attitudes
prevail, we found Dr. Enright's letter
encouraging.
Based on statistics obtained
from the U.S. Department of Health
andHumanServices.ninety-eightper-
cent of all abortions are done as a
means of birth control or to hide an
unexplained pregnancy. A mere two
percent are performed because of a
rape, incest or threat to the life of the
mother.
Studies by the Alan Cuttmacher
Institute, the research arm of Planned
Parenthood, have shown that forty
percent of all women who have had
an abortion will have two or more.
Furthermore, fifty percent of all abor-
tions are done on women who use
abortion as their only means of birth
control.
Many professors and students
consider the pro-life perspective to be
dose-minded and fanatical. Given the
above statistics, we have to wonder
who the cloee-umded really are. Many
pro-abortion professors perpetrate
their personal views on abortion in
their classes, influencing students who
have no preconceived ideas about
abortion. Many studentsare unaware
of the true facts behind the propa-
ganda.
Obviously, the issues surround-
ing abortion are not clear cut; how-
ever, abortion is dearly the taking of
human life, not just the removal of
unwanted "medical tissue
Heather Lockey
Junior
Social Work
Serena lanora
Graduate Student
Musk

9

A
By incorporating distinctly different styles, Course of the Emr.
complex. The album offers listeners the best of both worlds -
Style divide
By Jim Shamlin
Staff Writer
On the alternative scene, it's not
unusual for a band to surround itself
in the exotic babble-vomit of Onental
mysticism, vegetarianism and mass
consciousness�in fact, it'squite com-
mon � but the same practice is un-
conscionable in the heavy metal mar-
ket �or, at least, it was, until Course of
Empire.
The hype s urrounding this band' s
debut album bills it as "a group with
a philosophical and moral agenda"
and unabashedly latches on to every-
thing from mass consciousness to trib-
alism in a pretentious show of pseudo-
intellecrualism.
Course of Empire gets off to a bad
start with "PtahAsoft musical mur-
mur creates a background for a poetry
reading, which is as cheap a rip-off of
the Moody Blues as "Thriller" and
twice as hokey. There is a moment of
silence, and then music � in the loos-
est sense of the term.
The style is a mutant offspring of
heavy metal. Chad Ijovell hammers
the drums like a spastic orangutan,
playing simplistic rhythms at break-
neck speeds; bassist Paul Semrad saws
at a single string, machine-gunning
eighth-notes while reiaj
hand; MikeGraff tosses i
power chords from 50
guitarbook;and,abovtri
Vaughn Stevenson tn
endsupwhiningano n
seous imitation of Alx
Ozzy Osboume.
The first six track
album, are d ne in the sa
only dead air in-betwi
listener know when
finished and the next
even the lyrics bep ntos
� a collage of clichev
melodramatic.
The last half of thei
the exception of "Thi
thing entirely different
is a simple tune, melo
soothing, in which the
gin to make something of,
with their instrument
actually sine? Next,
thers" allows Graff to
electric guitar and do
work with an acoustij
light and sonorous,
some of the earlier trad
The album dOMBJ
the Great Eastern Sun,
tal with an Oriental fit
serene and a irv The i
Cavedogs rej
Alternative: "It mainly si
major suca
By Mark Brett
Staff Writer
The Cavedogs want us all to know
that, despite their fun-loving image,
they are not pleasant people. "In real
life guitarist Todd Spahr said, "we
suck If that is the case, they hid it
remarkably well in a recent telephone
interview. In fact, one would guess
that the above statement is just an-
other facet of the band's dislike of
labels.
One of their least favorite labels,
apparently, is "alternative This par-
ticular label was slapped on their most
recent album, Soul Martini, before the
shrink wrap could cool. "Alternative
is just a label made up by somebody. It
mainly seems to mean a band that
hasn't had any major success Spahr
said.
When such a label can be applied
to as diverse a range of sounds as the
Cavedogs' twisted basic rock chords,
the Dead Milkmen's grunge-punk in-
sanity and the Smithereens' Motown
smoothness, he has a good point.
Soul Martini is a collection of solid
rock and roll tunes (remember those?) deal-
ing with various personal and social con-
cepts. "Love Grenade" takes a look at the
explosion of the offs generation and their
Weals of peace. "Sorrow (Boots of Pain) is an
unrequited love song addressed to a death-
rock girl "Murder" delves into the sickening
spectacle of televised wars as a source of
entertainmentSong-writing is the Cavedogs
greatest strength, and on Soul Martini, while
every song might not be an instant classic
they are well-constructed and deal with most
subjects in an intelligent manner.
With all this very special emphasis on
topic and craftsmanship, the band's reputa-
tion as a -whacky bunch of guys" seems a bit
out of place.
If you ever stop posing for a minute,
The
can
Cavedogs
be heard it
they cat
said on �
Agi
try ver
consids
in any
"No
cept,Sp
lyrics I
should j
Hi
PinkFl
in the
really





Entertainment
fiu
�rre IcuBt (Earnlmian
May 27, 1992
�j
J. s.
ivi
&
fer Hammer
peak correctly
� ram it
. . vs
�� . w i)
k, wl . '

l
11 'vn omitted
j ly in-
! tech is potent,
� � . �

lated
is of the
Ian
J for Ins
ision,
btbe
ibling
Isolutelv
Look, I want to
lymbol to high
Isturbing quotes
. m which Bush
bcti sometimes
tttTV statements
Iminutes of each
keep his own
to just sit here
lean, we'reall in
Laid toonenews-
h later, he told
nress should
jmonth pnod,
nng statements
'Tm just not an
iv " "If I show
m me emotion, that's just the way I
I'm not too good at the emo-
-ide "We Bushes crv easily "
ist but least It occasionally I
, in -moke, it's not related to
ne of work' His series of com-
ment about the recession was only
ess hilarious.
Listen in on this exchange, as
Bush defended breaking his "no new
taxes" promise
Bush "Let me be clear, I'm not
in favot of new taxes I'll repeat that
over and over and over again And
this one compromise that � where
we begrudgmgly had to accept rev-
en vie� revenue increases, is the excep-
tion that proves the rule "
Reporter- "The exception that
proves the rule
Bu-h Tbe rule that I'm strongly
. posed to raising taxes"
Well, that clears that up His
� vment to raise taxes proves that
. pposcs raising taxes
If these were isolated incidents,
mere occasional slips of the tongue by
a man otherwise noted for his clarity
and precision, they would not be es-
pe� tally troubling, and making fun of
them would be both unfair and child-
ish
But they're absolutely typical
of Bush You wouldn't know it from
listening to his speeches, which are
about all that most people ever hear
from him, but his speeches don't re-
veal anything about how he thinks.
Ht doesn't write them
Listen, instead, to a press con-
ference with the president � not just
tbe ten-second ex ;erpt on theevening
news, but the whole sorry affair, start
to finish I've done it more than once,
and 1 usually have to lie down after-
wards until the headache goes away.
He speaks, but he does not communi-
cate, and he thereby cheapens the
value of language
The same day I read Bushisms, I
read that the Bush Administrahon is-
sued an executive order permitting
the Coast Gua rd to return Hainan boat
people to Haiti The White House de-
fended the action by saying it was
protecting the lives of Haitians, whose
boats aren't equipped to make the
fcOO-mile sea journey to this country.
If it was anyoneother than Bush
who came up with that transparently
false justification for the policy shift,
I'd be surprised Or perhaps I should
be worried it would mean his disease
is spreading
the Editor
Is are done as a
rol or to hide an
Incy A mere two
lied because of a
to the life of the
danGuttmacher
arm of Planned
lown that forty
fr who have had
M two or more
ercentof allabor-
men who use
y means of birth
rs and students
perspective to be
latical Given the
I have to wonder
I really are. Many
pro-abortion professors perpetrate
their personal views on abortion in
their classes, influencing students who
have no preconceived ideas about
abortion Many students are unaware
of the true facts behind the propa-
ganda
Obviously, the issues surround-
ing abortion are not clear cut; how-
ever, abortion is clearly the taking of
human life, not just the removal of
unwanted "medical tissue
Heather Lockey
Junior
Social Work
Serena lanora
Graduate Student
Music f.
Arrested Development
provides moral healing
Not just another album of problems
By Rob Todd
Assistant Sports Editor
Photo by Mark Trw
By incorporating distinctly different styles, Course of the Empire is an album that suffers from a split personality
complex. The album offers listeners the best of both worlds � rock and progressive.
Style divides 'Empire'
By Jim Shamlin
Staff Writer
On the alternative scene, it's not
unusual for a band to surround itself
in the exotic babble-vomit of Oriental
mvsticism, vegetarianism and mass
consciousness�in fact,it'squite com-
mon � but the same practice is un-
conscionable in the heavy metal mar-
ket �or, at least, it was, until Course of
Empire.
The hype surrounding this band s
debut album bills it as "a group with
a philosophical and moral agenda"
and unabashedly latches on to every-
thing from massconsciousness to trib-
alism in a pretentious show of pseudo-
intellectualism.
Course of Empire gets off to a bad
start with "Ptah A soft musical mur-
mur creates a background for a poetry
reading, which is as cheap a rip-off of
the M(xxfv Blues as "Thriller" and
twice as hokey. There is a moment of
silence, and then music � in the loos-
est sense of the term.
The stvle is a mutant offspring of
heavy metal: Chad Lovell hammers
the drums like a spastic orangutan,
playing simplistic rhythms at break-
neck speed s; bassist Paul Semrad saws
at a single string, machine-gunning
eighth-notes while relaxing his fret
hand; Mike Graff tosses in a handful of
power chords from some beginner
guitar book; and, above the cacophony,
Vaughn Stevenson tries to sing, but
endsupwhiningandscreaminga nau-
seous imitation of Alice Cooper or
Ozzy Osbourne.
The first six bracks, over half the
album, aredone in the same style, with
only dead air in-between to let the
listener know when one number is
finished and the next begins. In time,
even the lyrics begin to sound the same
� a collage of cliches, repetitive and
melodramatic.
The last half of their album, with
the exception of "Thrust is some-
thing entirely different. "PeaceChild"
is a simple tune, melodic and almost
soothing, in which the musicians be-
gin to make something other than noise
with their instruments and Stevenson
actually sings. Next, "Sins of the Fa-
thers" allows Graff to set aside the
electric guitar and do some admirable
work with an a: uistk. The piece is
light and sonon is, the antipode of
some of the earlier tracks.
The album closes with "Dawn of
the Great Eastern Sun an instrumen-
tal with an Oriental flavor � smooth,
serene and airy. The peaceful sound is
reminiscent of Kitaro's work, complete
with the interplay of guitar and synthe-
sizer. Although the piece fills the bestsix
minutes of the album, it seems dread-
fully outofplaceamong the other tracks.
Course of Empire's range of styles
suggest that the band ishopingtoachieve
a broad appeal, drawing in profits from
both the heavy metal and alternative
markets. The logic of this is question-
able and the viability is doubtful. The
two audiences are greatly dissimilar.
The metal hordes will probably miss
the point behind all the noise and will
definitely reach for the "stop" button
when the music begins to mellow. The
altemabvecrowd, meanwhile, will prob-
ably appreciate Course of Empire's at-
tention to trendy political issues, but
will probably be alienated by the under-
tone of patricide and incest, if not the
general sound, that putrefies the first
half of the album.
All the same, Course of Empire of-
fers something worthwhile to both au-
diences, and it's a pity that a CD can't be
split in half and each piece given to an
audience that will beappreciative. Hope-
fully, the debut album won't be their
last. Should the band decide to define
their audience more clearly and tailor
their sound accordingly, they may find
success in the future.
Public Enemy has provided the strongest
voice for the issues that confront contemporary
urban society � without providing any real
answers or remedies.
Arrested Development's album, 3 years, 5
months and 2 days in theLifeof (the time ittook
from the formation of the group to the release
of the album) concisely addresses the issues
that plague the urban community in terms any
child, black or white, is able to understand.
Their window to the issues is as clear as glass.
Speech, the group's writer and producer,
believes that the human spiritual development
proceeds from the beastly to the angelic. He is
trying to open the eyes of his community �
eyes that have been shut by greed, materialism
and violence.
"Too many black youth have taken on a
destructive mentality Speech said of the black
community. "Sheer materialism, low self-es-
teem, individualism,a lack of respect for elders
and life in general, have plagued the 20th cen-
tury African in hisher community
Rather than echoing the revolutionary cli-
mate that has a grip on this country, Arrested
Development offers solutions � rather than
simply restating the problems.
Nearly every word on the album is an
indictment of this country's problems and lack
of religion �even the name of the group speaks
of the frustration they have felt in the strangle-
hold of American society.
Music is not just politics and Arrested De-
velopment takes care of all the rest. Their "cul-
tural-southern-hiphop-folk-ethnic-funk" de-
scribes the group's music perfectly. It is all that
and then some.
In a wonderful twist from the usual Dread
Head style of rap, they incorporate the har-
monica, banjo and guitar to add a blues feeling
no other group in their genre has yet to achieve
However, they are not just another De la Soul
or Tribe Called Quest.
The music they create, as a whole, is very
laid back, yet they hype up the tempo on sev-
eral tracks.
"Mama's Always on Stage" attacks the
problem of single parent families being headed
by teenage women and the lack of responsibil-
ity felt by men today.
A harmonica, incorporated with the unison
calling of "Heyy strikes the listener and cre-
ates a feeling of melancholy and hopelessness
while the driving beat and hard rhythms keep
the words moving at an excited pace.
The story-like quality of the third brack,
"People Everyday adds to the atmosphere of
the confrontation of "a nigger and an African
The song is a modern day spin-off of the Sly
Stone anthem, "Everyday People
Arrested Development attacks America's
black Baptist churches for preaching passive
resistance in the song, "Fishin' 4 Religion
However, expressing the group's attitude
towards the violence of revolution, Speech, with
help from group-member Headliner, writes on
the track "Give a Man a Fish "You can't be
passive, you gota be active � Can't go with
what looks attractive Poor whites and blacks
bumrushmg the system Raise your fist, but
also raise your children Direct your anger.
Love. Nothing is ever built on hate. Instead
love! Love your life, tackle the government
'Tennessee the first single and video re-
leased off the album, is an open letter to God
which tries to redefine the use of "family tree
Many more hits are sure to follow.
Even if you do not see the veins of truth
found throughout the album, the music is easy
to appreciate. The amount of wisdom and en-
joyment a person can buy for about $12 is in-
credible.
In addition to Speech's chores with the
group, he and a friend from college have co-
authored a column in the Milwaukee Community
Journal titled "20th Century African" also known
as the "black by black rundown so you don't get
gunned down
For the past year and a half, Speech has
expressed his concerns in the column and re-
ceived praise from writer Roderick Shaeffer in
the May 1991 issue of Thf Source.
do it your own way, but not Ice Cube's,
Quick's or NW A's way Speech and his cohort
wrote. "(They're) kickin' fantasy and you're the
ones making it reality. The joke is on you, broth-
ers. They're getting paid and you're paying the
cost! Think about it"
Maybe we all need to think about it.
Cavedogs reject labelling trend
Alternative: "It mainly seems to mean a band hasn't had any
major success"�Todd Spahr
Prine concert delights
audience with variety
By Cliff Marrow
Spcial to The East Carolhdim
By Mark Brett
Staff Writer
The Cavedogs want us all to know
that, despite their fun-loving image,
they are not pleasant people. "In real
life guitarist Todd Spahr said, "we
suck If that is the case, they hid it
remarkably well in a recent telephone
interview. In fact, one would guess
that the above statement is just an-
other facet of the band's dislike of
labels.
One of their least favorite labels,
apparently, is "alternative This par-
ticular label was slapped on their most
recent album, Soul Martini, before the
shrink wrap could cool. "Alternative
is just a label made up by somebody. It
mainly seems to mean a band that
hasn't had any major success Spahr
said.
When such a label can be applied
to as diverse a range of sounds as the
Cavedogs' twisted basic rock chords,
the Dead Milkmen's grunge-punk in-
sanity and the Smithereens' Motown
smoothness, he has a good point.
'Sti'SS'A � y �h rand � �labe,ed ���22���KrS2�
roc ana run iui � v said on the subject. his bandmates don't hold that against rum.
'SttZSJSttl Sf-fc Agatl.Mrareing.heCav.dog, Asked � fans could be expecting .
P? Z X Generation and their try very hard to resist. When asked if they Cavedogcoverof-Du.tintheWmd"any-
TtTZ MttJSKrrr �� � �-S themselves a politically active tad time soon, the band �pU�dw �-
u�Kvedressed o a dead in any way, they replied with an emphatic gSSSSSS.
V fT? gftlSLrf hefoundVoddwekK.kWenteruinmfor "Everybody wants to be Ud ZpeUn M
entertainmOT" b je political statements in America. The band sometime
E'LLi JXXLZmtSSrdmZ Ambers, in fact, have no set ideology, �- The Cavedogs have(ustcome o� tour
SSSSSr5 gxttzxzzsz: ttss&ztssz.
ssgSKS&ss r�r ayaswsas
"$�iever stop posing for a minuK, really ��d record Drummer Mark Rivet, ell fcerr-etye, "S�y Bar F.YX
Photo by Mart Tuckor
The Cavedogs refuse to allow themselves to be labelled into any group of music. The same refusal
can be heard in their music, which refuses to conform to any set standard.
"One year my wife gave me a
really great Christmas present, a
divorce. So I wrote her this song
With this statement, John Prine
opened his concert on April 9 at
die Mosque in Richmond, Va. The
comment captured perfectly the
witty and comical mood of the
famous rhymster's almost two-
hour set Prine filled about half
mat time with songs from his new
Grammy-winning album. The
Missing Years. However, he took
no chance of alienating long-time
tans whom he gave a wide assort-
ment of his classic tunes from his
entire 20-year career.
During much of his sold-out
show, he was accompanied by
the three-mart unit Sins of
Memphisto, which embellished
the voice of the contemporary folk
singer with a multitude of instru-
ments, including strings, accor-
dion, harmonica, mandocello,
keyboards and flute. The other
half featured Prine playing alone
rjnacoustfcguitar.Switehingback
and forth between the two gave
the show more dimension and
spontaneity.
Between songs, he told brief
anecdotes about how he wrote
certain tongs, one of which was
written after he nustakeruy moved
in with a woman and another
which "was so good" the follow-
ing celebration caused him to
spendanightinjail-SoIjustsat
there in the cell thinking about
how cool the song was Prine
said.
With a smile, Prine captured
the hearts of his audience who
sartg afongwrm songs they recog-
ittitd and tried to follow with the
ones they didn't His songs deal
with many simple, yet serious
themes, Hke war, freedom, old
age and love. However, he wraps
these issues up in ironic and en-
dearing tunes with various lines:
"You may see me tonight with an
illegal smile. It don't cost very
much, but it lasts a long while
Prine also sang classics like "I Wish
You All the Best "Far From Me"
and "Sam Stone which offered
his feelings on heartbreak, loneli-
ness and death, but never without
"his tongue in cheek His unique
mixture of silliness and happiness
made his story-songs seem honest
and genuine.
His new batch of songs seemed
to come alive with the old, often
because of their simple yet honest
motifs. One particularly notewor-
thy song from the new album was
"Big, Old, Goofy World" where
Prine takes a slow, wistful and de-
tached look at the goofiness of the
world we live in.
The opening band, the Cow-
boy Junkies, offered a more sedate
and detached show. Their lead
singer, Margo Timmins' shy, sul-
try demeanor and the band's light
barely audible, bluesy style began
weU,ptoymgsongsfrom their three
albums including three tunes off
their now classic album, The Trin-
ity Sessions. They opened their hour
set with Timmins alone on stage
for the slow, beautiful chant, "Min-
ing for Gold
However, Timmins' trade-
mark breatWess singing and mum-
bling, which seems very provoca-
tive on recordings, came off artifi-
cial and forced during the show.
The audience's enthusiasm
soon shrank to a neutral, light ap-
plause by the end of the Junkies'
show.
The true highlight of their set
was when Prine joined Timmins
ber, If You Were the Woman and
I Was the Man a song from his
new album.





&N$$
Entertainment
�tjc lEafit Ear0ltntan
May 27, 1992
3
o s
rer Hammer
peak correctly
t the vn.iv I
� ���� emo-
lv "
ally I
� ited to
His senes � . om-
, recess. � .v,i only
�� rtge .is
. i ew
i , ear, I'm not
� �: at
. � . And
w .re
i . . � ; ' re -
. ��.
. .
at i His
. es "Kit
, . rtguc by
s aritv
t s-
? p fun of
�ld-
.�� typical
� � m 'Tom
which are
� hear
pee � Ion't re-
� . thinks
. ress i on-
� � not just
n theev tiling
' ' .� iffair, start
lone it n re than once.
. �. iwn after-
. .i es away.
� not communi-
�� � eapens the
' 1
' � . � : � � � itns, I
�Administration is-
i . � . i rder permitting
� ��; Haitian boat
e 1i White House de-
� led tl �� , saying it was
. es of Haitians, whose
oatsequipped to make the
�-�)journey to this country
fitwa. ther than Bush
�p with that transparently
-htKltion tor the policy shift,
� . irprised Or perhaps I should
��a rnedt would mean his disease
the Editor
. � � � � abor-
w use
means of birth
- and students
grspecrjvg to be
itkal i iven the
n e to wonder
Li really are Stain
ibortion professors perpetrate
�� . - persoi il views on abortion in
��- asses, influencing students who
. i ideas about
rt � M . students are unaware
f the true I l behind the propa-
I In iousIv the issues surmund-
. ibortion ire not clear cut, how-
ibortion is clearly the taking of
in lite not ivist the 'emoval of
unwanted "medical tissue "
Heather Lockev
lunior
Social Work
Serena Ianora
Graduate Student
Music
Arrested Development
provides moral healing
Not just another album of problems
By Rob Todd
Assistant Sports Editor
Photo by MarK Trew
B) incorporating distinctly different styles, Course of the Empire is an album that suffers from a split personality
rplex The album offers listeners the best of both worlds � rock and progressive.
Style divides 'Empire'
By Jim Shamlin
staff Writer
ci the alternative scene, it's not
unusu.il tor a hand to surround itself
in the exotk babble vomit of (Mental
mysticism vegetarianism mA mass
Consciousness infactjt'squitveom-
mon but the same practice is un-
cons ionable in the heavy metal mar-
ket or, at least, it was, until t. ourse oj
mpire.
Ihe hvpe surrounding this band's
debut album bills it as "a group w ith
a philosophicaJ m. moral agenda"
aivf unabashedly latches onto every-
thmgfrommassccHisciousnesstotrib-
alism in a pretentious show of pseudo-
intellectualism
Course1 of I mpire gets oft to a bad
start with "Ptah A soft musical mur-
mur creates a background tor a pi tr
reading, which is as cheap a rip-ott of
the Moody blues ,is "Thriller" and
twice as hokey here is a moment of
silence, and then musk in the loos-
est sense ol the term
The st le is a mutant offspring oi
heavy metal Chad Lovell hammers
the drums like a spastic orangutan,
playing simplistic rhvthms at break-
neck speeds; bassist PaulSemrad saws
at a single string, machine-gunning
eighth-notes while relaxing his fret
hand; MikeGraff tosses inahandful of
power chords from some beginner
guitar hook, and, above the i.uophonv,
Vaughn Stevenson tries to sing but
endsupwhirungandscreaminganau-
seous imitation ol Aliceooper or
OzzyOsboume.
Ihe first six tracks, over halt the
album, aredone in the same style, with
only dead .ur m-between to let the
listener know when one number is
finished and the next begins. In time,
even the Ivru s begin U i m und the same
� a collage of cliches, repetitive m
melodramatic.
Ihe last half of their album, with
the exception of "Thrust is some-
thmg entirely different "PeaceChild"
is a simple tune, mekxhc and almost
soothing, in which the musicians be-
gin to ma ke something other than noise
with their instruments and Stevenson
actually sings. Next, "Sins oi the Fa-
thers" allows Graff to set aside the
electric guitar and do some admirable
work with an acoustic. Ihe piece is
light Mi.i sonorous, the anrJpode al
some of the earlier tracks.
Ihe album closes with Dawn ot
the threat F.astemSun an instrumen-
tal with an Oriental flavor - srruMith,
serene and airy. Ihe pu eful sound is
reminiscent ot kitaro's work, complete
with tlie interplay ot guitar and synthe-
sizer. Although the piece tills the KM six
minutes of the album, it seems dread-
fu 11 v out of placeairx ng theother tracks.
Course of Empire's range ot stvles
suggi'st that the band is hoping toachieve
a bnvuf appeal, drawing in pmfits from
both the heavv metal ind altemahve
markets. Ihe logic of this is question-
able and the viabilitv is doubtful. The
two audunces are greatly dissimilar.
Ihe metal hordes will prohahlv miss
the point behind all the noise and will
definitely reach for the "stop" button
when the music begins to mellow. The
alternate ecnnvd, meanwhilewill proh-
ahlv appreciate Course of Empire's at-
tention to trendy political issues, but
will probably be alienated by the under-
time ot patricide and incest, if not the
general sound, that putrefies the find
half of the album.
All the same, Course of Empire of-
fers something worthwhile to both au-
diences, and it's a pitv that a CD can't be
split in half and each piece given to an
audiem e that will beapprtviative Hope-
fully, the debut album won't be their
last. Should the band decide to define
their audience more clearly and tailor
their sound accordingly, they may find
success in the future.
Public Enemy has provided the strongest
voice for the issues that confront contemporary
urban society - without providing any real
answers or remedies.
Arrested Development's album, 3 years, 5
months and 2 days in theUfeof (thetimeittmk
from the formation of the group to the release
of the album) concisely addresses the issues
that plague the urban community in terms any
child, black or white, is able to understand.
I heir window to the issues is as clear as glass.
Speech, the group's writer and producer,
believes that the human spiritual development
proceeds from the beastly to the angelic. He is
trying to open the eves oi his community �
eyes that have been shut by greed, materialism
and violence.
"Too many black youth have taken on a
destructive mentalitv Speech said of the black
community. "Sheer materialism, low self-es-
teem, individualism, a lack of respect for elders
and life in general, have plagued the 20th cen-
tury African in hisher community
Rather than echoing the revolutionary cli-
mate that has a grip on this country, Arrested
Development offers solutions � rather than
simply restating the problems.
Nearly everv word on the album is an
indictment of this country's problems and lack
of religion �even the name of the group speaks
of the frustration they have felt in the strangle-
hold of American society.
Music is not just politics and Arrested De-
velopment takes care of all the rest. Their "cul-
tural-southern-hiphop-folk-ethnic-funk" de-
scribes the group's music perfectly. It is all that
and then some.
In a wonderful twist from the usual Dread
Head stvle of rap, they incorporate the har-
monica, banjo and guitar to add a blues feeling
no other group in their genre has yet to achieve.
However, thev are not just another De la Soul
or I nbe Called Quest.
Ihe music they create, as a whole, is very
laid back, yet they hyp? up the tempo on sev-
eral tracks.
"Mama's Always on Stage" attacks the
problem of single parent families being headed
by teenage women and the lack of responsibil-
ity felt by men today.
A harmonica, incorporated with the unison
calling of "Hevy strikes the listener and cre-
ates a feeling of melancholy and hopelessness
while the driving beat and hard rhvthms keep
the words moving at an excited pace.
The story-like quality of the third track,
People Everyday adds to the atmosphere of
the confrontation of "a nigger and an African
The song is a modern day spin-off of the Sly
Stone anthem, "Everyday People
Arrested Development attacks America's
black Baptist churches for preaching passive
resistance in the song, "Fishin' 4 Religion
However, expressing the group's attitude
towards the violence of revolution, Speech, with
help from group-member Headliner, writes on
the track "Give a Man a Fish "You can't be
passive, you gota be active � Can't go with
what looks attractive Poor whites and blacks
bumrushing the svstem . . . Raise your fist, but
also raise your children . . . Direct your anger.
Love. Nothing is ever built on hate. Instead
love! Love your life, tackle the government
"Tennessee the first single and video re-
leased off the album, is an open letter to God
which tries to redefine the use of "family tree
Many more hits are sure to follow.
Even if you do not see the veins of truth
found throughout the album, the music is easy
to appreciate. The amount of wisdom and en-
joyment a person can buy for about $12 is in-
credible.
In addition to Speech's chores with the
group, he and a friend from college have co-
authored a column in the Milwaukee Community
Journal titled "20th Century African" also known
as the "black by black rundown so you don't get
gunned down
For the past vear and a half, Speech has
expressed his concerns in the column and re-
ceived praise from writer Roderick Shaeffer in
the May 141 issue of The Source.
do it your own way, but not Ice Cubf's,
Quick's or NW As way Speech and his cohort
wrote "(They're) kickin' fantasy and you're the
ones making it reality. The joke is on you, broth-
ers. They're getting paid and you're paving the
cost! Think about it
Maybe we all need to think about it.
Cavedogs reject labelling trend
Alternative: "It mainly seems to mean a band hasn't had any
major success" � Todd Spahr
Prine concert delights
audience with variety
By Cliff Marrow
Special to The East Carolinian
By Mark Brett
Sfjff Writer
Ihea vedogs want us all to know
that, despite their fun-loving image,
they are not pleasant people. "In real
life guitarist Todd Spahr said, "we
suck" If that is the case, thev hid it
rmarkahlv well in a recent telephone
interview. In fact, one would guess
that the above statement is just an-
other facet of the band's dislike of
labels
One of their least favorite labels,
apparently, is "alternative This par-
ticular label was slapped on their most
unent album, Soul Martini, before the
shrink wrap could cool. "Alternative
is just a label made up by somebody. It
mainly seems to mean a band that
hasn't had any major success Spahr
said
When such a label can be applied
to as diverse a range of sounds as the
( avedogs' twisted basic rock chords,
the Dead Milkmen's grunge-punk in-
sanity and the Smithereens' Motown
smtxithness, he has a good point.
Soul Martini is a collection of solid
rock and roll tunes (remember those?) deal-
ing with various personal and social con-
cepts. "Love Grenade" takes a look at the
explosion of the 60's generation and their
ideals of peace. "Sorrow (Boots of Pain)" is an
unrequited love song addressed to a death-
rock girl. "Murder" delves into the sickening
spectacle of televised wars as a source of
entertainment. Song-writing is the Cavedogs'
greatest strength, and on Soul Martini, while
Photo by Mark Tuck�r
The Cavedogs refuse to allow themselves to be labelled into any group of music. The same refusal
can be heard in their music, which refuses to conform to any set standard.
they catch you and you get labeled Spahr
said on the subject.
Again, labelsare something the Cavedogs
try very hard to resist. When asked if they
consider themselves a politically active band
in any way, they replied with an emphatic
"No
claims an early love of Kansas and Yes, but
his bandmates don't hold that against him.
Asked if fans could be expecting a
Cavedog cover of "Dust in the Wind" any-
time soon, the band replied with another
emphatic "No! But maybe 'Bohemian Rhap-
sody All jokes aside, Spahr told us that,
Bass player BrianStevens commented that while his goal is just to make good records,
he found it odd we look to entertainers for
political statements in America. The band
e7ervTonTm members, in fact, have no set ideology, ex-
Zare well constructed and deal wimnxt cept,SpahrwhosaidWeallth,nkthatBono s
nSS " � "�" �nner .yncsonthenewU2recordaresometh,ngwe
With all this very special emphasis on should unite against.
toDkand craftsmanship the band's reputa- Hailing from Boston the Cavedogs name
topic ana cra"ni r� r bit Pink Floyd and XTC as influences, but mainly
tion as a "whacky bunch of guys seemsab.t n JT y aua8Cavedog$ftheywoukikelo
�Ut �f you ever stop posing for a minute, really good records. Drummer Mark R.vers call themselves "Sissy Bar F.Y.I.
"Everybody wants to be Led Zeppelin at
some time
The Cavedogs have just come off tour
with Mojo Nixon and the Dead Milkmen;
while the band they'd most like to tour
with next is the Pixies.
As a final note, the band would also
like us all to know that if they weren't
"One year my wife gave me a
really great Christmas present, a
divorce. So 1 wrote her this song
With this statement, John Prine
opened his concert on April 9 at
the Mosque in Richmond, Va. The
comment captured perfectly the
witty and comical mood of the
famous rhymster's almost two-
hour set. Prine filled about half
that time with songs f rom his new
Grammy-winning album, The
Missing Years. However, he took
no chance of alienating long-time
fans whom he gave a wide assort-
ment of his classic tunes from his
entire 20-year career.
During much of his sold-out
show, he was accompanied by
the three-man unit Sins of
Memphisto, which embellished
thevoiceof the contemporary folk
singer with a multitude of instru-
ments, including strings, accor-
dion, harmonica, mandocello,
keyboards and flute. The other
half featured Prine playing alone
on acoustic guitar. Switchingback
and forth between the two gave
the show more dimension and
spontaneity.
Between songs, he told brief
anecdotes about how he wrote
certain songs, one of which was
written after he mistakenly moved
in with a woman and another
which "was so good" the follow-
ing celebration caused him to
spend a night in jail. "So 1 just sat
there in the cell thinking about
how cool the song was Prine
said.
With a smile, Prine captured
the hearts of his audience who
sang along with songs they recog-
nized and tried to follow with the
ones they didn't His songs deal
with many simple, yet serious
themes, like war, freedom, old
age and love. However, he wraps
these issues up in ironic and en-
dearing tunes with various lines:
"You may see me tonight with an
illegal smile. It don't cost very
much, but it lasts a long while
Prinealsosangclassicslike"IWish
You All the Best "Far From Me"
and "Sam Stone which offered
his feelings on heartbreak, loneli-
ness and death, but never without
"his tongue in cheek His unique
mixture of silliness and happiness
made his story-songs seem honest
and genuine.
His new batch of songs seemed
to come alive with the old, often
because of their simple yet honest
motifs. One particularly notewor-
thy song from the new album was
"Big, Old, Goofy World" where
Prine takes a slow, wistful and de-
tached look at the goofiness of the
world we live in.
The opening band, the Cow-
boy junkies, offered a more sedate
and detached show. Their lead
singer, Margo Timmins' shy, sul-
try demeanor and the band's light,
barely audible, bluesy style began
well, playing songs from their three
albums including three tunes off
their now classic album, The Trin-
ity Sessions. They opened their hour
set with Timmins alone on stage
for the slow, beautiful chant, "Min-
ing for Gold
However, Timmins' trade-
mark breathless singing and mum-
bling, which seems very provoca-
tive on recordings, came off artifi-
cial and forced during the show.
The audience's enthusiasm
soon shrank to a neutral, light ap-
plause by the end of the Junkies'
show.
The true highlight of their set
was when Prine joined Timmins
and the Junkies for their final num
ber, "If You Were the Woman and
I Was the Man a song from his
new album.





Classifieds
QH?e Saat (Earolttiian
May 27, 1992
IORRIVI
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 3
bedroom townhouse apartment $198
a month plus 1 4utihhes Non-smoker
pretered 3554N8r
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS 1 and
2 bedroom apartments Energy-effi-
cient, several locations in town Car-
peted, kitchen appliances, some wa-
ter and sewer paid washerdryer
hookups Now takingappltcationsfor
Fall Call 752-8415
WANTED 2 male roommates Fur-
nished bednxMn with bathroom ECU
bus access Available August for Fall
semester $175mon incis utilities
Call 321-1848
IOKSAI I
A Bciuuful PUce lo 1-iv?
- I New
� tad Retdj ToReni-
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
;S0 1- 5ih Sirtet
�1 ocated N-ar ECU
�Neat Mftjof Shaping Corners
� V:o5s From High�a i'itrol Station
Limited Offer � S330 a month
Conttcl J V ot Tomm Wilhami
7S6-7IIS or 130-1937
Office rn V1 $� !� - P�
�AZALEA GARDENS'
tncrmj t !T wn. tree � itrr tni m ��. � Mhrn, wi v
cable TV Causes � � iril�l y $MCtnm��rv6
cnrthletK MOBILE HOMF RESTALScaiplM or
4r� .f�r�i��i�ln�bUchori��inAi�l��0�n���
kv Brook Valio Courts Oub
Coruaci J.T or Tommv Wilhami
756 7813 '
FREE to a good home. Energetic fe-
male black Lab pup eight weeks old.
Call 757-0903. Leave message if
needed.
TWO AIRCONDITIONERS for sale
Good condition. Call 752-9058
FOR SALE: Magnavox stereo, tape
deck, and 2 speakers. Good condition.
Asking $50 Call 752-5899 or leave
message
SEIZED CARS trucks, boats, 4wheel-
ers, motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA
Available in your area now Call (800)
338-3388 ext. C-5999
IIILI WANTED
ASSEMBLERS NEEDED: Excellent
pay. Manv jobs to choose from Easy
work at home No experience needed
Call Workersof America 410-60-5296
ext. 200
BRODY'S is accepting applications
for an AdvertisingMerchandising
Associate Assist with making store
signage, create store and window de-
signs and various other duties Must
HEM WANTED
be available all summer in the after-
noon forapproximately 15 to 20 hours
per week Applv Brody's, The Plaza,
Mon-Thurs from 1pm to 4pm.
ACTIVEINDIVIDUALNEEDEDfor
a nine and thirteen year old hi take to
summer activities Driver's license
required Call 355-8128(home)or830-
2277 (work).
WANTED: Baseball players for the
1992 Carolina Bush League For more
information contact Mark Honeycutt
752-4630 or Chas Mitch'l 756-0763
Senous inquiries only please
EASY WORK! Excellent pay! As-
semble products at home Call toll
free 1-800-467-5566 ext. 5920.
CRUISESHIPS NOW HIRING:Earn
$2,000 month and world travel (Ha-
waii, Mexico, the Caribbean, etc )
Holiday, summer and career employ-
HELP WANTED
ment available. No experience neces-
sary For employment program call 1-
206-545-4155 ext C586
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT: Fisheries Earn $5,000
month Free transportation! Room &
board! Over 8,000 openings No expe-
rience necessary. Male or Female For
employment program call Student
Employment Services at 1-206-545-
4155 ext 1649
SOCCER COACHES needed from
mid-June until mid-August, coaching
youth 7-8 years old in new program
developed by Pitt Greenville Soccer
Association For more details call 756-
3879 after 6pm
CHILDC ARE NEEDED for two small
children, two or three weekday morn-
ings or afternoons Previous childcare
experience preferred but not neces-
sary. May be able to work around
HELP WANTED
your schedule Call 752-8564
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions Great benefits Call (800)
338-3388 ext P-3712
FREE TRAVEL: Air couriers and
cruiseships Students also needed
Christmas, Spring, and Summer for
amusement park employment Call
(800) 338-3388 ext F-3464
WZMB is now taking applications for
newscasters If you are interested, pick
up an application at the station in the
basemen t of Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter or call 757-6413
SERVICES OEEERED
TYPING: Error-free, quick and de-
pendableat reasonable cost Excellent
tvping and proofreading skills (gram-
mar, punctuation, sentence structure,
etcCall Paulint at 757-3693
PERSONALS
WRITERPHILOSOPHERMUSI-
CIAN AND POETIC SOUL seeks
friendship and correspondence from
like-minded lady J'hotos and letters
to MV lO Box 8663, Greenville, NC
27835.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
KOOKTKADKK
BUY AND rRADI
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50.00(1 111 l.l.S
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, V
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
now: used CD's
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Hiking Leases for 1
bedroom. 2 bedroom &
Efficfeacy Apartments.
CALL 752-2K65
I
I
I
I
I
I
L
Ifredo's N.Y. Pizza Open from 5pm til
718 E. 5th St. � Downtown � 752-0022
2 Large Pizzas
with 1 topping
$7.99
carry out only
not good after
9pm
Every Sun, Mon, Tues
I 3 Large Pizzas I ALl PITCHERS !
I
I
I
I
I
X
3 toppings
S11.99
good til 9pm
I
I
I
I
I
J.
$1.50
(with this coupon)
I
I
I
I
I
J
PUTT-PUTT
With over 1,000
courses world wide.
Mon-Thur 5-11
Friday 5-1
Saturday 10-11
y r 10th St. past DunHnDonuts Sunday 1-10
GET ONE J OET ONE
i
�xplraa May 30, 1992 I axplree May 30, 1992
Announcements
INTERVIEW SKILLS WORK-
SHOP
Seniors and graduate students com-
pleting their degree this summer who
need help in developing or refining
their interview skills are invited to a
workshop on June 3 at 3pm Spon-
sored bv Career Services, the work-
shop will be held in the Bloxton House
TJ1S�S1N�LES REGISTRA-
TION
Come out and register in Biology N-
102 May 27th, 4 30pm Men's,
women s leagues have been organized
for all faculty, staff and students
Equipment is available with your ID
through the Equipment Room located
in 115 Chnstenbury Gym For more
information contact David Gaskins at
757-6387.
The Newman Catholic Student Cen-
ter invites you to worship with them
Sunday Masses 11 30am ft 8 30pm at
the Newman Center, 553 E 10th St
Greenville Weekdays 8am at the
Newman Center
Register as an individual or team in
Biology N-102, JuneOthat 4pm Men's,
women's, and co-ad teams may sign-
up For details contact David Gaskins
at 757-6387
BISEXLAL-GAY-LESBIAS
ALL1AN.CJE
Social support, activism and activi-
ties All interested and caring people
welcome Call 757-6766 from 11 15-
12 30 Mon-Thurs for information on
time and place
HanJMfi MMfitfS REdSTRA-
I1QN.
Come out and register in Biology N-
102 May 27th at 4pm Games to be
held at Mendenhall Student Center
For details contact David Gaskins at 757-
6387
rL?UIl&CHJ0NGIRjr
Register now in the rlecreatjunal Out-
ckxir Center from 130-5(30 on Monday,
3 30-5 30 Tuesdays Wednesd.n and
Thursday and 11am-130pm on Friday
Event to be held May IN-31, leaving at 12
rv.xn Call 757-611 rormoredetvuN
LR.E-SSRE LEASE
Tens! Dial-a-Teen is interested tn your
valuable time We are kxking h r special
teens, between theagesof 15and 18, who
would like to volunteer their valuable
listening skills to help others mentis Ve
are ottenng training classes tor our tetn
hotline beginning June 3. 1992 Call 758-
HELP at come by 312 East 10th St.
CJJlBLNGRArELLiLWQRK-
SiiQP
Rtyiter in the Recreational Outdoor
Center now from 1 30-5 pm on Mm-
dav. 3 305 3ipm Tuein Wedrfdiy
k Thurviavand 11-1.30on Friday Event
ism be held on May2ttiat3gxn Cal757-
tul 1 for more details
CAIHQUC STLDEAXCEXTER
The Newman Catholic Student Center
invites vou to worship .ind celebrate with
them on the least of the Lord 's Asctnsion
Mass schedule Wednesciiv M. 27
Evening Vigil Miss 5 30ptr Aa a
TnurviiyiMliy28)m,12rxxT �
Tha�amariBlocalKiat953! -
at the fixn of CiUege Hill I r.v
PRESS RELEASE
We need vour expenem-v ar achiev e-
ments m evervd.iv situations car. U . �
ful to others Earn that r� i B fa
phshment Ke.il Criais I enter - pb i
mg Volunteer ChssC - - ' "
telephone hiit4ine and � �
WawgbecferaTg training classes
ennching neld beginning lime 3 '
Call TSH-HELl'or cc�ne by 312 Easl d
St
LION OF NARFORM
BY STANTON
hrtnK i�f Mri emtnA f �
Mjprrptr�rrv 1R � � .
the y M . i M al
nUMoii
rrLiMi� mm Mm -
rrwTitv m�j�rx1 ll
rfHsH '� rria- I
p�JrtKs apkafa I
thr �Li�i Ihr � y
up dTflMrfkf carpoi
an cMoaVfNaWSRg
aMBaVBtrcHaV Rmum l� �
(����trial BHiitution v
rHisim-xNO- thjl atft n4 u;k1� I
( !� vtiln �tri '�
hankruptnl bj �� � ��
cardb �tn dtsti
'srl�i,Kl� a �
vtirr�K Ihr t !�
hranvh aiad
fvi:jruti �� h.
�ia"id innditoirt Ra �
alltrmpl tn further d-
htJd aacr l1" iy j'
the It 'ajoaarai
ruiH�ui havoriaai
ptilicr hurrauwT
( iirp�iratr Baarn i '
Iiim; .
BY MISENHEIMER
Sports
Weak 'pen off)
dethrone Ove
baseball team
By Robert S. Todd
Assistant Sports Editor
There are ver' few s bodb in
the countr- where a winning bav
balJ season would be c nsiderei1
dismal. ECU is one of them
Head coach Can,iverton is
unaccustomed to losing he can
currentlv boastoneof the best win-
ning percentage arm ng active col-
lege baseball coat hes. In 1990, ECL
claimed the bet rei rd in the na-
tion at 47-9.
Taking home the( ibnial Ath-
letic AsstKiaboncham. . had
become habit � until this year. The
IatesbowedoutcrfthJsyear'stour-
natnentvithtwostraigl iesfor
the first time in ECL 5 I - ry in
Colonial Athletic Associati i
It would seem Overton might
have a hard time ck th the
Pirates posting the . I in
schtxil history, at 25-24, and the
school's first losing - thin
theconfererxv finishing tt7-10 But
somehow, Overton seems to find a
wav to shrug ;t i ifl kruiwing thin -
will get better.
"Let's just sav it was disappoint-
ing that our record was not as gotvl
as we had hoped Overton said
"We knew it would be tough ti i win
a fourth consecutive CAA at �
Sophomore sensation. Johnny
Beck, echid the same reelings
"We were expecting more he
said. "Some of the brakes didn't go
our way
A weak bullpen, rxr fielding
and lack of offense hurt ECU
thmughout the seasn.
The lack of a consistent closer
contributed to several losses, many
that the Tirates were leading until
late in the game. A strong man in
relief mav have salvaged three or
the the biggest games of the seasv ffl
for the Bucs. Tw ice the Wolfpack of
N.C. State rallied to overcome defi-
cits late in the game. As if that w ere
not enough, a heart-breaking loss in
extra-innings to another Atlantic-
Coast Conference opponent. Lx
Chanel Hill, exemplified the frus-
tration ECU fe
hold onto a leao
The sr I
fielders Chad
and Pat Watki
ECU-
free passes, EC
keep theoppo
The Bucs let
extraba
wearing the
gunned dow?
attempts
"CXir big�
of the vear
- rtonsaid
topnxJucerur
enough off en �?
position. CXir
althughouri
onto lea
The � i
Success is u-ij
the Bucs on th
TheBuc- j
their fou' "I
but their fifth j
Fortunatelv
never tarnish:
Ft r rrxt
theevp �
slipped awa
- - ; unio
John Ga
tracts with the
and the Cin
tiv.
EaM"n an
Pirate atl
the �
tjon, vst tiKJ
theea- j
"Thetosi
in nature
them had a
siorval contral
wnat we wi
Orn
the Bucs thi
emerges
fer from Kiel
bettered Kd
the bat, but
the !o � i
"When
were hopinj
Pirates ink
Payne gets 'twin t
JUCO transh
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sports Writer
gram and y
with us thai
.After a dismal 10-18 season
filled with sidelining mjunes and
manv 1osms under five points. ECU
Head coach Eddie Pavne has com-
pleted what is now considered the
best 12-cn recruiting class in the
Colonial Athletic Association.
Pavne s first signee was the 6-
foot-10-inch, Don EXuglas from
Bishop 0 Gomel High School in
Fails Church. Va
Douglas a 220-pound center,
begins onh his fourth season of
compeuDve basketball after aver-
aging 12 points and 10 rebounds for
has 23-8 Knights last season. Also
he was listed as honorable mention
All-Amenca m Van Coleman's Fu-
ture Stars, p laved in the Washing-
ton,DCA'irginia All-Star game last
vearand plaved in a summer league
with several of this year's
Georgetown freshman.
Less than 48 hours later, Payne
inked vet another tvtoot-10-inch
signee. Bernard Cooper of Bertie
High School agreed to take part in
the 1992-93 Pirate program.
Cooper, a 210-pound, three-
year letterman at Bertie, was All-
Cotonial Conference last season af-
ter averaging 18.7 points and 12
rebounds per game for the league
ctampions. He was named Most
Valuable FlaverlastsumrneratNC
State's basketball camp and was the
M.VJP. of the Ahoskie Christmas
Tournament held last season.
"Right now, we're real pleased
with thetwo players wegot Payne
said. "As we eet on into our pro-
help.
Ouickh
"twin tow t
are expert
dends for
Wc k
height i
strength
two voungl
big men v4
goodfrar
ome weigj
a phvsicai
After i
Cooper emt
a premier;
gram. Kar
his oral
April. Rk
thepr
out of tow
The:
from Rar
area Pla
aged 24
30 perct
and she
free thro
rebound
ing. Whill
player in
also'
team. H�
current!
mavev
Wit
Payne
lina'littlj
6-foot-4i
fromEaj
lumbia,
sieneei





Classifieds
- �lie iEaot (Earnltnian
May 27, 1992
IOKK1 VIIlOKSMl
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 3
bedroom townhouse apartment. $198
a month plus 1 4 utilities Non-smoker
prefered 355-0986
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS 1 and
2 bedroom apartments Energy-effi-
cient, several locations in town Car-
peted, kitchen appliances, some wa-
ter and sewer paid, washerdryer
hookups Now taking applications for
Fall Call 752-8915
WANTED 2 male roommates Fur-
nished bedroom with bathroom ECU
bus access Available August for Fall
semester, $175mon, incls utilities
Call 321-1848
A Beautiful PUce to Live
�All New
�AnJ Ready To Renf
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
28W 1- 5ih Street
�Located Near ECU
�Neat Major Shopping Centers
�Across From Highway i'atrol Station
ljmitcJ Offer � $330 a month
Contact J T or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 8301937
Office open � Apt. 8. 12-530pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
Qch � � �� � br��n hunirfwd wfmnawat.
�mrfyefTkwm. tm ��teiandteww. ��abmn.n,
j - t TV Cowe� m � mjicl ciily 120 � nxMh. 6
menb kw MOBILE HOMF HDtTALl cn�f a
kw track ViUe� Cnnvy Club
Conuct I T or Tommy Williams
Liz
FREE to a good home. Energetic fe-
male black Lab pup eight weeks old.
Call 757-0903. Leave message if
needed.
TWO AIRCONDITIONERS for sale.
Good condition. Call 752-9058
FOR SALE: Magnavox stereo, tape
deck, and 2 speakers Good condition.
Asking $50. Call 752-5899 or leave
message
SEIZED CARS trucks, boats, 4wheel-
ers, motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Available in your area now Call (800)
338-3388 ext. C-5999.
Ill IV WANTED
ASSEMBLERS NEEDED: Excellent
pay. Many jobs to choose from. Easy
work at home No experience needed.
Call Workersof America 410-860-5296
ext. 200.
BRODY'S is accepting applications
for an AdvertisingMerchandising
Associate Assist with making store
signage, create store and window de-
signs and various other duties. Must
HELP WANTED
be available all summer in the after-
noon for approximately 15 to 20 hours
per week Apply Brody's, The Plaza,
Mon-Thurs from 1pm to 4pm.
ACTIVEINDIVIDUALNEEDEDfor
a nine and thirteen year old to take to
summer activities. Driver's license
required Call 355-8128 (home) or 830-
2277 (work).
WANTED: Baseball players for the
1992 Carolina Bush League For more
information contact Mark Honeycutt
752-4630 or Chas Mitch'l 756-0763.
Serious inquiries only pleasel
EASY WORK! Excellent pay! As-
semble products at home. Call toll
free 1-800-467-5566 ext. 5920.
CRUISESHIPS NOW HIRING:Earn
$2,000 month and world travel (Ha-
waii, Mexico, the Caribbean, etc.)
Holiday, summerand career employ-
HELP WANTED
ment available. No experience neces-
sary. For employment program call 1-
206-545-4155 ext. C586.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT: Fisheries. Earn $5,000
month. Free transportation! Room &
board! Over 8,000 openings. No expe-
rience necessary. Male or Female. For
employment program call Student
Employment Services at 1-206-545-
4155 ext. 1649.
SOCCER COACHES needed from
mid-June until mid-August, coaching
youth 7-8 years old in new program
developed by Pitt Greenville Soccer
Association. For more details call 756-
3879 after 6pm.
CHILDC ARE NEEDED for two small
children, two or three weekday morn-
ings or af tern oons. Previous childca re
experience preferred but not neces-
sary. May be able to work around
HELP WANTED
your schedule Call 752-8564
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions Great benefits. Call (800)
338-3388 ext P-3712
FREE TRAVEL: Air couriers and
cruiseships Students also needed
Christmas, Spring, and Summer for
amusement park employment Call
(800) 338-3388 ext F-3464
WZMB is now taking applications for
newscasters. If you are interested, pick
up an application at the station in the
basemen t of Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter or call 757-6913
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING: Error-free, quick and de-
pendableat reasonable cost. Excellent
typing and proofreading skills (gram-
mar, punctuation, sentence structure,
etcCall Pauline at 757-3693.
PERSONALS
WRITERPHILOSOPHERMUSI-
CIAN AND POETIC SOUL seeks
friendship and correspondence from
like-minded lady Photos and letters
to MV PO Box 8663, Greenville, NC
27835.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
BUY AND l'RADI.
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50.000 TITTLES
919 Dickinson Avc.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NKW
NOW! USED CD'S
RINGGOLD TOWERS
1
2 Large Pizzas
Now laking Leases for 1
bednxim. 2 bednxim &
Kfticiency Apartments.
CALL 7522865
J L
with 1 topping
$7.99
carry out only
not good after
9pm
EVBTV
I 3 Large Pizzas I ALL PITCHERS
I
I
I
I
I
JL
3 toppings
$11.99
good til 9pm
I
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JL
$1.50
(with this coupon)
I
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PUTT-PUTT
With over 1,000
courses world wide.
Mon-Thur 5-11
Friday 5-1
Saturday 10-11
yj 10th St. past DunHn Donuts Sunday J-io
I
expires May 30, 1902 I explrea May 30, 1992
Announcements
INTERVIEW SJCJELS-WQ&K:
SHOT
Seniors and graduate students com-
pleting their degree this summer who
need help in developing or refining
their interview skills are invited to a
workshop on June 3 at 3pm Spon-
sored by Career Services, the work-
shopwiilbeheld in the Bio x ton House.
TENNIS SfflfiJBS REGISTRA-
TION
Come out and register in Biology N-
102 May 27th, 430pm. Men's,
women's leagueshavebeen organized
for all faculty, staff and students.
Equipment is available with your ID
through the Equipment Room located
in 115 Chnstenbury Gym For more
information contact David Gaskins at
757-T.387
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student Cen-
ter invites you to worship with them
Sunday Masses 11 30am k 8 30pm at
the Newman Center, 953 E 10th St
Greenville Weekdays Sam at the
Newman Center
BEACH VOLLEYBALL REG1S-
IRAHQS
Register as an individual or team in
BiologyN-102,June9that4pm Men's,
women's, and co-ed teams may sign-
up For details contact David Gaskins
at 757-8387.
BISEXLAL-GAY-LESBIAN
ALLIANCE
Social support, activism and activi-
ties All interested and canng people
welcome Call 757-67M from 11:15-
12 30 Mon-Thurs for information on
time and place
BOWLING SINGLES REGISTRA-
TION
Come out and register in Biokgy N-
102 May 27th at 4pm Games to be
held at Mendenhall Student Center
For details contact David Gaskins at 757-
6387.
RAFTINGHIKING TRIP
Register now in the Recreational Out-
door Center from 1.30-5:30 on Monday,
330-5:30 Tuesdays Wednesday, and
Thursday and Ham-1 30pm on Fnday.
Event to be held May 29-31, lea vmg at 12
nom. Call 757-6911 for more details
PRESS RELEASE
Teens! Dial-a-Teen is interested in your
valuable time We are looking for special
teens, between the ages of 15 and 18, who
would like to volunteer thar valuable
listening skills to help others in crisis We
are otfenng training classes tor our teen
hotline beginning June 3,1992 Call 758-
HELP of come by 312 East 10th St
CJJMBLNGiRAf.ELUNC WQRK-
SUQf
Register in the Recreational Outdoor
Center now mini 130-5 30pm an Mon-
day, 3.30-530pm Tuesday, Wednesday,
& Thursday and 11 -130 on Friday Event
is to be held on May28�hat3pm Call 757-
6911 for more details
CTJiCiLJClTJJ2EXLCENJER
The Newman Catholic Student Center
invites vou to worship and celebrate with
them on the feast of the Lord's Ascension
Mass schedule Wednesctiv (Ma) l
Evening Vigil Mass 5 30pm Ascension
Thursday (May 28)8am, 12rnxTi,5
TheCenter is kxated at 953 E 10th Street
at the foot of College Hill Dnve
PRESS RELEASE
Weneed vour experience' Your achie e-
ments in everyday situations can be use-
ful to others Earn that feeling of aco
phshment .taal Crisis Center is recruit-
ing Volunteer Cnsis Counselors for our
telephone hot-line and walk-in center
WewUlbeoffenngtrainingclassesnv: -
ennching field beginning June ?, I
Call TSUrfflParoomeby 312 East 10
St.
LION OF NARFORM
BY STANTON
UH, TYPE "I DON'T KNOW
B1E ADAM ROE
THE DOUBTER THE PERVERT" THE SUPPORTER
the i
Types of
Gas Station
employees
THE NAVIGATOR
13 &
umaom aoooNcuvrv
OmMVTIYlYn COf�IOM��
Ml. YOUDOK1UXXJI MIH
KH TOUt A PDMr SHOnr If 71 MCH
ham iaww
THE HOST
7 f-V
MCKNAMES
THIWOTDO
TMEMNT�
OU MOOtlB
AGI-32
THE STUDENT
NICKNAMES: AW 46
THE SUP0�Tt� IAJOOS 4
THE DCVASATO KIDS 4
THl STOW TEUXS WAiJT 42
tmi vrr
DAD
THE IMIGRANT

PrnhM-ut 1-artU: In lW.aflrr
brinx X� amtnj �� �u
�M Irfl itf the nhom ��id
�aiperpowrrv n� arpam
Inicmatmnall latJiiinrnileM
lh�( H in jh MH
hhMWi "fcum -
laMtaa" mm th�x (b��ti
mmL. m��1 all corpora
oMcn I" map. n-srvii'
p�ililic�U-apitaK lhru'
thr -cirtd. Olr I( �j- I I
up iif vmalliT i��m art
iaru-� eBOBBMBBBBflg B '
uHnnxrial. Rmm lu .
indutniil intUii"Ki -
buMncvso lhal �m n.il urwit'
( It timlnjl wrrr dotP
Kankrupinl h iht 1 11 (Mm)
cardN �frr diNtn1
fMHI inr anr m.i. -
ttftlKlr. M '
i-urTTtio Ih�-( h 1 i'i
hranvii �a unI la n
pojpaxanila i th ' inn '
wurid amdilHm" liru.u.mjn
WKmpi In further l- t
hd nrT vi� b jik! cMia
thr( H "ah-�t�.l d
naimnat iBMBlipjPl
pu4u-T hurrnuv HI
( i�Tiir-alr !ir. i I
lnvr .
SUNBURN
BY MISENHEIMER
OlOOtfr KMOWHB
coupuimociAwni
UMtDHAMCTNC o� u
MOtiM ii�rm (Oao(
6� JO- U
MiMaavf DAnovMBNT dhcjon
�mourn- iioAinion
NtCKNAMU: A�� 20-24
THE DtSMaATOII FEATURES.
THE NEW sOY LIKES STAR SEARCH
THETREMtUR
NICKNAMES
THE OWNER
�OSS
AMPORTIOY
MRGUUJIU
BIG MAMA KAYE-MONSTER HUNTER
BY STEVE MASON
Htlil��UTOM tuutHR-
KILTUN liTHtCHUALTlIk
T��rr o�iim S�� lAie
in vio�jisorT�s �ecr
1 trunk its going to
be a hot summer
this year, don't vou
think?
dunno.
it's pretty damn hot
now.
yeah, I suppose so.
it's the wars that's
causing all this heat.
why's that?
I'm not sure, but
IVegot a feettri
thats what's
causing it.
1 don't see how
that kid can plav in
this heat he s been
playing all day.
ht? better stay out of
thenad
yeah, hey kid.
better get out of
the road!
vou should keep
nut of the wav of the
marathvnersr
�4T
LAWN MOWER BOY
wren
S m
Weak 'pen ol
dethrone Ovei
baseball team
By Robert S. Todd
Assistant Sports Editor
There an? very' few s hoob in
the country- where a w inning base-
ball season would be considered
dismal. ECU is one of them.
Head coach Gar.Krerton is
unaccustomed to losing he can
currently boast one of the best win-
ning percentages among active a 1-
lege baseball coaches (r r ECU
claimed the best record in the na-
tion at 47-9.
Taking home theColonial Ath-
letic Association champn rtshiphad
become habit � until this year. The
Piratesbowedoutofth!sear ?tour-
nament with tw i straight l s for
the first time in BCU's history- in
Colonial Athletic Axriatjon plav
It would seem Overt r might
have a hard time dealing with the
Pirates posting the worst record in
school history, at 25-24, and the
school's first losing season within
theconference, finishing at 7-10. But
somehow, Overton seems to find a
way to shrug it off, knowing things
will get better.
"Let'sjustsavitwasdLsappoint-
ing that our record was not as g(xxi
as we had hoped Overton said.
"We knew it would be tough to win
a fourth consecutive CAA crown
Sophomore sensation, johnny
Beck, echcx?d the same feelings
"We w ere expecting more he
said. "Some of the brakes didn't go
our way
A weak bullpen, poor fielding
and lack of offense hurt ECU
throughout the season.
The lack of a consistent closer
contributed to several losses, many
that the Pirates were leading until
late in the game. A strong man in
relief may have salvaged three of
the the biggest games of the season
for the Bucs. Twice the Wolfpack of
N.C State rallied to overcome defi-
cits late in the game. As if that were
not enough, a heart-breaking loss in
extra-innings to another Atlantic
Coast Conference opponent, UNC-
Chapel Hill, exemplified the frus-
tration ECU fe.
hold onto a lead
The sh
fielders Chad
and Pat WatM
ECU'S lOOerro
free passes, EC
keep the oppo
The Bucs let
extrabases, air
wearing the
gunned downl
attempts
"Our bi
of the year
Overton said
tnproducerur
enough offerti
position. Our
although our I
onto leads
The : j
- . ess is
the Bucs on th
The Bucs werel
their fourth str
but their fifth
Fortunately,
never tarnish!
For most'
the expectatki
slipped away
season lunio
John Gast sitnf
tracts with l
and the Cin
bvely.
Eason an
Pirate attack.
theAIl-CAA
?on, Cast toci
the ear bond
"Ihetossi
in nature U
them had a
sional contn
what we wi
One 14 tJJ
the Bucs thij
emergence cj
fer from Ricl
bettered btd
the bat, but i
the loss of b
"When
were hopinl
Pirates ink
Payne gets 'twin t
JUCO transf
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sports Writer
After a dismal 10-18 season
filled with sidelining injuries and
many losses- under five points. ECU
Head coach Eddie Payne has com-
pleted what is now considered the
best 1992-93 recruiting class in the
Colonial Athletic Association.
Payne's first signee was the 6-
foot-10-inch, Don Douglas from
Bishop OConnell High School in
Falls Church, Va.
Douglas, a 220-pound center,
begins onlv his fourth season of
competitive basketball after aver-
aging 12 points and 10 rebounds for
his 23-8 Knights last season. Also,
he was listed as honorable mention
All-America in Van Coteman's Fu-
ture Stars, plaved m the Washing-
torvD.C-Virgirua All-Star game last
year and played in a summer league
with several of this year's
Georgetown freshman.
Less than 48 hours later, Payne
inked yet another 6-foot-lO-inch
signee. Bernard Cooper of Bertie
High School agreed to take part in
the 1992-93 Pirate program.
Cooper, a 210-pound, three-
year letterman at Bertie, was All-
Colonial Conference last season af-
ter averaging 18.7 points and 12
rebounds per game for the league
champions. He was named Most
Valuable Flayer lastsumrneratN.C
State's basketball camp and was the
M.V.P. of the Ahoskie Christmas
Tournament held last season.
"Rightnow, we're real pleased
withthetwoplaverewegot'Payne
said. "As we eet on into our pro-
gram and
with us, tha
help"
Quickh
"twin tow e
areexpect
dendsfor
"Wek
height, s
strength
two young
big men
goodrrar
some wai
a physical
After u
Cooper anJ
a premier j
gram. Kar
his oral c
April. Rk
thepr
out of tow
The:
from Rar
area Pla
aged243
30per�
and sho
freethrov
rebounds
ing. Whill
player in j
also:
team. H�
current!
mayev�
Wit
Paynes
Una "lit
6-fdot-4
fromEaf,
lumbia,
sieneel





Classifieds
ullie �afit (Earoltntan
May 27, 1992
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE VV N I ED to -hare 3
bedroom townhouse apartment SWS
a month plus 1 4uhlibes Non-smoker
prefered J55-0986
KINGS ARMS APAR 1 MEN IS 1 and
2 bedroom apartments Energy-effi-
cient several locations in town Car-
peted k ' hen appliances some wa-
h � md -ewer paid washer dryer
kups Nov taking applications for
Fall all 52 891
WANTED 2 male roommates Fnr-
ed bedroom with bathroom. ECl
busaccess Available August tor Tall
semestei S1 mon nuis utilities
Call J21 184
10 i-ic
New
INIYERSm PARTMENTS
50pm
1 EA GARDENS'
� �, � �� hn � b( t -� faimated apmitmrr.u
f r-�r '��; �-�� � -�rr ��itilll. �"�:�,
.� � iTV .�- � � � � i -i �- JT � month. 6
bxmH -�� M . v' B S U S coaptei
� ' � ' � - � �� ' �'�� "� Awuo� -�rdnni
ora Brook V - e rjuntn v�ls
� t " " � 5 Jli�m$
FOR SALE
FREE to a good home Energetic fe-
male black Uib pup eight weeks old
Call 757-0903 Leave message it
needed
TWO AIRtONDlTK)FRS tor sale
Good condition Call 752-9058
FOR SALE: Magnavox stereo, tape
deck,and 2 speakers I lood condition
Asking S50 Call 752-5899 or leave
message
SE1ZEDCARS trucks, boats, 4w heel-
ers, motorhomes by FBI, IKS. DEA
Available in your area now Call (S00)
338-3388 ext. C-5999
HELP WANTED
ASSEMBLERS NEEDED: Excellent
pay Many jobs to choose from I asy
work at home No experience needed
Call Workersof America 410-860-52
ext 200
BRODY'S is accepting applications
tor an Advertising Merchandising
Associate Assist with making store
signage, create store and window de-
signs and various other duties Must
HELP-WANTED
be available all summer in the after-
noon for approximately 15 to 20 hours
per week Apply Brody's, Ihel'laa,
Mon-Thurs from lpm to 4pm
ACnVEINDIVIDUALNEEDEDfor
a nine and thirteen year old to take to
summer activities Driver's license
required Call355-8128(home)or830-
2277 (work)
WANTED: Baseball players tor the
1442 Carolina hush 1 eague I or more
information contact Mark Honeycutt
752-4630 or c has Mitch'l 756-0763
Serious inquiries onlyplease
EAS WORK! Excellent pay! As-
semble products at home Call toll
tretJ 1-800-467-5566 ext 5920
CRUISE SHIPS OY HIRING:Earn
$2,000 moi th and world travel (Ha-
waii, Mexico the Caribbean, etc)
Holiday, summer and careeremploy-
HELPAVANTED
ment available No expenein e neces-
sary For employment program call 1-
206-545-4155 ext C586
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT: Fisheries Earn $5,000
month Free transportation! Room &
board!Over8,000openings Noexpe-
riencenecessary Male or Female For
employment program call Student
Employment Services at 1-206-545-
415? ext 1644
SOCCER COACHES needed from
mid-June until mid-August, coa hmg
vouth 7-8 years old in new program
developed by Pitt Greenville Soccer
Association For more details call 756-
3874 atter 6pm
CHILDCARE NEEDED for two small
children, two or three weekday morn-
ings or afternoons Previouschildcare
experience preferred but not neces-
sary May he able to work around
HELP WANTED
your schedule Call 752-8564
I'os i AI BS AVAILAB1 E! Many
positions Great benefits call (800)
338 3388ext P-3712
LRU lRWlT: Air couriers and
cruiseships 'students also needed
( hristmas Spring and Summer tor
amusement park employment.ill
s 13 K 388ext 1 J464
WZMBi � - w taking applicahons for
news asters If you are interested, pi k
up an appli abi �n at the station in the
basement of Mendenhall Student Cen-
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING: 1 m r fre . . k and ie
pendable at reasonal � st Excellent
typingandj roofreadingskills gram-
n � pun( ruat entei i tru rure,
PERSONALS
WRITERPHILOSOPHERMl SI-
C IAN AND POETK SOU -
friendship and oorresj � i �
like-minded lady Photosa I let
to MV it' Bo 86 Green
27835
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
Spoils
ROOKTRADIk
lit M) I KADI
P I1 KB K ItM �Ks
() V1 R
50.000 1 1 1 1 � s
Weak 'pen off
dethrone Ove
baseball team
919 Dickenson
(Jreenille, N,(
758-6909
COMICS (tl l� v M V
now ; i si M i'
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now 1 aking 1 cases foi 1
bedroom, 2 bedroom &
1 ilkictKA Apartments
CALL 752-2865
I
I
1
I
I
I
irge
with 1 topping
S7.99
carry out only
not good after
9pm
Every
I 3 Large Pizzas I ALL prTCHERS
I
I
I
I
I
3 toppings
$11.99
good til 9pm
I
I
I
I
I
J.
S1.50
(with this coupon)
I
I
I
I
I
J
PUTT-PUTT
With over 1,000
- courses world wide.
N 'sy'
Mon-Thur B
Friday
Saturday - .
.
10th St. past DunWn Donuts Sunday
BUY ONE i BUY ONE
ONJE
i
expires May 30, 1992 I
expires May 30, 1992
Announcements
1NUR 11 VN skills WORK
sHOi'
� - zraduate students com-
I ,� zthen legree this summer who
need hel n devi pmg or refining
erview skills are invited to .1
. . uni ;� 5pm Spon-
- , b C are r Servi es the work-
, , � . , iton House
iiNNis frfNClgs REGISTRA-
IION
I reg ster n Biolog) N
: : M.i 27tl 4 ; pm Mi � -
, . . � ave been organized
�, stafi and students
n . � � as ailable with your ID
through the Equipment Room ex ated
in 115 Christenbury Gym Lor more
information contact DavidGaskins at
757-6387
CATHOLIC STUDEN 1 CiMEi
The Newman Catholic Student Cen-
ter invites you to worship with them
Sunday Masses 11 30am & 8 30pm at
the Newman Center 953 1" 10th St.
Greenville Weekdays Sam .it the
Newman Center
BtAUi VQl 1 PYBALL REGIS-
Register .is .in individual or team in
BklogyN-102June9that4pm Men s,
womer � ai
up Fordet-u
.it 757-6387
teams may sign-
� 1 )a id laskins
BISEXTJAL-GA llshlAN
ALUN; I
Shhi.i1 supj � " act '� ism and I �
ties All interested I carii p pe ; .
welcome c all '57-6766 fron
1230 Moi 11 ;rs for mformahi
time and 1 �� �
BOWLING MNi.lls KlcislRV
riON
c ome out ai d registei 1 Btok gy N-
102 M.i 27m .it 4pm aims I I 1
held at Mendenhall Student Center
For details contact 1 Xn rK lasku
h387
RAFTTNGHDQNG 1 KIT
Register now m the Recreatiorui 1 - 1
door Center from 130-530 on M 1 la
3JO-53 ruesdays Ve�in�-s) 11 i
rhursday and llam-1 30pm on 1 rid
Event tobi I -eld M.iv:?l,ie.i ngatl2
ncxxial "5 6911 � t r" re let
I'Rlss RELEAS1
reensi Dial-a-Teen is inierestHJ 1 � u
valuable time We are looking i 1
teens, between tfe ages of 15 and -
would like hi volunteer theu
listening skills to he others n �" � � A
1
VV,
hhj � � � �
'S.V
( 1!MH!S(, RAPELUNG WORK-
SHOP
�. .x �, � � � . �� 1 � � r .� : � '
Center � �
- '� Li.
- � : Eve
e held on V
I ! hoik SJLjPENT CENTER
. � entei
. - . . � � ��� ��
Evenii . � �
. entei be
���.� � eg)
V R I - s K I L L
expene i
� � ever
� � ther Eai
- -
telephoru
� �
�58-H
LION OF NARFORM
BY STANTON
Bv Roberi
The
th-
ball - �
dismal I
Head
UIIli cusl
cunvr �
ning p"

claimed �' �
tion at 4 �
leu.
tx - ' �
Pirate -
rw �
the �
It
huu
Pirates 1
.
5CrU
th�
somerv
wa)
VVi Ig
ine th.i'
as ��

,i t lurtJ
Beck, e �
said
out 1
and
thr

tribute
th.it th
Lite in �
relief mav I
the � �
for the Bik - . ��
N.C. State rallied b 1 � eroome �
cib. late in the game. As it that were
not enough, a heart-bn i ssir
extra-innii I
� �
Chapel Hill
Pirates ink
Payne gets 'twin ti
JUCO transf
B Charles Mitchell
,r sr.
W �
After a
filled with -
rrv:in loss
Headcoa
pleted ���
Km 199
CoiiT.1.1. -
Pa �
foot
Bishop 0 v ��'N
Fall ' un V �
begins - " -M'r
oompetii
asng I
hi- 23-8 (
hewaslistedas �- rablemention
AH-America in Vai an'sFu-
ture Sfars
ton.Pc -Virginia imelast
ye�randpla-ed
with severa I tni" v'
Georgetown rreshman
Less thanks hour- � 'io
inkevi vet another 6-fbot-10-indt
signee Bernard I oopet of Bertie
High School agreed I � part in
the 1992-93 Pirate program
Civptr a 210-pound Ihree-
year ietternvm at Bertie was Ml
Colonial Conference tost season at-
ter averaging 187 points and
rebounds ptr game for the league
champions, He was named Most
Valuable Player last summer atN.C
State's baskethalh amp and was the
M.V.P. 01 the Ahoskie cTinstmas
Tournament held last -eason.
"Rightnow we re real pleased
VMththetwoplayerswegot, raT�e
said. "As we eet on into our oro-
area
aged 24

and sh
tree thn'
reKiurxl'
ing Whi
player in
also nam
team. H�
currentbj
mav e e
Wit'
Favne sei
Una "httll
fs-tlHlt-4
from Ea
lumbia,
siCTieet(





PERSONALS
752-8564 WRITFRPH1LOSOPHERMUSI-
l IAS AP POETIC SOU! seeks
Ml Bl B Many friendship .mil correspondence from
BOO) like-minciecl lady PhotM arid letters
hM POBox8663 Gracnvillc, NC
27835
ent Call
It -JM
S for
�ted pick
'en
S OFFERED
id de-
DISPLAY CLASSIFIEDS
ROOKTRADER
m VM 1 K DI
P MM Ki: K HOOKS
0 1 R
50,000 1 1 1 l 1 S
919 Dickenson Vve.
Greenville, N
758 6909
COMICS 01 D M N
NOW! 1 S 1� CD'S
PUTT
Mon-Thur 5-11
,000 Frlday M
courses world wide. Saturday 10-11
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58 HELP or come by 312 East I (th
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Sports
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Afcy 27, 7992
Weak 'pen offense
dethrone Overton,
baseball team in '92
By Robert S. Todd
Assistant Sports Editor
There are very few schools in
the country where a winning hase-
Kill season would be considered
dismal. ECU is one of them.
Head coach Gary Overton is
unaccustomed to losing - he can
currently boast one of the best win-
ning percentages among active col-
lege baseball coaches. In 199(1, ECU
Jaimed the best record in the na-
tion at 47-9.
Taking home theColonial Ath-
letic Association championship had
become habit � until this year. The
Pirates bowed out of this year's tour-
nament with two straight losses for
the first time in ECU's history in
Colonial Athletic Association play.
It would seem Overton might
have a hard time dealing with the
Tirates posting the worst record in
schixil history, at 25-24, and the
school's first losing season within
theconference,finishingat 7-10. But
somehow, Overton seems to find a
way to shrug it off, knowing things
wall get better.
"Let'sjustsayitwasdisappoint-
mg that our record was not as good
.is we had hoped Overton said.
'We knew it would be tough to win
a fourth consecutive CAA crown
Sophomore sensation, Johnnv
Beck, echoed the same feelings.
"We were expecting more he
said. "Some of the brakes didn't go
ourwav
A weak bullpen, poor fielding
and lack of offense hurt ECU
throughout the season.
The lack of a consistent closer
contributed to several losses, many
that the Tirates were leading until
late in the game. A strong man in
relief mav have salvaged three of
the the biggest games of the season
tor the Bucs. Twice the Wolfpack of
N.C. State rallied to overcome defi-
cits late in the game. As if that were
not enough, a heart-breaking loss in
extra-innings to another Atlantic
Coast Conference opponent, UNC-
Chapel Hill, exemplified the frus-
tration ECU felt all season trying to
hold onto a lead.
The shoddy glove work of in-
fielders Chad Triplett, Glynn Beck
and Pat Watiuns resulted in 59 of
ECU's 100 errors. Along with those
free passes, ECU catchers failed to
keep the opposition from running.
The Bucs let their opponents take
extrabases, almost at will. The men
wearing the tools of ignorance
gunned down 20 runners in 100
attempts.
"Our biggest disappointment
of the year was our offense
Overton said. "Not onlv did we fail
to produce runs, wed idn't generate
enough offense to get us in scoring
position. Our pitching was solid,
although our bullpen failed to hold
onto leads
The picture seems very bleak.
Success is usually expected from
the Bucs on the baseball diamond.
The Bucs were not only shixiting for
their fourth straightchampionship,
but their fifth in the last six seasons.
Fortunately, one bad season could
never tarnish such a sterling record.
For most of the Pirate faithful,
the expectations of another banner
slipped away before the start of the
season. Juniors Tommy Eason and
John Gast signed professional con-
tracts with the Philadelphia Phillies
and the Cincinnati Reds, respec-
tively.
Eason and Gast, the core of the
Pirate attack, were both named to
the All-CAA team in 1991. In addi-
tion, Gast took home Co-Player of
the Year honors.
"The loss of those two was great
in nature Overton said. "Both of
them had a chance to sign profes-
sional contracts, which is certainly
what we wish for all our players
One of the few bright spots for
the Bucs this past season was the
emergence of Lee Kushner, a trans-
fer from Rice University. Kushner
bettered both Eason and Gast with
the bat, but could not make up for
the loss of both.
"When we recruited Lee, we
were hoping for some power
Flk photo by Dall Rssd � 77m Bmt Csrollnlsn
UNC-Wilmington ended ECU's four-year reign on top of the Colonial Athletic Association's baseball charts by
handing the team a 9-7 loss in the 1992 tournament. The Pirates can only look to next year to regain the title.
Seahawks dump ECU in CAAs
By Robert S. Todd
Assistant Sports Editor
Games are impossible to win with a low-
octane offense, unless you have an impenetrable
defense. For ECU, leads have been a mixed bless-
ing. They have been as difficult to hold on to as a
greased pig and the bullpen does not have any
bulls.
ECU left the Colonial Athletic Association
tournament with a whimper. The Bucs failed to
win a CAA tournament game for the first time in
school history.
In game one of the tournament, held at
Harrington Field, the Pirates rolled over to the
Dukes of James Madison, 2-1.
Johnny Beck allowed only five hits while
striking out eight JMU players over eight innings.
The sixth inning provided the only scoring
for both teams. Lee "Mt. Krushner" Kushner led-
off the top half of the inning with a double to
right-center and advanced to third on a fly ball
to right field by Pat Watkins. Tom Moye drove
Kushner in with a single up the middle.
The bottom of the sixth was the only blem-
ish on Beck's performance. Beck has had prob-
lems with the big inning all season. With one
out, the Duke's Jeff Kaufman drew a walk.
After getting the second out of the inning, Beck
let Kevin Nehring send a shot to right-center
for a double. Kaufman crossed the plate easily.
With Beck rattled, Brian Morabito dialed eight,
sending the ball, again, to deep right-center for
a three-bagger. Beck tften settled down and
Chris Williams popped out to third. Neither
team had a baserunner during the remainder of
the game.
The Bucs found themselves in a must win
See CAA, page 8
Overton said. "He gave us more
than an ample amount (of offense)
from one person. Reluctantly, the
rest of the team did not comply
Unfortunately, Kushner may be
lost by tfie time players pull up their
stirrups and lace their cleats for the
start of next season.
"I would have to be drafted in
the first ten rounds and be guaran-
teed of education after I finish play-
ing Kushner said earlier in the
year. "I love Greenville, and they
would have to make me a hell of an
offer
Kushner placed eighth in the
conference in batting, at 353, sev-
enth in RBI with 42 and third in
home runs, launching 13 over fences
See Baseball, page 8
Lady luck
casts bad
spell on
softballeis
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sports Writer
At the start of the 1992 Lady
Pirate fast pitch sof tball season,Head
coach Sue Manahan was sitting
pretty. Not only did she return with
each player from the 1991 Colonial
Athletic Association championship
team, she added anadditionaJ player
(Sherri Allen) to help fill thecathing
duties behind the plate.
As the season began, senior co-
captains Chanel Hooker and Laura
Crowder led the Lady Bucs into a
year which would place ECU fast
pitch in the spotlight of the nation.
Pitchers Jenny Parsons (38-13),
Georgeann Wilke (4-3) and Tammy
Newman (3 appearances) turned in
outstanding pitching performances.
While seniors Christy Kee and
Mechelle Jones added to the defen-
sive scheme with their aggressive
style play.
The Pirates jumped to a quick
11-0 start averaging seven runs a
game while only allowing the oppo-
sition to one run a game.
Defense played a crucial part in
the Pirate winning style. Withsopho-
mores Stephanie Hobson, Lisa
Coreprew, Laume Farrington and
Michelle Ward stepping up with
caliber defense. The pitching staff
was able to keep the heat on the
opposition.
After a few minor adjustments,
the Lady Pirates were on track with
their 19-6 record. Finishing fourth in
the South Florida tournament and
second in the Lady Pirate Classic.
Manahan and her "Girls of Sum-
mer" were slowly beginning to re-
ceive the local and state attention
they deserved.
Juniors Camrnie Smith and
Cherry Hobson sparked the Pirate
offense, as ECU picked up big wins
against Wright State, Drake Univer-
sity and North Carolina.
See Softball, page 8
Pirates ink key recruits in basketball off-season
Payne gets 'twin towers
JUCO transfer
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sports Writer
After a dismal 10-18 season
filled with sidelining injuries and
many losses under five points, ECU
Head coach Eddie Payne has com-
pleted what is now considered the
best 1992-93 recruiting class in the
Colonial Athletic Association.
Payne's first signee was the 6-
foot-10-inch, Don Douglas from
Bishop OConnell High School in
Falls Church, Va.
Douglas, a 220-pound center,
begins only his fourth season of
competitive basketball after aver-
aging 12 points and 10 rebounds for
his 23-8 Knights last season. Also,
he was listed as honorable mention
All-America in Van Coleman's Fu-
ture Stars, played in the Washing-
ton,D.C-Virginia All-Stargamelast
year and played in a summer league
with several of this year's
Georgetown freshman.
Less than 48 hours later, Payne
inked yet another 6-foot-10-inch
signee. Bernard Cooper of Bertie
High School agreed to take part in
the 1992-93 Pirate program.
Cooper, a 210-pound, three-
year letterrnan at Bertie, was All-
Colonial Conference last season af-
ter averaging 18.7 points and 12
rebounds per game for the league
champions. He was named Most
Valuable Player lastsummeratNC.
State's basketball camp and was the
M.V.P. of the Ahoskie Christmas
Tournament held last season.
"Right now, we're real pleased
with the two players we got Payne
said. "As we �et on into our pro-
gram and people get more familiar
with us, that can't do anything but
help
Quickly being dubbed as the
"twin towers Dunbar and Cooper
are expected to pay immediatedivi-
dends for the Pirates.
"We kxjked for guys with some
height, some size and some
strength Payne said. "We found
two young men who are legitimate
big men with strong bodies and
good frames so that they can put on
some weight. We think each can be
a physical force for us
After inking the " twin towers
Cooper and Douglas, Payne added
a premier guard to the Pirate pro-
gram. Kareem Richardson offered
his oral commitment to ECU in
April. Richardson wanted to sign in
the presence of his coach, who was
out of town on vacation.
The 5-fbot-l 1 -inch point guard
from Rantoul, 111 was named the
area Player of the Year. He aver-
aged 245 points per game, hitting
30 percent of his 3-point attempts
and shooting 70 percent from the
free throw line. He led his team in
rebounds, assists, steals and scor-
ing. While being named as the top
player in his area, Richardson was
also named to the Illinois All-State
team. He is expected to assist the
currentback court ball handlers and
may even work as the wing.
With three prospective recruits,
Payne set his sights on a South Caro-
lina "little big man Greg James, a
6-foot-4 and one-half-inch forward
from EauClair High School in Co-
lumbia, S.C, became the fourth
sienee for the 1992 Pirate recruiting
r
Pierson finds players to fill
holes left by graduation
class.
"Greg is a young man who is a
proven winner Payne said. "He is
competitive and tough. I think hell
bring a lot to our program
James will bring a lot to the
ECU program. He averaged 18.9
points and 4.8 boards per game last
season for the Shamrocks, who fin-
ished 23-5 for Coach George
Gryrnph. He was named honorable
mention All-America in several
publications, includingHoop Scoop
and Cage Scope.
With four outstanding recruits
in hand and the spring signing pe-
riod about to end (May 15,1992),
Payne was sitting pretty. However,
his smile gleamed a little brighter
after the announcement of two ad-
ditional signees.
Wilber Hunter, a 66 forward
tromChowanCoUegeand Simpson
"Bump" Toliver of Hargrave Mili-
tary prep school in Chatham, Va
were the final prospects to sign their
rational letters of intent to play bas-
ketball for coach Eddie Payne.
Hunter average 16.4pointsand
67 rebounds per game for Chowan
last season. The Raleigh, N.C, na-
tive, was voted Chowan'sMVPand
named All-Carolinas Conference
last season. Hunter is often com-
pared toformerChowanNCState
basketbaUstandoutNateMcMillen,
who now plays for the Seattle Su-
personks in the MBA. Hunter's
game style and leadership has net-
ted him numerous awards. He was
named all-tournament in the Coal
Classic in Jasper, Ala and
Se Racrultt. page �
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sports Writer
After a 21-8 season and the
graduation of five seniors, Head
coach Pat Pierson had her basket-
ball recruiting goals set.
First she took a road trip to
Northwest High School in Georgia
to pay a visit to Belinda Cagle.
Cagle, a 5-foot-10-inch guard,
who averaged 20 points a game
along with seven rebounds and six
assists, was the first recruit in the
Pierson stable.
"Belinda is the type of student-
athlete we were looking for to fur-
ther the success of Lady Pirate bas-
ketball said Pierson. "She excels
in athletic competition and is also
an outstanding student
Cagle, as team captain, helped
lead her high school squad to a 19-
8 record and to die Georgia 2A
Regional Championship. In addi-
tion, she was named to the Georgia
State Athletic All-Star Team and to
the Georgia-Tennessee All-Star
team.
"She is a strong perimeter
shooter and, most of all, a very
versatile athlete Pierson said of
her first recruit
Next, Pierson was on her way
to the state of Virginia. There she
had her eyes set on a jewel of a
player. Kisha (pronounced quteh-
a) Redcross would be the next
signee for the 1992-93 Lady Pirates
team.
Redcross, a 5-foot-ll-inch,
four-year starting forward at
Gloucester High School, plays
Plsrson's style of basketball.
"Kisha plays a similar game to
Tonya Hargrove and is the type of
recruit we were looking for to re-
place her Pierson commented.
Hargrove was a two-time Lady Pi-
rate MVP & the 1990-91 Colonial
Athletic Association Player of the
Year. She graduated this past
school year.
Redcross averaged 15.2 points
a game, nine boards and shot 52
percent from the field. She was
also named to the Virginia High
School Ail-Star team and the All-
District unit
As to style and ability, coach
Pierson said this of her second re-
cruit: "She is very physical and
goes hard to the basket. She defi-
nitely fits thedescriptionof a power
forward
With two recruits signed,
Pierson was still working on an-
other. As expected she signed her
third recruit in 19 days.
Latesha Sutton from Green
Central High School, here in East-
em North Carolina, signed her let-
ter of intent In her senior year,
Sutton was second in the eastern
Plains Conference in scoring (185
per game), first in rebounding (12.9
per game) and fifth in steals (2.7
per game). Asa 5-foot-9-inch guard,
she was a Daily Reflector All-Area
and East-West All Star selection.
"Latesha is an exceptional ath-
lete who can do a variety of things
on the basketball court" Pierson
ssidof their Utestsignee. "Sheisan
excellent student as well and will
be a strong addition to the Lady
Pirate i





a She Coat Carolinian
My27, 1992
Jones leads corps of
Pirates in NFL draft
flr"l OPlfft retfKS3 Gallimore, Daniels sign as free agents
Baseball
Continued from page 7
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
Former ECU linebacker Robert
lones leads a class of five ECU play-
ers who were selected in the NFL
Draft.
lones was selected as the 24th
pick over all. The Dallas Cowboys
added lones to thier large group of
talented young players There's a
gixxl chance you'll see lones along
with Kennv Norton as Dallas' two
main linebackers next season.
"I feel great about this Jones
told The CtonMff OhsmrrHesettled
on a four-vear contract less than two
days after the draft, of which, the
terms were not diseased.
It wasn't until the next day that
quarterback leff Blake was picked in
thesixthnuind by the New York jets.
He responded positively to his situ-
ation
'They're bringing in a new of-
fense this year Blake told The Neu$
and Record of Greensboro. 'It's one
that I will fit into. That's why they
picked me
Tight end Luke Fisher, a
Medford, N.J native was picked in
the eighth round. The Minnesota
Vikings drafted Fisher and have pre-
liminary plans to use him as a half
back.
Defensive back Chris Hall
earned an opportunity to play along
side lones in the Cowboy organiza-
tion as a ninth round choice.
Bob Sloic, a former defensive
coach for ECU was recently hired by
Dallas. TheCowboysand Head coach
Softball
Jimmy Johnson are using a defen-
sive scheme similar to that of the
Pirates.
The Houston Oilers used their
10th round choice to draft ECU's
multi-purpose wide receiver Deon
Johnson Hisflashymovesand quick
nature fit in well with the Oilers'
style of play. He plans on trying out
with Houston as a return specialist
Hunter Gallamore and David
Daniels were also picked up by NFL
teams, as free agents. The New York
Giants scooped up Gallamore and
his receiving prowess, while Pitts-
burgh signed Daniels.
"People knew we were good
Blakesakl,referringtohis teammates.
"They just didn't know how good
we were. Now we're going to have
to prove ourselves again
Continued from page 7
As thedavsgot hotter, so did the
tjdjjr Pirates Now with a 3&KJ
record, their givtl of another CAA
championshi p and possible post sea-
son plav was in sight With 18 games
remaining, Fast Carolina received
regional attention when they were
selected as the Southeast Regions
No. 6 team
In their final 18 games the Lady
Pirates posted a 12-6 record, which
included a third place finish in the
UNC-Chapel I li 11 tournament and a
impressive thini place finish in the
USC Round Riin ti uirnev in South
C "arolina.
Now with a 42-1 Coverall record,
'era I prestigious tournament win-
nings under their belt and numer-
ous School and national rtCOfda M(
bed or broken, the moment of truth
�i arnved
With a few djyi to spare before
the announcement from the NCAA
selection team, the Ladv Pirates hekl
rheir annual awards banquet.
For their hard work, the "Girls
of Summer" received the following
national and regional awards.
� Jenny Parsons was named
Second Team NSC A (National Soft"
ball Coaches Asstxiation) All-South
Region She set a new ECU single
season fCOd with 38 wins ami was
named to the MKGnd team at the
pitcher position. This war, Parsons
broke a total of five pitching records
including most strikeouts with 1 Y9.
She also led the nation with her 38
wins in the NCAA.
� LMM Crowder, the national
leader for stt len bases, was an Flon-
orable Mention selection. Crowder
set a new single season record for
stolen bases and also broke the old
NC AA record forconsecutivestolen
bases with her 64 swipes Crowder
who sports a .438 batting average
which is Wth best in the nation, also
s�t four new Ladv Pirate records.
� Chervl Hobson was given
honors as the EC AC Division 1
women's softball All-Star team se-
lectee. Flobson was chosen as the
ECAC First Team Designated Hitter
after leading the Lady Pirates in RBls
with 48 while hitting an impressive
2KB batting average Hobson's 48
RBls set a new ECU record while
placing her 15th in the natun among
NCAA Division 1 softball statistics.
With the local and national
COMING UP
In OHff SSS3 ISAM
The Buffalo Man stops at local laundrymat
The sti rv of Newton James and his a TOO lb. buffalo that stopped
in the Emerald City last week. Becauseof space constraints, it was cut
from today's issue of The East Carolinian.
Go cart race track comes to Emerald City
Remember the go carts and tracks in Myrtle Beach? Well, local
businessmen have done the same on U.S. 2M, North of Greenville.
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Services
around the CAA.
"1 would be surprised if Lee
Kushner does not get a chance to
play professional baseball
Overton said. "He's certainly a hit-
ter the professional peopleare look-
ing for � he has a knack for setting
pitchers up. He's an intelligent hit-
ter
Kushner is spending his sum-
mer with the North East Collegiate
League � a wood bat league spon-
sored by Major League Baseball.
Scouts will have an eye on him
while he plays in New York and
may choose him high enough in the
draft to lure him away from
Harrington Field.
The disappointments of this
season should fadeaway with real-
ization of the potential next year's
team has. The possible return of
Kushner, the return of the staff's
ace, Beck,outfielder David Leisten,
who finished fifth in the conference
in batting and third baseman Glynn
Beck, who hit 327 for the season.
Beck will be sharpening his
tools in the Cape Cod League this
summer.
"(Playing with wood bats) re-
ally helps a pitcher a lot Beck said.
"You can pitch inside more - there
is more pop
Beck may already haveenough
"pop He finished second in the
league in strike outs, with 91. Beck
was only eight off the lead despite
pitching 15 less innings than league
leader Stephen Lyons of Old Do-
minion University.
Playing in the summer leagues,
Beck said, will give him a chance to
work on his pitching and get expe-
rience against players from all over
the country.
"(Next season) I expect to be a
lot better than 7-7 Beck said 1 feel
like a ten win pitcher
"Johnny Beck had two fine sea-
sons Overton said. "We had very
little run production for him. If we
can get from Johnny as we have the
previous two years, then he will
have done an excellent job
Immediate help for next season
Recruits
will be readily available if all of next
seasons commitments come
through.
"We haven't released our re-
cruiting list yet, but we have signed
a freshman who can hut and prob-
ably play rightaway Overton said.
"We've also signed a JUCO transfer
who was a pretty high draft choice
out of high school. The reason I'd
rather not release his name, is be-
cause next Monday (June 25) is the
draft and he could easily be drafted
and never come to East Carolina.
"Inanutshell,we're very happy
with the recruits we've had this
Spring
The idea that a winning season
seems dismal, as well as being the
worst in school history, says a lot
about the overall strength of the
program.
The Pirates will not suffer
thmugh another "disappointing"
winning season next year. Should
the Bucs hold onto Kushner and
their recruits, they may bring home
one more flag for Harrington Field.
Continued from page 7
awanls sb II flowing in, the 1992 ECU
Awards went as follows:
Outstanding Pitcher � lenny
ftefNM
Highest Batting Average �
Laura Crowder
Outstanding Defensive Flay �
Chanel Hooker, Tammy Newman
Most I mpwved Player �Cheryl
Flobson, Stephanie Hobson
"Whatever It Takes" Award �
Georgeann Wilke
Captain Awards � Chanel
Hooker, Laura Crowder
Senior Awards � Laura
Crowder, Chanel Hooker, Mechelle
Jonenes, Tammy Newman and
Christy Kee
Amongother accomplishments
this season, Manahan recorded her
3U)th career win and b now314-171
(M7) in just her 11 th season as ECU
head coach.
As the sun continued to shine
on the Lady Pirates, darkness was
on the horizon. ECU received a post
season invitation from the NIC com-
mittee to take part in the 1992 Na-
tional Invitational Champkmship to
be held in Illinois.
But as the champagne flowed
ami happiness was abound, reality
set in. ECU did not receive a bid
from the NCAA to play in the 1992
National Championship in Okla-
homa; however, the NIC host team.
University of Chicagoat Illinois, did
receive a NCAA bid and was forced
to postpone the tournament
So this record breading season
ends at 42-16 and says goodbye to
five seniors that wil I be sorely missed.
Whether for their contributions in
the defensive field or at the plate.
Crowder, Hooker, Jones, Newman
and Kee paved the way for next
years team to carry on the winning
tradition.
Chowan's own NBC Classic.
"We are extremely pleased to
have Wilber Hunter join our pro-
gram said Payne. "He is the type
of person and player we need to
help turn this program around
Hunter was instrumental in the
Braves run towards the 1992 NJCAA
National Championship. In the
Braves last 23 games, he averaged
18.9 points per game and was the
key factor in Chowan's regional
championship.
Toliver averaged 12.5 points
CAA
Continued from page 7
situation against UNC-
Wilmington (23-38) in the losers'
bracket
ECU got on the board early
and led 7-4 going into the top of
the ninth inning. UNC-
Wilmington exploded for five
runs to win the game, which sent
ECU packing.
The Seahawks' Kevin
Hooker reached first on an error
by shortstop Pat Watkins and
stole second. ECU's Lyle
Hartgrove, who came in for
Owen Davis to start the eighth
inning, hit the Seahawks' next
batter, Mark Chamberlain. Perry
Currin singled Hooker home and
moved Chamberlain to second.
After giving up a single to Corey
Broome, Head coach Gary
Overton pulled Hartgrove from
the mound.
With the bases loaded and
the score 7-5, Billy Layton took
the hill Layton served up back-
to-back singles that allowed two
more runs to score, knotting the
game at seven. Layton settled
down, but, by the end of the in-
ning, the Seahawks scratched up
two more runs on a deep fly and
a wild pitch.
ECU laid down in the bot-
tom of the ninth, three-up three-
down, and finished their season
with a very bitter pill to swal-
low
The f CU Recrrnllnital Service Outdoor AHvcnturr Program It
olf� ring the to melting flrtt teuton lummrr evrntt for all
faculty, ttaff and ttudentt. For Information on reglttratlon call
the ROC at 7S7 6911.
MNTUIffi
ClimbingRappelling Wkshp � May 28
You'll tic Introduced lO the b.ivrs of climbing and r.ippcllinq such .is
knot lym'J, belaying end equipment usage procedures, limited to 8
people Workshop begins at 3:00pm,
� THE
RaftinqHiking Trip � May 29-31
Spend a day hiking in the Pisgah National Forest then rock 'n roll
through class J to 4 rapids along the French Brand river near Hot
Springs, N( limited to 8 participants Trip leaves at l?noon.
GBEfll
Windsurfing Outing � June 4
Wive hards Beach is the setting for beginning to intermediate instruction.
Bring munchies and a sack dinner, towel, swimsuit and old tennis shoes or
aqua socks limited to 8 participants. Trip leaves Greenville at 3:00pm
1992
I
I
I
I
Beach Horseback Riding � June 12
Spend up to 1 hours walking and riding along the dunes of the
Barrier Islands near Cedar Island, NC limited to 8 participants.
and 7.5 boards per game for Goacfc
Larry Matthews' 29-5 team. His size
and shx)ting touch will add greatly
to the Pirates arsenal. Toliver also
has received many local, regional
and state awards for his on-court
ability.
Ifie OaiL Company
of Qnawdk LuL
Offwwu'S rmsi fuu seMC� hail ca�i sallvc
2408 S. Charles St. Suite 5 355-45
Faculty & Students -
$ 10 off full set of nails
(ask for Robin)
afir fond ft Ivmimd nmt
Tanning: $4-singlc visit�$15 -5 visits$25-10 visits
SAVE TIME!
Save
Stamps
Too
Pay Your
utility
bill at
the
NEW
EAST
BANK at
Mendenhall.
Monday - Friday
10 am-2 pm
Call Greenville Utilities at
551-1539 for further information.
Wednesday
eamm
Progressive Dance Night
10C Draft
$1.15 Tall Boys
$ 1.00 Kamikazes
�Ladles Free til 10:30
A
u4
22
Thursday
Student
Night
$ 1.00 Domestics
$ 1.60 Imports
$2.60 Pitchers
$2.86 Ice Teas
�LADIES FREE





Title
The East Carolinian, May 27, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 27, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.878
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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