The East Carolinian, April 16, 1992






To video, or not to video
Video Yearbook debate examined.
4
On a Quest
Johnny Quest thrills erowd at New Deli
5
�lie i�uBt (EutBlMun
Vot.66No.26
Thumoav, Anm 16. 1992
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Gutinviue, North Carolina
CmcuiATioN 12.000
8 Pages
Food seam uncovered
UIU 0 i It'll ,1
l.ll il
Ri I ii
student id i I il
ii.inu'i i � iiH m.un ii
lit � �, � � � ��
Indents into uni
�� i intl
� v. I in
in tlic
i ,n � �i'ii
� nhi - ,im th.M
I lood freezes tuition
In contrast to th national trend of sk
rocketing tuition cost Htxxi I ollege has
de� de I '� fn eze ituti I fees foi the 1992
. ' - 'AT
For thi first time in 20 vears theprivate
college for m ill keep tuition the same
,s tins yeai
"It was .i decision the fx�ard made to
demonstrate their commitment to families
ring the high cist of education said Nano
i lec direct I i ns
(iiliece r. I ' i ire how lone the
tni :v v ill l.v t
Murder report written
tter the murders i if fi e students tit the
University of Florida two researchers stud
iii 1 theeffei tsof the murders on students and
�i ns and in ��� i n i u .� i report on
�� t ir results
� report that
vs ill he used as a guide f r law enfon emenl
o if something like this happens in
� i. � i ommunir I I ia ea hasi idea
of wl ich groups are 'ikeh to be affected and
what kind f i I � � � ted said
I r Mi hael Her! tant proft sor of
iti " ' Florida sS hHl
ft Mi d
.vithM ernat,con
'���.��� ' I ieS lilt'
� � �s to find the data I i
theii �� poii
African system in use
' . ' '��: i un
del itel � ' ' � ' " 'i .in
� I ! hi I: rer.li tud
Hi- i .in language .mil literature, disco
ered fh e men who '�till use the language.
I uchscherer found the men using Ki-Ka-
ku in .1 remote village in Sierra Leone rhe
language uses 195 characters which can be
strung togethei in vowel -consonant combi-
IVltli 'Ms
I think tl.it it is important tor the n.i-
tion.il consciousness of Wesl Africa
luchscherei said. "I see this as an important
part of their heritage and s mrtething thev can
he proud of
Basketball coach resigns
Ihe men's basketball coach at South-
ern Illinois University at Edwardsvillere-
cently resigned in th� midst �i an Investi-
gation into his alleged mishandling of
player meal money
Larry (iraham, will officially step
down une30, ited personal reasons" for
his decision according to a school state-
ment
Ihe athletk department began inves-
tigatingiraham and how he handled meal
money intended for Ins players several
months ago The university's auditors are
now handling the I .be.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel. Taken from
CPS and other campus newspaper.
Inside Thursday
(rime SceneJ 2
l-jlitorialH
Entertainment�5
Classifieds6
Sportsn
Students sentenced in assault case
By I homas Murphy
si.iit WriH t
I wo I v U students who
h.i o been suspended from the
univei its lot one eai veio
ii fii ,i two-veai �usp 'n led
iitriii c t.M the Oct 21, Pl
itt of EC I student I ho
m.i Segrae
loin formei members 't
the I ambda i hi Alpha fratei
mt sere tiied in Pitt i .unt
'i -ti 111 i ourt on Ai'i il 2 and
convicted of charges ranging
from assault to trespassing.
lohn VanC nitron u ,is cm-
i( ted of assault w ith intent to
mt hi t serious injury,assault In
pointingagunand first degree
trespassing.
Van( i �utren rei eived .i
two year suspended sentence,
two years of unsuperv isedpro
bation,24hoursof ommunitv
t i v ii e, .i fine otI -ti v tt r res-
titution and 570 in oui t cost -
Van( outren's testimony
contradicte the state's evidence two-year suspended sentence
state's photographic evidence two years of unsupervised pro-
showed that Segrave was hit in nation ,r,A ,i fine of $200 in res-
the face three times
VanC outren testified that he
did not see anyone hit Segrave
$1,200 of the $1,400 w.is
awarded to lulee I.ivlor be-
i ,uise she was injured asre
suit of the mi ident.
Kin( !asev was onvicted
titution plus $55 in court costs
"odd Arnold was con-
i ted of first di gree trespass-
ing. Arnold was put on two
years of unsupervised proba-
tion and fined $55 in ourt costs.
Ma n Bro k was con-
victed of first-degree trespass-
of .iss.mlt with intent to mt I u t ing. Brtx k paid restitution and
serious injury and first-degree was put in probation. He ad-
trespassing. Casey was given a mitted his part in the math r
and re� en ed lenient y based on
his testimony.
I he four perpetrators are
allowed contact with Segra e
lulee Faylor (Segrav e's girl-
friend who was .i witness) or
their families t r two ears.
c n( H t. 21, the four assail-
ants entered &
through n unlcx ke) d( �or and
then entered his bedi
Segra �� aw 11 e grabbe i .i
See Assault : age 3
Scholar examines
hate groups, crimes
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Photo by Jill Cherry � ECU Phclo Lab
Bargain hunting
and find : ig d I uy wns the mam objective for students at the
StudentSl r � ile Good weather helped make the sale a success.
Reported hatec rimes have relatively
doubled in the past five years. I he num-
ber oi hate groups in the I nited States
Kis grown from 273 to 34r from lwi to
1991.
Monday night joe Autenexamined
the leaders and philosophies oi hate
crimes in America in a presentation at
the Jenkins Fine.A rts( enter auditorium.
"In mv opinion hate groups are
home-grown terrorists Auten said.
"There is a significant possibility of the
escalation of hate crimes because oi in-
creasing racial tensions, violence in
America and the kite gn �u ps are becom-
ing more militant, violent and terrorism
oriented
One of Auten's major points in his
talk was the underlying religion or belief
s stem that people committing hate
crimes use to justify their behavior.
ngklsraelism, or Identity, cen-
ters around the belief thatcertain groups
i f i .onti les are ( i s t hi sen pei ipleand
that the Jews .ire a result of an illicit
coupling between Eve and sit.m.
Brought to the I nited States from
England in the mid-20th century by
i. erald L K. Smith. ldentin also teaches
that killing homosexuals is oil's work.
Other religions su has( Xiinismand
Dualist Chrisuanitv, teaching behavior
based on the Morse legends that the
white race are the descendants i f gods
from a distant star, meld with Identit. I
form the h.isis of many hate groups
today.
Auten starred the second half of his
talkbv dist ussing some of the literature
that buite groups like the � � ifn I
Party and Thei hder use in teaching their
followers
Auten said he believes Ben
Klassen s, The is the
most significant and most dangerous
book.
Tht'W prea riesthat
"the thing about violence and terrorism
is that it works rheboi ka souses
versus trom the Bible, such as st. lohn
8:44 to justify its hate through esus
teachings Other hiHks. such as the
Turrit s and $3 5" refer to the
coming of a tilth era in the strength of
the Ku Kluv Kl.in.
Most of the leaders of hate e
m America believe that the fifth - ra is
upon them right now Auten said
In "33 5" (33 being the numerical
eiim alent of the KKK and 5 represent-
ing the titth era I it is believed that now
is the time tor members to go under-
ground and fight �'� RAcial
HOly W An with the tactics of terror-
ism.
!3 5" .iN bring it the idea of
an assassination point scheme. In this
scheme membi rs are awarded points
based on the race or beliefs of tl rsor
theyassassin I her the points,
tlie more ben fi ial the assassination
See Hate page 3
Women's studies
program names
new director
By Christie Lawrence
SUM Writer
Susan L McLammon, an assH iate profes-
sor in the EC I department of psychology, has
been appointed director of the ECU Women's
Studies Program, effective lulv 1, 1992.
McCammon has served as assistant direc-
tor of the program for two vears. She will suc-
ceed MarieFarr, the Women's Studies Program's
founding director.
lr. Farr, a member of the Pnglish faculty,
completes her second three-vear term as direc-
tor at the end of lune
McCammon became involved in the
Women's Studies Program because of her inter-
ests psychology and women's issues.
"One of my biggest interests is traumatic
events McCammon said. "But mv interest is
not just limited to i.ims of women
I he Women's Studies Program, a
multidist iphnarv program in the ECU College
of Arts and Sciences, was founded at ECU in
1985. Hie program encourages teaching and
research on women's experient es in cultures in
which these experiences have been ignored or
devalued.
The Women's Studies Program helps stu-
dents understand and value other human be-
ings by questioning fixed patterns of thought,
such as stereotyping, that result in sexism, rac-
ism and homophobia.
"I'm very pleased that Dr. McCammon has
accepted this challenging appointment said
See McCammon, page 2
Board to decide fate of yearbook
By Jeff Parker
Staff Writer
The university 's Media Board
will meet today to discuss the
fate of ECU's yearbook, the Hue
cancer.
The yearbook has been de-
funct since 1991 following numer-
ous production problems.
Kev to the discussion will be
the possible implementation of a
video yearbook as proposed by
head of the communication de-
partment, Dr. Harrell Allen.
According to Media Chair-
person Mary Beth Morde, the
video yearbook may have to re-
place the bound volume for a
while.
"It's not feasible at this time
to have a printed yearbook, there
just isn t enough monev Morde
said.
Morde cited figures pre-
sented to her hv media adviser
Greg Brown as part of a seven-
option budget package made by
Brown.
It the video yearbook is ap-
proved, the Media Board will
spend (50,000 for equipment,
which will be rented to the com-
munication department for $1
See Yearbook page 3
Stop or I'll
Photo by Jill Ch�rry � ECU Photo L�b
A future ECU student enjoys rides at the Purple Pirate Pigskin Pigout Students and families gathered
to enjoy gorgeous weather and great food for the ninth annual event held in honor of the football program





2 �he Eairt (ftarpltnian April 16, 1992
Student, canine motorcyclist given
verbal warnings on College Hill
April 8
0908�Clement Hall: Investigated bicycle larceny taken from
front of dorm.
0951Theatre Arts Building: Arrested subject for legal service.
1040�Willis: conducted follow-up investigation for a hit and
run.
U10�Brewster. Investigated bicycle larceny.
1232�Umstead Hall: Checked on alarm activation. Same was
mechanical trouble. Resident advisor reset same.
1500� Fleming Hall: Investigated harassing phone calls. Same
unfounded. Subject doing survey.
1515jenkins Art: Stuck elevator. People removed. Electrician
called.
2138College Hill Drive: Vehicle stopped for stop sign viola-
tion and riding a canine on a motorcycle. Student given verbal
warning.
224 v White Hall: Checked out damage to real property report.
1X124�Belk Hall. Checked disturbance east of dorm. Same was
subjects plaving basketball after hours.
0043�tenth Street and College Hill Drive: Checked out intoxi-
cated subject.
0047�Tenth Street and College Hill Dnve: Escorted one male
subject to Jones Hall.
0124�Carrett Flail: Three non-students damaging state prop-
ert. All three subject arrested tor intoxication, disruptive beha lor
and for damage to real property.
0142�Magistrate s office: Escorted three subjects from Garrett
Hall.
0420�Greene Hall: Checked out a visitation violation. Both
subjects issued a campus citation.
0701�Garrett Hall: Report of male subject going through a
window on the first floor. Subject gone on arrival.
1038�Nursing Building: Investigated larceny of a purse. Same
later recovered at the Nursing Building.
Crime Seen i� taken from official Public Safety log�.
FDA to limit silicone implant usage
. � - � ii .
(AP) � The Food and Drug
Administration will allow breast-
cancer patients to get silicone gel
implants but will severely restrict
their use in cosmetic surgery, ac-
cording to a published report.
The FDA explains how it in-
tends to resolve the controversy
over silicone implants in a draft
agreement presented this week to
the nation's last two implant
manufacturers, Mentor Corp. and
Inamed Corps McGhan Medical
Corp The Wall Street Journal re-
ported today.
The two companies will be
allowed to make and distribute
the silicone implants for recon-
structive surgery under strict con-
ditions.
"The agency has determined
that continued availability is
necessary for the public health
the agreement states.
The agreement, which could
be announced officially Thursday,
adopts most of the recommenda-
tions made by an FDA advisory
panel on Feb. 20.
The panel recommended that
plastic surgeons be allowed to im-
plant silicone prostheses for cos-
metic purposes only if they are
participating in clinical trials.
Women needing reconstruc-
tive surgery will be allowed ac-
cess to silicone implants if saline-
filled implants aren't "a satisfac-
tory alternative
Doctors will have to follow
strict rules of protocol � includ-
ingobtaininga six-page informed-
consent form from the patient, the
newspaper reported.
The rules of protocol will take
about six months to set up, but
women with ruptured or leaking
implants will be immediately eli-
gible for reconstructive proce-
dures. Doctors will have to docu-
ment the reasons for immediate
procedures.
The two companies currently
making the implants will have to
McCammon
Keats Sparrow, dean of the College
of Arts and Sciences. "I'm confi-
dent she will build upon the many
strengths that came about in the
program during Dr. Farr's progres-
sive tenure as director
Among the challengest
McCammon will face is pursuing
the goal to begin the development
of a bachelor's degree program in
the field of women's studies.
"I've already started propos-
ing the idea, figuring and planning
for the degree program
maintain a registry of all women
who receive implants. They will
also have to conduct medical and
scientific research on their prod-
ucts.
Dow Corning Corp an-
nounced last month it was with-
drawing from the breast implant
business. Earlier this year, thecom-
pany released memos from Jtstiles
confirming that it knew of poten-
tial health problems with the im-
plants for as long as 20 years but
underinformed doctorsand n-api-
ents.
Silicone gel breast implants
are used by an estimated 1 million
U.S. women.
Continued from page 1
McCammon said. "The General
Admissionsofficehasalready given
me approval for the majors pro-
gram
The Women Studies Program
enables students to pursue an aca-
demic minor in the field, by offering
courses, advising, speakers and
newsletters. The program attempts
to promote the general status of
women on the university campus
and throughout the region.
"I've had a lot of encourage-
mentand support from faculty and
students who have interest in the
Women'sStudiesProgram,and I'm
looking forward to the future
McCammon said.
McCammon is a native of
Versailles, Mo analumna of Drury
College, S.C. and holds a Doctorate
in clinical-community psychology
from the University of South Caro-
lina. McCammon also completed
herclinical-community psychology
internship in the Vanderbilt-
Peabodv program in professional
psychology.
Her professional achvitit-s have
included a Ford Foundation cur-
riculum grant for developing a
course, "Empowerment Against
Sexual Abuse'andagranttr.r-utfi
the N.C. Department oi M
Health for studying parent)
acteristics of adolescent sex �
ers.
McCammon, a licensed prac-
ticing psvchologist, serves i
suiting editor for the "Joun
Social Behavior and Persor
and "loumal o Traumatu So
,SGA4Seaieary;nin-pf f election returns:
TliftiiKf students voting: - ' 554 f

Students voting:
���� �
�r -�f�
Tnstur Tones
317i!
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night
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1 Greenville's New Natural Foods Source
offering
Natural and Organic Groceries " ORGANIC PRODUCE "
Bulk Foods � Herbs and Spices Vitamins
Supplements - Natural Remedies
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NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
wishes to announce the following
HOLY WEEK AND EASTER SERVICES
Holy Thursday Services (April 16): 7:30pm at St. Peter's
Church
Good Friday Services: 12:15pm - Stations of the Cross at
St. Peter's
7:30pm - Good Friday Liturgy
Service at St. Peter's
Saturday Easter Vigil Service (April 18): 8:30pm at St.
Peter's
Easter Sunday Masses: 11:30am and 8:30pm - Newman
Center, 953 E. 10th St.
( St. Peter's is located at 2700 E. 4th St.)
For further information, please call Fr. Paul Vaeth at 757-1991
To all ECU Graduating Seniors
Any individual purchasing a vehicle six months prior to or one year
after the date of g re" i
GMAC and a $500
after the date of graduation can qualify for instant financing through
$500 rebate from GMAC.
1992 Pontiac Sunbird
92299
Equipped with automatic transmission,
air conditioning, tinted glass, sport
mirrors, AM-FM cassette and more!
Payment based on list price of $12,323 with $738.00 dealer
discount, $1,000.00 down payment and 2.9 A.P.R. for 48 months.
With the staff at GEO imports hassle free no pressure, no purchasing
a vehicle is very easy.
REBATEGRAD REBATE)
Prizm$1,250 $500$1,750
Storm$1,500 $500$2,000
Tracker$1,000 $500$1,500
Metro$500 $500$1,000
Assault
Continued from page 1
9mrn pistol, and told them, 'Get
the fuck out of my house before
you get shot said Greenville po-
lice spokesman Thomas Forrest in
a previous interview. The pistol
was then fired into the ceiling of a
closet, Forrest said.
The pistol was taken from
Segrave, and he was beaten se-
verely. The four were charged on
Oct. 23 with assault and breaking
and entering.
The ECU Honor Board initially
expelled VanCoutren, Casey,
Arnold and Brock, but later re-
duced the decision to a one-vear
J
suspension.
Hate
Continued fror
"The onset o
the moral) us Ufa
crimes are the
important factors
groups Auten i
to recognize thatj
deadly senous
Auten is a ci
structor at the Nc
hce Academy in
Officially recc
standing cnmiruj
in North Caroli
ducted major pr
enmes at state-wj
North Carolina
uonally for his
en me.
i
w

.�
��
r'l
4
� t
-t
.�
present;
Every Thursday
Student fBt-CK
"One Beer One Bui
1.00-Domestl
2.50 - Pitche
2.85 - Ice Te;
LADIES FR
ALL NIGH
r
n
81
f
THE LEO JENKINS ME
oursx
gainsl
CANC
JOIN THE F1GH
May 1 & 2 (Fri, S
Starting time 6pi
Registration begins at 4:30pm at thl
Get your team of 8-10 people toge
run or jog against cane
Team members run or walk in shift
For more information, call 75i
Fun, Food and Exi
Guaranteed For
HOSTED BY:
Alpha Phi Omega
American Cancer Society
SPONSORED BY:
Bud Light
Eastern Carolina Coca
Tom Togs
WCZI - Classy 98.3
APPLICATION TO PARTIClPATl
I wl recruit a team -send me ink
IwouWietobeonateam
Endoeedis$10perpersontobeona'
Mail to: American Cancer
P.O.Box377,Greenvile,N
Paid for by Alpha Phi Om�





lant usage
i ill women
itu' will
- -lu.ii and
n then prod
� .in
i with
n -plant
� � the c on
�� tsfile-
� poten
" �
' but
Irpi ipi
plants
million
'
Source
J
V I II I
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n
991
uatinq Seniors
ear igh
;ing
OLLEGE -TE)
500$1,750
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$500$1,500
$500$1,000
yd. � Greenville, N.C.
5253
Assault
April 16, 1992 uUje East (CarolinianA3
Hate
Yearbook
Continued from page 1
Continued from page 1
"mm pistol, and told them, i �
the tuik out ol tm house before
ougetshol �aid Ireenvillepo
li e spokesman 1 homaa Foi rest in
a previous interview. Ihe pistnl
was then tint) into the ceiling oi .
i loset Forresl said.
Ihf pistol was taken from
Segrave and he was beaten se
verel) rhe tour were i barged on
Oct 23 with assault and breaking
and entering
IhelI i lonorBoard initially
expelled Van outren,asey,
mold and Brock, but later re
duced the decision to a one yeai
�uspension
Continued from page 1
Ihe onset of the fifth era ami
the moral justifk ation for thesehate
i rimes are the scariest, and most
important factors about these hate
groups Autensaid. "People need
to recognize tfut these groups are
deadly serious
Auten is a criminal justice in
sir in tor at the North I arolina Jus-
tice Academy in Saiemburg, NX.
(. ttu i.iIIv rt ognizedastheout-
standing inminal ustice educator
in Northarolina, Auten has con-
dih ted makr presentations on hate
rimes ,it state wide i onferences in
North I arolina find is known na-
iiomlk tor his research on hate
i rime
per vt'itr.
Morde said the student
voice will be represented at the
meeting bv si A President-elect
Courtney ones.
"Ill had to choose between
the book anil the video, I would
definitely choose the book
Jones said
Jones and Day Representa-
tive Michaelames indepen-
dently polled students in front
of the Student Store on March
30and will present their results
at the meeting.
On March 5, Allen made a
general presentation to the Me
dia Board toexplain more about
his proposed video yearbook,
which would otter highlights
of the school year in a video
format.
He described some of the
video and computer equipment
sin h a project would require,
highlighting the features and
special effects of the Video
roaster, a system used often in
commen ial video produ tion.
Allen's proposal suggested
i rearing a video of about "W-40
minutes m length, hihlthtine,
the events and people of ea h
school year to function in the
capacity of the still defunct Buc-
caneer,
The set-up of the video
ear book was roughly outlined
the Media Board would pa) tor
all of the equipment invoh ed.
and the communication depart-
ment would handle the actual
production.
Allen said his department
could create a small class of 6-8
students to learn the equipment
and produce the tape, and the
students could receive school
c redit from a new faculty mem-
ber then bein added to his de-
partment.
According to Allen, stu-
dents could obtain the video
yearbook downloaded from
cable television
Also suggested was the op-
tion of paving $2 to acquire ad
ditional copies.
After Allen departed, dis-
t ussion amone, the Media Board
was positive and optimistic
Dav Representative I en Avery
made mention of a possible sur-
vey to measure student sup-
port.
Brown said, budget-wise,
the timing was very good for
such an expenditure, citing sav-
ings of over (2,000 on recently-
purchased computers for the
media
Despite the initial outlay of
$50,01 Hi, thee ost afterwards was
suggested to be minimal,
c heaper than the printed book
Ihe Media Board meeting
will be held in Mendenhall Stu-
dententer at 4 p.m. and is open
to the public
to
�.�V,J
iv:
, . V;� if
�i
Every Thursday Night
Student frH I ,K Night
"One Beer One Buck"
1.00 - Domestics
2.50 - Pitchers
2.85 - Ice Teas
: LADIES FREE
I ALL NIGHT

M
JS�L
W
r�$

w
THE LEO JENKINS MEMORIAL
ours
gains
CANC
JOIN THE FIGHT
May 1 & 2 (Fri, Sat)
Starting time 6pm
Registration begins at 4:30pm at the ECU track.
Get your team of 8-10 people together to walk,
run or jog against cancer.
Team members run or walk in shifts for 24 hours.
For more information, call 752-2574.
Fun, Food and Exercise
Guaranteed For All!
HOSTED BY
Alpha Phi Omega
American Cancer Society
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY
SPONSORED BY:
Bud Light
Eastern Carolina Coca Cola
Tom Togs
WCZI - Classy 98.3
APPLICATION TO PARTICIPATE
I wili recruit a team - send me information
I would like to be on a team
Enclosed is $10 per person to be onateam of 8-12 people
Mail to: American Cancer Society,
P.O. Box 377, Greenville, NC 27835
Paid for by Alpha Phi Omega
EasLCacolin
PlayiioiN
Presents
� CLARENCE CARTER � THE BREEZE BAND
� THE BAND OF OZ � NORTH TOWER
� DOUG CLARK & THE HOT NUTS
THE MAD HATTER. .
EASTER WEEKEND-APRIL 18. 1992
North Topsail Beach Airport (Gate opens 11 00 AM)
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APRIL 21, 22. 23. 24 and 25 at 8:15 p.m.
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That's all you need to become a member or the
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Video has over 10,000 movies to choose from,
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�E?
I 1992 BLOCKBUSTEFI Entertainment Corporation





nt usage
s
)9
uatinq Seniors


4-

T-
1,750
52,000
1.500
$1,000
yd. � Grwnvfflc, N.C.
5253
Assault
Ahhil 16, 1992 Il7r Cant (Tarnlinian 3
Hate
Yearbook
Continued from page 1
Continued from page 1
Continued from page 1
"� told them Get The onset of the fifth era and
? ut ol m house before the moral justification for these hate
said Greenville po crimes are the scariest and most
u. spokesman ! homas Forrest in important t,u hirs about trxf hate
is interview The pistol groups utensaid People need
fired into the ceiling of a hi recognize tti.it th�-M' groups are
et i orrest satd deadh serious
istoi u,i- t.ikn from uten is a criminal justice in
� and tie uas beaten se structor at the North Carolina Jus-
rhe tour were harged on tice Academy in Salemburg (
I V t 23 with assault and breaking
ntering
fhel i I Honor R in1 tulh
aso
Bro k bu
ision ti .
. ttu i.illv r�i ognizedastheoul
standing i riminal justice edu .it.i
in North i arolina, Auten h.i con-
du tet major presentations on hate
mmes at state-wide onferetK es in
Northarolina .nd is known na
ilh for his resean h on hate
n ie
per year
Morde .ihI the stud I
voice will be represented at the
meeting b) sv. President elei t
c ourtney ones.
"It I had to choose between
the book ami the ideo, I w ouid
definitely i hoose the book
Jones said.
ones and I a) R prsenta
live Michael i arnes indepen
dently polled students in front
of the Student Store on March
U)and will present their results
at the meeting
(. n Man h : W len made a
general presentation to th
dia Hoard to explain more about
his proposed video yearbook,
which would offei h
i tin .chool veai in a ideii
f( II T1 l.l t
I fe des ribei I t the
ideo and i omputei equi pmenl
su h a pr �je( t would rei tuire,
highlighting the featui c and
spe ial effects of the Video
roaster a system used often in
commercial vid luction
� lien s proposal ted
reating i ide i of about M' 40
minutes in length, I hting
the e I'm . and pei 'j !� f each
si hool vear to i n in the
i apa it ol the still del un t Bui

rhe set-up o( the video
earb � �� as rou
the M iv foi
all ol
and theiomrnunu at ion depart
ment would handle the a tual
produ tion.
Allen said his department
could create a small class t 6-8
students to learn the equipment
and prod ui e the tape, arid the
students could receive school
i redo from a new faculty mem-
ber then bem added to his de
partment.
According to Allen, stu-
dents could obtain the video
yearbook downloaded from
. able television.
Also suggested was the op
tion of paying $2 to acquire
ditional i opies
After Allen departed I
i ussion ami mg the Mi lia ird
v ,1 I isitive and optimistic
epresentativi eri Avery
made mention of a possible sur-
vey to measure student sup-
port
Brown said, budget-wise,
the timm" was very good for
such an expenditure citing sav-
ings of over 3 oi rei ��ntlv-
purchased computers tor the
media
� -pne the initial outlay of
$5l th ost afterwards was
suggested to be minimal,
( heaper than the printed book.
he M ' ard metin
will be held in ' -nail Stu-
dent Cent � I p.m and is open
� ��
v
Every Thursday Night
Student m k Night
"One Beer One Buck"
1.00 - Domestics
2.50 - Pitchers
2.85 - Ice Teas
LADIES FREE l
ALL NIGHT
m
tf
� 7 ,1 J.V
w
l -ws
if.1
V
THE LEO JENKINS MEMORIAL
24Nours ,
CANCER
JOIN THE FIGHT
May 1 & 2 (Fri, Sat)
Starting time 6pm
Registration begins at 4:30pm at the ECU track.
Get your team of 8-10 people together to walk.
run or jog against cancer.
Team members run or walk in shifts for 24 hours.
For more information, call 752-2574.
Fun, Food and Exercise
Guaranteed For All!
HOSTED BY
Alpha Phi Omeg
American Cancer Society
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY
SPONSORED BY
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Tom Togs
WCZI - Classy 98.3
APPLICATION TO PARTICIPATE
I will recnjrt a team - send me information
I would like to be on a team
4
��'
NORTH TOPSAIL BEACH
Presents mm
� CLARENCE CARTER � THE BREEZE BAND
� THE BAND OF OZ � NORTH TOWER
� DOUG CLARK & THE HOT NUTS
THE MAD HATTER .
EASTER WEEKEND-APRIL 18. 1992
North Topsail Beach Airport (Gate opens 11 0C AM
fasLCacolina
Iavnou6c
PI
199L1992
Season
Enclosed is $10 per person to be on ateam of 8-12 people
Mail to: American Cancer Society,
P.O. Box 377, Greenville, NC 27835
Paid for by Alpha Phi Omega
TICKETS ONSALE A!
EAST COAST MUSICWRQR 94.3
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'58-4;�
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� MMODA1 N INI
EAST
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U'RII 21, 22. 23, 24 and 25 M 8:15 p.m.
PKII 2. at 21c p.m
I im flieatrc Er l�ss I nan Movie � Bring Date!
Ml STIDKNTS M.50
Call: 757-6829
Youd Be Surprised Who You
Can Pick Up With A Valid
Student I.D.
I li,u s all you need to become a member ol the
biggest video stoic in the world. HI 0( KBUS 1 ER
Video has over 10,000 movies to choose from,
featuring your favorite stars in all their hottest hits.
So bring in your l.( A student I.IX, sign up, and
pick out a movie. Its simple. Membership is FREE.
And vou never know who voull leave with.
2?
,�





Aprh 16, 19 . anc �aat tlnrnlinian 3
rs
'50
(00
500
1.000
Assault
tinued from page 1
Hate
Yearbook
Continued from page 1
Continued from page 1 pei yeai
Mordt1 said
� � ' the tilth era and oi e will bt� re tt thi
til ationti m these h.itf inert i in' I � .
� . .i' ii .Iiul mOSt l (Mil tllt'
and the commui
ment w ild handle th

Alien said hi d'
I I s s o I
til
about th�f h.itt
It I had to cl � tudents tn learn the equ i
i I People need the book and the vidi
� i � hat these groups are definitely
- � us U 'lie- said
uten is a criminal justice in ones and
tructor at the North Canlina Jus tive Michael
idem in Salemburg � dentlv poll I li I
recognii edasthei il t the Studi nt Ston
iminal justice ed
� uten has .it the meel
On Mai

it.iti.mi in li.it
m

!&�-
i
PRESENTS
Every Thursday Night V
Student nn i K Night '
One Beer One Buck"
1.00 - Domestics
2.50 - Pitchers
2.85 - Ice Teas
LADIES FREE
ALL NIGHT
A
THE LEO JENKINS MEMORIAL
24, hours

gainst
CANCER
JOIN THE FIGHT
�?i
May 1 & 2 (Fri, Sat)
Starting time 6pm
il tl ECU track
� , � ; � jetherto walk.
a � - n shifts for 24 hours.
I 752-2574.
Fun, Food and Exercise
Guaranteed For All!
:
AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY


BY
t Cola
i ;v 98 2
APPLICATION TO PARTICIPATE
I wil recruit a tea sendm I waw
I would like to be on a tean
Enclosed is $10 per person to be on a team of 8-12 people
Mail to: American Cancer Society,
P.O. Box 377, Greenville, NC 27835
Paid for by Al I a Phi Omega
Vidi and produce th tap
students could receive
credit fi ai faculty men
her thei being added 1
irtn
. I ' At. ' ! II i' tt A I I I Ml
� � dent ild obtain thi
� � . � vearbi froi
able tele isn
Also sugge U ' ��� � �'
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1 tor
tn tiav oi
������. ird ��� ,is
NORTH TOP�AILJJECH
Presents "
CLARFNi � THF BR ND
THE BAND OF Ol � NORTH TOWI
DOUG CLARK & THI HOT NU :
EM �
EASTER WEEKEND APRIL 18 19
Nortl
iasLiJacolina 1991 1992
X MM Ml
I 'KlVllOllv
EAST
CAROLINA
DANCE
THEATRE
A 11
EAST COAST ML'
� )l
TKI1 21. 22. 23. 24 and
VPRII 2ft .it 2:15 p
I i t I heatn Km I �- I nan M�i�m Ni Bi njj .
1(1 S I I 1I N ! s S4.5
V
I )i O0�v
Youd Be Surprised Who You
Can Pick Up With A Valid
Student I.D.
I hat's all von need to become a membei ol the
;est video store in the world. B1.0 KlUllR
Video has ovei 10,000 movies to t hoose from,
featuring voui favorite stars in all their holiest hits.
"so hi ww in vour I t I student l.l V, sign up. and
piJs oiu .i movie. Iis simple. Membership is I Rl 1 .
And vou never know u lm vou 1 leave uuh.
.��ff





UXre Saat Carolinian
Serving ttf East Carolina campus community since 1925
Letters to the Editor
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
Jennifer Wardrep, News Editor
Julie Roscoe, Asst. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Dana Danielson, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Robert Todd, Assistant Sports Editor
Jeff Becker, Copy Editor
Bi air Skinner, Copy Editor
Richard Haselric, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Steven Ollice, Classified Advertising Technician
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Jean Caraway, Advertising Production Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students. The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
is the opinion of the Editorial Board. 77k- East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should be
limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C
27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Video yearbook sparks debate
It is rare that the average student is ever able to would still be the option of going through the process
be present at the beginning of a new creation by their of making a new dub to whatever comes after the
school. Thanks to the open-house polio of most of our VCR.
student organizations, ECU students could take such
an opportunity this afternoon. On the agenda of the
Media F3oard meeting is the possible creation of a
video yearbook as proposed by head of the communi-
cation department, Dr. Harreil Allen.
There are several problems with the implemen-
Would the printed bxxk ever become obsolete?
Media Board Chair Mary Beth Morde did inquire
about satisfvingallpossibilitiesbyproducinga printed
book as well as a video. At that point in the meeting,
according to Media Board minutes, Allen was the one
who said that both would be feasible, though it is
tationof a videoyearbook at ECU, both functional and questionable how he can speak with authority about
ethical.
Functional: One of the greatest problems with
the whole venture is the simple fact that the Media
Board has not even asked the student body if it wants
a video yearbook. At the March 5 meeting, the Media
Board Day Representative asked ifa survey would be
taken to get student input.
The decision may come today, and the general
campus has not been informed of the issue at all. Given
the yearbook. And of course, that makes moot the
point of saving costs with the cheaper-made video.
Ethical: As problematic as the physical concerns
of the video yearbook appear, they are relatively small
when weighed against the ethical problem of the
enterprise. Whatessentially would happen isthe Media
Board would be buying $50,000 worth of equipment
for the communication department. It is true that the
department has had trouble receiving adequate fund-
the troubles in the past with coaxing students to pick ing for their existing programs, but it is not the place
up their yearbooks, it appears doubtful that the popu- for the Media Board to provide it with a new one.
lace will take to the idea of setting up times to have And while considering the video yearbook as a
their own copy made � which would make for an means to create a new production outlet, it is also a bit
incredibly lengthy process. odd that one of the communication department's
This leads to the next problem � not everyone incoming new faculty is already qualified to teach
has a VCR, and among students, that number dimin- such production, in spite of our school's previous and
ishes even more. A bound-volume yearbook is far current lack of such equipmenL
more accessible.
And a book does not wear out after one peruses
it several times and flips to their favorite section. Try
to do that on your VCR (if you have one) and see how
long the tape lasts, and consequently the VCR. Then
again, one could return to Greenville or mail in a new
tape after graduation and have a fresh new copy
dubbed. That would only cost two dollars plus either
travel costsor return postage, besides the initial amount
alreadv taken in student fees.
Weeks prior to the March 5 meeting, Allen and
Media Adviser Greg Brown had already taken the
Media Chair and Day Representative to the University
of Chapel Hill to tour the school's television operation,
to create more familiarity with such processes.
If the video yearbook already seems like a done
deal needing only a name, that may not be an unrealistic
assumption. This is a prime instance where students
can and need to come in and make their opinions heard,
since students will be the majority voting on the issue.
And hopefully the VCR will never go the way of Gotoroom212atMendenhallStudentCenterat4p.m
the eight-track tape player, becoming obsolete and today. Ask where me money for this would come from,
replaced with newer technology the way compact and how it would be spent.
discs have also replaced vinyl record s. Of course, there If s your money. It's your yearbook.
IFC speaker,
Hitler compared
To the Editor:
I would like to comment on the
presentation that was given by Ms.
Eileen Stevens 7:30 last Monday night
and theconditions under which it was
given. Ms. Stevens is an excellent
speaker and motivator, possibly one
of the best that I have ever had the
honor to listen to in person. Hitler was
also an adept speaker and motivator,
and his method of crowd control was
not all that different from that which
is used by ECU's Interfratemity Coun-
cil.
In explanation of my first point,
that both Ms. Stevens and Hitler were
great motivators and speakers, I would
like topointout the single-mindedness
of her speech. She repeatedly pointed
out that she believes that hazing is an
unacceptable abomination of the
Greek system. She said it has killed 55
people since her son's tragic death in
1978. She says that those who ha ze a re
immoral (the actual statement was
that "hazing is immoral"), and that
they should be stopped. Ms. Stevens
has found something that she dis-
agrees with. She has lost a son to it.
She seeks to wipe it off the face of her
earth. Hitler found that he did not
agree with the Jews He felt that he
was losing his country to them He
sought to wipe them off the face the
German earth Ms. Stevens and Hitler
both forgot that others of a slightly
different opinion also laid claim to
this dirt ball that we're riding on
She says that the word "tradi-
tion" when used to describe haing is
a misnomer She says that our Frater-
nal Fathers would hang their heads in
shame if they could see what we put
our pledges through. How would she
know? By her own admission she and
her husband are not Greek. She gave us
a beautifully orchestrated tear jerker
of a story of how her son died and she
came to hear of it We can get the same
tear jerking from Sally Struthers on
TV any night. How old is that kid
Melany? Five? Five plus what, the
three or four years that commercial
has been on television?She, like Hitler,
took her point of view and nested it in
a vibrant cloak of emotion and senti-
ment. She opened with the fact that
her son died. She told cf the horrors of
hazing. She pointed to the hazers and
pronounced them bad. Her argument
is based on her feelings about a facet
of fraternity and sorority life that she
cannot relate to (she said that). Thus
she is sadly placed on the same shelf
as those who would denounce books
with ideas that are not their own, or
other people because they have an-
other skin color. They do not under-
stand fully the object of their ire. Ms
Stevens does not understand hazing.
On to the subject of IFC crowd
control. Just what did that IFC goon
mean by "I'm proud of this rum out
and ECU Creeks JT What did he
expect when IFC issues the ultima-
tum that if every fraternity and soror-
ity did not offer a certain percentage
of their brothers and sisters that they
would receive a reprimand and a fine?
What hypocritical scumbag can take
the podium in front of the Greek com-
munity and say that he was proud of
their turnout when his organization
held a gun to their head? This poor
woman was speaking to a captive
audience, not an interested one. What
did IFC fear? Were they afraid that
most of the Greek community would
not find the maniacal ravings of some
old lady worthy of their time? I think
so. People vote with their feet, IFC.
Next time let the Greek community
vote by walking to such a presenta-
tion instead of dictating the choice of
attendance to them.
Danny Williford
Junior
English
Frat hazing
unlike military
To the Editor.
I'm writing in reference to the
presentation given by Ms. Eileen
Stevens on the evils of hazing The
presentation itself was fine, if not a wee
bit on the tear jerker side, but I'm writ-
ing about a particular statement made
by Ms. Stevens. In her speech, Ms.
Stevens stated that other organizations
besides fraternitiesand sororities haze.
In example, she stated that "athletics
and the military" also participate in
hazing. This is where 1 take offense.
The US military does not in any way,
shape or form "haze I can under-
stand where a mere civilian could con-
fuse the rigors of basic training to haz-
ing but, if Ms. Stevens had taken the
time to do her research, she would
have found where the two greatly dif-
fer.
First, one must remember that
everything done in the military is done
for a specific purpose. When one
watches a show about basic training
on TV or in the movies, one seeing it as
one would see the inside of a beehive;
noisy confusion But, if one breaks
down what he is seeing, then the truth
becomes self-evident The military has
the challenge of ta king a civilian and in
eight to 13 weeks (depending on ser-
vice) turning himher into a soldier
To do this, the military has to quickly
break that individual down and build
himher back up again They must
take this person, who during its whole
life, has been told that heshe is an
individual, special, one-of-a-kind and
break the "I'm an individual" way of
thinking. The military is a team, a fam-
ily. One must work together as a team
player or bnng death to himself and
others. To facilitate this, the military
takes away your individuality.
The screaming and yelling, so
populanzed by Hollywood and often
poorly and ineptly imitated by frater-
nities and sororities, is to again, help
break down the trainee's "civilian" at-
titude of individuality and to condi-
tion the trainee to routine of taking
orders and thinking under pressure
and stress Most people resent being
told what to do and their first instinct is
to say no or why without thinking
what has been asked of them, or the
situation at hand Again, this is an
attitude the military must break and
replace with the attitude of quick i.
sponse and thinking which can make
the difference between bfe and death
on the modem battlefield where weap.
ons can strike from beyond sight, m the
blink of an eye and lay waste to scores
of men.
I can see where Ms Stevens
might confuse what the military does
in training new soldiers to hazing con-
sidering her lack of expenence in the
area. This does not, however, excuse
her from doing research and finding
out the facts about the subject before
blatantly stating that the military par-
ticipate in such frivolous actions as
hazing new soldiers just because
they're new The military neither has
the time nor patience for such buffoon-
ery. We're training soldiers how to
fight and live, not boys and girls how
to drink and flirt
Patrick R Campbell
Senior
Criminal Justice
Entertainment
History affects
IQ testing
To the Editor:
Mr Mandelker stated in his letter
"that if even there had been nodiscnrru-
nation, thedifference between theblacks
and the whites' mean IQ surges, fetf
blacks would still be dra�tally
underrepresentedintheprot'essHT "Ir
defense of his stance, Mr Mnddi
uses the National Academy ofScia . as
backup. The National Academy of Sci-
ence claims that by observing the data
they can tell the "potential" avK � �
blacks if no discrimination look
My question is how can Ittt Na-
tional Academy of Science subtract rrom
the psyche of Afro-Americans the irre-
versible effects of slavery, racism, preju-
dice and outright rejection by the Ameri-
can people and its government
What majestic equation do they
have that will tell, to a reasonable degree
of accuracy, the capacity of tneblackrace
if these gross atrocities had never beer.
afflicted on them?
How do you negate the effects of
being treated less than human, the e-
fects of being enslaved for hundreds at
years, the effects of being told by the
Constjirution that you are three-fifths ofa
human, the effects of being told by the
Supreme Court that you are not "eb-
gible" to be a citizen, the effects of bang
told that you are not "good enough" to
go to school with, mix on the bus with,
eat m the same restaurant as the white
skinned, red blooded Amencan a uzens'
We, as blacks, have come a kxj
way, in every aspect, and now that vw
are "qualified" for these positions,
want them If affirmative action is what
it takes to guarantee our right of equa.
opportunity, then we will take it, and r
the event that America reneges on the
fundamental principle, then we, as aa-
zensofthisgreatnatKn,will"cashin or
the past promise of 40 ACRES AND A
MULE'
Randy Farmer
Sophomore
Political Science
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Confusing terms, big egos hinder political correctness debate
By Scott
Maxwell
Editorial
Columnist
First, let's distinguish between political
correctness and multiculturalism.
To be "politically correct" means to
adopt unthinkingly the politically safe view-
point, precisely because it is the politically safe
viewpoint. For example, if you're a lefty, and
you decided not to see Basic Instinct because
good lefties weren't supposed to see it, you're
being politically correct.
No one considers himself politically cor-
rect, because no one wishes to admit to being
an ethically bankrupt coward. Properly used,
the term is invariably pejorative, and is invari-
ably applied to others � usually to people
who are not in the room. The declension is: "I
am a progressive thinker, you are a conform-
ist; he or she is politically correct
Multiculturalism is the doctrine that a
given part of society � usually but not exclu-
sively the educational system � should take
full notice of the contributions that people of
all ethnicities have made to America's com-
posite culture. In addition, multiculturalists
typically see ethnicity and or gender as being
the defining components of an individual's
mentality � hence there is a "black view-
point" a "woman's viewpoint etc and all
such viewpoints should be given equal time in
curricula.
Finally, well distinguish Afrocentrism
from both of the above. Afrocentrism is the
doctrine mat academic disciplines should be
taught with emphasis on, or at least acknowl-
edgment of, the African origins of all things.
Afrocentnsts charge (as do multiculturalists)
that academic disciplines, especially iitera-
. hire and history, are taught from a Eurocentric
point of view �mat is, emphasis is dispropor-
tionately placed on the actions and contribu-
tions of European peoples. Afrocentrists some-
times state that black students ought to be
taught differently, even separately, from white
students, but they more commonly argue for a
change in what is taught to all students.
Sorry to get all formal like that, but it's a
necessary evil. The PC debate has been acri-
monious, even vicious; as in any highly charged
debate, terms frequently are misused out of
malice or ignorance. A further complication is
that each side has its own metaphors, its own
perspective on the same raw data. Conse-
quently, each side uses the same words to
mean different things, even without intent to
mislead. This is more than a semantic point; it
is in fact at the very heart of the debate: Just
what is political correctness? And just what is
multiculturalism? Without agreement on the
definitions, the debate is doomed to be unpro-
ductive.
The definitions I have given are my
own; as it happens, both sides would probably
disagree with them. Yet some standard, I think,
is necessary; otherwise we fall into the trap
that has made the PC debate more noise than
signal.
In the PC debate, many people who are
called politically correct are not; some people
who call themselves multiculturalists are not.
It's entirely possible to be a multiculturalist
without being PC, and it's entirely possible to
be PC without being a multiculturalist, though
some would have you believe the two terms
are practically interchangeable. And beliefs
vary among multiculturalists, as they do
among opponents of multiculturalism.
In short, you can't tell the players with-
out a program. As a first step in sorting out the
chaos, I offer my preceding definitions of the
terms "politically correct" and
"multiculturalism" for refinement
As a second step, I offer my admittedly
cynical sketch of the opposing sides of the
debate, using two ECU professors typical of
the two most common opposing views.
In the multiculturalists' comer, weigh-
f
ing in at an assistant professorship (soon to be
an associate professorship) in the English de-
partment, is Dr. Gay Wilentz. And in the op-
posite comer, weighing in at a visiting assis-
tant professorship, is Dr. Steven Mandelker.
I interviewed both professors (sepa-
rately, mind you), and what struck me most
strongly is the degree to which they have
misunderstood each other. My interview notes
read eerily like a dialogue between the two �
a dialogue they haven't had, but should.
Here's an example. More than once in
his interview, Mandelker stated his concern
that "good" books are sometimes excluded
from literature courses in favor of inferior
works � works that are included only be-
cause their authors are non-white or female or
both. Asked for a specific example, Mandelker
named Alice Walker's The Color Purple; at my
request, he named three books that he thought
were better and should be taught instead of
77k Color Purple � all three, as it happens,
were written by white males. Mandelker said
he has absolutely no objection to teaching
books written by people other titan white
males, but he thinks the books should not be
selected because their authors are not white
males. Instead, he says, the books should be
selected strictly according to their literary mer-
its.
The other side, as typified by Wilentz,
sees the writer's ethnicity as an integral part of
the value of the work. One reason ethnicity
matters, in Wilentz's view, is that black fe-
males (to take a specific instance) feel more
pride when some of the works they read were
written by black females. Whaf s more, she
says, teaching only the accomplishments of
white males is tantamount to teaching mat
white males have done everything of value in
history No one, she says, should beaQowedto
perpetuate such a lie.
They oufht to be arguing over whether
the value of a work of literature is affected by
who wrote it That's a philosophical question
that could be argued much more civilly than
the present temper of the debate would sug-
gest. But somehow they can't quite manage to
characterize it in those terms, not for more
than ten seconds at a stretch. They start to talk
about that central question, but somehow they
end up accusingeach other of everything short
of nuclear war. They mean well, I truly be-
lieve, but they are as human as the rest of us,
and no less flawed.
Another example. Mandelker's opinion
of so-called "hate speech" codes � university
rules which allow punishing those who deni-
grate others on the basis of race, gender, and so
on � is, in a word, uncharitable; Wilentz's
view is generally positive. From Mandelker's
perspective, hate speech codes are a limitation
on free speech; for Wilentz, they help to guar-
antee minority students a learning environ-
ment that is not hostile.
Trouble is, they're both right; their ar-
gument should be over whether the limitation
of free speech is outweighed by the improve-
ment (if any) in the learning environment not
over who's a racist and who's politically cor-
rect. That's just childish name-calling, gussied
up by tacking a Ph.D. onto it.
And then there are the things they agree
on. You'd be surprised. Both agree that profes-
sors should be allowed to make racist com-
ments in a classroom only if the statements are
relevant to the topic and contribute to the
teaming process. Both agree that a professor
who makes racist comments that do not con-
tribute to his students' learning, and who con-
tinues to make such comments even after be-
ing asked to stop, should be fired. They don't
see that as political correctness, just as a sen-
sible way to treat someone who isn't doing his
Both agree, too, that individual works
of literature ought to be included or excluded
solely on their merits � as previously noted,
their disagreement is over what constitutes
"merit although they can't seem to keep the
discussion on mat point. (As a side note, it
seems to me that Dr. Wilentz; a professor of
Music professo
to perform folk
By Dana Danielson
Assistant Entertainment fditor
Thursday night Greenville's
finest will not be found in a bar, but
in a bakery
Elliot Frank, a mi mbei f
ECU School of Musk fa
perform his exploration in folk
music traditions which ha
mead musk of the imeri is at the
Upper Crut Baker)
Song vmII ha.�� in n I �
flavor,rather than being � � clas-
sical as is usual with Frank I
inrJudeGypsy tunes ft hern
Spakt Brazilian rhumbas and Afro-
Cuban lullabies
"(Thursda is going to offer a
real positive alternative to those
people put off bv 'classical' music
Frank said. "Everyone should en-
joy it
Several of Frank's music stu-
dents will accompany him the sec -
ond half of the evening.
"They are mv most advanced
students Said Frank. "They are
enrolled as students but are cable of
being professionals
The presence of Frank's stu-
dents, Joel Mauger, Angelito
Agcaoili and Michael McGuiness,
will allow tor not only solo perfor-
mances, but will also otte
and quartet performance
"1 started playing claJ
tar and a lot of ktwasck)
ish folk music said Fran
an easy step � I just got n
books and learned
he first gradual J
program at the Lnr. ersi
gia, Frank began his sti
harles Duncan He
master's degree at vs
odist Uruversitv and is
Doctoral candidate at FsJ
University.
Frank has performeJ
C. Symphony and b
enters from New N
��ies
Why does Frank te
as perform?
"Many musicians oa
said. "It's very satisfying
students develop
Atop prize from thJ
lnternacional "Alirio
Caracas, Venezuela
Frank's accomplishmer
The performance vi
Hp.m. Admission is S:
eral public, $4 for Foikai
and half price for ECU
For more info, cal
at 752-8281
JQ delivers exce
By Pamela Oliver
Staff Writer
English, is presumptively better qualified to
define literary merit than is a professor of
philosophy).
My overall impression of Dr Wilentz is
that she wants to change the university system
to eradicate some serious injustices � hardly
something to disagree with, in the abstract �
but in some cases, as with hate speech codes,
she offers a cure worse than the disease
My impression of Dr. Mandelker is that
he sees himself as trying to defend an impor-
tant institution against a harmful change �
again, hardly something to disagree with, in
the abstract. But, probably because of mis-
communication, he has grievously misunder-
stood some of the things he's fighting against.
The challenge for those of us trying to
sort out our own views on the PC debate is to
listen carefully and todeliberate calmly. People
don't always say quite what they mean, espe-
cially when egos become involved. It's treach-
erous terrain, and trying to navigate it is a
frustrating experience.
On the positive side, things will ineviu-
bly get better. I've taken two courses with Dr
Wilentz and have found her to be intellectu-
ally honest � if she's wrong, and you show
her she's wrong, she admits she's wrong My
experience with Dr. Mandelker is consider-
ably more limited, but I have much the same
impression of him Better still, she is not politi-
cally correct, by my definition, and he i� no
racist (though a certain recent letter he wrote
to this newspaper has given me cause to won-
der).
Let's hope they're representative of
their respective sides. If they are, and if they
can manage to start talking honestly to each
other � as opposed to carrying out a political
war in the media and in the academic offices
� there's a real chance they'll dispel their
misunderstandings and com to a common
ground.
Dr. Mandelker Dr. Wilentz - are
you listening?
Just the mention of the name
johnnv Quest sent excitement
through the crowd Saturday night
at the New Deli.
People of all types streamed in
through thedoor, anxious to see the
band now sV much more popular
than when the) first played in
Greenville at the TKE fraternity
house.
However, audience members
had to suffer through the opening
act, The Not-So-Dandylions. before
they could see lohnnv Quest All
the songs had the same beat, same
guitar line and same vocal melody
The monotony was overbearing.
Even the band members leaked
bored
A wave of relief came over, the
crowd when Johnny Quest finally
appeared on stage at 12:13 a.m. All
four members, loe "IQ" Farmer, Jack
"Race" Campbell, Steve "Dr. Q"
Hill and Bill "Bandit" Ladd, were
itching to get started with the show
Thev came out kicking with a
number called Bulldozer Farmer,
lead singer for JQ, explained in his
familiar Southern draw 1 that their
first number was "about a guv who
finds out his girt has been fucking
around behind his back so he finds
a bulldozer and runs over her
Suddenly, theair exploded with
energy Ladd's guitar ground out
sounds that made the audience go
wild. Unlike the opening singer
who simply stood there, Farmer
took the microphone nght off the
stand and began jumping around
Johnny
beat tur
the stage Keeping
he was and what he wa
one moment to the ne
Most of the tunes
soft-core thrash and h
There were a few tun
have been a little I
sorm
coul � � ' j
excitement that emit
stage. Even Luke I -
football team thrashet
sidelines
IQ played out
tunes with a sense
Most ot their songs
being serious. One 9
posed!) about Fan
mother who had thrj
in one room and le'
hours a da)
"lOMillionSumi
backoff meirnewie
"going to the beach,
�DOOM and going
"Friends was a simj
going out and dnni
shooting pool
A favorite of tht
tune titled, "Rub-a-
troduced it as "a sonJ
baths with other peoj
like this Immedia)
broke out with a "Rii
Rosies' theme and a:
Farmer.
IQ even played
MOftof the Stew Mi
"Take the Money
started out soundif
like the onginal tun
Contemporary Christian Ek
for College Students ages
Audition Dates: April 24, 25, 2j
The Memorial Baptist
1510 Greenville Blvd.
Sponsored by The Memorial Baptu
� 1993 Spring Break Tour - New Oi
For Information call Randy
756-5314 or 756-6516
1
- �





to the Editor
ta scumbag w !��
-ntof thev rwk
that h was .
fhen hi- ,ri-
hea
� ��
.11 r.i vings
11 ng
military
replace with the attitude of quick re-
� i d thinking which can make
Ffcranct between bfe and death
, iHvlemh.irtlefield where weap.
ons an -tnke from beyond sight, in the
x f art eve and lay waste to scores
t men
-ee where Ms Stevens
what the military does
� nt �; new soldiers to hazingcon-
j , Kk of exoenence in the
area ' tdom nol however, excuse
v research and finding
ut tt. - �bowl the subject before
blatant . stating that the military par.
sudi frivolous actions as
g rw soldiers just because
, �. ,s The militan- neither has
era e tor such buftbon-
, era ling soldiers how to
, t boys and girls how
� a I -iirt
x K Campbell
-
istice
History affects
IQ testing
� - stated in his letter
" 'discnrru-
� �vn the blacks
PQ ingests that
v drastically
fasaioni "In
Mr Mandelker
: "xienceas
Kg demy ot Sq-
ier ng the data
capacity o
took place.
�� how can this Na- ena -ubtractfrom � - � � ericam the ure-tety racism, preju-
� iside eelg) t rejection by theAaMe-peopk litsgi vemnMM � taticai do they
i asonabie degree � the black race
� ties ad never been

� Mate the effects of
� . nan; the ef-
� . �- aved tot hundreds of
� v told by the
tan d rve-nfthsofa
� (being told by the
are not "eii-
- � .� �effects of being
ot'good enough" to
� r the bus with,
restaurant as flie white
�� edAmericancituMMrf
'�- as : Lai ks hove cume a long
.�� I that w
m fied for - positk ns, we
alive action is what
t takes l Eruarantei v right ot equal
I p " take it and ftl
America reneges on the
prirw . � then we, as db-
it ration, wiD "cash in'ca
" � ' eof . KI.S ANDA
� -
ectness debate

:
V -
landelker-
a limil
� iiuar-
ik environ-
lt, their ar-
hmitation
pe impn I e
pnmerit, not
ihcally cor-
ing, gussieti
I thev agree
Ithatprote
Iracist com-
tementsare
)ute to the
professor
lo not con-
Id who con-
In after be-
They don't
st as a sen-
't doing his
lual works
r excluded
isy noted,
constitutes
h keep the
Jde note, it
rofessor of
� ' etter qualified to
' a professor of
PDr Wilentzis
u c ��e universitysystem
'� s n e senous injustices � hardly
� in the abstract �
1 ' ' speech codes,
" ' '� rS4 " :� the disease.
M impression -Dr Mandelker is that
'trying to defend an lmpor-
-istirution against a harmful change �
�gain, hardly somel c � lagiw with, in
the abstract But, Prob il . becauM of mis-
:ommunication, be has e- . � maty misunder-
F the thmgs he's fighting against.
The challenge for those of us trying to
ufnuri- ion the PC debate is to
carefuDyand todeiiberawalmly People
talwayssaj qui what thev mean, espe-
when egos become inroi ved It'streach-
I terrain, and trving to navigate it is a
frustrating experience
3rt the positive side, things will inevita-
bly get better I ve taken two courses with Dr.
WHent and have found her to he intellectu-
ally honest - ,f she-s wrong, and you show
her she's wrong, she adm.ts she's wrong. My
experience w,m Dr Mandelker ,s consider-
ably more l,m,ted, but I have much the same
impression of h,m Better still, she is not politi-
cally correct, by my defin.bon, and he if no
racist (though a certain recent letter he wrote
to this newspaper has g.ven me cause to won-
den
Let's hope they're representative of
their respective sides If they are, and if th�y
can manage to start talking honestly to each
otner�as opposed to carrying out a politic!
var in the media and in the academic offic��
- there's a real chance they'll dispel th�ir
misunderstandings and come to a common
ground
Dr Mandelker Dr Wilentx
you listening?
Entertainment
OUie iEast Carolinian
April 16, 1992
Music professor
to perform folk
By Dana Danielson
Assistant Entertainment Editor
Thursday night Greenville's
finest will not be found in a bar, but
in .i bakerv.
Elliot Frank, a member of the
I. I Svhoo! of Music faculty, will
perform his exploration in folk
musk traditions which have influ-
enced music of the Americas at the
L pper Crust Bakery.
Songs will have a more folk
fl.uor.racherthanbeingsrnctlvclas-
sical as is usual with Frank. Thev
su ludeGvpsvtunes from southern
Spain, Brazilian rhumbas and Afro-
uban lullabies.
(Thursday is) going to offer a
real positive alternative to those
people put off by 'classical' music
Frank said. "Everyone should en-
joy it
Several of Frank's music stu-
dents will accompany him the sec-
ond half of the evening.
"They are my most advanced
students Said Frank. "They are
enrolled as students but arecableof
being professionals
The presence of Frank's stu-
dents, Joel Mauger, Angelito
Agcaoih and Michael McGuiness,
will allow for not only solo perfor-
mances, but will also offer duet, trio
and quartet performances as well.
"I started playing classical gui-
tar and a lot ot it was close to Span-
ish folk music said Frank. "It was
an easy step � 1 just got records and
books and learned
The first graduate of the guitar
program at the University of Geor-
gia, Frank began his study under
Charles Duncan. He earned his
master's degree at Southern Meth-
ixiist University and is presently a
DtKtoral candidate at Florida State
University.
Frank has performed with the
N.C. Svmphonv and in major mu-
sic centers from New York to Los
Angeles.
Why does Frank teach as well
as perform?
"Manv musicians do both he
said. "It's very sarisfving to see my
students develop
A top prize from the Concurso
lnternacional "Alirio Diaz in
Caracas, Venezuela also joins
Frank's accomplishments.
The performance will begin at
9 p.m. Admission is $5 for the gen-
eral public, $4 for Folkarts members
and half price for ECU students.
For more info, call Judv Orbach
at 752-8281.
Photo courtMy Folkarts Soctety
Elliot Frank, a member of the ECU School of Music faculty, will perform
his exploration in folk music at the Upper Crust Bakery tonight.
JQ delivers excellence to thirsty crowd
By Pamela Oliver
Staff Writer
lust the mention of the name
johnm Quest sent excitement
through the crowd Saturday night
at tiv New Deli
People of all types streamed in
thn ugh the door, anxious to see the
band now so much more popular
than when thev first played in
Greenville at the TKE fraternity
house
However, audience members
1W t suffer through the opening
act, IheNot-So-Dandv!ions,before
the could see lohnnv Quest. All
the -ings had the ame beat, same
guitar Imeand same vocal melody.
The monotony was overbearing.
Even the band members looked
bored.
A wave of relief came o er the
crowd when Johnny Quest finally
appeared on stageat 12:15a.m. All
four members, Joe "JQ" Farmer, Jack
Race" Campbell, Steve "Dr. Q"
Hill and Bill "Bandit" Ladd, were
itching to get started with the show.
They came out kicking with a
number called "Bulldozer Farmer,
lead singer for JQ, explained in his
familiar Southern drawl that their
firstnumber was "about a guy who
finds out his girl has been fucking
around behind his back so he finds
a bulldozer and runs over her
Suddenly, theair exploded with
energy. Ladd's guitar ground out
sounds that made the audience go
wild. Unlike the opening singer
who simply stood there, Farmer
hxik the microphone right off the
stand and began jumping around
Johnny Quest played their off-
beat tunes with sense of fun
the stage. Keeping up with where
he was and what he was doing from
one moment to the next was a task.
Most oi the tunes were a mix of
soft-core thrash and hard-core rap.
There were a few runes that might
h,r. e been a little too hard-core for
some of the audience, but no one
could resist gettingcaught up in the
excitement that emitted from the
stage. Even Luke Fisher of ECUS
football team thrashed a little on the
sideline.
IQ played out their off-beat
tunes with a sense of plain fun.
Most oi their songs were far from
being serious. One song was sup-
posedly about Farmer's grand-
mother who had three televisions
in one nxm and left them on 24
hours a day.
"IDMillion Summers the title
trackoff their new ielease,wasabout
"going to the beach, taking mush-
rooms and going body surfing
"Friends was a simple song about
going out and drinking beer and
shooting pool.
A favorite of the band's was a
tune titled, "Rub-a-Dub They in-
troduced it as "a song about taking
baths with other people, and it goes
like this Immediately, the band
broke out with a "Ring Around the
Rosies" theme and a sexy howl from
Farmer.
JQ even played their own ver-
sion of the Steve Miller Band's hit,
"Take the Money and Run It
started out sounding very much
like the original tune but soared to
an unfamiliar rapttvash combo
that thrilled everyone.
Farmer was even kind enough
to stop and discuss the disadvan-
tages of slam dancing.
"Remember hi- mother al-
ways said, "slam dancing can put
your eye out How considerate ot
him.
Hie slammers at the front paid
no heed, however. Thev continued
their slamming and stage diving as
igorous as ever. Kevin Finch, an
ECU student, had to take a break
from it all by making his way to the
calmer back part of the rwm. "It's
crazy down there he said "I've
lostmv shoes four times and my hat
twice It wasn't too long before he
was right back down there again.
During a pause between songs,
a guv in the audience who was
obviously caught up in the same
excitement,grabbed Farmer's New-
York Yankees baseball cap. Farmer
said, "One thing's for sure if you
come down to Greenville. If it ain't
nailed down, somebody's gonna
fuck with it Eventually he got his
hat back.
As early as the fifth song.
Farmer was swinging from the
rafters. He beat on his chest with
emphasis to the lyrics and danced
with his bare arms stretched up to
the sky, eyes closed as if worship-
ping whoever gave him all this en-
ergy and passion.
Johnny Quest does havea more
serious side. They have always
striven for racial harmony through
their actions and their music. Some
of their stings are dedicated to this
cause. "United" is one such song
that talks about brothers in har-
mony It is a very powerful song
with a hard grind to it.
lohnnyQuestwantsa mixof all
ethnic groups to see them perform
,u-d hear their plea for racial har-
mony. Sadly, most of the audience
was white at the New Deli that
night !Q had hoped for a better
ratio.
Johnny Quest should be play-
ing on bigger stages where their
message can be understocxi better
and heard bv more people. Thev
are a very sincere group of men
whoaregenuinelvconcerned about
the people in this world.
Throughout the whole set, the
bass was kicking, the guitar was
grinding and Hill was pounding
out the beat behind it all. Between
the f ul I sound of the band and wail-
ing, sometimes dissonant vocals,
Johnny Quest brought the club to a
height of ecstacy that every band
strives to acheive. However, the
audience had hoped the show
would last longer than an hour and
2D minutes. The band dispersed at
1:45 a.m. with the crowd begging
for more.
Johnny Quest has a new album
coming out on May 1 titled "10
Million Summers" that exemplifies
a d ifferent style than what their fans
usually hear live. More horns are
used, which explains the new blues
sound in their music. They have
waited almost three years for mis
album to becomea reality and seem
thrilled with the results.
nfe
tyjt
"Greenville's Only Exotic
Nightclub"
Contemporary Christian Ensemble
for College Students ages 18-24-
Audition Dates: April 24, 25, 26
The Memorial Baptist Church
1510 Greenville Blvd. SE
Sponsored by The Memorial Baptist Church
� 1993 Spring Break Tour - New Orleans, M
For Information call Randy Bayne
756-5314 or 756-6516
Adult Entertainment Center
;u( 110th st
D XMcPonaltf DickirfonAv.
Eaifa Store
Straight out of GrMnvilU 10 miU� to Earl's Store
TUESDAYS:
S.B.
i � �
L

Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS:
Amateur Night (Female Dancers)
THURSDAYS -SATURDAYS:
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 off admission Saturday Night
HELP WANTED: Fmm Exotic Dancers Needed. Call TM0I
Open Turn Hoars Omm 7:30pm Stage Teat �;90pm
Current and
Coming
Through April 16
Art exhibition: ECU senior James Michael Parker has some of his
finest works on display, including piinis ranging from intaglio to
lithograph to silkscreen and pieces achieved through color and photo
pnntmaking processes. Parker is a candidate lor the Bachelor ol 1 inc
Arts degree in art education with a concentration in prtntmaktng
Currently he is a student teacher at VV;ihl Coates Elementary School
and Rose High School tr Greenville Time: operating hours Place
Mendenhall Student Center Admission is liee and open to the public
April 15
Reading: N.C. writers Bland Simpson of Chapel Hill and Stephen
Smith of Southern Pines will read then works and perform original
songs. They are featured guests ol the Annual Spring Event of the
Friends of the F.CT library. Also appearing on the program; ECU
Chancellor Richard Hakin; Dr Kenneth Marks, director of Academic
Library Services at ECU; and Holly Mack Bell, president of the
Friends of the ECU Library. The Spring Event will be followed by a
wine and cheese reception and autograph session. lime: 7.36 p.m
Place: Room 244, MSC Admission is free and open to the public
April 25
Indian Bazaar: Explore the taste and culture of India through food,
folk dances, music, costumes, jewelry, spices, handicrafts, children's
games and more. The project has been organized by members of the
community from India. A dinner plate of seven delicious Indian food
items can be purchased for $5. Time: 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Place: American
Legion Hall, St. Andrews Dr. Admission is free and open to the public
Concert: Earth BuddiesConnells will be joined by fiREHOSE and
Dillon Fence. Time: 5p.m.Place: HardeesWalnulCreek Amphitheatre-
Tickets are on sale now at Ticketmaster (919-834-4000) for $8.50
S10.507S12.50. More info: Kerry Wilson (919) 831-6400.
May 2
Health Fair: Various workshops will be offered at the " W'ellness A
Family Affair" health fair Resources will include health screenings,
workshops and materials. Refreshments, door prizes and activities tr
the children will also be offered. Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m Place:
Cornerstone Missionary Baptist Church. More info: 752-7501.
May 3
Antique Show: Exhibits from over 90 dealers from N C S C and Va
will be shown. Entertainment will be provided all da including a
performance by Sutton Gospel Singers and Wadsworth Gospel Sing-
ers. Highlight, of the show include an authentic 1916 Duo-Art ptayei
piano playing intermittently throughout the day. chicken dinners
served beginning at noon, a country auction at 2 p.m a collectible dolls
display and a displas ol vintage bicycles by the East Carolina Nostalgic
BikeClub. rune 9 a in to 5 p in Place deem ille Antiques Mall, one
block east ol North Greene Street on Highway J3 Moie mio Bill
Lewis 752-1776
May 8
Concert: Travis Tntt ;ind Marty Stuart will perform Opening act � ill
be Grammy winner Mark O'Conner Time: 8pm Place Carow ukU
Paladium Tickets are available through Ticketmaster (74-522'65xi
or at Carowinds for $17 50 each
May 9
Graduation Speaker: Lawrence Rush "Rick' Atkinson. Pulitzer
Prize winning reporter at The Washington Post, will be the 1992
commencement speaker Atkinson, a 1974 ECU graduate, is author oi
the critically praised book. "The Long Gray Line which follows the
lives and careers of a cross-section of the West Point class of 1966
Spring commencement is scheduled for 10 a.m. in Ficklen Stadium
Approximately 2000 graduates will receive their degrees.
May 9-10
Art-Affects Festival: Artists and entertainers, lecturers and environ-
mental groups from all over the United States have been invited to
share their gills at "Art-Affects: A Loving Celebration of Life. Art and
Our Earth Mother The purpose of this festival is to sensitize people-
to (he sacredness of all forms of life on earth. The festivities include
a parade. The Earth Queen Beauty Pageant, rock 'n reggae with The
Amateurs, art, craft and environmental exhibits and an antique show.
Tune: festivities begin at 9 a.m. Place: City Park. Havelock, N.C. More
info: Tess Miles at (919) 393-8098.
May 15
Concert: Paula Abdul and Color Me Badd will perform. Time: 8:30
p.m. Place: Carowinds Paladium. Tickets are on sale now through
Ticketmaster (704-522-6500) or at Carowinds for S 19.50 and $22 50
ECONOMY MINI
STORAGE
USE YOUR
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
SHARE WITH A ROOMMATE
SPECIAL RATES MAY 1-AUG 31
300 FARMER ST
GREENVILLE
757-0373
J
If





Classifieds
QUie 3Eaat (Unrultninn
April 16,1992
B
Sports
lORRIM
I OR SMI
HHl.P WANTED
sSONAl.S
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS: One and
two bedroom apartments. Energy efficient,
several locations in town Carpeted, Kitchen
appliances, some water and sewer paid,
washer dryer hookups. Now taking applica
hons for Fall. Call 7S2-8915
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: For Fall
2 through Spring "93. $150.00 per month
plus 13 utilities. Tar River Estates. Semi-
fumished Call Mindy931-7775orStacey"Wl-
7H58.
WANTED TO RENT: Law firm needs two
fullv furnished one-bedroom apartment for
the summer May 30 � Aug. 8. If your apart-
ment is available for sublease please contact
Bert Speicher 355-3030.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted for apart
ment in prime location. 12 block from cam-
pus. 2 blocks from downtown. Monthly rent
INCLUDES utilities, phone and cable. ACT
NOW 7SMHI.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED-ASAP:
Nonsmoker $l?0month neg 12 utilities
Your own room. Call 791250.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED To sub
k'ase for summer Rent is $200month plus
11 2 utilities Upper classman or graduate
student preferred Non-smoker Call 355-2831
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT FOR RENT:
Available June 1 $300month, free water
pool use Kings Row Call Tomlohn 758-
7205.
ROOM FOR RENT: 3 minute walk to GCB
Starts mid May R70 month plus 1 4 utilities
Call 758268'
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to move
:r.to apt lune 1st $215 a month plus 12
utilities Downtown location Directly across
from campus Call Lisa at 758-8515
SUMMER SUBLEASE AVAILABLE:
Rmggold Towers Efficiency apt. $225 month
Available Mav 15-Augustl. Airconditioning.
secuntv. dose to campus, fullv furnished
Call 758-3290
ROOMMATE WANTED: 2 bedroom apart
ment for rent in house 1 2 blocks from art
building Includes full kitchen, full bath use
of washer and dryer Private entrance $25(1
plus part of utilities. Please call 758-9&11
Available immediately
FEMALE NONSMOKING ROOMMATE
NEEDED forsummer or longer for 2bedroom
townhouse DW. WD. 12 rentutilities
(cable and watersewer in rent) Call 321-
i�77
J BEDROOM HOUSE FOR RENT: Can
sublease for summer or take over lease
through next year 3 blocks from campus
(B3 S Meade) call 752-8112
TWO BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE FOR
RENT: Available mid Mav to sublease for
summer Semi furnished ECU bus service,
price is ERY REASONABLE Please call 757-
0787 leave message
GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR FEMALE
STUDENT to stav in a single parent home at
the beach for the summer References and
deposit JWf) 441434 evenings
SEIZED CARS: trucks, boats. 4-wheelers,
motor homes, by FBI. IRS, DEA. Available
yourareanow.Call8uD-338-3388Ext.C-5999
RENT OR BUY: A loft at a reasonable price.
Order now for the fall 758-2016.
BIKE FOR SALE: Schwinn Sprint 10-speed,
unisex, blue.rarely used and infantasticshape.
Must sell! $125. Call Dana at 931-8415 Great
bike
K1NCSIZE WATERBED Semi-wave book-
case headboard, padded rails, light pine One
vear old $200 0 bo 752-0772 after 5 p.m.
m NISSAN SENTRA: Sony stereo, mile-
age 93.000, trans excellent condition. Price
$1,950. 18-speed mountain bike, 10 months
old Price $80. Call 758-3049
HELPS! 184 VW letta�mustsell!Goodcond
$350 down neg k take up payments. Call
758-5215 and leave message Sell by 25 April.
FOR SALE: Large capacity washer and dryer
$150 Call 758-5435 after 12
FOR S ALE MacPlus personal computer hard
drive tgrev model) Great for desk top pub
lishing $800. (919) 7364256 after 6 p.m.
FOR SALE Aero 50 Honda scooter ll'M
model, good condition, less than 4.000 mik
$400 Call 551-2519 days or 355-3891 eve-
nings.
BUY THIS: Round table with leaf and six
chairs. Good condition $75 Call 758-0315,
leave message :f no answer.
SERVICES OFFERED
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for 1
bedroom. 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
A Beautiful Place to Live
�AU New
�And Ready To Rent-
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5lh Street
�Located Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Cenien
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
Limited Offer - $330 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Ape 8, 12-5:30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS'
NEED MONEY FOR COL' EGE? SFAMS
locates private sector financial aid for college
students Call Marshall Yount .1-800-238-8771
TYPING: Error free, quick and dependable
at reasonable cost. Excellent typing and
proofreading skills (grammar punctuation,
sentence structure, etcCall Paulino at 75 -
MS.
BETTER RESUMES GET JOBS. Don t take
chances when first impressions count A bet-
ter resume will open the right doors I can
help you applv for work with a personalized
job application letter and resume designed to
showcase vour talents If you're senousahout
the future, call me I'm a ptafaajtaasj writer
with over fifteen year's experience in market
ing and resume writing When you're ready
to move ahead, call Mark at B3MP72 anv
time
WORDPROCESS1NG: Resumes term pa
pers letters psychological assessments Rea
sonable rates, fast service Call 321-2522.
WHY PAY AND STARVE TO LOSE
WEIGHT? Save and eat to satisfy hunger
(even for sweets) and get fast, permanent
weight loss to the size mats right for you and
feel better than ever while you drop 13-1
pound daily (diabetics and hvpoglvcemics
too) Maybe even make a little money without
overhauling your life style to lose weight or
keep it off Free information by mail 335
3789
HELP WANTED
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE Manv posi
hons. Great benefits Call 800- 338- 3388 Ext. P-
3712.
FREETRAVEE Aircouriersandcruiseships
Students also needed Christmas, spring and
summer for amusement park employment
Call 800-338-3388 Ext F-3464
REWARD For the return of lost heart charm
bracelet with four charms. Reward guarenteed
more than Pwan Shop value! (919) 527-5925
No questions asked.
READ BOOKS FOR PAY! $100TiTLE! Fill
out likedislike forms FREE 24hr recording
505-764-0699.
TRAVELING FROM GREENVILLE TO
DURHAM, CHAPEL HILL? Working
mother is looking transportation for two chil-
dren to Chapel Hill on weekends. Gas plus.
Call 942-6509.
PROFESSIONAL COUPLE SEEKS
HOUSESITTING anytime during mid-May
thru August Will care for pets, etc. Call 918-
664 7869 evenings after 6 p.m. References
available
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for
night auditorfront desk position. Please ap-
ply in person at The Hampton Inn, 3439 S.
Memorial Dnve. Previous hotel experience
preferred but not necessary
FOR HIRE: Stock and sale person, no experi-
ence required Apply at Youth Shop Bohque.
Arlington Village.
WANTED Gamers to start gaming group in
Greenville Send resume of experience with
name, address and telephone numuber to
P.O. Box 3439 Greenville, NC 27858
STOP We need your help mailing our
circulars. Work fullpart time from$500wk.
GUARANTEED' Work at home! For free
info, send long self-addressed stamped enve-
lope Familv Homemailers. Box 351. Damas-
cus . MD20S72
CRUISE SHiKS NOW HIRING: Earn
S2.000month and world travel (Hawaii,
Mexico, the Cambean. etcHoliday, sum-
mer and career employment available No
experience necessary For employment pro-
gram cill 1-206-545-4155 ext C586
CHILDCARE NEEDED now and through
summer for MM children, ages 2 1 fl and 7.
two or three weekdays�mornings and after
noons Occasional Saturday evenings and
weekend overnights Must have experience
and own transportation Call for interview
with kids 752-6372.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Undergraduate
smoker, social drinker needed to share 2 bed-
room house. $150 rent1 3 utilitites. Call
757-1814.
HOUSE TO SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER, 2
bedroom, 1 bath, pets OK. $450month ?
utilities. Call 757-1814.
PERSONALS
HAPPY BIRTHDAY BARRY: Have a great
day tomorrow. Hope you survive the big 3-0!
ALPHA SIC: Thank you for all your help this
semester, especially with the coin drive. We
can't wait for our cookout after Barefoot. It
will be an end of the semester blow out.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
MftFTOTHFFASTCARPUNlAN
DELTA CHI PLEDGE CLASS: Good luck
this weekend. �The brothers.
ADPi: We had a great time cooking out with
you! Let's do it again! Love, the Sigmas.
PANHELLEN1C Congrats on your awards!
Love, the Sigmas
ANGELA SUTTON: Congrats on being
named vice president of SEPC! Love, the Sig-
mas
ALL-SING PARTICIPANTS: Congrats on
some great skits, and to Alpha Phi, Sigma and
ADPi for placing! Love, the Sigmas.
ASHLEY, ROBIN AND LE1LANI: Congrats
on doing awesome at Pika Greek Goddess!
Love, your Sigma sisters
MONICA BRAY: We hope you feel better
soon! We're thinkingof you! Love, your Sigma
sisters.
SIGMASW1SHEVERYONEAGREATEAS
TER BREAK
ALPHA PHI'S AND DATES: At the pre
formal picnic we ate every bite; our formal
would be a blast the very next night The
Hilton was decorated in very fine taste; this
night we could not waste Everyone looked
sharp in their formal attire, both gays and
girls were something to admire' The dinner
was served ust a bit late, but all-in-all it
turned out great! The DJ rocked til we could
rock no more; we were so disappointed to
walk out the door Another Alpha Phi formal
has gone by, we'll always look back with a
happy sigh.
ALL YOU CAN EAT SPAGHETTI DIN-
NER given by Delta Zeta April 21.1992.5.30-
830 in the Mendenhall mu I ti purpose room.
$3 00 per ticket See anv Delta Zeta for tickets
TH ANKS TO ALLTHE PARTICIPANTS in
the Gamma Sig Beta Pledge Class male auc-
tion benefitting the Cancer Society
YOU FINALLY MADE IT! Cathrine Cron,
Lvnda McCorrruck, Tanya Reams, Christy
Rogers, Melinda Cox, Kim Russell, Lea
Fitzgerald, Jenny Gagon, Michelle Harrell,
Amy Miller, Alica Porter, Kathy Rouse and
Anna West. We are so glad to ha ve you as our
sisters. Love, the sisters of Gamma Sig
CONGRATULATIONS PI KAPPA PHI for
winning the 2nd annual Gamma SigAlpha
Sig coin drive. We appreicate all the people
who supported us and we are looking for-
ward to doing this next year.
TO STEVE AND STEPHANIE May all
your days be filled with swimming, fnsbee
golf, slumber parties, ciagarettes and cha-
ching! Happy St Patrick's Day!
Kathy Sawyer I hope you have a great Easter
I'll be thinkin about you Cant wait until
Alpha Delta Pi Formal PS 1 think you're
kinda neat too! Guess Who??
Congratulations ECU students for proving
that you really do care about putting a dent
In student apathy Thanks for voting in the
SGA elections
Congratulations Pikes on Most Outstanding
Fraternity. Community Serivce and Highest
GPA Also to Jon Hand ohn Washko and
Keith Tilghman for being inducted into the
Greek Hall of Fame A Iso to Hunter Meadows
for the Highest GPA Full Throttle PIKES To
A Nabonal Award in Arizona!
JOYNER
LIBRARY
MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER
FAST CAROLINIAN
Qj A.SSIFIFD RATES
Students$2.00
Nonstudents$3.00
Display ads55.50
Deadline
Fridav 4 p,m� for Tuesday issue and
Tuesday 4 p,m, for Thursday issue.
ODDS
is now BUYING
and SELLING all
home furnishing
and appliances a tj
very reasonable
prices. For mord
nformation, call
RANDY at
3 5 5-2214 lea ve
message if no
answer).
ALASKA SUMMER JOBS
Earn S3,000month m Fisheries
Free Transportation! Room &
Board! Over 8,000 openings No
experience necessary Male or
Female. Foremplovment Program
call 1-21)6-543-4155 ext 4001
PERSONALS
HEADING FOR EUROPE THISSUMMER?
Jet there anytime for only $169 with
A1RH1TCH I (Reported in Lets Gal and the
New ork TimesAlso, super low round trip
fares to West coast AlRHITCH 212464-3000
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOYMENT: fish
�TiM Earn 15000 month Free transporta-
tion! Roomi Board'Over8000openings No
experience necessary Male or female For
employment program call Student Employ-
ment Services at 1 206-345-4135 ext. 1649
PLEDGES OF PHI KAPPA PS1: Great job on
!irple k Gold Weekend' You make the dif
ference' Keep it up�not much longer hi go!
Always Gentleman The Brothers
BRIAN HILL: llease don't hate us' We still
love you" Hope you enioyed Brian Hill Ap-
preciation Week' Love, the Photo Bandits
oMsTV. QJsjja � "III itM IWiB.�
�irtllin MOIILEHOMF. RENTALS- amma
�n. fcj ii� ���� a i � i �� i � Imkmmtm
mm Brack VsDsy Caosn Chfc.
Contact J.T. or Tommy William I
756-7815
WANTED: Gamers to start gaming group in
Greenville Send resume of experience with
name, address and telephone to P.O. Box
34� Greenville. NC 27858.
SKM360UP WEEKLY: Mailing brochures!
SpareFull time. Set own hours! Free Details!
Send self-addressed stamped envelope. Pub-
lishers (S) P.O. Box 51037 Durham, NC. 27717
LOOKING FOR A GREAT SUMMER JOB?
FLORIDA OB OPPORTUNITY REPORT A
Directory of Hospitality Industry employers,
job descriptions, wages and housing Lists
Attractions, Resort Hotels, Cruise Ships,
Summer Camps, and more! For vour copy
send S8.95toCAREER RESEARCH GROUP,
7226 W. Colonial Dr Suite 249, Orlando, Fl
32818.
BRIAN (STL'D): 1 had a great time this past
weekend at the beach and at your formal
Congrats on being named Brother of the Y ear
You deserved THAT award Love ya�
"Deborah Ann "
CONGRATS TO THE WINNERS OF THE
AZD ALL-SING! Everyone did a great job!
�Delta Zeta
THANKS EVERYONE for putting up with
me during All sing! You guys did an awe-
some job. Love. Amy.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE ECU
RUGBY TEAM for winning the state tourna-
ment You did a hell of a job especially
BLAIR BY RD, graduating captain of the team,
who scored the first and last tri of the tourna-
ment!
HAPPY 22nd BIRTHDAY CRAIC! Let's go
to S.S. 11 and throw down some pitchers, then
have a lawn party, and just MAYBE go four-
wheelin Love ya, Mandy.
DELTA ZETA WISHES EVERYONE A
SAFE AND HAPPY EASTER!
CONGRATULATIONS TO EVERYONE
ON A FABULOUS GREEK WEEK! Love.
Delta Zeta
CONGRATULATIONS TO MELANIE
MORRIS on her recent lavaliere! Love, your
Delta Zeta sisters
LAMBDA CHI AND KAPPA SIC: Thanks
for an awesome time dunng Greek week! We
had a blast! Love. Delta Zeta
CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST
WISHES TO OUR SENIORS! We love you
and we II miss you ternbly! Love, your DZ
sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS: Sam Matheny�
Delta Chi�for receiving ADPi Greek Man of
the Year! Love, the sisters of Alpha Delta Pi.
K A: It sure was fun getting "leid" by you guys
last night! Let's do it again soon. Love. Alpha
Delta Pi.
SIGMAS: Thanks for having us over for the
cookout! We had a great time' Love, Alpha
Delta Pi.
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA DELTA PI:
for winning 1st place in AZD All-sing k
thanks Mama Lee! Love, your sisters.
JILLI AN KAPLAN, I'll always love you. and
never leave mm Carmen Tarrantino. PS All
other girls, eat your heart out'
BlLLTOMLINSON:Congrarulahonsonget
ting the highest G P A (4 0) Award from IFC
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
HELP WANTED
Experienced cook
specializing in Mexican
food. Apply in person at
Alfredo's
GET $$$
Sell your textbooks back
at ECU Student Stores.
Selling used books here
means Recycling Them!
Alfredo's N.Y. Pizza
718 E. 5th St. wntown 752-0022
f with 1 topping j Personal Size ALLH,wh- ib
-1 topping pizza .
� with large soda �
i $3.99 i
good 10pm
J.�
I
I
I
I
I
L
topping
$7.99
carry out only
not good after
9pm
$1.50
(with this coupon)
fast larriiman
TO THE TKE WHO HELPED THE LITTLE
OLD LADY CROSS THE STREET Monday
at 11:30�you've restored our faith that chiv-
alry still exists and our hearts will NEVER be
the same! �the girls in the while Sentra.
TO ALLTHE BOYSON 12th AND FORBES:
Did you get enough pizza Monday night? Oh
yeah�Craig�how about the Emerald Pie
for dessert? Kisss-kjss. you messed with the
WRONG GIRLS.
CONGRATULATIONS JIM on your first
official newspaper as the new general man-
ager! You'll do a great job!
is now accepting applications for:
CLASSIFIED ADS TECHNICIAN
� Must have and maintain a
minimum 2.0 G.P.A.
�Must attend summer and fall semester
of 1992
� Have a strong knowledge of Page
Maker and Microsoft Word
� Strong typing skills necessary
Apply at Cooperative Education, second
floor GCB, or with The East Carolinian,
second floor publication bldg.
Announcements
THF BISEXUAL-
r.AV.IFSBIAN ALLIANCE
Social support, advocacy, activities. Every-
one welcome - gays, lesbians, bisexuals.
concerned family and friends Call ECU
counseling center 757-6766 for information
regarding meeting time and place.
NEWMAN
CJMQUC STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student Catholic Cen-
" ter invites you to worship with them Sunday
Masses 11:30 a.m. and 8:30 p.m. At the
New man Center, 953 E. 10th St Two houses
Ifrom me Fletcher Musk Building. For more
' information contact Fr Paul Vaeth, 757-1991
X awVMrai.BIHJTATIQN
FTTNP� raMPFrENCY TEST
Mmges Coliseum at 10 p.m. Tuesday. April
28.1992 A passing score on test is required of
all students prior to declaring physical edu
cation as a major 1. Maintaining an average
T-score Of 45 on the six-item test battery. 2.
Having a T-score of 45 on the aerobics run.
j- Any student with a medical condition that
would contraindkate participation in the
testing should contact Mike McCammon or
Dr. Gay Israel at 757-4688 To be exemptfrom
any portion of the test, you must have a
physician's excuse A detailed summary of
the test is available in the Human Perfor-
mance Laboratory, Room 371 Sports Medicine
Building. Your physician's excuse must spe-
cifically stale from which items you are ex-
empt.
EQ&Eldi
I.ANfr"Ar-B AWARDS DAY
The ECU Department of Foreign Languages
will be holding its annual Awards Day cel-
ebration on Wednesday, 22 April at 4 p.m. in
the Foreign Language Conference room (GC
3321 A). Come support excellence and
achievement in foreign languages.
FQBXlGJi
UMBJUa "FPABTMENT
Come one, come all! The ECU Department of
Foreign Languages is hosting a Foreign Lan-
guage Festival on Thursday, 23 April This
mulh-culrural event will be held at St Peter's
Church (4th St. entry )beginning 6:30p.m. For
tickets ($5) contact Georganne Davie in the
Fogeign Language Depart ment or me follow-
sngstudents:iamFaulkner,LisaWillis,Caren
Penny. Foreign "fun, folks, and food" - don't
���l! T
FPU tf-HOQl OF MUSIC EVENTS
TUES, APR. 14 � Faculty Recital featuring
Elliot Frank, guitar (Fletcher Recital Hall. 8:15
p.m. free) WED APR.15�School of Medi-
cine Noon-Hour Concert Series; "Jazz ECU
Jazz Bones, George Broussard, director with
guest artists Carroll V. Dashiell and Lewis
Pragasam (Brody Auditorium 12:30 p.m
free); ECU Jazz'Bones k Trombone Choir,
George Broussard, director (Fletcher Recital
Hall, 8:15 p.m free). THUR, APR. 16�Scott
Allen, percussion. Senior Recital (Fletcher
Recital HaIl,7p.m,free),The ECU Symphonic
Wind Ensemble. William W. Wiedrtch, con-
ductor (Wright Auditorium, 8:15 p.m free).
MON. APR. 20 � Michael McCinnis, guitar.
Senior Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 7 pm
free); Bert Sullivan, trombone. Senior Recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall,9 pm, free). Dial 757-
4270 for The School of Music's "Recorded
Calandar" of events.
WANTED FALL 1W2
Recreational Services will be holding inter-
views this spring and summer for the fol-
lowing fall positions 1 Student Marketer
(SHIPREO: positions available f Central,
West Campus and Commuter students. No
experience necessary. 1�Photojoaraaliat
Experience in news writmgrepornng and
or photography required. Above minimum
wage rate. 3�Artist Illustrator willing to
produce camera-ready artwork containing
sports related recreationalfun themes.
Above minimum rate. For details and an
application, stop by 204 Christenbury Gym-
nasium or call 757-6387 and ask for Jeannette
Roth.
MCTUCOFWAR
ECU Recreational Services will be sponsor-
ing a tug of war competition in conjunctions
with the annual Barefoot on the Mall
extraveganza. A challenge competition will
be held between teams of ten(men's, women's,
cd-i). The winners will have the opportunity
to compete against a "celebrity" team of fac-
ulty, staff and students. The competition will
take place on April 23 from 2 p.m-5 p.m. on
the Central Campus MalL Each participant
will be asked for a SI donation to provide
support to the Ronald McDonald House.
Teams may either pre register by picking up
a form in 204 Christenbury Gym or they may
register on a first -come Ant-serve ban the
day of the event For details call 757-6387.
SFavirrt bvenimc HOURS
The Career Services Office (Btoxton House)
will be open on April 6 and April 20 from 5
p.m. to 6:30 p.m. for students who may not be
able to come during regular office hours. Staff
will be available to answer questions, assist
with computerized career guidance programs
(Discover and SIC1), critique resumes and to
provide career counseling.
VOA CONCERT
A concert unique in the history of the East
Carolina University School of Musk is an-
nounced for Sunday. April 26. The event has
been planned by the Voice of America and the
School of Musk in celebration of the Voice of
America's 50th anniversary. Featuring some
of the School's most outstanding performers
and ensembles, the concert will be broadcast
by Voice of America live to a worldwide
audience. The publk is invited to attend this
very special event free of charge Seating
must be secured by 4 pm prior to broadcast
time
l.riWHftr�"1"�
The Law Honor Society will hold its next
meeting on April 20 at 5:15 p.m. in room 218
Ragsdale. Anyone planning to attend law
school or interested in law is welcome to
attend. If you have any questions, please
contact Melissa Smith 931-7569.
PHI SIGMA PI
Congratulations to the new brothers of Phi
Sigma Pi! Paula Anderson, David Baits, Donna
BoU. Nicole Boyer, Chris Ellis. Lindsay
Fernandez. Jennifer Gabbard, Teresa Garren.
Amanda Hines, Cathy NaUrrhaus, Came
Plank. Monka Reavis. Kelli Schufferth. An
drea Sodano. Jenn Upchurch, Ana Villareal.
Laura Wallace and Ed Zuravei
ECU EQUESTRIAN CLUB
Meeting 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 21 at Rock
Springs Equestrian Center. Anyone able to
give people a ride meet by the Mendenhll bus
stop no later than 4:15. New members wel-
come' Call Debbie 752-4915 or Eileen 830-
3931 with questions
AUDITIONS FOR COl ORCHARD
If you have ever wanted to become a member
of the Marching Pirates Colorguard, then
here's your chance! We are looking for indi-
viduab who love to perform in front of large,
enthusiastic crowds and work hard for excel-
lence. We will join the Marching Pirates at
home football games, sekted away games,
exhibitions, pep rallies and BOWL games. No
experience necessary. Come out and join the
fun and excitement Auditions will be held
Saturday April 25 or Saturday June 20 from 10
am to 5 pm at A.J. Fletcher Musk Building.
Lady Pirates r
in UNC tourn
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sports Writer
In the Lady Tarheel Classic,
which featured some of the Siuth-
east Region's top teams, as well as
twoofthenationalTop2l)teams the
ECU Lady Pirates fastpitch softball
team kicked some ass and took few
names.
On Friday m game one, UNC-
Charlotte was the first victim m the
list to fall to the Lady Tirau by the
score of 3-1. Jenny Parson pitched a
four-hitter as the Pirate defense
plaved with theeaseand grat�.
Bolshoi Ballet, committing just one
error and allowing one run. The tf-
fensive sting came from Laura
Crowder who turned in a 2-for-2
ticket and Mechelle Jones who pro-
duced a two out, two-RBI single 11
put the icing on thecake k r the Lady
Pirates.
Later that afternoon, a en n
100 spectators watched as iL de-
feated George Mason Uruversil
in their sea md game i f the tourna-
ment ones, a senior catcher
calling the �'ignals a Parsons
delivering high, hard
innings pitched, Tar
barters and struck oul
yielding three runs off I
senior-backed infield, f
baseman Tammy N'ew
Lady Dukes to just tw
in scoring position di
test Crowder, Pars
led the Lady Bucs'
with two hits each.
On Saturday, wH
were on hand enjoyi
Pirate Pigs kin Pignut j
Pirates were prepai
I iwistalCarolina.Wit
the ser ies hvt ga mes i
not a guaranteed wi
leadership proved h
torinagamewhe
both sides was -hi
pitched a three hitter
aggressivePirati
ball to assisti I
runs. Seniors Chant
Christy Kees rallied
ing the fourth inning
bat I
See Softball
LitQe League
smokeless tobal
BOSTON (AP) � Little
League baseball players often
dream of hitting a home run to
win the World Series, but
there's one part of the game
league officials would like
them to forget � chewing to-
bacco.
With studies showing
more youngsters dipping into
smokeless tobacco, U.S. Secre-
tary of Health and Human Ser-
vices Louis Sullivan an-
nounced a campaign Monday
to discourage kids from the
habit.
"Unfortunately, the asso-
ciation of baseball and tobacco
use goes back virtually to the
beginning of the game
Sullivan said in a speech to the
Little League International
Congress meeting in Boston
this week.
Little League officials
joined Sullivan in announcing
the program, which will dis-
tribute brochures to boys ages
10 to 12 who play in the base-
ball leagues. The brochures will
describe tobacco as both unat-
tractive and unhealthy.
Similar brochures will be
given to girls who play in Little
League baseball's softball di-
visions. Studies show girls
don't use smokeless tobacco as
much as boys, but the bro-
chures will ask the girls to
speak to the boys about their
habit.
"At Little Leajl
concerned with thl
association with t
baseball and are dt
educate our child!
ting tobacco's dell
fects said Crei
president of Little
Theanti-tobacd
will target 11 statl
cials say show the
of smokeless I
among teen-agcrj
West Virginia
Kentucky, Arkar
see, New Mexico!
Kansas, North d
tana and Wyominf
According t
ment of Health and
vices, more than
Americans used
bacco last ear ai
were between ag�
Health officials bl
less tobacco for ii
risk of oral cance
Ward Hubbe
manformeSrnoki
Council in Washinl
trade group mal
smokeless tobaccq
proven to causehi
Regarding
announced Monc
said: The smokJ
industry category
want anyone un
18 using its prodi
"ibuCan
0
3900
per month
M )STKNS
Date
April 20 - 22 10:00 - 3:00 �g,
p Student Store
Mon. - Wt
rasa
�M Mtm aaaaaaas to m �� � as �����
nr jetecoor or ����





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vj) Jpp
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It -ml floor publication bldg.
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taff
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�f meni aa
on of thi .
Featuring; some
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Iwtll be broadcast
hi 3 Worldwide
Sted to attend this
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djj to attend law-
is welcome to
juestions please
'S69
PHI SIGMA W
� the new brother, of I'hi
SigmaFi! Paula Anderson David Btofb iAmna
tills Lindsay
ifb.ml TeresaGarren
Amar. � � 's.itTluus. Cvric
ca Reavis � � ;f�Tth An
lenn I pchurch Ana Villareal.
tvd
ECU KHJESTHAHOia
foods; April 21 at Rock
'Tnrv � Vv. m able to
s people I ride meet bv the Mendenhll bus
I Vw members wel-
�� TSl-m5 or Eileen 830-
AUDU1QNS fQ&iQJLQ&CjUARD
If jfoa have ever wanted to become a member
of the Marching Pirates Colorguard. then
here's vour chance1 We are looking for indi-
viduals who love to perform in front of large,
enthusiastic cmwds and work hard for excel-
lence We will ,oin the Marching Pirates at
home football games selcted awav games,
exhibitions pepralliesandBOW'Lgames No
experience necessary Come out and oin the
fun and excitement" Auditions will be held
Saturday Apnl 25orSaturday lune20from 10
am. to 5 p m at A I Fletcher Music Building
Sports
(Hire �aat (Earalfnian
April 16, 1992
2
Lady Pirates roll
in UNC tourney
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sports Writer
In the Lady Tarheel Classic,
which featured some of the South-
east Region's top teams, as well as
two of the national Top 20 teams the
ECU 1 adv Pirates fastpitch softball
k k Isol some ass and took a few
names.
I )n Friday in game one, UNC-
itle was the first victim on the
i fall to the Lady Pirates hy the
e ol 3 1 lennv Parson pitched a
hitter as the Pirate defense
ed with the easeand grace of the
�hoi lv.illet, committing just one
� and allowing one nin. The of-
ve ting came from Liura
ier who turned in a 2-for-2
I and MecheUe Jones who pro-
ed a two out, two-RBI single to
the icing on thecake for the Lady
ites.
ater that afternoon, a crowd of
pe tators watched as ECU de-
tedieorge Mason University9-3
ir second game of the touma-
� fanes, a senior catcher, was
ng the signals as Parsons was
delivering high, hard heat In seven
innings pitched, Parsons faced 28
hatters and struck out three while
yielding three runs off nine hits. The
senior-backed infield, led by second
ba seman Tammy Newman, held the
Lady Dukes to just two base runners
in scoring position during the con-
test Crowder, Parsons and Jones
led the Lady Bucs' hitting squad
with two hits each.
On Saturday, while 7,000 plus
were on Kind enjoying the Great
Pirate Pigs kinPigoutparty, the Lady
rirates were preparing to meet
Coastal Carolina. With ECU leading
the series two games to one, this was
not a guaranteed win. The senior
leadership proved tobethedeciding
factor inagamewhere pitchingfrorn
both sides was sharp. Parsons
pitched a mr�5hitter, and thealwavs
aggressive Pi rate defense tx h tied i ne
ball to assist Coastal with their two
runs. Seniors Chanel Hooker and
Christy Kees rallied the troops dur-
ing Ihe fourth inning with back-to-
back singles which started a Pirate
See Softball, page 8
little League axes
smokeless tobacco
BOSTON (AP) � Little
League baseball players often
dream of hitting a home run to
win the World Series, but
there's one part of the game
league officials would like
them to forget � chewing to-
bacco.
With studies showing
more voungsters dipping into
smokeless tobacco, U.S. Secre-
tary of Health and Human Ser-
vices Louis Sullivan an-
nounced a campaign Monday
to discourage kids from the
habit.
"Unfortunately, the asso-
ciation of baseball and tobacco
use goes back virtually to the
beginning oi the game
Sullivan said in a speech to the
Little 1 eague International
Congress, meeting in Boston
thi week.
Little League officials
joined Sullivan in announcing
(he program, which will dis-
tribute brochures to boys ages
10 to 12 who play in the base-
ball leagues. Thebrochureswill
describe tobacco as both unat-
tractive and unhealthy.
Similar brochures will be
given to girls who play in Little
League baseball's softball di-
visions. Studies show girls
don't use smokeless tobacco as
much as boys, but the bro-
chures will ask the girls to
speak to the boys about their
habit.
"At Little League, we are
concerned with the product's
association with the game of
baseball and are determined to
educate our children to spit-
ting tobacco's deleterious ef-
fects said Creighton Hale,
president of Little League.
The anti-tobacco campaign
will target 11 states that offi-
cials say show the highest rates
of smokeless tobacco use
among teen-agers. They are
West Virginia, Mississippi,
Kentucky, Arkansas, Tennes-
see, New Mexico, Oklahoma,
Kansas, North Dakota, Mon-
ti na and Wyoming.
According to the Depart-
ment of Health and Human Ser-
vices, more than 12 million
Americans used smokeless to-
bacco last year, and 14 percent
were between ages 12 and 17.
Health officials blame smoke-
k ss tobacco for increasing the
risk of oral cancer.
Ward Hubbell, a spokes-
man for the Smokeless Tobacco
Council in Washington, said the
trade group maintains that
smokeless tobacco has not been
proven to cause hu man disease.
Regarding the campaign
announced Monday, Hubbell
said: "The smokeless tobacco
industry categorically does not
want anyone under the age of
18 using its products
buCan
Afford To Brag.
jg-&4fmt& ��
Xir
3900
per month
()STRXS
Aprll 20 � 22 1Q:Q0 - 3:00 gg, $20.00
Crew team rows irf
medal at Clemson
By Chris McCaffrey
Staff Writer
Photo by Dail n�d � ECU Photo Lab
The ECU Lady Pirate softball team continues to roll through the 1992
season asthey made it tothe semi-finals of the prestigious UNC tournament.
The crew team traveled to
Clemson, S.C, on Saturday to par-
ticipate in the Clemson Sprints,
walking away with a gold medal
and an overall good showing. More
than 18 schools were represented
and came together for close com-
petitive racing for the Bucs.
The men's novice four-A boat,
made up of Tom Eure, Matt Byrne,
Chris McCaffrey, Nanny Callis and
Brian Dishman pulled up to the
start to race UNC-W, Furman, Cita-
del and Savannah.
The novice A boat steadily
pulled away to win the heat by
open water with UNC-W nipping
Furman for second.The men'snov-
ice B boat raced in the second heat
against Georgia Tech, Clemson,
University of Tennessee and Geor-
gia State. The boat, consisting of
Will Doar, Chris Partin, Jerry
Favantos, Shaun O'Brian and Sue
O'Neill, Stayed with the other boats
but slipped halfway through to fin-
ish fifth. The men's novice A boat
pulled for a repeat performance of
the weekend before by winning the
finals by open water over Clemson,
Georgia Tech, Tennessee and UNC-
W in a time of 7:15.44 on a 2,000-
meter course. The gold medal won
by the A boat was the second first m
place victory in a year by this boat.
The women's varsity four made
up of Angie Brown, Yvonne
Leipoldt, Amy Braun, Carrington
Cosby and Sue O'Nei 11 fared wel 1 in
a very strong heat which included
Furman, UTK and Clemson. The
Bucs pulled out a strong race to
finish third. The third place show-
ing by this boat was the second this
semester in the major regattas.
The women' novice boat pro-
vided an early finish line rivalry �
with UNC-W. Brittany Olsen, Angie
Millis, Heather Biffle, Catherine
Rana and Sue O'Neill ran neck and
neck with UNC-W fighting for third
place in the finals of their event.
Technical problems stuck the Bucs
boat about 15 meters from the line
allowing UNC-W to edge them out
for third.
The crew team will travel to
Oak Ridge, Term this weekend for
the final regatta of the season.
Ruggers beat Guilford for state crown
By Hiram J. Webb
Staff Writr
The ECU rugbv team won the
state tournament last weekend in
Charlotte.
The Pirates easily defeated
Western Carolina in the first round
of play. Blair Byrd led all scorers
with two tries. Bert Hewitt, Rich-
ard "Opie" Moss and Jason Webb
each had one score. Moss made
four of five penalty kicks to give
ECU a 28-0 victory.
ECU was a little too confident
going into Saturday's second
game. East Carolina lacked spirit
against a well-coached Guilford
squad.
Guilford took a early 6-0 lead
by making two penalty
kicks.Webb's try and Moss' con-
version tied the game at six apiece
late in the second half. This would
not be enough though. Guilford
scored one more and won the game
12-6.
Many thought this would be
it for the Pirates; but, because they
had scored more points than any
other team, ECU received a wild-
card berth into the finals.
The next game matched a
physical East Carolina squad
against the quickness and finesse
of UNC-Chapel Hill. Things did
not look good for the Pirates early
on. Carolina led the half 6-0.
ECU was determined not to
go home without the champion-
ship. Bert Howitt was literally
pushed into the try zone by the
Fil� photo by Dail Reed � ECU Photo Lab
The ECU rugby team defeated Guilford College 17-12 in a grudge match over the weekend to move them to
No. 1 in the state. Some of the players pictured above will be in Greenville April 25 for the annual alumni game.
entire Piratescrum. Moss' kick was
good.
Winger Scott Major did not
want to be out done by the
scrummers and juked his way to
the middle of the try zone. Moss
made the conversion and ECU
won 12-6. The stage was now set
for a Guilford-ECU rematch for
the state championship.
Both ECU and Guilford knew
what to expect from each other,
since this was their second match
in less than 24 hours. At first, it
looked as if the championships
would be a repeat of the earlier
game. Guilford led 12-0 at the half.
East Carolina was determined
not to give up. Webb took Chris
Carney's pass in for ECU's first
score. Moss' conversion was no
good.
J.J. McCain couldn't be caught
by the Guilford defenders and
scored a try. Moss made the con-
version, but, ECU was still down
12-10.
As time wore on, Guilford
began to get sloppy and allowed
East Carolina a penalty kick. Moss
made the finest kick of his career
to give ECU a one point lead.
The Pirates were not yet satis-
fied; so Byrd scored once more,
with time running out, to give ECU
a 17-12 victory.
This was the fourth time in
See Rugby,page 8
Mon. - Wed.
pStudent Store
We're
Looking Forward
To Your Visit
To
North Myrtle Beach
During Easter
Second Avenue & Hillside Drive
North Myrtle Beach, S.C. 29597
(803) 249-2404
Do You Need
CASH?
We Are Buying
Used Menfs Clothing
$ WE PAY CASH $
SHIRTS SWEATERS T
PANTS SWEATS KNITS
JEANS SHOES ETC.
CASUAL ft PRESS
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and use our new rear entrance!
THE ESTATE SHOP
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(Across from Cubbies)
752-3866
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DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
ilA
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rook
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ET $$$
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i
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� t
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pting applications for:
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(OEDi . � . .
! h� Id
ones No
Htrnd law'H in Km
n n mi I'm �
�- , �� l -rday Apr .rm ; i
Sports
Lady Pirates roll
in UNC tourney
za j
� ' 2-OC 2j I
7
lll r I
l c harks Mitchell
senior Sports Writer
I ad) larheel c lassw.
featured some of the South-
, -umi s lop teams, as well as
,itiiui.il lop?0teams the
Pirates fastpttch sotthall
ked some ass and took a few
ni,� in iimc one V
�. .i- the fir-t ktimon the
� the Lad) Pirates K the
enn Parson pit hed a
the Pirate defense
iuiil grace of the
� � committing just
run I he lif-
ting ame from 1 aura
� med in a 2 I
Vfi �. helie Jones who .
�, 'si- RBI single to
nthecakeforthel ady
.let
watched asE I de-
Mason I ni ersil
4 the ti ins s. t
� catcher
,i- Par� -
delivering high, hard heat In seven
innings pitched, Parsons laced 2S
hatters and struck out thrtv while
uelding three runs ott nine hits. Ihe
senior-backed infield, led by second
haseman IammvNewman,heliithe
I ady I "Hikes h ust two hase mnners
in s(iring position dunng the con-
test C rowder, 'arsons ami lones
led the Lady Bocs' hitting squad
v. ith two hits each.
( n Saturday, while 7 000 plus
were on hand enoing the Great
Pirate Pigskin Figout party, fce Lady
Pirates were preparing to meet
oastal( arohna. With It leading
the series two gai I ne,thiswas
not ,i guaranteeil win. Ihe senkw
leadership proved to be thedei kting
ta. torinagamewherepitchingfrom
both sides was sharp. Parsons
piK hed a three hitter andtheahvays
i i Pirated.leiisehootedime
ball to assist � tal with their I
SeniorsPanel I looker and
( hristv Kees rallied th� ti - ; lur-
g the fourth inning with back I �
which started a Pirate
� Softball : ige 8
Little League axes
smokeless tobacco
N (AP) I if �
baseball players often
� me run to
but
. . � the game
WOUld like
� forget
th studies sh( ��- i p
�ungsters dipping into
-sstobai Secre
ealth and Human Ser-
Sullivan an
ige kid- from the

� fortunate!), the a
� baseball and toba co
back irtually to the
ol ' � � game
,n lii � - � hi the
i i nternati nal
meeting in Boston
ials
. in in annouru ing
ran which will dis-
t( bro hure to boys a
2 . ho play in the ba i
.� rhebrcx Pun sw ill
�. ti bai coas both unal
and unhealthy.
ii � � m ill be
. en to girls who play in Little
� iseball's Softball di-
visions Studies show girP
i . smokeless tobacco as
much as boys, hut the bro-
chures will ask the girls to
; eak to the boys about their
habit.
At Little league, we are
concerned with the product's
with the game of
baseball and are determined to
educate our children to spit-
ting tobacco's deleterious ef-
fects said Creighton Hale,
I resident of Little league
Fhe anti-tobacco campaign
will target 11 states that offi-
(ials say show the highest rates
of smokeless tobacco use
among teen-agers. I hev are
West Virginia, Mississippi,
Kentucky, Arkansas, erines-
. � New Mexico, Oklahoma,
Pans,is, North Dakota, Mon-
tana and Wyoming.
�V cording to the I tepart-
mentoi I lealthand 1 lumanSer
vices, more than 12 million
Americans used smokeless lo-
bac o last year, and Pi percent
� re between ages 12 and 17.
I lea 1th offi ials blame ;moke-
I, . t. 1 ac ' I r in reasing Ihe
risk of or.il i arw ei
Ward Hubbell, a pokes-
man for the Smokeless robacco
( ouncil in Washington, said the
trade group maintains that
smokeless tobacco has not been
proven to causehuman disease.
Regarding the campaign
announced Monday, Hubbell
said: Ihe smokeless tobacco
industry categorically does not
want anyone under the age of
18 using its products
Bhe iEant (Earoltntan
April 16, 1992
Crew team rows in
medal at Clemson
Bv Chris McCaffrey
Stiff Writer
Photo by Dail R�d � ECU Photo Lab
The ECU Lady Pirate softball team continues to roll through the 1992
easoi itheymadeittothesemi-finalsoftheprotifj.HJsUNCtourrwi�� I
The crew team traveled to
Clemson, S.C on Saturday to par-
ticipate in the Clemson Sprints,
walking away with a gold medal
and an overall good showing. More
than 18 schools were represented
and came together for close com-
petitive racing for the Bucs.
Phe men's novice four-A boat,
made up of Tom Pure, Matt Byrne,
Chns.McCaffrey, Nanny Callis and
Brian Dishman pulled up to the
starttoraceUN -VV, Furman,c. Eta-
del and Savannah.
The novice A boat steadily
pulled away to win the heat by
open water with LNC-VY nipping
Furmanforsei ond. rhemen'snov-
k e B K �t rat ed in the sea md heat
against Georgia lech, Clemson,
University i f 1 ennessee and (iei n-
gia State. Ihe boat, consisting of
Will Doar, Chris Partin, Jerry
Favantos, ShaunBrian and Sue
I Neill,stayed with the other boats
but slipped halfw ay thn nigh to fin-
ish fifth. Ihe men s no ice A boat
pulled for a repeat performance of
the weekend bef we by inning the
finals by open water ver Clemson,
C�eorgiaTech,Tennesstvand UNC-
W in a time of 7:15.44 on a 2,(M-
meter course. Ihe gold medal won
bv the A boat was the set ond first
place victory in a year bv this boat.
The women's varsity tour made
up of Angle Brown, Yvonne
Leipoldt. Amv Braun, Carnngton
Cosbv anil SueO'Neill fared well in
a verv strong heat which included
Furman, UTK and Clemson. Ihe
hues putted out a strong race to
finish third. Phe third place show-
ing by thist at was the se i md this
semester in the major regattas.
Ihe women' novice bo.it pro-
vided .f earh ft ish line rivalry
withUNC-W.Brittany( �ben,Ai
Miilis, Heather Biff � ktherine
Rana and Sue (v Neill ran neck and
net-k with LNC-W fighting tor third
place in me finals ot their event
rechnkal problems stu - I
boat about 15 meters from the
allowing I -�� � � �� themout
for third.
The crew team . travel to
( lenn th,s � -
the final regatta of the season.
Ruggers beat Guilford for state crown
By Hiram J. Webb
Staff Writer
The ECU rugby team won the
state tournament last weekend in
Charlotte.
The Pirates easily defeated
Western Carolina in the first round
of play. Blair Byrd led all scorers
with two tries. Bert Hewitt, Rich-
ard "Opie" Moss and Jason Webb
each had one score Moss made
four of five penalty kicks to give
IU a 28-0 victory.
PC L was a little too confident
going into Saturday's second
game. I as! C arohna lacked spirit
against a well-coached Guilford
squad.
Guilford took a early 6-0 lead
by making two penalty
kicks.Webb's trv and Moss' con-
version tied the game at six apu e
late in the second half. I his would
not be enough though. Guilford
scored ne m. re and w i n the game
12-6.
Main thought this would be
it for the Pirates; hut. because they
had scored more points than any
other team. ECU received a wild-
card berth into the finals.
Ihe next game matched a
physical last Carolina squad
against the quickness and finesse
of UNC-Chapel Hill. Things did
not Uxik gocx.1 for the Pirates early
on. Carolina led the half 6-0.
ECL' was determined not to
go home without the champion-
ship Bert Howitt was literally
pushed into the try zone by the
File photo by Dail Reed � ECU Photo Lab
The ECU rugby team defeated Guilford College 17-12 in a grudge match over the weekend to move them to
No 1 in the state Some of the players pictured above will be in Greenville April 25 for the annual alumni game
entire Pirate scrum. Moss'kick was
Winger Scott Major did not
want to be out done by the
scrummers ami juked his way to
the middle of the try zone Moss
made the conversion and ECU
won 12-6. Phe stage was now set
for a Guilford-ECU rematch for
the state championship.
Both ECU and Guilford knew
what to expect from each other,
since this was their second match
in less than 24 hours. At first, it
looked as if the championships
would be a repeat of the earlier
game. Guilford led 12-0 at the half.
Past Carolina was determined
not to give up. Webb took Chris
Carnev's pass in for ECU'S first
score. Moss' conversion was no
gixxl.
PP McCaincouldn'tbecaught
bv the Guilford defenders and
scored a trv. Moss made the con-
version, but, ECU was still down
12-10.
As time wore on, Guilford
began to get sloppy and allowed
EastCarolinaa penalty kick. Moss
made the finest kick oi his career
to give ECU a one point lead.
The Tirates were not vet satis-
fied; so Bvrd scored once more,
with time running out, to give ECU
a 17-12 victory.
This was the fourth time in
See Rugby, page 8
Anr.l 20 - 22Tj ,0:00 - 3:00 gg� $20.00
Student Store

��
We're
Looking Forward
To Your Visit
To
North Myrtle Beach
During Easter
Second Avenue & Hillside Drive
North Myrtle Beach, S.C. 29597
(803) 249-2404
Do You Need
CASH?
We Are Buying
Used Men's Clothing
$ WE PAY CASH $
SHIRTS SWEATERS
PANTS SWEATS
JEANS SHOES
CASUAL & DRESS
T
KNITS
ETC.
We Also Buy & Sell Used Furniture
Dorm Refrigerators & Microwaves
Park in the city parking !t behind Globe Hardware
and use our neM rear entrance'
THE ESTATE SHOP
416 Evans St.
(Across from Cubbies)
752-3866
10:00 - 5:00 Mon Sat
)





DISPLAY CLASSIFIED

an
at
� d"f � � �


p M M M �, wm � y ���� Ml � �r �
I Carolinian
�r:
fiK IN
�. �
Sports
Lady Pirates roll
in UNC tourney
r i hailos Mitchell
iui 1 arheel i lassie.
red in�� of the South
n - top teams ,is well .i1-
national rop20teams the
irates fastpitrh Mtttwll
meassand took a tow
ida in game oneI N
the first ictimon th
i.ui 1b th,
� � � a Parson pithed,
the Pirate d'

��
�i � � �
,val -��
delivering hieh hard heat Inseven
innings piuhod Parsons faced 28
batters and struck out three while
yielding three runs off nine hits. The
senkw h.k ktl infield, ltt by second
baseman lamnu Newman held the
1 ady 1 ukts U) iist twi1 Kim' runners
in scoring position during the con-
test Crowder, Parsons ami ones
led the Lad Bucs hitting squad
ith two hits en h
(n Satuniay, while 7IXX1 plus
� on hand enjo ing the,re.it
Pirate Pigskin Pigoutparh theLadv
rati wen preparinj to meet
istaK arolina VVithlI leading
the series h i I �'� '� �
� � guaranteed '�� in Ihi i
proved)
� - � . � im
� � id
pitched a tl I ' andthealu
� me

- �
Ithetrm
�� . � .
i Pirate
� � Softball ;
Little League axes
smokeless tobacco

� nke
- �
th e
i ceo
.
. . .

i
I dis
� �
. ' r I nat
nd utibt alt!

� .� t i v hi ; l.i'v ml ittle
baseball's � iftball di-
itudies -how girls
. rm m i� �ti ba (oas
� , but the bfO-
will ask the girls to
�L to tl ' . abo it their
M i ittle 1 eague we u
� wit1' K.1U( t S
w ith t! � .� � n � oi
baseball and .ire determined t. -
eiiu ate our i hildren to spit
ting ti ba co s deleter ious ef
fee ts saidreighton I lale
ident of l ittle l eague
heanti-tobaccocampaign
will target 11 states that offi-
i i.ils say show the highest rates
in. ikeless tobac o use
.inn mg teei igei 1 he) are
West irginia Mississippi
Kentucky rkansas rennes
New Mexico, ()klahoma
Nortl akota Mon-

-Vcoi to I art
� � I lealthand I luman !
� � �. �
����'�
were between I 1 "
� ials blai
.
- ' � ' � '
rd 1 lubbi II .i ; - �
� t � mki h
aulthe
( oun il ii '�'� " ' '
tradi .o. -up mail ita I it

I � en to causehuman disease.
Regarding the campaign
annount ed Monday, I lubbell
said I he smokeless tobao
industry categorically does not
want anyone under the age of
s usii ig its produ ts
uir?c lEaat (Earollnian
Arhil 16, 1992
Crew team rows in
medal at Clemson
By Chris McCaffrey
SUM VVriHr
Photo by Dail H�h1
The ECU Lo � � � rtl ' ontinues to roll II i
1 he crew team traveled to
c lemson, S.C . on Saturday to par-
ticipate in the Clemson Sprints.
walking away with a gold medal
and an overall good showing. More
than H schcxils were represented
and tame together for close com-
petitive racing tor the Bin. s.
lhe men's no ice four-A boat,
mule up of lorn 1 ure, Matt Byrne,
( hrisMd attrev, 'ann all is and
Brian I iishman pulled up to the
start to ra el N V I urman, ita-
del and Sa annah.
lhe no i( e A boat steadily
nulled away t i win the heat by
I en wati r with I '
I urman fi - n'sno
i; e D boaf ra ed in the se ond heat
against ieorgia fe h lemson,
I niversity of "ennessee andh
gia State. ' -flrig of
Will 1 �oar,hris Partin, lerry
1 ,i ant" 's. Shaun I t'Brian ami Sue
( � Neill � ed �� ith thei ithei I
but slipped halfwa . tl ' igl I i fin-
ish fifth I he men - ; e A boat
pulled for a repi it per) rmai
the weekend bef on . ii i ii tl �
finals by open w.iter i iver f lem �� i
( Georgia If h, tenner eeand I I �
W in a time of 7 15 M on .t 2,000
meter i �urse. fhe g M medal won
by the boat was the second first
place i' tor, in a year by this r.it
rhewomen'svarsity four made
up of Angle Brown, i onne
Leipokit, Amv Braun,arrington
( osbyandSue CNeill fared well in
,i very strong he.tt whi h in luded
! urman, L IK andlemson I
Bin s pulled out a strong race to
finish third. I he third place sh ��
mi' k th. boat ���� i �' � econd this
semester in the ma r n
lh '
vided an early fii :rv
with I V I rittu en.Angv
Millis, He it
RanaandSui
neikv. �
pla e in the I I " r event
le hni al ' k the 1
� it about
alii ��� ngUNC-Wl
� r third.
teai . travi
ekendfoi
��.
Ruggers beat Guilford for state crown
B Hiram j. Webb
Staff VSnter
IheH I rugbv team won the
state tournament last weekend in
c harlotte.
lhe Pirates easily defeated
Western( arolina in tfie first round
ol play. Blair Byrd led all scorers
with two tries Bert Hewitt Rich-
ard '()pie" Moss and lason Webb
each had one score. Moss made
tour of five penalu kicks to give
E Ua 28-0 ictory.
1I was.i little too onftdent
going into Saturday's second
game. 1 .ist C arolina la( k(si spirit
�lg.nnst a well-coached Guilford
squad
i luilft d took .i early f 0 lead
b making two penalty
ku ks.Webb's tr. and Moss' con-
� � ion tied thernrie.it six ,ipu e
late in the second halt tnis would
� � .�� �� � i .uiltonl
oreil one more and w thegai

' lam thought this would be
it foi the Pirates; but be an � tl � .
had si nred more points than any
other team EC! received a v ild
i.ird berth into the finals
lhe next game matched a
pie. si al East t 'arolina squad
against the quickness and finesse
Of UNC -Chapel Hill Things did
not look good tor the Pirates early
on. Carolina led the half fH).
I c U was determined not to
go home without the champion-
ship Bert Howitf was literally
pushed into the trv one by the
"
I , if
f ile photo t � 10 Lab
ECU rugby 1 lefeal lUiMord � . na rudge match over the weekend to m . Ihemto
4 � .� ; tun : bove will be in Greenville April 25 for the annua fame
entire Pirates rui ' ' - kwas
d.
Winger N itt Maj i
want to be out d the
m rummei and juked his w.i I
the middle of the trv s'iH' Moss
made the i onversion and 1I
won 12-6. fhe stage was now sef
tor a Guilford-1L rernati h tor
the state championship.
Both 111 and Guilford knew
what to expect from each other,
since this was their second matih
in less than 24 hours. At first, it
looked as it the hampionships
would be .i repeat of the earliet
ime Guilford led 12-Oatthehalf
1 ast arolina wasdeti rmined
not to give up Webb t((khris
Carney's pass m tor E( U's first
score. Moss' conversion was no
g( m, id.
1.1 .Ma ain couldn't be caught
b tiie Guilford defenders and
Kored a try. Moss made the con-
version, but, ECU was still down
12-10.
As time wore on, Guilford
began to get sloppy and alii �
East arolinaa penalty I � Mi ss
made the finest kick of his career
to give I i I a one point lead.
lhe Pirates were not et satis-
fied; so Byrd scored once more
with time running out, to gh eECL
a 17-12 victory.
Ihis was the fourth time in
See Rugby, page 8
April 20
Student Ston
lOjOO M)0 120.00
Moil Wed.
�r
We're
Looking Forward
To Your Visit
To
North Myrtle Beach
During Easter
Second Avenue & Hillside Drive
North Myrtle Beach, S.C. 29597
(803) 249-2404
Do You Need
Ha cash?
v We Are Buying
Used Men's Clothing
$ WE PAY CASH $
SHIRTS SWEATERS T
PANTS SWEATS KNITS
JEANS SHOES ETC.
CASUAL ft PRESS
We Also Buy & Sell Used Furniture
Dorm Refrigerators & Microwaves
I'di k in the i ity pai kiny, lor behind Globe Hardw an
and use out new real entrance!
THE ESTATE SHOP
416 Evans St
(Across from Cubbies)
752-3866
10:00 - 5:00 Mon Sat





8 �lic �aat(Uarolinian
April 16, 1992
Softball
Continued from page 7
rally. Crowder arxl lunes then sup-
plied the final punch with a single
and a two-out RBI single NlfMCl-
fullv. When the dust firwlly settled
and the game was over, K I walbxl
�way witha 4 2 victory over a vastly
improved Coastal Carolina team. g
Ihe win OW Cuistal assured the
Lady Tirates a ticket to the mini
round robin to beptovvd onSund.w
regardless of the outcome with the
regionally ranked Camecixks of
South Camlina.
Later that afternoon, the Lidv
Pirates squared (iff against the South
Carolina Cirruvocks The l.aih
(, iOTCOCkl were primed ami ready
to have their shot at the hot Pirates of
BCU. Darlene Carets limits! the IV
r.ites to ust six hits ami one run, OS
the Pirates gave wav to the .ame-
ctxks 7-1. Parsons took the loss in the
contest in wroth rwo key and costly
errors were recorded h the Pirate
defense. Even wMh the loss to South
Carolina, IU maintained their lop
seed and advanced to the hampi
onfthip day games
In the quarter tini.iK, the Lady
Pirates played, for the first time this
year, the Rambling Wreck of Geor-
gia Tech. After the disappointing
loss toSouthCarolina, ECU tixkout
their anger and showed their power
in shellacking Laura Elsheshai of
Georgia Tech for seven runs. Mich-
elle Ward and Lisa Coreprew were
the hot hat holders for the Tirates,as
thev combined for four of the seven
Pirate hits With that win, the Lady
Pirah-s were assured not less than a
fourth-place finish in the star-stud-
ded tournament
Finally, the table was set anil
K U would ml the nation's No. 15
team, the 1Jfcly Seminoles of Florida
State in Hies .1 -finials.Parsoasonce
again was given the ball and turned
in a outstanding performance. The
Lady Pira tes managed to push across
two runs early in the contest to put
the fear in the hearts of the Lady
Seminoles. The Pirate "D" also rose
to the occasion in holding Florida
State to just three hits in the early
frame of the game. But, as with all
gtxxi teams, Florida State mounted
theircomeback. With two timely hits
and two untimely ECU errors, the
Tirates found themselves playing
catch-up to a team that finally got
untracked. Florida State went on to
beat the Lady Pirates 5-2 and even-
tually won the whole shooting
match.
Harrisfeefer
Rugby
AG CONSULTING FIRM FIELD MONITOR
Positions available late May to mid-September.
Individual must be trustworthy, reliable,
conscientious, in good physical shape, and love
the outdoors. Hourly wage plus mileage for own
vehicle Excellent opportunity for college students
and teachers out for the summer. Send resume to
MCSI P.O. Box 179 Grifton, NC 28530 or Fax
(919) 524-3215.
SMITHFIELD
SEMI-BONEVFSS
WHOLE
Continued from page 7
Ave semesters that ECU has b en
number onv in North Carolina
ihe Pirates cmtacored iheiroppo
nents ne.irk two to one W ith theil
powerful, sometimes v iolent side
of play
This w.is tho end of E I"S
regular season; thev finished B
1 The team is inviting the alumni
lor the sixth annual alumni game
on April 25 at 1 p m. behind the
Allied Health building
CU Recreational Services Presents
9 p.m -2 3
2 completely Separate Clubs
under One Roof
NVcx of War
April 23,1992
"Pull together" for u good cause
loin in the fun ai EClTs Annual Barefoot
OTI llu- Mall and Sho unit SltppOfl 10 llu-
Ronald McDonald House.
Teams shall consist of ten members (male, female, co-rec) or
individuals may sign up on The Mall
A minimum $1 00 donation per participant requested
Qnate football video
1 RELIVE THE EXCITEMENT
OF THE 1991 SEASON!
&$& Order Your Highlight Video Today
And Believe For A Lifetime
CALL: 1-800-422-0240
or
Mail check or money order to:
1991 Pirate Video �fc
P0 Box 68618
Indianapolis, IN 46268 Aceo
��� ii : � i R lent kM( ta

We're Not Doctors,
But If We Were
We'd Recommend
Coming By
At Midnight, April 20,
For Hie Latest Cure.
Yes, we're having another Midnight Madness Sale,
this time to welcome the latest releases by 'Hie Cure,
George Strait, Slaughter, Doug K. Fresh, and 'Hie
Beastie Boys At Midnight on April 20 we'll have the
Ix-st prices around on our new releases, 10 off all of
our regular priced eds and cassettes, and and you can
rent two videos lor the price of one So set your alarm
clock, put out the cat, and come by to pick up the
newest Cure for all that ails you.
To register YOUR team
contact Kendra Curtis
at 757 6387 or stop by
204 Chnstenbury Gym
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THIS COUPON MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED LIMIT ONE COUPON
PER PURCHASE OFFER EXPIRES APRIL 21 1992
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1





Title
The East Carolinian, April 16, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 16, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.874
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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