The East Carolinian, April 7, 1992






Oh brother, my brother!
Students reflect on the visions of Brother Jim.
4
The Royal Blue reign 9
Blue Devils claim second consecutive NCAA crown.
�Ije iEaat (Eanrltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Voc .66 No.23
Tuesday, April 7, 1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12.000
10 Pages
Brother Jim condemns students
By Elizabeth Shimmel
SUM Writer
S.U. appoints president
Stanford I niversity is hoping to clean
up its image with the appointment of a new
president.
University of (!hk ago provost C ierhard
Casper will replacecurrent president, Donald
Kennedy w ho is resigning after 11 years.
Gerhard Casper is a man of tremen-
dous intellectual breadth anil depth, said
lames C GaWer, president of the board of
trustees. "He is the right man to lead Stanford
into the next century
ITie appointment mark- the first time an
outsider ha- been named t the post. Casper
was chosen out oi th" nomination- and ap-
plication-
STD class added
Ihe University or South Carolina has
added a new sex education section to their
university h'l class a course designed tor
freshman orientation
rhe new lecture will teach students about
sexually transmitted diseases and will in-
clude graphk slides of people infected with
arum- SI I Ys.
Ihe pictures pro idea fairly dramatk
eye-opening experience' said Dr. lames
lumer director of the university - health
center and co-devetoper of the current sex
education lass Ihe students have said th.it
they're ven helpful even though they're
urx omfortable to watch
After the slide presentation, two peer
health educators talk to small groups of stu-
dents and answer student questions
Free' MBA's offered
( lark University's Graduate School of
Management i offering financial assistance
to unemployed workers in search of a mas-
ter- degree.
applicants can qualify to receh e grants
that cover up to 75 percent of tuition tor one
graduate course per semester
rhe program came about as 1 mentored
a couple oi friend- who were looking tor
jobs said Robert I Irkh dean of the gradu-
ate school of management In mam respects
the would have been helped hv a ginnl
affiliation with an MBA program
Lirich -aid he is not aware of any other
schools offering similar program-
Judge denies NCAA bid
Member-of the l niversity ofNevadaat
Las Vegas men - ha-kethall team tiled a
motion to legally gain entry into the NCAA
tournament, but a e .nh'i district judge re-
jected the motion.
UNLV was banned from post-season
plav and television appearance- thi- -eason
because of 1977 violations at the school
The pla ver- argued that they were being
treated unfairly for violations that occurred
years before.
ludge I"onald Mo-lev slid hedidn't think
the current players were being treated fairly
by the C A but also said they don't have a
legal right to po-t -ea-on plav.
Former player convicted
AformerBostont eltics basketballplayer
was recently convicted of two counts of ve-
hicular homicide and two count- of leaving
the -a ene of an act ident.
Ihe jury foundharle- Smith guilty of
vehicular homicide while operating to en-
danger rather than vehicular homicide un-
der the influence of alcohol, the original
charge against him.
Smith, who played for Georgetown Uni-
versity, as well as for the 1488 Olympic bas-
ketball team, hit and killed Michelle Hartley,
20, and An Trinh, 21 on a busy street near the
university
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel Taken from
CPS and other campus newspapers
Inside Ttoesday
("rime Scene 2
lulitonalI
Satire 5
Classifieds6
Entertainment 7
Sporls19
bores de il masturbators.
These are the words used b lim i lilies to describe
all II students
Brother lim, a self-professed spiritual perfectionist
-poke on the C en
"He is wise.
He can pick
out a
homosexual
from 50
paces
� Billy Harris, pastor
tral Campus Mall
last week and -aid
his purpose tor
coming to EC L was
to"pro oke people
to think about the
Bible
Ihmkingi- not
theonk thing .illes
provoked as stu-
dents laughed
screamed and
taunted (lilies,call-
ing him a crack-
pot "idiot' and !iar "
While many people disagreed with Gilles some
members ol bis audience agreed w ith hi- view -
'He i- only speaking the I Jospei, he is felling the
truth -aid one student
Gilles sermons covered everything from se to
-ah at ion and in his ey es no one i- safe from the rath,
of c iod
o one he said, except people w ho belie e as he
does
Gilles described a person whobeliet esas he does as
Photo by Jill Cherry � ECU Photo Lab
Kristine Farmer was one of the students disputing Jim Gilles when he spoke on the Campus Mall last week
Farmer removed her shirt in order to protest Brother J-m's remarks
lid Billy 1 lam- pastor of the Pente ostal Chris- Gilles' ministry, just like mam other churches do in
a person who is free from a 11 sin and one who lives b the ban Assembly in Wilson (ities where he visits
Gilles along with his wife and child areresidingin c.ille- has been preaching at Harris' church this
their camper in the parking tot of Harris' church during week, and Harris is pleased to have him as a guest
their fi e d,i stav m Northan ilina
words the find in their literal translation ol the Bible
�- i alle- travels to college campuses around th�
country he hopes to com erl students religion- beliefs
and make them want toco tot hurt, h on Sundav n
Harris' thuuh i- offering financial support t.
See Whores page 3
Further contradictions
surround Public Safety
By Matt Jones
An ensemble cast
Photo by ECU Photo Lab
Several Durham City High School students performed at the Minority Open House held this
weekend The students won the award for the state's best ensemble cast production
Ihe scandal surrounding a
Publk Safetv i iperati m es alated
thi- week following statements
madehv an attorne which add
discrepancy to the campus po-
lk e side of the story
Ihe incident in oh es the at-
tempted break-in of cars in the
Mingest oli-eum parking lot and
the subsequent actions taken b
Public Safetyontroversy arose
last w eek after 1 Van 14 Student-
Ronald Speier disagreed with
statements made bv It Ernest
Suggs of Publk Safety
According to Sugg after
Publk Safety apprehended the
two tudents tovovled in the in-
cident, thev were turned o er to
Speier However Speier contra-
dicted Suggs' -tatement calling
anv involvement referred to by
Suggs mi-leadinganduntrue
Winthrop Gardner, an at-
torney acting as counsel for one
ot the students involved in the
inc ident batked upSpeier's ver-
-u -not theoccurrence in a recent
phone inten iew
My client never met with
Van Speier in connection with
thi- matter nor anv cither mat-
ter Gardner -aid. "He dealt
-oleh with individuals in the
Publk Safety department.
Referring to the version of
e ents as told h Suggs. Gardner
said rhe version is false
It was never suggested to
mydlent h�go to Dean Speier, nor
w as he e er directed to do SO
See Scandal page 3
Violence needs attention
Violence Awareness Week
Many campus organizations are striving to create aware-
ness and educate studentsabout the issues of violence, sex and
relationships and have planned various activities in order to
"silence violence
Campus Violence Redefined:
A Satellite Teleconference: A live, interactive discussion
oncampus violence tea tures panelists f mm universities around
the country. The program will be in Hendrix Theater Wednes-
day April 8 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
"Love on the Rocks
Peer Health Educators will discuss dating and relation-
ships in Great Room 2 of Mendenhall Student Center at 5 p.m
April 8.
Take Back the Night: Candlelight Vigil:
The march will start from the campus mall bandstand at
8 p.m. Thursday April 9.
Hands Off: Sex, Dating and Relationships:
Guest speaker Bob Hall will address date rape and com-
munication between partners in Hendrix Theater from 8 p.m
9-30 p.m Tuesday April 14.
Simple Self-Defeme Techniques:
Lt. Keith Knox of ECU Public Safety presents techniques
for everyone in the Mendenhall Student Center Multi-Pur-
pose Room from 8 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Wednesday April 15.
Peer Health Educators
strive to inform students
By Angela De Rosia
Senior News Writer
The Peer f feaithEducatorsare
studentsirribrrrangstuderttsefsuch
issues a- safer sex, sexually trans-
mitted disease awareness, discon-
nection between alcohol and sexu-
alik and men's.indwomen shealth
issues.
c � Wednesday, Apnl 8, the
Peer Health Educators w ill hold an
informational meeting at 4 p.m. in
theStudent Health (. enter resource
nxim for students wishing to be-
come part of this organization.
bach educator is trained
through the Student Health Ser-
vice, I lealthEducabc n I Vprtment
Iducatnrs attend a training pnv
gram at the start of each semester
and then meet twohcxjrs each week
afterward.
Ihe women's program,
"Women'slssues JustSayKnow
deals with breast self-examination,
pap smears, pnk-menstiual syn-
drome, osteoporosis, toxk shock
syndrome and other women's
I
hearth issues. Participants team
the Litest health facts for women
and are also given the opportunity
todenYnastratebreastexaminaticn
techniques using models.
What Every Man Should
Know" gives information regard-
ing cancer of the ICStCS tiMicular
self-examination, sexually trans-
mitted diseases arxl otlvr male
health concerns. Ihe hazarvls of
-ten udsand smokeless tobK coare
also discussed
"Love on the Rocks" airs the
dangers oi mixing akohol, drugs
and sex Students learn how to
"party smart rJinniglidemonstra-
bonsandactn ities The program is
included in the activities sched-
idadforVlolrficeAwarenessWaBk.
Lt. Keith Knox of FCC Pub-
lic Safetv will addresses the date
acquaintancerapesituabonin "Ac-
quaintance Rape It Can't Hap-
pen to Me " The program is recom-
mended for men and women.
Students participateina game
shinvfcxrnatto educate themselves
about their own sexuality in
Sexual Myths arxi Facts Ques-
tions include topics such as which
-exiulh traa-mitteddLseasecau-es
stenlitv it untreated and which dis-
ease is nx -t common on the ECU
campus.
Male and Female Responsi-
bility for Birth Control for coed
groupsonly provides demonstra-
tion�and acth itieson thiscurrentiy
popular topic Topics include the
knowledge and feelings about
-ex. ilitv relationships, commu-
nicatxn, sexually transmitted dis-
eases and pregnancy.
For sun w irshipers and tan-
ning bed unkies there is "The Ul-
traviolet Affair Safer Sunning
InformatKTi i given about the ef-
fects of ultraviolet rays, tips for
safer tanningand the true meaning
of sun protectkxi factor.
If students interested in be-
coming part of Peer Health Educa-
torsare unable toattend the April 8
meeting, thev maycontactSuzanne
Kellerman at 757- 6794. Deadline
tor applications is April 10. Inter-
views will be April 13-16.





2 1 CEbe fcgflt (Carolinian
April 7, 1992
crimf S,ENE
Students waiting to register cause
disturbance in Austin building
March 30
dH4�Joyner Library: Investigated damage to property. State
vehicle had tire cut.
1 ZO�Jarvis Hal I: Investigated brea king and entering. Nothing
taken.
1237�Student Store: Investigated a d isturbance. Dispute settled.
14l�v�Tyler Hall: Investigated bicycle larceny.
1502�Slay Hall: Investigated damage to property. Tires cut on
bicvcle.
154fv 10th and Lawrence streets: Vehicle stopped for driving
with license revoked and having a weapon on campus. Subject
taken into custody.
1756�Police Department: Checked out a hit and run report.
Q3I6�White Hall: Reset the fire alarm indicating trouble. Cause
unknown.
March 31
nq55JGreene Hall: Investigated solicitation. Suspects located
and charged with solicitation on campus. Subjectsalso banned from
campus propertv.
1334 -Jenkins Art building: Vehicle stopped for over-crowded
vehicle. Non-student given campus citation.
1622�Biologv building: Investigated bicycle larceny.
2257�Fletcher Hall: Responded to report of harassing phone
calls.
0154�College Hill Drive: Vehicle stopped for failure to bum
headlights. Student given verbal warning for light violation and
driving after drinking. Vehicle parked.
0239�Greene Hall: Provided transportation for an intoxicated
male to the TKE House.
April 1
0717-Mendenhall Student Center: Vehicle stopped. Student
charged with driving with license revoked, no insurance and ficti-
tious registration.
131H�School of Music: Investigated breaking and entering.
Entry gained bv breaking out lock.
1438� Drewster building: Investigated bicycle larceny.
1M04�Greene Hall: Checked out a banned subject. Same taken
into custody.
2144 fourth and Elm streets: Vehicle stopped for a red light
violation ,wd failure to regard police blue lights. Non-student given
a verbal warning.
(407 Austin building: Reference to a disturbance on second
floor Same coming form students waiting to register for classes. No
�ctioo taken.
April 2
14(4 - Nursing building: Investigated bicycle larceny.
1435 Tvler Hall. Investigated larcenv from vehicle. Same oc-
curred in the parking lot. Hubcap from vehicle taken.
Crime Sc�n� is tak�n from official Public Safety log.
Wellness fair offers screenings, prizes
By Angela De Rosia
Stnior Newt Writer
In an effort to increase
awareness of health related is-
sues, Office of Health Promo-
tion and Well Being, Recre-
ational Services and the Student
Health Center will present its
annual Wellness Fair today in
the Mendenhall Great Room
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
To cover a majority of mod-
ern health concerns, various free
screenings, exhibits, door prizes
and demonstrations will be of-
fered at the ECU Wellness Fair,
making this the largest of all
prior fairs.
Students will have the op-
portunity to learn more about
the services available on cam-
pus and in the community while
being exposed to various types
of health screenings and new
information. ,
Free screenings will be
available for blood pressure,
dental issues, blood sugar, mus-
cular strength, body composi-
tion, nutritional analysis, hear-
ing and flexibility. There will
be a $3 fee for cholesterol and a
$1 fee for glucose screenings.
Information about symp-
toms, care and prevention of a
variety of health risks will be
available.
Exhibits will include major
concerns such as child and traf-
fic safety, back care, self breast
examinations, sexually trans-
mitted diseases and stress and
time management. Some of
these exhibits will also have free
giveaways.
Representatives from the
ECU KarateClub will havedem-
onstrations on self defense at 12
p.m. and then kickboxing at 1
p.m.
A "Reebok Step Exercise"
demonstration by Dionne Evans
of Recreational Services will be
at 12:30 p.m.
The name of the fair was
changed from the Health Fair to
the Wellness Fair in order to
show the entire concept of
wellness rather than just physi-
cal health
The fair is being sponsored
by the Among the community
organizations represented will
be the Pitt County Heath De-
partment, Eastern Breast Can-
cer Detection Center, REAL Cri-
sis Center and Services for the
Blind.
The Office of Health Pro-
motion and Well Being would
also like to raise participation
in WAVE, the new health pro-
motion and wellness program
Students wishing for more
information about the fair may
call the Office of Health Pro-
motion and Well Being at 757-
6793.
JOIN
PEER HEALTH EDUCATORS
Responsibilities Qualifications
� Promote a healthy
lifestyle
� Peer health education
� Attend training course
and in-service
workshops
Good sense of humor
� Enthusiastic
and Energetic
� Interested in
health issues
For more information call:
Rewards
Experience in
presenting to groups
Increased knowledge
about healthwellness
� A chance to work with
great people
? Lifelong skills
To apply, please plan on
attending one of the following
meetings:
Wednesday, April 8th from
4-5pm and Thursday, April 9th
from 7-8pm in the Student
Health Service Resource Room.
Suzzanne Kellerman
Health Educator
757-6841
� Deadline to apply
April 10th, 1992
� Interviews will be
April 13th-16th, 1992
� Required training
August 20th and August
21st, 1992
i
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Wednesday, April 15th
10:00 am until 3:00 pm
in
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Large Selection of
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Selected art
supplies at one-
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lower!
ECU Student Stores- More Thou
Just Hooks! Your Dollars Support
Student Scholars,

Whores
Continued from page
speaker.
"He is wise Harris said. "He
can tell people have problems be-
fore he ever talks to them. He can
pick out a homosexual from 5U
paces"
Gilles said he had many of his
own problems before he turned his
life into a one-man ministry
He said that by the eighth
grade, "The seedsof rebellion were
well rooted in mv heart, as I be-
came 'cool' by using drugs, drink-
ing booze and listening to rock n
roll music"
Then, one night at a Van Halen
concert,Gilles said he realized he
no longer wanted to lead the life Of
a sinner.
"While anxiouslv waiting for
the end of that concert, G d showed
me the vast demonic control that
was empowering the members of
the whole crowd of 13,000
people he -aid
His personal experiences and
his beliefs are what Gilles feels
qualify him to speak to the crowds
that gather to listen to his sermons,
but not everyone feels he is quali-
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fied to be a preacher.
"He thinks that bt
experiences he can preaj
is not right said Sheila
think it is a shame
would stand around a
him he condemnet
without knowing anyi
them
But, while Gilles ti
with short hair they a
hell and yellsnames sue
whore" and "slut" to
many people agree w
of preaching and da
makes judgments agai
"He's got the ngntl
a sin because he b
Harris said.
"Heisnottheonel
judgment, he is spj
(God)
Gilles' visit to E(
short when campus
minded him twice hi
he received to speakj
was expired
He said that wher
he was planning to
leigh and speak at N
"Pro is to Con as progress is
Congress
� Anonymous
-1
THERE ARE mi
BECOMING A NUR$
And they're
sented bv the insigni
as a member of the
rps. The caduceus
means you're part of a
-�. -tern in which eduq
career advancement
not the exception. 1
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nga BSN, write: Army Nursev
pA 8974-9845. Or call toll tree: I -
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we:
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EDU!
Sponsored by.
Office of Health Promotion
and Well-Being
Student Health Services
Recreational Services
For more information,
call 757-6793.





April 7, 1992 3Fi� East (Carolinian 3
ngs, pnzes
self br.ast
j.ilK trans
i stressrui
t imeo(
- iha efree
v fromthe
ived
e- will bo
cal health
I he Mir i" being sponsored
by the Among the community
organizations represented will
be the Pitt C ounty Heath De-
partment Eastern Breast Can-
cer Detection Center, RE ALCri-
sis C enter ind Services for the
Blind
!he (Mtue ol Health Pro-
� on and Well Being would
also like to raise participation
in W I 'he new health pro-
motion and liveliness program.
Students wishing for more
intorm.it' n about the fair may
call the v flue ol Health Pro
rion and Well Being at 757-
CATORS
Rewards
� Experience in
presenting to groups
� Increased knowledge
about healthwellness
� A chance to work with
great people
� Lifelong skills
� Deadline to apply
April 10th. 1992
� Interviews will be
April 13th-16th, 1992
� Required training
August 20th and August
21st. 1992

k Sale!
ID

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Whores
Continued from page 1
People find wildlife important Scandal
speaker
"He is wise' Harris said. "He
can tell people have problems he-
tore he ever talks to them. He can
pick out a homosexual from 50
paces
Gilles said he had many of his
own problems before he turned his
life into a one-man ministry.
He said that by the eighth
grade, "The seeds of rebel I ion were
well rooted in my heart, as 1 be-
came cool' by using drugs, drink-
ing booze and listening to rock 'n
roll music
Then,onenightata VanHalen
concert,Gilles said he realized he
no longer wanted to lead the life of
a sinner.
"While anxiouslv waiting for
the end of that concert, God showed
me the vast demonic control that
was empowering the members of
the whole crowd of 13,000
people he said.
His personal experiences and
his beliefs are what Gilles feels
qualify him to speak to the crowds
that gather to listen to his sermons,
but not everyone feels he is quali-
fied to be a preacher.
"He thinks that because of his
experiences hecan preach, and that
is not rigfrt said Sheila Boswell, "I
think it is a shame that people
would stand around and listen to
him he condemned everyone
without knowing anything about
them
But, while Gilles tells women
with short hair they are going to
hell and yells names such as "homy
whore" and "slut" to passersby,
many people agree with his style
of preaching and don't feel he
makes judgments against others.
"He's got the right to call a sin
a sin because he is a minister
Harris said.
"He is not the one making the
judgment, he is speaking for
(God)
Gilles' visit to ECU was cut
short when campus police re-
minded him twice that the permit
he received to speak on campus
was expired
He said that when he left ECU,
he was planning to travel to Ra-
leigh and speak at N.C. State.
"Pro is to Con as progress is to
Congress
� Anonymous
� t
I.

(AP) � The people of North
Carolina are willing to pay to help
keep coastal wildlife, which gives
that wildlife significant economic
value, an assistant professor at East
Carolina University said.
The average North Carolina
household is willing to pay $12.99
cents per year for a sea turtle man-
agement program and $38.41 for a
coastal nongame wildlife program,
John C. Whitehead told the North
American Wildlife and Natural
Resources Conference.
That means the loggerhead sea
turtle is worth $8.75 million and the
coastal nongame wildlife program
is worth $25.87 million to North
Carolina households each year, he
said.
"These estimates can be used
for comparison to wildlife manage-
ment program costs to indicate the
economic efficiency and social de-
sirability of these programs said
Whitehead, an assistant professor
of economics.
The results were based on a
mail survey and follow-up by the
Survey Research Laboratory at East
Carolina University. It found people
valued wildlife for both on-site use,
such as wildlife watching, and off-
site use, such as reading or watch-
ing television programs about wild-
life.
Whitehead said the respon-
dents' willingness to pay varied
according to the possibility of recre-
ational value from the wildlife, such
as a chance to actually see the ani-
mals.
The perceived effectiveness of
the management program the
money would finance, she said.
ARE TWO SIDES TO
; A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented hv the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. 11 you re earn-
ing a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, RQ Be 5219, W'armmsrer,
PA 18074.9845, Or call toll tree: 1-SOC-USA-ARMY. ext. 438.
ARMY
WELLNESS FAIR
m ����
Tuesday, April 7,1992
10:00 am -4:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center,
Great Room
HEALTH SCREENINGS
Cholesterol $3
Nutritional Analysis
Blood Pressure
Dental
Flexibility
Glaucoma
Hearing
EDUCATIONAL EXHIBITS
Sponsored by:
Office of Health Promotion
and Well-Being
Student Health Services
Recreational Services
For more information,
call 757-6793:
DEMONSTRATIONS
GIVEAWAYS
REFRESHMENTS
At press time, Suggs could not
bereached for further comment At
the time that Speier contradicted
Suggs' statements, Suggs remained
steadfast on his version of what
happened.
When asked if the students
were sent to Speier, he said: "Yes
they were. Period
Continued from page 1
The initial reason for interest in
the incident stemmed from news
reports that an SBI informant
worked with Public Safety in ap-
prehending the students. Refuting
speculations of entrapment, Suggs
said the informant did not request
the student's involvement in the
incident.
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. -n C - Ox. Re a Summer Tar Heel!
�3 Session I: May 14- June 19, 1992
O M M"E Session II: June 25-July 31, 1992
Students from any college or university, graduates, teachers, and rising high
school seniors may apply as Visiting Summer Students lor first, second or both
sessions.
UNC-CH oilers over 900 courses in over -10 disciplines. A typical course load
per session is 6 semester hours.
Some evening and night courses and three-week short courses are ollered.
Thirty spaces still available in three-week Summer School Study .Abroad
programs.
Approximate Cost per Session: Tuition and tees ofabout 5115 plus $-40 per
credit hour for NC resident undergraduate or $271 per credit hour for
nonresident undergraduate.
For details, please send me a catalog and application form:
Name
Street
City
State
P
Nbfl to:
Sumnwr School, CB 3.VK). 200 IVm'grw Hall The I'niversity �� North Carolina al Chapel Hill.
Chapel Hill. NC27f.49-3.V40
I'honv: (800) UNCI -23. Fax: (919) 962-27.V2.
(AAEEO In�titulion) K
CI L E N C E
. VIOLENCE AWARENESS WEEK � APRIL 8-15. 1992
Why Violence Awareness Week?
17 uf college student ire crime victims
IS-2M tfaMtfi immmm hair been raped
?U 2S- student have experienced bus'elated nM(
li�k oj victims were undc he influence -M drugs or alcohol
Help us accomplish these goals
7i educate campus leaders Jo the issue.
To introduce basic conflict management -Xills.
To create an awareness M potentially violent sf-thons
To prepare individuals vith nor natal technique which enable the B�f person
to deal taft potentially dangerous conflict which escalate m!o violence.
To tMMf dm and direct tmmmmm between partner in any type of iclatr.nship
Titc Week's Extents Include:
Campus Violence Redefined: A Satellite Teleconference
1.00-3:00pm, April 8, 1992
Hendrix Theater - Mendenhall Student Center
Hands Off: Sex, Dating, and Relationships
Guest Speaker. Bob Hall
8:00-9:30 pm, April 14,1992
Hendrix Theater- Mendenhall Student Center
Take Back the Night: Candlelight Vigil
8:00pm, April 9,1992
Start from mall bandstand
"Love on the Rocks"
presented by Peer Health Educators
5:00pm, April 8,1992
Great Room 2 - Mendenhall Student Center
Simple Self-Defense Techniques for Everyone
by Keith Knox
8:00-9:30pm, April 15,1992
Multi-Purpose Room - Mendenhall Student Center
Thank vou lo llv Mmfaf �.iipp-Hii'

I rchfiH- mhI ihcUnnvf-Hv
L n;u rv�tv lousing
BCU AlhJrtic
BAUIILS
.ntcrfralvnuly Council
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Student l�Jc-wpl�-opmw� "rofjrsaR
Ucmk-foll StiKfcwt Ositcr
Kt-fclcHCC I UU A-MKMllO
IOLENCE
Funding provided by t C U
Student itoiti � Oeiijn' b��
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(Lift iEaat (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Mumming Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director�f Advertising
Jennifer Wardrep, News Editor
Julie Roscoe, Asst News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Dana Danfelson, Asst Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Robert Todd, Assistant Sports Editor
Jeff Becker, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Richard Hasflric, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Larry Hucgins, Circulation Manager
Chantal Wefdman, hiyout Manager
Steven Ollice, Classified Advertising Technician
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Jean Caraway, Advertising Technician
Dfborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the Fast Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies everv hiesday and Thursday The masthead editorial in each edition
is the opinion of ihe Editorial Board The F'ast Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view letters should be
limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
for publication letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C,
27R51M353 For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, April 7, 1992
Even to Brother Jim �
Constitution grants rights to all
He called us Jezebels, masturbators,
sluts He called fraternities havens for horny-
whoremongers and sororities hotbeds for
fornication. He claimed that homosexuals
and men with long hair are evil. Brother Jim
told us we are all going to hell
He made us angry.
The First Amendment of the U.S. Con-
stitution grants us freedoms of speech and
expression, and the courts have continually
upheld this right. The courts have also held
that the government has broad power in
regulating time, place and manner for ex-
pression.
Breach of peace laws and pt-rmit regu-
lations exist expresslv for the purpose of
ensuring peaceable and controlled forms of
expression, including picketing, parading
and demonstrating.
The courts have also insisted that all of
these regulations be non-discriminatory in
nature.
That is, a government could not issue a
parade permit for a pro-choice march and
refuse to issue one for a pro-life march.
Brother Jim could not have been re-
fused permission to speak on the campus
mall last week when other groups have
been granted the same freedom.
He has the right.
We called him an idiot, a liar and a
fanatic We resented and protested him for
expressing beliefs that are different from
ours. We told him he was wrong.
We quoted Bible verses disputing him,
disrobed in order to prove a point and hurled
obscenities. Brother Jim caused us to pon-
der something that not many of us had
thought about before � religion. We de-
fended beliefs that we did not know we had.
1 le made us think.
Regardless of whether or not we be-
lieved in his biblical interpretations or in the
wav he presented them. Brother Jim had a
right to be here. He caused protest and
disagreement, but he incited neither vio-
lence nor breach of the peace. He had a
permit; when it expired and he was asked to
leave, he left calmlv and peaceably.
Brother Jim made us angrv, but he also
provided a service � he stimulated our
minds.
Letters to the Editor
Mandelker attacks
affirmative action
To the Editor
I am writing to commend J
William Walker for his fine editorial
attacking affirmative action fi e, re-
verse discrimination) As Walker
points out, affirmative action "re-
kindles the fires of prejudices" and
leads to such injustices as whites be-
ing turned down for scholarships
"based solely on their race "
Reverse discrimination is usu-
ally defended on the ground that the
underrepresentation of blacks in pro-
fessions such as medicine, law and
academics is due to discrimination
Preferential treatment for blacks (at
the expense of, for example, Cauca-
sians and Asian-Americans) is thought
by some to be a proper way to com-
pensate for past injustice to earlier
generations.
But let us examine this argu-
ment Since 12 percent of the popula-
tion is black, shouldn't we expect that
tn tfie absence of discrimination, ap-
proximately 12 percent of physicians,
lawyers and professors would be
black?
Not at all. Even if there had
been no discrimination, the difference
between black and white mean IQ
suggest that blacks would still bedras-
tically underrepresented in the pro-
Imloni,
The IQ question has been much
discussed
It has been alleged by anxious
apologists for reverse discrimination
that IQ tests are biased against blacks,
but the National Academy of Science
has recently concluded that "(mental)
ability tests predict criterion perfor-
mance a�s well for blacks as for whiter "
The black mean IQ is more than
one standard deviation below the
white mean � a difference of more
than 15 points of IQ as measured by
such tests as the Wechsler Adult Intel-
ligence Scale
But physicians, for example, are
recruited from an IQ range of 114 and
above
Only three percent of the black
population (as opposed to 16 percent
of the white population) has an IQ in
this range Given that blacks are 12
percent of the population, ony two
percent (not 12 percent) of physicians
would then be expected to be black
eren in lhe absence of'discrimination The
tANWEWWM
humws m?j
On The Fringe
Students strip for 'The Brother'
most commonly advanced argument
for affirmative action is, consequently,
defective
Discrimination against some
racial groups in order to advantage
others is a damaging and dangerous
social policy which incites racial an-
tagonism Remedial education will
help blacks, reverse discrimination
merely encourages hypocrisy and
animosity
Steven Mandelker
Visiting Assistant Professor
Reader upset
with U2
To the Editor;
After reading the review of the
U2 concert, I was left with one ques-
tion If Bono would rather "kiss his
own ass than Coke's then why did
MTV's ass look so much desirable to
him (in reference to MTV sponsoring
the ZOO TV tour)?
Nick Gregory
Sophomore
Finance
By Tim E.
Hampton
Editorial
Columnist
Before Brother Jim left campus
fenl week, the former druggie and for-
nicator made certain to accost thou-
sands of ECU students with his brand
oi repent-you-evil-sinner accusative
Bible thumping.
Not since the city placed an ab-
horrent halt to the Halloween celebra-
tion have the students at this mod-
ern day Sodom and Gomorah" be-
come so riled While this after-hfe-
believing-T S Eliot-reading columnist
found the fanatical ranting of Bro Jim
to be theologically repulsive, never-
theless his presence on campus fos-
tered muchposittvedebateand caused
everyone � from atheist to the pris-
tine pious � to encounter their be-
liefs
From a sales-pitch pointof view,
Bro Jim's style was not the most per-
suasive, yet in this timeof shock-radio
and shock-journalism, he shocked the
hell out of some people And in many
confrontations, the bombastic
preacher won his arguments by de-
fault as those offended by comments
such as "All sorority girls are lusting
whores" resorted to foul expletives
and, in some cases, began to disrobe
Bro Jim must be given some
credit Men the world over have oft
tried the axung, coaxing approach to
make women take their clothes off As
Bro. Jim proved, all it really takes is
several prejudicial comments and a
few Bible verses, and btxim, women
will be stripping all around
Bro Jim alsoproved thathecan
attract homosexual males and have
the same results Covering his nose
with a handkerchief to safeguard him-
self from the AIDSvirus � becauseas
we all know, AIDS can be contracted
though breathing � the homosexual-
hat ing-Jesse-Helms-loving minister
had a small harem of homosexual fol-
io wers who took their clothing off and
even mooned him To safeguard other
orifices, Bro Jim placed his Bible be-
hind his twin buttock
His abilitv to determine the
sexual persuasion of a person from SO
paces a way must also becom mended
Just think if the ais had had Bro
Jim's powers, all the homosexuals in
eastern Europe would have been ex-
terminated
And also Bro Jim i perfectly
right, Catholicism is nothing more
than a pagan religion whose worship-
persareguiltyof idolatry Never mind
that St Paul founded the first Chris-
tian church and read rmm that any
and blasphemous bcxik, the Bible
After signing autographs like
"Tim, you whoremongering liberal,
Bro Jim" the college circuit riding
preacher left the Mall area of campus
without one convert Not one Even
the ECL Jesus freaks couldn't mea-
sure up to Bro Jim He would have
rendered Jesus, m His second coming,
a blasphemous hippie But Bro Jim
an compbshed his objective He made
blood boil, tears flow and people take
off their clothes
On thethe'logical pvi- .
� from an ethology f the stud) �
animals relate to their em a
stand point, the contemptuous rav
mgsofBro Jim wereentertair c
one had to stop and listen �
preacher, yet his slambastH
yielded a capitulated audience F �
one ECU celebrity, with his eq
famed dog, became caught uc n the
dogma
It was a rest at arguraei � I
skills, and most students lost� eve
though they will never admit I
because they lowered themselves t
his grounds One female became -
irate that she almost unlea e I
punch
The majority of the dose
resorted to throwing f-urev- ��� -1
Others choose to expec rale a
mulated salivary tl I
fire and brimstone face Ar I
again, let's not ft re '
chose public (but not pubic -�:
tion
Maybe, Bro fun is right M
this is the modem day Sodt hi
Gomorah, where everyday and
everynight students live by hedonis-
tic means Maybe ECU is comprised
of "seething masturbators" who, pre-
fer perusing a Hustler to that of an
Industrial Hygiene Textbook
In the end result, listerer-
reaffirmed their beliefs and disc .
those of Bro Jirr as maniacal psych
babble
And there was more than
uswhowishedtheiratetemalev. .
havehauledoff and popped the. :v i
be-Jesus out of his deranged
You'll Get Nothing And Like It
Election year good for political soul
By Parker Editorial Columnist4 rr �0 4
If only every year could be an
election year
Only during the environment
created by election time do our politi-
cal leaders ever remember that they
work for us and take the public semi-
seriously The rest of the time they are
pretty sure that we work for them
Who could have imagined that
Congressand the White House would
ever be in competition to cut their
own fringe benefits' Even if perk-
purging is being used to draw atten-
tion from more pertinent issues, at
least the idea of trimming excess has
entered our leaders'minds, and that's
an accomplishment Not taking
"gimmes" like free medical care for
granted mayputourlawmakerscloser
in touch with their estranged friend,
John Q Public.
Campaign fever iseven impact-
ing upon foreign policy President
Bush was still hesitant tohelpour new
comrades in democracy with their
frenzied economy, after everyone and
Nixon agreed that we should. But once
it became clear that Clinton and the
Democrats were including aid to Rus-
sia on their platform, Bush dazzled us
with the speed his people could put
together an aid program All we had
to do was make it a campaign issue �
how simple.
The Bush administration is very
defensive about their incumbent's
current tendency to be manipulated
by outsiders, but that is another symp-
tom of their political myopia Our lead-
ers have trouble seeing the prcxress of
power as it should function � we
want something done, they carry it
out � until election year, when all
those pairs oi eyeglasses are donned
Bush and Congress aren't bending to
the will of infidels, they're iust doing
their obs for a change
This period of people-power
won't last long, so we need to kike
advantage of it as much as we can
While Clinton, Brown, maybe Perot
and who-knows-who-else are bend-
ing to what the people want to hear,
we need to beat and mold the candi-
dates into the type of president we
want while they're still pliable What-
ever is made an issue now will war-
rant answers and promises
How to make some of those
promises lived up to is alsoclear Oust
incumbents that don't stick to their
bargains Pat Buchanan played up the
open nerve of the public that George
Bush irritated with his turnabout on
new taxes Booting Bush out will rees-
tablish those invisible parameters of
how much at one's word must be
kept Even the most starry-eyed ideal-
ist doesn't really expect a politician to
make good on all their platforms, but
if for example the winning Democrat
lives up to a mere third of the prom-
ises he makes, that's still a lot more
reform than we would otherwise get.
Our responsibility is to keep the
issues hot, and on the most important
weare faltering. Much like the people
in our own town who have tried to
somehow rush the warm weather's
return for the past month by wearing
shorts in the cold, so is the oaf
trying to end the recession bv pre
ing its end Economists are inter, n
mg every favorable sign as the
end of our financial woes However a
slight increase in homebuiiciirc does
not portent success in any area
home development General M ft tl
has yet to tell 20,000 employee- ft �
they were just kidding, arc! hiring
freezes areshll on all over the country
The national debt shows no sign ot
shrinking
Yet if we mistake lamp
improvement as long-term recover.
the economy will become a non-isw
this year, and that could prove disas-
trous Unless Tsongas actively returns
to the presidential race with his one
and only platform, the other candi-
dates will likely downplay the eco-
nomic debate, and that's always fiw
with Bush and his vague trickle-
down" sensibilines This a the vear
that we could make our politicians
figure out once and for aO ftd
stand on our financial future and if
we miss this opportunity v �
kick ourselves
1992 has so far been the year
that the people called for change Even
the more mediocre issues are still a far
cry from the lightweight debates over
patriotism that somehow figured into
the last elections. All we the public
have to do to make the changes is
make the problems campaign issues
and not let up Our limo-riding em-
ployees can improveour predicament
or we'll take care of them by
defenestration.
If only our leaders had to worn
about their jobs every day like the rest
of us.
C0NGMTMT1ON5!
� r
The Cl
BRIEFLY
Ml nl - s- 3 ftre f o r b u sv re a ders
HOLLYWOOD:
enef
a in all the
ha e
CELEBRITIES:
stored fim Bakker's faith
rid of her �-���
it, it -
ECONOM x: . a ren
oil price
cemed arx ut Bu
Senate race By another
time that Bu
dences -
MEDICINE:
New book gar
plenty of prai
The !a;
under tire again (hanks 1 I
new book that ha � I I I
the top of the I
In ' .
noted author Chnstiar
proves that the lapane-
lematicalryattem
dermine the United 1
economy sincetheend I �'� i
War II. '
'ThelapanesehavesecretK
been subverting us I r years
with quality control, low price-
and respectableservice While
writes
"They have all but suc-
ceeded m destroying the fun-
damental American concept
that you should make your
luctassloppih anddheaj
as possible hvpetheheiloul I
it v ith an advertising blitz, t oss
it in your customers' lap- and
then ndescendingiy at
them when thev ask tor help
with it
Unite- book has Irai
lavish pr.i meru i
manufacturers
'White is right: the bottom
line is and ever si
aidChrswerec'hairm,i:
try total
-si �
pointed out
�-� �
time, a apai
I
� � �

Bush admits to
President Bush admitted to-
day that he i one i millions of
Americans who are afflicted b a
speech defect known as headlexia
� theability to speakonlvin head-
lines
"Got a condition the presi-
dent saidmhis painful admission.
"Can talk only in headlines Wiil
� I
The prt j
ment sheds
headlexics a
iem in our svietvj
Manv headie
newspaper-
dispensable mer
duction staff. But
- mainly unavj
iem, sas ECU
ECU SNAPSHOTS
stupid statistics for stupid p
We're Berating More Sinn
10000
VT
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Year
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he Brother'
1 lyof how "lent)
'lu us r.iv-
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V. Tils
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- equally
1 ip in the
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Mavb I
whi , �
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. (ho-
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� � "i n � wi uld
. � � vil
And Like It
r political soul
th : - the nation
� i . nby redkt-
ire II '� rpret-
,m ,ls the qUH k
� �9 t f tT .1
i building ii im
in any area but
� pnt. i I'urr.ii Moton
. mplo) ees tb.it
I : ling and hiring
�r the country
ht shows no Mgn oi

� ' ' i take tftnpor.irv
ng term reiovery.
theecom my w ill bei omea non-issu1
ii.i prove disea
ess I m iikis n tiv fivreturns
evidential race with his OM
the other candi-
date will likely .lownpl.iv th �co-
le ' ��� md it's always fin
ikiut "trivklf-
down lensibilities I his is the ve.ir
that wt could maki ur politictani
� � � aandfoi ii) where 0w)
stand on ovir Hnancial future, .md it
w is this opportunity we can only
Ku k ourselves
v. tr hefti the year
that thepeopla called t. r i hanga Even
the IT -rt medi. K re issues .ire ��till I f.ir
i rv from the lighrwuejlu debates over
patriotism th.it somehow figured into
the List alecttam AH vse the public
hart to do to make the changes is
make the problem campaign issues
and not let up Our limo-nding em-
plovees can improveour predicament
or we'll take care of them by
defenestration
It I mlv our leaders had to worry
about their obs every day like the rest
�list
lit Wt: . .
I ters i !t
must
I letnocrat
the prom-
lot more
m Kel
Ito keep the
important
It tie people
re tried to
weather s
V- wearing
of us
ILATIOMST?
Opinion
uJlje EaatCEaroltnfan April 7, 1992 5
The Clearly Labeled Satire Page
� Mlm��-� nnt Rrnthvr .Itm hit w�'r at ill atnusintf m
We're not Brother Jim, but were still amusing
BRIEFLY
Mlnf-sartre for busy reader
Atlantis crew phones home
IIOLLYWOOO: Seeing the success oi ln tmtinct, filmmak-
� i s h,i e dec ided to include more negative portrayals of homosexu-
als in all their films from now on. "We'll hire gays to protest, if we
ii,n e to s.iys one movie mogul,
C ELEBRITIESs lammv Paye's decision to get a divofce re-
stored I mi Bakker's faith in Cod. It was a roundabout way of getting
ridol her limtold Ihe Amalgamated Press, "but hev don't knock
it it worked Hunks, Hig G
ECONOMY: By a remarkable coincidence, Saudi-dominated
ini prices started going down just after the White House got con-
cerned about Hush's re-election chances, after the Pennsylvania
Senate m�' By .mother remarkable coincidence, it was about that
time that Hush started opposing loan guarantees to Israel i oinci-
ont es �ute are remarkable things
MEDICINE; rake four Halfprin v andill us in tin-morning
I New book garners
plenty of praise
iyJepf RiKkai-
Though the space shuttle
Atlantis completed its atmo-
spheric surveillance mission last
week, NASA officials have been
shocked bv the exorbitant com-
munications bill run up by the
seven-astronaut crew during their
flight.
The numerous communica-
tions began on the night of the
Academy Awards, when the
Atlantis crew congratulated pro-
ducer George Lucas on receiving
the Irving 1 lhaiberg lifetime
achievementaward.Thecrewthen
became, as flight commander
I harles Bolder. r. described, "in-
fatuated with speaking to Earth "
During a flyover of North
America, the Atlantis crew called
down to express their opinions in
the New York primary polls. Four
of the crew picked Clinton to win,
two voted for Brown, and the rep-
resentative astronaut from Bel-
gium made an impassioned plea
for French president Francois
Mitterand.
While over Northern Europe,
the shuttle astronauts contacted
the royal family of England to
share their sympathies over the
death of Princess Diana's father.
The Belgian astronaut confused
and disgusted British viewers by
explaining that his space suit al-
lowed him to urinate without leav-
ing his seat.
As their flight brought them
over the Commonwealth of Inde-
pendent States, the Atlantis crew-
made a particularly long trans-
mission to thecosmonaut recently
returned to Earth from his exten-
sive mission, a mission begun
when the country was still the
USSR. The cosmonaut, whose
muscleshad severely atrophied in
outer space, was carried in a bucket
toa seat before the television screen
featuring the shuttle crew. The
Atlantis crew applauded the cos-
monaut, who responded by drool-
ing upon himself.
PassingoverSouth Africa, the
shuttle crew congratulated the
African people for their victories
over apartheid. The Belgian astro-
naut stared wide-eyed at the moni-
tor, ha vingnever seen black peop le
before.
Back over the United States,
the crew consented to be inter-
viewed bv Phil Donahue. None of
Clinton spin-doctors scandals
Av
w
l he lapanese run e ome
under fire again, thanks to a
new bonk that has rocketed to
the top ot the best seller lists
In Ungoistu Japan Bashing,
noted authoi t hrtsban White
pro es thai the lapanese hai e
systematic ally attempted toun-
dermine the I nited States
ts. onomy stro e the end of World
Wai ll
he Japanese have secretly
been subverting us tor years
with quality control, low prices
and respet table sen ue White
w rites
i he) ha e all but sm
(oedod in destro) ing the fun
da mental American concept
that you should make your
produc t as sloppily and heaph
,is possible, hype the hell out ot
it with an ad ertising blitz, toss
it m our i ustomers' laps and
then sneei condescendingly at
thom when they ask for help
with it
White's book has drawn
l,n ish praise from Amerkancat
manufac hirers
White is right: the bottom
line is and ever shall be king
s.ndt hrvswervechairman I ee
I mat uckoo. "For the lapaneseto
trv to take that away from us is
i ultural warfare
c ongress apparently agrees
( oincidenl with the release ol
ff'ngotsfii apan Ba$htng,Sen.)esse
I ielms, k( in trod u ed new
protectionist legislation I he
I Ielms bill would make it illegal
tor other countries to sell any
thing in America that as better
or less expensive than compa
rabte American products
I he bill passed unani-
mously.
Some Ameni ,n i ntu s have
pointed out that White's book
merely critk izes the lapanese for
actually doing what Americans
are alw ays saying the do: pro
duung the best product at an
affordable price. Most of those
i ntu s ha e now been shot.
Reaction from the lapanese
was subdued, though rumor has
it that they are rushing to pro-
ducea copy of White's book that
is smaller, less expensive ,nd a
taster read than the American
crsion
However, iist before press
time, a lapanese politician broke
the silent e to call White "lazy,
stupid and illit er, well, lav
and stupid
Till AMAI GAMATl D PRESS
Emboldened by the public's
widespread u i eptant e of his m.
mission that he had used man
juana but had not enjoyed it,
Democratic presidential hopeful
Bill Clinton today sought to re-
word his explanations of other
scandals in his past.
( Imton on his alleged draft-
dodging:
"When I was in England, I
lied to keep from getting drafted a
time or two and didn't like it I
didn't go to Vietnam, I didn't get a
leg shot off, and I didn't try it
again
Clinton on his wife's law firm:
"When nobody was looking, I
sent some business to Hillary's
law firm a time or two and didn't
like it I didn't get deeply involved,
l didn't make a profit, and I didn't
try it again
And, of course, Clinton on his
adulteries:
"When Hillary was out of
town, I experimented with adul-
tery a time or two and didn't like
it. I didn't penetrate the women, I
didn't have an orgasm, and l didn't
trv it again. Well, not frequently
Surgeon General attacks ads
I AVAH.AVAI! ! PRE5S
Surgeon General Iknow-
whatsgoodfbrya Oldfellow again
politely asked cigarette manufac-
turers to retrain from ad ertising
their products in anv way that
teenagers might find interesting.
"I know there's nothing I can
do about this Oldfellow said as
CIA director Robert Gates looked
on m smiled enigmatically. "I
lust thought I'd ask
Old fellow's new target is the
Marlboro Man, whom she attacks
as macho, rugged and basically
tree from apparent personal de-
fects.
"We can't have kids thinking
that there are smokers who are
good people Oldfellow said.
"Tobacco advertisements
shouldn't be allowed to perpetu-
ate such pernicious stereotypes
Oldfellow said that the only
cigarette advertising she would
consider acceptable would be ad-
vertising which portrayed ciga-
rette smokers as smelly, friendless
losers.
Bush trades barbs with Fooley
i
Aw I WA
Pri ss
President Hush today strongly
denied that the White House pro-
nil's even more perks than the
I ongress gets.
"Allegation not true said
Hush, reclining in a genuine Louis
l chair as the White House
manicurists attended to his nails,
"lust a humble public servant
Latet that day, as reporters
followed him from the White
House's screening room to the
newly installed basketball court.
Hush took up the theme again.
Too many perks, Congress
out of touch he said. "No won-
der thev didn't realize the reces-
sion was happening until � oops,
no, that was me. Don't print that!
Don't print that
House speaker Tom Fooley
vigorously disagreed with the
president's characterization of the
Congress.
Fcxilev cited an example of
what he calls the president's
"snobbishness
"One time my limo pulled up
next to his limo at a stop light
Fooley said. "1 rolled down the
power window, leaned my head
out, and said. Pardon me do
you have anv Grey Toupon?' And
he just sniffed and drove away
the astronauts said thev were gay
and all were pro-choice � except
for the Belgian astronaut, who was
unfamiliar with the term. When
asked what kind of engineer he
was, the visiting astronaut told
Donahue that he in fact ran a loco-
motive. A big steam train!
Upon re-entrv, the Atlantis
astronauts called several 9t X) num-
bers m hopes i)i meeting people
like themselves, just interested in
talking and having a good time.
After touchdown, puzzled.
N ASA scientists checked the labo-
ratory computers for information
concerning Earth's atmosphere
and found that the shuttle crew
had gathered no data.
"Oh we forgot explained
Captain Holden
SF writers
form club
I Amai i ,w Pj
Isaac Asimov is gone from
this world, but the tireless writer
is already working to organize
dead SF writers in the afterlife.
Asimov, working with
dead SF writers Frank Herbert,
Robert Heinlein and Thilip K.
Dick, has formed a Dead Sci-
ence Fi tion Writers' Society.
It's nothing like the Dead
Poets Society Asimov ex
plained. "We're iist a bunh of
fun-loving ghosts who hap-
pened to write science fiction
back when we had bodies
Asimov said the club's
main activity will be haunting
directors who butcher science
fiction stones in order to make
formula films, the group will
begin bv haunting Ridley Scott
and Paul Verhoeven, both of
whom have mangled Dick's sto-
ries.
"The Dead Science Fiction
Writers' Club will work to es-
tablish a justice in the world
tha t science fiction wri ter aren't
able to achieve while they're
alive Asimov said. "Holly-
wood, look out
Another DSFWC member,
the recently deceased Star Trek
creator and occasional SF writer
Gene Rixldenberrv. hopes to di-
rect Trek films from beyond the
grave.
Bush admits to speech defect
I m Amalgamated Press
President Hush admitted to-
dav that he is one of millions of
meru ana who are afflicted by a
speei h defect known as headlexia
the ability tospeakonlv in head-
lines
"dot a condition the presi-
lent said in his painful admission,
t an talk only in headlines. Will
seek therapy
I he president's announce-
ment shells light on the plight oi
headlexics.a largely ignored prob-
lem in our society.
Many headlexics find work at
newspapers, where thev are in-
dispensable members of the pro-
duction staff. But the larger soci-
ety is mainly unawareof the prob-
lem, says ECU speech counselor
ECU SNAPSHOTS
stupid statistics for stupid people
We're Berating More Sinners!
10000
y
8000-
1
5 6000 H
I
c
(75
4000 -
2000-
1966 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992
Year

Dr. Alanon Twelvestep
"There's a bias against
headlexics in America
Twelvestep said. "People just
aren't comfortable with people
who tend to drop their article ad-
jectives
Even though anti-headlexic
prejudice exists, Bush is not the
first president to suffer from
headlexia.
"Abraham Lincoln was a
headlexic, until he got help for his
condition said Twelvestep. "The
first draft of the Emancipation
Proclamation read, in its entirety,
'Gonna free slaves. Gonna do it,
right now The Gettysburg Ad-
dress was only 'Long time ago,
forefathers started country That
was all that would fit on the back
of the envelope
President Bush's inability to
form complete sentences, not to
mention his inability to connect
each sentence to the next in some
recognizable fashion, had long
been the subject of some puzzle-
ment.
"Admittedly, it's hard to
imagine that a guy who never
learned how to use his native lan-
guage could become president
said Twelvestep. "Thank good-
ness it turned out to be only a
speech defect�it would really be
terrible if the president of the
United States just couldn't speak
From the twisted mind of Oliver Stone
comes a film about an incredible new conspiracy theory
JAG
The assassination of James A. Garfield
Did Charles Jules Giteau really act alone?
Or was a second gunman hidden behind the sassy foal?
Would an intelligent man like Giteau really have
voluntarily paid for a carriage to take him to jail?
Find out the hysteria-provoking, fact-ignoring answers
to these and other trumped-up questions
in a theater near you.
And, coming this summer: ABE
I





Classifieds
(Eire East (Ear0ltntan
4pal 7,7992
i-ORRLNT
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS: Oneand two bed
'isirtnients EwrgJ tflkitM MNMl leva
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w aii hitnow l� bedrootti dupea VtA
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1 or 1 bedroom duplex JG7I Uth St J075 month
"(919)936 2663
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S v S t nv auntion of problem or ptcfe
v4; .� 75T-485S ioi Soan
FOMAU ROOMMATI NOMDl lo sublease
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Square I pperi Immi � i . � gradual -indent pre
IN Mnoker Ca S "�'
tKOCMMATESNEEDCOiNoi - Dkeratcaham
���� lew x Vu unc lulyandnem
��� STdepotat fach.SU 2.50 rent and 1 4
ROOMMATE WAhTTED pretaoaerfw
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, � v , 0 11 � but to �'� Mum
roWNHOt -i ,oh Ktsi :
age i art i �. � �� k I � n at
FEMALE ROOMMATI Ml PIP
l a '93 $1 v �' pet " .
j. � � � thtd I all
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RCtOMMATf .NTEl : Nv.ro,
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HMUt ROOMMATI" WANTED M
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R1NGGOLD TOWERS
Now laking Leases ft 1
bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
� ties. Cal v. v- , than a n i
i
st.smi p a H 441-312 gavaiiabiefcM � n . l Ca Si .���
WANTED TO RIST j.x ;�.mi needs txx.
oom apartn era for the a
c v � � �� ��: � ivaalab t
�� v spetchet 355 J
si MMOI IARTMENTREN1 Als otktfrow
- v r 31 or 2 �� nwa a m -
r per . � � 14 p�
; - isk tor ICnstv or Rachelle
PI INNING ON 51 WING lOR M MMlK'
rn - - � � o . �
for sun r I - - �iV:
area Maroi 7S8 . � c an i
St HI I kSI � � V
Mav tat �- kuguMifdei
RrotKM - - m .
ROOMMATI NEEDED tanoMr 4Md
pavean taaagt

MPAKTMENT rOM RENT - � 2 bedroom
Close tc in .� k - - B v-
. . Call 752-1(1 5
FORSAKE
SEIZrn CARS: trikks Kits I whwlm, motor
hotnea, bv I HI IRS. DEA AvaataMt vourartM now
Call ftXV.lVVWVxt C-S999
PAY IN-STATE Tl'ITION? Rtad lltlMg
(upd luition ttv practical pamphlet written bv
an attorney on the in Mate waidancy application
proo� ForSale SmdentSiotaa. Wright Building
FOR SALE; DIaiawnrI rW k bike (fmM cowdHion)
S275.11x1 Smith-Corona tv pew riter (like new l Sir-
RENTORBIY Vottat.i raaaonaM ptiCC Order
new tor the ralP! 751 2016
BIKE FOR SAILS, hw inn Spnnt U-speeil. unisev
blue, rarely u�t arvl in fanmatii -liape MuM kH
� c all Dana at 931 M15 CreM bike"
7 U K NIC.HT i londa. Bahama- and vrut-e
vacatton fwoticat�fee$3000( c�wl until sept
IctR SME. JM Ntoaan Nivima Blue w Nut
interior Loadedw lunrool Faiks!SA300.Yamaha
trumpet rr condition EaceHeM for beg
v � Ca 914S LeavemeaaageferLee
fkrflEUCS35A525drivea colormoratw I 25
s hnagewttierHprimei oomuchaorl
tcare to -� 1850 i all oe ai 758 4444
BlslMss MAJOatS BM :v 3 Modi 8 U
dnvt 8 N'c hard drivi mo chroa i monitor I
'k! Cornea w i 'Aor and additional
-cttwaro i all kjei at "VW-t
ALMOST NEW: 4 month old Fin: RU bike, ami
itnli ruiaet � rth o M.tk raflei 758 1247
FOR SME; Diamond ba,n bike cre.t: condMon
v i and Sn ith c crom rypewi H i Ike new
1125 I all 752-0164
FcRs-ME 1989 n
r 758 6481 forn
BIKE FOR Mil '
:4� SMrivi
, �� Cruieei Goodcondi-
04 Ha k � 5 mi
nVANTHD
1 SI 111 MS w t oiter salary coiningdiscounts Ap-
plications accepted at Brodv's the Plaai Mon -
Fhurs 1pm to 4 p m
LOOKING FOR A GREAT SUMMER JOB?
FLORIDA lOHorrORn'Nirr'REPORT A Direc-
tory ot Hospitality Industry employers. ob de-
scriptions, wages, anvl housing Lists Attractions.
Resort Hotels. Cruise Ships. Summer Camps, and
more' 1 or vour copy semi 88 "5 to CAJtBER RE-
SEAJK Hc.RlH IP. 7226 W Colonial Ir Suite 24.
Orlando, Fl 32818
REWARD For the return of lost heart charm
braceletwiihtour, harms Rewardguarenteedmore
than IVan Shop value! (9WJ 527-889S No ques-
tions asked
WANTED: Students inten'steii in films wishing to
u-e their know ledge to lvt upcoming movies for
Hemlriv IHttttt Know Irtlge ot foreign films a
plus Put up application to serve vn Student I'nion
film 11 mflllll I tor np onung year at Mendenhall
Call Matt lone- H 757 4366 tor details
WILL YOU NEED EXTRA MONEY THIS SUM-
MER? Weekend merchandiser Responsible per-
suni�dad daw wiwikletifntlflO i varywhti went
end Applv inperaonafter3p m weekdays letfrev s
btOT and wine Green St Ft Greenville NC
call 758-1515for directtone
LX) YOU HAVE ANY EMPTY ANHEUSER-
BUSCH KECS LYING AROUND? lel'frv s beer
and Wine anU c:e vou S10 tor each empty A-B
Keg We w iii buy hack some taps ami tubs C.reen
Si I a ca 758 1515 for directions Closed from
ivv-n to 1 p m
COLO ANO DIAMOND RING LOST around
StundentSton GeneraK oUegean 'BiologvBuiki-
� Great nam advabat large reward' 83
SERVICES OFFERED
SUP MONEY FOR COLLEGE? SFAMS locates
private sector financial Jiid for college srudems
Cai Marshall Youm 1-80 2384771
TYI'INC. Error-ftee quick and dependable at rea-
sonable cst Excellent typing and prevtr! Khng
? lb grammar pumtuanoa sememe structure.
M c all Pauline at 757-3693
BETTERREsLMESC.lt OBS ttakechames
when first ncouH k better itaune wiH
open the i gl I k on Icanhetpyouappi) fcrwork
iwidl a persona ted .� application letter and re
sum 'I've shuweatt youradentt Ml you're
�about the future .a me I maprtesiona;
�c - � - cc �' � ����- year s evpenetve in mar-
� � a . ret r writing When you reread) m
� ove .r-ea.
� o-V
i�t�: Y MH MAXIM tOOrc black street bike
n nt c-1 'a' neida ntai batteri ot to he recharged
Looksfi-��� neicaiafew � norrepatrs i.ameam
- xk at it S Great for spi c- r
md n r 83 raven eaaaga
HELP WANTED
IXYSTAl RlBs All ABIE Mam potatw -
Great benefits Ca - "�'�- '�'��-v 3712
FREE TRAM l - . teabipt Stu
rknn abx needt IChrotn �- srx v � ds t act
�or tmiimiiiiil park emp oymeni . a RW V-s
e�aa v Uo4
MILIER SlYIMNc. ANDWORPIHOCESSING.
�k. curairsert guaranteed Pickup ami de-
WORDPROt ESSINC Ret at m en papi n 11
krrs. pst c '� asset I H Rea na8
RIslXislBlF EXPERIENCEDCOllEC.l Ml
OFNTs .c I hki � � home Weare
i) .� � ivcek i bat � o �
netd � c a "�-�- ' ravenMaaage
a- TYHNc. sERMCE Bern beat r- ea
'�� k-up and deliver No t- tix-1 small cortex-
lanm Ca Hwttmt �1 1238
PERSONALS
ANDY: Thank youSvmuchforstanngupall night
to ulk to me It's nice to know 1 can still count on
you as a friend' Your bestest friend always
NOLAND, FRED,STEVE: Had a great time You
wouldn't believe' Love, Becca. Frica. am) Sherry
SHERRY SMITH! Congrats on being elei ted SGA
vice-president' We're proud of you' love, vour
Sigma sisters
SIGMAS hope everyone is having a GREAT
GREEK WEEK"
WELCOME; C arolvn Mensel. Sigma Feild Rep . to
FC U! We hope you have a great week' Love, the
Sigmas
CORN DOG AND HOT LIPS: You won the big
race, you both were so cool, vou made your oppo
nent look like a fool Good luck next year and it
you're both able, go back to Fexas and dame on a
table Congratulations Pee Dee
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS: DorYl torget to
support the Gamma Sigma Sigma Alpha Sigma
PhicoindnvehenefittingtheDream Factory March
30 through April 10 in front of the student store
THE GREAT PIRATE PUPLtVGOLD PIGSKIN
PIG-OUT PARTY, this Saturday at Fi.klen Sta-
dium. .30ptn Spring football game, the Spinners
and Highway 101 in concert. Barbecue plates $-5.
Ri kinni contest, and Pirate football All this tor only
S- for ECU students
COME WATCH the pirates in their purple gold
gamethiS'Saturdava! 2.Vp m inFicklenStadium
What does he future hold for pirate foothalPCome
torn HviW other pirate faithful Witness the pass
;ng attack ot Steve Logan
STAR: Can 1 born-w or New EdMst n - creat-
es! rim? Everybody savs its really cool arhei
vou turn it up super ioud'ee thankt?Meltnd) R
PI KAPPS Get mad) k part . � R I -
at Myrtle Beach this weekend!
COMMUNICATION MAORS: Be sure not to
mivs the Society cf Picaeaaional fournakaaa next
meeting, which will N-at S p m on April 9mGCB
2l'C- 'TieSp'isapre prc-teo:ui -v �
studentsinterestevi in media related careers b
wav Diuaik aatkllg and icumalism maiors are in-
vited to hear ruftv speakers, ami we U i M Ban
preparing h elect officers for next ve: Sodon'l
miss th on.e-evrrv two week opf Mull t)
IENNF1ER: : .ant wait for next vear living in
Ringgold will be awesome' May the wind be a.
w avs at vour back, may tb road rise �pto meet �
and mav manv men buy vou dnrk- a' j-V
DISPLAY CLASS1RED
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FAqT rROi 1N1AN CLASSIF1FP RATES
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Deadline
Friday 4 p,m� for Tuesday issue and Tuesday 4 p,m, for Thursday issue.
Evervone smile and be nice to Deborah- She's cool.
am
milk
Kingston
Place
WE HAVE
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR FALL SEMESTER
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393
BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR EC I STUDENTS
WE PROVIDE: IT LI V IT RNISHED APARTMENTS
AI 1 Gl VSSI S DISHES SILVERWARI
DISHWASHER POTS cv PANS
iERVK i-( i UBHGUSE-LAl NDRi
S IMMING I KM & LOTS MORE
AT A PRICE THAT WILL
COMPETE WITH THE DORMS!
HELPWA1VTED
Experienced cook
specializing in Mexican
food. Apply in person at
Alfredo's
Alfredo's N.Y. Pizza
718 E. 5th St. � Downtown � 752-0022
3 LartMi Ptoas TIKfTpSl TverY Sun. Mon. Tues
I 2 Large P,Z2aS ! Personal S.ze l ALL PITCHERS
I with 1 toPP'ng I 1 topping piua s q-i cq i
' CT QQ ' with large soda " ! '
! S7" j S3.99 jean
I carry out only . I Sr�z�J �
i o � good daily from . aS!E� �
�not good after 9pm I 30 ! . . !
I 12pm til 5pm (with this coupon
Beauoful Plan o Lh
� KB New
lIKRSimPARTMKNTS
� � -
air.l N'ra: I Cl
Meai NU � s pf Ceaaert
t i i'arc SiaticTi
S30 � -onth
c'o� T o: Totmnv WUliatM
7S6-7tlSort3(
Oftka c-pen pt S. 12-3 30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS'
- TV v j m � i� t - - SMC i moth, t
mauhiCAM VIOBILE HOXffi RtSTALS co.ft� �
vrm. imaiMBBtMaTMaaaaeaaMaaaaaaitattatB
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Contact IT or Tominv Wulitmi
WANTED: Vejmer to -tart gaming group in
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� O �Vv UtoGreenvile
c -
MACCCONSa LTAWT NEEDED v- rvome
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$uiV.ViirVELMi V.i
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nv Detadt se:v! M
- - P
LOST CAT . c c . - � -ten last seen
iTarlbverApia.4tten paetgirli Houndpltaat
753 ITU
P.RTTIMENalesapp!icatior. are be:ng accepted
fee aae Young Men's Depi ot3rodv - tfyoueiajo)
tasbjc-nablemen sck-thing ptvvidmgfnendlvset-
cicf extra -vome .Unhingdisvounts.weencour-
a�;e i on 10 aprh at ?r.x1 - the Plaza Mc-n-Thurs
I mi tv1 4 p m
BRtD 'S i- accepting applications tor a G FRI-
c AI ASS1ST.WI imust be available bv 1 p m and
have comruterexpenenceiand PART TTMV SALES
PERSONALS
HEADING rOK El ROPE THIS SUMMER' (el
there a- �� � n ' - , ' '� '�� � I V
� ��. New York Times
.n. timer lo � �� West coatl
- C H JIT -Se4 - 200
ALASKA SlMMfK IMIIOIMENT aaJwMa
� - T A
- v. o N ' ' .es
ar v peograa
caii � 11 . � � � Sen at m I � t�-
4ext r-4
TKE RINCC.IRL REC.IbTRATION va em at
7s� ; eaw -vameand number contest at the
Flbo V � � �. - - - � c MS25 Ten
v - � .c - v -av
sreiNC. ON THE OL TER BANKS StM Rat I)
exv'�- apt B 'J n IO students a: Fast
c ar.vir.a-ova.ationthtsspringonthesunnyOute!
�beakaalNc through N'a Ceneaoicttncaama
apph SoVX' eunt deposit required Call tor
availabilities I HO -�-44-4-
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTS
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
Hours:
Mon - Fri 8:30-3:00
SHE tEaat toflliman
is now accepting applications for
ADVERTISING PRODUCTION MANAGER
� Responsible for computer design of all
non-camera ready .iJs
� Musi have and maintain a minimun 2.0 G.P.A.
�Must be able to work AT LEAST SIMMER AND
FALL of 1992
� A strong knowledge ot" Aldus Freehand, Page Maker and
scanning equipment preferred.
Apply at Cooperative Education, second floor GCB. or
with Tht Eat Carolinian, second floor publication hide.
APPLICATION DEADLINE IS APRIL 15.1992
Announcements
THE GA-LESBIAN
Socia teappoai advocaKy activities Everv-
H tnkMM eav- lesbians bisexuals con-
opmed tarrulv and friend- call ECU cvunsel
r75J 5 tonntc'rmahonregardinj:
mex'ting time and place
NEWMAN
C ATHOL1C STUDENT CENTER
The New man Cathcilic Student Catholic Cen-
ter tnv ires v ou to M c-rship v ith them Sunday
Mbjmb llVjm jndS.Vpm At �h-
Nx nun Center ?�E lihSt Two houses
tnxm the Fletcher Music Building For more
intcTTtution oontact Fr Paul aoth 757-1991
KLIQLESTRIANCLLB
ECL Equestrian Club meeting Tuesday,
Apnl7 at 4 V pm in Medenhall Room 14
Officer elc-ctions will be held New candi
dates and new members welcome' Rr more
information call Debbie at 752 -W 5 or Eileen
at 830-ni
ALPHA EPS1LQN DELTA
Attn Professional students Everwonderwhat
vou'll do if vou re rejected bv the professional
school of vour choice1 Leam what to do to
prev ent rejection and how to deal with it if it
does MOW Dr Bill Brown will discuss this
(ope at this week's Alpha Epsilon Delta meet-
ing H pro on Tues Apnl 7 in Flanagan
202 ell pre professional students are urged
to attend
THROUGH THE BARRIERS
If vou would like to work towards reducing
the architectural, as well as the arhrudinal
barriers that students with special needs are
faced with every day. then come to the next
meeting of P.L'S.H. (People United to Sur
port the Handicapped) Thge meeting will be
4��-5�on Tuesday Apnl 7 in8c Mendenhall
Student Center We all face challenges every
dav so please come help raise awareness and
get a message heard
PFFR HEALTH EDUCATORS
Anv student interested in becoming a Peer
Health Educator mu- attend one of the fol-
Wwmg inlvrrrutiorul meetings' Wednesday,
Apnl 8 from 4 r pm or Thursday Apnl 9 from
7-8 pm These meeting- will be held in the
Student Health Service Resource Room ou
must attend one of the meetings to become a
Peer Health Educator Application forms w ill
be available at this time For more informa-
tion call 757-6714
�f REE" SKIN
r ANCFR SCREENING
Thursday Aprilu.tVam- 12.Vprn Rooms
IA B C D and E in Mendenhall Student
Center Signup is tvctimmendcxj Call 75
093 for additional information
WF1 LNFSS FAIR
Tuesday. Apnl 7. 10 00 am - 4.00 pm.
Mendenhall Student Center Great Room. For
more information, call 757-(S713 Sponsored
bv the Office of Health Pnitectton and Well
Being Recreational Services, and the Stu-
dent Health Center
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi members Our next meeting
b April 8 at 5:00 pm Meet in Room 244
Mendenhall We will elect officers See you
there'
meeting Tuesday at 2 p m. in Room 242 at
Mendenhall Call T15 for more info or if
you know a good Psvchic tor a massive se-
ance.
ECU LIBRARY BOOKSALE
lovner library Lobby Wed Apnl I "jm -
spm rtiurs Apnl a m. - 3 pm Paper
backs and hardbacks priced 10 cents to 2
dollars
A.M.E. Z1QN CHVJRCH
PalmSundav Sun Rise Service and Commun-
ion Service tor the month of April April 12.
I2at6am Holv eek Meditation Services
ixn Apnl 13-17 BH at 6 am to 7am The
services will be held at 1 ork Menuxnal A M.E
Zion Church. 201 Tyson Street Greenville.
YC The public is invited to these services
ALPHA PHI SIGMA
FREE CAR WASH!
Alpha Phi Sigma will be having a car wash at
the Quality Mart (Shell Station) on Greenville
Blvd on Saturday Apnl 11 from 9 a.m. to 9
pm. All donations will sponsor the Volun-
teer Guardian Program who are volunteers
and advocates for abused and neglected chil-
dren Speak up for a child" Free car wash
snsfia
FttrFPTIONAL CHILDREN
SCEC - Wed. April 8.1992 5 pm, Speight
201 Dr Patricia Anderson will speak about
using "Creative Dynamics" in the classroom
All interested persons are invited to attend
KURT YPNNEGUT.
CinaiASTHNEM. ELVIS
What do these people have in common? An-
swer Wed two of the three could be coming
to speak next semester if you come to viooe
your opinion at the next FORUM Cornmittee
STUDENT UNION FILMS
SF1 FCTION COMMITTEE
The 1992 Student Union Film Selection Com
rruftee is currently accepting applications for
potential members Students interested in
films, working as ateam, and accepting re-
sponsibilities should apply. Pkk up applica-
tions at the Student Union office in
Mendenhall Student C enter or call Matt lones
at 757-6366 for details
fflFMKT�Y PLACEMENT TEST
Ant student that took the Chemistry Place-
ment Test on April 1.1992 in Flanagan and
left with their answer sheet needs to contact
the Chemtstrv Department We need the an-
swer shtet in order for vou to place in Chem
istrv 1150 Thank vou.
HONORS PROGRAM
According to our records the following people
graduating May lg92 have the average and
the coursework hi qualify as Graduates of the
Honors Program Rebecca Chester. Enca
Churchhill. lonathon Grauel. Anne Horton
Derrick Hvman. Tern larvis Mickie Kennedy
Scott Maxwell. Michele McDevitt. Steve
Randolph Scvrt Smith Patrick Stanforth. Am
berSoutheriand AlexandraTnpp andScotty
Van Law Any other graduating senoir who
thinks heshe should be added to the list
should see Dr Sanders (6373) immediately
REDEFINED: A TELECONFERENCE
FOR CAMPUS LEADERS
Campus Violence Redefined will air Wednes-
day . Apnl S. 1992 from 1 p m to 3 pm in MSC
Hendnx Theatre This teleconference will fo-
cus on understanding issues related to cam-
pus violence, especially increasing aware-
ness of definitions and effects of violence,
causes, and passible solutions through irfch-
tuhonai policy and response, as well as pre-
vention efforts. Students, faculty and staff
invited For more information call 757-4881
EAST CAROLINA
irhnVERSfTVCHIMlNAL
IUST1CE PROGRAM AND
Al PHA PHI SIGMA PRESENTS:
Hate Crimes in America: Leaders and Phi-
losophy. Thoughts, words, and deeds � the
Bterature of hate, a blueprint for violence and
terror. Hate organizations such as the Ku
Mux Wan Nazis. Skinheads "Dragons of
God and others will be examined. Date:
Monday. April 1992 (6 pm to 8 p.m.) Place:
Wnkins Fme ArtsCenterAudironum Speaker
Mr. Joe Auren is a criminal justice instuctor at
North Carolina) usbce Academy Salemburg
North Carolina. He has been recognized as
the outstanding cnirunal tushc educator in
North Carolina and has tamed a- a distin
guished alumni levturerat Guilford O c
He has conducted major presentations on
hare enme at the Southern Cnrrunal lustice
Association and at -tate-vx tde conferences on
hate enme in North Carolina Mr Auren ha-
heona sworn officer and i krk'wn nationally
tor his research on hate enme For rrxxre intc-r
mation contact Mr M Campbell Schcvl ot
Scviai Work and Cnrrunal lusticv 4 5
ECU BIOLOGY CLUB
There will be a meeting on Wed Apnl B in
Room BNltW ot the Biology Building Topix
include election- vet schooltnp-ignupand
the senior ceremony The guest speaker Dr
Stellwag will -peak cn Career Oppvrtum
ties in BiotechmMogv and Molecular Biology
and the degrees needed to obtain these pc-i
hons
RETURNING ADULT
RASA will meet Apnl 7 at 5 M p � in Gen
eral Classrxx'm Building RM �l 3. We w ill be
planning programs and xvents tor Fall se-
mester 1992. All non traditional students (es-
pecially adults 23 and over) are encouraged
to attend If vou hav e had problems meeting
adult students with interests similar to your
own. R.ASA may be the group for vou Feel
free to stop by and check as out'
INTERVIEW
SKILLS WORKSHOP
Seniors and graduate students completing
their degree in May or the summer who have
not yet attended an interview skills work-
shop are invited to attend one on Wed April
8. Sponsored by Career Services, the work-
shops will be held in the Bloxton House at 3
pm.
IQB SFARCH WORKSHOP
Career Services announces a workshop de-
signed to help prospective graduates find
employment in aitight iob market Avarietyof
-trategies will be discussed and handout
wiilbe available The program w ill be held ir
Bloxron House on April 14 at 3 p m.
DiMENJARl
Mxvhng ed April I at 4 p rrt in Room Vki
Nomination tor elections will be held A pnn
capte t- coming tc demonstate inten iew - I I
Kb- and sample questions All Elemetarv
Educarixm Matcirs are welcome
1
t
WOMEN'S STUPIFS PROGRAM
A public forum on the future of women
reproductiv e rights and hx'alth w ill be held 11
Thursday April 9. at 7 30 p m in 241
Mendenhall Student Center on the campus cl
ECU Entitled OurbvesatRisk Rl 4vanJ
the Problem cf Birth Control Availabiiir,
tfie pnxgTam will be delivered bv LVKral
Steely executive directi-r cf Planrnvi Parent
hood Public Affair, of North Carolina LVvel
oped by a French hrmand cur-ntlv banrns
in the United States RL -4S a aaji ryir
im a-i � way et ending pregnancy in its earl;
Uge- its ue has also been proven benehcu
in the treatment of some types of cancer TMi
endometrioMs and depression Steely is be
mg sponsored K the ECU Women's Studie
lVogram For more information plaese cai
7S?-�aM
THE CFNTFB fOR
LNTERNATIONl
i
Clf.c. �
1 Univeif
tteof trxat
n Thurs

Acha Debela. Director of the Computing Cent
ter of the Arts North Carolina Central
sity. m a lecture on "A Pioneer in Spite
Odds GK. ftsUtfEthiopia- When
Apru 9.1991 Where Jenkins Fine Arts Audi
torium Time: 7 pm. Funded by a Unitei
States Department of Fxrucatjon Title VI Grant
For more inrbnnation, contact the Center fol
Intoi ciational Programs at 757-4828
Entertainment
Jeffery Gaim
By Lewis Coble
Entertainment Editor
Reach ingciutfrcim tht? self en-
tered stardom Lnflicting most of the
musical industry today, Jefferv
Gaines' music scathes the psyche
and challenges society's moral stan-
dards.
Gaines' self-titled debut album
is the result of one man's dream to
be more than what self-appointed
critics said he could be. Gaines has
brought himself to where he wants
to be and, miraculously, he has
maintained his vision of what is
important and beautiful.
The album opens with "Hero
in Me" � a mellow, slow-moving
song punctuated bv Games' vocals.
He dominates the song with the
music accenting him. Games is fea-
tured as a soloist, so his dominance
is not surprising. The song's lyrics
challenge the idea that people
should remain safe and secure
within themselves
Gaines' lyrics are what makes
this album work. He takes on the
fears and questions that lie deep
within evervone. In Whv "heques-
tions how and whv a person would
kill another human being. The song
is accompanied by slightly more
upbeat music with sharp drum se-
quences. It is one of Games' better
sung songs
Gaines rebels against the social
system that tnes to shape and mold
the vouth into little scKial clones in
"Headmasters oi Mine The song
seems to represent a j
ment against the peo
knowingly tried to stJ
Gaines back. Gaines' Off
a melody around his
What makes
going back to anothei
question posed in "V I
n illingbass rhythms ac
Gaines comes Kr06S
personal attachment
Yet, for all the1
strength in his lync
a fine line between o
sounding likea self-h
of the songs are great;
allv, Gaines is tt�
preachy.
The back-up bi
what it is) is good, bj
sounds pretty mul
throughout the alhi
sound with a touch
hint of folk.
Thedrummer:
obvious rhvthm, po
keep Gaines in time,
the main attraction d
Gaines ha- a rasl
which has an appeal j
and it does grow or
his vocal range is so
and on several Song
his range leaving ti
disappointed
All mail, the al
itv that is seldom
today � integrity
aged to hold true ti
music Few pert or
across like Games
an album that w;
Crucible fails t
bewitch audie
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Tonight, the EastCarolinariay-
house concludes its 1991-92 season
of mainstage dramas with Arthur
Miller's, 'The Crucible
A re-enactment oi the 1692
Witch Tnals oi Salem, Mass "The
Crucible" tries to relate the inten-
sity of emotion that prevailed at the
time. Three hundred years have
ontv served to diminish the effect of
the plav and leaves the audience
with virtually nothing to relate to
"Dancing in the woods' and
"poppets" mas have been taboo in
the Tth century, but no internal
connection was made with the au-
dience in order to arouse their inter-
est.
With anv play or production,
be it film or theatre, there needs to
be what is called "a willing suspen-
sion of disbelief This phrase means
that the audience or viewers, no
matter how outlandish or outdated
the situation is, relates to that situa-
tion in a visceral sense
In these performances of "The
Crucible there is no suspension.
The audience never fullv grasps the
sveritN of what is going on and
thus never connects with the play
Miller designed this play to be I
gut-wTencher, but it comes off more
as a comedv An atrocious script
combined with a marked lack of
character depth weighs this play
downbevond all
Though the
been timely when
it � now it is la jJ
guage i- loo stiltc-
the mouth oi
stones. Miller ad
points so often
ing leaving the ai
in their seats.
The intensitv
at a fever pitch ndl
ning, but then
the rest of the pla
climax conn
scene.but there
ene The St j
nowhere and lea
wondering whaj
more importantil
takes so long to
tnal scene that
back into the stu
Though the
greatly to this pre
so me of the acting
anv interest
Winbum Ci
rroctor, had lit
presence on stagl
who should intij
nate even sob
Craft didnt hav
cal size nor
needed. Craft in
conclusion of I
found it again d
SeeCr
Diso
FOSDIj
1890 SEi
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Combo Platters
w $9.95
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ter. .t the Arts North Carolina Central I m. erJ
�My ma lecture, n Pioneer in Spite of the
Odds C K DestaofEthiopa When Thurj
Apnl 9.1992 Where Jenkins F,ne Arts Audi
tonum Time 7 p m. Funded hv a L mtej
States Department of Education TitleVIGranfc
For more information, contact the Center foj
International Programs at 7374BS;
Entertainment
attic ?Eant (Earalttt an
April 7, 1992
Jeffery Gaines soothes psych

By Lewis Coble
Entertainment Editor
Reaching out from the self-cen-
tered stardom inflicting most of the
musical industry today, Jeffery
Gaines' music soothes the psyche
and challenges society's moral stan-
dards.
Gaines' self-titled debut album
is the result of one man's dream to
be more than what self-appointed
critics said he could be. Gaines has
brought himself to where he wants
to be and, miraculously, he has
maintained his vision of what is
important and beautiful.
The album opens with "Hero
in Me" � a mellow, slow-moving
song punctuated by Gaines' vocals.
He dominates the song with the
music accenting him. Gaines is fea-
tured as a soloist, so his dominance
is not surprising. The song's lyrics
challenge the idea that people
should remain safe and secure
within themselves.
Gaines' lyrics are what makes
this album work. He takes on the
fears and questions that lie deep
within everyone. In "Whyheques-
tions how and whv a person would
kill another human being. The song
is accompanied by slightly more
upbeat music with sharp drum se-
quences. It is one of Gaines' better
sung songs
Gaines rebels against the social
system that tries to shape and mold
the vouth into little social clones in
"Headmasters of Mine The song
seems to represent a personal state-
ment against the people who un-
knowingly tried to stifle and hold
Gaines back. Gaines' acoustic wraps
a melody around his lyrics.
What makes someone keep
going back to another person is the
question posed in "What is it Deep,
rollingbassrhythmsaccentthescing.
Gaines comes across as having a
personal attachment to the song.
Yet, for all the insight and
strength in his lyrics, Gaines walks
a fine line between originality and
soundinglikea self-help book. Most
of the songs are great, but occasion-
ally, Gaines is too dramatic and
preachy-
The back-up band (which is
what it is) is good, but their musk-
sounds pretty much the same
throughout the album; a mellow-
sound with a touch of soul and a
hint of folk.
The drummer sets a steady and
obvious rhvthm, possibly to help
keep Gaines in time. Still, Gaines is
the main attraction on the album.
Gaines has a raspy, deep voice
which has an appealing quality to it
and it does grow on a person. Yet,
his vocal range is somewhat limited
and on several songs, he over-steps
his range, leaving the listenera little
disappointed.
All in all, the album has a qual-
ity that is seldom found in music
today � integrity. Gaines has man-
aged to hold true to himself and his
music. Few performers today come
across likeGaines. Hehas pnxluced
an album that will appeal to an
Photo courtasey of Chrysalis Record
Jeffery Gaines enters into a self-centered, look-at-me music industry
with his debut album in hopes of touching people in a positive way.
audience that is interested in more Yet, holding to Gaines' vision
than mindless entertainment. For and goals, it probably does not
that reason, it is doubtful that the matter � just so long as the music-
album will make it to the top of the touches each listener in a positive
charts. wav.
Crucible fails to
bewitch audience
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Tonight, the East Carolina Play-
house concludes its 1991-92 season
of mainstage dramas with Arthur
Miller's, "The Crucible
A re-enactment of the 1692
Witch Trials of Salem, Mass "The
Crucible" tries to relate the inten-
sity of emotion that prevailed at the
time. Three hundred years have
only served todiminish theeffectof
the play and leaves the audience
with virtually nothing to relate to.
"Dancing in the woods" and
"poppets" may have been taboo in
the 17th century, but no internal
connection was made with the au-
dience in order to arouse their inter-
est.
With any play or production,
be it film or theatre, there needs to
be what is called "a willing suspen-
sionofdisbelief'Thisphrase means
that the audience or viewers, no
matter how outlandish or outdated
the situation is, relates to that situa-
tion in a visceral sense.
In these performances of "The
Crucible there is no suspension.
Theaudience never fully grasps the
severity of what is going on and
thus never connects with the play.
Miller designed this play to be a
gut-wrencher, b ut it comes off more
as a comedy. An atrocious script,
combined with a marked lack of
character depth, weighs this play
DISCOVER
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
down bevond all redemption
Though the script mav have
been timelv when Miller first w rote
it � now it is laughable The lan-
guage is tixi stilted and falls from
the mouths of the character like
stones. Miller also reiterates his
points so often that it becomes bor-
ing, leaving the audience yawning
in their seats.
The intensity of the play starts
at a fever pitch right from the begin-
ning, but then stagnates there for
the rest of the play. The only visible
climax comes in the volatile trial
scene, but there is no bui Idup to this
scene. The scene explodes out of
nowhere and leaves the audience
wondering what happened, and
more importantly, why. The play
takes so long to conclude after the
trial scene that the audience falls
back into the stupor of the first act.
Though the script contributed
greatly to this production's demise,
some of the acting present also killed
any interest.
Winbum Craft, playing John
Proctor, had little to no physical
presence on stage. Proctor is a man
who should intimidate and domi-
nate every scene that he is in, but
Craft didn't have necessary physi-
cal size nor mental dominance
needed. Craft lost his voice in the
conclusion of the first act and never
found it again. Craft's theatrics had
See Crucible, page 8
Whirligig makers
are coming
���
By Dana Danielson
Assistant Entertainment Editor
What could bring quilters,
woodcarvers, whirligig makers,
cooksand musicians together in
Greenville?
The occasion is" ACommu-
nitvCelebratiimof Folk Arts and
Folk Life in and around Pitt
County which will be held in
conjunction with the 79th an-
nual meetingof the North Caro-
lina Folklore Stviety.
"Even eastern North Caro-
linians usually think folk tradi-
tions exist onlv in the moun-
tains said Dr. Karen Baldwin,
director of the ECU Folklore
Archive and president of the
NorthCarolina Folklore StKiety.
"But this celebration will show
that the eastern region is equally
richinfolkartistsand traditions
Lester Gay and Leroy
"Shorty" Ellis will display their
decorative windmills and whirli-
gigs-
Ellis, a carpenter and
woodcrafter, will display min-
iature tobacco handling equip-
ment.
The Just Over Youth quilt-
ing group will demonstrate
pieced topquiltingattheirframe.
Inaddition,some JOY mem-
bers will demonstrate tobacco
twine crochet and display other
domestic handiwork items that
they have hand crafted.
Traditional cook Doris
Vines will prepareherappleand
potato "jacks plus a miniature
circus carved by baker and artist
Frank Diener will be displayed.
The Sharp Point Volunteer
Fire Department will raise funds
from their traditional Brunswick
stew and fried herring. Plates
will be sold from noon to 2 p.m.
at $4 each.
Tobacco auctioneer W.C.
Clark lr. will demonstrate the
musical chants and calls used in
the region's tobacco marketing
system.
The music begins at 11 a.m.
with a vanety of performers
The line-up includes George
Hicks, a blues singer and har-
monica player, in duet with gui-
tarist Scott Ainslie.
In addition, fiddler Otho
Willard and guitarist Herber
Coltrain will play square dance
music and old-time string band
tunes.
According to Baldwin,
Willard learned some of his fid-
dling techniques from Ace
Hamilton,awell-known fiddler.
Two gospel groups, Shadie
Clarkand Friends and The Vines
Sisters and Family, willalso per-
form.
In addition, Lemon
"Buster" Little will sing gospel
See Folkart.page 8
ECONOMY MINI
STORAGE
USE YOUR
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
SHARE WITH A ROOMMATE
SPECIAL RATES MAY 1-AUG 31
I
300 FARMER ST
GREENVILLE
757-0373

Current and
Corning
April 7
Concert: The first concert in "Guitarfest a
series of four classical guitar concerts offered
through April, will feature guest artist Robert
Nathanson in: the Mateo Albeniz Sonata in D
major, Ernesto Cardero's "Descarga a
Michael Lorimer arrangement of the J.S. Bach
Prelude, Fugue and Allegro, BMV 998, pieces
by 17th century composers Francisco Corbetta
and Francisco Guerau, and two modern works:
"Variations on a Turkish Theme" by Carlo
Domeniconi and "Las Campanas" by Ernesto
Garcia de Leon. Nathanson is an assistant
professor of music at UNC-Wilmington and an
active performer throughout the nation. Time:
8:15 p.m. Place: Fletcher Music Center Recital Hall.
Admission is free and open to the public.
Lecture: Sound sculpter Christopher Janney
will present his lecture "Sound as Visual Me-
dium In addition, Janney will consult with
library, art and music faculty, staff and the
architect to solicit input on is public art com-
mission, and to dicuss the public art process.
Janney is an internationally recognized artist
who was chosen by the NC Art Works for State
Buildings program to create an interactive
sculptural for the Joyner Library addition.
Time: 7 p.m. Place: Jenkins Auditorium. Admission is
free and open to the public.
April 9
Lecture: Acha Dabela, Director of the Com-
puting Center for the Arts at NCCU, will
present his lecture, "A Pioneer in Spite of the
Odds: G.K. Desta of Ethiopia Dabela will
examine the role of renowned Ethiopian
painter and poet Gebre Kristos Desta as a
pioneering "contemporary" artist who served
as a cultural ambasador, an educator and an
international celebrity. At the same time,
Desta simultaneously experienced a struggle
and challenge in the exploration and re-
affirmation of the "self against changes in
global and African values of socio-political and
other cultural norms. Time: 7 p.m. Place: Jenkins
Auditorium. Admission is free and open to the public.
April 9-12
Jazz Festival: A number of leading jazz performers
will perform and teach at ECU Jazz Festival '92. The
festival will open April 9 at 8 p.m. in Fletcher Music
Center Recital Hall with "Electronics and Music a
workshop and demonstration of new guitar signal
processing products led by Michael Dowdle as represen-
tative of DOD & DigiTech. On April 9, ECU students
will participate in a combos class with guest artists from
11-lp.m. At 2 p.m. clinics will be conducted by
keyboardist Kevin Toney of Los Angeles, percussionists
Land Richard and Arthur Lipner of New York City, and
hornist Davey Yarborough of Washington, D.C. The
ECU Jazz Ensemble will have open rehersal with guest
artists at 3:30 p.m. in Room 101 of the music center. At
10 p.m. ECU faculty memebrs Paul Tardif (piano) and
Carroll Dashiell, Jr. (bass) and several ECU student
performers will appear in an open jam session at The
Fizz, downtown Greenville. On April 11, Jazz Ensemble
Day will be held on the ECU mall from noon to 8 p.m.
AT 6 p.m. the jazz Ensemble from UNC Chapel Hill and
ECU's own Jazz Ensemble will perform. The jazz festi-
val will emd with a concert April 12 at 8 p.m. in the
Wright Auditorium. Featured will be the ECU Jazz
Ensemble, conducted by Dashiell and various visiting
performers as soloists. Jazz Festival concerts are open
to the public. More info: contact Carroll Dashiell at the
ECU School of Music at 757-6851.
I
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8 &tys tast (Haroltntan
Crucible
April 7, 1992
Continued from page 7
Folkart
Continued from page 7
no depth or realit) behind them,
rarely nuking himself believable.
1 nn oungstrom, who played
Reverend Partis, worked well in
conjunction v ith IVputv-Governor
Danforth played by Matt
McCuUoch. Youngstrom convinc-
ingh portrayed a whirr), setf-effac-
ing weasel who earnestly believes
heisconstantl) persecuted. His sub-
sen ience to Danforth as his better
was consistent and remained true
throughout the entire pla
McCulkxhalsogaveanequall)
c .i incmgportraitofamanwhoso
tirml believes in his convictions
that he overlooks even the most
ob iouscontraiy evidence Perhaps
a little too stiff And theatrical in his
gestures Mc( ulkxh nevertheless
portrayed bis character as well as
possible within such a dreadful
script
KelK deHaasand Krista( onti
playing Abigail Williams and EHza-
beth Proctor respectivelv, round out
the list of major characters. DeHaas
gives an adequate portrayal of the
woman scorned by the man she
lines. Her acting is on the same
level of her work in "Damn Yan-
kees" and "Equus Conti succeeds
in a quiet manner as the woman
whose love and trust never wavers
for her husband Though most of
the characters lacked sufficient
depth, Conti's character was firmly
entrenched in the real world
The lack of any reality and be-
lievabilitv bv me characters turned
this drama into a farce. The audi-
ence laughed more to relieve bore-
dom than tension and some even
left early to escape the dreadful
monotony.
Running more than three
hours, "The Crucible" ended the
imj.g2 eason on a dismal note.
and plav his rhythm instrument
devised from a pair of ordinary
tables poons.
A special bvent broadcast by
theGreenville Brightleaf Amateur
Radio Club will be an added fea-
ture this year, though it may not be
classified as "folk arts according
to Baldwin.
Besides the "community cel-
ebration the day's events feature
N.C. Folklore Society sessions.
"Wishful, Willful. Wily
Women a talk and song perfor-
mance will be presented byDr.Pi lly
Stewart. Stewart is a folklorist at
Salisbury, Maryland State Univer-
sity.
(he celebration will be held
April 11 at K IJ's Willis Building.
Exhibitionsareopentothepub-
lu and begin at 10 am
Greenville's New Natural Foods Source
offering
Natural and Organic Groceries
Wholesome Snacks ft Treats
NaturalCruelty Free
HealthBeauty Aids and Cosmetics
Body Building Supplements
by Iwinl.an
W
ikM
BLUE PLANETLifeFoods) 40. ANS
758 0850
Hours 9-6 M Sat
MALES AND FEMALES
rO PARTICIPATE IN THE
91H ANNUAL GEEAT PIRATE PURPLE
GOLD PIGSKIN PIG-OUT PAiTl
�MISS HAWAII AN TROPIC
SINTAN-BIKINI CONTEST
WENS' BEST LEGS COM EM
APRIL 11. IW2
FICKLE STADIUM
WIN CASH: ist place $100 2nd place-jw
TO 1 VI Hi USRECFJVt VH RK 1SH KM O It s U.I
HI vnilKrn KAWCrmtG OFFICE AT 757JSH
�rw. MlkUft (uMpmniis n' i iMin i I FMMW
IM I tokn MO l��l 1H. vin. ii BiKMVW
recmui
AG CONSULTING FIRM FIELD MONITOR
Positions available late May to mid-September.
Individual must be trustworthy, reliable,
conscientious, in good physical shape, and love
the outdoors. Hourly wage plus mileage for own
vehicle. Excellent opportunity for college students
and teachers out for the summer. Send resume to
MCSI P.O. Box 179 Gnfton, NC 28530 or Fax
(919)524-3215.
NORTH fdreAIL BEACHf
Presents
� CLARENCE CARTER � THE BREEZE BAND
� THE BAND OF OZ � NORTH TOWER
� DOUG CLARK & THE HOT NUTS
THE MAD HATTER. , n M
EASTER WEEKEND-APRIL 18. 1992
North Topsail Beach Airport (Gate opens 11:00 AM)
TICKETS ON SALE AT
EAST COAST MUSIC WRQR 94.3
'109 Charles Blvd RADIO
Phone 758-4251 Phone 830-0944
S22 50 DAY OF SHOW. $17 50 IN ADVANCE
FOR TICKET & ACCOMMODATION INFO 919-328-4745. 1 800-3S9 474S
Texasgulf
ial

present
I h GREAT PIRATE
PURPLEGOLD PIGS
PIG OUT PARTY
Friday, April 10 -
Sunday, April 12, 1992
FICKLEN STADIUM, GREENVILLE, N.C.
featuring
PURPLEGOLD
FOOTBALL GAME
Saturday, April 11 � 2:30 p.m.
with the 9th Ranked,
Peach Bowl Champion
ECU Pirates
with
HIGHWAY 101
and
THE SPINNERS
In Concert Immediately
Following the Game
ECU STUDENTS $5.00
APRIL 2, 3. 4, 6, and 7 at 8:15 pjn.
APRIL 5 at 2:15 psn.
I ivc I hum For Ijess Than A Mmheii So Brinj; Dale!
Ml STUDENTS: W.50
Call: 757-6829
Each ECU Student Can Purchase Two Tickets With A Valid ECU ID.
Other Tickets Can Be Purchased At Regular Ticket Prices (Advance $10 00 � DaV of Event $12 00)
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT MINGES COLISEUM
OR CALL 757-4500 or 1-800DIAL ECU (In N.C.)
TRACKS
"hese selections are Fresh Tracks' Just ouy it and trv it and if you don't like what
you hear, return it with receipt for another selection of equal value!
Fresh Trades prices scod April 2 - Apni 29,1992.
fi&SBflGffiTRft
Sports
Duke crushes Michigai
Laettner, H
MINN! �: US(AP f
Keyed1 p.Kasinl �
in King of the ' urt
Mike Ki
l oadi K �
stroked ti ��
uTKh.ir.i. ti I '
Monda) nighl
second � -� � �
ball title
Michigan
'Coad
lenge us al half! n
Grant Hill said
mental mistaki
It va the si time in ti
il
" � � adjustma I
.�� �
- -

� -
Recreational
students cli
Bv Darlene Weitman
IK- V
ECL Recreal
than just a v aerol
Recreational 5ei featun
Outrii i t Center or
monk known "he F
shops and equipment rental foi
anv outdoor a I
The K ha In
events for the remaindei I tl �
these e ents are planni i
Earth Da 92 n -X; � 2 then
day hike! �: � � itNat
This trip will d ' �
students he
Th- re . �' � � �
shell hunt g, seeing I
full) even : king
phin- The cost for this trip is SI
dent- and $2 for 1
trip meeting will b(
P.M in BD 101
rhes ndtripi nned ii
Earth Day is t ir Rivei
This trip begii - il
end at Toint Termina
fun as well a- pr
to the community. Participants should
at 2:30 in Christenbury Gym �
Ladies ready to 'shake thu
Bv Ricky Chann
ilaH Vriter
rhe Lady Piratetrackteam trav-
eled tougustinesCollegi ver
the weekend to compete ii
up meet before nv
letK Association's Conference
Championships The Lad Pirates
captured three first-place finishes
in the meet
Gretchen Harle led th. ti
ECL finishers as she placed first in
the 800-meter run in a season-best
bme of - 18.4
"Overall wehadapretfc good
meet Head coach Ovaries justice
said It s good I Harie I finall) g I
a victory because she has beer
struggling tor the last few weeks
DanitaRoseboroalsohadasea-
n-KM tirTV in the 1 tV-meter dash
Her time of 11 8 seconds qualified
her as one of the top performers in
the conference but she finished S�
ond in the race Roseboro also made
the finals in the 200-meters out she
withdrew becauseof leg,ramps.
Things are looking n
d
Sus. - j
-
� . - � - �
thn .
-s �
she

rur
for I
. - .
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vampionships
Ln �
said he's
team honors
rr greal
I
dividua �
get he said
We don't hJ
season to contenj
but we're lookin
up
How Duke, Michigan f,
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Continued from page 7
he celebration will he held
ttECl - Willis Building
msareopentothepub
i, and becin at 10 a m
-5 TOYOTA
(RATE
0 PIGSKIN
PARTY
featuring
URPLEGOLD
OTBALL GAME
relay, April 11 � 2:30 p.m.
i ith the 9th Ranked,
poch Bowl Champion
ECU Pirates
with
IGHWAY 101
and
HE SPINNERS
i Concert Immediately
Following the Game
.00
Kth Valid ECU ID
mi. J HI 00 � Da? �' 2 nn'
COLISEUM
ECU (In NX.)
W
.9911 �"
99l5l0"
Sports
Witt iEafit (Earolmtan
April 7,1992
51
I )i ike crushes Michigan 7 -
Laettner, Hurley spark Devils to win
WINNEAPOUSAP� Kasin
keyed I p Kasai Killer Instinct Kas
n Kinged the Court
Mike Krzvzewski a k.a.
Coach K made the adjustments,
tri kil the ego- ,md showed some
characteristic sideline emotion
Monday night in guiding Duke to its
econd consecutive NCAA basket-
all title with a 71-51 victory over
Michigan
c each, all he did was chal-
.� us at half time to plav better
tut Hill said "We were making
mental mistakes
It u.s the second time in this
Final Four that Duke made major
halfti me adjustments. The first time,
theRlueDevilsdefeated Indiana and
Krzyzewski's mentor, Boh Knight.
The second time, Krzvzewski was
rewarded with another title.
Krzvzewski, the ninth coach to
win more than one championship,
has taken Duke to the Final Four six
times in seven vears, including the
last five.
Duke trailed 31-30 at halftime
Christian Laettner missed six of eight
shots and committed seven turn-
overs, and Michigan shot 4S percent
whilehreakingthe Blue Devils' press.
Krzvzewski challenged Laettner
to be the best he could be and got
Duke to turn up the heat on defense.
Of Laettner, his star, his senior,
his leader, his coach on the floor, his
national Haver of the Year,
Krzvzewski said: "1 don't know if
it's just the emotion of going through
this thing or not. Seven tu -lovers
He was throwing up bricks.
"And we were onlv one down
We knew if we could rum up the
emotion, we could get going. Our
defense, in the second half was the
story"
As his star turned up the attack
(finishing with 14 points) and as his
team turned up the pressure,
Krzvzewski tumed up hisownemo-
tion.
Duke led onlv 48-fi with 7 min-
utes left hut finished the game with
a 23-6 surge. The Blue Devils held
Michigan to 2 percent shooting in
the second half and forced 10 turn-
overs after intermission.
"In the second half, we had no
semblance of order on offense
Wolverines coach Steve Fisher said.
"And I think it was as much their
defense as am thing
Duke built its lead and
Krzvzewski became mi rreand more
animated. At first, he'd pump a fist
or Like little leaps along the side-
lines.
Finallv, when Hill stole a pas
from lames Yoskuil and fed Anto-
nio Lang for a fast-break dunk that
put Duke ahead h2-4M with 1:54 to
go, Krzvzewski jumped out of his
seat and pumped both fists into the
air.
His team kid responded to his
challenges and put Michigan away
Yet another tnumph for Coach
K the King of the Final Four.
MICHIGAN (25-9)
Webbt-r 6-12 2-5 14, Jackson 0-1 0-0 0,
Howard4-9 1-39, Kse 5-12 1-2 11.
King 3-10 0-0 7, Kiley 2-h 0-0 4, Voskuil
122 2 4. I'ehnka 1 2 0-0 2, Hunter0-1
0-0 0, Talley 0-1 00 0, boussard 0-1 0-0
11 Seta 0-1 0 0 0, Armer 0-0 0-0 0 Totals
22-56 6-12 SI
DLKEG4-2)
Lang 2-3 1-2 5, C Hill h-U 2 2 IS.
Laettner 6-13 5-619, HurU-v 3 12 2 2
T Hill 5-10 5-8 16, Parks 1-3 2 2 4. Davis
0-2 0-0 0, Ast 0.(1 O-iI it, ("lark 04 0-0 0,
Blakoni-v 0-0 O-O 0, Hurt 0-0 0-0 0 Totals
25-57 17-22 71
Halrtime�Michigan JI. Duke 30
3-Pomt goals�Michigan 1-11 (King 1-2,
Howard 0-1 VoakudO-1 TaleyO-l,
Boussard 0-1, Webber 0-2, Rose 0-3),
Duk 4-9 (Laettner 2-4 T Hill 1-2,
Hurley 1-3) Fouled out�None
Rebounds�-Mulligan 5 (Webber 11),
Duke 57 iC Hill 10) Assists�Michigan
13 (Rose 4 Duke 12 (Hurlev 7) Total
fouls�Michigan 17, Duke 13 A�
50 379
Services
students climbing walls
Bucs earn bridesmaids' honors
By Darlene VVeitman
IRS Witer
ECl Kecreatnm.il Services offers more
than iust a v eight room and aerobics classes.
reational Sen ices features a Recreational
i iutdoor Center, or Fhe ROC as it is com-
monly known. The ROC offers trips, work-
shops and equipment rental for ust about
,m outdoor activity
I he ROC has planned many exciting
its for the remainder oi the vear. Two of
� events are planned in celebration of
I arth Dav '92. On April 2f. there will be a
la hike to Cape Lookout National Seashore.
s trip will double as a service project by
students helping with a beach cleanup.
I here will also be an opportunity for
shell
full)
p h i n


hunting seeing the sights and hope-
even spotting a few whales and dol-
Ihe cost for this trip is $15 tor stu-
and $20 for facult) and staff. The pre-
neeting will be held on April 22 at 5
in BD 101.
"he second trip planned in observance of
irth Da is the Iar River Canoe Clean up.
- trip begins at Town Commons and will
end at Point lerminal The dav will combine
tun os well as provide a worthwhile service
community Participants should meet
at: 10 in C hristenbur Gymon the day of the
trip, April 24. There is no cost for this trip
but donations are requested for the Barhe
cue lunch.
The Recreational Outdoor Center hopes
that these events will increase campus
awareness and remind the entire campus
community of the importance oi events like
these. The ROC and Recreational Services
hopes that everyone will not onlv get in-
volved with these activities, but also with
many other environmental health activities
as well.
Remember, every small part helps.
The ROC aLo holds manv workshops
throughout the year. On April 4, 1992, Fhe
ROC will hold its Climbing and Rapelling II
workshop This workshop will allow stu-
dents to apply previously learned skills and
improve their climbing techniques Since
this will he a workshop of applying skills,
students need to have attended the C limb-
ing and Rapelhng I Workshop or have a
basic knowledge of climbing techniques
Enrollment for this workshop closes on
April 8. Interested persons are encouraged
to sign up as soon as possible The cost is $s
for students and $10 for faculty, staff and
their guests Anyone interested in this work
shop or other climbing workshops can call
See Roc Services, page 10
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sports Writer
Photo by Dail R�d � ECU Photo Lab
I
ECU Lady Pirates finished second in the Furman University Spring
Fling, falling to UNC in the final game The team s record is 28 - 10
The Lady Tirates placed sec-
ond in the annual Furman Univer-
sitv Spring Fling, falling 5-0 in the
championship game to LNC-
Chapel Hill. In addition to being
crowned runner-ups, Cheryl
Hobson, Chanel Hooker, Jennv
Larsons and Laura Crowder were
named to the All-Tournament
Team.
On Fndav, the Lady Tirates
started the tournament with a 9-0
victon.nver Campbell University.
Parsons pitched the five-hit shut-
out as the defensive allowed ust
three Camel baserunners during
the contest. Hooker turned in a
perfect batting performance in go-
ing 2-tor-2 with two RBI. Parsons
helped her pitching cause bv drill-
ing two hits in three plate appear-
ances. Crowder almost stole the
show with her three stolen bases
while batting 2-for-4.
In the second game of the af-
ternoon, the Lady Tirates dropped
a 10-3 decision to the host Taladins
of Furman Parsons started the
pitching duties for the Tirates and
was bombarded tor six runs in 1
See Softball page 10
Ladies ready to 'shake things up'
By Ricky Chann
Staff Writer
Ihe Lady Pirate track team trav-
el to -st Augustines College over
� e weekend to compete in a tune-
i meet before the C olonial Ath-
� , Association's Conference
narnpkmships. rhe Lady Pirates
aptured three first-place finishes
in the meet
C retc hen I larlev led the tno of
L finishers as she placed first in
Ihe si v-meter run in a season-best
time of 2:18.4.
i erall. w e had a pretty gcxxl
meet Head coach Charles lustice
said. "It's goodHaftey) finally got
a victory, because she has been
struggling for the last few weeks
Damta Roseboroalso had a sea-
son K-st time in the 100-meterdash.
1 ler time of 1LH seconds qualified
her as one of the top performers in
tl tea inference, but she finished sec-
ond in the race Roseboroalso made
Ihe finals in the 200-meters, but she
withdrew because of leg cramps
"Things are It Hiking real prom
ising for (Roseboro) as we head into
the conference meet lustice said
SusanSchram, leading the Ladv
Pirates in field events, captured
another first in the shot put with a
throw of 43 feet, 3.5 inches. Shoul-
der problems have hampered
S hram for the past few weeks, but
she is expected to be at 100 percent
for the CAA Championship
The final first-place victory for
the team came in the 3.1XX)-meter
run as lessica Montgomery ran a
11.21 for the winning time In the
154XVmeters, Stacy Gren ran a 4.55
for a fourth-place finish
AsthefceamheadsintotheCAA
Championships at James Madison
University this weekend, lustice
said he's not looking to win the
team honors, but he expects to have
some great individual finishers.
"We're looking for as many in-
dividual performances as we can
get he said.
"We don't have the depth this
season to contend for the top spot,
but we're looking to shake things
up
Pirates navigate boats to victory on Lake Michie
. . �� i � �.l ry�1! I �. . 1 a��-� TW � L- ii 3
By Chris McCoffrey
Staff Writer
Unseasonably cold weather
including rain and sleet and
fast racing characterized
Saturday's regatta held bv Duke
University
Teams from ECU, Duke,
UNC-Chapel Hill. N.C. State.
UNC-Wilmmgton and William
and Mary gathered to race on
Lake Michie, near Durham.
The ECU men's novice four
clinched a first-place victory in
their event.
The Tirate men's novice
blasted off the the starting line to
grab a boat-length lead 5tH-meters
into the 1800-meter race Tom
Eure, Mat Byrne, Chris
McCaffrey.Damn Callisandcox-
swam Brian Dishman employed
Head coach Ibm ailan's method
oi starts with great success.
ECU slowly built a lead over
boats from Duke, I NC-W and
NCSU to advance to the finals.
In the second heat, another
men's novice boat competed
against Duke, UNC-CHand Wil-
liam and Mary. The Buc's Mike
McCullev, Chris Partin, Shawn
O'Brian, jerry Farantatos and cox-
swain Kary Dengler raced hard
but started to slip at the halfway
mark and finished fourth
In the finals of theevent,ECL
lined up at the start against Blue
Devils, Tarheels and Wolfpack.
The Tirates shot off the line with
UNC-CH right on their heels. The
entire race was dose, with ECU
edging out the Tarheels by three-
quarters of a length to grab the
first-place victory.
The ECU women's varsity
four endured the same weather
conditions during their races
ECU, two boats from Duke and
one boat from William and Man
lined up at the start. Angie Brown,
Yvonne Leipoldt. Lisa Hunt, Amy
Brown and coxswain Kary
Dengler held a firm grip on third
until the 1000-meter mark. Slowly,
See Crew page 10
�I W
How Duke, Michigan fared
cm�� .s
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Do You Need
CASH?
We Are Buying
Used Menfs Clothing
$ WE PAY CASH $
SHIRTS SWEATERS T
PANTS SWEATS
JEANS SHOES
CASUAL & DRESS
V
-&
V
Wednesday
id
1

16
4
0
0
0
0
0
We Also Buy & Sell Used Furniture
Dorm Refrigerators & Microwaves
M
d
1
4
Park in the citx parking lot behind Globe Hardware
and use our new rear entrance!
THE ESTATE SHOP
416 Evans St.
(Across from Cubbies)
752-3866
10:00 -5:00Mon- Sat
'
re-�
Progressive
Dance Night
10 Draft
$1.15 Tall Boys
$2.50 Pitchers
$ 1.00 Kamikazes
�Ladies Free til 10:30�






( nntlnuad ffom p�U� f
! , lh fhf , . lt.i.�li.� will I HfW
i ,1V lor I i Ml 'ni II i' I W.ll BulkHng
I state I nivei I �lMl.iiiMt�iit�H.t.i.
I, ,u.l Iwyu. ii It' �'
i lit
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in females
') TOYOTA
IRATE
D PIGSKIN
PARTY
featuring
URPLEGOLD
OTBALL GAME
rday, April 11 � 21Q m.
iu � tli� f' Ranked
'fir h Bowl Champion
ECU Ptfotea
li.ifr-i
IGHWAY 101
HE SPINNERS
fr, r j r'rs the fjfjrrtP
.00
, ;

& CtUttCM
ICC In IX
fTA
Sports
5hc �a0t (Earoltntan
4pflL 7,7992
Me crushes Michigan 71�51
Laettner, Hurley spark Devils to win
M INNI APOUS (AP) - K as m
K�yfdlip Kasm Killerlastinct.Kas
r King of the Court.
Mike Krzyzewski � a k a
hK made the adjustments,
�td the egos and showed some
im tpnstK sideline emotion
Mi Uv night in guiding Duke tn its
Mtcrjfld consecutive NCAA basket
�ll title with a 71-51 victory over
Ik h�an
ih, all he did was chai-
ns -it halftime to play better
.rnt Mill said "We were making
. � Ml mistakes "
It was the second time in this
Final Four that Duke made major
halftime adjustments The first time,
the Blue Devi Is defeated Indiana and
Krzyzewski's mentor, Bob Knight.
The second time, Krzyzewski was
rewarded with another title
Krzyzewski, the ninth coach to
win more than fine championship,
has taken Duke to the Final Four six
times in seven years, including the
last five.
Duke trailed 31 -10 at halftime
Christian 1 -aettner missed six of eight
shots and committed seven turn-
overs, and Michigan shot 48 percent
whi le breaking the Blue Devils' prf-ss
Krryzewski challenged 4iettner
to be the best he could be and got
Duke to turn up the heat on defense
Of Laettner, his star, his senior,
his leader, his coach on the floor, his
national Player of the Year,
Krzyzewski said: "I don't know if
it's just the emotion of going through
this thing or not. Seven turnovers
He was throwing up bricks
"And we were only one down.
Wp knew if we could rum up the
emotion, we could get going. Our
defense, in the second half was the
story"
As his star turned up the attack
(finishing with 19 points) and as his
team turned up the pressure,
Krzyzewskj turned up hisownemo-
tion.
Duke led only 48-45 with 7 min-
utes left but finished the game with
a 23-6 surge. The Blue Devils held
Michigan to 29 percent shrxting in
the second half and forced 10 turn-
overs aftpr intermission.
"In the second half, we had no
semblancp of order on offense
Wolverines coach Steve Fisher -wild.
"And I think it was as much their
defense as anything
Duke built its lead and
Krzyzewskj became more and more
animated. At first, he'd pump a fist
or take little leaps along the side-
lines.
Finally, when Hill stole a pass
from James Voskuil and fed Anto-
nio Lang for a fast-break dunk that
put Duke ahead 6249 with 154 to
go, Krzyzewski jumped out of his
seat and pumped both fists into the
air
His team had responded to his
challenges and put Michigan away.
Yet another tnumph for Coach
K the King of the Final Four
MICHIGAN (25-9)
Webber 6-12 2-5 14, Jackson 0-1 0-0 0,
Howard 4-9 1-3 9, Rose 5-12 1-2 11,
King M0 OO 1. Riley 2-4 CM) 4, Voskuil
1-2 2-2 4, Pelinka 1-2 0-0 2, Hunter 0-1
OO 0, Talley 0-1 CM) 0, Boussard 0-1 0-0
0, Seter 0-1 M 0, Armer O0 0-0 0. Totals
22-58 6-12 51
DUKE (34-2)
Ung 34 1-2 5. C Hill 3-14 2-2 18,
Laettner U 5-6 19, Hurley 3-12 2-2 9,
T HiD 5-10 5-8 16, Parks 1-3 2-2 4. Davis
0-2 0-0 0, Ast 0-0 0-0 0. Clark OO 0-0 0,
Blakeney 0-0 0-0 0. Burt CM) 0-0 0 Totals
25-5717-22 71
Halftime�Michigan 31, Duke 30
3-Pomt goals�Michigan 1-11 (King 1-2.
Howard 0-1. Voskuil 0-1, Talley 0-1,
Boussard Ol. Webber 0-2. Rose 0-3),
Duke 4-9 (Laettner 2-4. T Hill 1-2,
Hurley 1-3) Fouled out�None.
Rebounds�Michigan 35 fWebber 11),
Duke 37 (C Hill M) Assists�Michigan
13 (Rose 4). Duke 12 (Hurley 7). Total
fouls�Michigan 17. Duke 13. A�
50,379
Recreational Services has
students climbing walls
Bucs earn bridesmaids' honors
By Dariene Weitman
IRS W,f�r
F( U Recreational Services offers more
m )u �l a weight room and aerobics classes
p- rc�tton�l Service features a Recreational
lutdoofenter, or The ROC as it is com-
y known The ROC offers trips, work-
ihoDI and equipment rental for ust about
outdoor activity
riu� ROC has planned many exciting
. i nt. for the rf-mainder of the year Two of
. g rvefttl are planned in celebration Of
I firth Day 'W On April 7b, there will be a
t(. hike to ap�- lookout National Seashore
his trip will dout!� as a sprvice project by
tudentt helping with a beach cleanup
there will also n�- an opportunity for
hell hunting, seeing the eights and hope
full) rvtfl spotting a few whales and dol-
phins The cost for this trip is $1 for stu-
dent I 120 f"r t�4 ultv and staff The pre
trip meeting will be Held n April 22 at 5
I'M in HI) llll
I he �'�' rl trip planned In ohservanceof
E�rth D�y lt the Tar RiverMMlean up
PhlS trip begins at Townommons and will
i�nd at Point Terminal fhedav will combine
fun is well as provide a worthwhile service
0 lh� i nmmnnitv Partu ipants should meet
it2 M)m( hnstenburyOymonthedayof the
trip, April 24. There is no cost for this trip
but donations are requested for the Barbe-
cue lunch
The Recreational Outdoor Center hopes
that these events will increase campus
awareness and remind the entire campus
community of the importance of events like
these The ROC and Recreational Services
hopes that everyone will not only get in-
volved with these activities, but also with
many other environmental health activities
as well
Remember, every small part helps
The ROC also holds many workshops
throughout the year On April 9, 1W2, The
ROC will hold its Climbing and Rapelling II
workshop This workshop will allow stu-
dents to apply previously learned skills and
improve their climbing techniques Since
this will be a workshop of applying skills,
students need to have attended the Climb-
ing and Rapelling I Workshop or have a
basic knowledge of climbing techniques
Enrollment for this workshop closes on
April H Interested persons are encouraged
to sign up as soon as possible. The cost is $H
for students and $10 for faculty, staff and
their guests Anyone interested in this work
shop or other climbing workshops can call
See Rec Services, page 10
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sports Writer
Photo by 0�M R�d - ECU Photo Lab
ECU Lady Pirates finished second in the Furman University Spring
Fling, falling to UNC in the final game The teams record is 28-10.
The Lady Pirates placed sec-
ond in the annual Furman Univer-
sity Spring Fling, falling 5-0 in the
championship game to UNC-
Chapel Hill In addibon to being
crowned runner-ups, Cheryl
Hobson, Chanel Hooker, jenny
Parsons and Laura Crowder were
named to the All-Tournament
Team.
On Friday, the Lady Pirates
started the tournament with a 9-0
victory over Campbell University.
Parsons pitched the five-hit shut-
out as the defensive allowed just
three Camel baserunners during
the contest. Hooker turned in a
perfect batting performance in go-
ing 2-for-2 with two RBI. Parsons
helped her pitching cause by drill-
ing two hits in three plate appear-
ances. Crowder almost stole the
show with her three stolen bases
while batting 2-for-4.
In the second game of the af-
ternoon, the Lady Pirates dropped
a 10-3 decision to the host Paladins
of Furman. Parsons started the
pitching duties for the Pirates and
was bombarded for six runs in 1
See Softball page 10
Ladies ready to 'shake things up'
By Ricky Chann
Slaff Wnlr
Pirates navigate boats to victory on Lake Michie
UleUulv Pirate tra k team trav
tiedk)S( AugustirW ollegeover
to weekend to compete to �turn-
up meet before the olonial Ath
letu Assoc lalion'sonference
' hampionsbips Ihe Lady Piratic
teptUftd three first pU I finishes
In llw nwet
( ,ret( hen Harlev led the trio of
II' finishers as she placed first in
the DOOlllHW run in a season best
time of 2 IK 4
"Ovenfl, we had a putty good
meet" Haa4coahChaflai)uatlea
said "It's gixxi (Harley)finally got
I victory, because she has been
.truggling for the last few weeks "
I MnitaRoseboroalsohadasea
son hMtimemthe 100-meterdash
I ler time of 11 H seconds qualified
tier as one of the top performers in
tl �e conference, but she finished si
(mil in the race Roseboro also made
the finals in the 201Vmeters, but she
withdrew because of leg cramps
"Things are looking real prom
isingfor(Rosebon�)as we head into
the conference meet Justice said
Susan Schram, leading the lady
Pirates in field events, captured
another first in the shot put with a
throw of 43 feet, 35 inches Shoul-
der problems have hampered
Schram for the past few weeks, but
she is expec ted to be at 100 percent
for the CAA Championships.
The final first place victory for
the team tame in the 3,000-meter
run as Jesska Montgomery ran a
11:21 for the winning time In the
1 ,SOVmeters, Stacy Oren ran a 4.55
for a fourth-place finish
AstheteamheadsintntheCAA
( bampionships at James Madison
University this weekend, Justice
sanl he's not Uxiking to win the
team honors, but heexpects tohave
some gn�at individual finishers.
"We're looking for as many in-
dividual performances as we can
get he said.
"We don't have the depth this
season to contend for the top spot,
but we're looking to shake things
up
By Chris McCoffrey
SUM Writtr
Unseasonably cold weather
including rain and sleet - and
fast racing characterized
Saturday's regatta held by Duke
University.
Teams from ECU, Duke,
UNC-Chapel Hill, N.C State,
UNC-Wilmington and William
and Mary gathered to race on
Lake Michie, near Durham
The ECU men's novice four
clinched a first-place victory in
their event.
The Pirate men's novice
blasted off the the starting line to
grab a boat-length lead 500-meters
into the 18(X)-meter race. Tom
Eure, Mat Byrne, Chris
McCaffrey,DannyCallis and cox-
swain Brian Dishman employed
Head coach Tom allan's method
of starts with great success
ECU slowly built a lead over
boats from Duke, UNC-W and
NCSU to advance to the finals.
In the second heat, another
men's novice boat competed
against Duke, UNC-CH and Wil-
liam and Mary. The Buc's Mike
McCulley, Chris Partin, Shawn
CBnan, Jerry Farantatos and cox-
swain Kary Dengler raced hard
but started to slip at the halfway
mark and finished fourth.
In the finals of the event, ECU
lined up at the start against Blue
Devils, Tarheels and Wolfpack.
The Pirates shot off the line with
UNC-CH right on their heels. The
entire race was close, with ECU
edging out the Tarheels by three-
quarters of a length to grab the
first-place victory.
The ECU women's varsity
four endured the same weather
conditions during their races.
.�
ECU, two boats from Duke and
one boat from William and Mary
lined up at the start. Angie Brown,
Yvonne Leipoldt, Lisa Hunt, Amy
Brown and coxswain Kary
Dengler held a firm grip on third
until the 1000-meter mark. Slowly,
See Crew, page 10
&
How Duke, Michigan fared.
vawAN
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i-fr'ffr, � -
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10 HUtt Ea�t (Earoltnian
Softball
Continued from page 9
A pIL 7, 1992
Mid 23innings.Wilkeimtinin
the second inning to somewh.it
quiet the loud bats of Furman. ITie
Pirates did manage to hang out
threemnsinthesixth WithHixker
reaching first on an error, Michelle
Ward stroked a single to right to
i ontinue the rally. C. Hohsons'4-b,
no-out, run scoring fielders chouv
kept things going. Wilke then
tvlted a RBI single to score Ward
from third. Finally Lisa C"oreprew
drove a deep shot to left to scoreC.
I lohson and account for the third
and final run of the ball game
BCU fell short in the nightcap
game to Georgia Tech 8-6. Parsons
took the loss as the Pirates were
now looking at tho reality ot not
finishing the tournament at 300,
Ih� Pirate P was out of fofCT in
committing four errors during the
contort. The last two errors in the
late innings proved costly as the
Yellow ecfcets cashed in on the
opportunity Crowder lead tho
Pirate offense with a 5-fof J after
noon while also stealing three
bases.
On Saturday, the Lady Pirates
had to either win the nevt three
games ,nd plav in the champion
ship later that evening, or return
homead.n earlv Parsons pitched
a eight-hitter as the defense OMUC
up with play after plav Crowder
and C. Hobson lead the Pirate hit
ting attack with a 2-for-3, two RMI
& one stolen base and 2-fof3 plus
two RBI performances respectfully
to seal rheexritJng5-4 win over the
C amels of Campbell I m erstty
With winds in their sails, the
I ady Pirates set their sights on their
next opponents, the Chanticleers
of Coastal Carolina With thetena-
cious Pirate "P" in place. Parsons
pitched a six hitter en route to the S
1 victory. Crowder lead thedefen-
sivecharge with seven putoursand
threeasststs. The oftensecame from
the smoking bats of Hooker 3-for-
3 & a homerun and C. Hobson who
also notched her first four-bagger
of the season.
In the second meeting with
Furman, Georgeann Wilke came
out and pitched the Pirates to a
exciting, heart-stopping, finger-
nail-biting victory to set upa cham-
pionship showdown with the
Tarheels of North Carolina. The
1 ady Pirates won the contest 16-11
in the f seventh inning by
sco' .g live runs to savor the win.
Stephanie Hobson was all over
the Furman pitchers in going4-for-
9 and with her first bleacher
teacher, whiledriving in three runs.
Crowder also swunga hot bat with
her 3 for 5 and two RBI perfor-
mance.
In the clutch the ladies came
up w i th b ig plays on defensive and
key hits on offensive" Head coach
Manahan stated.
The championship game pit-
ted the Lady Tarheels against ECU,
the third meeting in five days for
the (wo teams. With the series tied
at one each, the large crowd waited
withanticipationforthefinalgame.
With the Lady Pirates playing in
their fourth game of the day, the
highly expected match-upwasany-
thing hut a barnhurner. The Lady
Pirates gave their all but was over-
whelmed by fatigue and a good
Lady Tarheel ball club.
The Lady Pirates will bring
their 28-10 record home this week
to entertain the Camels of
( amphell University. Came time
is scheduled for a 2:30 p.m. start at
the lady Pirate field.
Rec Services
757-6387 or 757-6911.
Ropes Course Media Day
On April 15 from 3 P.M4
P.M ECU Recreational Ser-
vices will hold its third annual
Ropes Course Media Day. The
media day which also serves as
an open house, will be held at
the intramural fields located
behind the Allied Health build-
ing.
The guest list will include
local television and radio sta-
tions as well as local businesses.
ECU student organizations and
interested students are also in-
vited to attend.
The media day will include
a demonstration of the ropes
Continued from page 9
Crew
course and an explanation of
its benefits and focuses. Cost,
scheduling and group sizes will
also be discussed. The will also
be a time for visitors to ask
questions. Course instructors
will be on hand to share their
experience with the ropes
course.
The media day helps to in-
crease the visibility on what the
ropes course has to offer, so
come find out what it is all
about. Anyone interested in
attending the media day or
scheduling a ropes course ex-
perience may contact Kathy Hill
in Christenbury Gym by call-
ing 757-6387.
Continued from page 9
they slipped to fourth and fin-
ished in fifth despite an exhaust-
ing effort.
Technical difficulties plagued
the women's novice race, causing
two restarts. Angie Mullins,
Carrington Crosby, Heather Biffe,
Catherine Rana and coxswain Jen-
nifer Wilson got off to a slow start.
Despite that, they powered past
UNC-CH near the 1000-meter
mark to take third place in the
heat, just behind Duke and Wil-
liam and Mary. This weekend the
ECU crew team will be traveling
to Clemson to participate in the
Clemson Sprints.
Ml
'�jl- -i,
jtTil;
Vow Are At KisPa If . . .
� You have fair skin, light Hair and eye color. Particularly sensitive art-
tnose wlttn blonde, red, or light brown hair and blue, green, or grey eyes.
� You allow yourself considerable exposure to the sun (regardless of skin type).
Wflrwifi Signs of Skirt Cancer
� A �fch"� growth that increases in size and appears pearly, translucent,
tan, brown, black or multicolored.
� A rnolo, birthmark or beauty mark that changes color, increases in size
or thickness, changes in texture, or is irregular in outline.
. An open sore or wound on the skin that does not heal or persists for
more than four weeks, or heals and then reopens.
?
FREE SFCITST
sn
When:
Where:
Time:
Provided Vy:
Thursday, April S, 1.992.
ISrfendenHall Student Center
Rooms 8A, H, C2, Dr and E
900 a.m. - 12.30 p.m.
Family Practice JPliysicians
Sponnorwl toy tHe OfUcp ot Hc-alth Promotion MM! W�ai-Bi,iK and tht- Family Practice Center

'browning MJy iVt
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Sun April 2
Al movie ore in Hencfcix
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Campus Violence Redefined:
A Teleconference For Campus Leaders
Wednesday, April 8, 1992
1-3 pm
MSC Hendrix Theatre
On today's campuses, faculty, staff,
administrators and students
frequently face issues related to
violence. Bias-related violence and
hostile campus climates are an
increasing problem in higher
education. This live, interactive
teleconference will focus on
increasing awareness of definitions
and effects of violence, causes, and
possible solutions through
institutional policies and response as
well as prevention efforts.
Panelists Include;
Michael Gordon,
Mary Roark, SUNY Pittsburgh
C Arthur Sandeen, University of
Florida-Gainesville
Paul Shang, Colorado State
University
Dorothy Sicgel, Towsoo State
University
Spo�Mcd by Sludcot Leadership
Violence Awareness Week.
by Uarecfiity Housing. Advertisement
by OCU htterf rstereity
I





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Title
The East Carolinian, April 7, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 07, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.871
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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