The East Carolinian, April 2, 1992






Demons, devils, and whores, beware!
Radical evangelist condemns ECU students.
4
A purple pigskin party
Festival to honor football program, athletes.
10
�he lEetHt (Eamltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.66 No.21
Thursday, April 2 1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12
12 Pi
Three students poisoned
Three college students on Spring
Break in West Talm Beach, Fla are in the
hospital in serious condition after heing
overcome hv carhon monoxide fumes in
their hotel room
The students, all from Massachusetts,
were discovered in their room by a maid.
Rescue workers originally thought the
students were badlv sunburned or suffer-
ing from a drug overdose because their
skin had turned a deep red color. It was
not until a police officer collapsed that
rescue workers realized that carbon mon-
oxide was leaking into the room from a
nearbv boiler.
School stays all-male
The trustees of Wahash College, a
small liberal arts college in Indiana, re-
cently voted unanimously not to change
the school's policy of not admitting
women.
The trustees said the school's single-
sex tradition had contributed to its aca-
demic excellence.
"There is no doubt in our minds that
one of the main reasons for the personal
and professional success of the Wabash
graduates throughout a centurv and a
half is theall-maleatmosphere the trust-
ees said
Editor charged in scam
The former editor of the student news-
paper at the Florida Institute of Technol-
ogy has been charged with diverting
$31,000 of the school's money in a com-
puter scam.
Darren Marc Astin was charged with
31 counts of computer fraud and grand
theft, school officials said
Astin is charged with using univer-
sity computers to credit his own account
with $31,019 in school funds while he was
employed by the university.
Gamblers arrested
A University of Rhode Island stu-
dent, along with two other men, has been
arrested in connection with a college
based gambling ring.
Roland Recker, 21, was charged with
bookmaking and organized criminal gam-
bling.
Three other men were arrested in Feb-
ruary in connection with the ring, which
police believe was based at the University
of Rhode Island.
Several Rhode Island basketball play-
ers are also under investigation for bet-
ting on professional and college games.
Greeks enforce policies
The Risk Management Committee of
the Inter-Fraternity and Panhellenic coun-
cils at the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill is creating a judicial review
board to look into possible infractions of
a new alcohol policy.
The policy prohibits common con-
tainers, use of chapter funds to buy alco-
hol for events with non-members present
and alcohol at rush events.
C orean Hamlin, president of the
Panhellenic Council, said the purpose of
the board is not to seek out violations.
"The board will not be going out and
checking at mixers Hamlin said. "The
only purpose will be to hear cases brought
before the board "
Compiled by CKiaboth SWmiwl Taken from
C�S ana) oWr eampu
Inside Thursday
Crime Scene 2
Editorial4
Comics A SatireJS
ClassifiedsJ4
Entertainment7
SportsIt
jj
Jones captures
SGA presidency
By Julie Roscoe
Assistant News Editor
Courtney lones has broken the
mold at ECU bv becoming the first
woman to win the SGA presidency.
The women with the "common
namesofSmith & lones "have proved
they have "uncommon leadership"
by almost tripling thenumber of votes
their opponents received in
Wednesday's election.
"It seems like we're returning to
what was a tradition said Dr. Mary
I. Bratton, a history professor who
wrote the history of ECU from its
beginning until 19H3.
The ECU student body has not
seen a woman president since 1W
when it was East Carolina Teacher's
College
"It reallv hasn't hit me vet said
Courtney lones, speaker of the legis-
lature and the newlv elected presi-
dent. Sherry's anil mv goal was to
speak to as many students as pos-
sible. If they know what the candi-
dates are all about they will come out
and vote "
lones received 1,43 votes, while
Sherry Smi th. the v ice president-elec t,
tallied 1,397 votes I"he total number
oi voits was a record 1,95f, about 11
percent of the student population.
"The numbers prove that we're
changing student apathy Jones
said.
The elections committee
chair, Kristie Hoffstedder, said last
vear that onlv about 500 students
voted.
"My goal this vear was 800
votes said Hoffstedder. "I am
ecstatic about the results
The voter turnout increased
bv 4(X) percent from last year.
That's a big improvement in
the last 7-8 vears said Rudv
Alexander, SGA advisor.
"The elections committee in-
deed gets credit for a fine job in
running the election, and the can-
didates Mirred up a lot of inter-
est
Alexander commended the
winners and losers for all the hard
work, effort and professionalism
they put into the election.
"I'd like to thank all the stu-
dents of ECU without whom we
wouldn't have been elected
Smith said. "All the hard work
and dedication paid off
lones thanked her opponent
Jonathan Brooks for being a gixd
competitor and reassured the vot-
ers she was not ust making cam-
paign promises these last few
weeks.
"The competition made me
Photo by Kavln Amos � ECU Photo Lab
Courtney Jones, the newly elected SGA president, hustles votes during Wednesday's
election Jones and her running mate Sherry Smith captured the top two executive spots.
more determined to win lones said. "I want
the students to know we were sincere in what
we said (while campaigning). These are things
we're already working on and we will continue
to work on. The students can expect pnxluctiv-
ity in the next vear
Jones and Smith met the chair of under-
graduate council at Harvard University, David
Aronburg, last month at the international Con-
ference on Student Government Associations.
Hegavehiscongratijlations when they spoke to
him bv phone at the victory party Wednesday
night.
1 send my wholehearted congratulations
to my new colleague of my second favorite
government Aronburg said. "ECU can Uxk
forward to some honest leadership next vear.
(Tood luck and go Pirates
lones is also the first non-Greek to
triumph as president in four vears.
Brad Osbome ran unopposed at the last
minute and is now SGA treasurer.
The election for secretary resulted in a
need for a run-off election after no one candi-
date of the three received the 50 percent plus
one necessary for a victory.
Tristin lones and Lisa Berting defeated
Heidi Hicks and will conduct a second cam-
paign in the next two weeks.
Hoffstedder said she has to meet with her
committee and set the date for the run-off
election. The rules express Jones and Berting
See SGA, page 3
1992 SGA ELECTIONS RBSUITS
President Courtney Jonts (1435)
)MMrt�u Break (IM)
Vice
President: Sherry Smith (1,397)
Crystal CrM M4)
Treasurer; Brad Oabomc (Ran unopposed)
Public Safety operation
provokes controversy
By Matt Jones
Managing Editor
Controversy surrounding
a two-year-old Public Safety
operation erupted after an ECU
administrator contradicted
statements made bv an officer
involved in the 14 incident.
Lt. Ernest Suggs of the Pub-
lic Safety department detailed
the incident which involved
two students apprehended in
the Minges Stadium parking
lot after attempting to break
into cars. Suggs said the stu-
dents were referred to Dean of
Student Life, Ronald Speier.
After reading Suggs' com-
ments in the March 19 edition
Starf Graphic by Micha�4 Martin � 7ft Eaat Carolinian
of The East Carolinian, Speier
released a prepared statement
which removed him from any
involvement with the incident.
"Any reference to mv in-
volvement in this matter is mis-
leading and untrue Speier
said. "Furthermore, the two
men in question were never
sent to me for appropriate ad-
judication
Suggs said he is "standing
on what he said before When
asked if the students were in-
deed sent to Speier, he said:
"Yes thev were. Period
In an interview with Suggs
before Speier s statement, he
reiterated several times thatthe
students were sent to Speier
after they were notified of pos-
sible outcomes. He explained
that the students were offered
a chance to work with Public
Safety and another law enforce-
ment agency on narcotics in-
vestigations instead of being
criminally charged.
" In lieu of criminal charges,
they were referred to Dr. Speier
for further disposition Suggs
said.
According to Suggs, only
one of the students agreed to
work with Public Safety in drug
investigations, yet both were
senttoSpeier. When asked why
theother student was notcrimi-
See Controversy page 3
Officials declare Sims' death a mystery
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Wriwr
He loved the outdt hits, fish-
ing, camping, chess.card games,
footba 11, racquetba 11, wor king on
cars, listening to musicand hang-
ing with his friends. That was
Ray Sims "in a nutshell said
Duke Bloyd, Sims' best friend
since the eighth grade and a
sophomore at ECU.
Sims was found dead March
18 at 7:45 a.m. where he had
apparently jumped or fallen off
die section five bleachers in
Fkklen Stadium.
"No suicide note was found
and his alcohol level showed that
he had a little to drink, but not
enough to be considered legally
impaired if he was behind the
wheel of a car said fames
DePuy, director of Public Safety.
"Ray's death is difficult for
everyone involved said Lt.
Keith Knox, head of Crime Pre-
vention for ECU Public Safety.
"lJobody will ever realty know
what happened but Ray, and he
look it with him
"Ray was the best guy I
knew Bloyd said. "He'd help
you in a tight spot, rather it be
money or a ride. He was a good
friend, and I'll sure miss him
Darin Ferguson, Sims'
suitemate and good friend, was
shocked after hearing the news.
"Ray wasa good all-around
guy who got along with every-
one Ferguson said. "He never
showed a sign to me about com-
mitting suicide He didn't give
the signs most suicide victims
give like giving away their
things, suicide threats or depres-
sion
Bloyd said he was disap-
pointed in the attitude the local
media took towards Sims's
death.
"Ray Sims wasn't a statis-
tic Bloyd said. "The local me-
dia made a circus out of Ray's
death. They treated the incident
like an open and shut case They
didn't investigate enough
Bloyd then continued with
an angry voice, "I can't believe
W1TN snowed the pool of blood
with flies swarming on the tele-
vision.
Bloyd
said Sims
came to him
most of the
time when
Sims had a
problem.
"He
would say.
Let's get
away, let's go
hiking and
then go on top
of a mountain
and philoso-
p h i z e
Bloyd said.
"Since
Ray and I did
most of our
thinking in
high places, I
think Ray
went on top of
the bleachers to think,
said.
Ray Sims (right) enjoyed camping and fishing with his beet friend Duke Bloyd His
body was found March 18 by Rckten Stadium.
Bloyd
i
jgMra
your mind and your musk
Bloyd said.
One of the sayings Bloyd "Hay was a practical joker,
and Sims lived by was "We may he had a way with people said
not always have money or a Jon Uhtman, a friend of Sim's
woman, but you'll always have and an ECU student "He could
hmm Ltt
talk you into doing just about
anything
Uhhnan is another friend of
Sims' who does not beHeve the





2 CEhc �ant(Carolinian
April 2, 1992
crimXS)'ene
After-hours basketball players
plague Slay Hall courts
March 25
144, . ,nvne 1 l.ill Urvakmgand entering And larceny investi-
gated Money taken
l?l� White 1 lallln k�t out report ol bammed subjects. Un-
tounded
2157 1 lot 1 lall Report of damage to real property.
00 W Sl.� Hall PistuilMnvvo�svibnvtsplaymgK�sketballafter
NOlM JUbfrCtl ad isod to Un I the area.
QQt8 Slav I (all I VtiitKuveotsubjecfcplavmgKsketballafter
hoilt
0122 IMuelight Phone at Seventh and lames streets: Subjects
williny; .i Otb
01V White Hall Kototvnco to a curfew violation. Subjects
k;n an . ethal warning tot �. urtew lolation and for public intoxica-
tion
OB Vr White 1 lall , utiew tolation Subject advised to leave.
02V Fifth and Holl streets Assisted Gnvnville police with a
hit Mid run No OM NM wpoitod iniured.
tMoM MingosGoliMnmvc Invkod the vohiclesaixi a suspicious
MMfKtWOund I vehicle Subject identified as the owner and let go.
March M
2306 fcnmlbtmwtff Building: Send to kxate a subject.
Contact made
0114 v Ireene l.ill c necked out scene with one male subject
having JUfdwty von&tt t student transported to the mag trace's
office
012 i. invne 1 lall v U kod out scene of two male subject
ce subject attested toi intoxicated atxf disorderly conduct and
taken to the magistrate otfk
024S �. ianett I lali I N ot t�xl tw 0 tenwles to Tyler.
OM5 Ivlot Hall look ,i teport ot harassment for the five
subjects �n orted to I x Ut
Match 27
1001 Flanagan buikting It osti gated larconv of a hicvcle.
1 M rhird and Koulc Meets hiotigatod breakingand en-
tet mg atxl larcvm from ohiv te in parking kt
1502 Scott Hall lmottgatedtmNilami activation. Equipment
nvilfunction
2013 x ollege Hill lnve ohkle stopped for speeding. Stu-
dent gnen I camffttt v nation tot speeding, and passenger given a
verbal warning tor uivloiaged virinking.
2145 Ganvtt I fall c fvwxi .i tckfnmGarrott to Fourth and
1 larding Streets tot cmkss and reckless Discontinued chase due
to tbeence ot siren on ehfc k ind treffk condMions.
2 rs i mstead l lall . Kecked oxit maintenance pwtokm On-
dut phitnlvt COlod
o4 ivik i lall i vk a report on � damaged vehicle.
Cnm� Scf� � U�� IMM �rftcial PuMic S�Nty toy.
Honor fraternity sponsors
volleyball marathon
By Christie Lawrence
AMiaUnl Nwt Editor
The ninth annual Volleyball Marathon to ben-
efit Easter Seals was held March 28 and 29 at
Minges Coliseum. Teams from around the state,
including Elizabeth City and Rocky Mount, came
to participate in the fund-raising event. The play-
ers on each team raised a $150 minimum donation
to Easter Seals for the team's participation in the
marathon.
Connie Hogan, development coordinator of
the Easter Seals Society said, "This year s goal was
to raise $11,700, but we exceeded that in rasing
over $15,000
The support group for the marathon was the
Phi Sigma Pi National Honor Fraternity. This
coed Fraternity is the oldest fraternity on the
campus and has been involved with the Easter
Seals Volleyball Marathon for more than four
years. The support group's responsibility is to get
the games started and officiate them.
"What is so nice about the service fraternity
helping is thai we don't have to recruit outside
officials Hogan said.
All proceeds from the event will go to the
Easter Seals Society, the oldest non-profit organi-
zation in the country.
"Easter Seals helps with any disability, not
just diseases Hogan said.
Ten more teams than last year participated in
the marathon, making a total of 41 teams playing
this year. Trophies and prizes were awarded to
the top three teams and individuals raising the
most money.
The first place team this year was Carolina
Telephone raising $1,633. The team received a
trophy and team dinner at the Golden Corral.
Second place team fund-raising prizes went
to Beach Fever for raising $1,577. Third place was
awarded to The Physical Terrorists for raising
$1,117.
The individual that raised the most money
was Wendv Wells of theCarolina Telephone team.
Wells raised over $869 and received a trophy and
trip for two to River Cove.
Second Place for the individual awards was
given to Tammy Lombardo of the Beach Fever
team for raising $775. Third place was awarded to
Keith Everett for raising $350.
Jeffrey's Beer and Wine, Pepsi and WDLX
sponsored the fund-raising event.
Thoughts
for the day.
"He knows
nothing; he
thinks he
knows
everything �
that clearly
points to a
political career
� Gorg Bernard Shaw
"An honest
politician is
one who
when he is
bought will
stay bought"
CfTOfOfl
110 E. 4th St
752-5855
to I
o
Friday. April 3
Nikki meets the Habachi
Asia Beat
Progressive Music
Performed by
Guru Lewis Pragasan
$2.00 off any entr��
$1.00 off any sandwich after 5pm
not valid with anv other offer
T
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
,J
AG CONSULTING FIRM FIELD MONITOR
Positions available late May to mid-September.
Individual must be trustworthy, reliable,
conscientious, in good physical shape, and love
the outdoors. Hourly wage plus mileage for own
vehicle. Excellent opportunity for college students
and teachers out for the summer. SenrJ resume to
MCSI P.O. Box 179 Grifton, NC 28530 or Fax
(919)524-3215.

ktt.VNAr1fl MMk MMMMt.
IJmJJmLS
MALES AND FEMALES-a JPlffc M L
TO PARTICIPATE IN THE� I
TH ANNUM, GREAT PIRATE Pl'RPLEI f 1
COLO PIGSKIN PIG-OIT PARTYIXj I 1
�MISS HAWAIIAN TROPIC
SI NTAN-BIKIM CONTEST MENS' BEST LEGS CONTEST L J
AMIIL II. IN
ncxiXN MM
WIN CASH: -s pvaci vx 2nd place - M
TO EVTHI D Mltn E MOM ITt�MTKN CU1 ICl THl nU" V MT1, OfnCT T T-ttJi
TIC �� B�� � M1i1 IIMMTO 1.m i. . ��� ii"mi�ivii.�oiL'
WELLNESS FAIR
Tuesday, April 7,1992
1000 am -4:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center,
Great Room
HEALTH SCREENINGS
Cholesterol $3
Nutritional Analysis
Blood Pressure
Dental
Flexibility
Glaucoma
Hearing
EDUCATIONAL EXHIBITS
COMING SOON
BAREFOOT ON THE MALL 1992
LINEUP
E,C. Grass
(rainsite - MSC - multipurpose room)
Cold Sweat
(rainsite - MSC - Hendrix)
? Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown
(rainsite - MSC - multipurpose room)
� The Ocean Blue
(rainsite - MSC - Hendrix)
12:00pm
1:00pm
2:20pm
4:00pm
Sponsored by:
Office of Health Promotion
and Well-Being
Student Health Services
Recreational Services
For more information,
call 757-6793.
DEMONSTRATIONS
GIVEAWAYS
REFRESHMENTS
Attractions
� Guess amount of money in a tub to win a
new Ford Mustang!
Velcro Fly Trap - jump against the wall and
see if you stick!
CARNIVAL GAMES
� Corkgun Shooting Gallery
� Teddy Bear Toss
IF YOUR ORGANIZATION
WOULD LIKE TO RESERVE A
BOOTH, PLEASE CALL
757-4766.
DEADLINE TO REGISTER APRIL 18
1 .
Residents walk
By Amy Humphries
SuH Writer
The Greenville March of
Dimes WalkAmenca 1992 will
take place Saturda . April 4 at 10
a.m. The March of Dimes is a na-
tional voluntary healthagency that
raises mone tohelp prevent birth
defects and infant mortality
"Every war, a quarter of a
million babies are born too small
� those babies are 40 times more
likely to die than normal babies
said Sybil Wheeler, division di-
rector for the March of Dimes.
"WalkAmerica gives every-
one in Greenville an opportunity
to help the March of Dimesensure
that babies are bom healthy
WalkAmenca 1992 begins at
the Elm Street Gym. The walk
continues behind Ficklen Stadium,
downCharles Boulevard
campus and back to E
The entire walk is a to
miles Participants walKJ
viduals or as teams reps
companies, clubs and
tions. Teams or mdivi
Mgn up for the valk a�
a.m on April 4, but mod
be raised previously.
Sponsors must pa
walk because walkers!
sponsored for each mill
participation. Wheeler
sor sheets are availah
Coastal Plains Divisn
March of Dimes at 205 Cj
St Suite C.
Walkers will rev ei el
refreshments after tomd
walk Awards will be gi
first and second place ir
first place child and
Thumbs up to ECU
Four future ECU recruits give thumbs up to the perform
The play was sponsored by North Carolina Public Schc
Controversy r
Continued from page 1
"nally charged, Suggs said it dealt
with "treating people fairly "
Suggs said the one student
who agreed to help Tublic Safety
later decided against it.
"You've got to be fair about
it" he said, tou can t say be-
cause vou didn t do this. I'm go-
ing 10 go ahead and charge you
Suggs said the students w ere
not arrested, but imply taken to
Tubhc Saietv and questioned af-
ter thev were apprehended.
'Technicallv a person is not
under arrest unbl after that officer
tells vou sir, vou are under arret
for blah, blah, blah Suggs said
"But when thev were bamght
down interviews were con-
ducted then, after those inter-
views and after looking at what
we had it was decided at that time
that thev were not to be ar-
rested. .And they were referred.
Suggs said he felt his state-
ments in the earlier article could
be misconstrued to include Speier
in the process of offering students
a chance to work with Tublic
Safetv
He said that students were
sent to Speier as an alternative to
being criminally charged and that
Speier did not actively offer le-
ruencv to students who cooper-
ated with the department
Anm
Sei
Tuesi
Wedr
SGA
Continued from page 1
will have to hokl a second cam-
paign on campus. Ce week is
needed for campaigning and one
week to re-organize the run-off.
kmes and Smith will be inau-
gurated on April 28 at the SGA
Banquet.
A Repre;
Be
All
JheEast
Carolinian
oughsaid.
IfY
ou





Thoughts
for the day:
"He knows
nothing; he
tliinkshe
knows
everything� ;
that clearly
points to a
political career
� Georg Bernard Shaw -
"An honest
politician is
one who
when he is
bought will
stay bought'
-Simon Cameron
ON
E MALL 1992
lorn)
12:00pm
1:00pm
Brown 2:20pm
lorn)
4:00pm
Ions
in a tub to win a
Istang!
(gainst the wall and
tick!
AMES :
ig Gallery
Toss
NIZATION
RESERVE A
SE CALL
166.
STER APRIL 18
April 2, 1992 (SJlit gagt (Carolinian 3
Residents walk for healthier babies
By Amy Humphries
Staff Writer
The Greenville March of
Dimes WalkAmerica 1992 will
take place Saturday, April 4 at 10
a.m. The March of Dimes is a na-
tional voluntary healthagency that
raises money to help prevent birth
detects and infant mortality.
"Every year, a quarter of a
million babies are born too small
� those babies are 40 times more
hkely to die than normal babies
said Sybil Wheeler, division di-
rector for the March of Dimes.
"WalkAmerica gives every-
one in Greenville an opportunity
to help the March of Dimes ensure
that babies are bom healthy
WalkAmerica 192 begins at
the Elm Street Gvm. The walk
: continues behind Ficklen Stadium,
down Charles Boulevard, through
campus and back to Elm Street.
The entire walk is a total of five
miles. Participants walk as indi-
viduals or as teams representing
companies, clubs and organiza-
tions. Teams or individuals can
sign up for the walk as late as 9
a.m. on April 4, but money must
be raised previously.
Sponsors must pay before the
walk because walkers are not
sponsored for each mile but for
participation. Wheeler said spon-
sor sheets are available at the
Coastal Plains Division of the
March of Dimes at 205 Commerce
St Suite C.
Walkers will receive pizza and
refreshments after completing the
walk. Awards will be given to the
first and second place individual,
first place child and first place
team. The banking team and high
school team to raise the most
money will also be awarded. All
walkers who raise $75 or more
will receive a WalkAmerica T-
shirt.
WalkAmerica is the country's
oldest, largest and most success-
ful walkingevent. This event takes
place in more than 1,400 commu-
nities nationwide and involves
more than 800,000 walkers.
This year will be Greenville's
HHh vear to hold a WalkAmerica
event. Last year, about 300 walk-
ers in Greenville raised over
$24,000 to support the March of
Dimes and its campaign for
healthier babies.
Clayton Pilgreen, the 1992
honorary chairman of
WalkAmerica, has cerebral palsy
and has walked in all 10 Greenville
walks. Last year Pilgreen retired
as fund-raiser.
"1 want to give someone else a
chance this year he said. "Iwant
everyone to raise money in
WalkAmerica so that we can save
babies
In previous years, Pilgreen
raised approximately $11,000 for
the March of Dimes through
WalkAmerica. The March of
Dimes provides funding for re-
search, community, service, edu-
cation and advocacy for healthier
babies.
"We would like to invite ev-
eryone in Greenville and the sur-
roundingareas to form a team and
join us on walk day Wheeler said.
"We will be having fun and walk-
ing for healthier children, and we
want this to be a banner year in
Greenville
Simms
Thumbs up to ECU
Prtolo by Jam�� Browning � ECU Photo Lab
Four future ECU recruits give thumbs up to the performance of "Heidi" at Wright Auditorium last week
The play was sponsored by North Carolina Public Schools.
Continued from page 1
fall was suicide. "Ray was sure of
himself, not the kind of person to
commit suicide Ulhman said. "A
lot of people say suicide is the cow-
ardly way out, but he had to have
some serious balls because that's a
high jump
Many rumors have gone
around thecampusaboutSims hav-
ing school, family and girlfriend
problems.
As far as school problems, a
few weeks before Sims' death he
told Bloyd that he needed to "get on
the ball in school
Concerning his family He had
always had family problems, and
he just found out that his mother
was dying and was put in a nursing
home in Texas Bloyd said.
Sims was the youngest of seven
children. He had four brothers and
two sisters.
Sims and his girlfriend had re-
cently decided to give each other
space, but there was no apparent
Controversy
Continued from page 1
nally charged, Suggs said it dealt
-with "treating people fairly
Suggs said the one student
who agreed to help Public Safety
later decided against it.
"You've got to be fair about
it he said. "You can't say 'be-
cause vou didn't do this, I'm go-
ing to go ahead and charge you
Suggs said the students were
not arrested, but simply taken to
Fublic Safety and questioned af-
ter they were apprehended.
"Technically a person is not
under arrest until after that officer
tells you 'sir, you are under arrest
for blah, blah, blah Suggs said.
"But when they were brought
down interviews were con-
ducted, then, after those inter-
views and after looking at what
we had, it was decided at that time
that they were not to be ar-
rested. And they were referred
Suggs said he felt his state-
ments in the earlier article could
be misconstrued to include Speier
in the process of offering students
a chance to work with Public
Safety.
He said that students were
sent to Speier as an alternative to
being criminally charged and that
Speier did not actively offer le-
niency to students who cooper-
ated with the department.
break up, Bloyd said.
ATTENTION ECU
GROUPS:
DO YOU NEED
MONEY?
Annual Fund-raising Planning
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SGA
Continued from page 1
will have to hold a second cam-
paign on campus. One week is
needed for campaigning and one
week to re-organize the run-off.
Jones and Smith will be inau-
gurated on April 28, at the SGA
Banquet.
The East
Carolinian
A Representative of Your Organization Must
Be Present At One Session In Order
To Obtain 1992-1993 Funding
All Groups With SGA Funded
Status Are Eligible
For Further Information Call
Alan Thomas, 757-0157
Amy Harris, 757-3159
If You Are Unsure If You Are Eligible For Funding -
Please Call
Millie Murphrey at 757-4726
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�Ije lEafit (Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
Jennifer Wardrep, News Editor
Julie Roscoe, Asst. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Dana Danielson, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Robert Todd, Assistant Sports Editor
Jeff Becker, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Richard Haselric, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Steven Ollice, Classified Advertising Technician
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Jean Caraway, Advertising Production Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925. emphasizing information that affects ECU
students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should be
limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville, N.C,
27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Thursday, April 2, 1992
Perot could ride to White House
If the choice of presidential candidates
seems sown up, do not be so sure. Currently
in North Carolina, as in the rest of the na-
tion, thousands of volunteers are busy rally-
ing signatures for a May 5 deadline. If enough
Americans are receptive, H. Ross Perot will
appear on the ballot this fall as an Indepen-
dent candidate for the White House.
Though many Democrats and Republi-
cans alike have scoffed at the idea of a non-
politician running for the office, there ap-
pears to be real concern, and even worry,
from both parties. If, as campaign commit-
tees have popularly theorized, candidacy
races are largely determined by media ad-
vertisement, then Perot has a strong chance
at becoming president. Perot has offered to
fund his campaign with $200 million of his
own money � more than the Democratic
nominee and even the president would have
to work with.
Self-funding is a feat that few could
pull off, yet Perot maintains himself to be
much more in touch with the average Ameri-
can than most elected officials. The self-
made billionaire from Texarkana still drives
a car that most Americans can afford and
lives relatively low-key. Perot even objects
to the idea of living in a Washington
"bubble which, as he attests, closes the
decision makers off from the pulse of the
country.
One reassurance that comes with Perot
as a candidate owes to his billionaire status
� he cannot be bought. Where the ethical
dilemma of special interest groups funding
our leaders is usually a problem for voters,
here it is nonexistent.
Perot rejects the idea that political per-
spectives can solve the country's problems.
As expected, his methodology is very much
businesslike; examine each problem, bring
in experts and test hypotheses betore spend-
ing big money. His largest concern is that of
the trillion-dollar deficit, which he thinks is
being ignored. Perot's financial acumen
could be an asset to the economy, and in this
respect give him an edge over politicians.
New options for national revenue may be
welcomed over the many possibilities of
taxing we usually face, as a logical matter of
course. When we elect a politician who re-
ceives his own pay from taxes, why do we
expect him to come up with any other solu-
tion?
Critics against the idea of Perot as chief
executive cite past instances in which big
businessmen attempted the transition to
public office. Politics and business operate
differently; Perot could not simply fire an
elected official as he might an incompetent
employee. Political process is one that em-
ploys persuasion to achieve its ends rather
than straight "bossing Yet Perot attests
that he would work with his Washington
peers more than presidents past. "I would
never give Congress a deadline retorts
Perot in reference to President Bush. "That
sends a clear signal that you're enemies. The
country doesn' t function as a unit that way
Perot believes his stance as a political
outsider offers him more objectivity and
therein may lie his greatest appeal. A con-
sensus of the public feels the two-party sys-
tem offers them no real options. Many vot-
ers are balloting against their own
affiliation's candidate in hopes of sending
Washington a message.
They may send more than that to the
capital.
SGA endorsement
looks like a prank
To the Editor
I feel that it is my duty to inform
the wnter of the "Opinion" column in
Tuesday's East Carolinian that the
month of March has 31 and not 30
days I came to the conclusion after
reading the article that the aforemen-
tioned column must have been the
writer's lntentasanAprilFool's prank
Surely it must, because anyone who
attended the candidates' forum on
Friday afternoon had to be convinced
that Courtney Jones and Sherry Smith
are the best candidates for SGA presi-
dent and vice president, respectively.
So where was the writer at the time of
the forum? It seems very obvious by
the endorsements given that he or she
was not in attendance. Maybe that's
why there is no author listed?
It seems that throughout my
tenure here at East Carolina we have
always sought out the best candidate
for our SGA executive officers, and
that is why I was in total awe to see 77k
East Carolinian's endorsement of
Jonathan Brooks. Mr. Brooks was
noted for his ability to communicate
his positions clearly, his experience in
state politics, his determination and
his lack of experience which will pro-
vide him with a "fresh look Let me
address these reasonings one by one.
First, in my opinion, Mr. Brooks
stated his lone position halfheartedly
and with no platform at all of how he
could accomplish his lone goal of bet-
tar relations with the city. Miss Jones
on the other hand stated her case
clearly of how she planned on accom-
plishing the goal of better relations
and stated what she had already done
to better the relations.
Mr. Brooks talks a good game,
but Miss Jones is backing up her points
with action.
Secondly, I would like to com-
mend Mr. Brooks with his involve-
ment with state government but must
wam him that it still will not give him
the working knowledge to accomplish
his goals within East Carolina's stu-
dent government.
Mr. Brooks has had every op-
portunity to join the SGA to gain at
least some experience in student gov-
ernment and how to deal with fellow
representatives, but he has repeatedly
chosen not to.
Finally, the point of inexpen-
ence That's really all you need to say.
I don't mink that anyone wants some-
one representing them in any fashion,
whether it be president of the SGA or
any other campus organization, who's
never been associated with their orga-
nization before and never shown any
prior interest in it before. I wonder
how the author of Tuesday's "Opin-
ion" column would feel if the East
Carolinian selected a new general man-
ager who had never before worked
with a newspaper but was selected
because his or her inexperience in the
written news media would afford him
or her a "fresh look" as to how the
paper should be operated.
Your selection for the position
of SGA vice president was even more
ludicrous, so it should take less to
address this point. What a relief it is to
know that the decision of who to en-
dorse for (he position of vice presi-
dent was based upon Miss Cross' de-
. SEE WHKEMASTUWORS, LBS
v WnilDS.PAAMSSlCJS
� - 'MEW
Got
raw
cision to run a single campaign and
because the author has deemed Miss
Smith's schedule too full. I do not
personally know why Miss Smith
chose to run with Miss Jones, but the
reasoning behind selecting one candi-
date over the other because one chose
a running mate and one did not is
absurd. Is your reasoning that "al-
though her opponent is more quali-
fied and knowledgeable about the
position she is seeking, I'm voting for
Cross because she showed 'spunk' by
going it alone?" I also wonder where
the author gets his or her authority to
know Miss Smith's future schedule
better than Miss Smith herself?
I realize that the Constitution
guarantees everyone their right to ex-
press their ideas freely, but you must
realize as a source of public informa-
tion that you should take great lengths
and even greater care in your selec-
tions for endorsements for leadership
positions on this campus because of
your noted influence within the cam-
pus population.
It was evident that you did not
do so by the reasons given for select-
ing one candidate over another It also
seems contradictory in your selection
of Mr. Brooks partly because of his
"lack of experience but within the
same article selected Osbome and
Berting because of the their respective
experience
I hope this lengthy letter will
serve as a point well taken so that in
the future more care will be taken
when handling out campus endorse-
ments.
Kevin A. Smith
Senior Class Vice President
Walker's Ride on the Wild Side
Affirmative action discriminates
By
J. William
Walker
Editorial
Columnist
You're a personnel executive
searching for the right person to head
your new program in Raleigh Your
two applicants have the same qualifi-
cations and merits and both are pre-
pared for the job One candidate, how-
ever, is white and the other is black.
On what do you base your decision7
Proponents of affirmative action
would say the minority should be cho-
sen based on their color This is com-
pletely wrong.
The idea that white or black
candidates could be turned down be-
cause of their race is prejudiced Us-
ing any restrictions for or against anv
race is not equal opportunity Affir-
mative action does not provide equal-
ity
In practice, it really promotes
inequality and discrimination It was
designed to give minorities an equal
chance, but an equal chance should
rely on qualifications and personal-
ity, not on minority status Ridding
our system of biases on race, sex and
background takes a lot more than sim-
ply giving advantages to minorities It
requires education and open minds,
not discrimination It actually re-
kindles fires of prejudice and leads to
reverse discrimination
Quotas, an integral concept be-
hind affirmativeaction, will not work
Quotas require businesses to employ
a certain percentage of minorities Ev-
ery business under the quota system
would have to re-examine their staff
on the basis of race and fire enough
people to make room for the minori-
ties Quotas define discrimination.
They give an unfair advantage to mi-
norities which clearly is not equal or
just.
Our system needs to look away
from discrimination Equal emplov-
ment opportunities are available and
the government need not step in and
regulate minority ratios Government
control of employment opportunities
will lead to furtherdiscnmination and
other problems
Affirmative action's negative
aspects can most readily be seen in
college admissions Scholarships for
minorities far outweigh those avail-
able to non-minonties. Take the top
5 percent of any graduating
school class and of those 5 percent,
minorities receive the lion's shart �
scholarships This is a result of irrr
mative action The non-minontie- .rv
that group will be turned dow i I r
those scholarships based solely of
their race Regardless of their schoias
tic efforts, their race prevents then
from obtaining their justly deserved
awards Doesn't that sound like the
problem that affirmative action w.i-
supposed to solve7 Clearly this is m :
equal opportunity but rather revers
discrimination Whenever there is ar
advantage based on race, the system
fails itself. And for that matter the
whole affirmative action system ;
designed to fail Affirmative action is
based on the idea of providing equal
opportunity in the work place, but
this provision is based on race, which
is counterproductive to its exister.ct
Affirmative action is a?
oxymoronic idea The idea that equal-
ity can be obtained through discnm
nation is preposterous Proponentspf
affirmative action need to re-examine
their goals and precepts If thev ire
fighting for equality, they need to hnd
a better battlefield than discrimina-
tion
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
David fights Goliath; winner unknown
By
Scott
Maxwell
Editorial
Columnist -TL-
And now, David takes on
Goliath.
Our "David" is a clean-cut,
thoughtful guy by the name of Paul
Hager. Hager lives in Bloomington,
Indiana, whereour drama takesplace,
and he works for the Indiana Civil
Liberties Union and the Hoosier Can-
nabis Re-legalization Coalition. He
also helped produce a couple of com-
mercials recently. More about that in
a second.
And "Goliath" couldn't have
been better cast: it's a giant media
company named Tele-Communica-
tions Inc. TCI is what's known in the
trade as a "multiple system operator"
� that is, it's a company that owns
and operates cable systems around
the country. In fact, it's the country's
largest MSO, providing service to 8.5
million of the 56 million cable house-
holds in the nation.
TCI has its fingers in a lot of
other pies, too; it wholly owns United
Artist Entertainment and has large
shares in the cable channels Arts &
Entertainment, Cable News Network
(and a lot of other Turner stuff). Black
Entertainment Television, and The
Discovery Channel. And much, much
more.
TCI may be known to some of
our readers by the sleazy tactics it
recently employed in Morganton, N.C.
Frantic to hang on to its $1.4-million-
per-year revenue from that city, TCI
spent almost 5150,000 in a campaign
to defeat the re-election bid of the
mayor and city councilmembers who
opposed renew ingTCTs contract (The
mayor and city councilmembers spent
under $600�collectively � and they
still won. Just to warm the hearts of
Jerry Brown's supporters)
Last year, TCI made $7 billion
You don't mess with TCI
Unless you're Paul Hager
Under the imprimatur of the
Hoosier Cannabis Re-legalization
Coalition, Hager produced two com-
mercials that tell the truth about mari-
juana. One explains that marijuana
was banned partly as "a racist attack
on immigrant groups and blacks who
used it for recreation the other re-
futes the myth that marijuana causes
brain damage Hager even has full
documentation to back up the facts
stated in the commercials.
Now, Hager and the HCRC pro-
duced the spots only after apprising
TCI of their pro-legalization content
and receiving assurances that TCI
would run them.
What happened after the com-
mercials werefinished is complicated,
suffice it to say that TCI backed out of
its agreement to show the advertise-
ments and would not give clear rea-
sons for its reversal (The rumor is that
four people�count 'em, four�called
to complain.)
Hager may yet win; he's taking
his case to news organizations and
talk shows, hoping to pressure TCI
into keeping its word. (Interested read-
ers who wish to join the mail cam-
paign can contact me via this newspa-
per for TCI's address.) Hager's wife,
an attorney, is looking into the possi-
ney,�
bility of legal action
Unfortunately, thisDa id hasn't
beaten Goliath � yet � so the sttjj
can't be prettily wrapped up Yet But
if Hager doesn't bnng down this cor-
porate giant, it's the worse for all of asi
Attentive readers will recall this
column's discussion of the Partner
ship for a Drug-Free America The
PDFA runs a million dollars' worth o
drug-scare advertisements even- day
on behalf of its major contnbutors r
alcohol companies, tobacco comjpr
nies, pharmaceutical companies and
drug-testing companies And tho
advertisements are ruh
unhesitatingly, even eagerly, by�V
ery television station, radio statiqp.
newspaper and magazine in existence,
including TCI's many holdings.
TCI is doing its level besClo
squelch the opposing view TCI ha?a
government-granted monopoly to!
provide cable service in the
Bloomington area (among other ar-
eas), and beca use most people get most j
of their information from television,
TCI largely controls the flow of infor-J
mation into cable households m the1
areas it serves
Precisely because it has a gov-
ernment monopoly, TCI has an obli-J
gation to place as few restnetions as j
possible on that flow of information
Neither TCI nor any other cable com- j
pany should be allowed to choose
whose political views may be ex-
pressed and whose may not; who will
be allowed to speak, and who will be
silenced.
Because if they get away wim
doing it to Paul Hager, folks one of
these days, they'll do it to you.
t
The Cl
Scandals p
THf Av �� v. Pj
BilKlintontoda angrik de-
nied reports that he had at ted ethi-
cally during most of hi reign a
governor i I fcrl
"I'll ki. k tJ whoever
said that ii �� gr) linl
shouted, banging i, a n�
table. "My campaign has rl
very hard to bn- , �
voters a scandal a week ebeen
very candid about that"
Qmtoncampaigr tid
reporters to con � ntoi
record before leveling imaging
accusations of ethical behavior.
"Nobody ha- a better record
of violating state el
Bill Clinton said;
"He's made his
rich, he' rewrite
breaking them, he
I ts owned by corp
did favors for
extramarital affair
lerrv Brown top
Brown re-p
ing that he's been I
his limited cam
would allow
Id like to
cal -viid Br
uldn't But
wish to get a chic
Fiowers. 1 don i
ECU SNAPSHOTS
or, how to lie with bars and
We're Electing More SGi
1992 "
1991
1990
1389
1988
I9BC
to
9
T
T
T
2000 4000
SGAs Elected
Kemple Boy
V 1
&
L � m
� . -
F
Captain Intent
?
-M
'
K
v
FredCorner
-�





Opinion
Slie EaBt&arolintan April 2, 1992 $
ISTURBATORS, PEFli
BWU A NEW
AND IVE SOT
mm
f
�w�L
the Wild Side
discriminates
� u graduating high
� se 5 percent
� . : - -hare o�
lips n s is a rt suU of attir-
� � i � : -minorities in-
. - med down tor-
u I solely otv
rdless (their scholesj
- raci prevents thenv
ng tru r istlj .�iei-er'��
I esn't tl at sound like the
�� iffirmative action was
I tosolvi . art) mis is not
-� b it) I ill r.ither reverse
� i Whenever there is an
� - � � � the 5j -tern
it matter the
�. ��.� s) tem is
� � ttive acttonis
ling equal
� rk place, but
� vhich
rproductivel �- . -tenet
�-���� ict �� is an
lea 1 . I� that equal-
ig : xnmi-
5 Pr pi rents of
eedt n -examine
� epts II thev are
foreq l theyi eed to find
rtlefi I � ir dis nmirta-
rer Hammer
inner unknown
nfort � � 'his David hasn't
so the stoty
pretl trapped up Yet But
Iocsc 1 wm this cor-
a orsetorallof tlsi
��� � -t readers will recall thi�
t
� 5 tssion of the Partnen
Druti-Free America The
-1 million dollars'worth of
rvertisements every day
� � ts major contributors �
companies, tobacco comj-
rues, pi irmaceutical companies afflfl
' " bug testing companies And those
:� erti cements are ruhj
unhesitatinglv, even eagerly, by-
K) en television station, radio statkjp.
- "�-re- newspaper and magazine in existe&
�es including TCI s many holdings
has ull TCI is doing its level besitc
jp the r.Kts squelch the opposing view TCI has i
c . ernment-granted monopoly t(
leHcKv pro- provide cable service in th�
'ter Bpprismfj Buvmington area (among other aH
jtion content e.i- a ndbev a use most people get most
I ot their information from television,
TCI largely controls the flow of mfor-
ktter the com- mation into cable households in the
complicated, areas it serves
'of Precisely because it has a gov-
M k1 erti-e- emment monopoly. TCI has an obli-
tne clear rea gahon to place as few restrictions as
rumor is that poniMl on that flow of information.
i tour �called Neither TCI nor any other cable com-
pany should be allowed to chooie
he staking whose political views may be ex-
izarions and pressed and whose may not, who will
ressure TCI be allowed to speak, and who will be
t rested read - si lenced
le mail cam-
trusnewspa- Because if they get away witfv
lager's wife, doing it to Paul Hager folks one of
itothepossi- these days, they'll do it to you
The Clearly Labeled Satire Page
� Anrf nw'v H��m ��rv fanriiri ahmit that m
And we've been very candid about that
Scandals permeate '92 presidential campaign
Thf Amalgamated Press
Bill Clinton today angrily de-
nied reports that he had acted ethi-
cally during most of his reign as
governor of Arkansas.
v "I'll kick the ass of whoever
.said that an angry Clinton
shouted, banging on a nearbv
table. "My campaign has worked
very- hard to bring the American
voters a scandal a week. I've been
very candid about that
Clinton campaign aides urged
reporters to consider Clinton's
record before leveling damaging wouldn't? But 1 don't have the
accusations of ethical behavior. cash to get a chick like Gennifer
"Nobody has a better record Flowers. 1 don't have the big
of violating state ethics laws than
Bill Clinton said one loyal aide.
"He's made his wife's law firm
rich, he's rewritten laws to avoid
breaking them, he's taken rides in
jets owned by corporations he later
did favors for he's even had
extramarital affairs. I'd like to see
Jerrv Brown top that
Brown responded by claim-
ing that he's been as unethical as
his limited campaign budget
would allow.
"I'd like to be more unethi-
cal said Brown. "What politician
money. Since starting this cam-
paign, I've had to settle for $10-a-
night hookers, and I've been very
candid about that
Brown also claims that com-
parisons of marital infidelities are
"unfair and misleading since
Brown is not married. "I'd behav-
ing just as many affairs as Bill
Clinton if I were married Brown
insisted. "Hell, I might be having
affairs unth Bill Clinton
Clinton aides scoffed at
Brown's attempts to compare his
ethics with their man's.
"Bill and Hilary regularly per-
form sexual acts that thirty-eight
states will put you in jail for said
oneaide. "We're talkingabout po-
sitions that Jerry Brown couldn't
get in to if he had a decade of Yoga
Clinton received a boost from
former candidate Tom Harkin,
who last week threw all his scan-
dals to Clinton.
"I've had a few affairs, some
shady financial dealings, some
experimenting with drugs in my
past said Harkin. "I'm giving it
all to Clinton. Hope he can use it
On the Republican side, Presi-
dent Bush and challenger Patrick
Buchanan hastened to establish
that they could be just as unethical
as any Democrat.
"I had affair said Bush.
"Woman told the press, press ig-
nored her. Can't understand it.
Press won't cover my affairs,
how're the American people
s'posed ta know?"
The president noted that he
had had Congressional allies stop
a bill to impeach him.
"Pretty unethical, squashin'
that bill like that Bush said.
"Crushin' out its little life, hushin'
it up good. Been very candid about
that
Buchanan focused mainly on
his political writings to prove his
own ethical unfitness.
"King George thinks a little
affair or two makes him an unethi-
cal man, someone not to be
trusted Buchanan said. "Well,
my friends, I can top him with ust
six words: I've said nice things
about Hitler. And I've been very
candid about that
School bans 'Huck Finn'
ECU SNAPSHOTS
or, how to lie with bars and numbers
We're Electing More SGAs!
CO
9

I
2000 4000 6000
SGAs Elected
8000
10000
Kemple Boy
Th; Amalgamated Press
Black middle-school students
aren't bright enough to under-
stand that Huckleberry Finn is a
denunciation of slavery and rac-
ism, says a school superintendent
who has banned the book from
classrooms.
"Some black people might be
offended by this book, and we
ought to cater to that feeling, even
if it's completely irrational said
Kinfolktown superintendent
Hairv Flaming.
Besides, Flaming says, it
would be a mistake for middle-
schoolers to beallowed to read the
bixik.
"Huckleberry Finn is about a
young white boy who realizes that
his racism is an evil thing, and
who manages to overcome it he
said. "We reallv ought to keep
books like that out of the hands of
By Chris Kemple
students until they're in high
school and they understand that
white people are totally incapable
of overcoming their racism. I
mean, that's just propaganda
The middle-school teacher
who wanted to teach the book
objected that the book's racist lan-
guage is more than justified by its
strong anti-racism stance, but
Flaming rejected that notion.
"I can't understand why
people are always concerned wi th
what a book iys said Flaming.
"Who cares what it snjS � all that
matters is the way it says it
Bv a strange coincidence,
Flaming was unable to recall the
name or grade level of the teacher
involved, making it impossible for
The Amalgamated Pres to get in
touch with him or her.
Kinfolktown Generic Middle
School principal Hurl East sup-
ports Flaming's decision.
Hazardo
"Basically, like most princi-
pals, I have no backbone, and I'm
not really qualified for any other
jobs, so I'm scared of the parents
said East. "I haven't read the book
myself, so I'd be incapable of ex-
plaining what it was about to some
parent who just saw the word
'nigger' in there and flipped. And
of course it would never occur to
me to read the book for myself and
discover what was in there. Yeah,
I gotta say for petty little know-
nothing bureaucrats like me, deci-
sions like this one are a godsend
Flaming denied that his deci-
sion amounted to censorship.
"Anyone who wants the book
can still get it said Flaming. "As
long as they're willing to bring in
a signed note from three qualified
psychologists, to pay a few thou-
sand dollars in usage fees, and to
figure out how to pick the lock on
the library safe
Internal memo
reveals plan
The Avialgamated Press
The State Department is con-
cerned that the United States
may run out of Third World
countries to scapegoat if Presi-
dent Bush is re-elected, accord-
ing to a document leaked to the
press Monday.
The internal memo discusses
State Department fears that Iraq
and Libya may comply too
readily with the meaure the
United States ha prodded the
United Nations to take against
them, leaving too few Third
World countries to sustain the
Bush administration for another
four years.
The document proposes di-
viding up the remaining Third
World countries into football-
field-sized parcels so that the
United States will always have
someone else to pick a fight with
when domestic troubles loom.
By Eric Manning
The Organization
by Marc Hodge
THAT UftTfcR
SWfll FORTH
EPA BEFORE GOING
V AFTER THE DISK
Captain Intent
By Kubeai
Grab Your Nuts & Run
by George Sortiano and Haselrig
Fred's Corner
XWD THKT WM tip MSMEX,
GMA� KEW- KT fcfc� UUGAE-
VtCANu QrffrME. flTUte -t
-S�ur UiWJ�Ydm: orTte
taVsrvMfcs, te �" taM
To?, Kt "SEOoNt COVVSRX.OTI�E
By Sean Pamll





Classifieds
(Eire Saat (Earolinian
April 2,1992
B
I OK Rl F
KJNCI ARMS APART MEMS lOM and
�- -� m apartments, Energy efficient.
H m i� �hcrs in townarpeted. kitchen
tpptuMCH vtiw vai�-r arid sevter paid
mahej drv-r hookups Now taking applies
rMLI all 752 wi S
IIMAI r R(XMMAU WAVTEDtorapart
n�-nt 1 2 Motft fnm campus 2 Mod from
downtown upmarket & laundromat
j�nth includes rent utilities, phone &
cat 794411
. All ABIT NOW 2 01 bedroom duple
Wh 13 � SKSaM Rf)t�2U
� "�sae 1 or 2 bedrx-m duple 2�7B
- $27 mm (919936-M�3
FOR RENT X)5 East 13m St 2-3bwlraoim
available Mav IS ��� I ft 758
H44 Thanks Susan Sloan Any questions or
problem or prabteaai iali7H;M4 or757
.�
ROOM FOB REN1 Itfredroomduptei I
� h, dcposil AailaMe May 1" Not lo
Lencetoff I'ark Bus Mop njthr at house ' all
I iisa or Shana at 752 CK2
HMAlt R�K)MMAFF NEEDED Ton
� is. Mj, � I'jn 12 rent and utilities
.� � Squan I jp�-r lassntan or gradu
u tudent preferred Non-emofcet 'all 35
1 H'KiMMMIS NEEDED Nob km ten
� . ; �. irooml wmhouai in May Km
rtd rn-�t Mhool c-ar 75 deposit each
� r. r.l and 1 �� utiliti 7S7 BUS
KoommaII WANTED Femak
f lor 2 BltownhoMM W 'D DW Wa
tet mm i jHi-inrcnt 1 '2 utilitsi phi M
in EC I t-iis route Must Mi- Q1-W77
invwuoi si POtBENl 2M I I 2bath
� lebte anytime � ah Tim
� � - orDA �t355-5655 Leave m�
MMAI I BOOMMATI NEEDS): for (all
� ring '� $150.00 pet month
I . ibfitiei m Rlv� Estates Semi
furnished CaHMtndy 931 777 � tacey931
UAIIAHII FOt SLMMIR SCHOOL) I
� . �� . . bethtowrthotewat ! wm( )aks
- j. � $; � Ji-�fsit Available Mas
. 8178
ROOMMATI WANTED 2 ted room apt 1
Ml from I Li OH �ummit St I'reter teMM
- � � required SI - plus 12 ulilitei
pertn mil IwmdryfaoltttHindMded Avail
� , ! irv ' n kr drinker OJC 752-fBH
Ft MAI I ROOMMATI WANTED MusH�
� slilBtB.imn Wn�r 1$17fltl (-tew-and
. ufcltttei ' ail Mi�� i � 2-0638 LhsDmi
j mile from � BApuS
IOR RIM OR Bl AC M RENTAL Emerald
1-1 (Kt-jnview Ifc r 2ba twius.avail
, i ' � 5 nHlee fa.1lltv 'staff emit
Rent ienns A iatr negotiable I'1 154-4444
I OK SAI I
SEIZED CARS: trucks boats 4-wheeters
motor homes bv FBI. IRS. DEA Available
your area now Call 800-3T8 3388 Ext C 54
PAY IN-ST ATE T UTTION? Read Iksiiifllii
SjiUe and Tuition flu practical pampWet
wntten bv an attorney on the in-state resi
dervoy application process For Sale Student
Stores Wnr,ht Building
FOR SALE; Diamond Back bike (real condi
hon) $275 and Smith-Corona typewriter (like
new) $125
FOR SALE Crate oHOXL guitar amplifier H
warts $250 830-1182
RENT OR BUY: A loft at a reasonable price
Order now for the fall" 7SI 3M
LANEY GUITAR AMP HEAD AC sene
protutie Excellent condition Slllneg Crate
shaker cabinet 212"elestian speakers ste
rc-o and mono inputs Like new W 757
25V7
BIKE FOR SALL S hwinn Sprint M HMHl
unisex, blue, rarely used and in lantastK shape
Must sell' S125all Dana at TA M15 Creat
bike"
7DAY6NICHT Flonda Bahamasandc mis.
vacation Two inkers for s ,� � oduntil
Sept 1MV2
FOR SALE: 1VM Nissan Maxirru blue w
blue interior Diaded w sunroof Talks'
$4�K) Yamaha trump�-i ;rejt condfHon
Eellent for beginner 1200 I all Wl 14
Leave message for Le�-
APPLE II OS: 15 A 5 25 drives orator mori
tor 1 25MgKAM Irrugewnter II printer Too
muib viftware to list Sall lov at 7H
44
BUSINESS MAJORS: IBM PS2 Model 80.
dnve, 4ii Mg hard drive monchrome
monitor, 1 Mg RAMO0MW E�oH Vsord
and additional vifrwareall l� al 7-
4444
ALMOST NEW: 4 month oid Fun mt btfct
arni earth cruiser with l�k Make offer 7S
1247
FOR SALFj Uamond ba k bike 'great .�-�),
tionj S27t(�I and SouthMOM t pewnter
Mike new) $12� all 752 01M
R)R SALLKollerbladeshghningWlh Sue6
(wome-n's 7 12) KgularU $19900 Now
C12l�i VSornoive If inter. �� : i!757 OT
after UK
S, KVK I SOU-f.KI I)
NEED MONEY FOR COLLEGE? SFAMS
locates pnvate vector hnarv tal aid for college
students Call Marshal) Yount 1-800-23JMJ771
TYPING: Error free quKk and dependable
at reasonable oust Excellent typing and proof
reading skills (grammar punctuation, sen-
tence structure etcCall 1'auline at757 3693
GRADUATING STUDENTS: Introducing
our new computerized resume distribution
service to state regional national firms Save
time, money effort while maximizing your
resume exposure Select 5I0 riuii r firms or
tirvcountv schools Mail resume and check
hirSW 9i bv M03S2 to National Collegiate
Resume CO Box 24K4, Chariotte N( 2K247
BETTER RESUMES GET JOBS Don t take
charvtes w hen first impressions count A bet
ter resurm- will open the nght d(xrs I tan
help vou applv for wck with a perv-nalied
)ob application letter and resume designed to
showcase .our talents If you're serious about
the future iall " I'm a pmfessional wnter
with over fifteen . rl expenence in market
ing and resume writing When you n? ready
to move anead Ctl Mark at 8304972 any-
time
MILLER'S TYPING AND WORD PRO-
CESSING: fast act urate service guaranty
Tic k up and dehv er. available 155 1196
WHY PAY AND STARVE TO LOSE
WEIGHT?: Save and eat to satisfy hunger
(even for sweets) and get fast permanent
weight loss to tfx size that's nght for vou and
fel better than ever while vou dnp 1 I H 1
ft. dailv 'DiaNtKs 4 hvp'glyenuts too)
Mavbe even make a little monev without
overhauling vur lifesfvle to 0M weight or
keep it off Free infonnation lv mail 155-
I'I KSONM S
late We'll party all night til the morning light
Love, Alpha llu
PERSONALS
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now raking I eases (or 1
bedfaon, 2 bedroom &
I llicienty Ap;trinients
CALL'752-2865
HFLP WANTED
PT)STAI. JOBS AVAILABLE Manv pirs,
tionsf.reatbenhts8B8s33B�338BExl P
1712
1K1 f TRAVEL Ainounersand. misships
StuJenfc. alvi needed Ihrislnvas spring and
summer for amusement park employment
( all sim m liW E.i I �AiA
WANT ED: (arm-n to start ganung gn.upin
I ,n-�-nville s�-nd nsum- of experience with
name address and ll.pfv.iw Id P.O li"
M390aH�rM N r'
1 ASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY' Ass. n.li.
pr.Klu.ts at homeall toll free 1 hi11 4.7
J5M t "2(1
HEADING FOR EUROPETHISSUMMER?
let there anvtirne for onlv SlS with
AIRHITCH ' 'Reported in U-t s Gol and the
New York Times Alv. super low mund trip
H�luWlCIMil MKH1TC H 212 SM2'��'
ALASKA SLMMTRFMPLOYMENT: fish
i-ru-s Lmiti $5000 month Pm transfxirta
hop' Koomi Board'CNer SI Mi openings No
ei�.ience nen-ssarv Male or female For
� �mplovment program -all Student Emplov
mm s.t. i at 1-3M "�4s 41 '�" t WB
T Kf RINGGIRl. REGISTRATION (all
Utti at 75� 4177 Ijeave name and numf� r
I ontst at the fclho April 1 First prize 8MB
2nd ISO rd S25 Ten bathing suits will be
given awav
SPRING ON THE OUTER BANKS Sun
Realty evterKls a sp�s ul inv itati. .n 11 sluJents
at Eastt arohnatovat atHKithisspnngon the
sunnv CHjter Banks of NC thn.tigh Mav 71
i ertam restni tions applv B380MCttfN) '1
posit MMiftdall for availabihtii 1 HIXt
04474
Pi DELTAti rtwaodaltt M i was i total
Mai let s do it again real soon' The brothers
of i'hi Kappa I'si
ALPHA PHI: Keep up that winning softbali
record'
ATTENTIONALLCAMPUS: Come find out
the answer to "Who's the best looking girl at
ECU Monday night April 6, come to the
Attic to the annual i'l Kappa Alpha Greek
Goddess IS foot widescreen TV for NCAA
Championship and $1 50 for 32 o beers
Don't miss out' See you there1
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS: Don't for
get to support the Gamma Sigma Sigma
AJpha Sigma PM can dnve benefitting the
Dream Factory. March 30- Apnl M in front of
the Student Store
DELTA SIC: Thanks for a great time last
week' We'll party with you guys any time'
Dae, Delta Zeta
HEY DELTA ZETA; Formal is only 2 davs
away' Are you fully prepared7 Get ready'
THEGREAT PlRATEPURPLEzCOLDPIG-
SKIN PIG-OUT PARTY. Is ust around the
corner Fnday Apnl 10 under the stadium,
the Fantastic Shakers fireworks, pig cooking
contest, carnival ndes and more Activities
start at 8 00 I'M
CONGRATULATIONS! To the new execu
tive committee of I'l KAPPA PHI Rart says
Perform as you said or you'll end up dead
NKOYO Happy birthday baby You re al
most a woman (just kidding) For now. you'll
lust have to be my ladv not my girl You are
mv sunshine One more year and you'll be
able to stumble anmnd legally (just kidding7'
I love vou and wish you all the best - stick in
there' Dive Always, Pookey Butt
DISPLAY CLASSIHHJ
StudentsgJJ
Nonstudents����
Dsplayads
Deadline
, � ,h Tu�sdav 4 p,m, for I nursdav issue
Friday 4 p,m� for Tuesday issue and luesaay tr.
0ljie�3BL�M?!l5!?5
is now accepting applications for:
ADVERTISING PRODUCTION MANAGER
� Responsible lor computer design of all
non-camera ready ads.
� Must have and maintain a minimun 2.0G.KA.
�Must be able to work AT LEAST SUMMER AND
FALL of 1992
� AtfKHMj knowledge ol Aldus Freehand. Page Maker and
scanning equipment preferred.
Apply at Cooperative Education, second floor GCB. r
with The East Carolinian second floor publication bldg
APPLICATION DEADLINE IS APRIL 15,1992
WANTED TOBLY
W ANT EIiga lion breeder aquarium cheap
1 ight kit and hood if possible Pump and filter
rt needed Call �1 �
Slhg Saat �ar0ltman
Applications are now being accepted for
ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVES.
� Candidates must have and maintain a minimum 2.0 G.P.A.
� Must have own transportation
� Must be able to work at least the summer and fall of 1992
Apply at Cooperative Education second floor GCB
or wtth The East Carolinian
second floor publications bklg
Tcalton Deadline is
Apnl 3, 1992
The
Nail Detigner
25 OFF
Any Nai! Service For
The Month Of April
127-AOakmont Dr
355-4225
A Htauuful Hate lo I jvc
�All New
�An. Pruy1oKenf
INIVKKSHYAPARTMKNTS
28V9 1- 5ih Street
�1xaiH Near ECU
�Netr Major Shopping Center
�Airoii Pram Highway Pilrol Suiinn
Ijmiied Oder i DO a munih
C�NMI I T. or Tiinimy Willi�mi
756 7815 or �30 1937
Office open Apt 8, 12 5 30pm
�AZALEA (JARDENS
(lew �nd ftm m It4wn SimiaSa aiuiaiiB.
cttf-rgyffTnl,flo� ��wimdw��r.�MhMl,aimt,
able TV ' �- �'� i in tin ���!� tMOtmntih. �
nMhiu MORIlJ-MOM? RENTALS cmfUta
�� AfanmMiralnnbatlmMinAutaUwra
arv H - - Vtllcy�wtijjr Huh
imiad J T. or Tommy William
7567815
I UK MDfTlUMAUafCwMwiikatwt
mg part tim�oll- tors Wevsill train AppU
at 12t6( harlesBlvd
IMAGE CONSULTANT NEEDED. High
imome potential t�iellent parttime or
fulltimr opportunityomplete training For
appointment .all C'll'i 714 895 I
$10-3�)UP WEEKLY: Mailing bnHhures'
SpareFull time Set own hours' Frve lt.nls'
Send self addressedlamped envelope Pub
lishers(S)iVO.8�$W37DtorhHrt 27717
SMALL BUSINESS: t ineone for light
receptiins�-reianal iuties 3 days (Mon
Fn7 10 JOflO AM 5 (� h Call "2 224
leave mer Ytim A ofCinth
LOST CAT reorae Ahit- rt i last
v-en in Tar kiver Apts 4 v up- t girls, if
found please all 71 17K2
RACfttl. WMA.iY Hayy: ?t birthday1
This waafeMt I hM You mean
WHyMng !cm o� Ko�er
SAM MAI Hi NY, SCOTT BROWN, AND
ROB S T EVEN Your formal dates were gog
gling Too bad vu wouldn't l.t longer, than
us Your mudasass WOKU
IOTA PLEDGE CLASS: Keep up the good
vsork The end is getting (.loser Ikothers of
Sigma u
SIGMA NU: Spring Formal is right around
the corner Get Some
TO SOME BLUE-EYEDGUY: Hope all your
tests went well this week Happv 22rid on
Friday' Love, Julie
THETA CHI: The Elbo awaits, so don't be
ur Time
is Now!
PROUD
IRATES
Our quartz time piece features The Pirate and the
phrase that rings victoryI Believe Made of
solid mahogany, this clock glows with a quality
finish. You can see it in the Student Bookstore on
campus. If makes the perfect graduation gift. We
will engrave the brass nameplatc to personalize
each iUhk with the person's name and degree, or
whatever you like! The clock measures 6" s 6 34"
and the timepiece requires one A A hattcry. This is
Officially Licensed. A portion of (he proceeds goes
to the KCll Education Foundation (Pirate (Turn.
TO ORDER WITH A CREDIT CARD,
CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-659-7985!
I em to 6 pm Eeatern In Graanville, pkMae caw 321-1771.
24 Hour FAX:j(919) 291j0440
Desk dock '$4'? b Brass name pale, ada'I'lO 56' Rease include $6 SO per dock for packing, postage insurance and u�
To order by mail, pont what you would le engraved on the brass name plate (two Ines up to 26 characters per line) and send rt with -ca
name, address, and phone number Include your check with drivers license number or your VISA Mastercard number wtth expiration aai
Announcements
lill. 0.AX -USBiAWALLiANCt
S�Kial support, advocacy, activities Every
one welcome gays, lesbians, bisemals con
i enuni family and friends Call F. I aiunsel
mg center 7S7 Afrfi I for information regarding
meeting time ami place
NEWMAN
LAIliOUC 51 UDtNI ttNItR
Th Newmanatholu Student Catholic Cen
ter mv ites v ou to worship with them Sunday
Masses 11 10 am and HTO pm Al the
Newman enter �51 E lOthSt Two houses
fnim the Fletcher Musk Building For more
information contact Fr Paul Vaeth. 757 WI
iLAUlLRLVALUAHONi
lunng the week of Apnl 6 10, a survey of
student opnKin of mstniction will be con-
ducted at EC I Questionnaires will be
dishbuted in classes with enrollments greater
than five All students will have an opportu
nity to en press opinions on the teaching ef fee
tiveness of their instructors The survey will
be conducted dunng class time and will take
appmwmately 15 minutes to complete Shi
dent participation ts voluntary and no identi
ties are requested Instructors have been re
quested to leave the classroom while theques
ttonnaires are completed Resulta or the sur
vey will be distributed to instuctors after final
jrnKte, have been posted The teaching eftec
tiveneas questionnaire was created by the
Faculty Senate Committee for Teaching Ef
fechveness and the Office of Planning and
Institutional Research The results of the sur
vey, along with other information and fac
tors are used foradministrativeevaluahonof
meiMtTuchirbythesupervisingadministahir
within the department or division.
SUiMMLR SCHOOL
im ROOM RLS LR V Al ION
51CNUPLNT0RMAI10N
KesideniT hall rwim payments for Summer
School 1992 will be accepted in the Cashier's
Office, Room 105, Spilman Building, begin
mng April 6,1W Room assignments will be
made in the Department of University Hous
mg, 201 Whichard Building. April 8-� The
rent for a term of summer school is S1HS
(Cotton and Jams Halls�$225) for a semi
private room and $270 (Cotton and larvis
Halls�$315) for a private room Residence
halls to be used for summer school are: Cot-
ton (women), larvis (men); Slay (co-ed)
prtl. FAMILY
HAt-TlCE CENTER
Winding Your Weigh Down, a rone week
weight kiss program will be held at the Fam-
ily Practice Center beginning Thursday, April
9fTom5T5p mto6:i5pm Call Mary Memer
at 551 S459 Monday through Friday from 8-5
to register or for more information. Class size
is limited and a fee la charged
STUPJfr" "CHANCE
ECU students It's not too late to apply for
NSE, Leicester. England, or Acedia Univer
slty for fall or spring replacements The deed
lineisappmachingsostopbytheofficeNOW!
Openings are still available New Mexico,
Maine, California, Ltah. Nova Scoria, or En
gland" Spend an exciting semester or year in
another state or country' And remember, you
only pay ECU Tuition! Come by and see the
list of universities available Contact Stephanie
Evancho in Brewster A 117 or call 757-6769
lor more information
PUBLIC SERVICE
The merchant of ones Industrial i'ark, Hwy
264 northeast, Greenville will be hosting the
second annual "Flying for the Children"
ballon rally Saturday. May 2 from 2 p m. until
9 p.m. The event will include helicopter ndes,
hot air balloon rides and other vanous attrac-
tion including live bands and local talent
demonstrations. All activities will take place
at Jones Industrial Park across from Agri-
Supply in Greenville All proceeds from the
event will be donated to the Children's hospi
tal of Eastern North Carolina during the tele
vised Children's Miracle Network Telethon
May 30 and M To volunteer or more inform
tion contact Beth Potter 919 757 3310.
SENIOR SHOW
Dawn Edward exhibits her senior show in
Environmental Design at the Greenville Mu-
seum of Art During March 29 through April
5 Reception is Saturday, April 4,1 pm to 4
t,
ECU BIOLOGY CLUB
PLANT SALE! ECU Biology Club, Thursday
and Friday. Apnl2-3from7 30am. tol p.m.
in Roon BS111, Biology Greenhouse
ECU SCHOOL
of music mum for
MARCH 31-APRIL 6.1991
TUES , MAR. 31�Jonathan Jolley, voice, Se-
nior Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 7 p.m.
free). THU RS. APR 2�EddieTurnage,string
bass, Senior Redtal (Fletcher Recital Hall.7
p.m free), and ECU Concert Choir, Brett
Watson, director (Wright Auditorium, 8:15
p.m free) FRI. APR 3�Dale Aucion,
sazophone. Graduate Recital (Fletcher Re-
cital Hall. 7 p.m free). SAT. APR. 4�Horn
Workshop (Fletcher Musk Center, all-day.
757 6331) SUN APR. 5� Faculty Concert
featuring Fritz Gearhart. violin, and Paul
Tardiff.ptarw (Fletcher Recital Hall, 3:15p.m
free).and Nicole Bvrd,accompanying Gradu
ate Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall. 7 p.m. free).
MON APR 6�The Percussion Players.Tony
Cox and Stacey Loggins. directors (Fletcher
Recital Hall. 815 pm. free).
F,CU rOETRY
m8UMMrrWiBAPfJL
CREENVTLLE - The Anal spring semester
meeting of the ECU Poetry Forum, will be
held Thursday, April I in MSC, Room 247, at
8pm. Dr Peter Makuck, the forum's director,
sett listeners are invited to attend. Poeta who
would like earn feedback on their poem
should bring along nve to eve� copies.
ECU EQUESTRIAN CLUB
ECU Equestrian Club meeting. Tuesday.
Apnl7, at 4 30 pm in Medenhall Room 14
Officer elections will be held New candi
dates and new member, welcome! For more
information call Debbie at 752-4915 or Eileen
at 830-3931
ALPHAEPSILONDFITA
Attn: Professional students. Ever wonder
what youll do if you're rejected by the profes-
sional school of your choke' Learn what to
do to prevent rejection and how to deal with
it if it does occur Dr Bill Brown will discuss
this topk at this week's Alpha Epsilon Delta
meeting at 7 OOpmonTues Apnl 7 in Flanagan
202. All pre professional students are urged
to attend.
P.U.S.H
THROUGH THF�ARRFRS
If you would like to work towards reducing
the architectural, as well as the athtudinal
barriers that students with special needs are
faced with every day. then come to the next
meeting of PUSH. (People United to Sup
port the Handicapped) Thge meeting will be
4iXWi�onTueeday,April7in8cMendenhaB
Student Center We all face challenges every
day,so please come help raise awareness and
get a message heard
PEER HEALTH FPUCAIflRS
Any student interested in becoming a Peer
Health Educator mus attend one of the fol-
lowing informational meeting! Wednesday
Entertainment
Gutterboy f
By Jim Shamlin
Staff Writer
From psychedelic to disxo,
through new wave and rap. to the
tinny drivel that dominates today's
pop charts, music ht g me thn ugh
sxi many phases that manv listeners
have forgotten what real Rock 'n'
Roll sounds like
Forty years after the pulse of
American culture faded into the
background i if the Dntish Invasion,
Cutterbov is making vake-upcall
that is lon overdue.
The (11 er 14 the band's debut
album won't turn manv heads. It's
j a simple black-and-white photo-
! graph of the band; five people who
' are anything but prettv The look is
i retro-sixties, five guys dressed like
j La?nny and Squigv only one of
theguysisn'taguvatall,butaslick-
headed biker-babe One thing is
� certain. Gutterboy won't be selling
j any albums with sex appeal
Of course, though manv have
: forgotten, real music fans don't buy
"albums for sex appeal, but for mu-
sic. In that respect, Gutterboy has
plenty to offer�pure-bkxxled rock-
�n-roll from the forgotten age, when
classes where made of glass, not
plastic; cars were made of steel, not
aluminum; and bands were made
Xf musicians, not models.
The 12-track CD opens with
SheGone a relaxed, simple piece
with an almost tmpical feel that
comes from a strange interplay of
saxophone and guitar. The rest of
lhe album is closer to "traditional"
Rixrk'n'Roll, ragged -edgeand driv-
ing
Gutterbov explores the bound-
aries of the genre, from the upbeat
Drive of "Far Away" and "Every
Other N'ight to the soft balladesque
of "Bus Stations and Tram Yards"
and "Let's Get Lost Even though
i
Ladybugs
risk death;
Dangerfield
in new film
the sound of each
number has it's
own identity,
there is a stylistic
integrity to the al-
bum� a distinc-
tive sound that
remains constant
through the al-
bum.
Gutterbov s
integrity comes
from being a
band in the true
servseoftheword
� musicians
working to-
gether, not war-
ring for center-
stage. VVhilealive
and organic, the
music maintains
an element of pre-
cision Every
sound seems to
belong and noth-
ing obtrudes. Ev-
en, track opens
and closes sol-
idly, with a preci-
sion that can only
come from care-
ful composing.
The music is
built around a
standard power
trio: drummer
Johnny Koncz
lavs down a
steady pulse, the
basic rhythm
with an occa-
sional counter-
rhvthm, switch-
ing tempos without:
Eric Hulsizer s bass
thev' re su pposed to dt
pliment the rhythm
powering the ha rmonj
istDannv Hulsizer bl
r
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Apnl 8 from 4- 5 pm or Thursday Apnl 9 rtom
7S pm These meetings will be held mf
Student Health Service itesource Item W
must attend one of the meetings to become
Peer Health Educator Application forms i
be available at this bme For more inform
hon call 757-�7s4.
-rarr- skin
f rNTR STREENINC
Thursday. April 9.9i00 am 12.30 pm Re
HA. B. C, D, and E in Mendenhall Studf
Center Sign-up is reoammended Call 757
6793 for additional information.
WFl 1MTSS FAlt
Tuesday, April 7, 10:00 am - 4-00 p
Mendenhall Student Center GreatRo0"
more information, call 757-6793 Sf0
by: the Office of Health Protection and Vf�-
Being, Recreational Services, and the
dent Health Center.
The next Alpha Phi Sigma meeting ��� ?
April 6 at ftOO pm, in 218 Rqpdek Anvon
interested is invited to attend. If you
sjtieshom ointactMelisea South at 9J1-75W-
When Rodney Dangerfield
;1 receives top billing in any cin-
I ematic feature, that feature be-
comes a Rodney Dangerfield
I film. Such is the case with Lady-
'� bugs, his newest vehicle.
Rodney's first starring role
I came in Easy Money, a 1983 film
in which he had to give up all his
I bad vices to gain an inheritance.
� Like Easy Money, his latest film is
I a pleasant comedy which the en-
l tire family on en;oy
i In ladybugs. Dangerfield
plays Chester Lee, a salesman
Jor Mullen Industries (we are
never told what they sell), vying
t for a promotion to the upper ech-
elon of his company. Once he
receives the promotion he plans
"to marry his girlfriend and begin
living the "good life
The only hurdle between
� -Chester and his dreams is a boss
who does not want to promote
him. While "kissing the boss
"ass which is what Chester's
successclass taught him, Chester
SeeLadybug.page8
Whit�
thanj
By
In the midst
about that very si
Final Four and pr
will find additior
lcxal theater show
Woody Harrti
and dire:ted by
Bull Durham to thj
White Mm
ball what Bull Du
� makes the gar
ing on the details
In the film. V
an ex-college basl
living by hustiina
tral Los Angeles.
his baseball cap I
shorts. He utilu
cannot play baskf
be lucky on the q
placing money-
lar to the one Toil
onlv with much
Billy hustle
the film opens,
he offers him
together. The;
tal king big, then
stakes with any
With Billy beir
court, Sidney's i
Billv as Sidney
f
C.AhaarMFTAmi
Gamma Beta Phi BaMnhenvOirn�tin��an5
April Sat fcOOpm. Meat In Room f
MendenheH. We will ttoct offic� ��
youthtfri a.
Ultimate Experience
Th. VORTEX, Carowinds $5 5 ���" P
ol loops, spins and drops over 2,040 feel of steal
1
T'
'





E Entertainment
�he �aHt (Uarolintan
April 2, 1992
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
iRftllNlAN f ASS1F
r rhursdty issue.
afit (Earulmfan
accepting applications tor:
PRODI CTION MANAGER
2.0G.P.A
MM MM IIIK WD
d Page Maker and
flooi GCB, or
ublicalion bldg.
bN DEADLINE IS APRIL 15,1952
ast (Carulmtan
: i ceptedfor
ING SALES REPRESENTATIVES.
maintain a minimum 2.0 G.P.A.
nsportation
�rk at least the summer and fall of 1992
cation second floor GCB
Mian
itronsbidg
ppik.tiion Deadline is
Vpril v 1992
R

k tor packing postage, insurance and tax.
�s per in� and sand it with your
�'� M i ard number h �xpiraiion data
LNUsB
I
I
LJ2ELIA
t I
Ibythi pr tea
n v Jix, :PSS
wEfukffl �
irnfinH
Iidents in
ILRs
. IRb rod in HM
ks trw iHitmilMi
�special iwaei an
m to KM rvt
niU-d to Sup
jp m�ting vsill he
fintcMneaeal
, Mhaaai mn
Im' aw jrvrwss and
iCAIQ&S
h -coming a Peer
one of the M-
ln-i! Wednesday
� . 'hurvJav Apnl9frwn
pro � ���rings will ho held in the
crvka taowea Room. You
ittend onof th� meetings to become a
aMt Educate Application forma will
bi available at this time For more informa-
i 757 M
-FREE- SMN
LAHQIR SCREENING
�n prtl9.9 00 am 12.30pm. Room
SA. S, D, and E in Mendenhall Student
ign up is recommended Call �57-
i addMtoml information.
WELLNESilAlR
�� Vpnl 7 IOiki am - 400 pm
nttal Shjd�-nt t. enter Great Room For
man information call 757-679? Sponsored
b the Office of H alth Protection and Wll-
�earta, KacNaMaMl Services and the 9tu-
dent Health tenter
The next pha Phi Sigma meeting will be
Apnl h at bBJ pnx in 218 Ragsdai. Anyone
interested is invited to attend. If you haveajny
c(uesrions contactMelissa Smith at 931-7549.
GAMMA MFTAPHI
Cdmma Beta Phi members: Our next meeting
is Apnl 8 at M� pm. Meet in Room 244
Mendenhall W vvtfj elect officers. St
vou there'
Gutterboy finds integrity
By Jim Shamlin
Staff Writer
From psychedelic to disco,
through new wave and rap, to the
tinny drivel that dominates today's
pop (harts, music has gone through
jo many phases that many listeners
have forgotten what real Rock 'n'
Roll rounds like.
Forty yem after the pulse of
American culture faded into the
Kh kground of the Bntish Invasion,
c .iittrrhov is makinga wake-upcall
thai i- long overdue.
Ihe COVei of the band's debut
album won't turn manv heads. It's
, simple black-and-white photo-
�ph of the band; five people who
are anything but pretty. The kxk is
retro -sixties, five guvs dressed like
I enny and Squtggy only one of
the guvs isn't a guv at al I. but a slick-
headed biker-babe. One thing is
u'rtain l .utterhov won't be selling
an albums with sex appeal.
cX Course, though manv have
forgotten, real music fansdon'tbuv
albums for sex appeal, but for mu-
s. In that respect, Gutterboy has
btentytoceter-puie4)kx)dedrock'
n -roll from the forgotten age, when
glasses where made of glass, not
plastic; cars were made of steel, not
aluminum; and bands were made
of musicians, not rrxxlels.
Fhe 12-track CD opens with
She Gone a relaxed, simple piece
with an almost tropical feel that
comes from a strange interplav of
saxophone and guitar. The rest of
the album is closer to "traditional"
Rik n Roll, ragged-edgeanddriv-
ing.
v .u tterbov explores the bound-
anes oi the genre, from the upbeat
drive of "Far Avvav" and "Everv
Other ight to the soft ballad esque
Of Bus Stations and Train Yards"
and "Let's Get Lost Even though
Ladybugs
risk death;
Dangerfield
in new film
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
When Rodney Dangerfield
receives top billing in any cin-
ematic feature, that feature be-
comes a Rodney Dangerfield
film. Such is the case with Luiy-
bugs, his newest vehicle.
Rodnev's first starring role
came in Eaity Money, a 1983 film
in which he had to give up all his
bad vices to gain an inheritance.
Like Easy Man ey, h i s I a tes t f i I m i s
; a pleasant comedy which the en-
1 tire family Chn enjoy
In Ltdlfbugt, Dangerfield
plays Chester Lee, a salesman
JJor Mullen Industries (we are
I never told what they sell), vying
w for a promotion to the upper ech-
ielon of his company. Once he
receives the promotion he plans
to marry his girlfriend and begin
living the "good life
The only hurdle between
-Chester and his dreams is a boss
who does not want to promote
him While "kissing the boss'
ass which is what Chester's
success class taught him, Chester
See Lady bug, page 8
the sound of each
number has it's
own identity,
there is a stylistic
integrity to theal-
bum � a distinc-
tive sound that
remains constant
through the al-
bum.
Gutterboy's
integrity comes
from being a
band in the true
sense of the word
� musicians
working to-
gether, not war-
ring for center-
stage. Whilealive
and organic, the
music maintains
an elementof pre-
cision. Every
sound seems to
belong and no th-
ing obtrudes. Ev-
er)' track opens
and closes sol-
idly, with a preci-
sion that can only
come from care-
ful composing.
The music is
built around a
standard power
trio: drummer
johnny Koncz
lays down a
steady pulse, the
basic rhythm
with an occa-
sional counter-
rhythm, switch-
ing tempos without missing a beat;
Eric Hulsizer's bass lines do what
thev're supposed to dothev com-
pliment the rhythm, never over-
powering the harrnonv; and guitar-
ist Dannv Hulsizer blends in a solid
Photo courtaay Mercury Entertainment
Eric Hulsizer,
most talented
Barb Morrison, Dito, vJohnny Koncz and Danny Hulsizer form one of the
bands of the decade, Gjfterboy Their debut album is well worth a listen.
harmony with a few graceful flour-
ishes, never leaving holes in the
music. To round out the band. Barb
Morrison adds saxophone and an
occasional acoustic guitar, giving
the music a fuller, richer sound
while lead singer Dito's soulful voice
creates the foreground.
Vocal precision is another of
Gutterboy's fortes � their voices
See Gutter, page 9
White men' prove capable of more
than just dribbling in new release
By Christie Woodleif
Staff Writer
In the midst of basketball mania arrives a film
about that very sport. While Americans watch the
Final Four and prepare for the NBA playoffs, many
will find additional basketball entertainment in any
local theater showing White Men Can't Jump.
Wtxxiy Harrelson stars in the latest film written
and directed by Ron Shelton, the man who brought
Bull Durham to the silver screen.
White Men Cant Jump does for outdoor basket-
ball what Bull Durham did for minor league baseball
� makes the game appear larger than life by focus-
ing on the details of individual player's lives.
In the film. Woody Harrelson plays Billy Hoyle,
an ex-college basketball player who now makes his
living by hustling pick-up basketball games in cen-
tral Los Angeles. Billy acts like a chump by wearing
his baseball cap backwards and donning long gray
shorts. He utilizes the stereotype mat white men
cannot play basketball to his advantage. He claims to
be lucky on the court then taunts his opponents into
placing money on his ability. The scam is very simi-
lar to the one Tom Cru ise uses in The Color of Money,
only with much smaller stakes.
Billy hustles Sidney Deane (Wesley Snipes) as
the film opens. Sidney is so impressed with Billy that
he offers him the business proposition of working
together. The scam involves Sidney showing off and
talking big, then offering to play rwo-on-two for high
stakes with any partner of his opponent's choosing.
With Billy being the sole white man around the
court, Sidney's opponents will most probably choose
Billy as Sidney's partner. This, of course, should put
money in Billy's and Sidney's pockets.
After playing together for a time Billy and
Sidney plan to enter the citywide two-on-two
tournament with a $5,000 top prize. The rest of
the tale chronicles the escapades and heartaches
of Billy's and Sidney's lives.
If the story had remained on the basketball
court, the film would have scored.
As the film stands, though, there are too
many problems off the court to make this pic-
ture of the same caliber as Bull Durham. The
three leads in WhiteMenCan't Jump � Harellson,
Snipes and Perez � have too much clutter
surrounding them to allow the viewer to be-
come familiar with their desires and needs.
The women in the film have no depth.
Sidney's wife and Billy's girlfriend appear spo-
radically to talk sensibly to their men about
ending their hustling ways. Billy's girlfriend
(Rosie Perez) is studying to be on Jeopardy to
make enough money so that she and Billy can
pay off the thugs from whom they borrowed
money. Sidney's wife (Tyra Ferrell) sulkily
watches their child all day because Sidney will
not let her work. Both actresses try desperately
to bring life to their small roles, but the script
does not provide the freedom to do so.
The subplot with the thugs chasing Billy
throughout the film is needless. That action
detracts from the main issue of how basketball
serves as a way of introducing us to two interest-
ing characters. Even Perez's character border-
lines on useless. She really serves no purpose
See White boys, page 9
Ultimate Experience
Photo courtesy Carowinds
The VORTEX Carowinds $5 5 million atandup roller coaster is the ultimate experience in thrill rides. Riders travel standing up through a series
of loops, spins and drops over 2,040 feet of steel track The VORTEX represents Carowinds single largest expenditure for a new product.
T
f
Current and
Coming
Currently Running
Art Exhibition: A variety of work by three members of
the an faeulty at UNC-Chapel Hill is now on display. The
exhibitors are painters Dennis Zaborowski and Richard
Kinnaird and primmaker Beth Grabowski, whose prints
include combinations of realistic and abstract images.
Running through April 18. Place; Mendenhall Gallery (second
floor of the west wing). Admission is free and open to the public
whenever the center is open. This exhibition is sponsored by the
ECU Student Union Visual Arts Committee.
Art Exhibition: ECU senior student Dawn Vanitta
Edwards has her art work in various media on view. The
exhibition features pen and ink architectural designs.
models, wood designs and metal sculptures. Edwards is a
candidate for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in environ-
mental design. Upon graduation from ECU. she plans to
continue her design studies at the graduate level at NCSU.
Running through April 5. Place: Greenville Museum of Art.
Art Exhibition: ECU School of Art Undergraduate Exhi-
bition is now being shown. Area curriculum coordinators
in the School of Art select the most outstanding works
submitted by over 700 undergraduate students. Curricu-
lum areas represented in the show are foundations, wood
design, metal design, textile design, fabric design, weav-
ing design, printmaking. painting, drawing, ceramics.
sculpture, communication arts, environment design and
video. Awards will be selected by Trinkett Clark, curator
of the Twentieth Century Art for the Chrysler Museum.
Norfolk. Va Running through April 11. Place: Wellington B.
Gray Gallery. Admission is free and open to the public.
April 2
Poetry Forum: Award-winning poet Marilyn Hacker will
read from her work as part of the ECU English Department' s
Graduate Colloquiem Series. Hecker is the author of six
books of poetry, one of which won the Lambda Literary
Award. Currently she is the editor-in-chief of The Kenyon
Review, a leading literary magazine, and has been the
recipient of numerous grants and awards. Time: 7:30 p.m.
Place: The VanLandingham Room of ECU's Home Economics
Building. Admission is free and open to the public.
Poetry Forum: Poets who would like to get feedback on
their work are invited to the final spring semester meeting
of the ECU Poetry Forum. Poets should bring five to seven
copies of their works along. Dr. Peter Makuck. director of
the forum, has also invited listeners to attend. Time: 8 p.m.
Place: Room 247 of Mendenhall Student ("enter.
Concert: The 42-voice Concert Choir oi ECU will per-
form under the baton of conductor and ECU alumnus Brett
Watson. Pieces to be presented will include: 'Ave Christe"
by Josquin des Pre, "Ave Maria" by Thomas Luis de
Victoria, the Maurice Durufke's "Ubi caritas Johannes
Brahms' "Love Song" and Lee Holby's "Where the Music
Comes From Piano accompanists will be Chris Bunch,
Justin Stur. and Roger McVey. The Choir has performed
in schools and churches across the nation on its spring tour,
including the National Cathedral in Washington. DC. and
Rockefeller Center in New York City. Time: 8:15 p.m.
Place: Wright Auditorium. Admission is free and open to the
public.
April 3
Children's Literature Conference: Milton Meltzer of
Worcester, Mass. will be the featured speaker at ECU's
16th Annual Children's Literature Conference. The con-
ference, "New Worlds and Long Journeys will also
feature several guest speakers including: Margaret Bush
of Simmons College on photography in children's non-
fiction; Jane Smith Daniels of UNC-Chapel Hill on Susan
Cooper's "The Gray King Janet Zehr of Salem College
on Louisa May Alcoa's fiction and E.Thomas Shields, Jr.
c�" ?�CU on recent works about Christopher Columbus.
Meltzer has writter popular books about Columbus.
Franklin, Washington and Twain and was nominated five
times for the National Book Award. Storyteller Ann
Sullivan of Greenville and harpist Ruth Moskop of ECU
will entertain with two American Indian stories told with
music. Time: 9 a.m. Place: Willis Building. Register in advance
by calling 757-6143 or (800) 767-9111. More info: Lee Anna
Lawrence, ECU Department of English, 757-6041.
April 5
Recital: Violinist Fritz Gearhart, new member of the ECU
School of Music faculty, will perform Beethoven Sonata
No, 5 in A Minor, Opus 23; Eugene Ysaye's Sonata No. 5
for Solo Violin, Opus 27 and the Faure Sonata for Violin
and Piano, Opus 13. Gearhart, who received his master's
degree and the prestigious Performer's Certificate from
the Eastman School of Music, appeared as concertmaster
in orchestras in the U.S. and Europe. He will be accompa-
nied by faculty pianist Paul Tardif, who is active as a solo
and ensemble performer in both classical and jazz presen-
tations. Time: 3:15 p.m. Place: Fletcher Music Cantor Recital






8 OJIre �aat fflamlfnian
April 2, 1992
'Gladiator' offers nothing new
Ladybug
Continued from paga 7
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
; ; Gladiator has nothing new to
liffer as far as a plot is concerned,
but it relies on the stars and their
portrayals to carry the load of this
film.
The movie is a about a young,
wholesome, American boy who
moves to a new section of his city,
the rumored "bad" section. He is
immediately faced with opposition
from students at the school and he
instantaneously makes enemies.
James Marshall (Twin PaafcOap-
pears in his first movie playing the
protagonist of the film, Tommy
Rilev. Tommy stands his ground
when faced with opposition.
The main action of the movie is
supplied by an underground box-
ing circuit. Tommy is forced to fight
topa the gambling debts his father
has accumulated when two enforc-
ers come to his apartment. Brian
Dennehy (F'X and Presumed Inno-
OfnQplays the part of the proprietor
of the illegal boxing ring. After
watching Tommy fight once,
Dennehy pays all of Tommy's
father's markers so he can pressure
Tommv into fighting for him on a
regular basis. Tommy refuses until
his father's safety is threatened.
Tommy is managed by Ozzie
Davis (Evening Shade) who plays a
man who has obviously seen many
voung bins put into the ring on a
high from the money that they earn.
He has seen the same young men
carried out of the ring near dead
and there was never anything that
he could do about it. He has lost his
love of the sport � until he sees
Tommv fight the first time.
As he watched Tommy box, a
new love for the sport entered him
and he saw his last chance to man-
age a good fighter. He became a
guardian of sorts for Tommy.
Though Tommy is having prob-
lems dealing with the situation that
lie's been put in, he manages to
Photo courtMy Columbia Plcturs
James Marshall (right) and Cuba Gooding, Jr star in the cheap drama,
Gladiator, set in the world of amateur boxing.
keep a level head. Since he fights his
schixlmates at night, he's having a
hard time getting accepted into the
school. It's not until Tommy saves
Abraham Lincoln, (yes, that is re-
ally his name in the movie) played
by Cuba Qxxiing, Jr. (Boyz N The
Hood) from a rival gang that he
makes a friend.
As it rums out, Lincoln is the
best boxer that Dennehv has in the
underground circuit. Lincoln is
promised a chance to fight profes-
sionally if he wins his next match.
Though Lincoln stands a chance of
permanent brain damage if he
should be hit in the head, he ac-
cepts. Lincoln sees his fists as his
only way out of the neighborhood
and the only way to provide foe his
daughter and girlfriend.
The fight, of course, pits Lin-
colnand Tommy against each other.
One is fighting for the safety of his
family, the other is fighting to pro-
vide for his family. The best two
fighters on the circuit are forced to
makedecisions that will affect their
lives forever.
There is a lot of cliche in Gladi-
ator, there are times when anyone
could predict the outcome of cer-
tain situations, but there was an
excitement about the actors in the
movie.
It is a cross between Rocky,
Uonheart and The Karate Kid, but
with more emotion. The movie is
strong enough to get the audience
into making active participation in
the movie, especially the fight
scenes.
RTOPj
JlTEN!
According to the Gavin
Report and Billboard
Publications, Inc.
College Albums
l.Lush
Spooky
2 Lou Reed
Magic and Loss
3. Social Distortion
Somewhere Between Heaven and Hell
4 Sugarcubcs
Stick Around for lov
5.U2
Achtung Baby
6. Cowboy Junkies
Black Eyed Man
7. Sarah McLauchlan
Solace
8 Concrete Blond
Walking in London
9. Rollins Band
The End of Silence
10. The Real People
The Real People
Dance Tracks
1 TheKLF
"Justified and Ancient"
2Siouxsie and the Banshees
"Fear"
3 N-loi
"Mindflux"
4 CttviOes jmi Colt
�' Pride"
5. Moby
"Go (Remix)"
6 Tht Shamen
"Make it Mine"
7 Radioactive Goldfish
"LSD is the Bomb"
8. La Sn le
lames Brown is Dead"
9.199
"Ntxrtume"
10 The Dylans
"Planet Due"
claims that he once was a great
soccer player. This delights his
boss so much that Chester is ap-
pointed coach of a girls' soccer
team that Mullen Industries
sponsors.
Chester actually knows noth-
ing about soccer so he persuades
his girlfriend's son, Matthew, to
dress like a girl and help the
team, the Ladybugs, to win the
championship so Chester can get
his promotion. Matthew be-
comes Martha and this sets the
stage for the comedy and drama
that follows.
Having a guy who dresses
like a girl allows the film makers
to set up many cliched, but still
funny, sequences. At one point
Martha's friends want her to go
skinny-dipping with them,
prompting Chester to dress like
a girl himself and pass himself
off as Martha's mother.
There is also one hackneyed
sequence in which Matthew must
constantly change outfits as he
travels from the kitchen, where
his mother puts away groceries,
to the den, where a member of
the Ladybugs sits waiting to talk
to Martha.
There is a subplot involving
the boss's daughter and Mat-
thew. Matthew is in love with
her but cannot tell her because
she only knows Matthew as
Martha. Thus a conflict is set up
which can only be resolved in
the final reel along with all other
problems.
Dangerfield plays himself,
cracking jokes whenever pos-
sible. The script supplies ample
ammunition for Dangerfield in
the form of several obnoxious
coaches. When an exuberant,
husky female coach tells Chester
that her team will "crush" his he
quickly retorts: "You're not al-
lowed to play As the feisty
coach walks away Chester tells
his boss: "At least she's not two-
faced � If she was she'd be wear-
ing the other one Many of these
zippy one-liners abound and
they compensate for a mediocre
story.
The filmmakers tried too
hard to make a story out of this
(jtaflfe FOOTBALL VIDEO
1 RELIVE THE EXCITEMENT
OF THE 1991 SEASON!
Order Your Highlight Video Today
And Believe For A Lifetime
CALL: 1-800-422-0240
or
Mail check or money order to:
1991 Pirate Video �fc
P.O. Box 68618
Indianapolis, IN 46268 t
S19 95S5 00 Shipping & Handling (NC Residents aad 6 tax)
�fe
Dress
for success.
ATHLETIC WOK
riaza TVIall �c Carolina Fast IVlall
Creonvillc
$2.00 i $7.00
Off Any Pair Umbto Shorts f Off Any Athletic Shoes In Stock
In Stock i , Regular Price $39.95 Or More
obvious vehicle for Dangerfield's
humor. One scene in which
Chester tells a Ladybug that she
is very beautiful is awkward. So
are the scenes involving Chester
and his girlfriend. Dangerfield
just does not appear sincere as a
lovelorn Romeo.
Ladybugs dews live up to the
expectations that accompany a
Rodney Dangerfield movie. It is
modestly funny without too
much reliance on plot. While this
does not represent a compliment,
itdoes not necessarily imply criti-
cism.
Predictable, lightweight
comedies do have their place.
They provide an amusing 90-
minute distraction. The film asks
little of the viewer except to ac-
cept the corniness of the story.
While this may constitute praise
for some to see Ladybugs in the
theater, most will want to wait
for video.
The "PG-13" rating on this
film is deceptive. Remember that
this recent rating was first used
for Indiana Jones and the Temple of
Doom, an extremely violent film
that the producers feared would
fare poorly if it got an "R" rating.
Ladybugs has no violence, no nu-
dity, and very little profanity,
yet the profanity must have been
enough to bump the rating up
from a more restrained "PC"
VKXiTIC
The
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750-7303
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Thursday
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Gibb Droll Band
Guitar Legend in the Making
Frida
Mike Edwards and the Banned
Classic Rock
$2.00 32 oz Draft
Saturday
Garden of Souls
wspecial guest The Bruce Frye Band
$2.00 32 oz Draft
Mon. the 6th NCAA on 15ft TV &
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Off Any Tee Shirt In Stock
Including
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4
WHY TOU SHOULD SEUtT PLANNING FOR
RETIREMENT WITH TOUR EYES CLOSED.
1
For retirement to be the time of your life, you
have to dream a little�about the things
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start a business. Just imagine
With a dream and a plan, you can make it
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but what about all those
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WE CAN HELP YOU WITH THE PLAN.
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1 START PLANNING FOR THE
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I For your free TIAA CREK Supplemental
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fmstituu Full name)
r i
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TIAA CKF.F fl�rt� tf�mi
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4
Gutter
Continued from page 7
blend well, as if they rehearse a
ila. Every member except Konc z
?ntributes to the backing vocab-
le Hulsizer brothers add a har-
ny that'sascc k irdinated and pre
ise as their music while Morrison .
lusky alto blends well with the
ier,deeperokes At times, there
I a haunting interp lay between the
oices of Dito and Morrison that's
irnewhat reminiscent of old X
The lyric are more than just
ther sound in the music The
ords, like poetry, come m m the
eart of modern youth. Dito sings
f hollow hearts and emptv hands
jf the anger and the tear that ci wnes
rom stanng in to the face of oppres-
ion � the message is pasMonate.
lese songs are not pathetK sobs of
kain, but dusky cries ,f desperate
opefromasoul,stil!rrong,clutchr
ig at the shadou of a promise on
ie horizon.
When it comes to the bottom
ie, Gutterbov is one of the most
llentedbandsofthedecade -their
Jusic is precise and integral, �
kganic and passionate.
White
other than the love
yet nothing in the
idolatry of her
If Shelton had
streamline the scn
created a much full
Although She(
flawed, his directnl
own minor league
encehasgiyenhim
ing athletics. He u:J
masterfully to hi't
ontheiourt.Thish
manage where sltj
so overused during
that the technique
cliched.
Here the slowi
the viewer to savor
and athleticism inv
baJI The many seqi
brilliantly chore!
scenes play like
with dexterity and
sweat b -
Sheltoi i �j
while still conveyi
of the game His
nght onto the ODU
1, Mexican Restaurant
521G . � LSG
Come to Chico's
for a "DEVIL" of
a weekend, i
And Enjoy The
Game Along With
These Drink
Specials
� Mon - 95c Draft
� Tues - Sangria $1.25
�Wed- Imports $1.25
� Thurs - Margaritas $2.50
f v PU
Friday, April
Sunday, April
F1CKLEN STADIUM, Gl
Each ECU Student
Other Ticket Can Be Purchased
TICKETSI
OR CALL





Continued from page 7
ij minute distraction. The film asks
r u: u little oi the viewer except to ac-
she ceP thl corwiness of the story
5 White this may constitute praise
.ome to see LadybugS in the
,i j theater most will want to wait
S , tor v ideo
I he PG-13" rating on this
,u , film is deceptive Remember that
thi- recent rating was first used
nes and the Temple oj
� m extremely violent film
that the producers feared would
fit got an "R" rating
is no iotence, no nu-
r little profanity,
� must have been
� bump the rating up
restrained T i
TIC
�09 t. 3�i St. -pr
CoMedY
ZONE
Ever) u'cd
nichl
v- HtehhaPs � .99 Memberships
Droll Band
�-
the Making
lurds and the Banned
00 32 oz Draft
Irden of Souls
The Bruce Frye Hand
00 32 oz Draft
6th M Won 15ft. TV &
�k Goddess Kikini Contest

KM K NT I N V KS I I N (.
PLANNING FOR
.R EYES CLOSED.
; quukly
'A SRAi
. ���� I ��?
� M firtrtn
j the ' rtAA to the
nt accMm! a ot
iblo annuit .
I�. nv e
� rs pa merits over a
l h?.i ,iUo o� able to
S R ' ii umtilation
i ret"
plus the tOl ��� 'Tien! manage
helped make n CREFthe
irement System in theountrv
itning and planning tor the time
lour ht- He ,iiim' the M'ciift von start vmir
the e' ivifiM and vour retiiv
.�.
IRTPI NIV(iK)R THF
IF OF YCM R I IFF, TOOAY.
HIOC
l8O0M2-27.VVF.ict. doth
April 2, 1992 (Ufte taat (Earoiintan 9
Srtis BtpCfl
1 (Fuf Rcmc
f
�f.t Ptrtit iftttt

IfypAJ t
!AA-CHi V liMBtitiffiBwrf Stf �it� Im-
erl hr �tMptetMi H0u ltfft�jra iftv�ai �r tend monrv
Gutter
Continued from page 7
Ifcnd well, as if they rehearse a
gpefll Every member except Koncz
attributes to the backing vocals�
the Hulsizer brothers add a har-
monv that's as coord inated and pre-
cise a their music while Morrison's
dusky alto blends well with the
trvr deeper voices. Attimes, there
ij a haunting interplay between the
voices of Dito and Morrison that's
jomewhal reminiscent of old X.
Ihe lyrics are more than just
another sound m the music. The
words, like poetry, come from the
heart of modem youth. Dito sings
oi Vllow hearts and empty hands,
�. anger and the fear that comes
m staring into the face of oppres-
sion the mesage is passionate,
sesi ngs are not pathetic sobs of
pain but dusky cries of desperate
hv �pe from a soul, still stmng,clutch-
it the shadow of a promise on
�iv horizon.
When it comes to the bottom
Ime Gutterboy is one of the most
talented bands of thedecade�their
music is precise and integral, vet
organic and passionate.
Whits boys emmm from ?��� ?
other than the love interest of Billy,
yet nothing in the film justifies his
idolatry of her.
If Shelton had just worked to
streamline the script, hecould have
created a much fuller work of art.
Although Shelton's writing is
flawed, his direction is superb. His
own minor league baseball experi-
enhas given him a knack for film-
ing athletics. He uses slow motion
masterfully to highlight the action
on the court. This is not an easy task
in an age where slow-mo has been
sooverused duringclimactic scenes
that the technique itself has become
diched.
Here the slow motion allows
the v iewer to sa v or the grace, bea uty
and athleticism involved in basket-
bal I. The many seq uences have been
brilliantly choreographed. The
scenes plav like a fine ballet rife
with dexterity and a charm � and
sweat too.
Shelton accentuates the beauty
while still conveying the grittiness
ot the game. His camera brings us
right onto the court for a vicarious
game of quality hoops.
Woody Harrelson proves that
hecanact. His performance fits per-
fectly into the film. He expertly ex-
poses all facets of Billy's personal-
ity. Billy's behavior on the sidelines
label him a chum, yet his self-assur-
ance becomes evident the instant he
steps on the macadam only to be
replaced by insecurity again after
the final bucket.
For all of his cockiness,
Harrelson's Billy remains shakily
unsure of life. He tells Sidney early
in the picture that college "didn't
work out Throughout the rest of
the film, we witness Billy trying to
make life work out without ever
quite succeeding.
Any film about athletic that
avoids the Rocky stereotype should
be commended. Whiff Men Can
jump ably does just that. Thedrama
rings true. The losses do not just
happen so that a major victor)' can
be scored in the finale. Only a ri-
diculous segment about Jeopardy
and the plot involving thugs de-
tract from the drama.
Get it right,
Get it straight,
Get it told,
Get it sold,
Get it said,
Get it read,
Get it all,
Get-
TheEast
Carolinian
521 CotanchcSt � 757-1666
Come to Chico's
for a "DEVIL" of
a weekend, i
And Enjoy The
Game Along With
These Drink J
Specials
� Mon - 95tf Draft
� Tues - Sangria $1.25
� Wed - Imports $1.25
� Thurs - Margaritas $2.50"
This Week's Entertainment
Fri April 3
MR POTATO HEAD
Sat April 4
HARDSOUL POETS
Every Wed
fri pre? at J, THE DRAFT
YOU CAN DRINK
9pm- lam 5i3Colanche
(located across from UBE)
758-0080
Hours
MonThnrs. 11am-3pm
Fri. 11am-2am
Sat. 9pm-2am
Texasgulf � TOYOTA
iol
present
The
oth A"nU
GREAT PIRATE
PURPLEGOLD PIGSKIN
PIG OUT PARTY
Friday, April 10
Sunday, April 12,1992
F1CKLEN STADIUM, G1EENVILLE, NX.
featuring
PURPLEGOLD
FOOTBALL GAME
Saturday, April 11 � 2:30 p.m.
with the 9th Ranked,
Peach Bowl Champion
ECU Pirates
with
HIGHWAY 101
and
THE SPINNERS
In Concert Immediately
Following the Game
Greenville's New Natural Foods Source
offering
Natural and Organic Groceries
Wholesome Snacks & Treats
NaturalCruelty Free
HealthBeauty Aids and Cosmetics
Body Buildine Supplements
feu�
-
LUE PLANETLtfeFoods) 405 EVANS ST. MALL
y 758-0850
Hours: 9-6. M-Sat
ECU STUDENTS $5.00
Eh ECU Student Can Purchase TWo Tickets With A Valid ECU I.D.
Other Ticket. C.n Be Purchased At Regular Ticket Price. (Adiraaca 110.00 � Day of Event 112.00)
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT HINGES COLISEUM
01 CALL 7S7-4S00 or MONDIAL ECU (In NX.)
TT
T
Summer Employment &
Internship Opportunities
On tfte overage our managers earn $9000.
It is a managemcnt-opporajnity. Our company will train you
bo operate your own Restaurant Responsibilines include
the overall performance of hisher location in all aspects of
revenue production, inventory laoor and food cost controls.
training and development and scheduling of personnel
product quality and guest satisfaction
7o wori weekends ir Spring and Fall. dKis 55 hours oer
vveek dunng June. July and August.
� Working all scheduled hours during season, average earn-
ings are S9000 plus COMMISSION AND END OF SEASON
BONUS Kings Dominion also pays an additional SI per
hour on iee�ends
� txrellenc oerefitshousing in pre and post season
For more trftormaoon. coll or send resume
Kings Dommton Resole Office
PO. Boa 2000 -l-SSSc Rt. 30 � Ooiwe. Virginia 7 304 7
Ronnie Bol (804) 876-5590-EO.E.
KJngs1)ominkn
food A Bevervg
Spring swingps get ready!
Register for the following intramural sport golf
competitions this semester!
Frisbee Disc Golf
Register: Tuesday, April 7 at 5:00pm in Bio 103
This is a one day tournament to be held April 8 on the
Frisbee Disc Golf Course located by Harrington Field. 4
person teams and individuals can compete.
Golf Singles
Register: Tuesday, April 7 at 5:30pm hi Bio 103
This tournament will be held April 14 & 15 at the Ayden
Country Club. Green fees: $10walk,$17cart. Tee off
times will be selected at this meeting.
'
Awards will be given for fewest
putts per round!
For details, call FCU Recreational Services at
ULTIMAX
GREENVU1E,NC
OAPMl4-5,1992
T hiuosjiiiiatisO
sponsored by ecu recreational services
no alcoholic beverages or glass allowed on playing fields
Intramural FicldsJLocated Adjacent to Ficklen Stadium





Sports
(Hire Eajet Carolinian
April 2, 1992
Clark, Kushner belt clutch hornets, Pirates sweep Seahawks
By Robert S. Todd
Assistant Sporte Fdi�or
� -
ECU's offense exploded likea
powder keg against UNC
"Wilmington, Sunday. Unfortu
hatelv, the Seahawks had a pow-
der keg of their own.
The Tirates overcame I one-
�run deficit bv hitting two tok)
home runs in the bottom of the
ninth inning to beat UNO
.Wilmington 87. ECU is now 4-5
in the Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion and 17-11 overall
"No, that was not planned bv
anv means Head coach C.arv
Overton said with a smile. How-
ever, Overton was not pleased
with the poor defensive perfor-
mance that allowed three un-
earned runs.
"We didn't kick ground balls,
we didn't drop fly balls'Overton
said. "We just didn't make the
plays that were routine in nature
Second baseman Heath Clark
led the inning off and worked the
count full. The next pitch was de-
posited well over the left field
fence.
"I set that pitch up Clark
said. "He threw some curveballs
in the dirt and I knew he was
going to come at me with a fast
ball. I got the pitch on the inside
part of the plate, stayed back and
used my hands
One batter later, first baseman
U�e Kushner hit a one-ball, two-
strike pitch into the trees for the
victory.
"When you get up and the
score is tied, it's easy Kushner
said. "When you get up (to the
plate) and you're down - that's
when it's hard. Heath (Clark) re-
ally came through for us when we
needed it.
"1 told the guy behind me,
'Don't even bother swinging - I'm
going to win it. We're going
home Kusner added. Kushner
missed a homerun in the first
inning by no more than an inch.
The ball bounced off the pipe back
into play giving Kushner a stand-
up triple, his first of the year.
The dramatics of Clark and
Kushner would not have been
need had the Seahawks been re-
strained in the seventh inning. Pi-
rate center fielder Dave Leisten,
told earlier by Overton to be
aggresive, dove for a ball in front
of him. The ball rolled to the fence,
giving UNC-Wilmington's third
baseman Chris Holstad a lead-off
triple.
The Seahawks milked the in-
ning for three runs on two hits.
With two outs and runnerson first
and third, third baseman Glynn
Beck dropped an infield popy.
The runner on second advanced
to third.
Relief pitcher Lyle Hartgrove
picked off catcher Corey Broome
trying to steal second and had him
caught in a rundown. Chad
Triplett was then charged with an
error when he dropped the ball
and allowed the runner to ad-
vance to second and the runner on
third to cross plate.
Seahawk right fielder Darren
McCain singled to leadoff the top
Of the eight inning. McCain stole
his fourth bag of the day to put
himself in scoring position. With
two outs, Clark btxted a ground
ball that allowed McCain to score
the go-ahead run.
Despite the shoddy defense,
Lyle Hartgrove recorded his third
victory. Hartgrove set the Bucs'
relief appearance record last year
with 20 and has a shot a the save
record as well. Hartgrove needs
three more saves to pass Brien
Berckman (1989) and Gary Smith
(1987).
9th Annual Great Pirate Purple & Gold Pigskin
Pi gout Party
ZtL
Pigskin Pig-Out
set for April 9-12
From Sport Information
Tickets are now on sale for all of the events in-
cluded in the ninth annual Great Pirate PurpleGold
Pigskin Pig-Out Party, held at ECU April 9-12.
1 he feature attraction of the Pig-Out is the annual
spring football game, along with a post-game concert
featuring Highway 101 and The Spinners at Eicklen
Stadium.
Tickets for the game and concert are10 for adults
and 5 for children in advance, $12 for adults and $5 for
children at the gate. Barbecue plates for game day will
also be on sale in advance for $3.50, with $4 on April 11.
Tickets are also available for Saturday night's and
Sundav afternoon's ECU vs. Old Dominion baseball
games at $2 per adult and $1 per child
Ihe weekend gets started April 9 with the Pig-Out
(klf Social and Auction, and the golf and tennis tour-
naments start the next morning.
On Enday night, the carnival begins with fire-
works and Hie Fantastic Shakers performing under-
neath Ficklen Stadium. The pig axiking contest will
also begin. The Pig-Out will also host the 1S92Carolina
Barbecue Championship Cook-Off.
I he carnival opens again Saturday morning with
I craft show, dunking booth, kiddie game, suntan-
The 9th Annual Great Pirate Purple
and Gold Pigskin Pig-Out Party
Schedule of events:
Thu April 9 7 p.m.
Fri April 10 8:30 a.m.
9 a.m.
6 p.m12 a.m
730 p.m.
8 p.m12 a.m
9:45 p.m.
10 p.m.
Sat April 11 7 a.m9 a.m.
10 a.m.
10 a.m.
11 a.m.
130 p.m.
1:45 p.m.
230 p.m.
(Immediately following game �
6 pan.
Sun April 12 lpjn6p.m
2 p.m.
Pig-Out Golf Classic Social and
Auction
Pig-Out Golf Classic
Tennis Tournament
Carnival Opens
Pig-Out Awards Dinner
The Fantastic Shakers - UVE
Fireworks Show in Stadium
Pig Cwking Begins
Judging of the Pigs
Carnival Opens
Barbeque plates served
Dunkin' Booth
Suntan- Best Legs Contest (men)
Suntan- Bikini Contest
ANNUAL SPRING GAME
Highway 101 & The Spinners LIVE)
ECU Baseball vs. Old Dominion
Carnival Opens
ECU Baseball vs.Old Dominion
Tickets available at Minges Coliseum:
Spring Game: $10 Adult $5 Children
Barbeque plates: $350 in advance $4 event day
Baseball Games $2 Adult $1 Children
For more information, call 757-4500 or 1-800 DIAL ECU
See Pigout, page 11
Your Home for the Best Music
Best Prices,�Town
Si I vii Ray
VlUll.HAN AND
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Texas Fiooo
IlOVr HTHUCK �ASV PBI0� �N0 JO tltirv i �U0� MOOD �afl
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Cassettes $5.98
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PINK FLOYD
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Includtna
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including
Carry On Wayward SonDual In Tha Wind
Point Of Know Ralurn
Play Tha Oama Tonight
Fight Fira With FiraPartacl Lovat
THE CHARLIE
DANIELS BAND
A DECADE OF HITS
including
Strokar Thama
Tha Oavll Want Down lb Oaorgia
Tha Sooth Gonna Do N Again
Unaaay WldafAnd g tha COB hit
How would you have liked being on
the field during the Peach Bowl when
the Pirates beat NC State in Atlanta?
Would you like to become part of one
of the most visible student athletic
groups on campus?
east coast
1109 Charles Blvd. � 758-4251
NOW OPEN TIL MIDNIGHT FRI. & SAT.

1992 MASCOT TRY-OUTS
Become ECU'S BIGGEST fan!
When: April 3,4,5
Where: Minges Coliseum
There will be 3 mascots chosen
For more information, contact Shannon Smith at 757-4672
1992
CHEERLEAUNG TfWOUTS
Friday, April 3 thru
Sunday April 5
Minges Coliseum
Lobby 4:30pm
No experience needed guys!
For information, call: 757-4672
4 x
Seahawks 7, Pirates 8
II
McBraw i
fcfcOOTO It
rf
3b
Cray
TaMk
�mi Cmtmttms
Lllilwcl
rurt.i
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fmtmm lt
Morw it
Softl
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UNO
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12 2 o e o 102 �i
IGnt Ctartl b�ii PadMI '� 2k OMMMta ' r r,it
k�w HolM�4. kuthnn Mom M �r� kuhr-iT St
MrCwri MrO�.�0. Hookn ��i�u -i m n a.ibt,
9H M� wxtefu
UXC-wl�n� � h � l at -a,
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Woo. LI I
Mov�
r�iiMav kawttAijaiAai
By Charl
Senior Sfl
ECL loot
Chapel Hill fa
Tarheel TuesdJ
first game of tvj
gave way to th(
but came back i
0.
Jenny PaJ
for the Pi rate-
decided by "hi
pitched seven!
seven hits anc
walks
Lisa Corel
Jones belted
Ladv Pirates
JOIN
PEER HE
Responsibilities
� Promote a healthy
lifestyle
� Peer health education
� Attend training course
and in-service
workshops
To apply, please plan on
attending one of the following
meetings:
Wednesday, April 8th from
4-5pm and Thursday, April 9th
from 7-8pm in the Student
Health Service Resource Room.
Take
Choict
On II
Friday, April
3 pm to 9 pi
Saturday, April
12 Noon to 6

c
EA
264AB'
FOR





10
ipSeahawks
i d the in
two his
it i on first
kan �. .l nn
�' pop �y
i.K ,1 iii ed
artgnwe
Broome
i had htm
I had
i ithan
the ball
s 10 ad
unnei on
Saahawk right fiekJerDarreti
K.nn singled to leadoff the top
ot the eight Inning McCain rtoie
his fourth bag c4 Ihe d.n to put
himself in scoring position. With
two outs Clark biHtl a ground
ball th.it allowed McCain to More
the go ahead run
Despite the shoddy defense,
Lylel lartgrove recorded hi thin!
k t�t Hartgrove set the Bucs
relief appearance record lat yeai
w ith .V and h.is .i shot a the s,i t
record as well Hartgrove needs
three more saves to pass Brian
Ben kman I wu and Gar) Smrti
H7)
uuilciriMt Pirate Purple
Pigskin Pie-Out Party
ichedule of events
iassu Sial and
i.lsSk
mamenl
. arnivalanta'plls wards Pinner Shaken-LIVE
ireworksshow inStadium
.� gins Pigs
1 .imiv.il lipt'lls
BarbequtplatCfl soread
I Hll'kontest (men)
Hay WSPRIN r6 n S.CAM I nntttTS I I 1 )
L 12 a m
I)
li -12 a.m.
m.
m.
m.

m
i m
0 p.m.
mg v.i'i
hm" vi Baseball vs. Old Dominion
- 6p.m. Carnival )pens
Un.
ECl Baseball vs. Old Dominion
available at Minges Coliseum:
ngGame I ilt1
plates $3 50 in ad M event day
tballGames$2 d ill H C hildren
lation. call 757-4500 or 1-800 DIAL ECU
e liked being on
'each Bowl when
State in Atlanta?
(come part of one
student athletic
;ampus?
TRY-OUTS
BIGGEST fan!

When: April 3,4,5
Minges Coliseum
be 3 mascots chosen
Shannon Smith at 757-4672
TRV-OU1S
ru
iuys!
-4672
April 2. 1992 fflht gnat (Carolinian 111
Seahawks 7. Pirates 8
laatarl
urn'
MAMtf dh
lOovril iv
VI (am tt
4
total
f urn t
t4w4h
lam
. -i
PW M �
- i" J
Un
2 1
UNC
ij
o a i
i m -?
- 4�u I 11 000 101 � I
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� .� 'lt�i�.l ku-hnn McruHl flwkdt KiuhrwAt) SB
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Mm i j o o oi
d ill U I i o I
riihiorilulitn I �xam�i
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sport WriUr
ECU took their 23-6 record to
Chapel Hill to take on the 25-8
Tarheels Tuesday afternoon. In the
first game of two, the Lady Pirates
gave way to the Lady Tarheels 3-2,
but came back to win the second 1 -
0.
jenny Parsons took the loss
for the Pirates in a contest that was
decided by "big plays Parsons
pitched seven innings allowing
seven hits and yielding just two
walks.
Lisa Coreprew and Mechelle
Jones belted the clutch hits for the
Lady Pirates. Coreprew went 1-
for-3 with one RBI and Jones
matched that with her l-for-3 bat-
ting with one RBI.
The Lady Tar Heels broke a
scoreless tie in the fourth innning,
but the Lady Pirates came back to
tie the contest at 2-2 in the top of the
sixth inning. UNC scored the game-
winning run in the bottom of the
seventh inning to capture the win
for the Lady Tar Heels.
In game two, Parsons pitched
nine innings of scoreless ball as the
Lady Pirates won the night cap 1-0
in nine innings.
Tammy Newman and
Stephanie Hobson led the Pirate
defensive charge. With Parsons
ing fully, the Lady Heels had their
hopes of a sweep swept away.
lnthetopoftheninth,Stephanie
Hobson was at second when Laura
Crowder laid down a sacrifice bunt
down thi rd to advanced Hobson 60
feet to third base.
With one out, Cheryl Hobson
stroked a single to left to score
Stephanie Hobson for the lone run
of the contest.
The Lady Pirates, now 24-7, are
on the road to Greenville, S.C, to
take part in the annual Furman In-
vitational Fastpitch Tournament on
April 3-5.
The team's next home appear-
ance will be April 8 at 2:30 p.m.
pitching well and the "D" execut- against Campbell University.
JOIN
PEER HEALTH EDUCATORS
Responsibilities
� Promote a healthy
lifestyle
� Peer health education
� Attend training course
and in-service
workshops
Qualifications
� Good sense of humor
� Enthusiastic
and Energetic
� Interested in
health issues
For more information call:
Rewards
� Experience in
presenting to groups
� Increased knowledge
about healthwellness
� A chance to work with
great people
� Lifelong skills
To apply, please plan on
attending one of the following
meetings:
Wednesday, April 8th from
4-5pm and Thursday, April 9th
from 7-8pm in the Student
Health Service Resource Room.
Suzzanne Kellerman
Health Educator
757-6841
� Deadline to apply
April 10th, 1992
� Interviews will be
April 13th-16th, 1992
� Required training
August 20th and August
21st, 1992
LIVE, PROFESSIONAL, MOBILE
VIDEO RECORDING STUDIO
rr
nded 1
&
t&
on
ovc
th�
mo
Take Your
Choice For
Only
Friday, April 3rd
3 pm to 9 pm
Saturday, April 4th
12 Noon to 6 pm
95
Don't Miss Our
Spring Fashion
Show
Saturday, April 4th
2:00 pm
CAROLINA
EAST MALL
264A Bypass on Highway 11, Greenville
FOR THE STYLE OF YOUR LIFE
Photo by Datl R�kJ � ECU Photo Lab
The ECU Softball team split a doubleheader with the Lady Tar Heels of
UNC-Chapel Hill Tuesday. The split moves the team's record to 24-7.
Pigout
bikini contest and autograph ses-
sion with the 1992 ECU football
team.
Another weekend highlight
will be the Texasgulf Breakfast of
Champions at the Hilton Inn Satur-
Continued from page 10
day, which will honor ECU'S out-
standing scholar-athletes.
For tickets or more informa-
tion, call the ECU Athletic Ticket
Office at 7574500 or toll free in
North Carolina, 1-800-DIAL ECU.
While out there catching
rays under the sun, why not
read any book under the sun
from Central Book & News
for the latest in:
� Hardbacks
� Paperbacks
� Magazines
� Greeting Cards
� Trading Cards
� And the only place to find local and
out of town newspapers
Creem ilk Shopping Center 757-7177 � open til �pm seven das a week
.�
�:��:
i M '�
I ��
Every Thursday Night
Student gmJCKl Night
"One Beer One Buck"
1.00 - Domestics
2.50 - Pitchers
2.85 - Ice Teas
LADIES FREE
ALL NIGHT
m
w
T





April 2, 1992 (She gnat Carolinian Jj
m
P
Seahawks
, ihawk right fielder Darren
tin singled toleadofl the tojp
ol th i ight inning Mc atn stole
( the da) to put
- ring position W ith
�. v Lirk booted a ground
� illowed Mci ain to score
id run
the shodd) defens
� i orded his thud
e set the Bu s
. re ord last yeai
� i the say e
, II lartgwn �� needs
ives t'1 pass Brien
.ind v h Mnith
ial Great Pirate Purple
l Hit Party
assu � h ial and
rs lll
M.ulium
. ;a1I
ld Dominion
ominion
able af M
ahon call 757-4500 or 1-800 DIAL ECU J
e liked being on
each Bowl when
State in Atlanta?
come part of one
student athletic
ampus?
1
IT TRY-OUTS
BIGGEST fan!
When: April 3,4,5
I: Minges Coliseum
I be 3 mascots chosen
t Shannon Smith at 757-4672
IGTIW-OUTS
ru
m
guys!
17-4672
Seahawks 7, Pirates 8
, M itifUftRlon
i�mhrUn �
IvfctV
UNC
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sports Writer
tab
1
N - i O 0 1 0 11110�"
iHtu 1 22 000 102 � �
Iflrt Nd P��krt Hji� ' tmlTlm Tnplf B
, gu '(Utad Kiomr MofM H 'art ! ku�hnertt) S�
. SI VMlQT
s� imtna.� f? N it ip �)
i . i
ifflf "Si' r rt
ECU took their 23-6 record to
Chapel Hill to take on the 25-8
Tarheels Tuesday afternoon. In the
first game of two, the Lady Pirates
gave vav to the Lady Tarheels 3-2,
hut came hack to win the second 1
0.
lennv Parsons took the loss
for the Tirates in a contest that was
decided hy 'big plays" Parsons
pitched seven innings allowing
seven hits and yielding just two
walks.
Lisa Coreprew and Mechelle
lones betted the clutch hits for the
Lady Pirates. Coreprew went 1-
for-3 with one RBI and Jones
matched that with her 1-for-3 bat-
ting with one RBI.
The Ladv Tar Heels hroke a
scoreless tie in the fourth innning,
but the lady Tirates came back to
tie the contest at 2-2 in the top of the
sixth inning. UNC scored the game-
winning run in the bottom of the
seventh inning to capture the win
for the Lady Tar Heels.
In game two, Parsons pitched
nine innings of scoreless ball as the
Lady Pirates won the night cap 1-0
in nine innings.
Tammy Newman and
Stephanie Hohson led the Pirate
defensive charge. With Parsons
pitching well and the "D" execut-
ing fully, the Lady Heels had their
hopes of a sweep swept away.
In the top of the ninth, Stephanie
Hohson was at second when Laura
Crowder laid down a sacrifice bunt
down third to advanced Hohson 60
feet to third base
With one out, Cheryl Hohson
stroked a single to left to score
Stephanie Hohson for the lone run
of the contest.
The Lady Pirates, now 24-7,are
on the road to Greenville, S.C, to
take part in the annual Furman In-
vitational fastpitch Tournament on
April 3-5
The team's next home appear-
ance will he April 8 at 2:30 p.m.
against C ampbell University
JOIN
PEER HEALTH EDUCATORS
Responsibilities
� Promote a healthy
lifestyle
� Peer health education
� Attend training course
and in-service
workshops
Qualifications
� Good sense of humor
� Enthusiastic
and Energetic
� Interested in
health issues
For more information call:
Rewards
� Experience in
presenting to groups
� Increased knowledge
about healthwellness
� A chance to work with
great people
� Lifelong skills
To apply, please plan on
attending one of the following
meetings:
Wednesday, April 8th from
4-5pm and Thursday. April 9th
from 7-8pm in the Student
Health Service Resource Room.
Suzzanne Kellerman
Health Educator
757-6841
� Deadline to apply
April 10th. 1992
� Interviews will be
April 13th-16th, 1992
� Required training
August 20th and August
21st. 1992
LIVE, PROFESSIONAL, MOBILE
VIDEO RECORDING STUDIO
ov
tftfA
M2
5
Take Your
Choice For
Only
Friday, April 3rd
3 pm to 9 pm
Saturday, April 4th
12 Noon to 6 pm
95
Don't Miss Our
Spring Fashion
Show
Saturday, April 4th
2:00 pm
CAROLINA
EAST MALL
264A Bypass on Highway 11, Greenville
FOR THE STYLE OF YOUR LIFE
T
Pnoto by Oail FUid � ECU PhcXo Lab
The ECU softball team spirt a doubleheader wrth the Lady Tar Heels of
UNC-Chapel Hill Tuesday The spirt moves the teams record to 24-7
Pigout
Continued from page 10
bikini contest and autograph ses-
sion with the 1992 ECU football
team.
Another weekend highlight
will be the Texasgulf Breakfast of
Champions at the Hilton Inn Satur-
day, which will honor ECU's out-
standing scholar-athletes.
For tickets or more informa-
tion, call the ECU Athletic Ticket
Office at 757-4500 or toll free in
North Carolina, 1-H00-DIAL ECU
While out there catching
rays under the sun, why not
read any book under the sun
from Central Book & News
for the latest in:
� Hardbacks
� Paperbacks
� Magazines
� Greeting Cards
� Trading Cards
� And the only place to find local and
out of town newspapers
Greenville Shopping Center � 757-7177 � open (il 9:30pm seven days a week
,
�v:
- g
PRESENTS
v

Every Thursday Night
Student FbuckI Night
"One Beer One Buck"
1.00 - Domestics
2.50 - Pitchers
2.85 - Ice Teas
LADIES FREE
ALL NIGHT
J. �!
�?��
m





April 2, 1992 Sfte Eaat (Carolinian 111
10
p Seahawks
ieki
sltlOO
I defenx
ledh
� tiru
I �
mith
Purple
t Partv
Mjihum
MI
minion
ECU
p
liked being on
'each Bowl when
State in Atlanta?
come part of one
student athletic
;ampuc?
1
T TRY-OUTS
BIGGEST fan!
When: April 3,4,5
: Minges Coliseum
I be 3 mascots chosen
t Shannon Smith at 757-4672
NG TRY-OUTS
ru
m
guys!
17-4672
Seahawks 7,Pirates 8
�AjEBB
WMkWH
UNC
By Charles Mitchell
SentOI Sports Writer
h h. M-
� M MR
� Nfctfli
I Kcwm s l
k m he �
ECl took their 23-6 record to
(hapel Hill to lake on Ihe 25-8
Iarheets ruesdayafternoon, inthe
firs! game of two, Ihe I ady Pirates
gavewa) tomeLady larhtvlO-2,
but came back to win the second I
0.
lennv Parsons took the loss
for the Pirates macontest that was
decided by big plays Parsons
pitched seven innings allowing
seven hit and yielding just two
Lisa Coreprev and Mechelle
ones belted the clutch hits for the
Lady Piratesoreprew went l-
for-3 with one RBI and Jones
matched thai with her l-for-3 bat-
ting with one RBI.
rhe Lad) lar Heels broke a
scoreless tie in the fourth innning,
but me Lad) Pirates came back to
tiethecontestat2-2inthetopofthe
sixth inning. UNC scored thegame-
winning run in the bottom ai the
seventh inning to capture the wto
tor the Lady lar Heeb.
In game two, Parsons pitched
nine innings of scoreless hall as the
Lady Pirates won the night cap 1-0
in nine innings.
lammy Newman ami
Stephanie Hobson led the Pirate
defensive charge With Parsons
pitching well ami the "D" exec ut
ing fullv, the Lady Heels had their
hopes of a sweep swept away.
In the ti m i if toe ninth,Stephanie
Ilobson wasatsecond when Laura
( rowderlaufdownasacnfuebunt
down third toadvanced HobsonfiO
feet to third haM
With one out, Cheryl Hobson
stroked a single to left to score
Stephanie lobson for the lone run
ot the content
the I ady Pirates, now 24-7,are
on the road to Greenville, S.C to
tike part in the annual Human ln
itationalFastpitch 1 oumamenton
April 3-5.
Ihe team's next home appear
ance will be April 8 at 2:30 pm
againstampbell University.
JOIN
PERJiEALmjDUATORS
Responsibilities Qualifications Rewards
Promote a healthy
lifestyle
Peer health education
Attend training course
and in-service
workshops
� Good sense of humor
� Enthusiastic
and Energetic
� Interested in
health issues
For more information call:
Experience in
presenting to groups
Increased knowledge
about healthwellness
A chance to work with
great people
Lifelong skills
To apply, please plan on
attending one of the following
meetings:
Wednesday. April 8th from
4-5pm and Thursday. April 9th
from 7-8pm in the Student
Health Service Resource Room.
Suzzanne Kellerman
Health Educator
757-6841
� Deadline to apply
April 10th. 1992
� Interviews will be
April 13th-16th. 1992
� Required training
August 20th and August
21st. 1992
LIVE, PROFESSIONAL, MOBILE
VIDEO RECORDING STUDIO
ttqjresp
ovn
.?:
uoded�"�&�
mu
Take Your
Choice For
Only
Friday, April 3rd
3 pm to 9 pm
Saturday, April 4th
12 Noon to 6 pm
Don't Miss Our
Spring Fashion
Show
Saturday, April 4th
2:00 pm
CAROLINA
EAST MALL
264A Bypass on Highway 11, Greenville
FOR THE STYLE OF YOUR LIFE
T

Photo by Dail Raid � ECU Photo Lab
The ECU soflball team split a doubleheader with the Lady Tar Heels of
UNC-Chapel Hill Tuesday The split moves the teams record to 24-7
Continued from page 10
Pigout
bikini contest and autograph se- day, which will honor EC U's out-
sort with the 1992 ECU football standing scholar-athletes.
For tickets or more lnforma-
leam. ,
Another weekend highlight Bon, call the E( I Athlete Ticket
will be the rexasguM Breakfast ol nce at 757-1500 or toll free bi
Champions at the Hilton Inn Satur- North Carolina l-800-DIAL ECL
While out there catching
rays under the sun, why not
read any book under the sun
from Central Book & News
for the latest in:
� Hardbacks
� Paperbacks
agazines
� Greeting Cards
� Trading Cards
� And the only place to find local and
out of town newspapers
Greenville Shopping Center � 757-7177 � open til 9:30pm seen days a week
vnyx
.v '� S f
5 !�
r'i
1

PRESENTS
VI
Every Thursday Night
Student RLXK3 N'9ht
"One Beer One Buck"
1.00 - Domestics
2.50 - Pitchers
2.85 - Ice Teas
LADIES FREE
ALL NIGHT
,r
s
���
W





12 She Sasttfarolintan April 2, 1992
RS, clubs have busy schedule
Lacrosse
ECU 20 UNC Warn ngton
An unexperienced I "V W had
.� tough time with an experienced
Pirate squad EC I beat them easily,
and were .ible to play the set nd .mil
third strings the entire second half,
his game added another in to the
undefeated club record
NCSU19 ECU16
Iras game was ver disappoint
ingfortheEC L LacrosseCkib. State is
now No 1 inttiedh'Bion (Southland
BCl istiedwiAElonforsecondpface
BQ wnit into halftone with a 10-8
lead but ttv Wotfpa k ame out en
��tnn in tht' s�. ond h.ilt .nxl got .1 12
10 lead Hv Pirates made an attempt
at catch uptherestof Ihegamebut it'll
sN wt to rec( rd tJvir first xw n it ss
Water Skiing Club
he 1I Water Skiinglub is
beginning the spring season alter ,1
longcold-weather res! Iheclubwill
be competing in i South XtLintu
( onference tournament held at
Young's Pond in Angier N.( April
4-5. Ihf competition 1- sanctioned
in the American Water Ski Associa-
tion and tht National Collegiate
Water Ski Association- Competition
will be available in both men's and
women's slalom, tricks and lump
ing.
IheC lub will alo participate in
a's-XC tournamentMtfor( learLike
on April 11-12 in Lexington, N.C
sponsored b I N( harlotte.
Some ot this year's highly t.i
voted participants from the club will
be (ason Hamrick, Brian Smith
George Crane, Kirk Sherrill, Cyndi
Faltinand Flame Deal.
Karate Kicks into Action
On March 21, the E I Karate
( lub held an interclub karate toui
namentattheBill McDonald Karate
s h.ol in Greem ille Several mem
bers participated and placed in the
events ot Kata (forms) and Kumite
(fighting)
he results of the tournament
are
Women's K.ita hirst Place
Amanda lie Nielsen, Second Place
( laudetteTavlor third Place Linda
McCormkk; tor Women's Kumite:
lirst Place Linda Mel "ormick, Stt
ond Place C laudettte lavlor, Ihird
Place Amanda lie Nielsen.
Men's Kata: First Place Steve
Bn rwn,Se 1 ixl PIa� e Andy 11 rnsby,
fhird Place Chris Penny; tor Men's
Kumite hirst Place Mike Pridgen,
Second Place And) Homsby, fhird
Place Steve Brown. Mike Pridgen
placed fourth in the Kutta division
amihris Penny plat ed ti uirth in the
Kumite division.
Fhe club will be traveling to
lavettville. N.( tor the William
( ha is fourth Annual Peace Keep-
ers Open Karate loumament April
4
Greek All-Star Softball
Ret reational Sen ices is spon-
scnng.H .reek All-Star Softball game
for the E I fraternities and sorori-
ties
Ihel ratemit) gamew ill beheld
onApril 8 at 930p.m. on intramural
field No.4 hestworitj gamewillbe
April 12 at 4 p.m.onintramural field
No. 4.
I
N
V
I
T
A
T
I
O
N
The Student Union FORUM Committee
presents
"HOW TO SAVE THE PLANET
featuring
Harvey Wasserman, Radio Commentator,
Eco-Activist, Author, Senior Advisor,
Greenpeace Nuclear Campaign
WHEN: Tuesday, April 7, 1992, 8pm
WHERE Hendrix Theatre
Pirate Pride
Commemorating the Pirate's
Record-Breaking Season
Great lasting Pirate Pride grape soda available only at UBE.
Stock upfortailgating this fall. Limited supplies available.
D
3c
516 South Cotanche � Greenville. NC 27834 � 919-758-2616
-4-
ONE
CENT
SALE
Boston Butt
Pork Roast
39
30t
A' . � � - - - � -
ggSSFWKAy

SAVE
PER LB.
House?OIF Raeford
Grade "A"
Turkey
Breast
Limit 2 Packages
With Additional
Purchase Please
SAVE
50t
P' �.
tf
Your Choice - Fresh Crisp
Variety
Lettuce
Boston, Romaine, Green Leaf,
fipy. Red Leaf
a
3
'�,
Ea.
FOR EXTRA SAVINGS!
HarrisTeeter ft)fftf I HarnsTeefer �&f
15 Oi. Bottle Conditioner Or
IVORY SHAMPOO
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE. GET
ANOTHEREQRONLY
This Coupon May Not
Be Reproduced Limit
One Coupon Per Family.
Per Visit With
Additional S10 Purchase
Otter Expires April 7. 199?
COUPON
VALUE
$1.48
2830
(C)
i i
i i
i i
i i
i i
i i
i i
i i
i i
i i
I I
i i
i i
4510
25 Sq. Ft. Roll
REYNOLDS WRAP
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE. GET
ANOTHEREQRJONLY
This Coupon May Not
Be Reproduced Limit
One Coupon Per Family
Per Visit With
Additional $10 Purchase
Otter t npires April 7. 1992
COUPON
VALUE
78�
(C)
Harris Teefer Wffif I Harris Teefer
4 Oi. Can McCormick
BLACK PEPPER
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE. GET
ANOTHEREGBjONLY
I W
This Coupon May Not
Be Reproduced Limit
One Coupon Per Family.
Per Visit.With
Additional $10 Purchase
Otter Expires April 7. 199?
COUPON
VALUE
$1.98
00024 (C)
3 Lb. Bag
YELLOW ONIONS
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE. GET
ANOTHEBEDRjONLY
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Be Reproduced Limit
One Coupon Per Family
Per Visit With
Additional $10 Purchase
Otter Expires April 7 1992
COUPON
VALUE
$1.28
(C)
J L
Harris Teefer YiMAtt,1 I Harris Teefer Won
5 Lb. Bag
IDAHO POTATOES
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE. GET
ANOTHEREQRjONLY
This Coupon May Not
Be Reproduced Limit
One Coupon Per Family.
Par Visit.With
Additional $10 Purchase
Otter Expires April 7 1992
COUPON
VALUE
$1.98
50 Ct. Bottle HT Coplets Or
IBUPROFEN TABLETS
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE. GET
ANOTHEREQRjONLY
This Coupon May Not
Be Reproduced Limit
One Coupon Per Family.
Per Visit With
Additional S10 Purchase
Otter Expires April 7. 1992
COUPON
VALUE
$2.98
Prices Effective Through April 7, 7992
Prices In This Ad Effective Through Tuesday. April 7 1992 In Mecklenburg County Stores Only
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities Nonebold To Dealers We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps





12 $he �aat (Carolinian April 2, 1992
RS, clubs have busy schedule
Lacrosse
ECU 20 UNC-Wmngtm 4
An unexperienced UNC-W had
a tough time with an experienced
Pirate squad. ECU beat them easily,
and were able to play the second and
third strings the entire second half.
This game added another win to the
undefeated club record.
NCSU19 ECU 16
This game was very disappoint-
ing for the ECU Lacrossedub. State is
now No. 1 in tte division (South), and
ECU is tied with Ekn for second place.
ECU went into halftime with a 11V8
lead, but the Wolfpack came out verv
strong in the second half and gota 12-
11) lead. The Pirates made an attempt
at catch up the rest of the game but fell
short to record their first season loss.
Water Skiing Club
The ECU Water Skiing Club is
beginning the spring season after a
long co Id-weather rest. Theclubwill
be competing in a South Atlantic
Conference tournament held at
Young's Pond in Angier, N.C, April
4-5. The competition is sanctioned
by the American Water Ski Associa-
tion and the National Collegiate
Water Ski Association. Competition
will be available in both men's and
women's slalom, tricks and jump-
ing.
TheClub will also participate in
a SAC tournament set for Clear Lake
on April 11-12 in Lexington, N.C,
sponsored by UNC-Charlotte.
Some of this year's highly fa-
vored participants from the club will
be Jason Hamrick, Brian Smith,
George Crane, Kirk Sherrill, Cyndi
Fallin and Flame Deal.
Karate Kicks into Action
On March 21, the ECU Karate
Club held an interdub karate tour-
nament at the Bill McDonald Karate
School in Greenville. Several mem-
bers participated and placed in the
events of Kata (forms) and Kumite
(fighting).
The results of the tournament
are:
Women's Kata: First Place
Amanda Lie Nielsen, Second Place
Claudette Taylor, Third Place Linda
McCormick; for Women's Kumite:
First Place Linda McCormick, Sec-
ond Place Claudettte Taylor, Third
Place Amanda Lie Nielsen.
Men's Kata: First Place Steve
Brown,Seconcl Place Andy Homsby,
Third Place Chris renny; for Men's
Kumite: First Place Mike Pridgen,
Second Place Andy Homsby, Third
Place Steve Brown. Mike Pridgen
placed fourth in the Kata division
and Chris Penny placed fourth in the
Kumite division.
The club will be traveling to
Fayettville, N.C, for the William
Chavis fourth Annual Peace Keep-
ers Open Karate Tournament April
4.
Greek All-Star Softball
Recreational Services isspon-
soringa Greek All-StarSo ft ball game
for the ECU fraternities and sorori-
ties.
TheFratemity game will beheld
onApril 8 at 9:30 p.m. on intramural
field No.4. The sorority game will be
April 12 at 4 p.m. on intramural field
No. 4.
I
N
V
I
T
A
T
I
O
N
The Student Union FORUM Committee
presents
"HOW TO SAVE THE PLANET"
featuring
Harvey Wasserman, Radio Commentator,
Eco-Activist, Author, Senior Advisor,
Greenpeace Nuclear Campaign
WHEN: Tuesday, April 7,1992, 8pm
WHERE: Hendrix Theatre
Pirate Pride
Commemorating the Pirate's
Recond-Breaking Season
Great tasting Pirate hide grape soda available only at UBE.
Stock up for tailgating this fall. Limited supplies available.
�il6Sou(hC�anche � Greenville, NC 27834 � 919-758-26I6
HouseOf Raeford
Grade "A'gjX
Turkey
Breast
Limit 2 Packages
With Additional
Purchase, Please
Lb.

Your Choice - Fresh Crisp
Variety
Lettuce
Boston, Romaine, Green Leaf,
Red Leaf
REDEEM THESE VALUABLE COUPONS
FOR EXTRA SAVINGS!
HarnsTeefer YftiVAItf
COUPON
15 Ox. Bottle Conditioner Or
IVORY SHAMPOO
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE, GET
ANOTHEB�QBjONLY
This Coupon May Not
Be Reproduced Limit
One Coupon Per Family.
Per Visit.With
Additional $10 Purchase
Otter Expires April 7. 1992
Haws teeter WNlglS
COUPON
VALUE
$1.48
2830
(C)
COUPON
25 Sq. Ft. Roll
REYNOLDS WRAP
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE, GET
ANOTHERFQRjONLY
This Coupon May Not
Be Reproduced Limit
One Coupon Per Family.
Per Visit.With
Additional $10 Purchase
Otter Eipires April 7 1992
J L
COUPON
VALUE
4510
(C)
Harnsfeeter YNMASIf I Harnsfeem YftWAHf
4 Oi. Can McCormick
BLACK PEPPER
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE, GET
ANOTHEREQRjDNLY
This Coupon May Not
Be Reproduced. Limit
One Coupon Per Family,
Per Visit.With
Additional $10 Purchase
Otter Expires April 7.1992
COUPON
VALUE
00024
(C)
COUPON
YELLOWONIONS
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE, GET
ANOTHEBXQapNLY
This Coupon May Not
Be Reproduced. Limit
One Coupon Per Family.
Per Visit.With
Additional $10 Purchase
Otter Expires April 7. 1992
COUPON
VALUE
$ 1.M
(C)
J L
Hatrisfeerer I&Vipo'n I Harnsfeerer JuASn
IDAHO POTATOES
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE, GET
ANOTHER�QRjDNLY
This Coupon May Not
Be Reproduced. Limit
One Coupon Per Family,
Per Visit,With
Additional S10 Purchase
Otter Eipires April 7, 1992
COUPON
VALUE
u3m
50 Ct. Bottle HT Coplets Or
IBUPROFEN TABLETS
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE, GET
ANOTHE&EQBJ0NLY
This Coupon May Not
Be Reproduced. Limit
One Coupon Per Family,
Per Visit. With
Additional S10 Purchase
Otter Expires April 7. 1992
COUPON
VALUE
Prices Effective Through April 7, 7992
Prices In This Ad Effective Tni
We Reserve The Right To Limit Guonti
7 1992. In Mecklenburg County Stores Only.
To Dealers. We GfarJy Accept Federal Food Stamps.





12 Slje iaatCarolinian April 2, 1992
RS, clubs have busy schedule
Lacrosse
ECU 20 UNC WHmmgtm4
AnuneqpemnoedUNC-W had
��lough t,rm Ultn an experienced
Hrate squad ECU beM them easily.
and were able u pla v the second and
third strings the entire second halt,
rhis ganv added another win to the
undefeated club record.
NCSU19 ECU 16
This game was very diappoint-
mgrortheFCl LKTosseClub. SLiteis
now No. 1 inthedi isKn(Stuth).and
ECU is tied with Ek mi fiorsea md pine
ECU went into halftmv with a HV8
lead but the WoVpadk came out very
strimg in the 9econd half and got a 12-
10 lead The Pirates nu1e an attempt
at catch up the rest of the gamehut tell
short to record tJvir first season loss.
Water Skiing Club
The ECL Water Skiing Club is
beginning the spring season after a
long cold-weather rest Iheclubwifl
be competing in a South Atlantu
Conference tournament held at
Young 's Pond in Angier. .CApril
4-5. The competition is sanctioned
bv the American Water Ski Associa-
tion and the National Collegiate
Water Ski AssKiation Competition
will be available in both men's and
women's slalom, tncks and jump-
ing
TheClub will also participate in
aS AC tournament set for Clear Lake
on April 11-12 in Lexington, N.C
sponsored bv UNC-Charlotte.
Some of this vear's highly fa-
vored participants from the c lub w-ill
be lason Hamrick, Brian Smith,
George Crane, Kirk Shernll, Cndi
Fallmand Flame DeaL
Karate Kicks into Action
Qn March 21, the ECL kar.ih-
Club held an interclub karate tour
nament at the Bill McDonald Karate
School in Greenville. Several mem-
bers participated and placed in the
events of Kata (forms) and kumite
(fighting).
Ihe results it the tournament
are:
Women's Kata. First Place
Amanda Lie ielsen, Second Place
Claudette lavlor, IhirdPlace Linda
McCormick; for Women's Kumite:
First Place Linda McCormick, Sec-
ond Placetla udettte Taylor, Third
Place Amanda Lie ielsen.
Men's Kata: Eirst Place Steve
Rrown,Second Pku e Andy Homsby,
Third Place Chris Penny; for Men's
Kumite. First Tlace Mike Pridgen,
Second Tlace Andy Homsby, Third
Place Steve Brown. Mike Tndgen
placed fourth in the Kata division
and Chns Pennv placed fourth in the
Kumite division.
The club will be traveling to
Favettville, .C, for the William
Chavis fourth Annual Peace Keep-
ers Open Karate Tournament April
4.
Greek All-Star Softball
Ri reational Services is spon-
soringaGreek AJl-StarSoftbaUgame
tor the ECU fraternities and sorori-
ties.
lliel ratemih game will beheld
onApnl S at 930 p.m. on intramural
field No. 4. Ihesoronty game will be
April 12 at 4 p.m. on intramural field
No. 4.
I
N
V
I
T
A
T
I
O
N
The Student Union FORUM Committee
presents
HOW TO SAVE THE PLANET"
featuring
Harvey Wasserman, Radio Commentator,
Eco-Activist, Author, Senior Advisor,
Greenpeace Nuclear Campaign
WHEN: Tuesday, April 7, 1992, 8pm
WHERE: Hendrix Theatre
Pirate Pride
Commemorating the Pirate's
Record-Breaking Season
Great tasting Pirate Pride grape soda available only at UBE.
Stock up for tailgating this fall. Limited supplies awiilabie.
M6 South Coianche � Greenville. NC 27834 � 919-758-2616
SALE
HouseOf Raeford
Grade "A'L
Turkey
Your Choice - Fresh Crisp
Variety
Lettuce
Boston, Romaine, Green Leaf,
Red Leaf
Ea.
REDEEM THESE VALUABLE COUPONS
FOR EXTRA SAVINGS!
HarrisTeefer ggtf$jf HarrisTeefer ftWftttf
LVl'J
15 Ox. Bottle Conditioner Or
IVORY SHAMPOO
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE. GET
ANOTHERJfQRONLY
This Coupon May Not
Be Reproduced Limit
One Coupon Per Family.
Per Visit.With
Additional $10 Purchase
Otter Expires April 7. 1992
COUPON
VALUE
$1.48
2830
(C)
25 Sq. Ft. Roll
REYNOLDS WRAP
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE. GET
AN0THEREOR0NLY
This Coupon May Not
Be Reproduced Limit
One Coupon Per Family.
Per Visit With
Additional S10 Purchase
Otter Eipires April 7. 1992
COUPON
VALUE
78
J L
4510
(C)
Harris reefer Wtettf I Harris Teerer valuable
4 Ox. Can McCormick
BLACK PEPPER
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE, GET
ANOTHEREQRJONLY
This Coupon May Not
Be Reproduced Limit
One Coupon Fer Family.
Per Visit.With
Additional S10 Purchase
Otter Expires April 7. 1992
COUPON
VALUE
$ 1.98
00024 (C)
Harris Teeter
3 Lb. Bag
YELLOW ONIONS
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE. GET
ANOTHEREQRJONLY
This Coupon May Not
Be Reproduced Limit
One Coupon Per Family
Per Visit With
Additional S10 Purchase
Otter Expires April 7 1992
COUPON
VALUE
$1.28
(C)
J L
VALUABLE
COUPON
IDAHO POTATOES
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE, GET
ANOTHEREQRJONLY
This Coupon May Not
Be Reproduced. Limit
One Coupon Per Family.
Per Visit.With
Additional S10 Purchase
Otter Expires April 7. 1992
COUPON
VALUE
$ 1.98
Harris reefer Y-AItf
50 Ct. Bottle HT Ccplets Or
IBUPROFEN TABLETS
BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE, GET
ANOTHEREQRJONLY
This Coupon May Not
Be Reproduced Limit
One Coupon Ptf Family.
Per Visit.With
Additional $10 Purchase
Otter Expires April 7. 1992
COUPON
VALUE
$2.98
-X.
Prices Effective Through April 7, 1992
Prices In This Ad Effective Through Tuesday April 7 1992 In Mecklenburg County Stores Only
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. NonefSold To Dealers We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps





Title
The East Carolinian, April 2, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 02, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.870
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58315
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