The East Carolinian, March 19, 1992






Les is more
Les Paul is more than just guitars.
6
Wake Up!
Nightmare season ends for Pirate basketball team.
II
-
�wtiWi��s���t�-� � MM I �
�1?� lEaat (ftar0liman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
.66No.17
Thursday, March 19, 1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
8 Pages
Vandals ruin display
Vandals at the University of Southern
Maine's Portland campus used cans of black
spray paint to ruin a display of AIDS aware-
ness posters.
Ninety-nine of the 250 posters on loan
from the Centre for AIDS DiKumentation,
Research and Education were damaged or
destroyed.
Some will not be able to be replaced,
Mime of the most interesting posters said
Clarence Crossman, CADRE spokesman
"l feel very angry and frustrated. I feel
these feelings as well as a determination to
capitalize on this to raise (AIDS) conscious-
ness.
I here are currently no suspects in the
vandalism, but an investigation will con-
tinue.
Student gamblers arrested
Students from both the University of
Rhode Island and Bryant College were ar-
rested recentlv in connection with a college-
baed gambling ring.
Matthew Zimmerman, considered the
leader of the operation, was charged with
bookmaking, racketeering, organized crime,
gambling and conspiracy. IVnnis Millette
and Raymond Damaso were Kith arrested
on gambling charges
"A street-type bookmaking operation,
gambling operation, doesn't last unless
they've been sanctioned bv organized crime.
You don't run a gambling organization un-
less you Pay slid Rhode Island State Police
Capt Brian Andrews
BrvantCollegehas removed one student
from the basketball team and suspended
four others accused of illegal betting
URI officials plan to investigate illegal
gambling in the dorms, Greek houses, off-
campus housing and theathletic department.
URI basketball coach Al Skinner denied
all allegations against the team being in-
voked in the ring.
"Ve're not involved Coach Al Skin-
ner said None of mv players are involved
Fraternity under scrutiny
Indiana University and the national chap-
ter of Alpha Tau Omega fraternity are inves-
tigating an incident that left a student hospi-
talized with a blixxi alcohol content of 4.0.
Thefratemitv and 26members have been
charged with hazing, endangering the life of
a student, giving false information to univer-
sity officials and violating the school's alco-
hol possession and consumption policies.
The national chapter of the fraternity
said the incident did not involve hazing
because the student was not forced to drink,
but the issue of extreme alcohol abuse is
disturbing.
"Somebody should have stopped him
said the executive director of the University
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Alpha Tau
Omega.
"That's what concerns me. As a result,
we almost allowed him to kill himself
Student saves lives
A Purdue University student was re-
centlv one of 17 people to receive theCamegie
Hero Fund Commission award.
Matthew Kupec won the award for sav-
ing the lives of two voung boys who fell
through the ice of a frozen lake.
Last March, Kupec saw twoboysages 10
and 12 fall through the ice, so he grabbed a
tree branch and crawled 40 feet on his stom-
ach across the ice to reach the boys.
The Carnegie commission, founded in
1M04 bv Andrew Carnegie, has honored more
than 7400 people who try to save lives at the
risk of losing their own.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimnwl. Taken from
CPS and other campua newapapera.
Student found
dead near Ficklen
By Marjorie Pitts
SUff Writer
A student
morning
Photo by J�m�� Browning � ECU Photo L�b
stands in the area where Robert Sims body was found early Wednesday
Sims fell about 100 feet from the press box in Ficklen Stadium.
An ECU public safety officer found
a student dead Wednesday morning at
Ficklen Stadium after an apparent sui-
cide.
The officer found Robert Ray Sims,
21, of 306D Belk Hall at 7.45 a.m. James
DePuy, director of Public Safety, said
foul play has been eliminated and sui-
cide is speculated becauseofficers found
no beer cans or other signs of mischief
near the scene.
Sims was found by the north side
elevator on the south side of the sta-
dium.
He died because of head injuries
after falling about 100 feet from the
press box, DePuy said.
He said test results of blood alco-
hol level and drug usage will be re-
leased Thursday.
Sims, who went by the name "Ray
was apparently an amiable young man,
said Dr. Alfred Matthews, vicechancel-
lor of student life. He said Sims had
manv close friends and had no evident
problems.
He was a native of Greenville and
graduated from D.H. Conley High
School in 1990.
He was classified as a freshman,
and as of last semester he had com-
pleted 29 hours, Matthews said.
"The idea that he was pushed off is
far fetched Matthews said. "The as-
sumption is that he committed suicide,
but we don't know for sure
DePuy said the truth may never
come out concerning Sims' death, but
Public Safety is currently investigating
the incident. He said they are searching
through his belongings and talking to
his friends and family. No clues have
been found.
"I don't know if we'll ever find out
what really happened DePuy said.
"It's all a mystery right now
Sims' suitemates, roommate, close
friends and family were with counsel-
ors on Wednesday. Many students are
concerned and counselors are available
to help students through this tragic or-
deal.
Friends and family members are
being interviewed by Public Safety.
Anyone having any information con-
cerning the incident should call Public
Safety at 757-6787.
Academy halts review of Public Safety
University evaluated following allegations of mistreatment
By Matthew Jones
Managing I ditor
A recent evaluation oi Pub-
lic Safety's drug enforcement
policies from the NO Justice
Academy was halted for vari-
ous reasons, including what the
director of the academy
deemed a lack of cooperation
from the university.
ECU's administrators re-
quested Iheacademy's helpear-
lier this month following a rec-
ommendation from the State
Auditor'soffice which reported
allegations of mistreatment in
their March 1991 report con-
cerning ECU.
When asked if university
officials were helpful in the re-
view, Martie Stanford, director
oi the academy, said Some
were not "Stanford would not
elaborate on the statement;
however, a letter to the uni-
versity explained the reasons
for the academy's withdrawal.
"Of the materials we re-
quested, we received only
cases that are not related to
the Audit concerns" the letter
stated Richard Brown, vice
chancel lor for Business Affairs,
said the university gave the
files to the academy that were
requested.
Stanford said the agency
also withdrew from the evalu-
ation because the task was "not
under our purview
The letter states: "We are
not in a position to resolve
disputes or investigate con-
See Public, page 2
Mistreatment surfaces on local news
By Matthew Jones
Managing Editor
Information concerning
the allegations of Public
Safety's mistreatment of stu-
dents surfaced on a WNCT
news segment Tuesday
night in which reporter Dave
Savini described one of the
incidents in question. The
report centered around a
Public Safety operation in-
volving ECU students
breaking into cars at the
Minges Stadium parking lot.
Savini said the students
were taken into custody af-
ter attempting to break into
cars; however, one of the stu-
dents involved was an SBI
informant which leads to
speculations of possible en-
trapment.
Lt. Ernest Suggs, a Public
Safety officer involved in the
incident, said the operation
involved no mistreatment.
He explained that no official
from Public Safety instructed
the informant to request the
student's involvement.
Suggs said the informant
contacted Public Safety be-
cause he overheard a conver-
sation between the two stu-
dents in question detailing
their plans to break into the
cars. Suggs requested more
information and then set up
a stake-out to wait for the
expected larceny.
After waiting about 30
minutes, Suggs said the stu-
dents arrived and began
breaking into the cars. The
officers then apprehended
the subjects and took them
back to the Public Safety of-
fice.
Following normal pro-
cedures, Suggs said the stu-
See News page 2
Officers arrest biter, not flasher
By Jennifer Wardrep
News Editor
An incident involving Director of Public
Safety lames DePuy and a suspected flasher
evolved into a classic example of McGruff
the crime dog's motto "Take a bite out of
crime
ing after the students reported being ap-
proached bv a man who touched one of the
students on her breast, exposed himself and
then fled the area.
DePuy said the students desenbed the
assailant as a tall, black male with facial hair
and wearinga knee-length black trenchcoat.
He said officers spread outand searched
for a man fitting the description. After
Terry Hopkins,41,of 1612 Hopkins Drive
bit DePu v and assaulted another public safety Hawkins was spotted, Depuy said he called
officer when they attempted to question him the Greenville Police Department, since he
in connection with another alleged on-cam- was off campus, and the officers went in the
'����� �"��
-
Classifieds3
EditorialM
Comics & Satire 5
Entertainment�
SportsIt
pus assault.
Campus Police
later discovered the
man was not in-
volved in the inci-
dent whichoccurred
in a campus build-
ing.
"This person
just happened to be
in the wrong placeat
the wrong time
DePuy said. "It was
unfortunate that this
had to happen j�mumumjjj j jjjmmmmmmmmmmmm
PolicearrestedHawkinsatabout 10a.m. Hawkins has been admitted into Dorthea
on Mar. 4 for injury to personal property, Dix mental hospital and has a history of
resisting, delaying and obstructing law en- violent reactions to police officers
1 hii person just
4nt))t'iu-(l tn he in the
wiling pUci m thi
IVfOflg linu It Wd
uithiilmuih' ih.ii Dili
had to hipptftt"
!�"�� Dt(NI)f Dfftttif at HmWig
store in order to question the man.
"All hell broke
loose, to be frank
DePuy said.
When the fe-
male students in-
volved in Belk
Building incident
went to the Pitt
County Jail to iden-
tify their assailant,
they told police
they had the wrong
man.
DePuy said
forcement and two counts of assault on law
enforcement officers.
The brawl occurred inside the McThrift
Food Store on the comer of 14th Street and
Charles Boulevard. Earlier the same day,
three female students had reported being
assaulted in the Belk Buildingon their way to
class. Campus policewerecalled to thebuild-
"He is mentally ill, kind of a street per-
son DePuy said. "He did fortunately get
some help
DePuy also said this is not the first time
the university has had problems with flash-
ers.
"This has been an ongoing thing, these
exposures he said.
I
Spiking into Spnnu.
fitvjmttmvt-tcuhMSTS
Volleyball on the mall becomes a popular sport with students whan tha
weather begins to warm. Saturday marks tha first day of spring.
(





2 I flltje Cast fflaroltntan March 19, 1992
Public
Continue d from pago 1
tested issues within an agency.
Matters of internal control and the
possibility of misconduct are be-
yond our resources and inappro-
priate for our training and techni-
cal responsibilities
Ben Irons, university attorney,
stressed that the evaluation was
not an investigation. He said the
academy's review was "for the
purpose of making recommenda-
tions which will provide assistance
in the performance of drug inves-
tigations
Irons and several other ad-
ministrators said no files requested
by the academy were denied.
"The university will provide
the information that is needed
Irons said.
He said the university is cur-
rently looking for an alternative
agency to conduct the evaluation.
Clarification:
The Mar. 5 article entitled "Underhander Stands
Up to Journalists" was not referring to The East
Carolinian's General Manager Pro-Tern. In
addition, the newspaper does not advocate
ridiculing persons who hold an opposing editorial
philosophy.
News
Continue d from page 1
dents were informed of the out-
come concerning their viola lions.
He said because no actual break-
ins occurred, the incident would
be referred to the dean of students,
Ronald Speier,for punishment in-
stead of to Greenville authorities.
According to Suggs, the stu-
dents wereof fered positions work-
ing with a Beaufort County drug
enforcement agency as narcotics
informants in exchang for le-
niencv from Speier.
"in lieu of prosecution, you
have some choices Suggs said.
He said onlv one of the stu-
dents accepted the offer to work
as a narcotic informant and was
involved in a later operation on
campus.
Suggs said both of the stu-
dents were sent to Speier after dis-
cussing possibilities with the Pub-
lic Safety officers.
The SBI could not be reached
for details concerning their
informant's actions.
m
��� � � j �
lr
i ff '
Thought for the day:
If money can't buy you
love, then why do most
dates begin at the cash
machine?
DAIDI.K)
DAN
' I ittlntff htihintf,
,� mi7ri, 'i�rci�rs.
Anl iiin s, !� ut nit in r
ATiTIC Th
f He 75�-7303 I �09 I. 3th St. Jg
A
CoMedY
zcm
CoMedY
Zone
Thursday
��
It?
March 26,1992
The Surf Report
Surf Shop
"BIKINI CLASSIC
In Association with
Venus Swimwear
1 st - $300
2nd-$100
3rd - $50
To enter call or come by:
Bogies 752-4668
Surf Report - 355-6680
v
uWhere Lost
Memories
Are Found
417 fcvatw St M.ill
Downtow ii
S2-1750
BUY � SALE � TRADE
Mon-Sat 10-5
Straight Ahead
and
Euphoria
.99 32 oz Draft � SH Highballs .99 Memberships
Friday
DILLON FENCE
$2.00 32 oz Draft
Saturday
Chairman of the
Board
$2.00 32 oz Draft
Tickets are here for WRQR's Comedy Zone
No. 11
Wed. April 1
Carrot Top
752-7303 for ticket information
�;
ECU LACROSSE
� ECU vs. UNC Wflmington - Sat, March
21,2:00 pm at Allied Health Field
"Come support Lacrosse, America's fastest growing
sport started by the Native Indians
Now Accepting
Applications
For The 1992-1993
Judicial Boards
These positions offer an excellent op-
portunity to gain experience and lead-
ership abilities that will benefit you
throughout your life. At the same time,
these positions will enable you to make
valuable contributions to East Caro-
lina University. For additional informa-
tion and applications contact the SGA
office at 218 Mendenhall.
All applications must be turned in by
Monday, March 30th.
Classifieds
This Weeks Entertainment
Fri Mar 20
Dark Star
75$ 16 oz. Draft
Sat Mar 21
HIWAY
BrervWed
ttB4MMMr
YDUCANBRTNK stan-lm
Hows ,
MonThurs.11am-3pm S13Cotandte
Fri.11am-2am
Sat 9pm-2am
(located across from UBS)
758-0080
r )R RLST
HOUSE TO SHARE: Furnished, quiet
and residential $200 per rrw nth and 1 2
utilities Call Mike at 355-2627
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS: One
and two bedroom apartments Enem
efficient, several locations in town Car-
peted, kitchen appliances, sume watB
and sewer paid, washerdryer hook-
ups Now taking applications tor Fall
Call 752-8915
TWO BEDROOM, one bath, heat and
water furnished S350 per month No
pets, close to campus Call 756-3563
ROOM NEEDED close to ECU, pay 1
2 expenses on rent of townhouse i r apart-
ment I am a mature female grad student
non-smoker, non-dnnker Please contact
355 st
ROOMMATE NEEDED: male non-
smoker to share a 2 bedn�nn apartment
near campus June 1 Call Fisher at 931-
7854 or 752-2845
2 BEDROOM Wilson Acres apartment
for sublet May h-Juh $435 per month
Call 758-0369 and leave message
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 12 rent and 1 2 utilities in a 2
bedroom duplex Female already living
in duplex Half mile from campus Call
758-1792 after6pm
2BEDROOM Tar Riverapartmentavaii-
able for May, June, July and next school
ear if wanted We will pay SI 50 of your
deposit 752-12
r )R REN
RIV,GOLDK
SamTaking Leas
bedriKiin. 2 bedz
Eflcienc) A pan
cALL 752-i
A lieauuful Place to Live
�All New
�And Ready To Ren
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 F. 5ih Street
�Located Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
Limited Offer - $330 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Ape 8. 12-5.30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS'
Gcac and qact am badrocm fenuabed lartnoa
noriyefficnl. tree water and atwer �aahawi. dp�xa,
cmbto TV Conjaea or aoijfc only 120 a tnorth, 6
nnbiac MOBILE HOME RENTALS capki �
t�� AannEaandRiabtkhccaHBAaalaGvdn
xv Brock Valley Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 '
FOR SAL
SEIZED CARS: tru. ks
ers, motor homes I
Available your area n� i
3388 Ext C-Sfi
69 TELECASTER Rl
Seymour Duncan pic ku p
ups in case Absolute
Ss?s call at 757-3 S7
FENDER SLPER 112
guitar amp with charm'
reverb Footswitch ir,ui
condition $375 call 7"
1983 CHEVY S-10 Bll
package � j
tenor, power a ind
high mile-
$3300 or best ��� i
PAY IN-STATE TLITlJ
dency Status and Tuiticj
pamphlet wntten by anl
in-state rt-sdency applj
For Sale Sruden1
ing
FOR SALE; " .
plete set-up $1 �
taiis
1986HONDARFBFI
cand apple reo
maintained nev.
access. r.e S I
FOR SALE. l
lentcondihon loaded wi
$1300 Call 931-9149
LOST AND!
POUND: 3
Golden with white fee I
Found near Speight Biu
cross between Collie
tneer Cal M � I
FOLND:?montholdl
Found in front of Br
2149
Announceme
srHOI ARSHIP DEADLINE
Applications for the Thomas W Rivers
Foreign Exchange Endowment Fund
Study abroad scholarship are aailable
in theCenter for International Programs,
Brewster A-177 The Rivers fund is in-
tended to promote study abroad and the
genuine interest in learning about other
cultures. The requirements for eligibility
are explained in the application form. If
vou are planning to study abroad during
the summer, you may apply fo� ��
scholarship now lfyouareplannrungto
srudv abroad next semester, vou should
wait for a future deadline The scholar-
ships are awarded four times per year
with the next deadlines on March 20,
1992, and June 12,1992 Vou may contact
the Center for International Programs at
757-6769 or stop by Brewster A-117 for
further information
G�U3fNrmSTlVtQlTS
� If you are a dancer who enjoys per form-
ing to large enthusiastic crowds, the
' Golden Girls dance line is for vou Affili-
ated with the Marching Pirates, the
Golden Girls perform at home football
games, pep rallies selected away games
exhibition- and Kiwi games Dance
majors and non-dance majors are wel-
come Tryouts are Saturday. March 28
from 10 a m to 5 p m (with lunch break)
m Chnstenbury Gym room 112 For more
iruwmation contact Michelle 931-7804.
Kellv 931-7829 or the Marching Band
office 757-6982
MALULAB
Students who received a grade of Incom-
plete (I) m Math Lab (MATH Mil) fall
Semester, 1991, must remove that incom-
plete bv 3 pm. Friday, March 20. 1992
The Math Lab is open from 2 p m to 4
pm Mondav through Thursday to al-
low students needing to remove an in-
Complete time to take the remaining tests
A student with an incomplete from the
fall semester who fails to complete the
jequired work bv March 20 will receive
a grade of T and be required to repeat
(fromthebeginning)MATHM)l (Note
Students entering the Math Lab to work
on removing an incomplete must have
: with them a picture ID.)
1NJ2QQ&
I; fjOrrFn RFCr'TRATION
Becreational Services wiU be holding
! fcidoor Soccer Registration on March 24
� 5 pm m Biology 103 For more infor-
maoon call 757-6387
FjTfARflllN FMENPS
; Mernbenof Easrijuotoia rriendsshould
bring their Lrttk Friends to River Park
Nor on Sunday, March 22 from 1 JO
r
p m to 4 3
and run BnngS2- i I
nature center ft j
Sunday This is a man
youi Director or
mation
ATTEV
ESJ1M '
Do you want I
Break, laying out in thd
come out to d j
Thursda March 26
Residence Halls it.
Oh mpics Garrert v
Hill in the fall. car. the j
champion- again i
them intc the ground
Ladies stand
Tyter? Can West Cai
that the are the PEj
Campus pull up in
Battle or the H I
a champion will be
Olympic Gold Metal
pnes food and
Residence Hall AsBO
Ecvsq
OF MVSK
EOAMARi
TL'ES MAR 17�
Senior Recital iFleti
pm, freeUnd Mai
comp�sirion, Seniol
Rectal Hall, 9 p.m.
18�John Heath, wo
Trumpet, Senior Red
Hall, 7 pm. free
Renee Perry voii
(Fletcher Recital HaUJ
MAR 23� Flute
Stachowski Decker
Reatal Hall, 7 p:
McVey piano.
(Fletcher Reatal H�
LOANS
Three educational!
North Carolina
leges in or out of
dents attending od
Una are available t
dation Inc. These
funded by North
other investors,
dependenton
are based on financ
tal Loans are for
porting students i
financial need. PI
ents of dependent I
based on financial f
mation, write Col





7301 1 �0� I 5th St. "Tg
CoMerf
ZONE
Thursday
raighl Vhead
and
Euphoria
9fe Highballs � k Memberships!
Friday
ON FENCE
$2.00 32 oz Draft
Saturday
man of the
ftoard
.2.00 32 oz Draft
,r RQR's Comedy Zone
No. 11
Wed. pril 1
Carrot Top
). for ticket information
Vting
Ifons
92-1993
oards
an excellent op-
rience and lead-
will benefit you
tthe same time,
able you to make
s to East Caro-
iditional informa-
contact the SGA
hall.
be turned in by
rch 30th.
Classifieds
�b;e xEaat Olarolinfan
March 19,1992
eek's Entertainment
Fri Mar 20
Dark Star
75M6oz. Draft
Sat Mar 21
HIWAY
Wed
LsJ.
TOE DRAFT
CAN DRINK 9pm-lam
513Cotanche
(located across from UBC)
l?m-3pm
758-0080
I OR RIM
HOUSE TO SHARE Furnished, quiet,
and residential S200 per month and 12
utilities Call Mike at 355-2627.
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS: One
and two bedroom apartments Energy
efficient, several locations in town Car-
peted, kitchen appliances, some water
and sewer paid, washerdryer hook-
ups Now taking applications for Fall
Call 752-8915
TWO BEDROOM, one bath, heat and
water furnished $350 per month No
pets close to campus Call 756-3563
ROOM NEEDED close to ECU, pay 1
2 expenses on rentof townhouseorapart-
ment lam a mature female grad student
non-smoker.non-dnnker Please con tact
355-8054
ROOMMATE NEEDED: male non-
smoker to share a 2 bedroom apartment
near campus June 1 Call Fisher at 931-
7854 or 752-2845
2 BEDROOM Wilson Acres apartment
tor sublet May 8-July S435 per month
Call 758-0369 and leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 12 rent and 12 utilities in a 2
bedroom duplex Female already living
in duplex Half mile from campus Call
758-1792 after 6 p.m.
2 BEDROOM Tar River apartment avail-
able for May, June, July and next school
vear if wanted. We will pay SI 50 of your
deposit 752-1217.
iORRI.NT
PI RSONAl.S
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases lor 1
bedroom. 2 bednxim &
Efficiency Apartments
CALL 752-2865
REWARD: For the stolen license plate:
DADYSGRL Plaese call 931-8326
LOST: Diamond tennis bracelet lost be-
tween Brewster Building and Student
Store. Call 752-3735.
FOKSALl:
'vami n
A Beautiful Place 10 Live
�All New
�And Ready To Rent-
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
�Located Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
Limited Offer � $330 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. 8, 12-5:30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clc�n �r�i it i� (�tt�n furai�l �(laiuiauia,
enrrfv cf!Y m. &� MB mdieMT, ���hcTl. )��.
cibtaTV CoajitJ or toik� only IMO � ractth, 6
nnhluc MOBILE HOME RENTALS coanlei or
ncu Brook Vtlltj Qjurtry dub.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
SEIZED CARS: trucks, boats, 4-wheel-
ers, motor homes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Available your area now Call 800-338-
3388 Ext. C-5999.
69 TELECASTER REISSUE with
Seymour Duncan pickups Original pick-
ups in case Absolute mint condition.
S575 call at 757-3057
FENDER SUPER 112 60 watt all tube
guitar amp with channel switching and
reverb Footswitch included Excellent
condition. $375 call 757-3057
1983 CHEVY S-10 BLAZER 4X4 tahoe
package, blackgrey with burgandy in-
terior, power windows, locks,automa tic,
high miles, one owner, taken care of.
$3300 or best offer, call 321-1588
PAY IN-STATE TUITION? Read JkSk
dency Status and Tuition, the practical
pamphlet wntten by an attorney on the
in-state residency application process
For Sale Student Stores. Wright Build-
ing
FOR SALE: 37 gallon aquarium com-
plete set-up $100 Call 758-0428 for de-
tuls
1986HONDAREBELMOTORCYCLE;
candy apple red, lots of chrome Well-
maintained, new tires, brakes and other
accessories $700 Call 752-4428
FOR SALE: Nissan Maxima 1984 excel-
lent condition loaded with sunroof, talks'
$4300. Call 931-9149 ask for Lee.
LOST AND ForND
FOUN D: 3 or 4 month old female puppy
Golden with white feet, muzzle and chest
Found near Speight Building Looks like
cross between Collie and Golden Re-
tnever Call Mike at 758-3827
FOUND: 3 month old black Lib puppy
Found in front of Brewster Call 756-
2149
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE: Many
positions Great benefits. Call 800-338-
3388 Ext. P-3712.
FREE TRAVEL: Air couriers and cruise
ships. Students also needed Christmas,
spring and summer foramusementpark
employment. Call 800-338-3388 Ext F-
3464.
$10 - 5360UP WEEKLY: Mailing Bro-
chures! SpareFull time Set own hours!
Free Details! Send self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers (s) P O
Box 51037 Durham, NC 27717.
BE PART OF THE ACTION! Football
managers wanted! Contact Fred
Sponhaltz in equipment room, sports
medicine building in person!
NEED BABYSITTERCOMPANION
for three and six year old boys this sum-
mer Approx. 6-10 hours per week Must
have own transportation and references.
Call Dillon Manly 355-0552.
WANTED: Gamers to start gaming
group in Greenville Send resume of ex-
perience with name, address and tele-
phone tc� P.O. Box 3439 Greenville, NC
27858
READ BOOKS FOR PAY! $100 PER
TITLE! Fill out like or dislike forms. Free
24hourrecording505-764-0699ext 3205
CHEERLEADING INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED FOR PRIVATE SUMMER
CAMPS. If you love cheering, this is the
summer ob for you' College experience
not necessary but strong high school
background is a must Flexible schedul-
ing Great pay Call for info. 919-383-
11)86.
LEARN TO FLY NOW! Aero Sales flight
training. Pitt-Greenville Airport Introduc-
tory flight $20. Call 752-1989
HEADING FOR EUROPE THIS SUM-
MER? jet there anytime for only $169 with
AIRH1TCH! (Reported in Let's Go! and the
New York Times) Also, super low round
trip fares to West coast AIRHITCH 212-
864-2000.
STUDY ABROAD IN AUSTRALIA: In-
formation on semester, year, graduate, and
internship programs in Perth, Townsville,
Sydney, and Melbourne Programs start at
$3520. Call 1-800-878-3696.
ALPHA PHI: Only three more weeks til
formal!
SIG EP: You better wear green or you'll get
pinched on your Can't wait for tonight.
It will be a blast! Love, Alpha Phi.
AOPi BASKETBALL TEAM: You guys
are awesome! Congratulations on winning
the championship! Love, the sisters.
BETA PI'S: You guys are doing an excel-
lent job! Keep it up Love, the sisters of
AOPi.
AOPi hopes everyone had a great spring
break! Love, the sisters.
NIKK1 RICHARDS. Your 21stbirthday is
now growing near, and we all thought that
it would never get here I tried to find you
the best gift of all times, but Garth couldn't
be bought, not even with cheap sparkling
wine To celebrate on Friday we shall hop
from bar to bar, you can drink as much as
vou want because -ou don't have to stumble
home far 1 hope that this celebration is the
very best, because after tomorrow night, it
all becomes one big "drunk fest " Happy
21st Birthday' Low, poor big sis, Whitney
DELTA CHI: Thanks for a great time at our
pre-downtown' Love, Delta Zeta.
TO ALL SORORITIES: Hope everyone
has fun at Panhellenic Field Day! Love, DZ.
:so l s
KEY WESTERN SIGM AS: It was a week
well never forget�if we could only re-
member! One thing for sure, we wish it
could've gone on forever! We will never
forget THE JACUZZI!�Kevin B's bottle
of Sunlite, Andrea going in with her dress
on, throwing Wynne in Christine's
robocops, Durty Harry's All You Can
Drink�A lot Ashley singing at Hog's
Breath; Tara getting nailed by a cup (fash-
ion police); Mike B k Steve R mopeding to
Miami with Ashley it Tara Kirsten k
SONAI S
Robyn on stage; Robin k Kati's red eyes;
Sharen's even taa Jill Laune�home-
sick? Never Robyn k Leilani�sleep past
sunrise Kevin B's pizza slice (did you find
her?); Rob R�"Mamababeee Billy K�
where'd you stay?; Andrea's toasts, Jay J's
orange reflector suit Sig ep sailors�can
you give us lessons??; "Take me drunk, I'm
home "1 kid you not, coosawatchie Jill,
Ahsley k Andrea's pizza run; the "for-
tress" we stayed in And an AWESOME
time was had by all
A (I SSIII1 D
M AP TO THF FCT r ABOHN1 AN
EDTJOMDMj
buy and trade:
paperback books
ovf:r
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickenson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NOW! USED CDS
(Hire JEaat (Sarttltman
It you are planning a career in advertising get a head
start by joining our advertising staff.
Applications are now being accepted for ADVERTISING
RAI ES HFPRFSFNTATIVES.

� Candidates must have and maintain minimum 2.0
G.P.A.
� Will attend summer school and fall semester 1992
� Must have own transportat ion
Apply at The East Carolinian
second floor publications bldg.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOYMENT:
fisheries Earn $5,000 month Free
transportation! Room k Board' Over
8,1X10 openings No experience neces-
sary Male or Female For employment
program call Student Employment Ser-
vices at 1-206-5454155 ext 1649
AOPi: Congratulations on winning the
basketball championship! Love, DZ
S1GMAS HOPE EVERYONE had a great
spnng break! Get excited for Greek Week!
KA: Can't wait for tonite! Love, theStgmas
Announcements
SCHOLARSHIP DEAD11NJ
Applications for the Thomas W Rivers
Foreign Exchange Endowment Fund
studv abrnad scholarship are available
in the Center for International Programs,
Brewster A-177 The Rivers fund is in-
tended to promote shidy abroad and the
genuine interest in learning about other
cultures The requirements for eligibility
are explained in the application form. If
vou are planning to study abroad during
the summer, you may apply for this
scholarship now Ifyouareplannningto
studv abroad next semester, you should
wait for a future deadline. The scholar-
ships are awarded four times per year
with the next deadlines on March 20,
1992, and June 12,1992. You may contact
the Center for International Programs at
757-67f9 or stop by Brewster A-117 for
further information
&3iJpmr.IRI,STRYQUTS
If you are a dancer who enjoys perform-
ing to large enthusiastic crowds, the
Golden Girls dance line is for you Affili-
ated with the Marching Pirates, the
Golden Girls perform at home football
games, pep rallies, selected away games,
exhibitions, and bowl games Dance
majors and non-dance majors are wel-
come. Tryouts are Saturday, March 28
from 10 am to 5 p.m. (with lunch break)
mChristeriburyGymroomll2 For more
information contact Michelle 931-7804,
Kelly 931-7829 or the Marching Band
office 757-6982.
p mto430p m for an afternoon of food
and fun BnngSZS if you want to go to the
nature center Rain date is the following
Sunday This is � mandatory event Call
your Director of Services tor more infor-
mation
ATJJENI1QN
ALL RESIDENCE HALLS
Do you want to prolong your Spnng
Break, laving out in the sun and etc Then
come out to the happening event on
Thursday. March 26 It's the Battle of the
Residence Halls in the 2nd annual Hall
Olympics Garrett won the King of the
Hdl in the fall, can they come up to be the
champions again or will Scott Hall beat
them into the groundCan the Fleming
Ladies stand up for their rights against
Tyler? Can West Campus show the Hill
that they are the BEST or will Central
Campus pull up in the ranks' It's the
Battle of the Halls, and out of this rumble
a champion will be chosen as the Hall
Olympic Gold Metalist There will be
prizes, food, and fun Sponsored by
Residence Hall Association
2100 Yonkers Rd P.O. Box 12100, Ra-
leigh, N C 27605-2100, or call 919-821-
4771
MATH LAB
Students who received a grade of Incom-
plete (1) in Math Lab (MATH 0001) fall
semester, 1991, must remove mat incom-
plete by 3 p m. Friday, March 20,1992
The Math Lab is open from 2p.rn.to4
p m Monday through Thursday to al-
low students needing to remove an in-
Complete time to take the remaining tests
A student with an incomplete from the
tail semester who fails to complete the
required work by March 20 will receive
a grade of "F" and be required to repeat
(fromttebeginning)MATHOrm(Note:
Students entering the Math Lab to work
dn removing an incomplete must have
with them a picture ID.)
INJ2QQ&
UK CFR FFCr'STHATlON
�Becreational Services will be holding
! Indoor Soccer Registration on March 24
at 5 p.m. in Biology 103. For more infor-
�mationcaU 757-6387.
Membersof EastCarolina Friendsshould
:bring their little Friends to River Park
North on Sunday, March 22 from 1:30
ECU SCHOOL
QF MUSIC EVENTS
FOR MARCH 17-23.1992
TUES, MAR. 17� Beth Norvell, piano.
Senior Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 7
p.m free),and Mary Morrison Dixon,
composition. Senior Recital (Fletcher
Recital Hall, 9 p.m free) WED, MAR
18�John Heath, voice and Tim Odom,
Trumpet, Senior Recital (Fletcher Recital
Hall, 7 p m, free) SUN . MAR 22�
Renee Perry, voice. Senior Recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall,7p rn.free). MON
MAR. 23�Flute Ensemble, Cynthia
Stachowski Decker, Director (Fletcher
Recital Hall. 7 p m. free), and Roger
McVey, piano. Sophomore Recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 9 p.m free).
The 1992 Greenville -Pitt Co Special
Olympics Spring Games will be held on
Apnll6atEB Aycockjr HighSchoolin
Greenville (rain date April 28). Volun-
teers are needed to serve as buddies
Chaperones for the Special Olympics
Volunteers must be able to work all day
- from 9 a.m. to 1:45 p m. (The first ones
there will be assigned positions) An
orientation meeting will be held on April
14 in Old Joyner Library. room 221 from
5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Free volunteer t-shirts
will be provided the day of the games to
all volunteers who have attended the
volenteer orientation session There will
be a concession stand for you tobuy your
lunch For more information, contact
Lisa Mills at 830-4551
H IMP-RAP" I WORKSHOP
Learn how to attempt Recreational Ser-
vices new Climbing Tower by attending
a Climb-Rapel workshop on March 19 at
3 p.m. at the Climb Tower located near
the Belk Building For more information
call 757-6387.
CO-REC
Y"l 1 FYFAII REGISTRATION
Co-Rec Volleyball Registration will be
on March 23 at 5 p.m. in Biology 103
This event, sponsored by Recreational
Services, should have two men and two
women teams. For more information call
757-6387.
p.m. to 2 p m in room 306 Belk Building
Please see the video at either Joyner or
Brody Libranes before you come for ad-
vising
REGISTRATION FOR
GENERAL CQ! I BGB STUDENTS
General College students should contact
their adv isers the week of March 23-27 to
make arrangements for academic advis-
ing for summer terms and fall semester,
1992. Early registration will begin March
30 and end April 3
THF.rrAY-lESP'AN ALLIANCE
Social support, advocacy, activities. Ev-
eryone welcome-gays, lesbians, bisexu-
als, concerned family and friends. Call
ECU counseling center 757-6661 for in-
formation regarding meeting time and
place.
THE CENTER
FOR INTERNATIONAL
PROGRAMS PRESENTS:
Dr. Sidney L Kasfirof Emory University
in a lectureon West African Masks. From
Ritual to Play Thursday, March 19,1992.
Jenkins Fine Arts Auditorium 7 p.m.
Funded by a United States Department
of Education Title VI Grant For more
information contact theCenter for Inter-
national Programs at 757-4829.
RFT1JRN1NG ADULT
STlJPFNTAoclAT1QN
There will be a meeting of the Returning
Adult Student Association Thursday,
March 19 at 5:30 in room 3013 of the
General Classroom Building. Plans for
the rest of the semester will be made and
social activities planned.
EDUCATIONAL
1 PANS AVAILABLE
Three educational loan programs for
North Carolina residents attending col-
leges in or out of state and for nonresi-
dents attending colleges in North Caro-
lina are available through College Foun-
dation Inc. These bans programs are
funded by North Carolina banks and
other investors Stafford Loans are for
dependent or independent students and
arebased on financial need. Supplemen-
tal Loans are for independent self-sup-
porting students and are not based on
financial need. PLUS Loans are for par-
ents of dependent students and are not
based on financial need. For more infor-
mation, write College Foundation Inc
ARFYQUVNHAm
WITH YOUR PRFSENT POSITION?
Do you enjoy discussing current issues,
considering new ideas, contemplating
the world around you? Would you like
to learn marketable skills, have flexible
hours, and receive financial assistance?
Then consider a Master of Arts degree in
Sociology from the Department of Soci-
ology and Anthropology at ECU. We
invite you to visit us on Wednesday
March 25 from 10a.m. to4p.m foraday
which will include facilty tours, infor-
mation sessions, and informal discus-
sions with faculty and students. Lunch
will be provided. For more Information
and Registration, call us at 919-757-6883
qRO'n� advising
FOR PBF-QTQNA1-
TfffttAPV STUDENTS
Pre-register for summer and fall sessions
starting Monday night March 23 from 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. in room 205 of the Belk
Building All other advising will be ev-
ery third Tuesday of each month from 12
PKPAPTMFNT OF PHYSICS
"The Future of the Savannah River
Nuclear Weapons Production Complex:
National Security versusthe Environ-
ment" will be the topic of lectures by
Brian Costner, at ECU on Mon, March
23,1992. Mr. Costner is Director of the
Energy Research Foundation, located in
Columbia S.C The Foundation works to
pursue enhanced environmental and
safety practices at the Savannah River
Site and throughout the nuclear weap-
ons complex. Mr. Costner's first presen-
tation will take place at 12:30 p.m. in the
small conference room above the Pitt.
Co. Mem. Hospital Cafeteria. This pre-
sentation is part of the Perspective Series
sponsored by the Dept of Medical Hu-
manities of ECU School of Medicine. Mr.
Costner's second presentation sponsored
by the ECU Dept. of Physics, will take
place at 4 p.m. in room PE 301 of the
Howell Science Complex on the ECU
campus Mr. Costner's visit to Greenville
is supported by the Eastern NC Chapter
of Physicians for Social Responsiblity
The public is invited to attend either
presentation, for more information,
please contact the Dept of Medical Hu-
manities at551-2797 or Dr. HalisOdabasi
in the Dept of Physics, 757-6430.
ATTENTION PRE-
PHYSICAL THERAPY STUDENTS
Registration advising for summer- fall
sen�sterwiUbehekionTuesday,March
24 and Wednesday, March 25 from 7 - 9
p.m. in the Belk Building (Room will be
posted on doors) AH pre-physical
therapy general college students must
attend one of theae advising sessions in
order to have registration forms ap-
proved and signed by an advisor. Only
excused absences will be rescheduled.
K
SCHOOl OF NURSING
AjJJBfflQM NURSING MAIORSANP
GEMMA! COL1 FGF. STUDENTS AS-
SIGNED TO A NURSING ADVISOR
The school of nursing will hold informa-
tional meetings concerning curriculum
changes and registration on Wednes-
day, March 25 Those enrolled in 2000
level nursing courses will meet at 5 p.m.
Those who are in pre-clinkal courses
will meet at 6 p.m. Students enrolled in
3000 and 4000 level nursing courses will
meet at 7 p.m. Advisor changes have
been made. Please consult the book out-
side Nursing 108 for your advisor'sname.
Some advisors will be available on
Wednesday evening between 4 pm and
8 p.m. Please check with your advisor or
check the list posted outside Nursing
108.
THRQUfiHTH�115
If you would like to work towards re-
ducing the architectural as well as the
attitudinal barriers that students with
special needs are laced with every day,
then come to the first organizational
meeting of PUSH. (People United to
Support the Handicapped). The meeting
will be on Tuesday, March 24 in 8c
MendenhaU Student Center at4 p.m. We
all face challenges every day, so please
come help raise awareness and get a
message heard.
CAMPUS
uamsBtouomMMM
The following organization will con-
duct employment interviews andor in-
formation sessions on campus during
March Seniors must register with Ca-
reer Services to participate ir: these inter-
views. March 18 Harris Teeter Super-
markets (for Mgt), March 18 Associated
Aluminum Products (Sales, Sales Mgt.),
March 18 Great Amer. Insurance Co
(Loss, Audit, Claims), March 18 Perdue
Farms (Mgt), March 19 U S. Navy, March
19 Southern States Cooperative (Retail
Mgt), March 20 Metropolitan Life (Sales).
March 24 Kmart Fashions (Mgt.), March
25 F.N. Wolf (Acct Exec -Sales). March
26 Maurice's (Retail Mgt), March 26
ServiceMaster Corp. (Mgt.)
INTERVIEW
SKTII IS WORKSHOP
Seniors and graduate students complet-
ing their degree in May or the summer
who have not yet attended an interview
skills workshop areinvited toattend one
on Monday, March 23 or Wednesday,
March 25. SponsoredbyCareerServices.
the workshops will be held m the Bloxton
House at 3 p.m.

CAMEL'S
CRUSAPF.FQR CHRIST
WFSIfV FOUNDATION
Dana Key of DeGarmo k Key will be
appearing in a solo concert Sunday,
March 22 at Jarvis Memorial United
Methodist Church. The group DeGarmo
k Key has been nominated for four
Grammy Awards and won a Nashville
Emmy in 1990 Dana Key is the great
grandsonofFrancis Scott Key,who wrote
the "Star Spangled Banner " Dana is on
the cuttingedgeof Contemporary Chns-
tian music. This should be a great con-
cert. The concert begins at 7 pm and
there is a $3 donation at the door
ECllRiOlOCYCLUB
There will be a meeting on Wednesday,
March 25 at 5 p.m. in room BN109 of the
ScienceComplex. Topics to be discussed
will include future activities and trips
New officer elections will also be held
New members are always welcome
SPEECH-LANGUAGE
avaimrmRY PATHOLOGY
All General College students who in-
tend to major in Speech-Language and
Auditory Pathology and have R
MuzzareUi as their advisor are to meet
on Wednesday, March 25 at 5 p.m. in
BrewsterC-103. Advising for early regis-
tration will take place at that time. Please
prepare a tentative class schedule before
the meeting
AJfHA PHI SIGMA
The National Crtainal Justice Honor
Society will be having our next meeting
on Match 23 at 5 pm, in 218 Ragsdale
Wewekotiteanyomwhotomteited. If
you have any questions please contact
Mebaea Smith at 931-7569





oHje �ast Carolinian
Sm'tng the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
Jennifer Wardrep, Neios Editor
Julie Roscoe, Asst. Neios Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Dana Danielson, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Robert S. Todd, Assistant Sports Editor
Jeff Becker, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Steven Ollice, Classified Advertising Technician
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Jean Caraway, Advertising Technician
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students The Bast Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday The masthead editorial in each edition
in the opinion of tl c Editorial Board The Fast Cawlinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Utters should be
limited to 250 words or less lyr purposes of decency and brevity. The East Cawlinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
for publication I elters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C
SS 4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Thursday, March 19, 1992
Disabled require more than ramps
One thing that students and people in
general do not like hearing is that they take
things for granted. Campuses are filled with
any number of prima donas ready to sing
the tragic life of the student.
have to write a paper. Mister So-and-So,
my economics professor, talks way over my head.
I had to stand in a long line to register for classes.
Nobody wants to hear it, but � we take
things for granted.
Now consider how many blind stu-
dents you hear at the Croatan loudly com-
plaining that they could not see what was
written on the blackboard. What number of
deaf students berate their teachers for speak-
ing a language many of them cannot imag-
ine the sound of. And the nerve of those
requestive wheelchair-bound who have to
navigate through the clamor of a thousand
pushy students into buildings ill-designed
for them.
Plainly those students who really do
have gripes about situations that make learn-
ing a larger effort than it should be are
generally not the ones who complain. Com-
plaining about what life has dealt you, is for
the most, every bit as productive as repri-
manding the wind for blowing. Instead,
most disabled students work harder to pur-
sue the education that attempts to elude
them, and many excel their non-handi-
capned peers in academic achievement.
This ability to compensate owes not
only to determination but to the help of
others who make the barriers easier to over-
come. In a period of administrative confu-
sion, one area in which ECU shines is our
Handicapped Student Services. Given their
resources, these people provide a nearly
unparalleled amount of quality and effort to
make the education inappreciative by many
of us as accessible as possible to the im-
paired or learning disabled student.
The Office of HSS assesses each student
who comes to them for special needs and
tailors their assistance in an individual ca-
pacity.
Not onlv is this commendable in light
of the numbers of learning disabled stu-
dents, but it also reveals another under-
standing we rarely display: one blind stu-
dent is not exactly like every other blind
student; all deaf students did not become
deaf at the same time and to the same de-
grees (in fact, hearing impaired services are
extremely challenging due to the various
categories of sign language and regional
backgrounds of the students and interpret-
ers); other impairments are not so uniform
as to be easily dealt with by across-the-
board textbook treatment as funders often
think.
HSS realizes that disabled students are
every bit as complex and individual as any-
one else and treat them in those respects.
It has been said that the only truly
disabled are those too lazy to take advan-
tage of everything offered to them. The dis-
abled know better than most the impor-
tance of options and need only the help of
those willing to shorten their bridges � to
clear the path a bit. ECU tries to do just that.
A learning disability is only a handicap
if we let it be one.
Maxwells Silver Hammer
Of Nixon, necessity, and nabobs
By Scott
Maxwell
Editorial
Columnist
S
Richard Nixon recently slith-
ered out from under his rock to cold
President Bush for not doing enough
to assist the Commonwealth of Inde-
pendent States
Nixon's rebuke embarrassed
Bush into mumbling an echo of his
inaugural address (You remember the
line after taking credit for "the long-
est peacetime economic expansion in
history Bush had the gall to claim
that we have more will than wallet "
We must have a hell of a lot of will.)
"We are spending too much as it al-
ready is the president said in re-
sponse hi Nixon's memo "So to do
the things I would really like to do, I
don't have a blank check for all of
that "
As loath as I am to admit it,
Nixon happens to be nght about this
one Every day we refuse the CIS the
money and food and medicine they
desperately need, brings us a day
closer to a resurgence of tyranny � a
tyranny well then have to spend tril-
lions more to fight
The CIS is, at present, chaotic
Any chaotic place is a good place for
spawning dictators, as rotting meat is
for maggots And there are several
other factors that make a new dicta-
torship increasingly likely.
First, there remains exactly one
intact institution in the former Soviet
Union the Red Army That's almost 4
million trained soldiers, plus tanks,
submarines, nuclear missiles, and so
on Contrary to the party line in this
country, last year's coup didn't fail in
spite of the Red Army; it failed be-
cause of it Had the Red Army troops
massed outside the Russian Parlia-
ment chosen to fire, a few peasants
with sticks and half a dozen turncoat
tanks wouldn't have stood a chance
The point is that an authontar-
ian government created by or sup-
ported by the army�which, not inci-
dentally, is intermittently reported to
be growing restive � has a much
better chance of survival than the in-
explicably penny-pinching George
Bush would have you believe. In fact,
the more the Red Army is made to feel
that the West is simply going to watch
their country self-destruct, the more
likely it becomes that the army will
step in and restore order as best it can
� and using the government model it
knows best
Second, the communist bureau-
crats are doubtless doing what they
can to make an army takeover more
likely Most of them are still in the jobs
they had when the CIS was the USSR,
and few stand to benefit from the new
order American bureaucrats would
do no less By withholding from the
former Soviet Union the money and
supplies it needs, we create discon-
tent which the bureaucrats can help
shape to their own ends.
Third, it's winter, which is tough
enough in that part of the world any
year. Freezing weather and empty
shelves make citizens miserable, and
a government that promised warm
clothes and plentiful food would be
likely to meeewith popular support
We like to pretend that most
people would rather have freedom
than food But the truth is just the
opposite in practice, most prefer food
to freedom If we continue to with-
hold food and cash from the Rus-
sians, they'll take it where they can
find it, no matter what the price.
What's most distressing about
this fiasco is that George Bush had to
be told that he wasn't doing enough
to help the fledgling CIS. A genuine
statesman, a true foreign-policy whiz
(as many call Bush), would have
known months ago that more needed
to be done Even humble columnists
like Yours Truly knew it, and I'm just
one of Spiro's nattering nabobs of
negativism. And a leader � as many
call Bush � would have done some-
thing about it, months ago If our
president had fought half as hard for
aid to the CISas hedid for that worth-
less transportation bill, the matter
would be well behind us already.
Even if Nixon's wake-up call
came in time, George Bush took an
awful risk with our lives by letting
the CIS go underfunded as long as it
has. A revived totalitarian govern-
ment in the former Soviet Union �
commanding a formidable nuclear
arsenal � would be a far greater
threat than anything we've faced in
recent memory, including that poor,
pitiful Saddam Hussein, whom Bush
made such an expansive fuss over.
Bush happened to be in the
Oval Office when (he USSR came
crashing down, thereby making the
world a safer place. Through inepti-
tude or malice, his unprecedented
stinginess threatens to make the
world more dangerous again. a
Campus Spectrum
N.C. Constitution challenged
Student addresses candidate-age issue
By William Thorpe Jr.
Campus Spectrum
Editor's note � The following ar
tide is a reprint of a letter tent to the
Supreme Court The writer is an ECU
graduate student currently running for
North Carolina Governor, if he win the
election, state law forbids him to MM the
office
Dear Chief Justice William
Kehnquistand Associate Justices
On the26th dav of February 1992,
1 presented myself to the State Boa rd oi
Elections and were denied filing a no-
tice of candidacy' for the office of Gov-
ernor of North Carolina, pursuant to
the provisions in the North Carolina
State Constitution cited in Article 111
at Section 2 (2) wherein it states "No
person shall be eligible for election to
the office of Governor or Lieutenant
Governor unless, at the time Of his
election, he shall have attained the OgM
of 30 years
While there appears to be no
infnngement of my North Carolina
State Constitutional nghts, the State
Board has violated my United States
Constitutional rights as a qualified
North Carolina voter to fully partici-
pate in government Therefore, 1 am
filing suit against the State Board in
federal district court asking that North
Carolina's gubernatorial filing qualifi-
cations be declared unconstitutional
based on age discrimination
After carefully researching the
constitutional laws, my attorney has
advised me that the litigation process
in a case of this nature may take up to
a year and tens of thousands of dollars
in legal expenses before it reaches your
high court for a final decision
I have allocated $12,000 of my
own money (so m uch for my law school
tuition and my house down-payment)
to have my counsel prepare a com-
plaint, motion and brief for a federal
injunction prohibiting North Carolina' s
May 5,1992 pnmary election until the
State Board places my name on the
ballot for the office of governor
Whatever personal sacrifice that
I must make are insignificant to my
commitment in working to strengthen
Amencan political democracy
With regards to this lawsuit
based on age discrimination, there are
two critical questions to be considered
What would be the advantages of a
youth gubematonal candidacy7 What
are the arguments against such a can-
didacy'
What would be the advantage of
such a candidacy7
The theory of age stratification
assumes that each stratum is composed
of people similar in age or life stage
who tend to share capacities, abilities
and motivations related to age In po-
litical terms, age strata are unequal in
access to positions of political power
In our society, young adults are less
likely to be political leaders than
middle-aged and olderadu'ts Thereis
a good explanation tor this Mostvoung
people do not register and vote be-
CMM(A) they were not taught in school
hi register and vote and (B) they feel
they have no one to vote for
Declanng the age qualification
for filing for the office of governor un-
constitutional will allow an 18 -29year
old citien the histonc opportunity to
mount a serious gubernatorial candi-
dacy One advantage of such a candi-
dacy is that it would insist that young
leaders play significant roles and help
shape policy and programs for thestate
One-fourth of the total vote is between
the ages 18 and 29 Yet this group has
the lowest voter registration and turn-
out than any other group
A youth cand idacy would excite,
maybe electrify, the young and
unrepresented masses, increasing their
voter registration and political partici-
pation.
A youth candidacy, then, would
provide more options in the electoral
process
If we treat age as a centrally im-
portant charactenstic-like class, sex or
ethnicit � we can easily recognize the
basic flaw in North Carolina p
Button clause For example - I m
address the poor people ot rtl j
hna who earn less than 111 ��
that they have the nght I
when it ciimes to the office i I �
thev must elect someone w ttjm
more than $10,000 a year?Ol �
suggest to the women of N
lina that they haveaoonstitur. �
tovotebasedon the 19th Anm :t-
but only men are eligible tore �� bopi
the office of governorOr wi uld it be
logical to propose to the dev tdars
of former slaves that btcaiftf I fa
15th Amendment they have a right I
vote, but mav only vote for h I
bematonal candidates' Caftan
However, this partkuiar datai
inNorthCarobna'sCanstinjtA r
proclaims to citi am beU w : � �
of 18 and 29 that they have .v � M
nght to vote for the office of � '� emor.
not for themselves, but for other!
side of" their age group
What are the argume-It j -
a youth gubematonal cand
One is that a youth gubemato-
nal candidate's age would effei I his or
her ability to perform the duties .nth
office
Not true This same lint of rea-
soning was once applied to da -
frage to citizens based upon the
sex or ethnic backgrounds
Assuming that this is a vjhd
argument, then why should the r.C'
of suffrage be granted to a group of
citizens who are deemed incompetent
to hold the office that their t&gibk te
vote for7 In other words, why should
youngpeoplehave theawesomepower
of electing someone toanofficeir w hadB
they themselves could not file1 The
point here is consistency This suoc
argument implies that since 18 M
year old citizens cannot run for gover-
nor they therefore, should not be eli-
gible to vote for that position ,
I highly recommend that yqa
and your court chose the progressive
option of allowing all citizens to be-
come eligible foe election to am off�
for which they can vote
feMey. Kid. Wanna Buy Some Fist.ii klrie?"
YOU DON'T HAVE TO WALK
through 0 city pork on your
�ov to work every day to hove
noticed those cut tittle two-bv-rwo-inch
iip lock plastic bogs strewn on the ground
They're everywhere Now. we know and
you know what they're used for Why is
it. then, that the manufacturers ond dis
tnbutors of me bogs cloim to think other-
wise' We asked some company spokes-
persons e�octv what their products are
used to corry
-Infectious hoiordV Gregory at Com-
Poc, Corbondole, Minors
'Marbles, beads, tie tacks, golf tees'
�ten at A-Poc Manufacturing, Grand
Rapids, Michigan
"Dirt somples"�Mark at Doy-Pac, Day-
ton, Ohio
"Fishing tockJe"�B.M at Rickart Hort-
land. Wisconsin
"Am ond crofts�Undo ot Huckster
Packaging, Houston, Teas
"liMe nuts"�Shelly ot PokSok. Spoto
Michigan
Coins shews, art supplies, seeds ports,
tobacco, pokce eodence "�tanning
tag (Harvard, iBinois) catalog
"If a guy s got a smoti part that he
wants to take in and out ond not lose it"
�Bob ot Ai Bee. Elk Grove Village Illinois
A tew employees did grudgingly admit
mot their product might conceivably some-
times be used improperly for .llici� purpos-
es One said he became a 'ittle suspicious
when a young mon m a very expensive
sweatsuit drove up m a Menredes and
asked to order 25 000 setf-teaien He
said he was using rhem for car leasing "
Despite the usual application of the
miniature bogs, the Drug Enforcement
Agency does not classify them as drug
paraphernalia Pockogmg material m and
of itself is not illegal soys a DEA
"cannobis investigator " Nevertheless, a
number of manufacturers and distributors
were under the impression that bogs
smaller that two inches square ore illegal
or at least officially discouraged Several
said they hod received tetters from the
DEA asking for names of people who
ordered the smartest bogv and some men.
tioiied o memo from industry leader Mm.
gnp that asked other companies to toin
them m a ban on the baby bunnies.
Susan Baker, an investigator for the
DEA soid onfy that local D�A branches
-vnght ask bog manufacture! s to furnish
names "at a courtesy Minagnp soles
monoger f �ctvo-Jion wo, en less
certain obose whether his company hod
ever distributed a memo "There mtght be
someone here who could know thai " he
said, "but it would not be my -
The Cle
Bush not plannin
to dominate worl
THr Av V
Scandalized by a recent
Pentagon mem. i ailing f r the
United States to en surf its
"worlddominance" by military
force if necessary, the White
House today sought to assure
other countries that Arr i
intends to be a peaceful, fair-
minded member ot the com-
munity of nations
"Our first objective must
be to kick the ass of anyone who
looks like he might possibly
pose a threat to the most para-
noid among us the Pentagon
document read in part
dally swarthy foreign du U
since it's easy to guli the Ai
can populace into hating thj
Yet White hi
spokesweasel Merlin Spitzi
categorically rejected tht
that the document might rj
America's foreign policy
"It's simply ndicuh
claim that the United StaJ
somehow out to dominal
world bv militarily threat
other nations Spitz'
scoffed. "We prefer to u;
United Nations as out tt
that. Ooo, I take that back'1
that back
BRIEFLY
Mini-satire for busy readers
LAW: Hmmm Mike Tyson was convicted of brutally raj
young woman, eh11 guess we all owe Robin Ovens an apokj
POLITICS: It a poll were held today, most people thi
Clinton would be slightly ahead of George Bush in the poll. a
ing to a recent poll.
WEATHER: The entire country is reporting record-hig
peratures this winter � even breaking the record-high tempe
thev set last winter, and the record-high temperatures thev
winter before that, and so on. By the way, the whole global w,
thing is a complete myth.
CELEBRITIES: Elizabeth Taylor meets, marries d
Mickey Mouse during birthday celebration, dose Wends
new sweetheart is Goofv.
all of Wax
Hazardous Waste
fpf.c � � V7?5
Fred's Corner
EVfc iaoWV 25" 22f!��
UisWfc Two fcHK NUb oHV-V
to? fa� 5tMk -bvew �s�xs
,
"8

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A
2
hdidcite-age issue
irohrui sagequd-
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grit to vok hut
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i of guvemor,
tfof OttMfSONfr
� enta .ic.iunst
tndidtcy'
deflect
� . if-ot th
untc ane cA W1
d upon their d-iss,
� �' - .i .lltd
should the r.i;ht
ted -i group of
� �� med incoirqpeael
e that their digibh
h uhv should
. - . iwaaoowpown
office in which
: not file' The
� v Phis sutK
es that nncf 18 te�3i
� run tor gover-
uld not be�li-
� ,v!tnn
nend that yq�
n ' se the progressive
(:tiens ID r-
� � k � �. � � � n to anv office
Uuy Some Fishinq Tackle?'
�Hi
��9 � XV�� qI om afc,
� "�� boc ,
� - ndu� (M
� � �.
- a tan obiV bo�K �K9g�t
�w Bate at- ��tatoc
XA wkI or� that toe D� tronch�
� JVk bog Onutocturi �(, 1,
-xjr� ot a courtw� " Mwnp jot
"O"09e� -� Richonhor �a, ,
ertom obou� ��t�' K5 coupon
?i)uW(i o ���mo 'TV�t �wtaht b
�X"one � �hc could knw. �, -
�wJ bu� would not be vj� "
Opinion
QJlfc �oHtCarolinian March 19, 1992 is
The Clearly Labeled Satire Page
U ��- Bii .hnnt Rmh � hnt rinn't read anvthtntf Into that "
It's all about Bosh � but don't read anything into that
Bush not planning
to dominate world
Tut Amau.amatedPress
Scandalized by a recent
Pentagon memo calling for the
1 nited States to ensure its
world dominance" bv military
torce if necessary, the White
House tixlav sought to assure
other countries that America
intends to be a peaceful, fair-
minded member of the com-
munity oi nations.
Our first objective must
be to kick the ass of anyone who
looks like he might possibly
pose ,i threat to the most para-
noid among us the Pentagon
document read in part. "Espe-
cially swarthy foreign dictators,
since it's easy to gull the Ameri-
can populace into hating them
Yet White House
spokesweasel Merlin Spitzwater
categorically rejected the idea
that the document might reflect
America's foreign policy.
"It's simply ridiculous to
claim that the United States is
somehow out to dominate the
world by militarily threatening
other nations Spitzwater
scoffed. "We prefer to use the
United Nations as our tool for
that. Ooo, I take that back! I take
that back
Bush hits campaign trail, slams rival
The Amalgamated Press
President Bush valiantly
struggled to increase his lead over
challenger Patrick Buchanan dur-
ing campaign appearances in
Michigan this week.
Speaking to reporters aboard
Air Force One, the incredibly luxu-
rious jet airplane that the presi-
dent gets to fly around in when-
ever he feels like it, and when I say
"incredibly luxurious" I'm not
pulling your leg, 1 mean, there's a
bar and a full-time masseuse and
crates full of Grecian Formula 44
left over from President Reagan's
term and some say the remains of
Jimmy Hoffa are in there some-
place, but anyway, back to the
astonishingly amusing satirical
story, Bush said, "There are two
things that are popular in Michi-
gan: the death penalty and aid for
the automobile industry
So Bush's message to
Michiganers � er, Michiganians
�or is that Michigoids � well, to
residents o( Michigan � was that
when Bush is re-elected, he'll make
it a capital offense to buy or own a
foreign-built car.
Some saw Bush's promise as a
sop to the disenchanted labor
movement; others took it as a slam
at the Mercedes-owning
Buchanan. But Bush defends the
death penalty expansion, claim-
ing it's the only way America can
regain her competitiveness in the
world market.
"Look, if people don't buy
your stuff, you lose the trade war,
said Bush. "So if people buy for-
eign-made goods, they're helping
us lose a war. And helping us lose
a war is treason, and treason is
punishable by death already, so
there's really nothing new about
this
Bush denied rumors of a se-
cret Pentagon memo that recom-
mends expanding the buv- Ameri-
can-or-die plan to citizens of for-
eign countries.
"Well, 1 won't sav we've never
considered it said Bush. "Let's
just sav 1 haven't had a chance to
coerce the United Nations into
forcing it on the world yet
Bush kicks off drug summit, Mardi Gras
BRIEFLY
Mini-satire for busy readers
I AW: Hmmm Mike Tyson was convicted of brutally raping a
) oung woman, eh? 1 guess we all owe Robin Givens an apology
POLITICS: If a poll were held today, most people think Bill
Clinton would be slightly ahead oi George Bush in the poll, accord-
ing to a recent poll.
WEATHER: The entire country is reporting record-high tem-
peratures this winter � even breaking the record-high temperatures
the set last winter, and the record-high temperatures they set the
winter before that, and so on. By the way, the whole global warming
thing is a complete mvth.
CELEBRITIES: Elizabeth Taylor meets, marries, divorces
Mkkey Mouse during birthday celebration. Close friends say Liz's
new sweetheart i Goofy.
The Amalgamated Press
President Bush kicked off
three days of festivities in New
Orleans today, as he and leaders
from six Latin American nations
began their combination Mardi
Gras celebration and drug sum-
mit.
Bush apparently had begun
the partying early. Waving a
nearly empty bottle of tequila in
the general direction of assembled
reporters, Bush invited the news-
men to "help y'selves to the booze.
We got some pork rinds, too, inna
bus
Next, throwing his arms
around his Latino compadres, the
president said, "Y'know, 1 � I
love you guys and passed out. A
Secret Service agent immediately
wrestled the president's now-
empty tequila bottle to the ground.
Vice President Dan Quayle
was barred from the event, since
alcohol would be served there and
he's just a teensy bit too young for
that.
White House spokesweasel
Merlin Spitzwater, on hand for
the occasion, informed the press
that the purpose of the summit
was to curb the use of drugs. Tak-
ing a drag of his cigarette and
washing it down with Mime caf-
feine-rich Colombian coffee,
Spitzwater denied allegations that
the drug summit was primarily a
political event intended to shore
up the president's plummeting ap-
proval rating.
"I denv the allegations that
the drug allegation is a political
summit � 1 mean, that the drug
event is a presidential raring �
well, 1 deny whatever you said
said Spitzwater. "The president is
genuinely and totally opposed to
drugs, except those drugs that
happen to be legal because of his-
torical accident or the political and
financial clout of the companies
who now sell them
Spitzwater called on the Con-
gress to release millions of dollars
in Peruvian assets that were fro-
zen because of that country's hu-
man rights abuses. "Who cares
about human rights?" said
Spitzwater. "We'refightingdrugs,
here
Spitzwater also commented
on controversial reports that the
military is playing a larger and
larger role in fighting the drug
war abroad.
"We're just sending them a
few military advisers said
Spitzwater. "Kind of like the early
days of Vietnam � I mean, noth-
ingatalllike Vietnam! Don't print
that! Don't print that
Spitzwater rejected criticism
bv Congressional Democrats that
the multibillion-doUar drug war
has been a failure.
Failure indeed scoffed
Spitzwater. "Find a college stu-
dent who got kicked out of school
because he tried pot, or a busi-
nessman who lost his job because
he did cocaine on his own time,
and ask them if we 'failed' to ruin
their lives
Spitzwater broke up the meet-
ing with reporters to put an ice
pack on the head of the president,
who was beginning to come
around.
When he fully recovers from
his drunken stupor, Bush report-
edly will be asked to sign a pledge
not to vomit on the other leaders
during the conference.
Fred's Corner
HNE Tvoo t& Mtit OUUV
CARTOONIST MEETING
for all you budding cartoonists who deeply desire to get cartoonig experience
on the Pirates Comics page and you faithful veterans presently on the page.
Today 6:00pm. East Carolinian Office





Entertainment
Site iEant Olarniintan
March 19, 1992
Sports
fe's still one of the best
Les Paul: Music legend past and present
Bv Lewis Coble
l ntertainment Editor
I ditor's Mote Thbstoryisbrdom
�:� two p�ts due to the length ofthe
� �mi) P.ir! tWO RDiJHVrm next
Tuesday's pqxt
Forihoseofyoubmnafter I960,
,aii may not be directlv familiar
with Les Paul. Yet, as you sit and
listen to whatever form of music
vHi happen to enjoy, you should
-top nd give thanks for this man
anjj his contributions to the music
industry.
I es Paul represents an age in
� v musk industry that has not been
seen tor quite some time. Paul has a
music history that could give
MkSteal ackson or any other cur-
reni star a run tor their money. Yet,
Paul is perhaps a bit obscure for the
linger generation. Still, Paul's
i tntributjons to the music indus-
try . siu hasuWeetectricguitar,mute-
track recording and the echo pedal,
affect ever) piece of music that
corfjes across the radio waves to-
da�
In a recent interview, Les Paul
took 11 writers and myself on a
humorous and insightful trip that
lumps about between the past,
present and future.
Faul left home at the age oi 13
.nd travelled the United States in
arch oi work. In 14, he and his
partners decided to let luck lead the
waj . "We packed our car in 193ri
and westixxl out in frontand flipped
a com � heads New York or tails
I -V " he said. "It landed heads and
m � were on our way to New York.
When we got to New York, we hit
(hebuUseye. The world progressed
Mid went on.
TTie conversation then turned
� w nether or not Paul felt that song
. liters today differ from the writ-
ers of the past Well, with thesong
w liters ti (day I think the artist more
r less gather hi information from
either someone else in his group or
makes something within them-
selves he said. "In the old days,
vou use to go down to Tin Can
Alley on Broadway, and there
would be 5(X1 song publishing firms
and song writers
When questioned about
whether or not he had ever been a
"You don't have to
have a bowel move-
ment to have a hit
record or to prove
that vou have one
-Les Paul on the current trend
of playing rock music very
loudly.
guitar instructor, Faul quickly ex-
plained his first and only attempt at
instruction. "No, I wouldn't want
to be (an instructor), but 1 had to be
because 1 have three boys and a
daughter he said. "It is interest-
ing, 1 had to teachhim (first son)and
1 chose to do that. I ran into my first
time of ever of teaching whit 1 hid
learned. It w as terriblv, terribly dif-
ficult, too
Paul was then questioned about
his favorite guitar player. Although
he had trouble thinking oi just one
individual, he did manage to give
his feelings about guitar players
today. "Thereare SO many out there
today he said, trying to think. "It is
prettv hard to nail one down. It is
almost like it's a different player
each week. Ifvoucould putthemall
together, you'd have one hell of a
guitar player. 1 tell you that
Taul expressed a small amount
of concern when asked about the
techniques and gadgets used bv
guitar players tixiay. "Lnfortu-
natelv, thev're depending upon
olume he said. "Thev re depend-
ing on something to drive their
message home, rath r than to use
less gadgets and less power and
mo re actual sitting down in thechair
and doing it
Still playing the guitar after 65
vears and making weekly appear-
ancesat Fat Tuesday's in New York,
Paul gave his three secrets for main-
taining his longevity. "First, you
have to love your work he said.
"The second one is that you have to
work hard. The third one is that you
don't dare let yourself form some
blinders, like they do w ith a horse
so that hedoesn't get distracted. So,
I think it's terribly important that
you stav with the times. That's why
vou'll find me going to Burn Arena
and Madison Square Gardens to
see Paul McCartney and to see oth-
ers. They'reolder. You got to see the
young guys too
Charing the conversation, Paul
mentioned Jimmy Hendrix. He ex-
plained the first time he ever met
Hendrix. "1 thought he was a formi-
dable plaver and a great guy he
said. "I found him on Route 46 in
12.1 am sure I didn't find him in
the beginning, but 1 found him be-
fore he was ever discovered. He
was looking for a job. Unfortunately,
when 1 came back a couple hours
later and said, 'Where's that left-
handed guitar player? That wild
man?' Thev said, 'We threw him
out Oi course, 1 never did find him
until rruinv vears later. This is in
12 and in WaS, he hit in England
When asked if he felt respon-
sible for the way todavs guitarists
plav, Paul provided a modem day
example oi his influence on the
music scene. At Fat Tuesdays, some
of the top guitar players came in
there because I've got a new little
gimmick that 1 use when I pick
now he said. "Where I can make
this thing like I'mchokinga chicken
It's a wild sound. It is an unusual
sound. Guitar players come in there
and stand on their
heads in every way
to find out how I'm
doing
Expressinghu-
mility, Paul ex-
plained his reac-
tions to being con-
sidered a major in-
spiration by so
many people in the
music industry.
"It's a very flatter-
ing thing he said.
"It is like a dream.
It's something I
neveranticipated.lt
doesn't seem like
it's me and it's a
hard thing for me
to handle. I'm very
grateful and very
happv. But I must
openly admit that
it is like it should be
someone else
Displaying a
very open mind,
Paul defended the
nght of all forms of
music when asked
if he felt any music
trend was un-
healthy for the in-
dustry. "I don't
think so he said.
"I think you have
to comedown w ith
the whole ball oi
wax. The music
goes round and
round. We had hid
our crazv stuff back there, as well as
we have it now. We had it before
me and we're going to have it after
me. The thing that 1 mostly get dis-
turbed about is that we try to force
them (tvpes of music) into a box
We trv to categorize them tix spe-
cifically. I have difficulty trying to
force mvself into any box
Taul did provide a metaphor
Still playing the
and to work on
Pncrto courtMy Mauric J�ymo�r Promotion
guitar after 65 years. Les Paul continues to perform weekly in New York
guitars and equipment for the music industry
for the current trend of plaving
music as loud as possible. "When I
go to the concerts and 1 have to put
ear plugs on and the music is just
absolutelv he said. "When a
guv hits a bass note, 1 don't have to
take mv clothes to the dry cleaners.
Thev just clean my pants out. They
clean mv clothes for me. You can
just feel the vibrations going through
vou. It's almost like a bowel move-
ment. Someof it is uncomfortable. I
do wonder if the answer is loud.
"1 don't think it is I think that if
you're going to get to a person, vou
got to get to them at normal listen-
ing levels. You don't have to have a
Dowel movement to have a hit
record or to prove that you have
one
PI KAPPA ALPHA
&
THE RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE
would like to thank the following people for their
support in the "Walk to Wilmington
The East Carolinian
Car Sounds and Security
Budget Car Rental
Kinkos
Answerphone
Micro Age Computers
ECU - Student Government
Wes Shepard
Greenville Express Car Wash
Eastern Wrecker Sales
Varsity Hairstyle
Great Expectations
The Pantry
Champions Health and Fitnes Center
Harris Teeter
East Coast Music and Video
David Anderson
The Elbo Room
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Workman
Public Safety
Athletic Office
Chancellor Eakin
Society for Advancement of Mngmt.
B and B Wrecker Service
Lee Tingen
RKS Mobile Home Supply
Southern Eyes of Greenville
New East Bank
Laura Sweet
U.B.E.
Delta Chi Fraternity
Keith Telghman
Coastal Plain Freight Service
Trish Radcliffe
Kim Collie
Cassie Allman
Tony Sloan
Gamma Sigma Sigma
DeanSpeier
The Gun Rack
Village Pawn Shop
Hair by Rycke
Bogies
Rum Runner Dive Shop
Alpha Phi Sorority
Kwik Stitch
Boulevard Bagel Shop
Paritana Bob's
Tarrytown Grill
Sdssorsmith Inc.
Carrie Mouw
Tumage Insurance Agency
Travel Express Inc.
Home School Assoc. of St Peter's School
Anderson, Collins
lead netters over Bra
By Chris Stansbury
Staff Writer
The ECL Ladv P;rate tenr11-
team won their f irst tw 11 matches
but lost the !a? tw matches
dunngSpnng Break .Whileplav-
ing in Florence, S.C , and Hilton
Head, S.C the split moves the
team's record 11 3-3 on the year
The Lad) Pirate- defeated
FrancisManonC oBege 4, with
the deciding matth between a
three set tie brea k doubles match
between ECU 's Knstjne Ander-
son and Alison Collins and
FMC's Tonya Wadford and
Alaine Hemdon, whk h the Ladv
Pirates prevailed in a 6-3 4-
6 victory The same Ladv Pirate
doubles team provided tw
the three double- victories on
the week.
ECL defeated Transylvania
University,6-3, and lost toUNC-
Charlofte and CAA opl
)id Dominion 1-8 and)
-pectively.
The Ladv Pirates u
by team captain Kim
lennifer Fen ton and Elke
who contnbuted each w
-ingles win- and only
Harvev and Fenton arel
1 and No. 2 seeds inter)
ablv, and Garten is ti
seeded plaver
Kn- plaed ex I
well, and mavbe the besj
plaved all vear, but )u-t
get a break this week
-istant coach Dave Sh�
V i 3 seed Kris Robins
over the past week Rj
suffered defeats in I
and doubles matches
The Lady Pirates! i
is March 17, when thev
Guilford College at 2:
Greenville on Minges
tw
Kristine Anderson
Alison Coll it
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Photo Lab Man
for the Universi
Experienced photographer needed t
ing The East Carolinian student newi
the Rebel magazine, radio station
Tuition to summer school and a $175i
for 12 months of service. Duties inc
monthly reports to the Media Boa:
photographers, monitoring mventoi
item budget. Requirements: Must
average, be enrolled as a full-time sti
attend summer school. Apply by 5 p.l
Media Board Office, Second Floor. S
t I
AD DONATED BY E.C.U. STUDENT STORES
i�r i �1
Now Ac
Applid
For The 1
Judicial
These positions off
portunity to gain ex
ership abilities thai
throughout your life J
these positions will
valuable contribute
lina University. For
tion and application
office at 218 Mend(
All applications mi
Monday,





Entertainment
uUie lEaat (Itaroitnian
March 19, 1992
Sports
fe's still one ot the best
Les Paul: Music legend past and present
By Lewis Coble
Entertainment Editor
Editor sNote. Das storyisbroken
�: parts due to tlw length of the
� �. will appear in next
For those of you bornafter I960,
iii may not be directly familiar
ith I es Paul Yet, as you 5tt and
ten to whatever form of musk
hj happen to enov, you should
top and cie thanks tor this man
,tvt liis contributions to the music
�i
es Paul represents an age in
usk industrythathasnotbeen
- vi , tor quite some time. Taul has a
, his ton that could give
' heal lackson or any other cur-
I Mr ,1 run tor their tnonev. Net,
perhaps a bit obscure tor the
�unger generation Still, Paul's
tntributions to the musu indus-
�uchas the electric guitar, multi-
. KrevordingandthetvhoyxKl.il
eel � er piece of music th.it
r�es across the radio waves to-
" In .i recent interview Les Paul
k 11 writers and myself on a
n orous and insightful trip that
�nips about between the past,
resent and future.
Paul left home at the age of 13
i.id travelled the United States in
- ik h ot work. In ly, he and his
irtnersdecided to let luck lead the
� r. We packed our car in 1
: .� esbxxi out in front and flipped
heads New N ork or tails
be said It landed head sand
it wa to New N ork
� .� � cot to New N ork we hit
� .t Ihe world progressed
� t on.
Die conversation then turned
hetherornotPaulfeltthatsong
ters UhI.h differ from the writ-
th�
ast Well, with the song
writerstoday 1 think theartistmore
� r less gathers his information from
either someone else in his group or
makes something within them-
selves he said. "In the old days,
you use to go down to Tin Can
Alley on Broadway, and there
would he5)songpublishingfirms
and songwriters
When questioned about
whether or not he had ever been a
"You don't have to
have a bowel move-
ment to have a hit
record or to prove
that you have one
-Les Paul on the current trend
of playing rock music very
loudly.
guitar instructor, Paul quickly ex-
plained his first and onlv attempt at
instruction "No, 1 wouldn't want
to be (an instructor), but I had to be
because 1 have three boys and a
daughter he said. "It is interest-
ing. I had to teach him (first son) and
1 chose to do that I ran into my first
time of ever of teaching what 1 had
learned. It was terriblv, ternblvdif-
ficult, ttxv"
Paul was then questioned about
his favorite guitar player. Although
he had trouble thinking of just one
indi idual, he did manage to give
his feelings about guitar players
today. "Therearesomarryoutthere
todavhe said, trying to think 'It is
pretty hard to nail one down. It is
almost like it's a different plaver
each week If you could putthemall
together, you'd have one hell of a
guitar player. 1 tell you that
Paul expressed a small amount
of concern when asked about the
techniques and gadgets used bv
guitar players today. "Unfortu-
nately, they're depending upon
volume, "he said Triev're depend-
ing on something to drive their
message home, rather than to use
less gadgets and less power and
more actual sittingdow n in thechair
and doing it
Still playing the guitar after f�5
vears and making weekly appear-
ancesatFatTuesday'sin New York,
Taiil gave his three secrets for main-
tuning his longevity. "First, you
have to love your work he said.
"The second one is that vou have to
work hard. The third one is that you
don't dare let yourself form some
blinders, like they do with a horse
so that he doesn't get distracted.So,
I think it's terribly important that
you stav with the times. That's why
you'll find me going to Bums Arena
and Madison Square Gardens to
seeTaul McCartney and to stv oth-
ers. They're older. You got to see the
young guvs too
During the com ersation, Taul
mentioned Jimmy I lendrix. He ex-
plained the first time he ever met
Hendrix thought he wasa formi-
dable plaver and a great gu he
said. "1 found him on Route 4r in
12. I am sure 1 didn't find him in
the beginning, but I found him be-
fore he was ever discovered. He
was looking for a job. Unfortunately,
when 1 came back a couple hours
later and said Where s that left-
handed guitar player? I hat wild
man?' Ihey said. We threw him
outOf course, I neverdid find him
until many vears later Ihis is in
Wh2anil in 1965,hehitin I ngland
When asked it he felt respon-
sible for the wav todays guitarists
plav, Paul provided a modem day
example of his influence on the
musk scene. At Fat 1 uesdays, si me
of the top guitar players came in
there because I've got a new little
gimmick that 1 uy when I pick
now he said "Where I can make
this thing likel'mchokingachicken
It's a wild sound It is an unusual
sound.(rtiitarplayerscome in there
and stand on their
heads in every way
to find out how I'm
doing
Expressinghu-
mility, Faul ex-
plained his reac-
tions to being con-
sidered a major in-
spiration by so
many people in the
music industry.
"It's a very flatter-
ing thing he said.
"It is like a dream.
It's something I
neveranticipated. It
ckesrit seem like
it's me and it's a
hard thing for me
to handle. I'm very
grateful and very
happy. But I must
openly admit that
itislikeitshouldbe
someone else
Displaying a
very open mind,
Paul defended the
right of all forms of
musk when asked
it he felt any music
trend was un-
healthy for the in-
dustry. "I don't
think so he said.
I think vou have
to come down with
the whole ball of
wax. Ihe music
goes round and
round. We had had
ourcrazy stuff back there,aswellas
we have it now We had it before
me and we're going to ha e it after
me. Ihe thing that I most!) get dis-
turbed about is that we try to force
them (types of muskinto a box
We try to categorize them too spe-
cifically. 1 hue difficulty trying to
force mvselt into any box
Paul did provide a metaphor
Still playing the
and to work on
Photo court��y Mauric J�ymo�r Promotion
guitar after 65 years. Les Paul continues to perform weekly in New York
guitars and equipment for the music industry
tor the current trend of plaving you. Ifs almost like a bowel move-
musk as loud as possible. "When 1 nvnt Some of it is uncomfortable. I
goto the concerts and 1 havetoput ' wonder it the answer is loud
ear plugs on and the music is just
absolutely " he said When a
guv hits a bass note, I don't have to
Like mv clothes to the dry deaners.
Ihev ust clean mv pants out. They
1 don't think it is I think that if
you're going to get to a person you
got to get to them at normal listen-
ing levels. 'ioudorithaetnhaea
bowel movement to have a hit
Jean mv clothes for me You can record or to proe that vou haw
justfeel the vibrations going through one
PI KAPPA ALPHA
&
THE RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE
would like to thank the following people for their
support in the "Walk to Wilmington
The East Carolinian
Car Sounds and Security
Budget Car Rental
Kinkos
Answerphone
Micro Age Computers
ECU - Student Government
Wes Shepand
Greenville Express Car Wash
Eastern Wrecker Sales
Varsity Hairstyle
Great Expectations
The Pantry
Champions Health and Fitnes Center
Harris Teeter
East Coast Music and Video
David Anderson
The Elbo Room
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Workman
Public Safety
Athletic Office
Chancellor Eakin
Society for Advancement of Mngmt.
B and B Wrecker Service
Lee Tingen
RKS Mobile Home Supply
Southern Eyes of Greenville
New East Bank
Laura Sweet
U.B.E.
Delta Chi Fraternity
Keith Telghman
Coastal Plain Freight Service
Trish Radcliffe
Kim Collie
Cassie Allman
Tony Sloan
Gamma Sigma Sigma
DeanSpeier
The Gun Rack
Village Pawn Shop
Hair by Rycke
Bogies
Rum Runner DKe Shop
Alpha Phi Sorority
Kwik Stitch
Boulevard Bagel Shop
Pantana Bob's
Tarrytown Grill
Scissorsmith Inc.
Carrie Mouw
Tumage Insurance Agency
Travel Express Inc.
Home School Assoc. of St. Peter's School
AD DONATED BY E.C.U. STUDENT STORES
Anderson, Collins
lead netters over Bre;
Bv Chris Stansburv
Sut- W v-
TheECL Lad)
team won their fir I
but lost the la it tw
dunngSpnner. r A
ing in Florern e
Head, S.C , th-
team's record ti "
The Lad) Piral
FrancisMari � . :
the deciding mat
three set be break I match
between
son and Alisoi
FM s 1 � and
AlaineHemdi � ����
Firates pre : �
6 vict ry. Thesam
double teat led 1 �
the Ihree
the wei I
EC I deft itedTi mia
University 6-3,and
� � -
- .
, �- b ��iv.
Lad) Pii
am captain I
ferl entonani
whocontJ
. � . �
ind Fent
1 and N'o. 2 s
and

acl
eed J �

� � �
reei
r
Kristine Anderson
V 'W
Alison Col
Photo Lab Man
for the Universi
Expenenced photographer needed t
ingTheEast Carolinian student new
the Rebel magazine, radio station j
Tuition to summer school and a175
for 12 months of service. Duties i
monthly reports to the Media B
photographers, monitoring invent
item budget. Requirements: Musi
average, be enrolled as a full-time st
attend summer school. Apply by
Media Board Office, Second F
i
Now Ac
Applia
For The 1
Judicial
These positions offi
portunity to gain ex
ership abilities thai
throughout your life.
these positions will
valuable contribute
lina University. For
tion and application
office at 218 Mendi
All applications mu
Monday, M





resent
' g courtesy Maunc J�ymo�r Promotion
�.ontinues to perform weekly in New York
I like .1 bowel move-
jn I nvnt Some of it is uncomfortable. 1
mder if the answer is loud
t think it is I think that if
get to a person, you
t to them at normal listen-
levels You don't have to have a
rwel movement ti-� have a hit
r to print- that you have
r their
Shop
Dive Shop
ronty
igelShop
's
III
Inc.
irance Agency
sine.
Assoc. of St. Peter's School
STORES
Sports
�be East (Earnlintan
March 19,1992
Anderson, Collins
lead netteis over Break
By Chris Stansbury
Staff Writer
The ECU Lady Pirate tennis
tea m won their first two matches
hut lost the last two matches
duringSpringBreak. While play-
ing in Florence, S.C and Hilton
Head, S.C the split moves the
team's record to 3-3 on the year.
The Lady Pirates defeated
Francis Marion College, 5-4, with
the deciding match between a
three set tie break doubles match
between ECU's Krisbne Ander-
son and Alison Collins and
PMC's Tonya Wadford and
�Maine Hemdon, which the Lady
Pirates prevailed in a 6-3,4-6,7-
6 victory. The same Lady Pirate
doubles team provided two of
the three doubles victories on
the week.
ECU defeated Transylvania
University, 6-3, and lost to UNC-
Charlotte and CAA opponent
Old Dominion 1-8 and 2-7 re-
spectively.
The Lady Pirates were led
by team captain Kim Harvey,
Jennifer Fentonand ElkeGarten,
who contributed each with two
singles wins and only one loss.
Harvey and Fenton are the No.
1 and No. 2 seeds interchange-
ably, and Garten is the No. 4
seeded player.
"Kris played extremely
well, and maybe the best shehas
played all year, but just couldn't
get a break this week said as-
sistant coach Dave Shell about
No. 3 seed Kris Robinson's play
over the past week. Robinson
suffered defeats in both singles
and doubles matches.
The Lady Pirates nextmatch
is March 17, when they will host
Guilford College at 230 p.m. in
Greenville on Minges Courts.
Payne looks to recruiting to improve 10-18 season
Kristine Anderson
Alison Collins
By Robert S. Todd
Assistant Sports Editor
If sbeen said thatyou can't know
whereyou'regoingifyoudon'tknow
where you've been.
While this old cliche still holds
true, ECU's men's basketball season
may best be forgotten. The "night-
mare season Head coach Eddie
Payne oncedescribed, ended in Rich-
mond at the hands of American Uni-
versity, 76-69.
"We had to shuffle our line-ups
and our rotations constantly Payne
said. "Wenever, really, gotourchem-
istry set The team was always in flux
�people's roles were changing and
they never really got a chance to get
comfortable
Payne's first season at the helm
of the Bucs' ship began smoothly.
Excluding tosses toDukeand Cincin-
nati, both nationally ranked and on
their home courts, ECU played 500
basketball through their first 12
games.Thenthey had their legs swept
out from under them � literally.
Dee Copeland, described as the
heart and sole of the team, wentdown
with the first anterior crubate liga-
ment tear. Then Kevin Armstrong.
Then Jeff Whitaker. All three on the
right knee(somuchforstartingthings
out on the right foot).
Without CopeJand at center the
pirates losteight of their nextlOgames
and fell to JMU 8648 in their final
meeting. With Copeland in the line-
up, ECU took conference co-cham-
pion James Madison to overtime.
Frustration was the theme of the
past season. Pirate faithful should not
be too disappointed, however. With
42 player games ksttninjury,itwould
be unfair to Payne and the entire team
to expect much more than their 10-18
record, and sixth place finish � in a
pre-season poll the Pirates were
picked to finish seventh in the Colo-
nial Athletic Association. The 10-18
record ties the ninth worst record in
school history.
ECU played in a team record five
overtime games, winning two, while
losing six games by five points or less.
If Copeland, Armstrong and
Whitaker are worth six points extra
per game the Bucs' record would be
16-12.
That may be a little optimistic
and speculative butwe tost eight
ball games in the last 30 Payne
back at full strength � hopefully. services of two freshmen standing f
"Hespends all his time working legitimate 6-foot 10-inches tall and
on his knee, he doesn't have any time 220 plus pounds. Bernard Cooper,
to work on his game Payne said of oneof the Twin Towers, attended the
Copeland. However, the insertion of alma matter of Lyons, Bertie High
Copeland in next year's line up will School. Cooper and Don Douglas,
still be an appreciated addition � out of Bishop O'ConneU HighSchool
even if he is not at full strength. With in Falls Church, Va.
P
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Photo Lab Manager Sought
for the University Media Board
Experienced photographer needed to manage small photo lab serv-
ing The East Carolinian student newspaper, Expressions magazine,
the Rebel magazine, radio station WZMB, and the Media Board.
Tuition to summer school and a $175 per month stipend is provided
for 12 months of service. Duties include providing meaningful bi-
monthly reports to the Media Board, supervising and assigning
photographers, monitoring inventory, and administering a line-
item budget. Requirements: Must have at least a 2.5 grade point
average, be enrolled as a full-time student at ECU and be willing to
attend summer school. Apply by 5 p.m. March 25 at the University
Media Board Office, Second Floor, Student Publications Building.
Now Accepting
Applications
For The 1992-1993
Judicial Boards
These positions offer an excellent op-
portunity to gain experience and lead-
ership abilities that will benefit you
throughout your life. At the same time,
these positions will enable you to make
valuable contributions to East Caro-
lina University. For additional informa-
tion and applications contact the SGA
office at 218 Mendenhall.
All applications must be turned
Monday, March 30th
In by Sk N
I0th.
Copeland'sworkethkandoptirrusrn,
he is likely to be ready for the chal-
lenge of next season.
James "Pit Bull" Lewis will have
an unexpected banner year under his
belt as a contributing senior.
"I think (playing more) really
telrhirrCPaynesaidofLewis. "As
saidWhen you look at it from that a senior 1 expect him to be a really
perspectiveyou know,or believeyou solid performer. He defends so well.
The 7-footers he plays against � he
gives all those guys problems
The Bucs will also employ the
could have done a little better
To bring up any more of the
disappointment and loosing streaks
(the longest beingeight games)of this
season would not be therapeutic. The
season is over and no one can give us
a chance to take away the mistakes
that were made, the free throws that
were missed, the knees thatsnapped,
and the hearts thatbroke. Well,maybe
not the hearts that broke.
A glimmer of hope still shines
through in the thoughtsof next year's
basketball season. Lester "the Left
Handed Gun Slinger" Lyons will be
trying to improve to first team All -
CAA from this years second team
honor, and be, perhaps, the premier
guard in the conference�asajunior.
Anton "Kill at Will" GUI was
voted to the CAA All-Rookie team,
and Ike "the Prez" Copeland will be
"They havegood bodies and can
be physical Payne said of the re-
cruits. "They are not great players,
but they could be good players. We
don't have anybody 6-10, 230 and
they can help us.
"Weneed (our recruits�signed
and unsigned) tocome in here and be
impacts on our program and make
our program better he added.
Payne also said theTwin Towers
are not the scorers that Gill is, but they
See Season page 8

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8 (Bt?e least (Uarulinian
March 19, 1992
Tennis team
wins four of
five matches
By Chri Stansbury
Staff Writer
The ECU men's tennis team was
on the nwd for their Spring Break,
and managed tn win tour-out-of-five
matches. ThePiratesdefeated Francis
Marion College, Marquette Uni er-
sity, Webber College, and the Uni
versitv of Pittsburg, while losingonlv
hi the host team, the University of
South Florida
The Tirates were lex.1 by the two
teamav-captains. 1 nmmv McDonald
and Markku Savusalo, with four
singles ictories to ore I088 each. No
member of the team held a losing
record in singles play. The team as a
whole won 20 singles matches with
only ten losses In doubles action,
ECU won five-of-nine matches
throughout the week
The rirates had shutout victories
against FrancisManonandPittsburg
64) and defeated Marquette h-3. The
only overall match tliat ECU lost was
to the No. 15 ranked team in the
country, South Honda. USF had just
lost three of their top players to the
professional circuit, but still blanked
the Pirates
The Pirates next battle will be
Much 23, in Wilson, N.C, against
Barton College.
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Season
Continued from page 7
are better rehounders Gill led the
team in reboundingand pulled dowri
10 or more nine times
ECU has failed to put tigether
back-ti-hack winning seasons since
the 1974 and 17 seasons ami have
never had a winning record in the
CAA
The billhoaaf that stands to the
side of one of Greenville's busies!
streets was put up at least a war Uxi
earlv. The tradition the sign is inform
ing about might begin next war. The
Bucs should have their first winning
seasm since Blue Edwards' depar-
ture
Men's, Women's and Co-Ed leagues
Register: Monday, March 16 at voopm in Hfo 102
VOIXEYBAIX
Co-Ed leagues
Kt'KlMcr: Monti.iy. March 2 al V.OOpiu in llio 102
C ertsTrident Volleyball Tournament
Register: Monday, March Z at S:30pm in llio 103
INDOOR SOGCER
Men's and Women's Ixagucs
K-viM�r: flies, March t at S:l)(��m in llio IO�
I OR MOKI INI OHMATION tJVI I Kl (111 ATIONAI SI RVK I.S Al
757 65S7. INTER! sibl LNOIVIOl Al S MUST ATTUNIi Tlltsi
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We're here (as if you hadn't noticed). Spend Spring Break in a hot place.
The Nike Factory Store. Carolina Pottery Outlet Center, Industrial Park Dr Smithfield.
(919) 989-6100. Discontinuedirregular sports and fitness stuff. Leave now, we'll wait.
Grade "A'Hb
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Limit 3 PkgsV
with fci
Additional
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Lb.
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Cans
LIMIT 2 WITH
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PURCHASE
Parkay
Margarine Qtrs
2 liter Bottle - Diet Coke or
Coke
Classic

Prices Effective Through March 24, 1992
Prices In Th,s Ad Effective Through Tuesday, Morch 24, 1992 In Stores Only
We Reserve The Right To limit Quantities None Sold To Deolers. We Godly Accept Federal Food Stamps.





8 $be �aot(Earoltnian
March 19, 1992
Tennis team
wins four of
five matches
IN SEARCH OF MR. OR MRS. RIGHT?
By Chri Stansbury
Stjtf Writer
iheFC'L'men s terras team was
on the load tor their Spring Break
and managed to win tour out-ot-five
matches. thePiratesdefeated Francis
Marion College. Marquette I niver
sitv, Webber College, and the Uni
versify of Rtlsburg, while losingonly
to the host te.im the I niersit of
Smth Florida
Ihe Pirates were lti K the ho
taemco-captams omrm McRmald
and Markku Savusaki with four
singles vk u rie5 ti 11 me l,ss ea h No
member ot the team held i losing
record in singles pl.iv the team as .1
whole won 20 singles matches with
onl ten losses In doubles action,
ECU won five-ol nine matches
throughout the vivk
rhePirateshad shutoub k lories
against Francis Marion and Pittsburg
64) anddefeated Marquette6-3 Fhe
ortlvoverall match th.it he I lost was
te tlie No 15 ranked team in Ihe
countn. South Florida USFhadjttst
lost three ot their top players to the
professional in uil but still blanked
lie Pirates 9-0
The Pirates next battle will be
March 23 in Wilson against
Rulon c oUese
Confronting Men & Women as
They Relate to One Another
GCB 2024
7pm
Thursday, March 19
Sponsored h) Ncv I tfc Christian Fellowship
Season
Continued from page 7
are better rehounder- c.ill lt1 the
teaminrerxniixlmg.ind pulled down
10Of more nine times
ECT h,is failed to put together
ha, k t -ru k winning v,n n- sim e
the I974and 1975 seasons and hue
neer had .i winning record in the
( v
Ihe hllhwml th.it stands hi th'
suit' rrf one of (IfeenviUe's busiest
streets was put up .it leist ,i year too
early Ihe traditk m the sign is infi mi
mg.ihout might N'gin next veaf Ihe
BtM s should h�n c their first w inning
season since Blue Edwards' depar-
ture
SPRING FUN FO H E V E R Y O N E �
SOFTBALL
Mens. Women's .tnd Co�Kd leagues
Nrnlstfi Mondaty, Mart'tl i� .it $�0�f�ni In Hl�i 102
VOLLEYBALL
o let I C.IUCS
KcislK Mimil.iv, M.in It IS .�� VH�ni in Btfl JO.?
erts Iritlt-nt Volleyball Tournament
KikMi r Monday, M.in li � .if S. Mlpm ill llio I
INIXX)R SOGCER
IVfcti's .md Women s l4.ij4iifs
Ki-v;ist�' liirs. Nt.trt'lt � ,il N : (XI pin in II n i I 0 "�
I � H Ml IHI INIOKM VlldN (All HI 111 (I'lllNM SI K It ISAI
S � (.H � IN I I HI SI 1 � IMIMV 11)1 M s Ml s� A I'll NO 1 III SI
S( III HI I I 11 Ml I I I Nt .s INI IN II l l s NI � 1 I A Ms Vt I 1 I 1MI
FA�wsf
We're here (as if you hadn't noticed). Spend Spring Break in a hot place.
The Nike Factory Store. Carolina Pottery Outlet Center, Industrial Park Or Smithfield.
(919) 989-6100. Discontinuedirregular sports and fitness stuff, leave now, we'll wait.
m
i
Chicken of
The Sea Tuna
6.125 Oz.
Cans
LIMIT 7 WITH I I
Parkay
Margarine Qtrs.
2f - -
2 liter Bottle - Diet Coke or
Coke
Classic

Prices Effective Through March 24, 1992
Prices In This Ad Effective Through Tuesday March 24 1992 In Stores Only
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities None Sold To Dealers We Giadly Accept Federal Food Stamps





8 3Ue ISaat iL'aruliniau
Mau 19, 1992
Tennis team
wins four of
five matches
IN SEARCH OF MR. OR MRS. RIGHT?
B) Qiri Slansbur)
llvl v I tmm -titini-h.tmw.t
v�n tfv nvui Kw thru spniv, BftVlk
Ami n,uuii1 t intoui out-OI. fiw
mritcht rhePlMtt!iWfattt11 I.IIK i-
bnom �IUyr Marquette l nivei
vit Wt'Hvt.mv.� iiixl tiu- I ni
wrsrh ntfPittsburp whik'kngimh
h ttv hosl ttwtn thr I niversih ol
South Pkrk1a
1W PuvttP w� ' ltfd tlv twt
ti�tiuov.)M.un- lomrm 1 1 ni.iu!
and M.ikkvi Smisdlo with row
Singk u ti'iir t.1. it �- r.u h No
nvmlvi v't ttv ii �
u hi� wtM! n ilh
onh, ��
ECU won 1
thl
rht�i
,nU!V : i.r � V
(� r ,MXl . WiV M "c �
vMi 0 �" ' - '�
to the - ' ��
CH�ntT SoutJ Ki lut
Confronting Men & Women as
They Relate to One Another
GCB 2024
7pm
Thursday. March 19
I '
Eton
-
Season
Continued from pncje
10 or rm n umi

rlvTh .� � ��'
� � � � - a -
Buohi
ms - iiwatxi vior.u
STRING U N �OR fVfKYONI?
ISOFTBAUE.
u n !s Wiiiticii and t o t tl I eagtios
K vi- i mmhI Man ti l � it s OOpni In lli�i i ' '
VOLLEYBAIJL
t t 1(1 I f.lVil ltS
Klliit� I MH.I i, Nt.lt. Ii . .u s OOpin in Iliti It) '
t tit h hI nl Volleyball liHirn.iiiHiU
Kl'liistt'l NI, . 1, .i 1 - . 11 . 11 S i' i � 111 11' II i. � I i' ;
INI X X R SC X X Jkl
Ml'llS .it ul Wminn s l( ,ii;iks
Ki'v;ilt i I )� . M .li 11 . i i I S � i m n i i l tit (I I 0 �
IOKMONI IMOI
�. , N 1 S I I I
�M II I 1 I I I Nil I
N Ml K I I I U i N I M Kll Is Nl
i ini�i 11 . MSMIM mum llll-si
INI'INUM v NI II WIN Xlll ull
�cssra
We're here (as if you hadn't noticed). Spend Spring Break in a hot place.
The Nike Factory Store. Carolina Pottery Outlet Center, Industrial Park Di, Smithfield.
(919) 989-6100. Discontinuedirregular sports and fitness stuff. Leave now, we'll wait.
Grade "AnA sj
Tyson-Holly Farms
Breast! Ii
Quarters
All-Varieties
Chicken of
The Sea Tuna
2For
6.125 Oz.
Cans fc
iwii: WITH � �
ADOIllONAt
PURCHASi
Parkay
Margarine Qtrs.
� � �T-
� i � � I m i � � i � � ��� � � � I ill I
( i
rffe
Borden,
i
Milk
ii
dJ w t
6I
.r:
a
Half Gal.
2 liter Bottle - Diet Coke or
Coke
Classic
Prices effective Through March 24, 1992
Ths Ad fcHpttive Thioogh Tutisdd) Morel 1992 In ' es Onl
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities None Sold To Dealers We Gladly Accept Fedetai Food Stamps





8
vUic tjiwt vlarnlumm

Tennis team
wins tourof
five matches
IN SEARCH OF MR. OR MRS. RIGHT?
H , hri Stansbun

.

:n'ttt
rind '
3 AM
-�A � ?vy 1
���F MBS
IF
Confronting Men & Women as
They Relate to One Another
GCB 2024
7pm
Thursday. March 19
Season
n paqo
S r H I N C, t U N f O R IVfKYONI
SOIHTBAIJ.
Men "n Wmiii ii s 11 u 1 u I 11 I � iiik s
VOLLEYBAIJ
l I I � 1 I .1 M f V

M , . t � . I. I VI
t iris I i ui nt �1 It l.i 11 tournament
inixxrscxx.i:r
M l � I 1 S . I l 11 I O 11 1� ft S I A � il m M S
Marx-It 2 i i Urn
I SM MKMtls M
VI �� MI I M il l Mil'
vl �- M I " Will DMI
We're here (as if you hadn't noticed). i d Spring Break in a hot place.
The Nike Factory Store. Carolina Pottery Outlet Center, Industrial Parl Di, Sm fhfield
(919) 989-6100. Discontinuedirregular sports and fitness stuff leave now we'll a '
3 Hainsfeeler
rJWvLU

Tyson-Holly Farms V -�
illl Limit 3 Pkgs
Iil with �s
kf! Additional ?
Purchase
Breast
Quarters
Lb.
4 �-��� . .
All'Varieties
��,
Chicken of
The Sea Tuna
2For
Parkay
Margarine Qtrs
6.125 Oz.
Cans
ADDHIONAl
PURCH
b
Milk
Half Gal.
2 liter Bottle - Diet Coke or
Coke
Classic
Prices Effective Through March 24, 1992
lay March 24 �
I Quantities Noni





Title
The East Carolinian, March 19, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 19, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.866
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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