The East Carolinian, March 17, 1992






Let them play games
Residents allowed to participate in fantasy games.
4
A fly on the wall
An inside look at U2's "Zoo TV" tour.
IS
Stye iEaat (ftarnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.66 No.16
Tuesday, March 17,1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
8 Pag�
University offers shots
After two students died last year at the
University of Illinois from meningitis, the
school has decided to offer free vaccinations
for the disease.
Officials said about 18,000 students have
received the vaccination against the bacteria
that can cause meningitis.
This year, five University of Illinois stu-
dents have been infected with the disease
which is an inflammation of the lining of the
brain.
According to the Center for DiseaseCon-
trol in Atlanta, people living in crowded sur-
roundings are at risk of picking up the infec-
tion
Condom man delivers
Students at Indiana University of Penn-
sylvania that get stuck in romantic emergen-
cies are now able to pick up the phone and
have condoms delivered to their door.
TheCondom Men; Darryl Landfried,Scott
Overbeck and John Reiter, make up the board
of directors, as well as act as delivery men for
the company.
The company delivers glow-in-the-dark
condoms, kev chains with condoms inside,
and discreet matchbooks with condoms in
them.
Despite this variety, Overbeck said,
"There's more of a demand for run-of-the-
mill condoms
TheCondom Men have tried to downplay
the exotic protection items in order to sell
more high-quality latex condoms.
All of theemploveesof TheCondom Men
are able to answer questions about sexually
transmitted diseases and also provide litera-
ture on safe sex practices.
Consistent with students' fears about dis-
eases, Overbeckaid 35 percent of the condom
requests come from women.
"We were very surprised by that fact
Overbeck said, considering that the Condom
Men do not advertise their services.
Vermont diversifies
The lack of student diversity at the Uni-
versity of Vermont has brought students and
administrators to blows, but this issue is not a
new source of conflict at the school.
Minorities make up 5.2 percent of the
11,000 member student body, and the popu-
lation of Vermont is 98.5 percent white.
In the past year, students have confronted
officials with the problem in many ways. Two
students even engaged in a hunger strike,
with no response from the administration.
"Clearly, over the past four of five years,
the school has made a conscious effort to
increase numbers, and progress has been
made said Nick Marro, director if university
public relations, "but it's not as rapid as some
individuals would like to see
"A lot of state residents feel like this is a
state university, and there is nothing wrong
with it representing the state population; oth-
ers see it differently said John Commers,
assistant news editor for the student newspa-
per.
ASU rapes below average
Appalachian State University crime logs
do not show one reported rape during the
1990-91 school year.
Many officials feel this is because ASU
security has been slowly upgrading their se-
curity, according to Director of Public Safety,
Roy Tugman.
The school has many blue light emer-
gency phone systems across campus, and the
number is constantly increasing. Many lights
have been added to dim and unlit areas,
especially in parking lots. Closed circuit cam-
eras have also been added to many of the
parking lots.
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Vromptwa vy cnnovtn aniFftmw. laRvn irofn
CPSandi
InsideTuesday
Crime SceneJ 1
EditorialJ 4
EntertainmentJ S
ClassifiedsJ �
Sports77
Resident Education
changes dorm policy
Photo by K�vin Amo - ECU Photo Lab
Doggin' the paper
Inadditontoourwidehuman readership. The East Carolinian
is also enjoyed by canines across campus This particular
reader is fit to be tied to this empty paper rack
By Julie Roscoe
Assistant News Editor
The furor caused by the ban
on psychological games in the
residenthallsendedwithastate-
ment by thedirector, Carla Jones,
issuing a change in the next print-
ing of the policy wri tten in tiring
Spaces.
Jones stated in a memo to
the director of ECU's college ra-
dio station, WZMB, Tim John-
son, that Resident Education de-
cided to revise the policy to read
that "the disruptive behavior
caused by the use of games is
prohibited, not the actual games
themselves
'The game itself has not been
the issue as much as the disrup-
tion it caused Jones wrote. She
is referring to an incident in the
residenthalls withaOuija board
game in the summer. The un-
specified disruption resulted in
the printed policy.
The present policy under
Disruptive Behavior Policy in the
91-92 guide for students resid-
ing on campus reads, "Psycho-
logical games such as Ouija
boards, 'Dungeons and Drag-
ons' and 'Killer' are all prohib-
ited in the residence halls
When Karen Greenwell re-
turned to ECU in the fall and
read the policy she was infuri-
ated and decided to try to change
it. Greenwell is the president of
the Science Fiction Fantasy Or-
ganization which is a group of
students who play role-playing
games such as D&D.
Greenwell contacted the
"The game itself
has not been the
issue as much as
the disruption it
caused
-Carla Jones, Director of
Resident Education
SGA Student Welfare commit-
tee and an amendment was in-
troduced suggesting a change.
The amendment read, "We, the
SGA, oppose the ban on psycho-
logical games in the dorm, and
wish the policy to be amended
only to restrict physically vio-
lent games in the dorms
The amendment reflects
Greenwell's belief that the policy
implies students cannot play
games that are mentally and cre-
atively stimulating, which physi-
cally harm no one.
The SGA legislation did not
accept the amendment on the
grounds that a resident educa-
tion representativeshould speak
in reference to the rule. The
amendment was buried in the
Student Welfare committee.
"I think many members of
SGA invested a lot of interest
and time in this problem and to
them I give my deep thanks
Greenwell said. "But the Stu-
dent Welfare committee sat on
the bill for a month because they
wanted more information
Greenwell also passed
around a petition asking for sig-
natures from students and fac-
ulty and other people opposed
to the ban on psychological
games. Over 600 people signed
it.
Greenwell said she is
pleased with the announced
change.
"It takes a lot of courage
after something has been in print
to make a change Greenwell
said.
Major Minor fair provides assistance
By Christie Lawrence
Staff Writer
Students searchingfora ma-
jor or minor will receive atten-
tion and assistance Wednesday
from more than 40 departments
at East Carolina.
TheCareer Education Com-
mittee will sponsor the third
annual Major'Minors Fair from
12-30 p.m.to 3-30 p.m. March 18
in the Mendenhall Great Room.
All students interested in chtxs-
ing or changing their major are
urged to attend.
Leonard D. Lilley,chairman
of the Career Education Com-
mittee, said the Majors Minors
Fair is especially helpful for a
person who is thinking of choos-
ing or changing a major.
For the many students not
aware of all the departments on
campus, the fair is an excellent
resource. Also, students who are
undeclared, uncertain of their
majors, or just curious about the
options that may be available,
visiting Mendenhall Wednesday
will be a learning experience.
The main objective of the
fair is to provide a setting where
students can get information on
a variety of academic programs
for the departments of potential
majorsand minors. Students will
also beable to ask about require-
ments and career opportunities
available in each curriculum.
More than 40 stations, rang-
ing from education to technical
departments, will be operating
for the students to review. Rep-
resentatives at each station will
include faculty, senior students
and trained operators to answer
any questions. Pamphlets and
brochures from the departments
will also be provided for stu-
dents to take home and read.
Students will not have to
make an appointment to talk to
representatives of each depart-
ment because individual needs
and interests will be discussed
immediately.
Refreshments for the fair
will be provided by the Parents'
Association.
Minority affairs
director dies at 35
By Julie Roscoe
Assistant News Editor
Dr. Larry T. Smith, 35, the
director of minority affairs and
assistant vice chancellor for stu-
dent life at ECU died of natural
causes in his home Thursday,
March 12.
Smith had beenat ECU since
1988 and during his tenure he
implemented several programs
to enhance cultural diversity on
campus. He helped to create the
Purple Pride or P Squared and
the Chancellor's Minority Stu-
dent Leadership program.
"He tried to make some
changes said Dr. Al Matthews,
vice-chancellor of student life.
"The fact that we present Pirate
Pride during orientation shows
a celebration for diversity and
advocates a very positive i mage.
It has made an affect and a state-
ment for the university and what
it stands for
Matthews was Smith's su-
pervisor and said thatSmith was
bright and cared deeply about
students.
Dean of Students Dr. Ro-
nald Speier explained the loss of
Smith at ECU and said all the
people of the Student Lite staff
are saddened that such an asset
to the university passed away.
"He initiated a creative pro-
gram directed to help with the
understanding of the diversity
and differences of the students
and initiated a minority student
leadership program two years
ago Speier said. "We an real
Dr. Larry Smith
sorry he's not going to be wi th us
anymore
The P squared program be-
gins at the freshman orientation
level and illuminates new ECU
students to the cultural and ra-
cial diversity of the university.
Smith was associate dean of
students and director of minor-
ity affairs at Knox College in
Galesburg, 111. before he began
working at ECU.
He received his bachelor of
arts degree in English at Johnson
C Smith University in Charlotte
in 1978.
He then earned a master's
degree in student personnel and
a doctorate in education admin-
istration and supervision at
Bowling Green in Ohio.
The university is holding a
rnernorialservkeinhishonjprin
Hendrix theater on Wednesday,
March 18, at noon.
They're back!
Photo by JW Cherry- ECU Photo Lob
Students returned to classes Monday from a cold and rainy Spring Broak. Though spring
officially begins Saturday, Greenville's weather is once again less than seasonal.
SGA reviews budgets for funding
By Jennifer Ward rep
News Editor
SGA will begin reviewing
budgets this week in order to
decide which organizations
will receive appropriations for
next year.
Organizations funded by
SGA must present operational
budgets for the fiscal year (June
1992 � June 1993) to either
Allen Thomas or Amy Harris,
co-chairs of the Appropriations
Committee.
"This is the most impor-
tant thing they do all year
Thomas said. "It's much harder
to get money later in the year.
Then, it's a fine-toothed comb
Thomas said the purpose
of the procedure is to enable
the groups to go ahead and
start planning events for next
year.
Organizations should con-
tact Thomas or Harris or the
SGA office to make an appoint-
ment.
Meetings are scheduled
for Tuesdays and Wednesdays
for the next three weeks. Tho-
mas said at the SGA meeting
Monday night that no groups
had contacted them about the
appropriations.
SGA President Alex Mar-
tin announced during the meet-
ing that the accreditation com-
mHteewiil vis ECU next Mon-
day. He said members of the
committee review schools ev-
en few years for accreditation.
The committee, which con-
sists of 19 people, will also at-
tend a student forum luncheon.
Martin and Thomas will attend
the forum along with other stu-
dents and faculty members.
SGA unanimously ap-
proved appropriations in the
amount of $700 for senior
plaques. The plaques are given
out at commencement every
year to the top senior in each
major-
Matthew Gilbert of the
Rules and Judiciary Commit-
tee announced Resident
Education's decision to over-
turn their rate prohibiting psy-
chological games in the resi-
i-





2 OJlTe �aBt (Haroltnfan March 17, 1992
CRIMES EN E
Subject charged with assault on a
police officer, damage to property
March 2
0133�Commuter Lot: Vehicle stopped for speeding. Student
given verbal warning.
1040- Sports Medicine Building: C hecked out a reference for a
larceny report.
1354� Allied Health Building: (he ked out report of smoke in
the building.
2257�General Classroom Building: Vehicle stopped for one-
way street violation. Non-sttulrnt given verbal warning.
March 3
0001�Reade Street. Su-pu k)US dctivity report. Subject turned
over to Greenville Tolice Department.
(1015�Memorial Gvm Vehicle stopped for speeding. Non-
student given a verbal warning
024(V� Allied Health: two non-studentl were banned from
campus following a suspicion m ti Ity report.
(1511�Ficklen Stadium Vehicle stopped for suspicious activity.
Student given a verbal warning
(W43 Aycock Hall: Assisted rescue call. Subject not trans-
port ed.
1147�Scott Hall: Vehicle stopped for expired registration.
Student given a state Citation
1442 lones Hall: Vehulc stopped for speeding. Student given
campus citation.
1311 White Hall: Report oi loud music Unable to locate sub-
let.
1612�-GottenHall: Vehk U stopped Student given verbal warn-
ing for expired tigs.
1h4u College Hill Drive chic le stopped for speeding. Student
issued a campus citation
1901 Mendenhall Studententer Vehicle stopped for careless
and reckless dnving. Student tolled ,i i .impus citation.
125- Police Department ubin t transported to the magistrate's
office for assault on an officer
March 4
0350 Hdchflf Hall: A�bted rt-M ue in transporting student to
Pitt County Memorial Hospital for possible appendicitis.
0700�lovner Library: Rep rt of flag still missing from north of
the building
0919�Allied Health: Chei ked out a reported assault. Subject
gone on arrival.
0920 Charles Strtvt: Suboi t taken into CUHody and charged
with assault on a police of tic er damage t( i propertv and obstruct and
delay
1125�Hetcher Hall. Checked out a larceny report.
131H Belk Hall: Checked ut indecent exposure report.
1810�-lohnson Street: Vehicle stopped Student issued a cam-
pus citation for spinning tires
Crims Sc�n� ta takan from official Public Safaty toga.
Activists oppose monkey genocide
(AP)�Animal rights activists
aren't happy about a plan to exter-
minate wild Rhesus monkeys on
state land near the Silver Springs
tourist attraction. The Department
of Natural Resources decided to
capture and kill the monkeys after
several of the simians tested posi-
tive for the Herpes B virus, which
can be deadly tohumans if they are
bitten by monkeys with open sores.
Marion County Audubon So-
ciety president Tish Hennessey is
planning a protest for Sunday and
has appealed to DNR director Vir-
ginia Wetherall to block the death
sentence, but so far the project re-
mains on track.
"I'm going to get hung if I do
remove the monkeys, and hung if
THE ARMY
NURSING
CHALLENGE.
You've worked hard
for your BSN. You'd like
to continue the challenge.
That's what Army Nurs-
ing offers professional
challenges.
Plus new study
opportunities, continuing
education, travel. And
you'll have the respect
and prestige accorded
an officer in the United
States Army.
If you're working on
your BSN or already have
a BSN, talk to your Army
Nurse Corps Recruiter.
SGT. 1st Class Jacobs
and
SGT. 1st Class Reinelt
1-800-662-7473
ARMY NURSE CORPS.
BEAU YOU CAN BE.
Movies:
Crimes of Passion
Wed March 18
Robin Hood
Thurs FrL, and Sat.
March 19-21
The Highlander
Sun March 22
Travel:
Film on New
Zealand - Outdoor
Adventure
Mon March 23
Hendrix Theatre
8:00 P.M.
Coffeehouse:
Roger Gillen
Musician
The Underground
8:00 P.M.
1 don't, so let's get on with the
hanging said Mark Glisson, a
DNR bureau chief.
The free-ranging monkeys, de-
scended from a group that the
owner of Silver Springs bought
Leisure Acquisition Corporation.
Anthropologist Linda Wolfe,
who researched the monkeysalong
the Silver River for a number of
years, said there are a number of
better ways to control the threat of
from a circus 50 years ago, have disease, such as providing enough
been considered a health hazard
since January blood tests by the
DNR on seven monkeys indicated
that four carry Herpes B, a virus
carried by monkeys and apes.
DNR plans to contract with
trappers to capture the monkeys
and have them destroyed hu-
manely under a veterinarian's su-
pervision. The plan applies only to
state lands and not to monkeys
that remain on the property of Sil-
ver Springs, now owned by Florida
food to keep them in the area of the
attraction, and continuing to steri I-
ize the offspring.
"I think it's terrible said
Wolfe, chairman of the sociology
and anthropology department at
East Carolina University in
Greenville, N.C. "They have no
reason to do this. I think the dem-
onstration on Sunday is good. The
people making these decisions
need to know thereare people who
want the monkeys to stay
Expressions:
Thank you for
the use of your
computers
during our
recent and
lengthy crisis.
Congratulatioas
on your
magazine - it
looks great!
- The East Carolinian Stun
r
I
Photo Lab Manager Sought
for the University Media Board
Experienced photographer needed to manage small photo lab serv-
ing The East Carolinian student newspaper, Expressions magazine.
the Rebel magazine, radio station WZMB, and the Media Board.
Tuition to summer school and a $175 per month stipend is provided
for 12 months of service. Duties include providing meaningful bi-
monthly reports to the Media Board, supervising and assigning
photographers, monitoring inventory, and administering a line-
item budget. Requirements: Must have at least a 2.5 grade point
average, be enrolled as a full-time student at ECU and be willing to
attend summer school. Apply by 5 p.m. March 25 at the University
Media Board Office, Second Floor, Student Publications Building.
The Department of Resident Education
and
The Residence Hall Association
Congratulates the Winners of the
Multicultural Trivia Quiz
for African American Awareness Month
1st Place Gene Kennedy
2nd Place Jason Jones
3rd Place Jon Chadwick
-l
Now Accepting
Applications
For The 1992-1993
Judicial Boards
These positions offer an excellent op-
portunity to gain experience and lead-
ership abilities that will benefit you
throughout your life. At the same time,
these positions will enable you to make
valuable contributions to East Caro-
lina University. For additional informa-
tion and applications contact the SGA
office at 218 Mendenhall.
1
All applications must be turned in by WN
Monday, March 30th. 1
Irish gayTmarch in
KKTON(AP)� Bcercam
and obscenities were hurled at
two dozen Irish-American ho-
mosexuals who marched un-
der their own banner in this
city's St. Patrick's Day parade.
"You can't keep an
Irishman down Brian Thomas
Callahan of the Irish-American
Gav, Lesbian and Bisexual Pride
Committee said Sunday a he
held one end of the group's
shamrock-adorned banner
"Tell him no and he's not going
to listen
Eight people werearrestetl,
at least three on charge
taunting the ga marchers, po-
lice said. In Boston, mounted
policeac ted as a buffer be
marchers and the crcm
about 600,000 that turned out
for the parade!
the South B
eteransour
Moll ,
alongsideandal
with officers tJ
the parade rot
In h enclave oi
mespet
fire ra�
not pov.
any me
holdingch
�iitiesar.
such slogans a
queers " The
Me.irin pink
camatic
with a c ourt or
to jeers v, ith shj
St Patri �
n 0 A
NORTH TOPSAIL
Presents
� CLARENCE CARTER � THE BREE
� THE BAND OF OZ � NORTH TO
� DOUG CLARK & THE HOT NUTS
THE MAD HATTER. . r '
EASTER WEEKEND-APRIL 18,
North Topsail Beach Airport (Gate opens
TICKETS ON SALE AT
EAST COAST MUSIC WRi
1109 Charles Blvd F
Phone 758-4251 Phone
S22 50 DAY OF SHOW $17 50 IN ADVA
FOR TICKET & ACCOMMODATION INFO 919-328 474I
Disc
FOSDH
I890 SE,
�2
7
U
i
Two Regular
Combo Platters
$995
FOSDICK'S
18� SEAFOOD
Small Shrimp Dinner
$2.99
FOSDICKS
180 SEAFOOD
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m
��
v V
����a:
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Donee Nighi
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$1.15 Tall Boys
$2.50 Pitchers
$ 1.00 Kamika;
�todies free til 10:
YiU
�m. lit� mi.i iM��.1





ide
Inorporation
! inda Wolfe
mcmkev s��l �ng
r ,1 number ol
It ,i numbei i i
itrol the threat oi
the ire i t the
nuinctosteril
s,iu1
d
zcx1
Expressions:
Thank you for
the use of your
computers
during our
recent and
lengthy crisis.
Congratulations
on your
magazine - it
looks great!
- I he East Carolinian Staff
lager Sought
ty Media Board
� jmall photo lab serv-
ressions magazine,
ZMB and the Media Board.
r month stipend is provided
elude providing meaningful bi-
i( ard, - ip i ng and assigning
btory, and administering a line-
i grade point
student d be willing to
he University
Si ications Building.
'esident Education
d
all Association
Winners of the
Trivia Quiz
Awareness Month
ne Kennedy
lason Jones
n Chadwick
cepting
ations
992-1993
Boards
'ex an excellent op-
iperience and lead-
it will benefit you
.At the same time,
lenable you to make
Ions to East Caro-
additional informa-
s contact the SGA
lenhall.
ist be turned in by
arch 30th.





Irish gays march in Boston
BOSTON (AH Beer cans
and obscenities were hurled at
two dozen Irish-American ho-
mosexuals who marched un-
der their own banner in this
city's St. Patrick's Day parade.
"You can't keep an
Irishman down Brian Thomas
Callahanof the Irish- American
Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Pride
Committee said Sunday as he
held one end of the group's
shamrock-adorned banner.
"Tell him no and he's not going
to listen
Eight people were arrested,
at least three on charges of
taunting the gay marchers, po-
lice said. In Boston, mounted
police acted as a buffer between
marchers and the crowd of
about fMX),(KXl that turned out
for the parade sponsored by
the South Boston Allied War
Veterans Council.
Motorcycle police cruised
alongsideand a police van filled
with officers followed behind
the parade route through the
Irish enclave of South Boston.
Somespectators tossed tiny
firecrackers at the marchers �
not powerful enough to harm
anyone. Other spectators, some
holding children, screamed ob-
scenities and waved signs with
such slogans as, "AIDS cures
gays" and "Quarantine the
queers The homosexuals,
wearing pink triangles and
green carnations and armed
with a cOttfl Order, responded
to eers with shouts of "Happy
St Patrick's Da v
March 17, 1992 Sljg Cast Carolinian 3
Ji . Ji
NORTH TOPSAIL
Presents
CLARENCE CARTER � THE BREEZE BAND
THE BAND OF OZ � NORTH TOWER
DOUG CLARK & THE HOT NUTS
THE MAD HATTER, voitr MC
EASTER WEEKEND�APRIL 18. 1992
North Topsail Beach Airport (Gate opens 11:00 AM)
TICKETS ON SALE AT
EAST COAST MUSIC WRQR 94.3
1109 Charles Blvd
Phone 758-4251
RADIO
Phone 830-0944
$22 50 DAY OF SHOW, $17 50 IN ADVANCE
FOR TICKET A ACCOMMODATION INFO 919-328 4745 1 800 359 4745
DISCOVER
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
Judge withdraws castration ruling
(AP) � A judge today with
drew hisapproval for the castration
of a convicted child molester who
had volunteered for the surgery,
saying a doctor could not be found
to perform the operation.
State District Judge Michael
McSpadden also removed himself
from trying the case I f Steven Allen
Butler, who is charged with aggra-
vated sexual assault of a 13-year-
old girl. No date has been set for
that trial.
Butler, 2H, had volunteered
March 6 to be castrated rather than
face a prison sentence if convicted
of the crime. At the time of his arrest
last April, he had been serving K-
year probated lenience for inde-
cency with a 7-year-old girl.
Butler's family met privately
with McSpadden n Saturday, say-
ing they believed Butler was inca-
pable Of making such a decision.
They hail hired an attorney of their
own to get the castration decision
overturned.
Butler's five sisters hugged ami
wept outside the courtroom after
McSpadden s ruling
During the 15-minute hearing
today, Butler did not acknowledge
W
AKi
s
-A
Ihtnk that 1 �ihull nnt-r M�
a ;�. ��� (Ota '1 04 a irr
m - u
Join the City of Greenville.
Releaf. Inc. and ECU
in celebrating
ARBOR DAY
Wednesday. March 18. 1992
10:00 a.m. at the corner
of Second Reade Streets
IN � �� Budding
, &
"&f18 O i i M orl Car more Information
! s V

CONTEST
DATES
MARCH
17th 24th
& 31st
APRIL
7th &
14th
10PM.
&t2
DDFAFXlTjG THENATIONS
;k;lAOL ICO LARGEST
SWIMSUIT
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COMES TO
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MARCH SPECIALS
AquaClear. power f,lters
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NOW
$79.99
University Center
14th and Charles St. � 757-0056
M-F 11-9 � Sat 19-9 � Sun 12-6
the preNence of hb family in the
large courtr(Km.
McSpadden asked Butler if the
courtorButler'sattorney suggested
he volunteer for the surgery as a
way to getout of jail. Butler has been
held at the Harris County Jail with-
out bond since his arrest after the
girl told authonties she had been
raped repeatedly by Butler.
Butler, who sat quietly, re-
sponded, "No The judge also
asked Butler if he had been encour-
aged or coerced to seek castration.
"No Butler replied again.
Butler's attorney, Clyde Wil-
liams, told McSpadden a physician
who had offered to do the surgical
removal of the testes for free had
backed out of the deal. Another
doctor who had said he would do
the s u rgery f or a fee a Iso reneged on
his offer, Ms. Williams said.
Ms. Williams also said she was
filing a motion to have herself re-
moved as Butler's attorney.
"It is imperative that I have the
support of Mr. Butler's family.Since
I don't, I am preparing a motion to
be removed as Mr. Butler's attor-
ney she told reporters after the
hearing.
Join W I or An
INTERNATIONAL CELEBRATION
The International Student Association
at Last Carolina University
prrsrnrs
an International Celebration
hjffct d.r.nfr. pcrfarmrKf� aHk �r.d exhibus
March 21st. 1992 from 6 30 p m to 11 00 p m
Mrndenhall siudeni Cerurr (Mulupurpoj Room)
Admission $ft00�udrms M 00 grnrnl public
Our auto ir.trrrv II 10 rromoi iruemtonal culture awareness
?u 'uniri mf.w.T�.ioo tall
c mir ndaa tXIxr TV 4?W
MtaaniM Studfm CaaaSf FI? �X iVmtt 5pm)
Limited Staling So Buy Your Tickets Now
'ISA members � !rrc jdmir.ancr
The Three Steers
Restaurant
2626 Memorial Drive
Greenville, N.C. 27834
All ABC Permits "We Specialize in
Phone: (919) 756-2414 Steaks & Seafood'
i
i
c o up o n
2for1
Get Two Sets of 3" Prints From
Every Roll of Film Developed
Receive e second set ol standard size 3 prints absolutely
FREE wn your next rcl of 35mm. disc. 110 or 126 color print
film left tor developing at our everyday low pneos! C-41
process or.rv - excludes larger 4 sa prints. Coupon must be
attached to outside of orderenvelope. Not valid with any r"
coupe ofter
ECU Student Stores
Wright Bldg.
Good March 16 thru March 25. 1992





ide
orporation
W i inda Wolfe
numbet oi
Li 1 numbet oi
fl the threat oi
iding enough
the are oi the
11 ten!
said
tht- m h iolog
it .it
� in
Expressions
Thank you for
the use of your
computers i
during our
recent and
lengthy crisis.
Congratulations
on vour
magazine - it
looks great!
I he East Caroliniun Staff
U W
lager Sought
ity Media Board
1 to manage small photo lab serv-
i er, Expressions magazine,
MB, and the Media Board.
r month stipend is provided
j meaningful bi-
g and assigning
nistering a line-
� t 2.5 grade point
nd be willing to
� the University
us Building.
ii i in
'esident Education
d
'all Association
Winners of the
Trivia Quiz
Awareness Month
ne Kennedy
jason Jones
n Chadwick
cepting
at ions
992-1993
Boards
:er an excellent op-
iperience and lead-
it will benefit you
.At the same time,
enable you to make
Ions to East Caro-
additional informa-
is contact the SGA
lenhall.
ist be turned in by
larch 30th.
Irish gays march in Boston
March 17, 1992 gfe jagg Carolinian 3
BOSTON (AD -Beercans
and obscenities were hurled at
two dozen Irish-American ho-
mosexuals who marched un-
der their own banner in this
city's St. Tatrick's Day parade.
"You can't keep an
Irishman down Brian Thomas
Callahanof the Irish-American
Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Pride
Committee said Sundav as he
held one end of the group's
shamrock-adorned banner.
"Tell him no and he's not going
to listen
Eight people werearrested,
at least three on charges of
taunting the gav marchers, po-
lice said. In Boston, mounted
police acted as a buffer between
marchers and the crowd oi
about 600,000 that turned out
for the parade sponsored by
the South Boston Allied War
Veterans Council.
Motorcycle police cruised
alongsideanda police van filled
with officers followed behind
the parade route through the
Irish enclave of South Boston.
Somespectators tossed tinv
firecrackers at the marchers �
not powerful enough to harm
anyone. Otherspectators, some
holding children, screamed ob-
scenities and waved signs with
such slogans as, "AIDS cures
g.ivs" and "Quarantine the
queers The homosexuals,
wearing pink triangles and
green carnations and armed
with a court order, responded
to jeers with shouts of "1 lappv
St Patrick's Dav
Judge withdraws castration ruling
(AD � A judge today with-
drew hisapproval for the castration
of a convicted child molester who
had volunteered for the surgery,
saying a doctor could not be found
to perform the operation.
State District fudge Michael
McSpadden also removed himself
from trying the case of Steven Allen
Butler, who is charged with aggra-
vated sexual assault of a 13-vear-
old girl. No date has been set tor
that trial.
Butler, 28, had volunteered
March 6 to be castrated rather than
face a prison sentence if convicted
of thecrime. At the timeof his arrest
last April, he had been servinga U-
year probated sentence for inde-
cency with a 7-year-old girl.
Butler's family met privately
with McSpadden on Saturday, sav-
ing they believed Butler was inca-
pable of making such a decision.
They had hired an attorney of their
own to get the castration decision
overturned.
Butler's five sisters hugged and
wept outside the courtroom after
McSpadden's ruling.
During the 15-mtnute hearing
tiKl.iy, Butler did not acknowledge
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the presence of his family in the
large courtroom.
McSpadden asked Butler if the
court or Butler's attorney suggested
he volunteer for the surgery as a
way togetout of jail. Butler has been
held at the Harris County Jail with-
out hond since his arrest after the
girl told authorities she had been
raped repeatedly by Butler.
Butler, who sat quietly, re-
sponded. "o " The judge also
asked Butler if he had been encour-
aged or coerced to seek castration.
"No Butler replied again.
Butler's attorney, Clyde Wil-
liams, told McSpadden a physician
who had offered to do the surgical
removal of the testes for free had
backed out of the deal. Another
doctor who had said he would do
the surgery for a fee also reneged on
his offer, Ms. Williams said.
Ms. Williams also said she was
filing a motion to have herself re-
moved as Butler's attorney.
"It is imperative that I have the
su p port of Mr. Butler's family. Since
I don't, 1 am preparing a motion to
be removed as Mr. Butler's attor-
ney she told reporters after the
hearing.
INTERNATIONAL CELEBRATION
E WOv
The International Student Association
a; Last Carolina University
presents
an International Celebration
bjfTei d.r.nfr. pcrfrrr.ames rrsu" and cnhibt:s
Man h 21st, 1992 from 6 30 p m. to 11:00 p m
MendenhaH xu.if Gentff Muir.purposr Room)
� � S' Omdmt 18 00 general public
II - - - -t'nauonal cu'lure awareness
�a (Mi taU
i nan I bet W �'88
Mtn4j ha - Mi WBC rafter 3 p m )
Limned Seating So Buy Your Tickets Sow
�I SJl men en lite admittance
The Three Steers
Restaurant
2826 Memorial Drive
Greenville, N.C. 278341
All ABC Permits
Phone:(919)756-2414
We Specialize In
Steaks & Seafood'
COUPON
2for1
j Get Two Sets of 3" Prints From
t Every Roll of Film Developed
i Receive- r second set Oi standard size 3" prints absolutely
' FREE wn vcur next rcl' of 35mm. disc. 110 or 126 color print
' film left fcr developing at our everyday tow prices! C-41
i process or.iv - excludes larger 4 size pnnts. Coupon must be
I attached to cjside ol order envelope. Not valid with any other
I coupe ofrer
S ECU Student Stores
Wright Bldg.
Good March 16 thru March 25.1992
I





�lj� i�uBt darnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
Jennifer Wardrep, News Editor
Julie Roscoe, Asst. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
DanaDamelson, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Robert S. Todd, Assistant Sports Editor
Jeff Becker, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Steven Ollice, Classified Advertising Technician
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Jean Caraway, Advertising Technician
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
IftlSSlWOOUSltf- yry,
v with vmcxtci! a v- 7
J-K ZWJt first WAS I THAT? f y jp
,
V (HeiPti
NO I
7V East CaroltRMM has served the Hast Carolina campus community since ll)25, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students The East Carolinian publishes 12,(XK) copies every Tuesday and Thursday. "The masthead editorial in each edition
is the opinion of the Editorial Board The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should be
limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, Ihe East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
for publication I etters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg KCU, Greenville, N.C
27858-4353. Tor more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Ban's reversal shows common sense
The recent controversy surrounding the
ban on psychological games in the residence
halls represents an old-fashioned witch-hunt.
Fortunately, that policy is now no longer
enforced. Residence hall officials recently re-
versed their decision to han the games.
Furor raised over the han from the con-
certed efforts from the Science Fiction and Fan-
tasy Organization and the student media played
major roles in the the policy's reversal.
The decision, however, stems mainly from
problems surrounding the residence hall's posi-
tion. The policy panning the games states "psy-
chological games such as Ouija hoards, 'Dun-
geons and Dragons and 'Killer' are all prohib-
ited in the residence hall The entire policy is
ambiguous and uninformed.
To group Ouija hoards and 'Dungeons &
Dragons' into the same category demonstrates
that the administrators simply chose games that
had ominous-sounding titles. Games such as
Risk, Battleship and the card game War all fall
under the same catagory, yet were not included.
Administrators felt that banning the games
preventented violent behavior. Should people
then prevent their children from playing cops
and robbers or cowboys and Indians? No. 'D&D'
is an extension oi the games everyone played as
children.
The university obviously saw the double-
standard presented bv their ban.
We have seen basic accusations and stereo-
types blossum into mass hysteria far too often in
our country's past.
Just like in the old days of Salem, Mass
ECU administrators realized that the games
they banned are innocent victims of misinfor-
mation and prejudice.
You'll Get Nothing And Like It
Moderates form base for third party
By
Parker
Editorial
Columnist
-
&r
"Democrats is Liberal 'n' Re-
publicans is Conservative "
That's a boiled down version of
the answer you'll hear from a typical
student asked to define the major po-
litical parties That generalized
thought is also predominant among
the voting public, and subsequently,
the parties themselves.
Despite the actual origins of the
Republican and Democratic parties,
our love of easy classification has ba-
sically defined the groups to the point
that people with liberal tendencies
feel they must be Democrats, and con-
servative-minded folk assume that
they are genetically Republican. In
turn, the parties define our notions of
liberalism and conservatism Do we
actually know what the terms mean?
By definition, conservatism
means the tendency to maintain the
existing order and resist change. Lib-
eralism means to be broad-minded
and tolerant
Though we're applying them to
politics, many ultraconservatives
would like it understood that these
are views that apply to moral values
Ironically, many ultraliberals are
happy with that categorization and
base their politics on that
In truth, for political purposes
the two viewpoints are applied best in
promoting social and economic
progress Being liberal is what pro-
pels you forward, taking the risks to
effect change, better your system,
make money, whatever. The founders
of our country were being liberal when
they rebelled against England, for a
very basic example Once goals are
achieved, conservatism keeps that
order�following the basic principles
of the Constitution for 200 years is a
conservative follow-up to that afore-
mentioned liberal act The two stances
should complement each other, but
that would imply moderacy, a posi-
tion we can't seem to understand.
Yet most people are moderates,
on all levels. Though popular psy-
chology classifies our personalities as
Type A or Type B, it does at least
admit that most people fall in the
middle, and that the types are ex-
tremes. In our nation, most residents
are not rich or poor, but middle-class
We're not all overweight or anorexic,
short or tall, or so on We wouldn't
tolerate having only two kinds of
VSSTA�4D�ST
FOR
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UOFPS
6iVe ME
MOTHER f�t
MY � L
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The Right Side
Newspaper follows self-made agenda
Bv
Nathan
Hicks
Editorial
Columnist
V
music to listen to (though many prob-
ably think that as well), so it's a bit
surprising that we settle for two
stances perta ining to self-government
Maybe we simply don't under-
stand the extremity of purely liberal
or purely conservative thought. Con-
ceptually, we often view the ideals on
a conventional line, the way we un-
derstand time. Liberals fall way on
the left, conservatives far right, mod-
erates in the middle. We're all still on
the same line right? What's the prob-
lem?
Now picture the three in rela-
tion to a circle. Now L and C are both
clearly on trtj parameter, and M is
right at the center. More pondering
will reveal how alarmlingly well this
diagram works L and C are both of-
ten militant in achieving their ends
Both do not see any merit in the other.
Both will spend ungodly amounts of
money to insure their interests And
both are equally tar from the heart of
matters.
Before now, this column, like
many of us, has taken its moderate
stances for granted, assuming they
were clearly discemable.
But perhaps it's time for
moderacy to become a full-fledged
political ideology, to remind the pub-
lic of its existence. The running title of
these editorials won't change to any-
thing so clever as "The Moderate
Side but you can assume an acting
philosophy when you read them (in-
cidentally, for those who have asked,
"You'll Get Nothing and Like It" is a
reference to the human condition).
Be warned, however, that being
actively moderate is not easy at first.
You'll confuse your friends who want
to have you all figured out so they
know where discussion is heading
beforehand. In lieu of politicians who
closely mirror your views, you'll have
to occasionally side with certain Re-
publicans and Democrats in respects
to their positions on specific issues. In
short, you will have to think about
each point of importance rather than
sling a broad philosophy at it.
It takes some effort, but it's the
only approach that works. Jerry
Brown, who is really an activist dis-
guised as a politician, does make a
good point when he calls for a third
major party for voters to rally behind.
Though there is no telling what he
wants the party to be, one should exist
to fill the gaps left by the two we ha ve.
Then all we need are some thinkers
PARKER'S PICKS: Clinton in
Michigan and Illinois, Long Range; De-
spite campaign feuding, Tsongas rW-
comes Clinton's running mate.
Welcome back, greetings, and
salutations With the start oi a new
half-semester, the opportunity arises
to reorganize and possiblv �et a hold
ot a class or two Along with the re-
construction ot a few study patterns, a
new restructuring need be raised to
the current agenda
If anyone has .) gripe with Pie
East Carolinian s styleand contentnow
is the time to write the letters to the
editor Nothing gets changed when
the Editorial Board has free reign oi
what to do with the paper It's my
paper, it's your paper It you are
happy fine, but 1 personally hear a
ton of complaints about the focuses i r
The Eat Carolinun
The paper is a student paper,
however, it seems that its style is tai-
lored to a select group of people im-
mediately reflectant ot those in charge
Maybe I'm wrong, but if a size-
able amount of students can write in
saying that they want all these damn
comicbook reviews in then sure thev'U
stay in Personally I'm to the point
that the Amazing Spiderman needs to
be shot in cheass with nuclear raid As
intelligent individuals, who the hell
cares about these childish forms of
literature1 Wake upSkippy' Smell the
coffee and get off the Starship Enter-
prise It ain't real.
Alone with the funnv books we
alsoare so fortunate as tohaveayi m c
Ceraldo-Wanna Be who can't seem to
let go of a story that has already been
driven into the ground a thousand
times i's we do need to know what
our ncket scientist Public Safety are
up to but I simply don't see nor hear
students running to the paperstands
and suspencefuBy wondering of the
latest chapter written into As I
Safety Tarns Hi anyone really read
esearl es past the first 2
were written a lecad r si ag
Amazing) the) say the same t a
amazingly they keep appearing on
the front page of your paper, and
amazingly we as students ha
stand-up and get rid ot this paper
Jimmv nonsense that befw earn 11�aes
tails to enlighten even the comic bo k
boys
Hopefully a new trend is � �
starting to appear in the paper That
trend being columnists bickering
amongst one another and responding
in a fashion suitable for that oi a letter
to the editor to another columnist ar-
ticle Is this the crap you students
want to read? Or is this the crap that a
columnist writes when he can't come
up with something insightful of his
own' Then again I guess all of us
could write about racism and all would
be uniform, unbiased and we could
all live with happiness like that of the
Cosby show ramilv
Is the sports section a sports
section or is it a two minute update on
what might be happening in the ath-
letic world7 In the past the sj -� -
tion managed to do a c d
guess the glory days of an ����
: . - n ver Maybe we si
c along with the flow ���. .�
a bunch of "rotund" comic b ok read-
ers start believing Star Tres -
and kick back or. the couch
Ninja Turtle pasta I'd rather
heart ripped out through m si
der, but unless we start t-
� paj et into somel ng
g up it will remau '� bt
a half-assed medium that serv �
as an absorbent to clean up i n I
after Editorial B ard Keggers Write
letters and then write some n r� et-
ters Forcethepapertochangi l
. is students want to read
have problems let them r� �
Write in on what you feel and � � �'
in. the letters .ir- all read
times printed
It there is a particu ir
event, or general area you 1 k
more information about or
you feel needs to be addressed I a
make up a list The informal:
want to see can't be worse thai
is already printed, it can only K
because it's what vou want to read
It's vour paper Read it ar 1
:� rnp'iain and change it, but don't
s;t around and whine about how if
sim ks it vou haven't the gum: �
make useful comments on wl -
wanttoread The Editorial Board 1 it-
letters almost as much as they like to
work So drop them a line and make a
difference
Name That Tune. Mr. Spock!
� This celebratory gathering occurs at mv
behest and I shall be lachrymose if it so befits
� She chooses to purchase a terraced incline
directed toward a postltfe paradisiacal region
� You provide illumination tor the period ot
time delimited bv my nativity and the
We re in the Nineties Now
IVUIiqned GroupNew. Politically Correct Name
Angry persons PriestsPeople ot i holer People ot collar
Square-dance dMjay Sorting assistants, collators Doughnut glazersPeople ot caller People ot culler People of cruller
Great Bear repairpersonsPeople otooler
DenveritesPeople of Colorado
VegetarianPeople of cauliflower
The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter fansPeople of McCullers
complete cessation ot mv metabolic
functions
� Adieu, iaundiced vehicular pathwav
consisting of blocks of baked clav
� And we will engoge in much ubilant activirv
until such time as the male parent chooses to
repossess her vehicle ot motonzed transport
� The leather coverings now
encosing m pedal
extremities have been
manufactured tor the
specific purpose of
ambulatory forward
motion
� Expresses deep affection
toward yours truly in the
manner of a hardened
igneous obect
� Please remove vourselt
from the immediate vicinity
of my visible collection of
minute water particles. Dr
McCoy
Entertainment
Cochrane's
By Jim Shamlin
Staff Writer
Mosf Americans think of
Canada as a barren patch of land
north of Michigan asori � � uffer
zone between the Ar, tu ;r V and
civilization Noone e i �
thing about a greatanadiar
or a great Canadian intellectual
These are oontradictii ins in terms
Of course, it would be a lie to
say that nothing . � ame
from Caitada After ail tfien-
Michael J. Fox, who had his stu I
the cover of teeny-bopper m
zineb and finally took his
place in B-mo it-s t: and
close in a few weei
there was Bryan Adan still
playing matinee in � the
opening act for Mel T. ���� �
other has-been lounge liz
Tom Cochrane, ant ther lime-
light-seekini: wannabe who
himseifa musician, hascrawled out
of the tundra and ont fhi real'
American .scene
Trivia buffs
( i k hrane as the
hand Red Rider
Fringe" made a h-l
the pip charts j
J
solo(translatkwi
like a malodorouj
e his own .v
surprising thing
-
willing togi
Cochrai �
�t modern sociali
be tru j
i
will find then
the ears witt
politual stab j
from
� nip

"Thisisdi
drugs Any cue
he would ha
it in.
U2 delivers th
By Michael Albuquerque
Staff VNriter
Rtwing into i the Chark ttteCob-
seumamid a barrage of thunderous
guitar nffs and nx:k anthems, L2
brought its s i TV Tour" to more
than 25,000 adoring fans on Tues-
day, March 3.
.And much to the delight of the
sellout crowd, L"2 showed that they
have undergone manv changes
during their 5-year hiatus from the
tour circuit. The band showed ev-
eryone that rock n roll's political
conscience of the '80s still remem-
bers how to Kxien up and have fun
� and even have a laugh.
Driven matnlv bv the new ma-
terial from Achtung Bar U2 dove
headlong into its 20-song, WO
minute set with the explosive "Zixi
Station the opening track off the
.lihum.
Lead
in a black U
with his track
and sang
the steenne
As The � (J
lntenseguitara-
thestage in n
metallic percusl
Larrv Mullen ir.
Clayton.
The band lefl
audien � j
as L2 quick I
the first single
To complement I
computenzed
en thing vou km
lehntv is a
multitude I
about the
24t
Sprin
Co
Tues.
PRIZES:
1st Pli
2nd
3rd PI
DOORS O
COM





t
If-made agenda
rts ec-
but 1
n entertain-
� v -i uld
�. read-
rrek is mi
. ngcw
ivemy
shoul-
trj ng to
rves
up vomit
cers Write
e more let-
ge to what
� read It vou
t known
� � ind believe
d many
� : at topic,
. uld like
� r concern
ed, then
� rmation you
rse than what
i v he better
� to read
I .indlike
� rut don?
b ut how it
the g nj on to
� .s-h.it you
I loves
as they like to
� eand make a
'HInt
MAGAZINE
01uf
.
'
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�� � i
'� .icinitv
s J'
-8
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Entertainment
QJlie �aat Carolinian
March 17, 1992
Cochrane's music lacks originality
Bv Jim Shamlin
Staff Writer
Most Americans think of
v anada .is a barren patch of land
north ot Michigan, a M�rt of buffer
zone between the Arctic circle and
ilizatkm. ixme ever hears any-
thing about a great Canadian artist
r a great Canadian intellectual
Phese are contradictions in terms
. course, it would be a lie to
that nothing gotxl ever came
fromanada. After all there was
' , h.iel I. Fox, who had his stint on
e cover of teenv-bopper maga-
ines and finally took his rightful
place in B-movies that open and
-o in a few weeks. Then, loo,
there was Bryan Adams, who's still
. aying matinee in Vegas as the
ipening act for Mel Torme or some
ther has-been lounge lizard.
lorn CiKhrane, another lime-
cht Mvking wannabe who calls
sell"a musician, hascrawled out
ot the tundra and onto the "real"
American scene.
Trivia buffs may remember
Gxrhrane as the front man of the
band Red Rider, whose "Lunatic
Fringe" made a brief appearance on
the pop charts some time ago. Since
then, Cochrane has decided to go
solo (translation: "was regurgitated
like a malodorous prune") and re-
lease his own album, World. The
surprising thing is that a major
record company, Capital Records,
was willing to give him a chance.
Cochrane claims to be a voice
of modem social conscience, which
mav be true, but the message he
conveys lacks originality. Listeners
will find themselves beaten about
the ears with every "trendy" socio-
political statement of the last de-
cade � from anti-drugs to anti-
censorship. In reading over
Gx-hrane's lyrics, it's clear that if
"This is drugs. This is your brain on
drugs. Any questions?" rhymed,
he would have found a way to work
it in.
This is not to say that there's no
originality in Cochrane's writing,
but he goes from the extreme of
mouthing out hackneyed messages
that noone wants to hear anymore,
to an equally undesirable antipode
� singing lyrics that are too per-
sonal foranvoneelse to understand.
His most original tune, "The Secret
is to Know When to Stop an in-
tensely personal torch song that
probably makes sense to only two
people: Cochrane himself and the
nameless woman who had thegood
sense to dump him.
Lyrics, of course, aren't every-
thing. It's entirely possible to ignore
the words and listen to the sound �
which mightbewhat listeners could
do with Cochrane's latest album.
Unfortunately, the musical side of
World isonly a lighter shadeof bland.
Thealbum opens with "Life is a
highway a basic rock tune with a
Motown feel � slap bass, choral
refrains and funk guitar. It sounds a
lot like Bryan Adams with Tina
Turner's back-up musicians. Then,
of course, there's "Get Back Up a
tune with the ha untingjangle- whis-
per of old Fleetwood Mac�except
for the lyrics, which are a lot Bryan
Adams. Finally Cochrane plays
"Sinking Like a Sunset the com-
pulsory rock ballad, complete with
traditional piano and the vocal style
of someonelike,well,Bryan Adams.
The rest of the album is much
the same � an imitation of some-
one imitating someone else.
Cochrane begins with the basic rock
�beginner-txxik basic rock � and
blends in bits of other styles.
Rather than creating an inno-
vative synthesis, he subordinates
the secondary styles to su it the first,
hammering the life out of them so
that they trudge along like nags in a
carousel.
Released in late February, World
is probably collecting dust on the
shelves of local record stores by
now � which is precisely where it
should remain.
Photo courtesy Capitol Records
Tom Cochrane. another limelight-seeing wannabe who calls himself a
musician, has crawled out of the tundra and onto the "real" American scene.
thunderous performance
By Michael Albuquerque
Staff Writer
Roaring into the CharlotteColi-
sfum amid a barrage of thunderous
cuitar nffs and rock anthems, U2
brought its "Zoo TV Tour" to more
than 25,000 adoring fans on Tues-
day, March 3.
And much to the delight of the
sellout crowd, U2 showed that they
have undergone many changes
during their 5-year hiatus from the
tour circuit. The band showed ev-
eryone that rock n roll's political
conscience oi the '80s still remem-
bers how to loosen up and have fun
� and even have a laugh
Driven mainly by the new ma-
terial from Achtung Baby, L2 olove
headlong into its 20-song, 110
minute set with (heexplosive 'Zoo
Station the opening track off the
new album.
Lead singer Bono set the mcxxl
for the evening as he took the stage
in a black leather outfit (complete
with his trademark "fly" sunglasses')
and sang I'm ready to let go of
the steenng wheel "
As The Edge maintained his
intenseguitarassault, Bono roamed
thestage in mixk convulsions to the
metallic percussion of drummer
Larrv Mullen jr. and bassist Adam
Clayton.
The band left little time for their
audience tocatchacoilectivebreath
as L2 quickly tore into "The Fly
the first single off their new album.
To complement this powerful song,
computerized messages (i.e "Ev-
erything vou know is wrong "Ce-
lebrity is a job") flashed across the
multitude oi TV monitors spread
about the stage
SixTrabants(EastGermancars)
were suspended above the stage,
their headlights castingan ominous
glow over the crowd, as U2 contin-
ued to delight the crowd with six
more songs off of the Achtun$ Baby
album.
Ranging from the ominous
"Until the End of the World" (a
song about the last days of Jesus as
seen from the perspective of judas
Iscariot) to the personal "One" (a
song inspired by The Edge's mari-
tal breakdown), the new material
left something for everyone to en-
joy-
Ironically, the high point of the
show came next when the band
strolled onto a 100-foot catwalk ex-
tending into the crowd and played
a two-song acoustic set on a tiny
stage surrounded bv fans. U2 be-
gan this set with a stripped-down
version of "Angel of Harlem" (com-
plete with a bongo drr.m solo), at
the request of a fan who offered
Bono $1 to play the song.
"You shouldn't offer me this
Bono said in a playful manner. "I
think we've already taken enough
of your money
Next came an angelic cover of
Lou Reed's "Satellite of Love" (cur-
rently featured as an outtake on
U2's new CD single) with only The
Edge accompanying Bono's pierc-
ing vocals.
The band then returned to the
main stage to begin a set of their big,
crowd-pleasing hits such as "Bad
"Pride (In the Name of Love)" and
"Where the Streets Have No Name
As the final notes of "I Still
Haven't Found What I'm Looking
For" washed over the crowd, the
band left the stage and an ocean of
24th Annual
Spring Bikini
Contest
Tlies. March 17,1992
$1.00 for members
$2.00 for guests
PRIZES:
screaming fans behind, only to re-
turn minutes later for a four-song
encore.
As U2 began theopeningchords
to "Desire Bono, now dressed in a
gold lame jacket (a la Elvis Tresley),
returned to the stage with a large
mirror which he kissed and then
mockingly told his reflection.
"You're fucking beautiful � ap-
parently in reference to an argu-
ment between Bono and Coca-Cola.
It seems that Coca-Cola asked Bono
to endorse its pnxiuct during the
current tour to which he replied,
"I'll kiss mv own ass before I'll kiss
Coke's
After pertorming another track
oii the new album, a romantic hush
fell over the audience while L2
plaved a sweetly serene version of
"With or Without You
The mood quicklv changed,
however, when a male fan some-
hew managed to Mip past the road
crew, walked up to Bono and
tapped him on the shoulder. Al-
though he was surprised at first,
Bono quickly seized the moment
and stow danced with his male
admirer. He then instructed the fan
to carry him off the stage in a mock
"opera" scene reminiscent of a
Shakespearean tragedv.
Bono returned to the stage one
last time to join the band in the new
song "Love is Blindness And this
timehechoseamoresui table dance
partner � a voung woman from
the front row. Alter a slow turn on
the dance floor, he kissed his part-
ner twice and gently returned her
hi the waiting arms oi the crowd.
Bono then gave a final wave to the
audience as the four Irishmen left
the stage for the evening.
ATTENTION ECU
GROUPS:
DO YOU NEED
MONEY?
Annual Fund-raising Planning
Sessions Are Scheduled for:
1st Place $150 CASH
2nd Place $75 CASH
3rd Place $25 CASH
DOORS OPEN AT 9:00 PM
COME EARLY
Tuesday. March 17Room 2473-6pm
Wednesday, March 18Room 2474-7pm
Tuesday, March 24Room 2473-6pm
Wednesday, March 25Room 144-7pm
Tuesday, March 31Room 2473-6pm
Wednesday, April 1Room 2424-7pm
Tuesday, April 7Room 2473-6pm
Wednesday, April 8Room 2474-7pm
A Representative of Your Organization Must
Be Present At One Session In Order
To Obtain 1992-1993 Funding
All Groups With SGA Funded
Status Are Eligible
For Further Information Call
Alan Thomas, 757-0157
Amy Harris, 757-3159
If You Are Unsure If You Are Eligible For Funding -
Please Call
Millie Murphrey at 757-4726





Classifieds
mtiz Eant (Earoltnian
March 17,1992
HOUSE TO SHARE: Furnished,
quiet, and residential S2(X)per month
and 12 utilities. Call Mike at 355-
2r-27.
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS:
One and two bedroom apartments.
Energy efficient, several locations in
town. Carpeted, kitchen appliances,
st me water and sewer paid, washer
dryer hookups. Now taking applica-
tions for Fall. Call 752-8915.
TWO BEDROOM, one bath, heat
and water furnished. $350 per month.
No pets, dost to campus. Call 756-
3563.
H MAI F ROOMMATE WANTED
ASAP: Non smoker, 170 per month
"t c I 2 utilities, your iwn room,
c all 758-2549.
KIM.GOl I) TOWERS
Now I aking Leases lor l
bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiencj Apartments
CALL 752-2865
A Hfiuuful Plice to Live
�AU New
�And Rc�dy To Rent-
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5ih Siren
�Locaied Ne�r ECU
�Near Mijor Shopping Cenieri
�Across From Highway Pitrol Sunon
Limned Offer � J330 i month
Contact J.T or Tommy WUlumi
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. 8, 12-5:30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and qw�i ana teahjam famuhftd iflumi,
�nrt t If an. fr� �iiri end m�� wtahn. dryarm.
cable TV' Couples or inglei crJ v IMO i month, 6
rnntlMK MOBILE HOME RENTALJ ���� or
�nfjes. �I1 �I�afjdjrir lilm'irtmf
Ottf Bra ViUey Country C�b
Contact J.T or Tommy Wilhimi
756SIS
69 TELECASTER REISSUE with
Seymour Duncan pickups. Original
pickups in case. Absolute mint con-
dition. $575 call at 757-3057.
FENDER SUPER 112 60 watt all tube
guitar amp with channel switching
and reverb. Footswitch included.
Excellent condition. $375 call 757-
3057.
1983 CHEVY S-10 BLAZER 4X4
tahoe package, blackgrey with
burgandy interior, power windows,
locks, automatic, high miles, one
owner, taken care of. $3300 or best
offer, call 321-1588.
PAY IN-STATE TUITION? Read
Residency Status and Tuition, the
practical pamphlet written by an at-
torney on the in-state residency ap-
plication process. For Sale: Student
Stores, Wright Building.
83 FORD ESCORT: Runs good,
needs transmition, $400 neg. Mens
Schwinn 10-speed (used) $50.
Womens sequin evening jacket (size
s) $50. 8306893 ask for Josh or Nell.
or keep it off. Free information by
mail. 355-3789.
NEED MONEY FOR COLLEGE?
SFAMS locates private sector finan-
cial aid for college students. Call
Marshall Yount 1-800-238-8771.
CHEERLEADING INSTRUC-
TORS NEEDED FOR PRIVATE
SUMMER CAMPS. If you love
cheering, this is the summer job for
you! College experience not neces-
sary but strong high school back-
ground is a must. Flexible schedul-
ing. Great pay. Call for info. 919-383-
0086.
SI KVK I S
I Kl II
FOK SAM
SEIZED CARS: trucks, boats, 4
wheelers, motor homes, bv FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available your area now. Call
800-338-3388 Ext. C-5999.
CLEANING: Married, female, stu-
dent, working her way through
school. 8 yrs. of experience cleaning
personal homes. Reasonable rates
and own supplies. Please call Cindy
Myer at 752-2759.
WHY PAY AND STARVE TO
LOOSE WEIGHT? Save and eat to
satisfy hunger (even for sweets) and
get fast permanent weight loss to the
size that's nght for you,and feel bet-
ter than ever while you drop a third
to one pound daily. (Diabetics and
hypoglycemics too) Maybe even
make a little money without over-
hauling your lifestyle to loose weight
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE: Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 800-
338-3388 Ext. P-3712.
FREE TRAVEL Air couriers and
cruise ships. Students also needed
Christmas, spring and summer for
amusement park employment. Call
800-336-3388 Ext. F-3464.
$10 - S360AJP WEEKLY: Mailing
Brochures! SpareFull time. Setown
hours! Free Details! Send self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope: Publish-
ers r.O. Box 51037Durham,NC 27717.
BE PART OF THE ACTION! Foot-
ball managers wanted! Contact Fred
Sponhaltz in equipment room, sports
medicine building in person!
NEED BABYSITTERCOMPAN-
ION for three and six year old bovs
this summer. Approx. 6-10 hours per
week. Must have own transportation
and references. Call Dillon Manly 355-
0552.
WANTED: Gamers to start gaming
group in Greenville. Send resume oi
expenence with name, address and
telephone to P.O. Box343Greenville,
NC 27858.
READ BOOKS FOR PAY! $100 PER
TITLE! Fill out like or dislike forms.
Free 24 hour recording 506-7644)699
ext. 3205.
LEARN TO FLY NOW! Aero Sales
flight training. Pitt-Greenville Air-
port Introductory flight $20. Call 752-
1989.
TOTHEGUYSWHOBROKETWO
WINDOWS, Thanks for the beauti-
ful repairs
SIG-EP: The night started slow with
no bus to go! But we grabbed a brew
and skated the night through-we did
the hokipoki and turned ourselves
around, even though some of us
ended up on the ground! Loved to
roll on with ya'll again! Love, the
sisters of Chi-O.
Bj: Happy two years I love you! Bee.
HEADING FOR EUROPE THIS
SUMMER? Jet thereanvtime for only
S169 with AIRHfTCH ! (Reported in
Let's Go! and the New York Times.)
Also, super low round trip fares to
West coast A1RHITCH. 212-864-2000.
STUDY ABROAD IN AUSTRA-
LIA: Information on semester, year,
graduate, and internship programs
in Perth, Townsville, Sydney, and
Melbourne. Programs start at $3520.
Call 1-800-878-36.
ERS0HMEL
ERVICES
OF EASTERN
NORTH CAROLINA
� CAREER PLACEMENT
�RESUMFi SERVICE
"A Professional Edge. . .
Our Personal
Commitment
2717 S. Memorial Dr.
919-756-5820
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTS
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
Hours:
Mon - Fri 8:30-3:00
Wk
'Lt
9
9
u?
What is it about this per-
son? Why do they attract
you so? At one time or an-
other, everyone finds that
irresistible someone. What
makes that magic? Why do
they drive you crazy? The
stars can shed some light
on these questions. I can
compare horoscopes for the
two of you: Is it in the stars,
or are you star-crossed lov-
ers? This 15 plus page re-
port looks at each of your
styles of relating and the
relationship between you.
It's so accurate you may
not want to show it to your
lover! Just send $20
birthdates, places and
times to:
Heart Beat
203 S. Berkeley Blvd.
Suite 32
Goldsboro, NC 27534
Enclose CkMoney Order
Visa - Mastercard number
& Exp date
Includes Postage & Shipping
MAPTQTHEEASTCAROl 1MAV
EAST CARPI INI AN,
CLASSIFIED RATES
Students$2.00
Nonstudents$3.00
Display ads$5.50
Deadline
Friday 4 p,m� for Tuesday issue and
Tuesday 4 p,m, for Thursday issue
WE
ARE
HERE

JOYNER LIBRARY

MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
Announcements
HOSPITALITY MGMT. ASSOC
H1 A is looking for a responsible and
dedicated person, preferablv a Hos-
pitality major, interested in the secre-
tary assistant job for the club. Great
opportunity ami lots of fun! Call 931-
7399 if interested.
GROUP ADVISISC,
rORPRK-OTSTUnKNTs;
Ihere will be advising every third
luesda) of each month from 12 p.m.
to 2 p.m. in room 203 Belk building.
Please see the video at either Joyner
or Brody libraries before you come
tor advising.
SCHOLARSHIP DEAnUNF.
Applications for the Thomas W. Riv-
rs Foreign Exchange Endowment
Fund study abroad scholarship are
available in the Center for Interna-
tional Programs, Brewster A-177. The
Rivers fund is intended to promote
study abroad and the genuine inter-
est in learning about other cultures.
The requirements for eligibility are
explained in the application form. If
you are planning to study abroad
during the summer, you may apply
for this scholarship now. If you are
plannning to study abroad next se-
mester, you should wait for a future
deadline. The scholarships are
awarded four times per year with the
next deadlines on March 20, 1992,
and June 12, 1992. You may contact
theCenterfor International Programs
at 757-h7b9 or stop by Brewster A-l 17
for further information.
STUDENTS FOR CHRIST
Learnabouttruelove,friendship,and
commitment. Join students forChnst
in a Bible study at 6:30 p.m. on Thurs-
days in rcxim 14, Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. It will be a life changing,
challenging experience.
MAJORSMINORS FAIR
Undecided about a major? Visit the
majorsminors fair Wednesday,
March 18, 12:30-3:30 p.m. in
Mendenhall Great Room. The fair,
sponsored by the Career Education
Committee, gives ECU students op-
portunities to meet with faculty and
senior students to discuss potential
majorsand minors. Over 40 academic
departments will be represented. This
is an excellent resource for students
whoare undeclared,uncertain of their
majors, or just curious about the aca-
demic options that may be available.
All students interested in selecting or
changing their major or minor are
urged to attend the fair. For informa-
tion call 757-$979.
GOLDEN GIRLS TRYOITS
If you are a dancer who enjoys per-
forming to large enthusiastic crowds,
the Golden Girlsdance line is for you.
Affiliated with the Marching Pirates,
the Golden Girls perform at home
football games, pep rallies, selected
away games, exhibitions, and bowl
games. Dance majorsand non-dance
maors are welcome. Trvouts are Sat-
urday March 2H from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. (with lunch break) in
Chnstenbury Gym room 112. For
more information contact: Michelle
931-78u4,Kelly931-7829or the March-
ing Band office 757-6982.
MATH I AB
Students who received a grade of
Incomplete (I) in Math Lab (MATH
0001) fall semester, 1991, must re-
move that incomplete by 3 p.m. Fri-
day, March 20,1992. The Math Lab is
open from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
through Thursday to allow students
needingtoremovean incomplete time
to take the remaining tests. A student
with an incomplete from the fall se-
mester who fails to complete the re-
quired work by March 20 will receive
a grade of "F" and be required to
repeat (from the beginning) MATH
0001. (Note: Students entering the
Math Lab to work on removing an
incomplete must have with them a
picture ID.)
BEACH
HORSEBACK TRIP MFFTTNir.
Do you love spending time at the
beach? If you said "yes Recreational
Services will be holding an informa-
tive meeting for a beach horseback
trip. This meeting will be March 18 at
5 p.m. in Brewster D101. For more
information, call 757-6387.
TENNIS
SINGLES REGISTRATION
Recreational Services will be holding
tennis singles registration on March
18 at 5 p.m. in Biology 103. For more
information, call 757-6387.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi members: our next
meeting is March 18 at 5 p.m. in the
multi-purposProom at Mendenhall.
Officers meet at 4:15.
INDOOR
SOCCER RFGISTRATION!
Recreational Services will beholding
Indoor Soccer Registation on March
24 atp.m. in Biology 103. For more
information call 757-387.
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
Members of East Carolina Friends
should bring their Little Friends to
River Park North on Sunday, March
22 from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. for an
afternoon oi food and fun. Bring $25
if you want to go to the nature center.
Rain date is the following Sunday.
This is a mandatory event. Call your
Director of Services for more infor-
mation.
ATTENTION
ALLRESIPFNCFHAHS
Do you want to prolong your Spring
Break, laying out in the sun and etc.
rhencomeouttothehappeningevent
on Thursday, March 26. It's the Battle
Of the Residence Halls in the 2nd
annual Hall Olympics. Garrett won
the King of the Hill in the fall, can they
come up to be the champions again or
will Scott Hall beat them into the
ground? Can the Fleming Ladies
stand upfortheir rightsagainst Tyler?
Can West Campus show the Hill that
they are the BEST or will Central
Campus pull up in the ranks? It's the
Battle of the Halls, and out of this
rumble a champion will be chosen as
the Hall Olympic Gold Metalist.
There will be prizes, food, and fun.
Sponsored by Residence Hall Asso-
ciation.
ECUSCHOOl
OF MUSIC EVENTS
FOR MARCH 17.711QQ?
TUES MAR. 17� Beth Norvell, pi-
ano, Senior Recital (Fletcher Recital
Hall, 7 p.m free),and Mary Morrison
Dixon, composition, Senior Recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 9 p.m free).
WED, MAR 18�John Heath, voice
and Tim Odom, Trumpet, Senior
Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 7 p.m
free). SUN MAR 22-Renee Perry,
voice, Senior Recital (Fletcher Recital
Hall, 7 p.m free). MON. MAR 23�
Flute Ensemble, Cynthia Stachowski
Decker, Director (Fletcher Recital
Hall, 7 p.m free), and Roger McVey,
piano, Sophomore Recital (Fletcher
Recital Hall, 9 p.m free).
EDUCATION.
LOANS AVAH AW1P
Three ecucational loan programs fd
North Carolina residents attending
colleges in or out of state and for
nonresidents attending colleges in
North Carolina are available through
College Foundation Inc. These loans
programs are funded by North Caro-
lina banks and other investors.
Stafford Loans are for dependent or
independent students and are based
on financial need. Supplemental
Loans are for independent self-sup-
porting students and are not based
on financial need. PLUS Loans are
for parents oi dependent students
and are not based on financial need.
For more information, write College
Foundation Inc 2100 Yonkers Rd.
P.O. Box 12100, Raleigh, N.C. 27605-
2100, or call 919-821-4771.
OFFICFOFHFAITHA.NP
WELL-BEING PRFSf NTS
THE LUNCH N'I EARN SFR1FS
Wednesday, March 18,12:15-1 p.m
MSC Multi-Purpose Room, "Eating
Heal thy ona Low Budget" Bringyour
lunch and join us. Jo Bartlett,
Nutritionalist at the Family Practice
Center, will provide helpful hints on
how to prepare good tasting, low fat
meals, at minimal cost For more
information, call 757-6793.
SPECIAI OIYMPirs
The 1992 Greenville -Pitt Co. Special
Olympics Spring Games will be held
on April 16 at EB. Aycock Jr. High
School in Green ille (rain date: April
28). Volunteers are needed to serve as
buddiesChaperones for the Special
Olympics. Volunteers must be able
to work all day - from 9 a.m. to 1:45
p.m. fThe first ones there will be as-
signed positions). An orientation
meeting will be held on April 14 in
Old Joyner Library, room 221 from 5
p.m. to 6 p.m. Free volunteer t-shirts
will be provided the day of the games
to all volunteers who have attended
the volenteer orientation session.
There will be a concession stand for
you to buy your lunch. For more
information,contact Lisa Millsat 830-
4551.
CUMB-RAPFL I WORKSHOP
Learn how to attempt Recreational
Services new Climbing Tower by at-
tending a Climb-Rapel workshop on
March 19at3p.nt attheClimb Tower
located near the Belk Building. For
more information call 757-6387.
CO-REC
VOLLEYBALL REGISTRATION
Co-Rec Volleyball Registration will
be on March 23 at 5 p.m. in Biology
103. This event, sponsored by Recre-
ational Services, should have two men
and two women teams. For more
information call 757-t387.
ARE YOU UNHAPPY wrjH
YOUR PRESENT POSITION?
Do you enjoy discussing current is-
sues, considering new ideas, contem-
plating the world around you? Would
you like to learn marketable skills,
have flexible hours, and receive fi-
nancial assistance? Then consider a
Master of Arts degree in Sociology
from the Department of Sociology
and Anthropology at ECU. We invite
you to visit us on Wednesday March
25 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. for a day
which will include facilty tours, in-
formation sessions, and informal dis-
cussions with faculity and students.
Lunch will be provided. For more
Information and Registration, call us
at 919-757-6883.
GROUP ADVISING
FQRPRF-OCCUPATIONAI
THERAPY STTinENTS
Pre-register for summer and fall ses-
sions starting Monday night March
23 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in room 205
of the Belk Building. All other advis-
ing will be every third Tuesday of
each month from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. in
room 306 Belk Building. Please see
the video at either Joyner or Brody
Libraries before you come for advis-
ing.
REGISTRATION,
FORGENEBAI
COLLEGE STimENJS
General College studen ts should con-
tact their advisers the week of March
23-27 to make arrangements for aca-
demic advising for summer terms
and fall semester, 1992. Early regis-
tration will begin March 30 and end
April 3.
THEGAY.lESBlANAIIlANn:
Social support, advocacy, activities.
Everyone welcome - gays, lesbians,
bisexuals, concerned family and
friends. Call ECU counseling center
757-6661 for information regarding
meeting time and place.
DEPARTMENT OP Ptryftlfft
The Future of the Savannah River
Nuclear Weapons Production Com-
plex: National Security versusthe
Environment" will be the topic of
lectures by Bran Costner, at ECU on
Mon March 23,1992. Mr. Costner is
Director of the Energy Research Foun-
dation, located in Columbia S.C. The
Foundation works to pursue en-
hanced environmental and safety
practices at the Savannah River Site
and throughout the nuclear weapons
complex. Mr. Costner's first presen-
tation will take place at 12:30 p.m. in
the small conference room above the
Pitt Co. Mem. Hospital Cafeteria.
This presentation is part oi the Per-
spective Senes sponsored by the Dept
of Medical Humanities oi ECU School
of Medicine. Mr. Costner's second
presentation sponsored by the ECU
Dept oi Physics, will take place at 4
p.m. in room PE 301 oi the Howell
Science Complex on the ECU cam-
pus. Mr. Costner's visit to Greenville
is supported by the Eastern NCChap-
ter of Physicians for Social
Responsiblity. The public is invited
toattend either presentation; for more
information, please contact the Dept.
of Medical Humanities at 551-2797 or
Dr. Halis Odabasi in the Dept of
Physics, 757-6430.
EASTCAROUSA
EQUESTRIAN CLUB
The ECU Equestrian Club will meet
on Tuesday, March 17 at 4:30 p.m. in
room 14, MSC We will discuss the
committees we should establish, cam-
pus registration and the March 29
party. See you there! New members
welcome.
ATTENTION
PRE-PHYSICAi
THERAPY STimFNTS
Registration advising for summer-
fall semester will be held on Tuesday,
March 24 and Wednesday, March 25
from 7 - 9 p.m. in the Belk Building
(Room will be posted on doors). All
pre-physical therapy general college
students must attend one of these
advising sessions in order to have
registration forms approved and
signed by an advisor. Only excused
absences will be rescheduled.
THE TENTER FOB
INTERNATlftNAl
PROGRAM PBFS,ENTfr
Dr. Sidney L Kasfir of Emory Uni-
versity in a lecture on West African
Masks: From Ritual to Play. Thurs-
day, March 19, 1992. Jenkins Fine
Arts Auditorium 7 p.m. Funded by a
United States Department of Educa-
tion Title VI Grant For more infor-
mation, contact the Center for Inter-
national Programs at 757-4829.
Sports
Parsons
leads
team in
tourney
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sports VWiter
Intheopeninggai
Pirate round robin t umamenl
Jenny Parsons pitched five score-
less innings all. rvs tng e hit.
In short rebel lei wgeanri '� ilke al-
lowed just rv. hits
blanket! George Mason Inn i
6-0 in the toumamer- I � zame
The outstanding pitching
ma nee coupled with U �
aggressive and
proved to much for the Lady Patri-
ots.
Cheryl Hobson led Lhe Pirate
hitting attack v. id i tv, ihitsand three
runs batted in. Laura Crow der and
MkheUe Ward also contributed two
hits apiece
Following thewinoverGe i
Mason, and a one hour break the
Lady Tirate were paired with the
Lady Cavaliers of the Unrvers � �
Virginia.
ECU appeared to be going
through rhem rtk mswhen the Ladv
Cavaliers scored three unearned
runs to put ECU on the spot for the
first lime of the day.
In a coaching change that might
have marveled even the iate Yan-
kee skipper Billy Martin, Head
coach Sue Manahan sent Wilke to
the mound to relieve Parsons.
Manahan also pulled catcher Lisa
Corprew, moved Stephanie Hobon
from third base to catcher and in-
serted Lauren Farnngton at third
base, all with one out and a Ladv
Cavalier runner on first.
Under m,i confusion, the
"Girls of Summer" went to work
Chanel Hixiker tracked down a
Senior Lad,
round robin I
Mason, the U
nd out,
Tamrp Newi
the inning
EC
i - es the pi
��
enci
moui
three b
steam
In the top
aam pnduc
change
re-entered an
Farnngton. .
Corprew dr.
which went
During
Hargrove, Sm
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
Tonva Hargrove, a senior for-
ward on the Lady Tirate basketball
team, was named to theC AA's first
team All-Conference. As a fresh-
man, Hargrove was named to the
All-Rixkje team, and the pat two
seaon -
AU-Conterend
Tht
native was thi
of tht
Shk -
ing with In.
the second ui
led in reboun
Now A
Applii
For The
Judicii
These positions o
portunity to gain e
ership abilities tl
throughout your li'
these positions wi!
valuable contribui
lina University. Fo
tion and applicatii
office at 218 Mem
All applications
Monday,





EEL
IN
IROLINA
MINI
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!

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It nti.il
h enter
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makes that magic7 Why do
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stars can shed some light
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pare horoscopes forthe
�a of you: Is it in the stars,
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- This 15 plus page re-
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o accurate you may
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Heart Beat
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ATTLNTIQS
pre-phsicu
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bilsemester i behe : Tuesday,
- � March 25
�: - - Am Mk MHtng
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O. Sidnev L Kafir r Emory Uni-
verstv M a .ectun? � West Arrow
Mas Fran Ritual to Play. Thurv
lav March 19 1992. Jenkins fir
Arts Auditorium 7 p.m. Funded by a
I -mad States Department of Educ-
acn Tide VI Grant For more infor-
mation, contact the Center for Inter-
"attonai Programs at 757-4829.
Sports
Parsons
leads
team in
tourney
By Charles Mitchell
Senior Sports Writer
in Iheoperanggmteoflhe Lady
round robin tournament,
l nn Parsoni pitched five score-
innmgs, allowing only one hit.
short reltef,GeorgeannWiikeal-
nved just two hits as the Tirates
ni (ieocge Mason University
in the tournament's first game.
outstanding pitching pecfor-
� coupled with the, usually,
ressive and strong defense
ed to much for the Lady ratri-
Cheryi Hobson led the Pirate
: tingattu k with two hits and three
batted in. UnuraCrowderand
' Im hdleVVardalsocontnhutedtwo
I � apiece.
ft ll( v ing the win overGeorge
n, and a one hour break, the
adj Pirates were paired with the
ady( .naliers of the University of
ni.i
I C L appeared to be going
m uigh the mobons when the Lady
avaliers soond three unearned
ins to put Et L on the spot for the
first time of the day.
In a a Mching change that might
ave marveled even the late Yan-
kee skipper Billy Martin, Head
oach Sue Manahan sent Wilke to
the mound to relieve Parsons.
Manahan also pulled catcher Lisa
I orprew, moved Stephanie Hobson
from third base to catcher and in-
serted Lauren ramngton at third
base, all with one out and a Ladv
Cavalier runner on first
Under mass confusion, the
Girls of Summer" went to work
Chanel Hooker tracked down a
She lEaHt (Emrolintttn
March 17,1992
ODU trips Lady Pirates en
route to big NCAA dance
File photo by Dai I Raad � ECU photo Lab
Senior Lady Pirate pitcher Jenny Parsons helped ECU sweep its own
round robin tournament over Spring Break The team defeated George
Mason, the University of Virginia and UNC-Greensboro in the tourney
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
The Lady Pirate basketball team
had one thing left to accomplish to
finish one of the best seasons of
ECU women's basketball � cap-
ture the Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion Championship crown and go
on to the NCAA tournament.
ECU already claimed the 1992
regular season title, earned more
than 20 wins this season, defeated
every team in the conference and
had their head coach, Pat Tierson,
named the Coach of the Year.
It all came down to the Cham-
pionship game at the Old Domin-
ion Field House where ECU would
once again meet the Ladv Mon-
archs o( Old Dominion. The two
teams had split victories earlier in
the season, with ODU winning the
later 72�71 at ODU.
The Lady Pirates battled back
from a 20-point ODU lead to pull
within three points, only to lose to
the Lady Monarchs bv five, SO�75
and place second in the tournament.
"I'm proud of our comeback
against a really gixxi team said
Pierson. "They came out early and
established the lead and made it
hard for us to get into the game in
the first half
The biggest ECU lead was two
points, and that was earlv in the first
half.
ECU struggled in the early go-
ing, missing easy shots and missing
on free throw opportunities, usu-
ally a 75 percent free throw shoot-
ing team. They shot42 percent from
the field and 9-18 from the line. By
the end of the first half ECU found
themselves down by 12 points.
The Lady Monarchs continued
to build up their lead in the second
half and had a 20 point advantage
with 1439 to play in the game.
ECU made their runs,butaga in
they missed the easy shots and
missed free throws that kept them
from claiming the lead. Celeste Hill
stepped up her game to dominate
in the second half and score a game
high 24 points-16 in the second half.
"It's always easier to make free
throws when your ahead but when
you're behind it's a different story
Pierson said. "The missed free throw
opportunities really hurt us
Rhonda Smith led the Lady Pi-
rates with 19 points. Tonya
Hargrove had 1H points and dished
out six assists. Hargrove and Gaynor
CDonnell were named to the All-
Toumament team.
ODU's Pam Huntley was
named the tournament's MVP. She
scored 16 points against ECU and
had strong performances in the
team's rwoearlier tournament wins
over American and Richmond.
Teammate Hill, joined her on the
All-Tournament team.
In ECU's first round of play,
they defeated UNC-Wilmington 74-
61 for the third time this season.
CDonnell led wit 20 points, five
assists and five steals (6-10. 3-5, 3-
po inters).
Connie Small scored 19 points
and had three steals and Hargrove
added 16 points and eight rebounds.
In the it 'mi-final game, the Lady
Pirates earned a hard fought 63-54
win over the Lady Dukes of James
Madison. Last vear ECU eliminated
the top ranked Lady Dukes in the
semi's only to go on to the champi-
onshipgameand lose to Richmond.
See ODU page 8
deep fly ball in center field for the
second out, and second baseman
Tammv Newman scooped up a hot
grounder for the force at first to end
the inning.
ECU managed to push one run
across the plate, but two runners
were stranded on baseas the inning
ended. When Wilke returned to the
mound, she faced the minimum
three batters as UVa was losing
steam.
In the topofthefifth, the Pirates
again produced another massive
change. Offensively, LisaCorprew
re-entered and hatted in place of
Farnngton. With a runner on first,
(orprew drove a shot down third
which went for a triple.
During the batting change in
the fifth inning defensively some
changes were made as well. With
Corprew back at catcher, Stephanie
Hobson moved back to third base,
Parsons returned to the mound as
Wilke went to right field. Cherlv
Hobson then went to first base as
Chnsty Kee left the game.
The bottom of the sixth inning
for theCaval lers produced only one
hit, as two runners were left on
base In the last at bat for the Lady
Pirates, the top of the order was up
Senior shortstop Lau ra Crowder led
things off with a single up the
middle. As Michelle Ward dug in
for the pitch, Crowder stole second.
Ward then reached first on a field-
ers choice. Now with runners on
See Tourney, page 8
Pierson named CAA Coach of the Year
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
ECU Lady Pirate Head basket-
ball coach Tat Pierson was named
the Colonial Athletic Association's
1992 Coach of the Year. Pierson di-
rected this year's squad to a 21-8
overall record. The Lady Pirates
captured theregularseasonconfer-
ence title but lost in the champion-
ship game to claim second in the
CAA.
ECU led the conference in both
scoring (76.0ppg) and scoring mar-
gin (7.1) and was second in free
throw percentage (75 percent).
Pierson is in her fifth year with
the Ladv Pirates after joining the
ECU staff in 1986-87. In her first
season, the Lady Pirates finished at
15-13 and 7-5 in the conference.
Last year, the team finished at
12-17 and fifth in the CAA with a 6-
9 record and made it to the champi-
onship game, losing to Richmond
88-70.
Pierson, a 1977 graduate of
Northwestern State (La.) is 74-68
(518) in her five seasons with ECU.
Inner 13 year coaching career, she is
240-157 (.604).
Pat Pierson
Hargrove, Smith and Coley named to All-Conference teams
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
Ibnya Hargrove, a senior for-
ward on the Ladv Pirate basketball
team, was named to the C A As first
team All-Conference. As a fresh-
man, Hargrove was named to the
11-Rookie team, and the past two
season she has been selected to the
All-Conference team.
The5-foot 8-inch Raleigh, N.C
native was the 1990-91 CAA Player
of the Year.
She led the Lady Pirates in scor-
ing with 16.2 points per game, for
the second season in a row. She also
led in rebounding, 9J per game
and field goal percentage, 54 per-
cent.
Hargrove is onlv the fourth
Ladv Pirate ever to score over 1,500
points She stands in fourth place in
the record books for career scoring.
She also ranks fourth in career re-
bounding, third in blocked shots
and third in steals.
Junior center, Rhonda Smith
was named to the CAA's second
team All-Conference The Polkton,
NC, native was a junior transfer
from Louasburg junior College.
Smith was the second leading
scorer on the team with 15.1 ppg
and 7.4 rpg. She scored a career high
26 points against North Carolina
A&T, and grabbed a career high 12
rebounds at UNC-Asheville.
Smith scored in double figures
in al! but three games this season
and had six "double-double" per-
formances (pointrebounds).
She shot over 74 percent from
the foul line and scored 438 points
in her first season with the Ladv
Pirates.
Junior guard Toina Coley was
named to the All-Defense and All-
Academic team's.
Coley led the team in steals
with 91 (3.1 spg), she was second in
the conference. She ranks in fourth
place in the ECU record books for
career steals with over 160.
Now Accepting
Applications
For The 1992-1993
Judicial Boards
These positions offer an excellent op-
portunity to gain experience and lead-
ership abilities that will benefit you
throughout your life. At the same time,
these positions will enable you to make
valuable contributions to East Caro-
lina University. For additional informa-
tion and applications contact the SGA
office at 218 Mendenhall.
All applications must be turned in by
Monday, March 30th.
New Age Movement
and
The New World Order:
Your Best Friend or Worst Enemy?
A Slide Presentation
Mendenhall March 17,18 7:30pm
Room 247 (Refreshments)
Apostolic Campus Ministry
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you're earn-
ing a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, FO Box 3219, Warminster,
PA 18974-9845. Or call toll free: 1-800-USA-ARMY, ext. 438.
AWW NURSE CORPS. B ALLYO0 CAN BE





8 uJije �aat (Earolinian
March 17, 1992
Tourney
Continued from page 7
second and first, C. Hobson ad-
vanced the runners with a deep fly
ball With one out Wilke then
doubled to left center field to score
Kith Crowder and Ward. Then the
flixxl gates seemed to open, as the
Tirates continued pounding the ball
and scored two runs before the in-
ning was over. With the score now
r0 in favor of the Lady Pirates,
Parsons tixk to the mound and
quick.lv dispensed of thedetermined
Virginia squad.
"Now that s how vou manu-
facture runs when vou need them
ODU
in vour last at-bat" a volunteer as-
sistant coach said. "The ladies
staved fixrused and did what had to
be done
The Lady Pirates bats came
alive in Sunday's game against
UNC-Greensboro, bombing Winn
Hazlegrove for 17 hits and eight
runs. Laura "Lou" Crowder led the
onslaught with two singles, a
double and three RBl's. Michelle
Ward assisted with her four-for-
four performance at the plate.
Tammv Newman, Cherly
Hobon and Lisa Corprew each had
Continued from page 7
ToinaColeyand Hargroveeach
had 1" points. Colev's 17 points w
her career high. Smith added 12
points and nine rebounds.
ECU finished the 1W1-92 sea-
son with an overall record of 21-8
and 12-2 in the CAA. The 21 wins
were the most victories since the
185-86 season when ECU won the
conference.
otto laBt Carolinian
If you are planning a career in
advertising get a head start by
joining our advertising staff.
Applications now being accepted
for Advertising Sales
Representatives. Apply at our office,
second floor publications building.
two hits and one RBI. Jenny Par-
sons, the game winning pi tcher, had
three hits in four trips to the plate.
Parsons allowed just three hits
and two runs as the defense proved
too much for the UNC-Greensboro
squad. The Lady Pirates perfor-
mance was well received by the
large crowd of Pirate fans and sup-
porters.
Before the game, senior avcap-
tain Laura "Lou" Crowder had just
a handful of hits in numerous at
bats. But when the smoke cleared,
"Lou" had four of the 10 Pirate hits
as the offense scored seven runs to
completed the round robin tourna-
ment undefeated with a 7-2 victory
over George Mason University.
Crowder a senior Business-Finance
Major from Colonial Heights, Va
finished the evening with four hits,
one RBI, four runs scored and three
stolen bases. Followed by Cheryl
Hobson with her two-for-three per-
formance with four RBI's.
Jenny Parsons went the dis-
tance, allowing just six hits and two
runs, while the defense - as usual -
played exceptionally well.
TODAY!
St. Paddys Day
HOE. 4th St752-5855
The Acoustic Bus
$1.00 Green Draft $1.25 Highballs
$1.00 Killian Draft $1.00 Greenballs
and other green stuff
DECK OPEN ON TUESDAY
Fri. Sat
Mike Lightnin Wells
Old Habits
Greenville's New Natural Foods Source
NOW OPEN
Natural and Organic Grocenes " ORGANIC PRODUCE "
Bulk Foods Herbs and Spices Vitamins
Supplements - Natural Remedies
Cruelty-Free Health and Beauty Aids
ft j�
BLUE PLANET LtfeFoods)
40S EVANS ST MALL
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Hours 9 6. M-Sat
ST. PATRIGK'S DAY
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Tuesday, March 17th � 6:00-9:00 p.m.
with Applebee's & WDLX
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"Shoot" On Over For
MARCH MADNESS
And Enjoy The
Game Along With
These Drink
Specials
� Mon - 95? Draft
� Tues - Sangria $1.25
� Wed - Imports $1.25
Thurs - Margaritas $2.50
$
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Draft Beer and House Wine
All Day
$
1.93
Catch the Spring Break round-up of the ECU baseball,
Softball and tennis teams in Thursday's edition of
The East Carolinian
Jmpikii
ST. PATRICK'S NIGHT JAM
FOUNTAIN of YOUTH
and surprise opening band!
$2
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Pitchers!
at the door!
TONIGHT!
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j





Title
The East Carolinian, March 17, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 17, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.865
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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