The East Carolinian, March 3, 1992






The End
An end to racism lies with the youth of our world.
4
The luck of the Pirates 9
Purple and Gold pull off last second miracle against Tech.
mitmwifmimsmHsefmtlwaiitttmmfiftttisi'fi
(Bht i�nzt (Earaltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.66No.14
Tuesday, March 3. 1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
10 Pages
School president shot
he president of a apanese universih
was shottodeath in hi- Boston hotel rxxwi the
night before he was to sign a sister-school
agreement with the president of the Univer-
sity of Massachusetts
lawo Matsuda's wife told police that a
masked man tried hi force his wa into the
room ,nA then shot Matsuda once in tht
lower bat k
Police have made no arrests and s.jid
nothing was missing from the president s
room rhe sistei school agreement included
student .mil facultv exchanges ,nd possible
joint resean h projec ts
K hope i- th.it .it some point in the
future we vt ill beabletomoA e forward on this
relationship " I M '� hancellorSherr) Penney
told th�- Boston Globe
Students Jell-O wrestle
Ihel m ersiu of North amlina-Rosto
I i hange Program hopesa night of nestling
in lime-green It'll, w ill raise enough monev
to send 12 University students and twofac-
ult members to Rostov-on IVnml,n
Contestants include members Lf the( let
I tangars Student Em ironmental A tion( oa
lition, Camlina Fever .inJ the fencing and
football teams among others.
I want it to raisea lot of money, hut I
think it will he a lot of fun and u ill bring the
studentcommunit) together said! veFurst,
whoorganizedtheeventwimAshJev Perkins.
U.C. Berkeley arrests 68
A 22 percent fee hike at the L nh ersit of
I alifornta at Berkeley brought on a day-long
rally th.it ended with the arrest of 68 students
on trespassing charges
( ampus police in riot gear initially
Nocked the entrance to the Moffitt Library,
but e entuali) 2 students were allowed to
enter rhreehurnlred more students remained
outside in support.
'eVe optimistic that if we can get all the
campuses to take action am) get the students
mobilized, we stand a real good chance ot
getting Mime change said fun i eung, a
student senator at Berkeley rhat's our main
goal right now
1 ie students aIso from berkelev, held a
five-da) hunger strike to protest the fee in-
i rease.
School forces paybacks
An estimated 95,000 college students at
172 Illinois colfegesand universities are being
forced to repay part of the financial aid thev
received from the Illinois student Assistance
Commission. All of the students are hemg
asked to pay 12 percent of the aid thev re-
L t'l tl.
went) pen entofthe undergraduate stu-
dent body at Northern Illinois University ill
receive bills asking for the 12 percent pay-
ment. In addition, 6)00 University of Illinois
studenb will oweatotaJ of about $92500 this
semester.
'Tarenb are upset about this, but we had
no choice said Bob Clement, director of
public information for the commission.
Athlete charged with rape
A University of North Carolina soccer
player was rev ently arrested and charged with
seiond-degree rape
Thomas Patrick lonV'O'C onner,21,co-
captamof the team firrvNmears, was arrested
after a woman told police she had been as-
saulted by OX onner He hasalreadvhadhis
first court appearance and isnowawareofall
the charges against him.
Second-degree rapt1 does not involve the
use of a weapon, serious personal injury or
more than one offender. It carries a maximum
sentence of 10 vears.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
InsideTuesday
(rime Scene 2
Klitonal 4
Classifieds6
I ntertainment 7
Spurts9
Student Union sticks with art
By Jeff Becker
SUff Writer
In a 4-3 division, the Stu-
dent L mon Board of Directors
allowed tWO Student Union
members to keep the prize
money awarded to them tor their
winning entries m the union's
annual lllumina Art C ompeti-
uon.
c ontroversj surrounded
last week 'sexhibibon after Kerr
Smith, a member of the union's
Visual Arts t ommittee, won
$175 for his first-place painting
titled "Clay Woman and
Patrick Daugherty, president of
the Student Union.collected $150
for his second-place painting
While waiting for a Change of
light in Chapel Hill
Although no written policy
exists banning union members
trom entering the competition,
questions surfaced concerning
the exhibition's integrity.
Rudy Alexander, director of
university unions, questioned
tlie idea of awarding money to
union members wht participate
in union-sponsored competi-
tions. At a Feb. 27 meeting, he
brought the issue to the hoard's
attention.
"Since I find this very ir-
regular, 1'mnot prepared to sign
requisitions for these cash prizes
tobeawarded unless thistx hrd
determines that this should be
done Alexander said.
Daugherty and Alexander
discussed the issue of allowing
union members to enter the com-
petition at a meeting on I eh 16.
At the mtvting, Alexander said
he told Daugherty he could not
restrict members from entering
the competition but made his
positii n c lear that having mem-
bers compete would he an un-
ethical dec ision
Daugherty said Alexander
told him members of the union
had not partk ipated in the m
petition in the past, and the dei i
sion toalli w union members to
enter rested with the Visual Art-
( ommittee Daughertv said U
took Alexander's comments to
mean the dec isionwassubjet t to
change
I taugherty said he took the
issue to V alerie Balogh hair of
the Visual Arts Committee.
Balogh said she discussed the
issue with I auhert and agreed
that union members should be
eligible to participate. She also
said the Visual Artsommittee
as ,i whole never voted on the
issue
According to Daughertv,
Alexander said members of the
Visual Artsommittee could
compete as long as thev did not
ha e am (i mtai t with the judge
during the selection process
' Whenl lonFurst, this year's
See lllumina page 2
Habitat members
camp out for homeless
By Angela DeRosia
'�pnnir News Writer
The II chapterotMahit.it for Hu-
manity "sha ked out" in order to bring
attention to I lomeless Awareness Week
Six IC L students camped out on
the ttuiII in small cardboard sha k- i eb
25 and 26. Mark Gryder, Heidi Cottev.
David Blizzard, Nano Adams Donna
Rev is and Ashie)
I tinkle are members
of the EC L Habitat
for 1 iumanity.
liCL coordi-
nated thee ent with
chapters at L
Chapel Hill, Duke
N.C State and Wake
Forest universities
In a modern
day society where we
haveenough technol-
ogy to put a man on
"It just shows
there are people
in the world
who don't mind
helping people
in need'
Linda and Millard 1 uller in 1976 Habitat
tor Humanity builds housing tor people
whootherw isewould not iiae a place to
live I ach house is built by needy and
affluent people working together.
All the work is done bv volunteers
and funded K tax-deductible donations
1 louses are sold to partner families with
no interest mortgages issued over a 2iL
ear pen. �i
Money paid on
these hi mes g es into a
fund used to begin the
construction oi other
homes. (ne family has
already been selected
tor a home in the
Greenville area and the
organization hopes to
build two more this
year
'Itjustshows there
.ire people in the world
uho don't mind help-
the moon, why can't we provide simple, mg people w hi i need help, " i hester said
decent housing tor all people in our na- Approximate!) 250applicationshave
tton Gryder said. "Some students walk been put in for Habitat tor Humanity
bv ,ux turn up their noses, hut the) need housing
Pholo by Jill Ch�rry � ECU Photo Lab
Several ECU student members of Habitat for Humanity camped out on the mall
Feb 25 and 26 in order to bring attention to Homeless Awareness Week
to think about tins"
Gryder said that Habitat for Hu-
manity provides what the government
has failed m. building affordable hous-
ing for homeless people.
Ihe organization was founded bv
Fhe E( I chapter works in associa-
tion with the Ireem ille PittCounrychap-
ter.
Students w ishing to become involved
with the- 1 c I chapter can contact Mark
Gryder at 757-3356.
SGA members
share new ideas
By Julie Roscoe
Assistjnt tws Editor
IhreeSGA members re-
cently returned from an edu-
cational ,nd international
leadership conference and
shared some of what thev
learned with SGA Monday
night.
Sherry Smith, chair of the
screenings and appointments
committee traveled to Texas
for the 12th annual Confer-
ence on Student Government
Associations (COSGA).
The other schools im-
pressed me with their spirit
and pride the students have
for their school and their
SGA Smith said. "There is a
lot of apathv here in SGA and
1 want to change that
Courtney Jones, speaker
of the house, and Katie
Carstens also attended the
conferenceand returned with
excitement and suggestions
for improvement at ECU.
" I ant to hold cookouts,
leadership retreats to get
away fromGreem ille,andto
get to know each other bet-
ter Jones said. "We have a
gixxl thing goingbut we want
to improve
Carstens gave a sugges-
tion for a required general
cc)lege multicultural history
class "to learn about the dif-
ferent cultures we have here
at ECU
The COSGA convention
took on an international per-
spective with representatives
from 72 schools from the
United States, England,
Canada, Greece, lapan and
Russia.
Brynn Thomas will chair
a new committee which will
write guidelines for the pro-
cess of appropnations and
constitutions and print them
in the SG A EXx u ments Hand -
bcxik.
"So all the organizations
on campus will understand
the process they must go
through to get SGA ap-
pnnal Jones said.
A new organization, the
Inter-Academic Consortium,
had itsconstitutionapproved
Monday in SGA. The organi-
zation wll provide a unified
voice for all academic gmups
with SGA, the university ad-
ministration and the public,
said Bill Carroll, the found-
ing chairperson.
Goals of the gr up are to
co-sponsor events and to
learn the process of dealing
with SGA. Manygnmps have
between NMO members, but
this group will represent 400-
3tXI students
Prof essor describes new perspective
By Reid Parker
Staff Write!
Professor Robert L. Harris,
Ir. spoke on the topic" J r m the
Melting Pot to Multi-
culturalismThe new perspec-
tive, described bv Harris, is the
multicultural theory that seeks
to describe the American past
with new approaches.
The speech was held in the
Mendenhatl Student Center
Great Room at 7:30 p m. on
Wednesday, Feb. 2t.
Harris lecture was part of
the "African-American Aware
ness: The Roots of Distinction"
series sponsored bv the Stu-
dent UntonMinority Arts Com-
mittee as part of Black History
Month
Harris shaped his lecture
by first defining the melting
pot theory, giving historical
background on it, and then
charting its history to the emer-
gent multicultural thesis and
its position in c urrent thought.
Harris s.ud multi-
culturalism, or cultural plural-
ism, has been described as a
symphony where each instru-
ment provides a different
sound. With the addition of
more instruments a more com-
plex sound is produced, each
adding harmony and disso-
nance to create music
Harris holds a Rockefeller
Foundation Humanities Fel-
See Professor page 3
Dribbling Down the Pike
Pholo by Jill Ch�rry � ECU Pholo Lab
Members of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity team up with Chancellor Eakin, Assistant Athletic
Director Lee Workman, and Stephanie Roberson to kick off the First Walk to Wilmington The
walk raised funds for Ronald McDonald Heise of Greenville





�Ilic ictiat (Carolinian
March 3, 1992
SENE
lllumina
Professor
Continued from page 1
Student given verbal warning for
backing down a one-way street
Feb. 24
J v Mendenhall bus stop Subje t being harassed
1018 AycockHallhecked out reference to larceny report.
1340 (enkins rtBuilding Reference to damage to state prop-
ert and larceny report
1548 Fleming Hall C hecked out reference to larcenj report
Ft�b. 2S
0728 Speighf building: Report of suspicious person. Subject
identified and released
0741 Rotan, and Johnston streets Damage t� real property
reported No report taken at this time
0809 Fourth and Rotan streets follow-up investigation.
0857ollege IHU I rh e ehk le stopped tor failure to bum
headlights erbal vs aming v;i en
1922 v oliege Hill Drive commuter k�t: Vehicle stopped tor
speeding erbal warning gi en to student.
1015 Speight building Checked out fire alarm Activated by
staff
1052 Christenbun Memorial Gym Reference to larcenj re-
port
111" Sports Medicine building Reference to larcem report.
124 Garrett and Fletchei Halls Vehicle stopped for backing
down a one wa street Student given .i verbal warning
1544ollege Hill Drive Vehicle stopped tor a left-turn vtola-
tion and failure to weai seal belt
i; Howard House Vehicle stopped and student warned
about being on towing list
2010 Student Store ! hecked out fire alarm Samereset
2036 lonesHall hecked out fire alarm Sameresel
001 fcvcockl Ull ehk le -t, �pped for sti �p sign iolation and
dri ing with revoked li ense st.it and campus itations gi en
0200 Mendenhall Student C enter Ch� ki1 the area in refer-
ent e to a kmd noise Phe area se ure.
0422 Fletcher Hall Investigated area in reference to female
screaming for help I ho area and building were checked Same
unfounded
Feb. 26
2158 Umstead Hall Reference to water overflow Same un-
founded
120 Garrett 1 lall Intoxicated femalerHrthwestofhall.Subject
tumod over to friends
0132 ones Hall Vehicle stopped for one-wa) street violation.
Non-studenf given erbal warning
0201 Garrett Hall Responded bo request from hall staff for
assistance with .in into ak Male student issued campus
citations tor simple assault damage to real property and public
intoxication.
Crim Scene i� taken from official public Satety Log�
juror, arrived, (Smith) was not in
uVbuilding Daugherty said. "We
tiHk every stop we amid to make
the selection process �is legitimate
as possible. We separated the pieces
of the various artists who entered
their work. The name tags identify-
ing the artists were face down on
the back of the work, and the piece
of mine that won did not have a
name tag on it
Bakogh invited Furst, a profes-
sor at the University of NorthCaro-
lin.i at Wilmington, to judge the
competition. Both Balogh and
Haughertv met Furst when thev
lived in Wilmington
In a letter dated Feb. 26, Furst
assured Alexander the competition
was judged without bias.
"Apparently the suggestion
had emerged because Mr
Daugherty once lived in
Wilmington, where 1 also live, his
work was unfairly selected tor an
award he wrote rhis is nonsense
and an insulting suggestion about
my integrit) as well. When I last
saw him a couple of years ago, he
was leaving town to pursue a de-
gree in illustration. Theonlv works
ot his with which I was and have
been familiar with wore small
ink portraits th.it appeared in our
focal newspaper. 1 did not recog-
raze the large paintings in your show
bv the same hand
At the Feb. 27 meeting the
board of directors listened to
Alexander, Smith and I taughert)
debate for 45 minutes Board mem
bers then cleared the ro m to con-
duct a closed-door vote on the is
sue. Atter 1 minutes, Kelle
Lawrence, chair of Ihe board ame
out of the room and announced the
decision.
"Ihe board voted 1 ' to allow
you to keep the rw me, but there is
very strong feeling mat you should
decline on grounds of ethical rea-
sons Lawrence said We are not
going todenv you the ash because
it already happened, hut it would
be ltxked upon mm h more favor-
ably if vou were to dec line the wish
awards
Daugherti, said he would keep
the money.
"If I didn't tool stronglv aboutit
in the first place, I wouldn't have
went in there anil made m i ase
he said. "The reason I was making
my case was bee auseof th� t.n t that
the exhibition v,b on the up and-
up. lodo what you are suggesting
would behvpo ritual on m part
Daughertv said he v ill make a
statement to the other contestants
explaining w hv he decided to kei
the monev and announce a policy
change to a oid similar pmblems
We're
Looking Forward
To Your Visit
To
North Myrtle Beach
During Spring Break
And Easter
Second Avenue & Hillside Drive
North Myrtle Beach. S.C. 29597
(803) 249-2404
georges hair designs
Full Serv el nisex Sal�n
fanning
Skin and Nail Care
Walk his Welcome
THE PLAZA MALL
Sreenv e 3 va
Open Mon - Sa 9 3Qc -9c
Sundav ' pm - 6c
Tel: 756-6200
� r I �
STANTON SQUARE
r er - )0ar
i �-v . H i
Tel: 757-0076
$2.00 Off All Hair cuts $5.00 Off Tanning Package
EXP 3-31 -92 I EXP 3-31 -92
Student Government Association
Elections
for
Executive Officers:
Positions Available:
� Student Body President
� Student Body Vice-President
� Student Body Secretary
� Student Body Treasurer
Requirements:
� Full-time student
� Overall 2.0 GPA
� 48 semester hours
� Enrollment in 2 previous semesters
at ECU
� Must be in good standing
CUBA 6 0 0 D I N 6 J R - 1 AH ES MARSHALL
Filing Date: Feb. 25 - March 3. Applica-
tions must be in SGA office by 5 PM,
March 3. Applications can be picked up
in SGA office from 8-5 in Mendenhall.
MANDATORY CANDIDATES MEETING MARCH 17 AT 4 PM
A HU! S( RHNINC, OF K MAIOR MOTION PICTl RI FROM OI L MBU Pic H Rts
date: Tuesday, March 3
timi 8:00pm
location Hendrix Theater
Plcil-l- rr,i, I nrlu St WfHM l ill Hf I imttfj
Sponsored by the ECU "Student Union Films Committee
I ind is ai
rt
� gj
� � �.

k
� It

� , n
. � -
Rol
Episcopal Stud
St. Paul's I pi
41)1 I
I across 5th St. in front of Ian
ion r
LENTEN !�
March 4: M1
7 30 am
S mdays:
VVednesda s
! H
Campus M
OFF
PEACH
BV
r
MARCi
ECU





�Ihc �aat(Carolinian
March 3, 1992
Sene
lllumina
Continued from paqe 1
Student given verbal warning for
backing down a one-way street

lob 25
� -
SO
- � �
� ��� . � .
n subtt
��
n etiCiUion
ii him
juni arrived (Smith) was n.t in h the same hand
lhebuildingDaughertysaidWe -t the Fel -��.���.
hnk every step we could to make board ol d
the selection process as legitimate lexandei
as possible. We separated the pieces debate for 45 mil
of the various artists who entered bers then cleared
their work he name tags identify- duct a closed
ing the artists were face down on sue tt.t l-� i
the back of the work, and the piece Lawrence
if mine that won did not have a outoftJ i
name lag on it ' de ision
Balogh invited Furst, a profes The board
sor at trie University of North Caro you toI �
iin.i .it Wilmington, to judge the ven, sti . '
competition Both Balogh and decliin i r
Daugherh met Furst when they sons, Lawrei �
lived in Wilmington going to deny
In a letter dated Feb 26 Furst it already hap
Assured Alexander the competition W looked upon mut h
was judged without bias ably if you were 1
pparenth the suggestion awards
had emerged because Mr Daughert
Daughert once lived in themoney
Wilmington where 1 also live his "Ifldidn'ttei
work was unfairly sele ted for an in the first pla �
award he wrote rhis is nonsense went in then
and an insulting suggestion about he said !�� ��
my � tegi h as well W hen I last m
�n him ,) i ouple of vears ago he
was leav ing town to pursue a de
.���' in illustrate m Iheinly works
of his ith which 1 was and have
he liar s ith were -ni.til
- it appeared in our
new pa pel I did not n
. �� . irgepaintii invoui �
1
the exhibit


. � � �
� �; � ' �
We're
Looking Forward
To Your Visit
To
North Myrtle Beach
During Spring Break
And Easter
Second Avenue & Hillside Drive
Norm Myrtle Beach. S.C 29597
(803) 249-2404
georges hair designs
Crime Scene is t.iken from official public Safet Logs
Student Government Association
Elections
for
Executive Officers:
Positions Available:
� Student Body President
� Student Body Vice-President
� Student Body Secretary
� Student Body Treasurer
Requirements:
� Full-time student
� Overall 2.0 GPA
� 48 semester hours
� Enrollment in 2 previous semesters
at ECU
� Must be in good standing
CUBA G 0 0 D I N G J R � JAMES MARSHALL
Filing Date: Feb. 25 - March 3. Applica-
tions must be in SGA office by 5 PM,
March 3. Applications can be picked up
in SGA office from 8-5 in Mendenhall.
Columbia
Pictures
V I KM SCREENING 01 MAOR MOTION PK 11 Kl I ROM l Oil V
dati Tuesday, March 3
riMi 8:00pm
lcm no Hendrix Theater
Pleau rrtii I arty Sttittne Will B, limited
MANDATORY CANDIDATES MEETING MARCH 17AT 4 PM
Professor
Sponsored by the ECU'Student Union Films Committee
Episcopal Stii(
St. Paul's I pi
LKNTI
Mun s
OFF
PEACH
$(3&
r
sn2
MAR&
ECU





2
e he liiiiit (�arulintmi
Mai
1992
lllumina
Professor
Continued from p i
Student given verbal warning for
backine down a one-wa street
i 11 �i (Nmthi w ,i- not in
d , �.� I � Hlh. tt 11. t �
tiH�k even '� , ���' ihiki to m.ikr
, i tion pnves d Iritmi.iti'
r the Siinv
M tl � �
� � � � :
.possible We ; arati dthepieo del ati I
� �� � hi .ir 11 -1 v ho entered
tru-u work he rum t.t � ulentih

.in. t .i .
I
n it
I, a prot
�r at the Li ei ' ' ' -
� it Wiln
mp
� � � � met in
� m W iln . '
i lettei latevl Kel
� Alexander the on pel I
�.���� .vithout i �
� .��,��� � � nisi Mi

We're
Looking Forward
To Your Visit
To
North Myrtle Beach
During Spring Break
And Easter
Secon
North Myrtie Be i
z
S t
.
ment Association
Elections
for
Executive Officers:
Positions Available:
� Student Body President
� Student Body Vice-President
� Student Body Secretary
� Student Body Treasurer
Requirements:
� Full time student
� Overall 2.0 GPA
� 48 semester hours
� Enrollment in 2 previous semesters
at ECU
� Must be in good standing
Filing Dale: Feb. 25 - March 3. Applica-
tions must be in SGA office by 5 PM,
March 3. Applications can he picked up
in SGA office from S-5 in Mendenhall.
MANDATORY CANDIDATES MEETING MARCH 17 VI 4 l�M
gearges hair designs
LAZA
"56-6200
$2.00 Off All Hair cuts 1 $5.00 Off Tanning Package
EXP 3-31-92 I EXP 3-31-92
CUBA G 0 0 D I N G J R JAMES MARSHALL
PEAC

V
Columbia
Picture
i)ii Tuesday, March 3
nmi 8:00pm
i vriov Hendrix Theater
Sponsored by the ECUStudenl Union Films Comniitree
V
MARd
ECU





2
(Hire tEaat (Carolinian
March 3, 1992
lllumina
Professor
Student given verbal warning for
backing down a one-way street
Feb. 24
1936�Mendenhall bus stop. Subject being harassed.
1018�Aycock Hall: Checked out reference to larceny report.
1340�Jenkins Art Building: Reference to damage to state prop-
erty and larceny report.
154gFlemmg Hall: Checked out reference to larceny report.
Feb. 25
0728�Speight building. Report of suspicious person. Subject
identified and released.
0741�Rotarv and Johnston streets: Damage to real property
reported. No report taken at this time.
0809�Fourth and Rotary streets: follow-up investigation.
0857�College Hill Drive: Vehicle stopped for failure to burn
headlights. Verbal warning given.
0922�College Hill Drive commuter lot: Vehicle stopped for
speeding. Verbal warning given to student.
1015�Speight building: Checked out fire alarm. Activated by
staff.
1052�Chnstenburv Memorial Gym: Reference to larceny re-
port.
1117�Sports Medicine building. Reference to larceny report.
124�Carrett and Fletcher Halls: Vehicle Stopped for backing
down a one way street. Student given a verbal warning.
1544�College Hill Drive: Vehicle -topped for a left-turn viola-
tion and failure to wear seat belt.
1817�Howard House Vehicle stopped and student warned
about being on towing list.
2010�Student Store: Checked out fire alarm. Same reset.
2036�Jones Hall: Checked out fire alarm. Same reset.
0013�Aycock Hail: Vehicle stopped for stop-sign violation and
driving with revoked license. State and campus citations given.
0200� Mendenhall Student Center: Checked the area in refer-
ence to a loud noise. The area secure.
0422�Hetcher Hall: Investigated area in reference to female
screaming for help. The area and building were checked. Same
unfounded.
Feb. 26
2158� Umstead Hall: Reference to water overflow. Same un-
founded.
0120�Garrett Hall: Intoxicated femalenorthwestof hall. Subect
turned over to friends.
0132�Jones Hall: Vehicle stopped for one-way-street violation.
Non-student given verbal warning.
0201�Garrett Hall: Responded to request from hall staff for
assistance with an intoxicated male. Male student issued campus
citations for simple assault, damage to real property and public
intoxication.
Crime Scene it taken from official public Safety Logs
juror, arrived, (Smith) was not in
thebuilding Daugherty said. "We
took every step we could to make
the selection process as legitimate
as possible. Weseparatedthepieces
of the various artists who entered
their work. The name tags identify-
ing the artists were face down on
the back of the work, and the piece
of mine that won did not have a
name tag on it
Balogh invited Furst, a profes-
sor at the University of North Caro-
lina at Wilmington, to judge the
competition. Both Balogh and
Daugherty met Furst when they
lived in Wilmington.
In a letter dated Feb. 26, Furst
assured Alexander the competition
was judged without bias.
"Apparently the suggestion
had emerged because Mr.
Daugherty once lived in
Wilmington, where I also live, his
work was unfairly selected for an
awa rd he wrote. "This i s nonsense
and an insulting suggestion about
my integrity as well. When I last
saw him a couple of years ago, he
was leaving town to pursue a de-
gree in illustration. The only works
of his with which I was � and have
been � familiar with were small
ink portraits that appeared in our
Icxal newspaper. I did not recog-
nizethelarge paintings in your show
Continued from page 1
by the same hand
At the Feb. 27 meeting, the
board of directors listened to
Alexander, Smith and Daugherty
debate for 45 minutes. Board mem-
bers then cleared the nxim to con-
duct a closed-door vote on the is-
sue. After 15 minutes, Kelle
Lawrence, chair of the board, came
out of the mom and announced the
decision.
"The board voted 4-3 to allow
you to keep the monev, but there is
very strong feeling that you should
decline on grounds of ethical rea-
sons Lawrence said. "We are not
going to deny you the cash because
it already happened, but it would
be looked upon much more favor-
ably if you were to decline the cash
awards
Daugherty said he would keep
the money.
"If I didn't feel strongly about it
in the first place, I wouldn't have
went in there and made my case
he said. "The reason I was making
mycasewas because erf the fact that
the exhibition was on the up-and-
up. To do what you are suggesting
would be hypocritical on mv part
Daughertv said he will make a
statement to the other contestants
explaining why he decided to keep
the monev and announce a policy
change to avoid similar problems.
tfZr
We're
Looking Forward
To Your Visit
To
North Myrtle Beach
During Spring Break
And Easter
Second Avenue & Hillside Drive
North Myrtle Beach, S.C. 29597
(803) 249-2404
luvsship and is an historian and
fellow at the State University of
;Nev York at Buffalo
He recei vet! hi s doctorate from
.Northwestern University in 1974
v, ith a dissertation on the "The
-Free Black Response to American
;Ransm, 1790-1863
According to Harri the melt-
jng pot theorv is an outmoded
idea that is perpetuated bv the
establishment through people like
ex-president Ronald Reagan.
The melting pot theorv sprang
Ifrom the popular idea i f America
5-eing the land of limitless oppor-
tunity.
The melting pot theorv be-
came a popular symbol of assimi-
lation in the early 1900s. Ameri-
can Exceptionalisn was the idea
4hat the United States could form
�a new nation through the melding
of manv cultures, in contrast to
Ithe rigid cultural stratification of
�Europe's history, Harris said.
As quoted bv Harris, poets
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Robert H
like Ralph Waldo
new nation that
new state, literatui
forth. However
out that the melti
systematically ex
color, including A
and Latinos
He cite
decisionwhii
Episcopal Stu
St. Paul's Epi
401 E
(across 5th St. in front of Garret!
You Art
LENTEN S
March 4: ASH
HOLY EUCHARIS1 &
7:30 am 11
Supper for college students and progn
Student Government Association
Elections
CUBA GOODING R - JAHES MARSHALL
Sundays:
Wednesdays:
7:30 am � 9:0'
5:30 pm - Hoi) I
6:30 pm - Student
7:00 pm - Lenten
Campus Minister. Mai
Executive Officers:
Positions Available:
� Student Body President
� Student Body Vice-President
� Student Body Secretary
� Student Body Treasurer
Requirements:
� Full-time student
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� 48 semester hours
� Enrollment in 2 previous semesters
at ECU
� Must be in good standing
Filing Date: Feb. 25 - March 3. Applica-
tions must be in SGA office by 5 PM,
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in SGA office from 8-5 in Mendenhall.
PEACH
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A FREE SCREENING OF A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE FROM COLUMBIA PICTURES
date: Tuesday, March 3
time: 8:00pm
location: Hendrix Theater
Please Arrive Early. Seating Will Be Limited.
Sponsored by the ECUStudent Union Films Committee
HARd
ECU





March 3, 1992 She JEaat (Earolfnfan 3
We're
ing Forward
Your Visit
To
Myrtle Beach
Spring Break
,nd Easter
venue & Hillside Drive
Ttle Beach S C 29597
303) 249-2404
ir designs
� ; s lists
tody Wax
ciu( IS
STANTON SQUARE
; Rood
Sol f9arr - 6o
Tel 757-0076
J5.00 Off Tanning Package
EXP3-31-92
AMES MARSHALL
A



I
� '
Riley. Nobody.
iS P DAWN S�L TONY TERRY GERARD'
JCTVRf fROM(OHMBI-PI( IlRfs
iter
Vif fir I iiiiiW
:nt Union Films Committee
Professor
Continued from page 1
lowship and is an historian and
fellow at the State University of
New York at Buffalo.
He received his doctorate from
ISiorthwestem University in 1974
-with a dissertation on the "The
free Black Response to American
Racism, 1790-1863
According to Harris, the melt-
jng pot theory is an outmoded
-idea that is perpetuated by the
establishment through people like
ex-president Ronald Reagan.
The melting pot theory sprang
Ifrom the popular idea of America
3eing the land of limitless oppor-
tunity.
The melting pot theory be-
came a popular symbol of assimi-
lation in the early 19(X)s. "Ameri-
can Exceptionalism" was the idea
-that the United States could form
a new nation through the melding
"of many cultures, in contrast to
Uhe rigid cultural stratification of
Europe's history, Harris said.
As quoted by Harris, poets
Robert Harris
like Ralph Waldo Emerson saw a
new nation that would create a
new state, literature, ethics and so
forth. However, Harris pointed
out that the melting pot theory
systematically excluded people of
color, including Africans, Asians
and Latinos.
He cited a Supreme Court
decision which outlined thecourt's
belief that only white Europeans
could successfully meld into
American society.
The rediscovery of ethnicity
gained ground in the 1970s. More
dissertations on that topic were
written during mis period than all
other periods combined, accord-
ing to Harris.
The new awareness sprung
from previous civil rights move-
ments, chiefly those that erupted
during the 1960s, including anti-
war movement of the U.S. inter-
vention in Vietnam, thecivil rights
movement and the ghetto riots in
the nation's cities, said Harris.
All of these actions brought
awareness to the prevailing inter-
pretation of history and then chal-
lenged the accepted notions of it,
said Harris.
Multiculturalism emerged as
the dominate theory with the pub-
lication of the book Beyond the
Melting Pot in 1963, Harris said.
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Suits by: Ritchie � Pam Dulca � Bendigo
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Episcopal Student Fellowship
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
401 E. 4th St.
(across 5th St. in front of Garrett Hall; walk down Holly St. to 4th St.)
You Are There!
LENTEN SCHEDULE
March 4: ASH WEDNESDAY
HOLY EUCHARIST & IMPOSITION OF ASHES
7:30 am 10 am 5:30 pm
Supper for college students and program follow 5:30 service each Wednesday.
GRAND OPENING
Perfect Impressions
Hair Salon
March 2,1992
jf
OPENING
WEEK -
ECU Students
$2.00 Discount
with I.D.
Sundays.
Wednesdays:
7:30 am � 9.00 am � 11.00 am Holy Eucharist
5:30 pm - Holy Eucharist
6:30 pm - Students join parish for supper
7:00 pm - Lenten program
Campus Minister: Marty Gartman � 752-3482
HOURS:
Mon-Fri
2:30-8:00
Sat 9:30-6:00
FOR
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oUie �a0t Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
Jennifer Wardrep, Newt Editor
Julie Roscoe, Asst. Nexvs Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Dana Danielson, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Jlff Becker, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretory
Richard Haselric, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Steven Ollice, Classified Advertising Technician
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Jean Caraway, Advertising Technician
The East Carolinian has served the Mast Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
stiulenls The hast ('arolmian publishes 12,000 copies everv Tuesday and Thursday. The mastliead editorial in each edition
is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view Letters should be
limited to 250 Words or less I'or purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
tor publication I etters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Dldg , ECU, Greenville. N.(,
27858-4353 For more information, call (lMl 737-4366
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, March 3, 1992
Youth holds answer to racism
Racism is a ridiculous concept. toward the young.
Racism on our college campus is even Young people are not born with in-
more ridiculous. stinctual dislike for others based upon
Racism results from lack of intelli- race. A young person must be carefully
gence. College should produce a gain of sculpted to incite ignorant prejudice based
intelligence. Therefore, it is quite illogicial solely upon the stereotype of the races,
that racism can thrive on the campus of a If an end to racism exists, it lies in the
learning institution.
But it does.
One must only read the
messages scrawled on the
desks or in the bathrooms
of our university to learn
that racism is alive and well
on the campus.
But why?
One would think that
by the time students enroll
at ECU, thev would have
grown out of their childish
If an end to
racism exists,
it lies in the
collective laps
of our nation's
youth.
collective laps of our nation's youth.
The question that must
be asked is how do we raise
our children without the
influence of racism. It will
not be easy.
With all the examples
of racism running amuck
on our campus, the job will
be difficult.
Our children will have
to be weaned away from
attitudes of stereotyping;
shortcomings concerning prejudice and they must learn that differences between
stereotypes. Apparently they have not. people are individual, not all-encompass-
The answer to this problem is not a ing; most importantly, thev must learn
simple one. If someone has made it this far that racism is ignorant,
in life and still holds racist tendencies, it is Racism may be too widespread to
likely that those tendencies will never be battle on our campus, but we ould never
abolished. The answer should be directed give up on our vouth.
?�&.
Letters to the Editor
Pitzer unfairly treated in column
To The Editor
In the Feb 25 issue of The East
Carolinian an editorial by Nathan
Hk ks chastised Mr Patrick Piter for
Tunning for the city council
Mr Hicks states that the reason
jee're in college is to get an education.
This is true, but a large part of college
is also experiencing new perspectives
and seeing things as other people
might see them Mr Piter should be
encouraged and not attacked for
Mining for office Contrary to most
people his age, he is at least politically
active If, as Mr Hicks says, the idea
of Piter winning is completely pre-
posterous, then why write the article?
The only thing preposterous is Mr
Hicks trying u. encourage students
not to vote
Seeing how neither Mr Hicks
nor myself are Pitzer-aged students,
we were both probably amund when
Hhe Tar River "riot" occurred Man,
Vvere we students asking for it that
pight. God forbid you were a student
Just coming home from work. But,
Jwy now, don't anybody complain.
We should have all bean inside study-
ing like Mr Hicks instead of outside
prinking that alcohol like a bunch of
�st-adolescent hell raisers Nobody
should complain about that noise or-
dinance either It was put into action
to silence all Greenville citizens and
not just the students. Gee, I wonder if
the ordinance applies to church bells
(for the a theis ts keeping score at home)
or maybe it would apply to that jack-
hammer that woke me up every
morning for a damn week Probably
not, but that's okay because you're
only here for 4 or 5 years and then you
leave A select few, however, will
probably stay around Creenville and
work for WITN.
From the bleeding-heart,
downtown goingwisdomatic" (nice
word) minority left, I say to the young
Rehnquist wanna-be, pull your head
out of your orifice of choice.
Paul Hardy
Political Science
Senior
To The Editor:
I was sincerely disappointed at
theopinion that Na than Hicks expressed
in his editorial column on 1 uesday, Feb.
25,1992.
Mr. Hicks (hereafter referred to
as Homey) needs to allow someone
other than his mama to pay his tuition
and form his ideas. Through lack of
intellectual development. Homey has
some opinions which are bereft intelli-
gence.
For example:
1. If Mr. Pitzerwere not of eligible
age to run for city council, he would not
2. ECU students act responsibly.
If a student is allowed to remain in this
university, that student must act as a
"normal, civil human" being, other-
wise, the student would be kicked out
of school.
3 One does not to have to pay
dues to be on city council. He must only
be registered to vote in Greenville and
file for the position. If Homey considers
kissing establish men t ass for 20 years as
paying dues, maybe I should be an
editorial columnist for The East Caro-
linian where I could kiss some real ass.
4. Mr. Pitzer did not say there
was a horrible relationship between the
students and the city council as Homey
implied.
In Chapel Hill, there are two
students on the city council. Is that out
of ordinary, or is that the sign of a
progressive community?
I do not consider "the idea of
Pitzer being a part of the city council"
absurd. Rather, it is an idea whose time
has come.
Michael A McDermott
Graduate y
School of Business
ilt comwtp
fr�frfirr i out
M? SO
CA&fUL f
The Right Side
Smokers infringe on rights of others
By Nathan Hicks Editorial Columnistft
There are always little things
that some people do in public places
that annoy the others nearby.
In church, an old man invari-
ably rattles the change around in his
pockets, in movie theatres people al-
ways talk and in hallwaysgroupscon-
gregate, making passage an obstacle
course Yes, these things are aggra sit-
ing, but at least they don't seriously
affect other's health in the pnnress
However, there is one specific
thing that people do in public that
really should not have to be tolerated
by those ti us concerned with living
� that thing being smoking in public-
places
Smokers care not for anyone
but themselves when they light up
around people who don't smoke Sec-
ond-hand smoke has been pioven to
cause cancer in people who inhale it,
but smokers don't really care They
simply pla Russian Roulette with
those aroii i who, for the most
part,don' be part of thegame
Situ line and bitch that
it's theirv. en right to smoke
and with mi I have no problem If
someone wants to smoke that's their
choice, but they don't have the right to
endanger those around them. Aside
from the health risk, non-smokers re-
ally don't like having to smell the
smoki' ill the time or go home smell-
ing li kea butt because Ronnie Redneck
has a Marlboro jones People with
asthma or other sinus problems are
constantly assaulted by the toxic fumes
radiating from a cigarette, but I guess
the fact that people die from asthma
attacks or others not being able to
breathe is really not important to the
exhaust pipes that walk around pol-
luting the air
In v i rtua 1 ly every grocery store,
restaurant and night club people
smoke and completely ruin the atmo-
sphere for the non-smoking patrons
When I'm eating, the last thing I want
is a wisp of smoke wafting under my
nose The act of smoking in an earing
establishment rs a completely disgust-
ingpractice I'veneverheardasmoker
siv they weren't bothered by some
guv at the next table flatulating dur-
ing dinner. Nor have I heard a non-
smoker comment that they want
people to smoke in restaurants or any-
where public for that matter The fact
is that smoking in public is rude � no
ifs, ands or butts
Students constantly gather out-
side of classrooms and puff away fill-
ing the air with their toxic-laden lung-
funk creating a room-sized chimney
of bad breath and smoke I don't think
I can even begin to describe the joy
non-smokers experience when exit-
ing a classroom and entering a musky
armpit of a hall. "But it's cold out-
side Whah! I really can't under-
stand why smokers don't realize what
they are doing and change their hab-
its, maybe if all the non-smokers got
together, ate a lot of beans and didn't
bathe for a month the message would
get across
Along with the pollution of the
air, another form of pollution mani-
fests itself Smokers finish their ciga-
rettes and then just drop the butts or
the ground or in the hallway Is this
some legal form of littering7 Or is it
just the same old story that smokers
simply don't care The latter I think
People empty the ashtray in
their cars in parking lots all the time
This isn't normal behavior, it's a men-
ace to society Riding down the road
you seecigarettes fly out the windows
of cars ranging from Pintos to
Cadillacs Obviously it's not a wealth
thing, but a jerk thing Nevermind tjie
fact that a butt has a half-life thjat
outlasts a smoker, but do you think
mesetarbaringcrennscareaboutwriit
other people have to live in down the
road7 Hell no' They care about their
own simple pleasures and could cajre
less if the world rots on its axis The
biggest contradiction I've seen u a
person walking around in a "Saveojir
Planet" T-shirt with a smoke affixed
to their lip
Smoking shouldn't have to fce
regulated by laws People should sh Jw
good judgement and considerations
others when picking 'heir spot to gti a
fix However, this time will probanv
never come so all we non-smoking
victims can do is try to get our govern-
ment to pass legislation outlawing �e
unscrupulous acts of this inconsider-
ate horde of drug addicts.
Letters to the Editor
Students respond to Mandelker's view$
To The Editor:
I have a few comments re-
garding the letter printed in the Feb.
2? issue of The Eatt Carolinian from Dr.
Steven Mandelker.
First of all, I am not aware of
Swarthmore College's acquaintance
rape policy, and Dr Mandelker's
quote may have indeed been taken
out of context but my Webster's II: New
Riverside Dictionary defines rape as
"the crime of forcing another person
to submit to sexual intercourse Ac-
quaintance rape therefore is simply a
more specific crime whereas the as-
sailant is known to the victim. This is
not a change in definition.
Unfortunately for American
women, we live in what was founded
as a male-dominant society, but this
domination has been slowly changing
over the past 30 years as most women
and men have begun to see that it is
not necessary. There are still, how-
ever, many women that have been
socialized to believe in male domi-
nance, rape-supportive myths, social
scripts and specific gender roles. Even
more unfortunate is that even more
men, apparently including Dr.
Mandelker, still hold these ideas as
true.
Through this socialization,
women are taught to believe mat they
have no power or control over their
ow n bodies and sexual acti v i ties. They
are taught that men's needs are more
important than their own In this man-
ner, women are taught that a man
they know and or ha veda ted, or even
simply carried on a conversation with,
have certain rights with them. Many
women have not yet realized that just
because a man has spent money on
them, gotten them drunk, or even en-
gaged in some amount of petting with
the woman's consent or even initia-
tion does not give the man the right to
have sexual intercourse with them.
The so-called "piece of radical femi-
nist propaganda" that Dr. Mandelker
saw is simply an attempt to counter-
act this socialization and these myths,
even after the fact.
Studies have shown that a
woman has approximately 25-33 per-
cent chance of experiencing a com-
pleted rape in her lifetime. One par-
ticular study done on campuses na-
tionwide showed that 1 in 4 of the
female college students surveyed had
experienced a rape and, of those, 85
percent knew their attacker. These
are not occasional acts of violence and
should not be swept under the rug as
unimportant. THIS IS GENUINE VTO-
LENCE AGAINST WOMEN!
In my opinion, only someone
with a sick mind would refer to rape
as "normal sexual interaction
Feminists do not wish to abolish
"normal heterosexual relationships
as Dr. Mandelker would like to think
but DO want to abolish the idea mat
having sexual intercourse with a
woman when she says "no" is abso-
lutely inappropriate, unacceptable
and criminal, no matter what stage in
the relationship the man and the
women are.
Gina Leggett Akorn
Junior
Psychology
To The Editor:
First Lwould like to welcome
"visiting" Professor Mandelker to
ECU and then ask him to drag �is
distorted logic back to the cave trim
which it came Mandelker incorrectly
represents Mike Tyson's convictin
as an "alleged phenomenon obvi-
ously the jury did not buy Tyson's
eioquent defense. Secondly, by �t-
ing Swarthmore's Workshop, �
professor attempts to show knowl-
edge on the subject of "date rade"
and that it incurs no more than ph��-
cal abuse. He refuses to accept ' (fe-
wer as a reason for a woman ijot
reporting rape. The "sick mind"�of
feminists that Mandelker refersjto
seems more appropriate for men
who wish to keep women quiet in
the issue. �
The definition of rape has not
been broadened, but rather it hj�
been smeared by a society that Jr-
gues women "have it coming o
them What is more sick? Awomjn
being raped by someone she knoV�
or the individual that offered herl
million to keep quiet once the cri��
was committed.
Rape is not an "occasional let
of violence" as numbers grow eaih
year despite thousands of unie-
ported cases. Women are not asking
for "preferential treatment thy
want equal treatment under the 1
They want justice for rape whi
not a "traditional form of sexual
teraction" as Mandelker argut
Mandelker is viewing this cri
through rose colored glasses as
tells women to lie back and tak
with a smile on his face and a clu
his hand.
Julie Carver
Junior
Nursing
is
New officers take oal
�� -
Special to The East Carolinian
The Army is looking for a few
good officers, and on Jan. 16, at the
ifirst Army ROTC iab of the semes-
iter, four cadets raised their right
hands and took an oath This oath
symbolized their intention to finish
; the last two years of the Army ROTC
!program�junior and senior
years�and accept a commission as
'an Army Second Lieutenant on the
same day they grad uate from ECL.
The four cadets were Charles
Hlstrom,JetfMaglio,CraigJackson
and Brian Zuchelkowski. The ca-
dets took the oath in room 130 of the
Ra wl Building in the presence i if the
other cadets in the ECU Pirate Bat-
talion.
The road to becoming an Arm y
officer is challenging,
seeking a commission
certain standards. Th�
dets proved themselvi
continuing in the ROT
by passing the Army'S
ness Test, the Officer
tery Test, maintaining
minimum GPA of 2.5, i
strahng superior leadt
through execution oft
cadet duties.
These four cadet-1
conbnue to meet the st
future commissioning.
attend ROTC classes ar
ing their last two war
and attend the Army
vanced Camp at Fort
during the summer p
senior year.


i
MSW�iyS���nmmm ilium
SPRING BROK SPECIAL
A ROLL
AT
D
Annual F

1
tr

it

v
V
Tuesday, March 17
Wednesday, March
Tuesday, March 24
Wednesday, March
Tuesday, March 31
Wednesday, April 1
Tuesday, April 7
Wednesday, April 8
A Representative o
All Group

:





1
4
0
ftrr�oft
wtoAPto
�-AMt I
s so
�FUL!
rights of others
ts maybe if .ill thf non-smokers got
� �(�� , - ate ' lot oi beans and didn't
� . message would
. �
ji � thi pollution of the
� ipollution maru-
. � fe$ts its � okers finish their ciga-
rettes I thei ust drop the bulls on
��, . hallway Is this
- , ega � m � littering'Or is it
ust � mitm Id -� ry th.it smokers
simply dor I -ire The latter I think.
� pie empty the ashtray in
their cars in parking lots all the time.
This isr t normal behavior, it's a men-
ace to society Riding down the road
you see cigarettes fly out the windows
irs ranging from Pintos ,to
Cadillacs Obviously it's not a wealth
thine but a jerk thing Nevermind tin
� � � it a burl has .) half-life trjat
� ists 3 smoker but I
: � g arle i
I.
peop !
itmo-
f- c . rrons
z ! want
ehsgust-

i naveu
� do you thiak
i care about wraH
live in down the
I ' isk)
� under-
� vewh.it
1 -heir hab-
� i. The care about thlir
wv si nj le pleasures and could caYe
less it the rid rots on its axis Tpe
biggest . : Tadiction lve seen is a
persoi h garoundina"Sav�O0
. � shirt with a smoke affixid
� �� , - �
Smoking shouldn't have to pe
reg i ate Ibylaws People should show
gement and considerabonao
�� . rs �� hen picking their spnit to gea
ru H. t-er this time will probaffly
never n � so all we non-smokijig
victimscai str) �� getourgoveai'
mentt �. tss egislaHon outlawing me
unscrupulous acts of this iiiiiiiniilii
ate horde o( drug addicts
the Editor
andelker's view$
temi-
� � lelkei
inter-
nd these mvths,
Ishown tl �
lately 25-33 per-
liencing a com-
ptime One par-
campuses na-
jt 1 in 4 of the
Its surveyed had
nd. of thos Ks
attacker Thest
sot lolenceand
Lnder the rug as
GENUINE VK
K3MEN1
only someone
ild refer to rape
interaction "
nsh to abolish
lal relationships
luld like to think
lish the idea that
Irrourse with a
ys "no" is abso-
p, unacceptable
pr what stage in
man and the
Ucorn
i ke to welcome
Mandelker to
March 3. 1992 gfc �aat Carolinian 15
New officers take oaths
Special to The East Carolinian
The Army is looking for a few
giod officers, and on Jan. 16, at the
first Army ROTC lab of the semes-
ter, four cadets raised their right
hands and took an oath. This oath
symbolized their intention to finish
the last two years of the Army ROTC
program�junior and senior
ears�and accept a commission as
an Army Second Lieutenant on the
same day they graduate from ECU.
The four cadets were Charles
Ellstrom, Jeff Maglio, Craig Jackson
and Brian Zuchelkowski. The ca-
dets took the oath in room 130of the
iCa w I Bui Id ing in the presence of the
other cadets in the ECU Pirate Bat-
talion.
The road to becoming an Army
1 I I and then ask him to drag jjis
: -� rted logic back to the cave frctm
which itcamc Mandt Ikerincorrccpy
represents Mike Tyson's convictAm
i- sr alleged phenomenon obri-
is J the jury did not buy Tyson's
eloquent defense Secondly, by i
. Swarthmorc s Workshop,
r Fessor attempts to show knowl-
edge on the subject of "date raf
and that it incurs no more than ph)
cal abuse He refuses to accept "(
nial" as ,i reason for a woman
reporting rape The "sick mind
feminists that Mandelker refersf
seems more appropriate for -
who wish to keep women quiet In
the issue 3
The definition of rape has it
been broadened, but rather it rfcs
been smeared bv a society that r-
gue women "have it coming io
them " What is more sick7 Awornpn
being raped by someone she knors
or the individual that offered herl
million to keep quiet once the cri4�
was committed
Rape is not an "occasional
of violence" as numbers grow ea
year despite thousands of un
ported cases Women are not asking
for "preferential treatment th ry
wantequal treatment under the la -
They want justice for rape which is
not a "traditional form of sexual n-
teraction" as Mandelker argu s.
Mandelker is viewing this crii ��
through rose colored glasses as ��
tells women to lie back and tak� it
with a smile on his face and a clubf n
his hand.
Julie Carver
Junior
Nursing "
officer is challenging, and cadets
seeking a commission must meet
certain standards. These four ca-
dets proved themselves worthy of
continuing in the ROTC program
by passing the Army's Physical Fit-
ness Test, the Officer Service Bat-
tery Test, maintaining an overall
minimum GPA of 2.5, and demon-
strating superior leadership skills
through execution of their assigned
cadet duties.
These four cadets must now
continue to meet the standards for
future commissioning. They must
attend ROTC classes and labs dur-
ing their last two years of school,
and attend the Army ROTC Ad-
vanced Camp at Fort Bragg, NC.
during the summer prior to their
senior year.
Presents
� CLARENCE CARTER � THE BREEZE BAND
� THE BAND OF OZ � NORTH TOWER
� DOUG CLARK & THE HOT NUTS
THE MAD HATTER, your MC
EASTER WEEKEND-APRIL 18, 1992
North Topsail Beach Airport (Gate opens 11:00 AM)
TICKETS ON SALE AT
EAST COAST MUSIC WRD�" S4'3
1109 Charles Blvd. RA�� ntkAA
Phone: 758-4251 Phone: 830-0944
$22 50 DAY OF SHOW, $17.50 IN ADVANCE
FOR TICKET & ACCOMMODATION INFO 919-328-4745. 1-800-359-4745
Going on Spring Break?
Does Your Car Rattle and Shake
Are You in Doubt?
Have it Checked Out!
STEVE BRILEY'S AUTOMOTIVE
3140-H M0SELY DR.
Just Behind Parkers BBQ off
of Greenville Blvd.
752-5043
M-F 8-5

BOTH
M�
AFTER!
rli m special
S6 Gota,nch� St.
Downtown Greenville
MARCH SPECIALS
AquaClear. power filters
ALL ON
C A T 17 � �a displacement
&AL& For 45 tQ 10Q gaJlon
tanks
Was $49.19
NOW
$33.99
55 gallon tank � hood � light
Pp? NOW
$79.99
University Center
14th and Charles St. � 757-0056
M-F 11-9 � Sat 10-9 � Sun 12-6
ATTENTION ECU GROUPS:
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
Annual Fund-raising Planning Sessions Are
Scheduled for:
Tuesday, March 17
Wednesday, March 18
Tuesday, March 24
Wednesday, March 25
Tuesday, March 31
Wednesday, April 1
Tuesday, April 7
Wednesday, April 8
Room 247
Room 247
Room 247
Room 14
Room 247
Room 242
Room 247
Room 247
3-6pm
4-7pm
3-6pm
4-7pm
3-6pm
4-7pm
3-6pm
4-7pm
A Representative of Your Organization Must Be Present At One Session In Order
To Obtain 1992-1993 Funding
All Groups With SGA Funded Status Are Eligible
For Further Information Call
Alan Thomas, 757-0157
Amy Harris, 757-3159
If You Are Unsure If You Are Eligible For Funding -
Please Call
Millie Murphrey at 757-4726�





Classifieds
(5f?e iEaot Carolinian
March 3,1992
Entertainment
t'l KM )A!
OUSE TO SHARE: Fur-
shed, quiet, and residential
.200permonthand 12 utilities.
Call Mike at 355-2627.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED ASAP: nonsmoker,
$154.33 and 13 utilities, close
to campus. Call 830-1674.
track keyboard. Excellentshape,
with stand. $1000 or best offer.
Call7564803between 10-6p.m.
FOR SALE: 83 Ford Escort.
Runs good, needs transmission.
$400 neg. Mens Schwinn 10-
speed (used) $50. Womens se-
quin evening jacket (size S) $50.
830-6893 ask for Josh or Nell.
NEED ROOMMATE ASAP
Private bedroom in partially
furnished duplex. Washer
drver, central air heat. $133.33
per month, 13 utilities. Come
by and see! 205-B Stancil St. Call
Tony or Loren at 931-7919 or
931-7940.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for 1
bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
A Beautiful PUce to Live
�AU New-
�And Ready To Rent-
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Street
�Located Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
limited Offer - $330 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williami
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. 8. 12-5:30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
G��n and qavt one bencxn Kmutoed �pftrmratl.
�array c !TV ���. ft� ��� ��i �"��. ���hat. T
cabte TV Ow;cs m s:pc antt $20 � murth. 6
nntleii MOBILE HOME RENTALS co�ple�
1U0m AavnaaandnuoikhtsnMinAutaaGvdBni
arc Brook (. c CanB dub.
Coniact J.T. or Tommy Williams
7567815
CLEANING: Married, female,
student, working her way
through school. 8 yrs. of expe-
rience cleaning personal homes.
Reasonable rates and own
supplies. Please call Cindy
Myer at 752-2757.
U-WIID
FOKSALE
SEIZED CARS: trucks, boats,
4-wheelers, motor homes, by
FBI, IRS, DEA. Available your
areanow.Call 800-338-3388 Ext.
C-5999.
1986 HONDA REBEL MO-
TORCYCLE: Well-main-
tained, new tires, brakes and
battery with accessories. $800
752-4428.
BEAUTIFUL YAMAHA
TRUMPET .ForSale. Very nice,
well cared-for trumpet in great
condition. Brand new Bach case.
Best offer or $175. Great deal!
Call 931-9189 or work, 757-6366
ask for Chantal.
FORSALE: Roland D-20 multi-
timbral linear synthesizer mul ti-
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE:
Manv positions. Great benefits.
Call 800-338-3388 Ext. P-3712.
FREE TRAVEL Air couriers
and cruise ships. Students also
needed Christmas, spring and
summer for amusement park
employment. Call 800-338-3388
Ext. F-3464.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT
PAY Assemble products at
home. Call toll free l-800-4b7-
5566 Ext. 5920.
500-1000 CAMP POSITIONS
AVAILABLE: Staff Referral
Services provides a network of
camps, now hiring, from the
"Keys" to Wise-Minn. One ap-
plication reaches all camps.
Applications at Career Services
- Bloxton House.
BABYSITTER: Responsible,
nonsmoker wanted to care for
two vear old on occasiona 1 week
J
nights, weekends, and over-
night (6 p.m. to 8 a.m.). Call 321-
0870 for information.
SUMMER JOB: The City of
Raleigh Parks and Recreation
Department is seeking enthu-
siastic hard working individu-
als for summer employment.
Positions include pool manag-
ers, life guards, camp counsel-
ors, nature, athletic, arts, and
lake personnel, park mainte-
nance and therapeutic pro-
grams. EOE MFH Contact:
2401 Wade Avenue, Raleigh,
NC, 27602. Phone:831-6640.
SPLIT DECISION VOCAL
SEARCH: Audition over the
phone. Call Stephen Patrick
(919) 455-0775 or 3534646. As-
sociate of New Kids On the
Block'sproducerMauriceStarr.
$10 -S360UP WEEKLY: Mail-
ing Brochures! SpareFulltime.
Set own hours! Free Details!
Send self-addressed stamped
envelope: Publishers (s) P.O.
Box 51037 Durham, NC 27717.
FASHION
MECHANDISING MAJOR:
Brody's is accepting applica-
tions for secretary to Buying
Staff. Must be computer ori-
ented, have good phone voice,
and enjoy paper work. 20 to 25
hours per week, prefer morn-
ing availability, must be avail-
able by lp.m. Apply atBrody's,
The Plaza Monday through
Wednesday.
rf ks( )-i
SPRING BREAK: Daytona
Beach Florida, 6 days only $69.
Call 1-800-344-8914.
CHI OMEGA: Congratulations
to the new sisters! Megan Byron,
April Chrisman, Kim
Cloaninger, Trica Creegan,
Christie Crider, Mary Beth
Ditteaux,Ginny Evans,Mehryn
GalarcU,GingerGriffen,Jennifer
Horsley, Tammy Matthews,
Jeannie Monaghan, Angie
Morgan, Cassie Mouw, Jennifer
McCain, Laura Overbaur,Trish
O'Neal, Kim Owens, Amy
Powell, Dori Quinlan, Shelly
Roberson, Susan Shelly, Amy
Sineath, Renee Smith, Amy
Taylor, Teresa White. LOVE,
CHI OMEGA.
NEED MONEY FOR COL-
LEGE?: SFAMS locates private
sector financial aid for college
students. Call Marshall Yount.
1-800-238-8771.
your tireless enthusiasm and
for believing in me. I realize
with every passing day your
healthy and rewarding influ-
ence you shine in my life. Most
importantly, I find myself lov-
ing you more with time and I
realize mat I've never loved one
person in so many ways. Find-
ing you was the beauty of fate
and I'm so thankful I did. I love
you so much. Love, "SNOOPY"
MICHELE, I couldn't ask for a
better Big Sis. Thanks for every-
thing. You're the best and I love
you! Amy
LADIES OF ZETA TAU AL-
PHA: Beautiful company, great
friends, and good drink made
for an excellent evening. We'd
definitely say our New Years
social was a blast! Thanks for a
very memorable evening. The
brothers and pledges of Sigma
Nu.
SPRING BREAK TRIPS: En-
joy a great tan in Marchto
Panama City, Disney World,
Cancun, and Jamaica. Call
Heather at 757-0573.
TO THE ALPHA SIG GUYS:
Thanks for the party on Thurs-
day past. Lets do it again. We all
had a blast. Love, the sisters and
pledges of Gamma Sig.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY
STEPHEN BOBERSKY! Have
a fantastic day. It's another first!
Love, Julie.
AMY, VERN, STAR, LISA,
ANDREA, DANETTE, AND
SARAH LookoutBahama's
1991 EXEC Thank you for such
an excellent year! Love, your
sisters in Alpha Phi.
KAPPA SIGMA: Thanks for a
great time at the pre-down
town! Love, the Alpha Phi's.
safe) Spring Break! Love, Alpha
Phi.
RON CLARK Have you any
SCRUPLES? You and a friend,
an activity, noiseswhat to do?
Don't lick your fingers Love
Smack and Nympho.
TKE: Thanks for a fun time
Thursday night! Can't wait to
do it again! Love, the Sigmas.
SIGMA WATERPOLO
TEAM: Way to go! You all are
doing great! Love, your sisters
and fans!
PHI MU ALPHA: Thank you
for the serenade! Too bad they
all don't sound like that! Love,
the Sigmas.
ANNAANDMISHA:TwoKA
lavalieres in one week! Con-
gratulations Billy C- we love
having you over to the house,
but remember it gets a little
chilly in the evening. Next time
bring a sweater (or pants) We
love you! Love, the Sigmas.
S500SCHOLARSHIPCOULD
BEYOURS! Finda PiKapp and
buy a ticket by today! The
drawing will be held tomorrow
by DeanSpiers. (BIG HTNT)The
sales have been low this year so
the numbers are in your favor!
From the quotemaster. T have
been one aquainted with the
night, I have walked in rain and
back in rain, and outwalked the
furthest city light Proclaimed
the time was niether wrong nor
right, Ihavebeen one aquainted
with the night In all my trav-
els, I know that the night will
always end.
LOREN: Now that you haVe
moved down the street frorjn
me, when do the slumber par-
ties begin?
TO ALL OF MY FRIENDS:
Party at my house in Raleigh On
Saturday,March7,1992.Spnng
Break and the parents are his-
tory! Jean Bean.
PSSSSTCHICKEN
Congrats on the new job, best of
luck with the new 4 hour sleep
schedule.Thanks for everything
I learned with and through you
� don't forget I love you and
will always be your best buddy
if needed. Lots of smiles and
giggles, D.
JEFF, ROB, BEN, AND
MARKrRASTA BUDS, DRJNKIN'
RUM OUT OF COCONUT?.
THONGS ON BABES, NO TLACE
TO STAY, TOO MUCH SUN AND
NOT ENOUGH MONEY! EVERY-
BODY CAN KISS OUR �T WERE
GOIN TOJAM AC1A. HELL YEAH
A (I ASSIFttO
MAP TO THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JOYNER
LIBRARY
MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER
L�rjt�t Library ol lnUrmaM�nhi uT
19.1TB TOPICS ALL SLMJtCTS
O'flpUiatofl Today witr VISA. MC of 000
800-351-0222
Or taaa B 00 M nnavi
II m MM (tea rTOO-A la
BTWTKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50.000 TITLES
919Dickenson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW )
NOW! USED CD'S
V
WATTING WILLCOSTYOU!
Limited spaces are filling up
fast! Jamaica air fare $349,
Tranferes and hotel for 7 nights
only $100 more. Call Heather at
757-0573.
"WOODSTOCK" Thanks for EVERYONE have a great (but
TODAYS LATEST HAIR FASHIONS
Premiere eaioncS
507 S. Evans St.
(Beside Cubbies)
830-0030
20 DISCOUNT ON ANY SERVICE
WITH THIS AD � Exp. 4-15-92
Announcements
i
GAMMA BETA PHI
S Attention students: Anyone
j with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better
I who is interested in Gamma
Beta Phi, an honor fraternity
andserviceorganization,please
call Dena Price at 931-8282.
HOSPrjAirTY
MGMT, ASSQC
f MA is looking for a respon-
sible and dedicated person,
preferably a Hospitality major,
interested in the secretary as-
sistant job for the club. Great
opportunity and lots of fun! Call
931-7399 if interested.
GROUP ADVISING
FOR PRF-OT STUDENTS
�There will be advising every
third Tuesday of each month
from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. in room
203 Belk building. Please see
the video at either Joyner or
Brody libraries beforeyoucome
for advising.
DOWN EAST
CYCLING CLUB
al Cycling Team seeking
new members for 92-93 racing
Uoc
squad, all levels andCats (TV -I).
Sponsorship and limited perks
included. For more information
callMiles752-0012,Bill758-8616
Eric 8300435.
BUSINESS
ETIQUETTE SEMINAR
There is more to professional
success than earning a degree
and wearing appropriate attire
to the job interview. Career
Services invites seniors and
other interested students to
"Putting Your Best Fj2lk For-
ward a program on business
etiquette and how to conduct
yourself professionally during
a business meaL What to expect
at the second interview (after
the campus interview) will also
be discussed.The program will
be held in Medndenhall Room
221 on March 3 at 3:00 p.m.
Contact Career Services,
Bloxton House to register.
QFfJCE
OF HEALTH
PROMOTION
ANnWFlL.BFJNG
Presents The Lunch 'n' Learn
Series.Wecmesday, March 4,
12:15-1:00 pm,MSC Multi-Pur-
pose Room, "How Does Your
Garden Grow?" Bring your
lunch and join us. Al Hight,
urbanhorticulturist,PittCounty
Agricultural Extension Service,
will discuss the aspects of plan-
ning and planting a "healthy"
vegetable garden. For more in-
formation, call 757-6793.
FriIFOlIFSTRIANCLUB
Horses interest you? ECU
EquestrianClubandteambeing
formed. First meeting Tues-
day, March 3,1992 at 5:00 pm,
Room 212 Menclenhall Student
Center. Beginner through ad-
vanced riders welcome.
Trainer, horses and new stable
with indoor ring near campus
available for our use. Call
Debbie at 752-4915 or Eileen at
830-3931 for details.
NEWMAN
XAIHQJJC
STimFNT CENTER
Lent begins Ash Wednesday,
March 4. Special Ash Wednes-
day masses: 12 noon in Great
Room of Mendenhall Student
Center and 5:30 pm at the
NewmanCenter,953E. 10th St.
at the foot of College Hill Drive.
INTERNATIONAL
STimENT ASSOCIATION
The International Student As-
sociation will be having its an-
nual International Dinner on
Mar. 21 from 6:30 pm to 1100
pm in Mendenhall Student
Center. There will be food, per-
formances, and exhibits from
around the world. Tickets are
$6.00 students and $8.00 gen-
eral public. For more informa-
tion call: 757-4788 or 757-4900
after 5 pm.
about other cultures. The re-
quirements for eligibility are
explained in the application
form. If you are planning to
study abroad during the sum-
mer, you may apply for mis
scholarship now. If you are
plannning to study abroad next
semester, you should wait for a
future deadline. The scholar-
ships are awarded four times
per year with me next deadlines
on March 20,1992, and June 12,
1992. You may contact the
Center for International Pro-
grams at 757-6769 or stop by
Brewster A-117 for further in-
formation.
STHOLARSHIP
DEADLINE
AppUcationsformeThomasW.
Rivers Foreign Exchange En-
dowment Fund study abroad
scholarship are available in the
Center for International Pro-
grains, Brewster A-177. The
Rivers fund is intended to pro-
mote study abroad and the
genuine interest in learning
RETURNING
AD1HT STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION (RASA)
There will be a RASA meeting
on Thursday, March 5 in Gen-
eral Classroom building RM
3013 at 5:30 p.m. This meeting
will focus on planning activi-
ties for those students who are
staying in Greenville over
Spring Break. If youare curious
to know more about RASA we
inviteyouiocome to this meet-
ing. Non-traditional studentk
are especially encouraged tp
attend j
STUDENTS WANTED J
The Outdoor Recreation Pro-
gram is recruiting Rock Climby-
ing and Rappelling Instructor
Applicantsmustposesscurreiit
First Aid and CPR Certifka
tions,leadershipabilities,stronfe
interpersonal skills and knowl-
edge of group dynamics. Bast
knowledge of climbing anil
rappelling systems is desired.
Applicants training dates wijl
be announced after Spring
Break Intereseted persons mat
apply in 204 Christenbury
Gymnasium Monday through
Friday 8 a.m. to 5 pm For de-
tails call Brian Miller or KathV
Hill at 7576387.
STUDENTS FOR CHRIST
Learn about true love, friend-
ship, and commitment Jom
students for Christ in a Bib ?
study at6:30p.m. on Thursday s
in room 14, Mendenhall Sti -
dent Center. It will be a hie
changing, challenging experi-
ence.
Hypnotism si
By Tommy Murphy
Suff Writer
Would you like to earn better
grades? Could you stand to lose a
few pounds? Was your New Year's
resolution to stop smoking? Do
you think going back into a past
lifecould be interesting? If so, there
is something here for you at ECU
� hypnosis.
Hypnotism is not a neat stage-
show trick. It has been proven to
work alone or in conjunction with
other types of therapy such as be-
havioral modification and cogni-
tive therapy.
One local psychotherapist,
who wishes to remain anonymous,
defined hypnosis as "a heightened
relaxed state whereoneis focused,
aware and concentrated in such a
tnanner that one can reach their
subconscious mind " The psycho-
therapist defined the subconscious
as "a great memory bank full of
one's life long habits, memones
and experiences
Several ECU students met this
past weekend. Two of them, Kate
and John, wanted to be hypno-
tized. Will Canterbury agreed to
be the hypnotist. Thev met in the
living roomof lohn's apartment.
This particular room had a big
cushioned couch perfect for the
hypnotism.
Canterbury is working to-
ward his degree in psychology at
ECU. He also plans to become a
certified hypnotist by the national
institute. He must be certified,
since there is not a license avail-
able in North Carolina. Canter-
bur)' has hypnotized over 200
people in the past year and a half.
There are three settings which
can be used to hypnotize some-
one. Canterbury used two � a
'quiet setting and a noisy setting.
In a quiet setting, a person can be
hypnotized by use of guided im-
agery, where the hypnotist paints
a pretty picture which helps relax
the person to the point that the
individual can imagine the set-
ting and be put into hypnosis. In a
; noisy setting, one can be hypno-
tized with an ear massage. The ear
massage method limits the per-
Wm
John (left) is taken!
the events that hel
son to hearing sou
mic, metered and
The individual bt
laxed and falls u
state.
While Kate wJ
Canterbury motivj
buy any cookies,
when she goes to tr
Now she dnnks
has set up a daily
ule.
John was hv
could go back mt
wanted to know i
past life.
Canterbury
John's present agd
slowly back throuf
time. John was k
his present life,
three or four yeai
impression of that!
At 29, John rt
of his wedding
about his haircutl
fore the weddiny
his wife's dress
beat down on thej
church.
John remei
We knew that it
much more than a h
The similarities between our favorite telev
and the life and times of our 37th preside
uncanny to be coincidence, despite the fact tha
never an episode in which Greg and MarciaJ
engaged Henry Kissinger in prayer.
Richard Milhous Nixon The Brad
Nixon has five letters
Presidency began in 1969
' � Presidency ended in
August 1974
� Native southern Califor-
nian
� Returned to TV in 1977
: (with Dave Frost)
� Staged early 1980s
comeback (77i Real War)
� Six Crises
Was lawyer in previous
job
s � Big football fan
� Brady has fiv
� Series began i
� Series ended i
1974
� Native souihei
nians
� Returned to
(with Brady Bu
� Staged early
back (with The
� Six children
� Mike Brady
previous job
� Greg star of
grid team
� Secretly taped conversa- � Peter secretly
tions in White House, 1971 sations in nous
� Pat Nixon referred to as
"Lonely Lady" of San
Clemente
� First Secretary of De-
fense gruff but tolerable
Melvin Laird
a � Had a beloved dog,
Checkers
� Carol Brady
lovely lady" il
� Gruff but lovJ
butcher played
Melvin
� Had a belovel
r�� frtm �p� Htf ��IW - la ftfarl





����
IPFRSONALS
Entertainment
Stye �aot (Earolinf an
March 3, 1992
n
11
jhj From the quotemaster. I have
been Olie aquainted with the
night, I have walked in rain and
back in rain, and outwalked the
furthesttity light, Proclaim!
the tune was niether wrong nor
right Ihavebeenone aquainted
with the night In all my trav-
els I know that the night will
always end.
any
end
do?
ove
time
i lit to
las.
MO
U are
isters
ove
KA
LOREN: Now that vou haVe
moved down the street from
me hen do the slumber par-
ties begm ?
It) ALL OF MY FRIENDS:
Tarn at my house in Raleigh on
Saturday March h�2 Spring
Break and the parents are hu-
tory! lean Bean
TSSSST CHICKEN
�grats on the new job,best of
luck with the new 4 hour sleep
, hedute Thanksforeverything
I learned with and through vou
rjon t forget I love you and
a - be your best buddy
it needed I ots of smiles ami
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OVER
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�M9 Dickenson Ave.
Greenville, M
75S-ftM()'
COMICS OLD & NEW I
now; i'skd CD's I
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fans St.
)30
NY SERVICE
p. 4-15-92
The a ing. Non-traditional students
)ility are are especially encouraged to
plication attend
inning to
the sum- STUDENTS WANTED
tor this The Outdoor Recreation Pro-
vou are gram is recruiting Rock Climb-
broad next ing and Rappelling Instructors,
i wait tor a Applicants mustposesscurrerit
le scholar- First Aid and CPR Certifica-
jtour times tions, leadership abilities strong
t deadlines interpersonal skills and knowl-
id June 12, edge of group dynamics. Basic
jntact the knowledge of climbing anil
ional Pro- rappelling systems is desirecj.
lor stop by Applicants training dates wm
further in- be announced after Spring
Break. Intereseted persons may
apply in 204 Christenbury
Gymnasium Monday through
Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. For de-
tails call Brian Miller or Kathy
Hill at 757-6387.
STUDENTS FOR CHRIST
Ijeam about true love, friend-
ship, and commitment. Join
students for Christ in a Bibje
studvat6:30p.m. onThursda)i5
in room 14, Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center It will be a liie
changing, challenging experi-
ence "
lENTS
ifiASAJ
JA meeting
5 in Gen-
ilding RM
is meeting
ung activi-
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iville over
i are curious
it RASA we
this meet-
Hypnotism strengthens willpower
By Tommy Murphy
Staff Writer
Would you like to earn better
grades? Could you stand to lose a
few pounds?Was your New Year's
resolution to stop smoking? Do
you think going back into a past
life could be interesting? If so, there
is something here for you at ECU
� hypnosis.
Hypnotism is not a neat stage-
show trick. It has been proven to
work alone or in conjunction with
other types of therapy such as be-
havioral modification and cogni-
tive therapy.
One local psychotherapist,
who wishes to remain anonymous,
defined hypnosis as "a heightened
relaxed state where one is focused,
aware and concentrated in such a
manner that one can reach their
subconscious mind The psycho-
therapist defined the subconscious
as "a great memory bank full of
one's life long habits, memories
and experiences
Several ECU students met mis
past weekend. Two of them, Kate
and John, wanted to be hypno-
tized. Will Canterbury agreed to
be the hypnotist. They met in the
living roomof lohn's apartment.
This particular room had a big
cushioned couch perfect for the
hypnotism.
Canterbury is working to-
ward his degree in psychology at
ECU. He also plans to become a
certified hypnotist by the national
institute. He must be certified,
since there is not a license avail-
able in North Carolina. Canter-
bury has hypnotized over 200
people in the past year and a half.
There a re three settings which
can be used to hypnotize some-
one. Canterbury used two � a
� quiet setting and a noisy setting.
In a quiet setting, a person can be
hypnotized by use of guided im-
agery, where the hypnotist paints
a pretty picture which helps relax
the person to the point that the
individual can imagine the set-
ting and be put into hypnosis. In a
noisy setting, one can be hypno-
tized with an ear massage. Theear
massage method limits the per-
Pholo by Tommy Murphy
John (left) is taken back through his life by Will Canterbury in an attempt to help John rediscover himself and
the events that helped shaped John's life. Canterbury hopes to prove the benefits of hypnotism.
son to hearing sounds in a rhyth-
mic, metered and monotone way.
The individual becomes very re-
laxed and falls into a sleeplike
state.
While Kate was hypnotized,
Canterbury motivated her not to
buy any cookies, chips or drinks
when she goes to the grocery store.
Now she drinks more water and
has set up a daily exercise sched-
ule.
John was hypnotized so he
could go back into the past. He
wanted to know if he had had a
past life.
Canterbury started with
John's present age and took him
slowly back through his entire life-
time. John was led back through
his present life, stopping every
three or four years to get John's
impression of that point in his life.
At 29, John recalled the events
of his wedding day. He told us
about his haircut two hours be-
fore the wedding and described
his wife's dress and the rain that
beat down on them as they left the
church.
John remembered racing
down the highway in his Ford
Maverick at 120 mph when he
was 20, moving from New York to
North Carolina when he was 17
and recalled disliking grits and
collards.
but didn't have the vocabulary to
say it that way. In the womb, he
said he felt warm and safe.
Next Canterbury Uxik John
back before John's birth. Soon, in a
past life, John described being at
Being six was painful for John the top of a hill beside another
because he got a cramp in his left
leg while he was describing what
school was like. He kept com-
plaining that his leg hurt while he
was lying there and it began to
jerk. Canterbury calmed him
down and moved John to a differ-
ent year.
John remembered events from
his early years such as taking a
nap in his room. He described the
details of his room, from the green
rug on the floor to the window
that was too high for him to see
out. He recalled lying in his crib
and being scared of the dark.
Looking further back to when
he was six months old, he remem-
bered playing with an orange car
and drinking milk from a bottle
that his mother made for him. The
day of his birth, he recalled being
very cold and being held "by his
soldier. The soldier told him to
keep his head down. John then
looked over the top of the hill,
what he saw horrified him. John
saw a man raise a rifle and fire at
him, then he went blank. John
jumped at that point, his eyes wide
with horror. Canterbury decided
it was too dangerous to go back
any further into John's other past
lives.
Since the weekend, Kate has
lost two pounds and eats only until
she fills her hungSr.
John has come to terms with
the first experience in his past lives.
John can't wait to be hypnotized
again so he and Canterbury can
figure out the meaning of it in his
present life.
For Kate, hypnosis has been
wonderful, because now, "she
feels that she can get her youthful
We knew that it was
much more than a hunch!
The similarities between our favorite television family
and the life and times of our 37th president were too
uncanny to be coincidence, despite the fact that there was
never an episode in which Greg and Marcia drunkenly
engaged Henry Kissinger in prayer.
Richard Milhous Nixon The Brady Bunch
back He meant being cradled, figure back.
Walnut Creek
prepares for
second season
Nixon has five letters
� Brady has live letters
Presidency began in 1969 � Series began in 1969
By Mark Brett
Staff Writer
� � �
Presidency ended in
August 1974
� Native southern Califor-
nian
� Returned to TV in 1977
: (with Dave Frost)
� Staged early 1980s
I comeback (The Real War)
� Six Crises
� Was lawyer in previous
job
,
�, � Big football fan
Secretly taped conversa-
tions in White House, 1971
� Pat Nixon referred to as
"Lonely Lady" of San
Clemente
� Series ended in August
1974
� Native southern Califor-
nians
� Returned to TV in 1977
(with Brady Bunch Hour)
� Staged early 1980s come-
back (with The Brady Brides)
� Six children
� Mike Brady was lawyer in
previous job (The Defenders)
� Greg star of West dale High
grid team
� Peter secretly taped conver-
sations in house, 1971
� Carol Brady referred to
"lovely lady" in theme song
� First Secretary of De-
fense gruff but tolerable
�Melvin Laird
� Had a beloved dog,
Checkers
� Gruff but lovable Sam the
butcher played by Allan
Melvin
� Had a beloved dog. Tiger
fOw trim My Htjttlnt - to orOm c�ll I-000-788-H35
In a year of huge money-losing
arena tours, the Hardee's Walnut
Creek Amphitheatre turned a profit
that made it the ninth highest
nwney-makingamphimeatreinthe
nation.
In 1991, during WalnutCreek's
shortened four-month openingsea-
son,theamphitheatreheld31 shows
that brought in 313,000 people and
grossed more than $5 million.
WalnutCreek was the only new
facility, and North Carolina's only
amphitheatre, on Performance
Magazine's top-ten list
WalnutCreek wasalsoa finalist
in Pollster magazine's concert in-
dustry awatds. The amphitheatre
was nominated in the Best Venue
category and ranked among the five
finalists.
"Our success can be attributed
to mis great market Walnut Creek
General Manager Wilson Rogers
said. "The people in the Triangle
area and all of eastern North
Carolina reallyappreciategreatlive
music. The 'Creek just provided a
beautiful, unique setting for them
to enjoy it"
The "great, live music" mat the
most people enjoyed in '91 can be
found in the amphitheatre's five
top-grossing shows. In no particu-
lar order these luminaries include
jimmy Buffert Rod Stewart, Van
Halen, the Allman Brothers with
Little Feat and Perry Ferrell's
Lollapatooza Festival (featuring the
Rollins Band, Butthole Surfers, Ice
T, Nine Inch Nails, Living Colour,
Siouxsie and the Banshees and
Ferrell's own Jane's Addiction).
ButWalnutCreek'ssuccesshas
not been financial. According to Bob
Klaus, the amphitheatre's director
of marketing, only about five of the
acts SStfcsd for the 1991 season were
initially planning to play the area.
Former Police frontman Sting, in
fact, returned to the Triangle to play
at Walnut Creek.
This greater opportunity has
drawn large crowds, which have
been, for the most part, very well-
behaved. As any frequent concert-
goer knows, a rock band and a few
thousand sweating, impatient fans
can lead to fistfights and other vio-
lence before the night ends. Walnut
Creek, however, has had little of
this type of problem. Klaus at-
tributes this to the nature of the
facility. The open air seems to relax
people. Rather than being crammed
into a large concrete structure, the
crowd at Walnut Creek has more
freedom of movement and thus is
more mellow.
Late in the 1991 season how-
ever, the amphitheatre's neighbors
were somewhat less than mellow.
Several local residents complained
about the noise level coming from
Walnut Creek, though the facility
was within thecityof Raie gh'snoise
restriction policies. To alleviate the
problem, the amphitheatre con-
structed a 100 foot long by 12 foot
high earthen wall between the
complaining residents and itself
during the off-season.
The wall has yet to be tested,
but Walnut Creek officials hope it
will calm their neighbor's jangled
nerves as the 1992 season opens in
April.
This season, the amphitheatre
should be host 35 � 40 shows,
among which may be Lollapalooza
0.
Currently Running
Art Exhibition: Jacob Lawrence: AnAmeriranMam-
ter. An exhibition of 20th Century American paint-
ings. Running through March 23 at Wellington B.
Gray Gallery. Free admission, open to the public.
Art Exhibition: .Joyce B. Scntt: Explorations. An
exhibition of beadwork and cast paper works.
Running through March 23 at Wellington B.
Gray Gallery. Free admission, open to the public.
Art Exhibition: Joe Bakers New Paintings. These
paintings explore the color, form and light of
the formal eastern North Carolina land-
scape. Running through March 21 at Wellington B. Gray
Gallery. Free admission, open to the public.
March 3
Recital: Percussionists Mark Ford and Tony Cox,
joined by tubaist Jeffrey Jarvis. will perform five
contemporary works. Time: 8:15 p.m. Place: Fletcher
Music Center Recital Hall. Admission free and open to the
public.
March 4
Chamber Music Series: The 30-voice Westminster
Singers from Westminster Choir College will per-
form a variety of music from four centuries. Time: 8
p.m. Place. Hendrtx Theatre. Admission. $8 adults. $6 fac-
ultystaff. $5 children and $8 at the door. Ticket info: 1-800-
ECU-ARTS.
Concert. The 18 member ECU Jazz Band will
present a concert featuring a jazz arrangement of
works by Faure. Marcer and Arlen, Prima and
Sondheim. Time: 8:15 p.m. Place: Fletcher Recital Hall.
Admission is free and open to the public.
March 5
Concert. The Preservation Hall Jazz Band, direct
from Louisiana, will perform authentic New Orleans
jazz played by some of the artists who created this
great sound. Time: 8 p.m. Place: Thalian Hall In Wilmington.
Ticket prices: $20. $18 and $10. with discounts available for
Members in Thalian Hall. Canadian visitors and weekend
ticket package purchasers. Reservations: 1-800-523-2820.
March 6
Concert. The three-women band of Saffire � The
Uppity Blues Women will perform a full-length
concert of driving blues music. Time: 8 p.m. Place:
Thalian Hall in Wilmington. Ticket prices: $12. $10 and $8.
with discounts available for Members in Thalian Hall. Cana-
dian visitors and weekend ticket package purchasers. Reser-
vations: 1-800-523-2820.
March 7
Concert. The Red Clay Ramblers, a N.C. string
band with roots in old-time mountain music, will
perform a concert infused with the best of country.
Dixieland and bluegrass traditions. Time: 8 p.m. Place:
Thalian Hall in Wilmington. Ticket prices: $13. $11 and $8.
with discounts available for Members of Thalian Hall Cana-
dian visitors and weekend ticket package purchasers. Reser-
vation. 1-800-523-2820.
Convention: Tarboro Comic Book Convention will
have loads of comics for sale or trade. Time: 11 a-m.�
4 p.m. Place: Edgecombe Memorial Library. Tarboro. Admis-
sion is free and open to the public. More info: Scott's Comics
at (919) 571-1310.
Art exhibition: "From the Ground Up: Experienc-
ing Architecture" will illustrate the fundamentals of
architecture by demonstrating how a building is
affected by its site, function, structure and con-
struction and aesthetics. Running through March 7.
1993. Place: N.C. Museum of Art. Raleigh. Admission is free
and open to the public. More info: Elizabeth Hollaway at (9191
833-1935.
March 13
Concert. The Amazing Kreskin. a mentalist, will
perform his extra-sensory feats. Dismissing any
connection with the occult or supernatural powers,
Kreskin reveals the inner-most thoughts of his
audience in concert. Time: 8 p.m. Place: Thalian Hall in
Wilmington. Ticket prices: $15. $13 and $8, with discounts
available for Members in Thalian Hall. Reservations: 1-800-
523-2820.
March 19
Lecture: Dr. Sidney Kasfir, from Emory University
in Georgia, will present "West African Masks: From
Ritual to Play Time: 7 p.m. Place: Jenkins Auditorium.
Admission is free and open to the public.
March 22
Ski discount. Snowshoe Mountain Resort in West
Virginia will offer ECU students 50 percent savings
on both lodging and skiing. Valid through March 29.
More info: Snowshoe Reservations (304) 572-5352.
H





8 gfre East Carolinian
March 3, 1992
Mega City produces classic prog rock
By Mark Brett
Staff Writer
Sad songs of loss and alien-
ation. Sounds like the fodder for a
classic progressive rock album, and
Mega City Four's Sebastopol Road is
exactly that. Perverse song titles,
anairofearnestself-pity and simple
chord progressions form into a
subtle mix of satisfying music.
Mega City Four owes early '80s
New Wave and the Smiths in sub-
ject matter, thus avoiding the pit-
falls of REM-worship. Not that the
music is derivative; every band has
Its influences.
Considering this group's 1987
c-onception, in fact, thecurrentcrop
of popular alternative bands most
likely owes them quite a bit. Just to
name a couple, Dinosaur Jr. and
former Mega City Four disciples
Ned's Atomic Dustbin sound quite
a bit like these guys. This being the
caw, the Mega's status as an un-
known is more than ixld. Hope-
fully with Sevastopol Road, their first
American release, this will change.
Who knows, maybe MTV wi II ev en
play them, thus mandating their
status as "hip for at least a week.
SebtStopd Road itself includes
such juicy musical tidbits as "Anne
Bancroft "Wasting My Breath
and the damnedably subtle
"What's Up That last one begs for
some liner notes to decipher what
appears to bea very delicate web of
intricate lyrics. The occasional
mumbled word in mis song, usu-
ally a key one in each verse, leaves
any true u nderstand ing just beyond
Pholo Cour1��y of Big Lit R�cord�
Perverse song titles, an air of earnest self-pity and simple chord
progressions form a subtle mix of satisfying music Sebastopol Road.
reach. This subtlety of word is the
real mark of the album, from song
btles thatacruallydon'tget repeated
to the point of nausea and in fact
aren't usually even part of the lyrics
to songs whose meanings hinge on
a single word.
� Anne Bancroft" demonstrates
the band's perverse wit. On the sur-
face we have a simple song of
lovelorn devotion. "I'm right here
waiting for you and I don't care
who knows it the martyred cho-
rus pledges It all seems a bit sappy
until the realization dawns that, by
its title, the song is addressed to the
movie actress of the '40s. The air of
innocent, hopeless ardor ceases to
be endearingly annoying and takes
on a pathetic aspect that repels and
amuses at the same time.
"Wasting My Breath" is Mega
City Four's magnum opus in which
they address their own subtlety,
lack of fame and artistic aims. Any
subtlety in our society, they argue,
is pushed aside by the louder idiots
whose points are simple and easily
grasped. "The emptiest guns the
songgoes, "make the loudest noises,
the emptiest heads ha ve the loudest
voices
Not to sound incredibly pomp-
ous, however, the band also ad-
dresses their own artistic shortcom-
ings here. Painting an incredibly
unclear picture of the problem in
metaphor, they ask, "Now do you
understand?"
The music in general on
Sebastopol Road is a bit repetitive,
many of die same rhythms and
chord progressions repeated on
song after song, in pretty much the
way they are in most progressive
nxk. This is not such a negative
point, however. The rhythms are,
for the most part, at least engaging,
and the drums manage to keep the
music propelled well enough to
keep the listener's interest. This is
pretty much the way rhythms are in
most progressive rock.
Like most music forms, pro-
gressive rock has its traditions and
patterns, and Mega City Four sim-
ply follows them. All in all,
Sebastopol Road is, as stated above, a
classic prog rock album.
What's the
best way to
eat an Oreo
cookie?
Dr. Daniel Nathan. W Umbel
Prixe in PhimutloayMedicine 1
haven't eaten Oreo's for awhile I
eat Animal cookies with ray grand-
daughter. I generally bite the head
off first, then proceed in a bit more
random way to eat the rest Maybe
that sort of. let's say. dehumanizes them But this is sort of
ruminating without any conviction that IVe got my finger on
anything
Dr. Michael Bishop. 199 Nobel Prime in PhymiaiogvMedleb:
"Dunk it In tea. Dlnklng cookies is part of my heritage �central
Pennsylvania. I think it's a way to revive stale goods baked goods.
Oreos may not be stale, but they're certainly crunchy. You dunk
them, and then they're nice and soft. I don't eat Oreos now. anyway
It's been years much to my regret. You dunk it about halfway in
and rat half the cookie, then dunk it a quarter, and so forth I
hope none of my friends see this
Dr. Gertrude Elion. 19SS Nobel Prixe in PhymioloauMedicine:
"Oh. for heaven's sake, what kind of quesUon is that? I eat them
straight out of the package
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Lacrosse
team sweeps
jHoward,
Georgetown
By Michael Ashley
Staff Writer
! ECU lacfOS� entered the
liation's capitol this weekend to im-
dprove on their 2-0 record, and that
?eyelid.
I ECU swept both Howard and
jGeorgetown to remain undefeated
"heading into conference plav The
ieam showed poise and strength to
Zbeat the two tough opponents
Saturday's game pitted the IY
jates against the Howard Bis, n in a
bitterly cold match where tempera-
tures dipped into single digits
3-kward fielded a Luge. phvMcal and
jfery aggressive team, but were no
Snatch for a more skillful ECU team.
The Pirates took the earlv lead, but
WOMBsd always staved dose. The
3Pirates plaved 15 minutes with a
nan down because of penalties, and
;She team still managed to control the
Jempo, winning 13-1? Drew Borque
Jed the way with eight assists and
Jwo goals and kept the ECU team
ired up with big hits all da.
Sunday's game saw a different
rypeoffoeintheGeorgetowr.Hoyas.
I The game turned out to be the
Roughest by far for the Pirates, who
liad to come back from a fie-goal
deficit. The Tirates were a little slug-
�Jjsh follow lngSaturday 's game, and
jn the first half they fell behind 8-3.
3oor field conditions, questionable
Jails and a highly skilled team were
"hot enough to kill the team spmt as
ECU' fought back and bed the score
at 11, as the clock ran out
The game then went in to double
overtime as the two teams traded
shot after shot until ECU's BUI
Tomlimson took a fast break the
length of the field and passed to Kirk
Katzburg, who put in the winning
shot, making the final 12-11.
ECU's scoring was lead by
attackmen Kirk Katzburg and Scott
Smith, and rrudfiekiers LakeSlacum,
Drew Borque and Chns Jams. The
five controlled the tempo of the en-
tire game. The tested Pirate defense
was led by Wes Davis, J.P. Reynolds
and Larry Fortier.
ECU- will take a three-week va-
cation before resuming conference
plav on March 21 against UNC-
Wilmington at home.
The team will have to be pre-
pared for the meat of their confer-
encescheduleagainsttheSeahaw ks,
N.C. State and a highly touted Old
Dominion team.
Virginia Tech s
night s game T
By Ric
Surf
The ECU
been proving ail
some of the M
nation. This pal
once again had
in their premi
relav as the tear
University oi R
Even with
dunng the first I
team still manaf
place while rur
et time in thel
could have runl
during the first
Lady Pirate tennis
alls to UNC-Greei
By Chris Stansbury
Staff Writer
The ECU Lady Pirate tennis
team suffered a defeat against the
Lady SpartansofUNC-Greensboro
on Monday, dropping their record
to 1-1 on the season. The Lady
Pirates fought hard through the
entire match, winning two tough
three-set matches.
The Lady Pirates, losing to the
Spartans 5-4, scored singles victo-
ries from Kim Harvey, Alison
Collins, and Kris Robinson.
Robinson a m1
a first set loss to I
Matlin to win
In doubles
captain Harvey
teamed upanck
Joanna Bias ma I
The two played I
first set loss ano
sets for their sec
son.
The Lady 11
Florence, S.C.vj
Francis Marion
March 8.
jPaison pitches te;
jEMU, Barton Col
By Charles Mitchell
Staff Writer
With a stellar defensive per-
formance, the Lady Pirates began
Jthe 1992 season with a double-
jbang. Behind the pitching of Jenny
parsons, the defense all but shut
down a strong Eastern Michigan
5-2) team in game one. Michelle
IWard led the Pirates with three
lilts, as the offense out ran their
opponent 4-1.
In game two, Eastern Michi-
gan sent the Pirates into extra in-
nings with the score tied at one.
ttryi Hobson led the bottom of
the ntiHh off with a single, then
advanced to
bunt. With or
singled in the
On Sundal
travel to Bartol
N.C.) for their
header. Thetei
by an identical
son combint
Wilke for tl
Stephanie
Newman, Cr
Sherry Allen I
with multiple
bats.
The Pira
record to 4-0
at 2 p.m. agai





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Sports
uHje lEast (Earulintan
March 3,1992
Lacrosse
team sweeps
Howard,
Georgetown
H Michael Ashley
SUM WnL-r
( I I,k rosse entered the
capitol this weekend to un-
to then 2 0 record, mm that
( l swept both Howard and
twn to remain undefeated
, into conference play. I he
howed j nse and strength to
r tw n tough opponents
� rurda s game pitted the Pi-
11 -t the t toward Bison in .1
Id match where tempera
dipped into single dibits
I fielded a large, physical and
.yjt'nt' team but were no
foi .1 moreskillful E 1 team.
Pirates took the early lead but
H ,u always st.mxl close. The
played 15 minutes with a
low nbecauseof penalties,and
team still managed to control the
winninglS 13 Drev� Borque
. vva with eight assists and
goals aw kept the 1I team
up V ith big hits .ill d.
Sundav 's game s.n .1 different
iffoeinthei ieorgetov nHoyas
1 m game turned out to be the
' 'M K far for the Pirates who
� 1 come b k from .1 five-goal
; rhe Pirates were a little slug
followingSaturda sgame,and
� first hall thej fell behind s
field conditions, questionable
- and a highh skilled team were
� enough to Will the team spirit as
v U fought bat k and tied the score
it 11. as the Jo.k ran out
rhegame then went into double
overtime as the two teams traded
�hot after shot until ECU'S Bill
romlimson tixk a fast break the
length of the field and passed to Kirk
Kiltbury; who put in the winning
shot making the final 12-11.
ECl s -v oring w .is lead bv
ittackmen Kirk Katzburgand Scott
mith and midfielders lakeSl.uum,
�rew Borque and Chris lar is lT�e
e controlled the tempo of the en-
1 game Ihe tested Pirate defense
. 1- led by u es I tavis, .P. Reynolds
- larrv Fortier
E( I will take a three-week va-
n before resuming conference
on March 21 against I i
mington at home
rhe team will have to be pre-
red tor the meat of their confer-
a heduteagainsttheSeahawks,
�state and a highl touted Old
� n inion team.
Pirates surprise fans,
Hokies in OT, 78-76
Seniors say farewell
Pholo by D�v� Com � Con�gi�l� Timt
Virginia Tech s John Rivers battles with ECU s Anton Gill (left) and Curley Young for a rebound in Monday
night's game The Pirates stunned the Hokies. 78-76 in overtime before a crowd of 3,000 people
By Robert S. Todd
Assistant Sports Editor
Three thousand ECU fans al-
most went into cardiac arrest Mon-
day night
Anton Call's jump shot over
Virginia Tech's seven foot center
Fnk Wilson slid through the net
with :tV4 left in overtime to give the
Firates a 78-78 upset win over Vir-
ginia lech in Minges Coliseum.
(ill made up for missing two
clutch free throws at the 1:57 mark
Robin House, plaving in his last
home game, sank a three pointer
(three feet behind the line), tying
the game 73-73 and sending the
game into the extra five minute pe-
rn kI.
The Pirates, down 34-3M at in-
termission, fell behind bv as many
.is 14 points in the second half. How-
ever, fames Lewis surged an 1S-0
scoring run that put ECU up by
four, 54-50 with 958 remaining in
regulation.
ECU customarily lost their lead
and found themselves facing a ll-
point deficit with less than three
minutes m the game The Firates
managed to force two quick tum-
oversoft oi Virginia Tech's inbounds
passes to help slice Virginia Tech's
lead. Call was fouled with :31 to go,
and dropped one bucket to cut the
lead to three1. Twenty seconds later
House sank oneof the most impor-
tant three pointers of the season,
and his career.
In overtime, Houseagatn came
thnmgh with a trev, to put the Bucs
up bv one. With :2b remaining, the
Hokies'Corey Jackson bed the game
with a free throw.
The Firates defeated a Hokie
squad which upset Tulane, then
ranked 14th in the nation, H9-73.
"You like to see effort pay off
said Virginia Tech Head coach Bill
Foster. "Unfortunately we were
watching it from the w n ng bench
Detroit Pistons scout Stan
Novae was in attendance to watch
Wilson (a Detnot native). But he
also noticed ECU's Lester Lyons.
Novae said Lyons has a lot of
talent.
"He could go pro eventually,
but there are so manv gaurds �
you've got to be a Harold Minor
(University of Southern California i
or Anothv Feeler (Missouri). Blue
Edwards was and is much bigger
and stronger
Unfortunately, Novae came
away from the game less
impressed with Wilson than he had
been before the game.
"He dtesn't do anything �
what the hell does he do1" Novae
said. "I've seen some big guvs who
are horrible � he's as bad as any (it
them
The victory was especially
sweet for ECU's seniors, whti played
their last home game
"We (ECU) sent them out with
a bang said Ronnell Peterson.
Senior Jeff Perlich sank half of
his four thee-pomt attempts, for six
points on the night. House finished
his final home appearance by lead-
ing the team in scoring with 14
points, while handing out three as-
sists and pulling down five re-
bounds.
See Upset, page 10
Sprinters gain national recognition at Florida Invitational
Bv Rick Chann
SUff Writrr
The ECU men's tr.u k team has
been proving all season that it has
some oi the top sprinters in the
nation l"hts past weekend, they
once again had a strong showing
in their premier event, the mile
relay, as the team competed at the
I Diversity ol Florida
Even with some difficulties
during the first hand-oft the relay
team still managed to apturefirst
plat e w rule running the fifth t.ist
est time in the nation Ihe team
Could have run a taster time, but
during the first hand-ott. an inex-
perienced runner from Florida
shoved Junior Robinson past the
point of his hand-oft to Fred c Hvens.
ITie bumping caused Owens
to fight traffic earlv on in his leg,
but he still managed toruna strong
second leg of 47. seconds. Fhe
next exchange was ,i goinl ow as
Owens passed the baton to Core)
Brooks who ran a 47u seconds.
Fhe relay was again anchored by
Brian lr in who ran a 4b.3 out front
and by himself to cross the finish
line m 3:09.67 tor first place
I lead coach Bill � arson was
pleased with the ettort oi the relay
anil s.iio! e erj hxlv ran solid
Carson said the rela would
h,i e run a time t.isf enough to be
an automatic qualifier tor the
NCAA meet it it had not been for
the bumping during the first ex-
change rherela team,whichhas
earned All-Ameruan honors the
past two seasons, has met the pro-
visional time and will be oneof ten
relays invited to Indianapolis m
two weeks to compete in the na-
tionals
lr inalsocompeted mtheopen
400-meter dash and captured first
pi.ice m ith a time ot 4.51 seconds.
1 listimec urrenth ranks him fourth
in the nation and is an automatic
qualifier tor the national meet,
lames Robbins also competed in
the 4U-meter dash in which his
timeof 4934 seconds qualified him
for the IC4A meet.
In the 2UVmeter dash, three
ECU runners ran their personal
best rimes Charles Miles placed
ninth with a time of 21.69 seconds,
Damon Desue finished 12th in
21.77, and Danny Allette was 13th
in 21.7.
Desue also ran a 6.3 second m
the 55-meter dash to advance to
the finals. In the finals, he ran a b.42
for an eighth place finish.
The team visited George Ma-
son Feb 23. to take part in the Col-
legiate invitational.
In the 55-meter dash, DeSue
finished third in 6.43 seconds and
teammate Miles finished fourth
with a rime oi 6.44 seconds.
Owens captured first place in
section one oi the 4l)0-meter dash
with a timeof 49.1 seconds. Brooks
finished third in a time of 49.91
seconds.
The team will compete at the
IC4A meet held at Princeton this
weekend. Qualifiers for this meet
include Desue and Miles in the 55-
and 200-meter dashes, as well as
Blake in the 55-meter dash.
lrvin and Robinson will com-
pete in the open 400-meter and as
members of the mile relay, along
with Brooks and Owens.
Lady Pirate tennis team
falls to UNC-Greensboro
By Chris Stansbury
suff Writer
Ihe Ft U Lady Pirate tennis
team suffered a defeat against the
1 ady Spartans ofUNC-Greensboro
on Monday, dropping their record
to 1-1 on the season. The Lady
Pirates fought hard through the
entire match, winning two tough
three-set matches.
Ihe Lady Pirates, losing to the
Spartans 5-4, scored stogies victo-
ries from Kim Harvey, Alison
( ollins, and Kris Robinson.
Robinson, a sophomore, overcame
a first set loss u Lady Spartan Rachel
Matlin to win 2-6, 7-5,6-1.
In doubles action, ECU senior
captain 1 larveyand JenniferFenton
teamed up and defeated Matlin and
Joanna Bias in a long three set battle.
The two played hard, overlooked a
first set loss and won the final two
sets for their second win of the sea-
son
Fhe Lady Pirates will travel to
Florence, S.C, where they will play
Francis Marion College on Sunday,
March K.
Soltz, Brown pace
swimmers in tourney
By Chip Kline
SUff Writer
Parson pitches team by
EMU, Barton College
By Charles Mitchell
Staff Writer
With a stellar defensive per-
formance, the Lady Tirates began
the 1992 season with a double-
bang. Behind the pitchingof Jenny
Parsons, the defense all but shut
down a strong Eastern Michigan
45-2) team in game one. Michelle
Ward led the Pirates with three
hits, as the offense out ran their
opponent 4-1.
In game two, Eastern Michi-
gan sent the Pirates into extra in-
nings with the score tied at one.
Cheryl Hobson led the bottom of
the nirtth off with a single, then
advanced to second on a sacrifice
bunt With one out Lisa Coreprue
singled in the game winning run.
On Sunday the Lady Tirates
travel to Barton College (Wilson,
N.C.) for their scheduled double
header. The team won both games
by an identical score of 104). Par-
son combined with Georgeann
Wilke for the two shutouts.
Stephanie Hobson, Tammy
Newman, Cheryl Hobson and
Sherry Allen led the hitting attack
with multiple hits in as many at
bats.
The Pirates moved their
record to 4-0 and play Thursday
at 2 p.m. against Baridn College.
Coming off their worst regu-
lar-season finishes, the EC L
men's and women's swimming
and diving teams had little hope
for another Colonial Athletic As-
sobation title.
We never even talked about
winning a team title said Head
coach Rkk Kobe. "Our focus was
KX) percent on the individual
goals of each swimmer
Ihis year's team is young,
with only two senior's on the
men's team, and one on the
women's team.
Ihe men's team finished
higher than anyone expected.
They grabbed third place over-
all, while the women finished a
disappointing seventh out of
seven teams.
James Madison University
won the men's side of the meet
bv a whopping 196.5 points over
second place American Univer-
sity 753.5 to 557 points. ECU
finished close behind AU with
546 points.
Brian Soltz and Sean Brown
paced the men's team with two
individual victories.
Soltz was the "King" of the
sprints winning both the 50- and
100- yard freestyles, while Brown,
a transfer from the University of
Kentucky won the 100-and 200-
yard breaststrokes.
fhe 200-yard medley relay (
Coral, Brown, C.allaher, Soltz)
and the 200-yard freestyle relay (
Donovan, Soltz, Herndon,
c assity) both set new varsity
records.
Donovan also set a new
Freshman Record in the400-yard
Individual Medley.
"Everyone sw am great. 1 am
extremely happy with the per-
formanceofthe team said Kobe.
"This year's team won more in-
dividual events than the 1989
and 1S7 CAA Champion
teams
On the women's side of the
meet, American University held
off a strong JMU squad for the
CAA crown: 801.5 points to 759
points.
The only woman to qualify
for the finals in all her events was
Jacqueline Sibler. She qualified
in the 500- and 1,650-yard
frees hies and the 400-yard Indi-
vidual Medley.
Kobe said this was the hard-
est working team he has ever
coached.
"This is a real honest sport,
what vou put in to it is what you
get out he said. "They (the
women) really exceded all ex-
pectations put in front of Lhem
fof this meet
N
File pholo by D�n Rood � ECU pholo L�t
The ECU men's swimming and diving team finished third in the CAA
ChampionsNps, held Feb. 27-29 in Minges Coliseum. The Lady
Pirates did not fare as well, as they finished seventh.





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Sports
Hhc lEaat (Earultnian
March 3,1992
1 acrosse
team sweeps
r loward,
Georgetown
In Michael Ashley
M.ltt Wtlt.T
u rosse entered the
" i - weekend to im-
'�i! 2 (1 record and that
I both Howard and
� � � remain undefeated
� I i nferen e pla I he
kved poise and strength to
� rwi ti �ugh opponents
. ime pitted the Pi-
t the I loward Bison in a
� it ' here tempera
into single digits
phvsicaland
�ne team hut were no
for an �r skillful II team
� hnk the earlv lead but
�. - sta ed cl se I lit'
� ed 15 minutes with ,i
� � � � fp nalties and
n � iged to control the
; rning 15 rev Borque
" eight assists and
I kept the ECt learn
���.�� i dav
. ��� aw ,) different
� � �� �� eorgel .�. nt Unas
med i 'ut to be the
far for the Pirates w ho
ie bacl � � .i five-goal
� � it werea littleslug-
ingSaturda sgame and
e fii the tell behind s
ndit ns questionable
ind thighh skilled team were
� �' b kill the team spirit as
� - ind tied the s ore
�� � lock ran out
a � ethei en( into louble
rtirm � � teams traded
I after shot unl ECU's Bill
romlims i took a fast break the
� �� � � ind passed to Kirk
Katzl re, wl � the winning
Pirates surprise fans,
Hokies in OT, 78-76
Seniors say farewell
Photo by Dav� i
oli�giat� I m�t
By Robert S. Todd
Assistant Sports Fditor
Ihrtv thousand EC L tans al-
most went into cardiac arrest Mon-
day night
Anton Gill's ump -hot over
Virginia rech's seven toot center
I rik Wilson shd through the net
with 04 left in overtime to give the
Pirates a 78-76 upset win over Vir-
ginia lee h in Mingesoliseum.
( all made up for missing two
i luUh fret'throws at the 1:57 mark.
Robin House, playing in his last
home game, sank a three pointer
i three feet behind the line), tying
the game 73-73 and sending the
game into the extra five minute pe-
riod
Ihe Pirates, down 34-38 at in-
termission, tell behind by as many
as 14 points in thesecond half. How-
ever, lames Lewis surged an 18-0
-soring run that put ECU up by
tour, 54-50 with 958 remaining in
regulation.
E( !U customarily krattheir lead
and found themselves facing a H1-
point deficit with less than three
minute- in the game The Pirates
managed tn tone two quick tum-
oversoffof irginia lechinbound-
passes to help slice Virginia Tech's
lead.c .ill was fouled with31 to go,
and dropped one bucket tn cut the
lead to three Twenty seconds later
1 louse sank one erf the most impor-
tant three pointers erf the -eason,
�ind his career.
In overtime House again came
through with a trey, to put theBucs
up by one. V ith 2 remaining, the
Hokies Corev lacks) n tied the game
with a free thr w
The Pirates defeated a Hokie
squad which upset Tulane, then
ranked 14th in the nation, 89-73.
"You like to seeeffort p iff,
said Virginia lech Head coa h Bill
Foster. "LnfortunateK we were
watt hingitfn m the wn m bench
Detroit Fiston- scout Stan
Novae was in attendance to watch
Wilson (a Detnot native i Hut he
also noticed ECU's Lester Lyons.
Novae -aid Lyons has a lot of
talent
"He could go pro eventuallv,
but there are so manv gaurds -
you've got to be a Harold Minor
l University of Southern California l
or Anothv Feeler (Missouri). Blue
Edwards was and is much bigger
and stronger
Unfortunatelv, Novae can �
awav from the game less
impressed with Wi isi n than he had
been before the game.
"He doesn't do anvthing
what the hell does he do1" Nova
-aid "I've seen some big guys wh i
are horrible �he's as bad as any '
them
The victory was especially
sweetforE( L 's seniors, who played
their last home iime
"We(E L I sent them out with
a bang slid Konnell Peterson.
Senior Jeff Perhch sank half i r
his tour thee-point attempts, for six
points cn the night. House finished
his final home appearance by lead-
ing the team in scoring with 14
points, while handing out three as
sists and pulling down five re-
bounds
See Upset page 10
Virginia Techs John Rivers battles with ECU'S Anton Gill (left) and Curley Young for a rel Monday
night s game The Pirates stunned the Hokies 78-76 in overtime before a crowd of 3.000 pec, ��
Sprinters gain national recognition at Florida Invitational
Bv Kick Chann
. � - . � , MM. Snift
In Ifii li � I ak Slacum
- roue andhns Ian is I he
ed the tempo of the en-
came IT �- ted Pirate defense
dedbvWes Davis I P Reynolds
' I irr 11 rtier
i i I will take a three-week va-
fore resuming conference
. n March 21 against I N
it honm
� e team will have to be pre-
� � r the meat of their onfer-
� ttheSeahawks
� ite and ,i hagtiK touted'Li
- ti in
Ufl V r il.T
I he IT men stra kteam has
pro mg all season that it has
- me ol the top sprinters in the
nation I his pa-t weekend they
otk e again had a strong -how ing
in their premier event, the mile
rela, as the team i impeted at the
I ni ersitA of Fli rida
en w ith -ome diffk ulties
during the tir-t hand-c�ff the relay
team -till managed toe apture first
pla. e w hile running the fifth fast-
est time in the nation Ihe team
could have run a faster time but
dunng the first hand-off, an inex-
perienced runner from Florida
shoved lunior Robinson past the
pointofhishand off to 1 red ��� �
Ihe bumping aused
to fight trattic early on in hi
buthe still managed to runa strong
second leg of 4" K- seconds. The
next ex( hange w a- a coixt n' as
( wens passed the baton to (
BrtHk- who ran a 4" u seconds
rhe rela was again anchored by
Brian lr in w ho ran a46 $out front
and b him-elt to cross the finish
line in 11N h7 tor first pla( e
1 A com h Bill ('arson was
pleased w ith the eff rt i then i
and-aid evervbod) ran-olid
i ar-on -aid the rela w
have run a rime fast enough to he
n automata qualifier tor the
' meet it it had not been for
the bumping during th first ex-
hangi � � iv I wl i h has
earned All-Amei hxnors the
past two seasons has met the pro-
visional time and will beoneof ten
reiav- in ittd to Indianapolis in
rwi ��- eeks to mpete in the na-
ils
In inalsocompeteii mtheopen
I � � . � � lash and captured first
� u e with a 1 I 46 51 se onds
) listin . ��� .himfourth
� � ind �" autoni.itu
qua fit national meet
an � � mpeted in
the 4tV-meter dash in which his
time ot 4 4 seconds qualified him
tor the 1C4A meet.
In the 200-meter dash, three
U runners ran their personal
best time- Charles Miles placed
ninth with a time of 21.69 seconds,
Damon Desue finished 12th in
21.77, and Danny Allettewas 13th
in 21.97.
Desue also ran a 639 second in
the 55-meter dash to advance to
the finals. In the finals, he ran a n.42
for an eighth place finish.
Ihe team visited George Ma-
son Feb 23. to take part in the Col-
legiate Invitational.
In the 55-meter da-h. DeSue
finished third in 6.43 seconds ano
teammate Miles finished fourth
with a time of n.44 seconds.
Owens captured first place in
section one erf the 4ttumeter dash
with a time ot 49.1 seconds. Brooks
finished third in a time of 49.9!
seconds.
The team will compete at the
1C4A meet held at Princeton this
weekend. Qualifiers for this meet
include Desue and Miles in the 55-
and 2U-meter dashes, as well a
Blake in the 55-meter dash
lrwn and Robinson will com-
pete in the open 4i0-meter and a-
members of the mile relay, along
w ith Brixik and Owens.
Lady Pirate tennis team
falls to UNC-Greensboro
Bv Chris Stansburv
suit Writer
Lad) Pirate tennis
.��� red a defeat against the
if I v ireensboro
h pi .� their record
the season fhe I a
tes fought hard through the
' match, winning two tough
e set mau hes
,sd Pirates, losing to the
rtans ri, scored -ingles victo-
from Kim Harvey, Alison
Robinson, a iophomore, o ere ame
a first set loss to Lad SpartanRai hel
Mathn to win 2-6 7-5 1
n doubles action E( I senkw
captain! larveyand (enniferFenton
teamed upanddefeated Matlinand
Joanna Bia-inalongthree-et battle
Ihe two played hard, overkxked a
first set loss and won the final two
sets tor their second w in o( the sea
sin.
Ihe Lady Pirate- will travel to
Florew e,S. rwherethey will pla
Francis Marion ollege on Sunday,
Soltz, Brown pace
swimmers in tourney
Bv Chip Kline
SUM VSriter
i- And Kris Robinson. March S.
Parson pitches team by
EMU, Barton College
By Charles Mitchell
SuH Vritr
With a Stellar defensive per-
t irmam e, the I m I irates began
the 1992 season with a double-
hang Behind the pitching fennv
Parsons, the defense all but shut
down a strong Eastern Michigan
(5-2) team in game one Mic helle
Ward led the Pirates with three
hit as the offense out ran their
opponent 4-1
In game two. F a-tem Michi-
gan sent the Pirates into extra in-
nings with the score tied at one.
Chervl Hobson led the bottom of
the nirfch off with a single, then
advanced to second on a sacrifice
bunt With one out Lisaoreprue
singled in the game winning run.
(Vi Sund.n the I ,d Pirates
Iran el to Barton ollege (V ilson,
(for their -t heduled double
header I he trim w m hi th game-
bv an identic .i I st,ire i 10-0 Par-
son combined with GeOTgeaiYI
Wilke for the two shutouts
Stephanie Hobson, Tammy
Newman, Chervl Hobson and
Sherrv Allen led the hitting attack
with multiple hits in as many at
bats
The Pirates moved their
record to 4-0 and plav ihunday
at 2 p.m. against Barlon C ollege
( urning off their worst regu
l.ir season finishes, the II
men's and women - swimming
and diving teams had little hope
for another Colonial Athletii V
-ih iation title.
V ene ereven talked at ut
w inning i team title said I lead
vkk h Fh k Kobe. "( Hirt.H us was
lito percent on the individual
goals of ea h sw immer
fhis year's team i- young,
with onlj two senior's on the
men- team and one on the
women's team
Ihe men's team finished
higher than anyone expected
Ihev grabbed third place over-
all, while the women finished a
disappointing seventh out of
seven team-
lame Madison University
won th�- men- side oi the meet
bv a whopping 19625 points over
second place American Univer-
sity 75325 to 557 point- ECU
finished close behind AL with
h points
Brian Soltz and Sean Brown
paced the men's team with two
individual victories.
Soltz was the "King" ti the
-prints winning both the 50- and
M y- vard freeslyteS, while Brown,
a transfer from the University of
rue k won the 100- and 200-
yard breaststrokes
i he 2n 'vard m�tlle relav (
Goral brown, Callaher Soltz)
and the 200-yard freest) lerelaj I
tovan, Soltz, Herndon,
( a�it) both set new arsity
n-c ords.
1 iii' an also set a new
I reshman Record inthe400-yard
lndi idual Medle
I ervi �ne sw am great I am
extremely happ with the per-
tt rman eof the teamsaid Kobe.
I his year's team won more in-
dividual events than the 1989
And P(S CAAhampion
teams
On the wi�men - side of the
meet. American I niversityheld
off a strong IML squad tor the
CAA crown: HO 5 points to 75
points.
The on K woman to qualify
ti r the finals in all her events w a-
lKiueline Sibler She qualified
in the 500- and 1 650-yard
rreestytesand the 400-yard Indi-
vidual Medle
Kobe said thi- was the hard-
est working team he has ever
coached
"This is a real honest sport,
what vou put in to it is what you
get out he said. Ihev (the
women) reallv exceded all ex-
pectations put in front ot them
fof this meet
?
R pholo by Dail Rm4 � ECU photo Lab
The ECU men's swimming and drving team finished third in the CAA
Championships, held Feb 27-29 in Minges Coliseum The Lady
Pirates did not fare as well, as they finished seventh
J





10 CElie �aat (Carolinian
March 3, 1991
Kushner brings fun back to Pirate baseball
By Robert S. Todd
Assistant Sports Editor
Many cold mornings were
spent in the batting cage in his back
yard. Many cold afternixns and
evenings w ere spent the same way.
A sacrifice to some, a means to
a goal for Others. The rewards came
in a chalked box about 20 vards
from an island of dirt surwunded
bv grass or astro turf. Rice
University's practice field is the turf
inside the Astrodome.
Lee Kushner
"That was something you
dreamabout EC U's first baseman
Lee Kushner said. "You couldn't
believe you were in the Astrodome.
1 never did get one out
Trading Houston forGreenville
was not as tough as most might
think. Rice Universitv'scoach David
Hall is a quitter, according to
Kushner.
"He didn't care about how his
players represented the schiKl
Kushner said. "Down the road 1
would love to see Rice in a regional
(plavoffgame)
Rice had players who "didn't
want to screw up their hands �
players who wanted to be doctors
Kushner said. "(ECU's) Coach
won't let a player not give his all
Kushner said he turned down
offers to play first base from NX.
State and UNC- Chapel Hill to be a
Pirate� knowing little about ECU
or the Emerald Cits' when he de-
cided to transfer. N.C State's coach
never saw fit to watch Kushner play.
Offended, Kushner said (in not mi
kind words) he w ill make the most
of his chance to show State what
they missed out on. ECU battles the
Wolf pack on April 7 at Harrington
Field.
The 20-vear-old junior said he
could not be happier than in
Greenville.
"This community rallies behind
this school. It's the only show in
town Kushner said. "You can't
ask for better support
The Astrodomeand Greenville
are a long way from where he grew
up. Living in an affluent New jer-
sey community with "a bunch of
spoiled rich kids, who get whatever
thev want and never have to work
for anything as Kushner said,
could certainly have affected him.
Things could have been given to
him, vet he chose to work.
"I gave up a lot of things. 1
would go out and hit instead of
going to the movies or ust screwing
around Kushner said. "1 knew
what I w anted to do in the long
run
The long run has often been
traded in for the short cut bv Uxiav's
athletes. Kushner might takea short
cutUo a class, but not in a class.
Considering the time investment
thatbaseball requires, his3.43 grade
point average for the fall semester
might come as a surprise to most
people. Baseball forces players to
miss more days of class than either
the football or basketball team.
Kushner said he takes excep-
tion to the maximum 20 hours of
practice maximum and one day off
minimum, imposed by the NCAA,
as well as the proposed drugs and
AIDS testing of athletes.
"If we're supposed to be stu-
dents first, why not test the guys in
the suite next to me?" he said. "The
NCAA is totally ludicrous
The Pirates' offense would not
be the only thing that would be hurt
had hechose toattend ECU's Peach
Bowl victim's school. Kushner
brought an infectious personality
along with his bat. His unwilling-
ness to make baseball difficult is
refreshing. Listening to his chatter
in the infield provokes memories of
little league games.
"When you take the fun away
from the game, the game becomes
hell to play Kushner said. "That's
the way 1 felt at Rice. I used to dread
going to the ball park. I didn't think
that could happen to me
Kushner said he felt that if you
can stav a kid as long as you can,
you'veg 't half thebattlewon.Prob-
ablv gotx advice for anybody, not
just budding baseball players.
-s
Upset
Soccer club ties UNC-Wilmingti
Wednesday
Continued from page 9
ECU fans did not have a proper
chance to say goodbye to perhaps,
die most misfortunate player on the
team, left Whitaker. He was forced
to sit out the first It) games of season
waiting for a NCAA ruling on el igi-
bilitv. Whitaker onlv managed to
slip in eight games into his season
before becoming the third Pirate to
suffer an anterior cruciate ligament
tear.
Perlich was second m Indiana
in scoring as a senior in high school
at 32.1 points per game. The
Churubusco native holds the state
record with 10 three pointers mono
game, while holding 20 school
records.
"Pearl" a he is known to his
teamates, was an all-conference
player every year in high school,
and team MTVP three years. He also
led the state in free throw shooting
his senior year. Scoring his 2,(XXth
point on his home court was the
biggest thnll in hi athletic career.
House, born and raised in
Greenville, walked on as a fresh-
man and earned a scholarship.
Without his significant contribu-
tions this season, ECU might not
have finished with double figures
in the win column.
By Jeanne Shaffer
Staff Writer
The ECU women's soccer
club tied UNC-Wilmington, 2-
2, Feb. 23 on a rainy, wet
Seahawk field. The tie moves
the team's record to 0-1-1, fol-
lowing a 2-1 defeat to the N.C.
State club earlier in the season.
Michelle Lockwood of the
Lady Seahawks scored late in
the first half on a corner kick
that slipped past ECU goalie
faimeson Tierce for the first goal
of the game. After several shots
on goal bv both teams, the Lady
Seahawks took the lead into half-
time.
ECU tied the score at one
goal apiece when Stephanie
Aicher scored in the opening
minutes of the second half.
Aicher challenged the Lady
Seahawk's goalie Ann Marie Fay
on the six yard line and pushed
the ball into the goal.
The Lady Tirates substituted
goaltenders, bringing in Bridget
Kruse who is recovering from a
back injury. Kruse stopped three
Seahawk shots before Shawn
Hueglin found the back of the
net to regain the lead for the
Wilmington squad.
With just under 10 minutes
remaining to play, Lady Pirate
Amv Warren scored the final
goal of the game. Pirate defen-
sive plavers Eileen Moore and
Alison Russell had outstanding
performances throughout the
game and showed exceptional
skill to quell the Lady Seahawk's
final attacks.
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 3, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 03, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.863
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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