The East Carolinian, February 27, 1992






Cracking down
Bush should stiffen drug penalties.
4
Pirates look to CAA tournament
Team beats William & Mary, 79-75
II
Wz iEaHt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.66 No.13
Thursday, February 27, 1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
8 Pages
mound Other
Clubs challenge ruling
Two Princeton University eating dubs,
the I iger Inn and the Ivy Club, arc challeng-
ing a state court ruling forcing the organiza-
tions to admit women members.
Sallv Frank, a Princeton undergraduate,
tiled the first complaint against the clubs to
the New lersov Division of Civil Rights in
1979. in 1987 the office Ordered the organi-
zations to admit females
In K). the New Jersey Supreme Court
followed suit and ordered the eating dubs to
stop discriminating against women.
Although the two organizations have
continued to tight the order, women have
been able to join in the past vear.
Female undergraduates now outnumber
the men 28-20 at the K v Club, while the Tiger
Club StoU hasthemaiontvot male members at
53-17.
Hie IS Supreme Court may settle the
matter in late Fcbruan
Frats busted for cocaine
Fweleve University of Virginia fraternity
memberswere arrested on drug charges after
throe fraternity houses were busted tor sell-
ing drugs in March 11.
Lnlv line member was acquitted.
lames A Carter Ir, age 20, was found
innocent after his defense attorney argued
Carter was unfairly trapped into selling two
bags ol cocaine by a paid government in-
former, Tamir Noufi.
Carter's attorney said the student from
Newport News did not use drugs until
IXvember M. when he was under academic
pressure during final exams.
The three fraternity Inuises busted were
Tau kappa Fpsilon, Vita Upsilon and Phi
ipsilon Pi.
Coach bashes gays
A football coach's statement that homo-
sexuabry is Man abomination of almighty God"
has angered me University of Colorado presi-
dent and divided the campus in the issue of
the limits of free speech.
Coach Bill McCartney,a Christian funda-
mentalist , called a news conference on cam-
pus to express his support tor a campaign to
throw out a state law prohibiting discrimina-
tion against gays and lesbians in housing and
hiring.
Since the press conference, five demon-
strations ha veboen held on campus, the office
of President Judith Albino has been picketed
and more than 50 letters have been sem to the
editor of the campus newspaper, the Uni-
versity of Colorado Daily.
Despite the controversy, there is no evi-
dence that McCarthy violated university
policy.
Murder leaves no leads
Police at the University of California at
Berkeley have no leads in the slaying of a
young woman whose body was found in a
student government office.
Grace Raulo Asuncion, 20, had attended
a meeting of the Filipino-American Alliance
at 5 p.m. the evening of her death. Other
members left after the meeting, but Asuncion
stayed in the office alone. A janitor found her
body at 9:20 p.m.
Police said they believe Asuncion was
stabbed several times in the neck by either a
pair of scissors, a letter-opener or a knife.
They have not yet recovered the weapon.
"It scares me that this crime was so ran-
dom said an unidentified student who works
at the campus newspaper.
"I fear for my safety, no one is safe
Compiled by Dana Danlelaon Taken from CPS
and other campua newspaper.
Inside Thursday
Crime Scene 2
Classifieds3
EditorialM
Entertainment 5
Comics6
Sports17
Study finds no reason to ban games
By Julie Roscoe
Assistant News Vditor
In August, Resident Educa-
tion decided to ban games such
as Dungeons and Dragons, a
fantasvrole pla inggame.inthe
residence halls o psychologi
cal study in the last five years has
been able to show a reason tor
the banning ot those games.
The policy printed in iving
Spaces, the official guide for stu-
dents residing oncampus, states,
"Psychological games siuh as
China Nurds. 'Dungeons anil
Dragons and Killer are all
prohibited in the residence
halls
Between 1980 and 1985
fundamental religious groups
linked the game Dungeonsand
Dragons (D&D) tosatank wor-
shipand policeblamed thegame
for individual cast-sot runaway
children, suicides and various
other crimes.
In response to the furor sur
rounding psychological games,
Arnvmdo Simon a psychologist,
investigated the actual psycho-
logical aspects ot Dungeonsand
Dragons. In NS7 Simon snight
to examine the emotional stabil-
ity ot players ot D&D
"Indeed, as a whole group,
D&D players obtain a health)
psychological profile Simon
stated at the conclusion ot the
study. "Them is much evidence
that overall playing of (role-
playing) games is beneficial and
therapeutic
lanet lohnson, assistant di-
rector ol resident education, de
tended the administration s ban
on the games by referring, to in
formation received at national
conferences. "We heard con-
cern trom other universities
She explained that the
games generally "cause disrup-
tion" incommunitios. However,
when askil it D&D had caused
problems on the campus, she
slid that no disruption had oc-
curred
"We had several problems
with Ouija boards last year with
several buildings and several
students, Johnson said. "We
decided we needed some regu-
lations on the use ot CXiija and
then we went on to several other
psychological games
"It'sa trend in lotsof univer-
sities so the administration is
careful about those particular
kinds of games lohnson said
For his study, Simon ques-
tioned 68 avid tans and players
chosen from science tiction and
gaming conventions to partici-
pate in the study. A Person-
ality Factor Questionnaire was
used focusing on emotional sta-
bility Simon also performed a
Pearson( onelation between the
number ot years playing the
game and emotional stability.
Photo by Jill Charry � ECU Photo Lab
The Science Fiction and Fantasy Organization s display in the lobby of Mendenhail depicts various
fantasy games and books The club opposes a Resident Education ban on psychological games
I le found no correlation.
LA. DeRenard and LM.
Kline perforrnedone of the only
Other, psychologists, docu-
mented studies of D&D effects
in the last five years
1 hev examined differences
in alienation of plavers and
nonplayers. The subjects an-
swered questionnaires contain-
ing the Anomia Sale and the
Alienation Scale I hose scales
measure general and specific
types of alienation
"The present study yields
few differences between players
and nonplayers the results
stated This suggests that nega-
tive effects ot playing the game
are still unknown and perhaps
nonexistent
Theonly generally support-
ive result for enemies of P&P
from the study was that players
who are committed to the game1
or plav the game with more in-
tensity than other plavers were
reported as having more feel-
ings of alienation
The researchers questioned
this result bv asking for a com-
parison of committed P&D
plavers with people committed
to anv leisure activity.
See D&D page 2
Photo courtasy ot Candi Lanning
ECU'S Pure Gold Dancers were ranked eighth in the nation in the preliminaries of Universal Dance
Association's annual competition They will compete next in San Antonio. Texas, in April.
Dancers receive national ranking
By Amy Humphries &
Chip Kline
Staff Writers
National rankings are the
norm this year for ECU teams.
The Pure Gold Dancers,
who perform at half-time of
the men's basketball games,
have achieved their first na-
tional ranking.
ECU's Pure Cold Dancers
ranked eighth in the nation af-
ter the preliminary phase of a
national dance competition.
The dancers hope to compete
in a second competition.
"We're hoping that this
will be a year for firsts said
Candi Lanning, a member of
the Pure Cold Pancers for two
years.
"With a football team that
is first in the state and a dance
team that is first in the na-
tion
The team needs $7,000 to
enter the Universal Dance
Association's national compe-
tition which will be held in
San Antonio, Texas, April 9.
"We hope that f he department
of athletics will help with the
money said coach Shannon
Smith.
"There will be very stiff
competition from squads
ranging from independent
dance teams from Florida State
and the University of Illinois
Smith said. Eleven other teams
will perform in the competi-
tion.
The dancers sent in two
videotaped performances
consisting of routines to the
school fight song and another
song for the preliminary com-
petition on February 6.
There are about 70 to 100
schoolsaround the nation that
compete.
A major competitor from
North Carolina is UNC-
Chapel Hill.
The Pure Gold Dancers
have been around campus ap-
proximately eight years al-
though coach Smith has only
been with them this year.
The squad has a new in-
fluxofgirIs,anewcaptainand
an air of new excitement.
"Normally it's been an in-
dividual thing but we came in
this vear ready to go as a group
and not as a bunch of indi-
viduals said Lanning.
Practice anywhere and
anytime has been the theme
this year. The team trains three
times a week on their routines
at all hours of the day and
night.
Lanning said that the team
practices two to five hours per
day for compet;tions. Sched-
ule conflicts with intramural
activities sometimes leaves the
team practicing their routine
at 11:30 p.m. They also lift
weights three days a week at 6
a.m.
Smith said he has encour-
aged the team since the begin-
ning of the season to strive for
national recognition.
Individual talent has al-
ways existed in the Pure Gold
Dancers, but has never reached
its potential as a team, Smith
said.
"Coach always told us that
he believed in us Lanning
said. "He always knew that
we could go far
News segment angers
parents, students
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
When Andy Cordan, a
reporter for W1T, toured
ECU in the Kick of an ECU
Public Safety car last semes-
ter, his views of campus were
that of a typical Public Safety
Officer, said Jim DePuy di-
rector of Public Safety,but the
atmosphereofthecampustoat
evening was anything but
typical.
(Jordan rode with a lub-
Ik Safety officer on Sept. 27
Cordan's purpose was to find
out what the job of a campus
policemen is like, said Chr.s
Mc Daniel. WITN news direc-
tor.
The news segment which
aired Feb. 12, showed not only
what the job of an ECU Public
Safety officer was, it also ex-
posed ECU students intoxi-
cated, fighting and mouthing
off to campus police.
"We have spent manv
years trying to get rid oi the
party image hereat ECU said
Susanna Hudson, director of
the Parents Association at
ECU.
"This segment can set us
back tremendously. W1T
should counteract the storv
with something that displays
the progress we have made
The segment was shot the
weekend of the University of
South Carolina against ECU
home football game.
The night was anything
but typical for Gmeimlle be-
cause it was the night before a
well-anticipated homeiootball
game with a long-time rival.
An example of the intense
feelingsof this particular foot-
ball challengeisthe post-game
celebrations. After ECU de-
feated USC, both goal-posts
were torn down, and the ex-
citement spilled into the streets
of downtown.
"The segment was actu-
ally not directed to students,
but to what campus police is
all about said DePuy.
"Thereare nights during
the vear. especially before a
home game, that this has
proven to be prettv true. But,
the professional portrait of this
happening every night is in-
accurate.
I ill Metzler, a senior En-
glish major, said WITN did
not portray an accurate pic-
ture ot ECU nightlife.
"They should have picked
a typical Thursday, Fndav or
Saturday night, not a home
footballgame weekend "said
Metle. I've been downtown
nights that were not half as
crazy as the nights before a
home football game
"The parents support the
campus police, but had a
problem with the promotion
on WITN before the story
aired Hudson said.
"We didn't stage any-
thing We reported what our
cameras saw, we didn't ask
anyone to perform said Chris
McDaniel, news director for
WITN
"It was a representation
of a tough night for campus
police. We write stones about
what people do, lots of bmes
it's not what people want to
see
On Halloween 1989,
WITN was one of the many
television stations that re-
ported the action in the streets
oi Greenville. Prosecutors
wanted to use the tapes that
wero not aired or edited to help
identifv some people and the
station refused.
"We took our time and
spent our money protecting
the first amendment, which
benefited.a kt of ECU stu-
dents said McDaniel.
"When we did that we
did not hear a peep from ECU
studentsor staff members. We
do not give prosecutors our
notes. We don't give away in-
formation that we don't give
to the public without a court
fight
I





2 8(K Caat darolfnian February 27, 1992
CRIMFS'ENE
Intoxicated subject found fallen
down; not hurt, went on his way
Feb. 21
0732�Scott Hall: Legal service to serve papers. Contact
was made, subject taken to the Magistrate's office.
1323�Chico's: Vehicle stopped for careless and reckless.
Student given verbal warning.
1337�General Classroom Building: Vehicle stopped for
obstructive view. Student given verbal warning.
1340�Reade and 5th streets: Checked out reference to
suspicious vehicle in area.
1534�Belk Hall: Checked out reference to indecent expo-
sure report.
1544�James and 7th streets: Checked out reference to hit-
and-run report.
Feb. 22
0201�Jones Hall: Unconscious intoxicated subject, awak-
ened and sent home.
0217�Belk Hall: Vehicle stopped, driver given state
citation for crossing double yellow line and borderline DWI.
0228�Reade and 3rd streets: Found intoxicated subject
fallen down. Subject not hurt, went on his way.
0422�Minges: Checked out report of vehicle involved ina
possible breaking and entering and larceny.
0641�Tyler Hall: Assisted rescue, subject transported to
Pitt County Memorial Hospital emergency room.
1014�Charles and 9th streets: Reference to possible
suspicious activity at abandoned house. No one found.
1429�Jenkins Art Building: Reference to larceny of display
items.
1522�Croatan. Vehicle stopped for three stop-sign viola-
tions and exceeding safe speed. Student given state citation.
2052�Umstead Hall: Unconscious intoxicated male subject
found. Turned over to Umstead resident.
2124�Fletcher Hall: Male non-student banned for under-
age possession of alcohol and altered driver's license.
2209�Mendenhall Student Center: Male student given
verbal warning for alcohol violation.
Crime Scan Is Ukwi from official Public Safety Log.
CAR WASH
Phi Sigma Pi
pledge class
Saturday, Feb. 29
Fuel Doc
(10th St. and Greenville Blvd.)
Proceeds go toward the
Dr. Jack Thornton Scholarship

�M
w
?
B
ft'

IV'
Thursday
Student
Budget Night
$1.15 Tall Boys
$1.25 Imports
10 High Balls
Ice Teas
ladies Free All Might
D&D
Continued from pagt 1
Terhaps the feelings expressed by
the committed players in this study
are nodifferentthan feelings of other
individuals who are intensely com-
mitted to other recreational activi-
ties the authors concluded. "This
idea should be explored
The second part of this article
will be published next week.
RUSH
'I
INTERNATIONAL
2 - INFO MEETING
MARCH 3-ITALIAN SOCIAL
4 - RAINBOW PARTY
Epsilon Sigma Alpha
SERVICE ORGANIZATION
AT:
MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER
FOR INFO AND RIDES
CALL: 830-4965 OR 758-7689
Seorges hair designs
Full Service Unisex Salon
Tanning
Skin and Nail Care
Walk-Ins Welcome
THE PLAZA MALL
Greenville Blvd.
Open Mon. - Sat. 9:30am -9pm
Sunday l pm - 6pm
Tel: 756-6200
European Trained Stylists
- Latest in Facial & Body Wax
- Professional Hair Products
STANTON SQUARE
On Stantonsburg Road
Open Mon. - Fri. 10am - 8pm
Saturday 9am - 6pm
Tel: 757-0076
$2.00 Off All Hair cuts $5.00 Off Tanning Package
EXP3-31-92
EXP 3-31-92
s�
Till
Announcing
low-interest loans for
ligh-performance
machines.
Here's how you can afford an Apple'
Macintosh" computer, even if you can't afford
a Macintosh.
Qualifying students, parents borrowing
on behalf of students, and faculty and staff
members with an annual salary of at least
$15,000, can purchase a Macintosh using
the Apple Computer Loan program.
Apply to borrow from $1,500 to $10,000
for the computer, other Apple products-
including the Appletan? extended service
plan, and up to three software packages.
If you're a student, you'll be able to defer
principal payments for up to 48 months while
in school, making interest-only payments until
30 days after you graduate or leave school.
Interest rates are surprisingly fow, and you
can take up to eight years to repay.
So stop by and fill out an Apple Computer
Loan application today. bu could be driving
a very powerful machine sooner than you think.
l.( I Sliulcnl Slows: Wore llum just books � onr dollars su
l udonl m ?�'? �-
Wright Building Telephone: 757-6731
Score Hours Monday � Thursday, 8 am. - 8 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday 11 a.m. � 5 p.m.
'7riium�rmr
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Affe Compwrttk Vt H �ffk ��� f) Malawi w nawum! indcmjc c Apf Cuwpuw In. HmfkCtf
t
Classifieds
I OK KIM
LUXURY SUITE: A seventh story
luxury suite hanging over the white
sand and clear water of South
Florida's most beautiful beach. Com-
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lievable luxury; minutes from jai-
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derdale Beach, Miami Action. $800
for week 37 - 314 at Hollywood
Beach Tower. Call (305)472-2870.
FEMALEROOMMATE WANTED:
For apartment half a block from cam-
pus, 2 blocks from downtown, super-
market, and laundromat. $220 per
month, includes rent, utilities, phone
and cable. 758-6418.
KINGSARMS APARTMENTS: 1
and 2 bedroom apartments, energy
efficient, several locations in town,
carpeted, kitchen appliances, some
water and sewer paid, washer and
dryer hook-ups. 752-8915.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 1 2 block
from campus, 1 3 rent and utilities.
Call anytime 758-0700.
fOKS,
FOR SALE: Largl
washer in excellent
sell soon. Price negc
1899 anytime.
2 YEAR OLD IGUj
long. Lizard,heat i
for SI 25 or will trae
830-5162.
1986 HONDA RI
CYCLE Well-mainl
brakes and battery
$800 � 752-4428
FOR SALE: Son)
Player w remote. Hi
dual 18 bit DA d
features! In great
Contact Matt at 75
BEAUTIFUL YA?
PET: For Saie. Verv
for trumpet in great
new Bach case.
Great deal! Call 93
757-6366 ask for Cl
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for 1
bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New
�And Ready To Rent-
UNIVERSITY -APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5ih Street
�Located Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Ceniers
�Acrojj From Highway Patrol Station
Limited Offer - $330 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy WilJiams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. 8. 12-5:30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
Qm and quact one brdrocwr. ntmiiated afjafUiauita.
energy efTcm. frw waw arid ac��,waahcri, dryer.
cab TV Coopiea a nrpci only $20 � month, 6
naxhlns. MOBILE HOME RENTALS -cwipieac
unfter Aparsnera malmvta hemnmm KiAtm Cranr�
Dear Brook Valley Country Gob.
Cotiua J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
FOR SAIE
SEIZED CARS: trucks, boats, 4-
wheelers, motor homes, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available your area now. Call
800-338-3388 Ext. C-5999.
FOR SALE: Sleeper sofa, reclincr, and
chair. Please call 746-3757.
UNBELIEVABLE 1985 Dodge Ram
50 Sport Pick-up Truck. Excellent con-
dition. Kenwood hi power stereo, 5
speed, work box, sport wheels. Book
value S3700 without improvements
first. S2450 drives it home. 752-9641
FOR SALE: Used king size bed; used
sofa bed; picnic table with four
benches; Weiider Slant board; large
kennel cab II. Call Jaquie before 12
p.m. or after 6 p.m. at 757-3032.
SERF VICES
GIRLS, YOU TEN!
What you need is
seur to relieve that
through deep mus
therapeutic massag
for appt.
CLEANING: Mar
dent, working h
school. 8 vrs. of exi
personal homes,
and own supplies.
Mver at 752-2757.
HFLP W
FAST FL'NDRi
GRAM: Fratemit
dent dubs. Earn uj
week. Plus receni
vourself. And a fri
calling 1-800-932-q
POSTAL JOBS A
positions. Great
338-3388 Ext. P-37
FREE TRAVEL
cruise ships. Studl
Christmas, spring
amusement park
800-338-3388 Ext.
TOPLESS DAN
Plavhouse nightcn
cash SSS. Call Pat
735-7713 or Club 71
EASY WORK! EX
Assemble produa
free 1-800-167-5:
500-1000 CAM!
AVAILABLE: Stafl
provides a networ
hi ring, from the "Kc
One application n
Announceme
GAMMA BETA PHI
Attention students: Anyone with a
G.P.A. of 3.0 or better who is inter-
ested in Gamma Beta Phi, an honor
fraternity and service organization,
please call Dena Price at 931-8282.
HOSPITALITY MGMT. ASSQC
HMA is looking for a responsible and
dedicated person, preferably a Hos-
pitality major, interested in the secre-
tary assistant job for the club. Great
opportunity and tots of fun! Call 931 -
7399 if interested.
CATCH ALL, OF THE ACTION!
Be a volunteer timer at the CAA
Swimming and Diving Champion-
ships. ECU is hosting the Colonial
Athletic Association Swimming and
Diving Championships Feb. 26, 27,
28, and 29. Timersare needed for Feb.
27 28 from 10:15 am to 2 p.m. and
from 6:15 to9p.m. Also Feb. 29, from
10:15 to 2 pm and from 5:15 to 830
pm Refreshments will be provided
and if three sessions are worked you
will receive a CAA Swimming and
Diving T-shirt To volunteer please
call Stewart Esposito at 758-8415 or
Matt Maloney at 757-4531
fiRfflfP ADVISING
mBrKIHrTT11"0
There will be advising every third
Tuesday of each month from 12pm
to 2 pm in room 203 Belk building.
Please see the video at either Joyner
or Brody libraries before you come
for advising.
DOWN
Local Cycling Te
members for 92-93
levels and Cats (I
and limited perks it
information call St
758-86161 Eric 830-1
SIG.vj
Get ready for the
Sigma Pi is sports
nual chili cook-offj
Thanks to all who;
pating. Feb. 27.
9273.
LIBRARY S
Second btock da
begin on March 2J
sections 21-40.
schedule of when
gin: March 2 (M
March 2 �Monday
4 Wednesday rut
Alpha Phi Sigma, I
Justice Honor ScoJ
have their next
1992 at 5 p.m. in 2
one interested is i
you have any
issa Smith
CAfTAJN'
OnFriday,Feb.28,
will be giving his





Classifieds
Sttjc lEaat (Carolinian
February 27,1992
:ETING
SOCIAL
)W PARTY
AT:
MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER
FOR INFO AND RIDES
CALL 830-4965 OR 758-7689
r designs
ean "rained Stylists
in facial & Body Wax
ssional Hair Products
STANTON SQUARE
ttonsburg Road
Fri I0am-8pm
iy 9am - 6pm
Tel: 757-0076
5.00 Off Tanning Package
EXP 3-31-92
for
ce
L . (u 11 lx able u i defer
lf ir up t 148 mi mths while
Iterestx inh payments until
aduate or leave school
rpasingh k w. and yi u
years to rep�
Bout an Apple Computer
i i o uld lx- driving
x i mer than yi u think.
suffort tulVm srfuthir
iturday 11a.m. -5 p.m.
�. V if ay�a1 -wi mriir lipKmmm xm
KfOaettf m: mag �
n-am or s��-� M.��� a� to A 6 -
- ����.�-�- f r.
�i'IPMai�kll,�Mc�r
A
LUXURY SUITE A seventh story
luxury suite hanging over the white
sand and clear water of South
Florida's most beautiful beach. Com-
pletely fumished.sleepsfive in unbe-
lievable luxury; minutes from Jai-
Alai, airport, horses, dogs, Ft Lau-
derdale Beach, Miami Action. $800
for week 37 - 314 at Hollywood
Beach TowerA Call (305) 472-2870.
FEMALEROOMMATEWANTED:
For apartment half a block from cam-
pus, 2 blocks from downtown, super-
market, and laundromat. $220 per
month, includes rent, utilities, phone
and cable. 758-6418.
KINGSARMS APARTMENTS: 1
and 2 bedroom apartments, energy
efficient, several locations in town,
carpeted, kitchen appliances, some
water and sewer paid, washer and
dryer hook-ups. 752-8915.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 12 block
from campus, 1 3 rent and utilities.
Call anytime 758-0700.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for 1
bedrcxm, 2 bedroom A
Efficiency Aparlmcnis
CALL 752-2865
A Beautiful Place to Live
�All New
�And Ready To Rent-
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5ih Street
�Located Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
Limited Offer � $330 a month
Contact J.T. or Tammy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open � Ape 8. 12-5.30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS'
Qeaa and quwt one betaxra fumirfwj ��lUiaua,
eneryy effk an, free �i�indif�tr, �when. �ytn.
cable TV. Coupiei or i in gin only. J240 a month. 6
month leas MOBILE HOME RENTALS oos plea �
anjla. Ananmrntai�lmnbikhotna�ir Aaaiaao�i�ii
near Break Valley Country Quo.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
FOR SALE: Large portable dish-
washer in excellent condition. Must
sell soon. Price negotiable Call 321-
1899 anytime.
2 YEAR OLD IGUANA: 2 1 2 feet
long. Lizard, heat rock and large cage
for SI 25 or will trade for CD player.
830-5162.
1986 HONDA REBEL MOTOR-
CYCLE: Well-maintained,new tires,
brakes and battery with accessories.
$800 � 752428.
FOR SALE: Sony Compact Disc
Player w remote. 8x oversampling
dual 18 bit DA converter. Many
features! In great condition. $175.00
Contact Matt at 758-4763.
BEAUTIFUL YAMAHA TRUM-
PET: For Sale. Very nice, well cared-
for trumpet in great condition. Brand
new Bach case. Best offer or $175.
Great deal! Call 931-9189 or work,
757-6366 ask for Chantal.
GIRLS, YOU TENSE? STRESSED?
What you need is a practiced mas-
seur to relieve that everyday tension,
through deep muscle and full body
therapeutic massage. Call 758-6418
for appt.
CLEANING: Married, female, stu-
dent, working her way through
school. 8 yrs. of experience cleaning
personal homes. Reasonable rates
and own supplies. Please call Cindy
Mver at 752-2757.
HP VVANTFD
FOKSAIE
SEIZED CARS: trucks, boats, 4-
wheclers, motor homes, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available your area now. Call
800-338-3388 Ext. C-5999.
FOR SALE: Sleeper sofa, recliner, and
chair. Please call 746-3757.
UNBELIEVABLE: 1985 Dodge Ram
50 Sport Pick-up Truck. Excellentcon-
dition. Kenwood hi power stereo, 5
speed, work box, sport wheels. Book
value $3700 without improvements
first. $2450 drives it home. 752-9641
FAST FUNDRAISING PRO-
GRAM: Fraternities, sororities, stu-
dent dubs. Earn up to $1000 in one
week. Plus receive a $1000 bonus
vourself. And a free watch just for
calling 1-800-932-0528 Ext. 65.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 800-
338-3388 Ext. P-3712.
FREE TRAVEL: Air couriers and
cruise ships. Students also needed
Christmas, spring and summer for
amusement park employment. Call
800-338-3388 Ext. F-3464
TOPLESS DANCERS WANTED
Playhouse nightclub is Goldsboro,
cash $$$. Call Paul 736-0716 or Sid
735-7713 or Club 731 -9962.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY
Assemble products at home. Call toll
free 1-800467-5566 Ext. 5920.
Applications at Career Services -
Bloxton House.
COURIERFILECLERKTOWORK
PART-TIME: Must have drivers li-
cense and reliable transportation.
Hours are mostly in the morning (9
a.m. to 1 p.m.). Phone 758-1747 and
ask for Mr. Rush or apply at Pitt
Surgical, P.A. 905 Johns Hopkins
Drive, Greenville, NG
APPLICATIONS: Brody's and
Brady's for Men are accepting appli-
cations for part-time sales positions.
Must be dependable, conscientious,
and enjoy finer fashions. Salary and
clothing discounts. Apply at Brody's
in the Plaza Monday through
Wednesday 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
BABYSITTER: Responsible, non-
smoker wanted to care for two year
old on occasional week nights, week-
ends, and overnight (6p.m. to8a.m.).
Call 321-0870 for information.
SUMMER JOB: The City of Raleigh
Parks and Recreation Department is
seeking enthusiastic hard working
ind ividuals for summer employment
Positions include pool managers, life
guards, camp counselors, nature, ath-
letic, arts, and lake personnel, park
maintenance and therapeutic pro-
grams. EOE MFH Contact 2401
Wade Avenue, Raleigh, NC, 27602.
Phone: 831-6640.
BAND SEEKS: keyboard player w
singing ability. Preferably female w
band experience. Willprovideequip-
ment Call Rich 830-9426 or Mark
830-9426.
NOW HIRING: Part-time employ-
ees Burger King, Stantonsburg Rd.
Greenville, NC 27834. No phone calls
please.
SPLIT DECISION VOCAL
SEARCH: Audition over the phone.
Call Stephen Patrick (919) 455-0775
or 353-4646. Associate of New Kids
On the Block's producer Maurice
Starr.
$10 - 5360UP WEEKLY: Mailing
Brochures! SpareFull time. Set own
hours! Free Details! Send self-ad-
dressed stamped envelope: Publish-
ers (s) P.O. Box 51037 Durham, NC
27717.
P! HLS( )Al S
FOR SALE: Used king size bed; used 500-1000 CAMP POSITIONS
sofa bed; picnic table with four AVAILABLE: Staff Referral Services
benches; Weiider Slant board; large provides a network of camps, now
kennel cab II. Call Jaquie before 12 hiring,from the "Keys" to Wise-Minn.
p.m. or after 6 p.m. at 757-3032. One application reaches all camps.
SPRING BREAK Daytona Beach
Florida, 6 days only $69. Call 1-800-
344-8914.
COME SEE GREAT STUFF. Bud
Light Daredevils will be Jamming at
half time during ECU - VA. Tech.
game Monday March 2 at 7 p.m.
GUESS WHO?? Dr. WhoXand Dr.
Mc Coy Also Science Fiction and
Fantasy comics, movies, art, cloth-
ing, music, books etc will be dis-
cussed at the Science Fiction and Fan-
tasy Organization meeting this Sat.
Feb. 29,6 p.m. in Mendenhall Base-
ment TV room.
CHI OMEG Congratulations to the
new sisters! Megan Byron, April
Chrisman, Kim Cloaninger, Trica
Creegan, Christie Crider, Mary Beth
Ditteaux, Ginny Evans, Mehryn
Galardi, Ginger Griffen, Jennifer
Horsley, Tammy Matthews, Jeannie
Monaghan, Angie Morgan, Cassie
Mouw, Jennifer McCain, Laura
Overbaur,Trish O'Neal, KimOwens,
Amy Sineath,Renee Smith, Amy Tay-
lor, Teresa White. LOVE, CHI
OMEGA.
SIG-EP: Looking foward to rolling
on with all of you tonight! Love, the
sisters of Chi Omega.
CARA, SALLY, JULIE, JOANNE
We love you! Please hang in there
KAPPA ALPHA: Jack and Jill went
up the stairs to get a shot of They
both boogied down, but didn't break
their crowns and had fun ever after!
Thanks so much! Wc had a great
time! Can'twaittogettogetheragain!
Love, sisters of Chi-Omega.
DELTA ZETA: Last Thursday was a
real barn-burner. Lefs do it again
real soon. Love, Alpha Sig.
ENJOY: A great tan in March! Spring
Break trips to Panama City, Disney
World, Cancun and Jamaica. Call
Heather 757-0573.
WAITING WILL COST YOU: Lim-
ited spaoesare filling up fast! Jamaica
airfare$1349,transfersand hotel for7
nights only $100 more. Call Heather
757-0573.
CONGRATULATIONS: To the new
sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha! We love
you! TheZetas.
SIGMA NU: From the time we
arived, things were outta sight! We
knew we were in for a fabulous night.
The fountain was flowing all right!
Near midnight the exdtement in the
air was growing. We blew our horns
and shared a few kisses knowing, It
was New Year's Eve once again!
Thanks for celebrating New Years
with us! You guys are great! Can't
waitforGreekWeek! Love, the Zeta's.
ATTN. LAMBDA CHI'S: We all
went courtin' to the Lambda Chi
house, to find out who would be our
perfect spouse. We got married once
too often; the divorce was just as
good if we could do it all over again -
You better believe we would! Love,
the Alpha Xi Delta's.
MICHELLE GIBBS AND HEIDI
HICKS: Ya'll are doing a great job
with social, we can't wait to see what
you have planned for us next! Love,
your AZD sisters.
SIGMA PI'S: Thanks for the great
party Saturday! We're really looking
forward to the Chili Cookoff! Love,
the AZDs.
DELTA CHI: We had fun at the pre-
downtown Wednesday, can't wait to
do it again! Love, AZD.
TO THE ALEX TREBECK
ALLSTARS: Good luck in
Blacksburg! Robert, Jamie, Brenda,
Jon and Chas and enjoy the slopes!
TO PAUL A SIGMA NU: How do
you expect to make it class when you
can't make it around the block, when
the gas gauge is empty most cars will
stop. If s bad enough your car looks
like a lima bean, but leaving it
stranded is pretty damn mean. Next
time you and Mahoney decide to go
for a drive, call one of us, we'll give
you a ride. But whaf s happened has
happened and whaf s done is done,
there's a gas station around the cor-
ner, why don't you go "GET SOME
LAMBDA CHI: Thaknks for invit-
ing us to party with you last night at
Splash. We had a blast. Love, Alpha
Delta Pi.
THETACHI: We can't wait for our
social tonight. Let's make it a great
one. Love, Alpha Delta Pi.
ADPi BASKETBALL TEAM: Con-
gratulations on a great game last Sun-
day. We're proud of you! Love, your
sisters.
ALPHA SIGS, DELTA ZETAS:
Rednecks, cowboy boots and ban-
danas galore - what social could have
asked for more? Loads of fun was
had by all, Lefs do it again soon!
Thanksall! Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA BASKETBALL
TEAM: You guys are doing an awe-
some job! Keep up the good work
and win the finals.
PHI MU ALPHA: What can we say
about last Thursday's serenade? You
can sing for us any day! Love, Delta
Zeta.
CONGRATS: Delta Zeta'son taking
all the awards at Province Weekend!
DZ'S: Get ready to meet the sTranger
of your dreams??! Get psyched for
Saturday night.
LAMBDA CHL- We had fun at the
fiesta - Gracias! Love, the Sigmas.
TKE: Can;t wait to disco down to-
night! Love, the Sigmas.
SIGMAS AND DATES: Once again
-a crazy night! Kimberley, what time
did you leave? Jen W was that a
luggage cart? Hope a good time was
had by all at stranger
PIKE'S: Get psyched for the "Walk
to Wilmington" this weekend. We're
looking forward to seeing everyone
on campus in front of the Student
Store 12:00 noon Friday!
NEED MONEY FOR COLLEGE?:
SFAMS locates private sector finan-
cial aid for college students. Call
Marshall Yount. 1-800-238-8771.
LAST CHANCE! SPRING BREAK
TO FLORIDA BEACHES: Daytona
$149 Panama Gty S139. Calf Alex
752-7973.
JISPI X lASSlHED
MAP TO THE EAST CAROLLN IAN
JOYNER
LIBRARY
STATPHOM
MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER
19.27$ rones - ail suMcn
On. Catalog Today wift VISA. MC �f COO
800-351-0222
iBOOMfta
' m Kaiw �a m�A fa Miw C
SP0R
1-900-246-5467
� Box Score Stats
For Al Pro Sports
� NCAA Scoreboard
Manager's Special
I every Sun, Mon, Tues
I $1.50 pitchers
All pizza slices 1 top-
ping 75
2 Large Pizzas j
with 1 topping
i
i
$6.99
! (with this coupon) ! (with this coupon) j
Announcements
C.AMMA BETA PHI
Attention students: Anyone with a
GP.A. of 3.0 or better who is inter-
ested in Gamma Beta Phi, an honor
fraternity and service organization,
please call Dena Price at 931-8282.
HOSPITALITY MGMT. ASSQC,
HMA is looking for a responsible and
dedicated person, preferably a Hos-
pitality major, interested in the secre-
tary assistant job for the club. Great
opportunity and lots of fun! Call 931-
7399 if interested.
CATCH ALL OF THE ACTION!
Be a volunteer timer at the CAA
Swimming and Diving Champion-
ships. ECU is hosting the Colonial
Athletic Association Swimming and
Diving Championships Feb. 26, 27,
28, and 29. Timersare needed for Feb.
27,28 from 10.15 a.m. to 2 p.xrt and
from 6:15 to9p.m. Also Feb. 29, from
10:15 to 2 p.m. and from 5:15 to 830
p.m. Refreshments will be provided
and if three sessions are worked you
will receive a CAA Swimming and
Diving T-shirt To volunteer please
call Stewart Esposito at 758-8415 or
Matt Maloney at 757-4532.
rmn.ftnTgrtJPENTS
There will be advising every third
Tuesday of each month from 12 pjn.
to 2 p.m. in room 203 Belk building.
Please see the video at either Joyner
or Brody libraries before you come
for advising.
DOWN EAST CYCLING CLUB
Local Cycling Team seeking new
members for 92-93 racing squad, all
levels and Cats (IV -I). Sponsorship
and limited perks included. For more
information call Miles 752-0012, Bill
758-8616 Eric 830-0435.
SlGMAfl
Get ready for the Chili Bowl, Greeks!
Sigma Pi is sponsoring the first an-
nual chili cook-off. It will be a blast!
Thanks to all who are already partici-
pating. Feb. 27. Questions call 830-
9273.
LIBRARY SCIENCE 1000
Second block dassesof LIBS 1000 will
begin on March 2. This will include
sections 21-40. The following is a
schedule of when each dass will be-
gin: March 2 (MW), March 3 OTH),
March 2 (Mond ay night dass), March
4 (Wednesday night class).
ALPHA PHI SIGMA
Alpha Phi Sigma, National Criminal
justice Honor Society, is scheduled to
have their next meeting on March 2,
1992 at 5 p.m. in 218 Ragsdale. Any-
one interested is invited to attend. If
you have any questions contact Mel-
issa Smith, President, at 931-7569.
H.MA
CAPTAIN CONTROVERSY
On Friday,Feb.28,Dr.Stanley Sandier
will be giving his presentation on the
1
"H.M.S. Captain Controversy
Launched in 1869, this experimental
turret ship withstood concerns about
her stability until she capsized in a
severe gail in 1870, taking her de-
signer and 471 others down with her.
Dr. Sandier is the Command Histo-
rian of the Kennedy Special Warfare
Center of the United States Army,
located in Fort Brag, North Carolina.
He is also the author of The Emer-
gence of the Modem Capital Ship.
INTERNATIQNAL
STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
There will be a meeting on Thursday,
Feb. 27th at 5:30 p.m.
CRAZY LAZY WATER DAYS
If you love the water, don't miss out
on Recreational Services Crazy Lazy
Water Days! Four person teams will
participate in wacky water games. If
interested please attend an impor-
tant information meeting on March 3
at 5 p.m. in Biology 103. For more
information call 757-6387.
RETURNING ADULT
STUDENT ASSOCIATION
T he Returning Adult Student Asso-
ciation (RASA) will have a meeting
on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 530 p.m. in
General Classroom Building, Room
3013. The purpose of this meeting is
to form committees and establish or-
ganizational goals. All interested stu-
dents are encouraged to attend.
ECUSCHOOL
FOR FEB. 25-MARCH 2.1992
THURS Feb. 27, Mike Dixon, piano.
Senior Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 7
p.m free), and Eric Greene, voice,
Senior Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall,9
p.m free). FRI Feb. 28, Black His-
tory ConcertWorkshop featuring
Leslie Burrs, Guest artist in flute and
jazz, and the Leslie Burrs Quartet
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:15 p.m free)
and a Flute Workshop (2 p.m. to 4
p.m free) SUN March 1, Faculty
Recital featuring Charles Bath, piano
OTetcher Recital Hall, 8:15 p.m free).
INTRODUCnON
TO MEDITATION
A four week dass in meditation tech-
niques and philosophy will begin at 7
p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 27, in Room
N109 of the Howell Science Com-
plex. All are invited. Bring a cushion
and wear comfortable clothing. For
information call Stephen Jalickee at
830-3792.
SOCIETY OF
PHYSIC STUDENTS
The Physics Club will be meeting
every Thursday at 1 p.m. Any stu-
dents interested are encouraged to
attend. Any questions call Steve at
830-3792.
BUSINESS
ETIQUETTE SEMINAR
There is more to professional success
than earning a degree and wearing

appropriate attire to the job inter-
view. Career Services invites seniors
and otherinterested students to "Put-
ting Your Best Fork Forward a pro-
gram on business etiquette and how
to conduct yourself professionally
during a business meal What to
expect at the second interview (after
the campus interview) will also be
discussed.
The program will be held in
Medndenhall Room 221 on March 3
at 3:00 p.m. Contact Career Services,
Bloxton House to register.
OFFICE OF
HEALTH PROMOTION
AND WELL-BEING
Presents The Lunch 'n' Learn Series.
Wednesday, March 4,12:15-1:00 pm,
MSC Ivrulti-Purpose Room, "How
Does Your Garden Grow?' Bring
your lunch and join us. Al Hight,
urban horticulturist, Pitt County Ag-
ricultural Extension Service, will dis-
cuss theaspectsof planning and plant-
inga "healthy" vegetable garden. For
more information, call 757-6793.
FTU EQIESTRIAN CLUB
Horses interest you? ECU Eques-
trian Club and team being formed,
first meeting Tuesday, March 3,1992
at 5d0 pm, Room 212 Mendenhall
Student Center. Beginner through
advanced riders welcome. Trainer,
horses and new stable with indoor
ring near campus available for our
use CallDebbieat752915orEleen
at 830-3931 for details. u
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
Lent begins Ash Wednesday, March
4. Special Ash Wednesday masses.
12 noon in Great Room of Mendenhall
Student Center and 5:30 pm at the
Newman Center, 953 E. lOthSt.atrhp
foot of College Hill Drive.
i
INTERNATIONAL
STUDENT ASSOCIATION ;
The International Student Associa-
tion will be ha ving its annual Interna-
tional Dinner on Mar. 21 from 6:30
pm to 1100 pm in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. There will be food, per-
formances, and exhibits from around
the world. Tickets are S6.00 students
and $8.00 general public. For more
irtformationcan:757-4788or757-4900
after 5 pm.
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY THE
SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS
in conjunction with
THE DEPARTMENT
OF ENGLISH PRESENTS
Mike Hammer and Patrick Bizzaro
synthesizing the expressive arts,
music, poetry and mixed-media
drawingpainting. February 27,330
pm, Room 1327 Jenkins fine Arts
Building. This presentation is part of
a continuing series of interdepart-
mental experiences wimVisring Art-
ist foe Baker, and students of Ad-
vanced and Graduate Painting Stu-
dio. All interested students and fac-
ulty are invited.





�jje
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The Em Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of v,cw. Letters should be
limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, The East Carolinian reserves the nght to edit or reject letters
for plication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C,
27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Thursday, February 27, 1992
VtoJlfl
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Bush should crack down on drugs Modest proprosal wihjsolve racism
, . , j,oi.4 77,n Our country's incessant bicker- �- M H M wWrmmtrvsothevcan'twoH
The Democratic staff of the House the last decade could be used to virtually
Judicary crime subcommittee issued a re- seal off the American border from the drug
port Monday concerning the drug problem cartels. It would not solve the problem, but
in the United States. The report stated that it is a start.
"there is no evidence that a single street Drugs destroy. They promote violence,
dealer has missed a single sale because he the spread of AIDS, birth defects, unem-
eouldn't get his hands on a rock of crack ployment the list goes on.
Drug dealers in the United States have People use drugs for a number of rea-
continuous access to supplies and have no sons. Whether it be for escape, relaxation,
problem fulfilling user demand. boredom, whatever � this country has a
George Bush and leaders from five problem. If fewer drugs entered the coun-
Latin American countries will meet in San try, Americans could concentrate on other
Antonio, Texas, today to discuss the prob- problems, illiteracy and poverty to name
lem of drugs. Each U.S. president since just two. With fewer drugs available, more
Lyndon Johnson has revealed a plan for a Americans would have a healthier mind
"War on Drugs Each plan has failed; more with which to function. A healthy mind is
than 26 million Americans used drugs in at least a starting point for solving other
1991 and and put more than $140 billion in problems.
the pockets of drug dealers. Drug abuse derives from deep socio-
The time has come to be serious. economic problems. There may never be
The Bush administration needs to fight an answer to stopping the drug problem in
drugs on all fronts. Improved education in America.
schools, better treatment for dependents As long as the family foundation con-
and stopping drugs from entering the tinues to crumble and society continues to
country should all be top priorities. alienate its members, there will always be
With the vast military capabilities of a desire to escape.
this country, the Bush administration could There may be no clear-cut answer for
severely hamper the influx of drugs enter- solving the drug problem, but leaders can
ing this country. The extensive number of at least make a serious attempt to keep as
weapons purchased by the United States in many people off drugs as possible.
H�H THISi-l-
STOP 'ENS!
Our country's incessant bicker-
ing about race-related issues is no
longer productive. Think of the time
and energy we expend in arguments
about affirmative action and reverse
discrimination and "hate crimes" and
all the rest of it.
It's not that these issues
shouldn't be argued about. 1 think
they should�if ourarguments led to
progress. They don't. What an irra-
tional, unconscionable waste.
Fortunately, 1 have a solution.
With a relatively small investment of
time and money, we can put racism
(and ail ourargumentsabout it) behind
us forever. Here is my plan
We need only do what several
other countriesaround the world have
beendoing for the past few years: split
up.
We'll set a rule of thumb that
each different ethnic group should
receive a contiguous area of land
roughly proportional to its percentage
of the total population, and that every
ethnic group should havea minimum
of one seaport, for purposes of trade
and commerce with other nations.
Blacks are about 10 percent of
the population (according to my in-
creasingly unreliable memory), so it
seems fair, as a rough guide, to allocate
10 percent of the states to them. For
the sakeof discussion, blacks will take
five states in the Southeast � say,
Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Missis-
sippi, and Louisiana. That provides
them with choice real estate and oil
fields.
What's more, several of those
states contain large numbersof blacks
already, many of them poor. They
can't afford to move and won't have
to.
That done, the rest is easy. Say,
New York for Jews, some part of Texas
for Hispanics. Asians will relocatein a
portion of Oregon.
For purposes of historical irony
and poetic justice, Plymouth Rockand
By
Scott
Maxwell
Editorial
Columnist
surrounding areas will be divided
among descendants of various
American Indian tribes.
The remainder, of course, is for
whites. (Or should we split that, too,
among Irish-Americans, Italian-
Americans, and so on7 We are after
ethnic purity, you know.)
Wecan hash out more equitable
arrangements, if there's something
I've overlooked (and there probably
is). The point is, each major ethnic
group will own and control its own
region of what is now the United
States.
There's one more condition to
stipulate. Each new nation must agree
never to have any kind of relationship
with theothers, period. Nodiplomatic
relations, no sailing in each other's
waters, no flying over each other's
airspace, no wars (difficult to en force,
I realize), nothing. The whole point of
this plan is to achieve separation, after
all. Why mess it up?
As an interim measure, inter-
racial couples and persons of mixed
backgrounds will be granted dual
citizenships as appropriate. That's a
problem that will substantially dis-
appear in a generation anyway, since
the strictly enforced separation I just
mentioned will preclude future in-
termarriages.
If we follow this plan, we will in
the future be spared the frothings of
white racists that blacks are conspir-
ing to take away all the good jobs (or
that Jews secretly own and control all
the businesses); likewise, we will be
spared the delusions of black racists
that all whites areout to exclude them
from business opportunities.
Whites won't be allowed into
thcblacks' country, so they can t work
in their businesses, much lew control
them. And vice versa.
In sum, all ethnic groups w
free to go their own merry ways
untroubled by Others
So that's the plan. It we wish
we can now begin to implement I �
We could � if we really, reallv
wanted to � grow the hell up We
could, it we wanted to, begin to trea-
sure and respect our society's i
sitv
Not just our physical diverv:
which is of little interest or value in
itself, but our cultural and p-
diversity.
For example, Clarence Thomas
and Thurgood Marshall have bttkifl
common with each other except ska
color, but why should we care about
their skin color? We could, M
wanted to, focus instead on what we
can learn from each of those wrf
different men. Their ethnicitv is irrel-
evant, it is their minds that matter
At the same time, we could � i!
we wanted to � stop preferd :r.a:
separation would bnng us anything
but a temporary respite. There is no
shame or loss in integrating i diversf;
society; there is only strength �pro-
vided, of course, that both, the larger
group and the smaller group make
genuine efforts to learn boa each
other.
If we're going to separate b �
each other, then let's do it already and
get on with our lives.
But if we're not willing to
separate from each other, we are go-
ing to have to learn to get along with
each other Period.
I am largely past caring which
we do. But it's time we either gave up
and went our separate ways, or :artti
to look past the anger.
Now.
Campus Spectrum
Student voters should exercise rights
��
Letters to the Editor
Mandelker's date-rape definition angers student
To The Editor:
I would like to address Mr.
Mandelker's letter of Feb. 25. His ref-
erence to date rape as an "alleged
phenomenon" is not only ignorant,
but a blantant slap in the face to those
who have been raped. Whether rape
occurs from a brutal, violent attack by
a man jumping out from behind a
bush, or it occurs when a victim knows
the person committing the crime, rape
is rape.
No means no.
There are many women on
campus who have gone through this
ordeal, and not reported it. The police
treat victims like perpetrators. The
courts analyze victims' backgrounds
and discuss whether or not "they
asked for it
Date rape is not a "non-existent
crime
Rape exists, and will not go
away. Women are confronting the
truth. Mr. Mandelker is the one
wearing dirty spectacles.
Rachael Autry
Junior
English Education
Bush's environmental stance brings concern
To The Editor:
The United Nations conference
on the environment at Rio de Janeiro,
Brazil, in June offers a great opportu-
nity for the world's only remaining
superpower to lead. And our presi-
dent isn't even planning to go!
Doesn't he know that if we wait
to be absolutely sure there's a green-
house effect, it will be too late to avoid
the evils?
Can't he see that we need
worldwide population control? That
if each couple produced only four
productive offspring, the space that
was adequate 50 years ago would be
packed? That without population con-
trol, a half-island like Haiti is doomed
to poverty, starvation and massive
emigration, even without despotic
government?
Doesn't he recognize that pro-
tecting the ozone layer is an interna-
tional necessity? I appreciate his
moving up the target date for almost
zero percent production of CFC's in
the United States. But it's vague to me.
Is it more than words? Will we just
substitute something that's only a little
less dangerous? If we have a good
plan, let's "exporf it at the confer-
ence.
U.S. leadershipcould begin with
the agenda. The worst contributor to
environmental destruction � wars
and preparation for wars�isn't on it.
Our president could insist it be added
now while TV images of burning oil
wells and oil releases that dwarf
Exxon-Valdez are fresh in minds an
over the world.
Let our environmental presi-
dent carry the banner. Let our country
lead the world.
Edith Webber
English Department
Emeritus
The North Carolina Presiden-
tial Primary will be held on May 5.
Who will you vote for? I know, I know,
voting is a lot of trouble. You haven't
had time to register. You don't even
know where to register. Besides, poli-
ticians don't care about college stu-
dents, anyway, so why bother?
Well, voting is no more trouble
than standing in line outside a bar on
a Saturday night to get in and pay
$230 for a beer. Registering to vote
takes about a tenth of the time it takes
to register for classes every semester,
and the Board of Elections is conve-
niently located in the same building
as the liquor store downtown on
Cotanche Street. And, oh yes, the rea-
son politicians don't care about us is
because less than 35 percent of the
people in our age group vote.
You have to understand that
politicians are pretty low on the food
chain, lower even than lawyers, and
votes are all they care about (other
than money, which they just use to
buy votes). It doesn't bother them that
our generation will be the one that has
to pay off the trillion-dollar national
debt or the billion-dollar interest on
that debt.
Politicians don't care that many
of us won't find jobs when we gradu-
ate, or that we may not be able to
afford health insurance when we're
out from under our parents' policies.
They don't care that our generation's
success or failure will be the nation's
success or failure. None of that mat-
ters and none of us matter because we
don't give them the votes they need to
get in or stay in office.
Thaf s the sad truth of it. The
level of a politician's concern over an
By Hugh Hawley
Special to The East Carolinian
issue is directly related to the number
of votes that issue will generate. A
candidate (or his highly-paid cam-
paign managers) will analyze an is-
sue, decide how many votes he will
get by supporting or not supporting
it, and then determine on that basis
his own personal, deeply-held con-
victions. So, if you don't vote, you
don't get to help the candidate make
up his mind.
However, if you do vote, the
politicians will be forced to take into
account your opinion on an issue, and
to determine the effect your vote will
have on their candidacy. That's how
we originally got the right to vote in
1972. The government was sending
18-to-20-year-olds to Vietnam, even
though they couldn't vote. The lead-
ers of our nation didn't care that that
was a bit unjust (the founding fathers
were mad about taxation without rep-
resentation, yet Lyndon Johnson had
no problem with conscription without
representation), but when enough
people our age made it a problem, the
politicians realized that they had bet-
ter listen or those young people would
vote them out of office when they
turned 21.
Now none of us have to worry
about being drafted, but there are
plenty of other things out there that
ought to really piss us off. The people
who voted when we weren't old
enough seem to have really left us in
the outhouse as far as finding a suc-
cessful career. You seniors know what
Entertainment
f
I'm talking about. Just trv to find a �b
out there that is even remote! v related
to the degree you have spent five M
six years earning. I've seen news sto-
nes about recent graduates commit-
ting the most distasteful act ot moving
back in with their parents.
After four or five years ot not
having to make your bed, being able
to stay out all night drinking and
living without the fear of a parent
walking in on you and your girlfnend
while you're well, vou know, can
you imagine having to live at home
again? The horror
But that may be what we're fac-
ing if the economy doesn't turn
around. It seems like it will be up to us
youngsters to makethechanges.Since
we won't be able to find jobs in the
near future, we can't really turn the
politicians' heads with money (which
speaks almost as loudly as votes), and
since members of congress won't read
a letter unless it's signed by the owne
of a multi-million dollar corporation
within their district, we better use the
only form of expression we're allow
� voting.
Sometime during the month oil
March, there will be a stand outside
the Student Store where some of youi
more civic-minded peers will be try
ing to get you to register. Unlike most
of the people who set up a table ort
that sidewalk, we won't be asking for
money or trying to get you to join
anything; well simply be giving votf
the chance to exercise your right ta
manipulate the minds of the candH
dates by causing them to consider th
effect of our opinions on their em
payment outlook. 1 do hope you'
drop by. ;
I
Alumina art pn
By Valeria Balogh
Staff Writer
"Abstract expressionism is
alive and well here at ECU re-
marked Donald Furst, judged this
year's Illumtna Art Competition.
Furst is a professor at the Univer-
sity of North Carolina at
Wilmington where he teaches
printmaking and drawing
After several hoursot viewing
and reviewing the entries, Furst
explained why he chose the pieces
that won. He also talked about what
a judge looks for m a winning piece
of art work.
Furst's overall view about the
work was that there was a curious
hxation with a quirkv kind ot Gothic
surrealism. He also saw an interest
in vigorous brush strokes and an
expressionishc, highly emotional
treatment of the figure Furst
seemed pleased and interested in
the work that ECU s art students
are doing.
The most successful pieces in
Furst's eves were the ones with
picture unity � ones where all the
pai of a piece seemed to be work-
ing together to convey a
idea. Furst said each w
projected a senous intei
"They knew what th
togetacrossandgotitaci
said.
Furst used acuratorj
ti veon judging the work!
agenda, nor theme in
he judged. He chose thl
piece regardless of sizJ
style, subject matter or ii
said that even though
student show, he revj
pieces that were free ot
ence � art that came a
the student's own expej
Artists are alwavs I
appointment when a
they entered in a comr.
jected. There is always i
of why their entry did
When Furst was as
some light on this qu
sponded by mentionit
culty of a judge's positl
Hesaidthatapiec
in one regard and taill
Examples could be'
drawn yet poorly coml
or a work could be
Lost Colony f o
By Lisa Williams
Staff Writer
It all began in 1387 when 113
men, women and children left
PI vmouth, England and set sail to a
new land. But their dreams disap-
peared as quickly as the people did
� with hardly a trace.
People have always been fasci-
nated with the story of the first
struggle in the new land. This is
why Paul Green's elaborate theat-
rical spectacle, "The Lost Colony
will enter its 52nd production sea-
son on June 12.
Not only does this outdoor
drama teach history, it also offers
voung actors valuable training
ground in all face! I
theatre.
These original pi
on actual events anc
where the events tool,
summer some 4,3v
students find jobsmot
"The Lost Colon vl
first and longest run
performance, will be 1
he auditions for tt
drama.
This musically a
will choose actors, SU
and production staff
of three casting calls.i
take place in Manteo
29.
One hundred at
8 LOCATIONS
TO SERVE YOU
L
Carolina Dairies 1
Orange Juice (plasl
2 Liter Pepsi
79$
GreenGiant
15oz. Whole K
11 oz. Niblets
15oz.CutGreen





GUte iEaat �ar0ltttfart
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, Gerard Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
11 win r Warprfp, News Editor Richard Hasklrig, Staff Illustrator
Jl l u Roscoe, Asst. News Editor MlCHAEL ALBUQUERQUE, Business Manager
Li vvis Coble, Entertainment Editor LARRY HuGGINS, Circulation Manager
DANA DaMELSON, Asst, Entertainment Editor ScOTT Maxwell, Systems Engineer
MlCHAEL Martin, Sports Editor Steven Ollice, Classified Adverting Technician
) n Bt CK1 R, Copy Editor CHRIS Norman, Darkroom Technician
Bl air Skinner, Copy Editor Jean Caraway, Advertising Technician
Chantai Wieoman, layout Manager Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Ty Give IT MERE
I
MO, US HV&
( HAD TO LV�
HERE-MY TURN'
WAMHK'
WAHHH
ITS MINE'
Entertainment
he Easti an liman has served the East Carolina campus community since 1V25. emphasizing information thai affects ECU
students !� East Carolinian publishes 12.IXH) copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
a the opinion ot the Editorial Board. Ihe East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should be
limited to 250� ords or less, lor purposes of decency and brevity. The East C 'aroliman reserves the right to edit or reject letters
iMii stiotl 1 etters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C
lor more information, ill l1!1)) 7? 7 6.to6.
Opinion
Page 4, Thursday, February 27, 1992
Alumina art pr
&&&
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Bush should crack down on drugs Modest proposal willsolve racism
he Democratic Staff of the House the last decade could be used to virtually
judicary crime subcommittee issued a re- seal off the American border from the drug
port Monday concerning the drug problem cartels It would not solve the problem, but
in the United States. The report stated that it is a start.
there is no evidence that a single street Drugs destroy. They promote violence,
dealer has missed a single sale because he the spread of AIDS, birth detects, unem-
couldn't get his hands on a rock ot crack
Drug dealers in the United States have
i ontinuous access to supplies and have no
problem fulfilling user demand.
v ,eorge Bush and leaders from five
Latin American countries will meet in San
Antonio, Texas, today to discuss the prob-
lem ot drugs Each U.S. president since
1 vndon ohnson has revealed a plan tor a
War on Drugs Each plan has failed; more
than 26 million Americans used drugs in
1991 and and put more than $140 billion in
the pockets ot drug dealers.
The time has come to be serious.
plovment the list goes on.
People use drugs tor a number ot rea-
sons. Whether it be tor escape, relaxation,
boredom, whatever � this country has a
problem. It fewer drugs entered the coun-
try, Americans could concentrate on other
problems, illiteracy and poverty to name
just two. With fewer drugs available, more
Americans would have a healthier mind
with which to function. A healthy mind is
at least a starting point tor solving other
problems.
Drug abuse derives from deep socio-
economic problems. There may never be
The Bush administration needs to fight an answer to stopping the drug problem in
drugs on all fronts Improved education in America.
schools, better treatment for dependents
and stopping drugs from entering the
I ountry should all be top priorities.
With the wist military capabilities of
this country, the Bush administration could
severely hamper the influx of drugs enter-
ing this country. The extensive number of
weapons purchased by the United States in
As long as the family foundation con-
tinues to crumble and society continues to
alienate its members, there will always be
a desire to escape.
There may be no clear-cut answer for
solving the drug problem, but leaders can
at least make a serious attempt to keep as
many people off drugs as possible.
CHir country's incessant bicker
ing about race-related issues is no
longer productive. Think of the time
and energy we expend in arguments
about affirmative action and reverse
discrimination and "hate crimes" and
all tin- rcsl of it.
It's not th.it these issues
shouldn't bo argued about 1 think
they should it our arguments led to
progress. They don't Wh.it an irra-
tional, unconscionable waste.
Fortunately, I have a solution
With a relatively '�mall investment ot
timo and money, wo can put racism
(andallourargumentsabout it) behind
us forever I lore is my plan
Wo need only do what several
other countries around the world have
boon doing tor t ho past tow years: split
up
U. II set a rule ot thumb that
each ditr. rent ethnic group should
receive a contiguous area ot land
roughlv proportional to its percentage
ot the total population, and that every
ethnic group should havea minimum
ot one seaport, tor purjx'sos ot trade
and commerce with other nations
Blacks are about bt percent ot
the population (according to mv in-
Byryk
Scott Maxwell?i
1 ditorial' - W
Columnist�f.
surrounding anas v. tx I '� :� d
among descendants ot various
American Indian tribes
The remainder, ot course, is tor
whites. (Or should we spin that, too
among Irish-Americans, Italian-
Americans, and so on? We ttre after
ethnic purity, you know 1
Wecan hash out moreequitable
arrangements, it there's something
I've overlooked (and there probably
is) Ihe point is, each major ethnic
iwn Ard control its own
region
states
at is now the United
Whites von't be
theblacks'country, so tl 1
in their businesses, much 1
them And vice versa
Insum.allethi 51
, to c th r ow merry
mtt . cdb h �
s that's th. ; Lai If
wecan now begin to implenv � �
Wo 0 uld if wen 1 . �� . .
wanted to srms the h
could. wo wanted t t: .
sure and respect our society
SitV
Not ust our phy u hversin
which is ot little interest - .
itself, but our cultural ind pei
diversity
For exam pk 11
and Thurgood Marsha
common with each other � tskti
ailnr, but why should wi
By Valeria Balogh
Staff Writer
"Abstract expressionism i
alive and well here at EC
marked Donal J Furs! tdgi
war's fflumina Arl ' mpetit
burst is a professor it th
sitv ot North arolina
Wilmington v. here I
pnntmakmg; and Ira � .
Afters,
and reviewing the enb
explained why hi I e the pie
thatwon.lk.iis. talked ab
a)udgeliHks,t. writ
of art work
Furst's overall . I
work was that thei isacuriou
ticationv.it! 1 �� �
surrealism. I lea - awai
in vigorous brui I trok . I 1
expressionist highly. I 1
treatment ol the figun
seemed pleased and nten ted
the work that EC1 ttl tudei
are doing
The most successful ; ie
Furst's eyes ��� � re the 01
picture unit) 1 ines '��� here all tr
parts of a piece seemed to be ��� r
.� � gether 1 nvej -
It 1 Furst said each wf
� nous inter
� v knew what tt
� getact issandgotitac
tusedacurator
I
� r
lj i. He ch - �
ctmarj
-
���� �
I thai refreeol
� � � irt thai amed
. . 1
tment when a

ted
f wh
. . .
:� � led by mei
�. � � posil
� �� -viid that 1
I! : .
� : - lb
"here's one more condition to their �-km a!or v�.
Stipulate Ea h new nation must agree
never to haveany kind ot relationship
with the others, period Nodiplomatic
relations, no sailing in each other's
waters, no living over each other's
airspace, no wars (difficult to enforce
1 realize), nothing The whole point ot
wanted to, focus instead nwl at iw
can learn from each or tl
ditterent men Their ethnicity - �-� -
evant; it is their minds tl �
At the same time v
we wanted to - stop pro i
separation would brine us tnytl
creasingly unreliable memory), so it this plan is to achieve separation, after but a temporary respite fhei
top ev'
seems fair, as a rough guide, to allocate
10 percent of the states to them Fror
thesakeof discussion, blacks will take
five states m the Southeast say,
Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Missis
sippi, and Louisiana That provides
them with choice real estate and oil
fields.
What's more, several of those
states contain large numbers of blacks
already, many of them poor. Thev
can't attord to move and won't have
to.
That done, the rest is easy Si
all. Whv mess it up1
As an interim measure, inter-
racial couples and persons ot mixed
backgrounds will be granted dual
citizenships as appropriate "hat's a
problem that will substantially dis-
appear in a generation anyway, since
the strictly enforced separation I just
mentioned will preclude future in-
termarriages.
It we follow this plan, we will in
the future be spared the frothing: ot
white racists that blacks are conspir-
ing to take away all the good nbs (or
New York tor )ews, some part ot Texas that lews secret Iv own and control all
torHispamcs Asians will relocate in a the businesses); likewise, we will be
portion ot Oregon. spared the delusions 0! black racists
For purposes ot historical irony that all whites are out to exclude them
and poetic justice, Plymouth Rock and from business opportunities
shame or loss in integrating ad
society; there is only strength
vided, ot course, that both thi � t
group and the smaller cr
genuine efforts to ear fi
other
it we're going to separj
eachother, then let's do it aln � Mid
get on with our lives
But it we're not wil ng to
separate from each other w n -
ing to have to learn to g I 3 ' ���
each other Period
I am largely past caring ���" �"
we do But it's time we either gavt r
and went our separate ways -
to look past the anger
Now
Lost Colony f o
Bv Lisa Williams
Staff Writer
It all began it 1587 when 115
men, women and children left
Plymouth, England and sel sail tea
new land But their dreams disap
pearedasqukkJyasthepeopledid
� with hardlv a trace.
Pet ipiehavealwaysbeen fas 1
nated with the story of the first
struggle in the new land. This is
v hv Paul (Ireen's elaborate theat-
rical spei lade, "The LostCblony
will enter its '2nJ production sea-
son on une 12.
Not only does this outdoor
drama teach history, it also otters
young actors valuable training
where trw
summer some 4,50
students find jobs
' The Lost O
: � run
performance, will be
lie audit ns for tl
drama
Thismuskal �
will choose actors -1
and production si
of three casting.
take place in Mai
29.
One hundr
8 LOCATIONS
TO SERVE YOL
Campus Spectrum

rjJII' t .
Letters to the Editor
ftaoftZ
Student voters should exercise rights I
Mandelker's date-rape definition angers student
It) The Editor:
I would like to address Mr.
Ma nd el kefs letter of Feb. 25. His ref-
erence to date rape as an "allegixi
phenomenon" is not only ignorant,
but a blantant slap in the face to those
who have been raped. Whether rape
01 urs from a brutal, violent attack by
a man jumping out from behind a
hush, or it occurs when a victim knows
the person committing the crime, rape
is rape.
No means no
There are many women on
campus who have gone through this
ordeal, and not reported it. The police
treat victims like perpetrators. The
courts analyze victims' backgrounds
and discuss whether or not "they
asked for it"
Date rape is not a "non-existent
crime
Rape exists, and will not go
away. Women are confronting the
truth. Mr. Mandelker is the one
wearing dirty spectacles.
Rachael Autry
Junior
English Education
Bush's environmental stance brings concern
To The Editor:
Ihe United Nations ronference
on the environment at Rio de Janeiro,
Brazil, in June offers a great opportu-
nity for the world's only remaining
superpower to lead. And our presi-
dent isn't even planning to go!
Doesn't he know that if we wait
to be absolutely sure there's a green-
house effect, it will betoo late toavoid
the evils?
Can't he see that we need
worldwide population control? That
if each couple produced only four
productive offspring, the space that
was adequate 50 years ago would be
packed?That without population con-
trol, a half-island like Haiti is doomed
to poverty, starvation and massive
emigration, even without despotic
government?
Doesn't he recognize that pro-
tecting the ozone layer is an interna-
tional necessity? I appreciate his
moving up the target date for almost
zero percent production of CFC's in
the United States. But it's vague to me.
Is it more than words? Will we just
substitute something that's only a little
less dangerous? If we have a good
plan, let's "export" it at the ronfer-
ence.
U.S.leadershipcould begin with
the agenda. The worst contributor to
environmental destruction � wars
and preparation for wars � isn't on it.
Our president could insist it be added
now while TV images of burning oil
wells and oil releases that dwarf
Exxon-Valdez are fresh in minds all
over the world.
Let our environmental presi-
dent carry the banner. Let our country
lead the world.
Edith Webber
English Department
Emeritus
The North Carolina Presiden-
tial Primary will be held on May 5.
Who will you vote tor11 know, I know,
voting is a lot ot trouble. You haven't
had time to register. You don't even
know whereto register Besides, poli-
ticians don't care about college stu-
dents, anyway, so why bother?
Well, voting is no more trouble
than standing in line outside a bar on
a Saturday night to get in and pay
S2.50 for a beer. Registering to vote
takes about a tenth of the time it takes
to register for classes every semester,
and the Board of Elections is conve-
niently located in the same building
as the liquor store downtown on
Cotanche Street. And, oh yes, the rea-
son politicians don't care about us is
because less than .15 percent of the
people in our age group vote.
You have to understand that
politicians are pretty low on the food
chain, lower even than lawyers, and
votes are all they can- about (other
than money, which they just use to
buy votes). It doesn' t bother them t hat
our generation will be the one that has
to pav off the trillion-dollar national
debt or the billion-dollar interest on
that debt.
Politicians don't carethat many
of us won't find jobs when we gradu-
ate, or that we may not be able to
afford health insurance when we're
out from under our parents' policies.
They don't care that our generation's
success or failure will be the nation's
success or failure. None of that mat-
ters and none of us matter because we
don't give them the votes they need to
get in or stay in office.
That's the sad truth of it. The
level of a politician's concern over an
By Hugh Hawley
Special to The tast Carolinian
issue is directly related to the number
of votes that issue will generate A
candidate (or his highly-paid cam-
paign managers) will analyze an is-
sue, decide how many votes he will
get by supporting or not supporting
it, and then determine on that basis
his own personal, deeply-held con-
victions. St), if you don't vote, vou
don't get to help the candidate make
up his mind.
However, if you do vote, the
politicians will be forced to take into
account your opinion on an issue, and
to determine the effect your vote will
have on their candidacy. That's how
we originally got the right to vote in
1972. The government was sending
18-to-20-year-olds to Vietnam, even
though they couldn't vote. The lead-
ers of our nation didn't care that that
was a bit unjust (the founding fathers
were mad about taxation without rep-
resentation, yet Lyndon Johnson had
no problem with conscription without
representation), but when enough
people our age made it a problem, the
politicians realized that they had bet-
ter listen orthoseyoung people would
vote them out of office when they
turned 21.
Now none of us have to worry
about being drafted, but there are
plenty of other things out there that
ought to really piss us off. The people
who voted when we weren't old
enough seem to have really left us in
the outhouse as far as finding a suc-
cessful career. You seniors know what
I'm talkingabout. )ust trv to find a � b
out there that is even remotely r
to the degree vou have sp nt fiv� r
six years earning. I've seen news �
ries about recent graduates coi
tingthemostdistasterulactofn � -
back in with their parents
After tour or five years . '
having to make your bed, being
to stay out all night drinkir; antj
living without the tear of a parent
walking in on vou and vour girlfriend
while you're well, vou know csa
you imagine having to live at home
again1 The horror
But that mav be what we're be-
ing if the economy doesn't turn
around. It seems like it will be'up to us
youngsters to make the changes Since
we won't be able to find jobs in the
near future, we can't reallv turn the
politicians' heads with money! which
speaks almost as loudlv as votes), and
since members of congress won't read
a letter unless it's signed bv the owner
of a multt-million dollar corporation
within their district, we better use th�
only form of expression we 're allow!
� voting.
Sometime during the month of
March, there will be a stand outside
the Student Store where some ot your
more civic-minded peers will be trv-
mg to get you to register Unlike most
of the people who set up a table on
that sidewalk, we won't be asking for
money or trying to get you to Kim
anything, we'll simply be giving you
the chance to exercise your right to
manipulate the minds of the candi-
dates by causing them to consider the
effect of our opinions on their em;
ployment outlook. I do hope you U
drop by.
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tegin to tn a-
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or value in
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ngth � pro-
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exercise rights
ist try to find a ob
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rig 1 t seen news StO-
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tast � act of moving
r five years at not
� �� . ur bed, being able
night dnnking, and
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' � � ' well vou know, can
' iving to live at home
i he horror
But that may be what we're fac-
' ' ' economy doesn't turn
md It seems like it willbeuptous
vou ngsters to make the changes. Since
we won't be able to find pbs in the
near future, we can't reallv turn the
ins' heads with money (which
�-paks ,j most as loudly as votes), and
�nrr hers ot congress won't read
a letter unless it's signed bytheowne
of a multi-million dollar corporation
within their district, we better use th�i
only form of expression we're allowct
voting
Sometime during the month of
March, there will bo � stand outside
the student Store where some of you�
more civic-minded peers will be try?
mg to get you to register Unlike most
of the people who set up a table orf
that sidewalk, we won't be asking fof
monev or trying to get you to join
anything, we'll simply be giving you
the chance to exercise your right to
manipulate the minds of the candi-
dates bv causing them to consider the
effect of our opinions on their em-
ployment outlook I do hope you'll"
drop by.
wte in
ndmg
even
e lead-
bat that
; fathers
put rep-
n had
�without
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Entertainment
uU� East (Karalmtan
February 27, 1992
Illwriina art projects 'serious intent7
By Valeria Balogh
Staff Writer
Abstract expressionism is
alive and well here at ECU re-
marked Donald Furst, judge of this
year's lllumina Art Competition.
I urst is a professor at the Univer-
sity of North Carolina at
Wilmington where he teaches
printmaking md drawing.
tter seven! hotrod viewing
and reviewing the entries, Furst
explained why he chose the pieces
thai won I loalso talked about what
i ; idge looks for in a winning piece
p art work.
( urst's overall view about the
work w.is that there was a curious
I v.itu mi with, t quirky kind of Gothic
surrealism. I leaJsosswatt interest
in vigorous brush strokes and an
expressionistic, highly emotional
treatment of the figure. Furst
seemed pleased and interested in
the work that ECU'S art students
in doing.
The most successful pieces in
Fursfs eves were the ones with
picture unity � ones where all the
i a piece seemed to be work
ing together to convey a dominant
idea. Furst said each work chosen
projected a serious intent.
"They knew what they wanted
to get acrossand got it across Furst
said.
Furst used acuratorial perspec-
tive on judging the work. He had no
agenda, nor theme in mind when
he judged. He chose the strongest
piece regardless of size, material,
style, subject matter or imagery. He
said that even though this was a
student show, he rewarded the
pieces that were free of direct influ-
ence � art that came directly from
the student's own experience.
Artists are always fighting dis-
appointment when a piece of art
they entered in a competition is re-
jected. There is always the question
of why their entry did not get in.
When Furst was asked to shed
some light on this question he re-
sponded by mentioning the diffi-
culty of a judge's position
He said that a piece can do well
in one regard and fail in another.
Examples could be a beautifully
drawn yet poorly composed piece,
or a work could be superbly pre-
sented but the idea is second hand.
Another factor in success could be
the way a piece is cropped on the
edges.
For Furst it is a painful process
to reject show pieces that had in-
triguing possibilities or effective
passages yet the whole d id not coa-
lesce.
Furst also went on to explain
why each piece won.
Kerry Smith's "Clay Woman"
won Best in Show.
"This piece intrigued me be-
causeofit'sresolutionofopposites
Furst said. "The colors are gentle
and the surface is a rich accumula-
tion of pigment.
The second place winner was
Sherri Cowan for her si 1 ver perf u me
container.
This piece attracted Furst be-
cause of its casual suavity and its
witty visual contradiction. He re-
ferred to it as "sweetness and the
toolbox
Third place went to Tamara
Fedder for her scratchboard piece,
"Shadows of Kitchens Past
"Thisartist made wonderful use
of the whole range of tones from
stark white to rich black and a par-
but the rugged surface and figure ticularly broad variety of grey tones
distortions are effectively disturb-
ing. The piece is at once subtle and
aggressive
Patrick Dougherty's "While
Waiting for a Change of Light in
Chapel Hill" was awarded first
place. According to Furst, this piece
succeeded because it wasmore than
one thing at the same time.
The paintingoperatesona level
of ferocious brush work and on an-
other level of visual discription. The
built entirely from scratches Furst
said.
"Despiteitsscale,thislittlepiece
has considerable visual impact. It
can hold its own with much larger
a nd colorful works. The marks made
and the imagery presented mesh
effectively
Several honorable mentions
were also given.
The lllumina show will be on
display until March 6. The exhibit is
Photo by Jit! Charry - ECU Photo lab
viewer ponders the relationship intheupstairsgalleryofMendenhall
between figures. Thecolorsare lush Student Center.
While Waiting for a Change of Light in Chapel Hill" by
Patrick Dougherty
Lost Colony found; requires 125 creative settlers for survival
By Lisa Williams
Staff Writer
It all began in 1587 when 115
women and children left
1 mouth, England and set sail to a
i w land. But their dreams disap-
I x ared asqukkfy as the people did
with hardly a trace.
People havealwaysbeen fasci-
nated with the story of the first
struggle in the new land. This is
hy Paul Green's elaborate theat-
al spectacle, "The List Colony
a ill enter its 32nd production sea-
sort on lune 12.
Not onlv dcxs this outdoor
drama teach history, it also offers
young actors valuable training
ground in all facets of professional
theatre.
These original plavs are based
on actual events and performed
where the events took place. Each
summer some 4,500 university
students find jobs in outdoor drama.
"The Lost Colony the nations
first and longest running outdoor
performance, will be holding pub-
lic auditions for their outdoor
drama.
This musically concordant play
will choose actors, singers, dancers
and production Staff within a series
o three casting calls. The first will
take place in Manteo, N.C on Feb.
24.
One hundred and twenty-five
company members are needed to
fill this exhibition which tells the
story of the first English Colony
attempt to settle the shores of "new
world" America.
Director Fred Chappcll will be
returning for his seventh season to
oversee the production of 'The Lost
Colony Chappell is the former
artistic director of the Alliance The-
atre in Atlanta.
Lost Colony performers will
also beinvolved in workshops while
performing for Outer Banks audi-
ences six nights weekly during the
summer months. These provide the
actors with many chances to use
their theatrical skills.
The Professional Theatre Work-
shop gives ground to valuable train-
ing in all aspects of professional
theatre. Last year, they hosted the
Playwrights' Festival.
The festival offered company
members the opportunity to take
part in the creation of two new plays:
"Another Kind of Hero a musical
wntten by Philidelphia playwright
Lexley Steele; and "Zeke's Vision
adark comedy by playwright Hank
Bates.
The new shows were per-
formed and cntiqued at the Lost
Colony before opening in other
theatres this year.
The dramas are rich in
oppurtunitics for both performer
and technician.
Stunt and stage-combat profes-
sionals train and rehearse actors
whose safety dependson ma jorcon-
centration,careful blockingand stiff
rehersal.
Pyrotechnicians (artificers
trained to handle period weaponry
and explosives), fight directors, his-
torians and speech consultants are
some of the people contributing
their expertise to productions.
The design installation and
maintenenceof sophisticated equip-
ment for sound, voice refinement,
special effects and lighting all re-
quire skilled staff and state-of-the-
art technology.
In addition to all of their hard
work,actorsstill must compete with
tree frogs, heat lightning and sud-
den summer storms which are all
part of a night's work.
Actors and singers who are in-
terested in auditioning should re-
port Feb. 29 with a two-minute
monologue or two mintues of
singing at 10 a.m.Dancers will be
auditioned at 3 p.m along with
technicians and the costume staff.
If you're planning a visit to the
Lost Colony, which opens June 12,
don't forget to check out other sites
such as the Fort National Historical
Site, The Thomas Hanot Nature
Trail and the enchanting Elizabe-
than Gardens.
For more information contact
Elizabeth Evans at (919) 473-2127.
8 LOCATIONS
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To all you faithful Pirate Comic readers out there. Richard Haselrig and
�� theother cartoon staffers extend a sincere and humble x Jr
'$ THANK YOU!
0"Rockefeller's presents the:
w
ILD
@DE!
M
USIC
'BENEFIT
AM:
- :
lUmU&TQRS
mmmrn
�i
&
wm�
"Hi
WMm
: FRIDAY,FEB. 28
�'
� � � �'
BOORS OPEN AT 9; 00
ADMISSION
MtU
UMdU liill.t ���! �
DOOR PROCEEDS GO TO BENEFIT:
Student Government Association
Elections
for
Executive Officers:
Positions Available:
� Student Body President
� Student Body Vice-President
� Student Body Secretary
� Student Body Treasurer
Requirements:
� Full-time student
� Overall 2.0 GPA
� 48 semester hours
� Enrollment in 2 previous semesters
at ECU
� Must be in good standing
Filing Date: Feb. 25 - March 3. Applica-
tions must be in SGA office by 5 PM,
March 3. Applications can be picked up
in SGA office from 8-5 in Mendenhali.
L
MANDATORY CANDIDATES MEETING MARCH 17 AT 4 PM
Sport sT
Pirates slip b
By Robert S. Todd
Staff Writer
ECU'S James Lewis piaved like
a pit bull against William & Mary
Wednesday night
Lewis sank his teeth into the
Tribe's defense kx a career-high 21
points on seven-of-lOsTK �ting
the floor, as the Pirates v. n 79-7!
Lewis' constant heightdisadvantup-
is always compensated by his raw
determination
"IBigger men! make me come
out and play better Lewis so id
'They hype me up and i 11 une i art
and give 110 percent
ECU trailed William & Mary
most of the first halt and went into
the locker room cV
trailing by as mar
early in the second
went on a 31-17 a
themarj7-s7
ing
TheBucshit2Q
freethrov j
r the 1
I
said "Ai � �
from us, but w
The Tr �
rn re than n.
offei - '�-
trio of Kurt
Denr � ters

Lacrosse season op
By Michael Ashlev
Staff Wnte:
Experience, leadership ar
ditioning paved the wa
end sweep of Vi!liam & Mat
UNC-Greensbon) for the EC
crosse team. The qukk 24 start
proo ves the ECU team
be strong this year and a �
them at the top i f the C. I I
rankings.
The first came of thr veekend
was a rematch of the 1991
i
& Mary . I
-
1
� �-
- �
I
� ry I � � �
-
for
Helios crowned o
By Amy Gapp
Suit Writer
TheECUwomen'sfrisbeeteam,
the Helios, was in Virginia compet-
ing in their first tournament of the
spring semester.
The team -
robe -
-
supnsed RuJ
defense, tot
another.
A whir
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m
By Haselrig
LEM HEAD
BIE ADAM
HE LONG TERM EFFECTS OF THE OLE
HI SHOULDER BOOKBAG TECHNIQUE.
and
vow
ent Association
ns
fficers:
lie:
fesident
:e-President
:retary
asurer
revious semesters
landing
larch 3. Applica-
office by 5 PM,
can be picked up
in Mendenhall.
TING MARCH 17AT 4 I'M
Sports
uliie lEaHt (Earultntan
February 27,1992
7
Pirates slip by Tribe, 79-75
Bv Robert S. Todd
Staff Writer
K Ws lames U'wis played like
a pH Hill against William & Mary
Wednesday night.
Lewii sxink his teeth into the
Yibe s defense for a career-high 21
pnitsnseven-of-10shHtingfmm
trn- floor, as the Pirates won 79-75.
Uuis lunsterriheight disadvantage
tys compensated by his raw
Jotennnvition.
Bigger men) make me come
out aixl play better Lewis said.
'Thv hype me up and I come out
md give 110 percent
K U trailed William & Mary
most ol the first half and went into
the locker room down 33-32. After
trailing by as many as five points
early in the second half, the Pirates
went on a 31-17 scoring run to give
them a 67-57 lead with 4:09 remain-
ing.
TheBucshit20-of-30second half
free throws, holding a slim lead down
the stretch for the 79-75 victory.
'Teople might not believe i t, bu t
we've got a real god team Lewis
said. "A lot of fanshave turned away
from us, but we need their support
The Tribe's Thomas Roberts
more than made up for the lack of
offense recicved fmmtheirbackcourt
trio of Kurt Small, David Cox, and
Derrick Peters. Roberts exploded
against the Pirates for31 points, lead-
ing both teams.
Ronnell Peterson turned in a
solid game while Lester Lyons
struggled for his nine points shoot-
ing two of 11 from the floor. Lyons
still managed to out score the Tribe's
Small, Cox, and Peters who com-
bined for seven pointson three-of-10
shooting.
Robin House sparked ECU de-
fensively in the second half.
"You canal wayscount on Robin
for certain things coach Eddie
Payne said.
House has only one more career
home game.
"If the Bulls draft me, it's time
for Jordan to retire House said with
a smile.
Lacrosse season opens with two wins
By Michael Ashley
Staff Writer
perience, leadership and con-
d rung paved the way for a week-
end sweep of William & Marv and
LNC-Greenabofo tor the ECU la-
cr team The quick 2-0 start
r � 'MhrrVl'teamwillonceagain
h �� mg this war and also places
it ttx top of the NCI.I. division
igs.
lie first game of the weekend
v is a rematch of the 1991 division
championshipgameagaiiist William
& Mary. Leadership became the key
difference in a very physical ganx- as
the two teams played to a sudden
dcathovxThrne,ticJat5-5.0iie minute
into theoverrime period, HCU's Like
Slacum scored the winning giil to
complete a hat-trick and seal a 6-5
victory for the Pirates.
DrewBorqueand Kirk Katburg
also scored goals, while Wes Davis
and Larry Fortier added the defen-
sive punch tor ECU.
Sunday's ganx showed what a
far superior team can do to a young
program as the Pirates took on the
Spartans of UNC-Greensboro. On the
rainy afternoon, ECU picked apart an
unconditioned and overmatched
team with goal after goal. By the end
of the game, the score was 13-3.
Slacum, Katzburg and a host of
other Pirates tcxk part in the scoring,
including a fast break by Troy Plavec
and a hat-tnck from Chns Long.
The Pirates will travel to Wash-
ington, D.C this weekend to take on
Georgetown and Howard.
Photo by Dail R��d � ECU Photo Lab
Pirate netters take two
The ECU men's tennis team has won theirf irst two matches of the
year In Saturday's matchup with Catawba, the Pirates won 9-0.
winning all nine matches in straight sets. In singles action, ECU
won 72 games to Catawaba's five. The team will be in action
today as they host conference foe Old Dominion
Fraternity
'dribbles'
to UNC-W
By M. Chantal Weedman
Staff Writer
Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity will
be "dribbling down the pike" to
Wilmington this weekend in a
fundraiser for the chapter's
philanthrophy. The Ronald
McDonald House.
The First Pi Kappa Alpha 'Walk
to Wilmington' willbeginFndayat
the Student Store and will include
fraternity brothers as well as fac-
ulty. Approxiately 48 Pikes will
dribble a basketball 117 miles from
the ECU campus to I rask Coliseum
on thecampusof UNC-Wilmington
for the Saturday night matchupbe-
tween the Pi rates and theSeahawks.
Public Relations Director
Stephanie Roberson commends the
Pikes on their year-round involve-
ment with the chanty and espe-
cially for their efforts to raise funds
through the Walk.
"We at Ronald McDonald
Houseareexcited about participat-
ing in such a tun event Roberson
said.
Pi Kappa Alpha president John
Hand said the idea for the
See PIKE page 8
Helios crowned co-champions in Virginia ultimate frisbee tournament
By Amy Oapp
Stafl Writer
rheECU women'sfnsbeeteam,
tl � I lelios, was in Virginia compet-
in their first tournament of the
spring semester.
The team opened the round-
robin play on Saturday by rolling
over Rutgers University 13-2. ECU
suprised Rutgers with a tenacious
defense, forcing one turnover after
another.
A whirl wind began to pick up
speed at the start of the Helios' sec-
ond game,against The University of
Virginia. It was a defensive struggle
all the way and eventually the game
had to be time capped. At the end of
two hours of play the Helios lost, 10-
8.
ECU began their next game,
against Carnegie Mellon immedi-
ately. The fatigued Helios found
themselves down 0-4 early, and the
deficit served as a wake-up call that
started a 5-0 run for the ECU team
Rtxikie lasa McAnn led the defeu-
si veattack that held C"amagie Mellon
to just one goal,and the Helios held
on for a 7-5 win.
Sunday morning the weather
was more cooperative; but the Uni-
versity of Pittsburgh team was not
The I lelios kept up with the much
taller Pitt team and won 13-9.
The Helios finished the tourney
with a win over a fatigued Virginia
lech team. Jill Bean, Kathy Niblock
and Maria Long had outstanding
plav offensively for the team. The
win left the I lelios tied for first plactj.
Celebrate
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Capricorn Recording Artists
Col. Bruce Hampton &
Aquarium Rescue Unit
.99 32 oz Draft � .990 Highballs � .991 Memberships
Pool
1-800-642-6801
8EA BAIR MOTEL
on tour
BEACHCOMBER
OCEANFRONT MOTEL
I & 2 bedroom effi-
ciencies with micro-
wave, HBO. ocean-
front pool, balconies.
Close to everything!
1-800-282-2113
RATES
$29 $40
jl3-4!6
$45"$64
417 419
Friday
Cold Sweat
Rockin' Rhythm and Blues
$2.00 32 oz Draft
Saturday
Purple School Bus
Psycadelic Rock
$2.00 32 oz Draft
Spring Break '92
North Myrtle Beach
Myrtle Beach
The Grand Strand
You've Got The Time
We've Got The Beach!
So, Pack your bags, grab your
friends, find any mode of
transportation and join the
Spring Break Beach Blast in
North Myrtle Beach, Myrtle
Beach and The Grand Strand.
We have sun and surf, trendy
nightclubs, and a festive party
atmosphere. You won't want
to miss this most excellent
adventure.
For more information about how you can join the
Spring Break Beach Blast call:
1-8()0-35fr-3(W, ext. 700





8 uUre �agt�aroiintan February 27, 1991
PIKE
Continued from page 7
Hairisfeeter
fundraiser came from the execu-
tives of the organization who
wanted to raise funds for the local
chanty. Currently, four to seven
brothers volunteer their time each
week to the charity. The chapter
has expended an estimated 2,000
work-hours this year in helping
the organization that assists seri-
ously ill children and their fami-
lies.
Hie fraternity hopes to double
that number through the Walk to
Wilmington. They are accepting
donations and general pledges in
hopes of raising $5,000 for the
Greenville Ronald McDonald
House Share a Night Fund.
Hand will begin the Walk at
12:30 p.m. Friday at the Student
Store Helping Hand will be
Roberson, Dean of Students Ro-
nald Speir, Lee Workman, ECU'S
assistant athletic director, and
Chancellor Richard Eakin.
The group will be escorted to
the edge of campus by ECU Public
Safetv, then will receive another
police escort from the Greenville
Police Department to the city lim-
its. Hand estimates that the trip
will take approximately 28 hours.
"We're feeling excited Hand
said. "Thisisall fora great cause. It
may be a lot of work, but it's some-
thing 1 can tell my grandkids some-
day
Ronald McDonald House
sponsors a "home awav from
home" for families of children vis-
iting The Children's Hospital of
Eastern N.C. or the University
Medical Center. The House serves
apporxiamatelv 750 families each
year and w ill celebrate its fifth year
inEastern North Carolina in une
of 1992.
It is important thatall thefra-
Baseball team
loses to UNG-G,
streak ends
Undefeated baseball teams are
as common as chicken teeth.
ECU failed to bnng just one of
their six base runners home and
tarnished their perfect record, fall-
ing to 2-1 on the season.
ECU soniv scoring threat came
in the fifth inning when second
baseman I loath Clark singled with
one out. Center fielder Pat Watkins
went on to strike out and first
baseman Lee Kushner ftted out to
left, to end the inning.
I "he Pirates ha ve only been shut-
out twice in their last 185 games.
April 24. Ii against Old Domin-
ion was the last game the Pirates
were held scoreless. ECU'S 3-0 loss
to UNC-Greensboro marked the
first con test between the two teams.
ternities make the community and House' image John Washko, a
the campus aware that we tfrater- senior management major and Pi
nities) are not like that Animal Kappa Alpha member said.
Greenville's New Natural Foods Source
OPENING EBL EEB. 2ft
offering
Natural and Organic Groceries " ORGANIC PRODUCE "
Bulk Foods Herbs and Spices Vitamins
Supplements - Natural Remedies
Cruelty-Free Health and Beauty Aids
Harris mm mm
10W PRICES
1LUE PLANET LtfeFoods)
1
405 EVANS ST MALL
758 0850
Hours 9 6. M Sat
Going on Spring Break?
Does Your Car Rattle and Shake
Are You in Doubt?
Have it Checked Out!
STEVE BRILEY'S AUTOMOTIVE
3140-H M0SFXY DR.
Just Behind Parkers BBQ off
of Greenville Blvd.
752-5043
M-FS-5
Free 10
Point
Check
Up
This Week's Entertainment
Fri Feb 28
The Usuals
Sat Feb 29
BS&M
Starting next Wed - $3 Admissii
AH the Draft You Can Drink
9pm-lam
Hours
MonThtirs. 11am-3pm
Fri. 11am-2am
Sat. 9pm-2am
513Cotanche
(located across from UBE)
758-0080
20offallSWIMWEAR
Lori's Inimate Apparel
Sale: Feb 27-March 6
Special Ordering Available
Sorry, Discount Does Not Apply
Suits by: Ritchie � Pam Dulca � Bendigo
� Sharkbite - Arriving Daily
915 Red Banks Road
nan
HIDDEN CLOSET
University Shopping Center
(Next to Harris Teeter)
,MonSat. 10-8 Sun. 1-5
SIDEWALK � CLEARANCE
SALE
Fresh, Boston
Pork
Roast
White
Potatoes
Hunter Premium!
Cream
Diet Pepsi Or
Pepsi Cola
99
MDUCtD
PRJC
6Pk.
16 Ox.
REDEEM THESE BUY ONE GET ONE FREE
COUPONS FOR ADDITIONAL SAVINGSI
r
i
Hair is feeler
n r
i i
Hattisfeeter
i
. BUY ONE OET � ! BUY ONE GET
1 ONE FREE I I OWE FRK
I When You Purchase One lattice I I When You Purchase On 10 O.
1 Apple Pie from Our Dli-�akry � ' Boa Of Moore' Potato Chip
I
Sat. (Feb. 29th)
Lowest Prlc�� Ev�r - 30 to 70 Saving
H
B
FDR MEN
PanTs$11.99
Cotton Sweaters $14,991
Knit Shirts$11.99
Wool Pants $19.99
Were $78
FOR WOMEN
Pants
Sweaters
Shorts
Customer Return
Tank Tops
� � � �
Cotton Sweater
$11.99
$19.99
$19.99 rn
$11.99 I
. $9.99
$14.99
TVu Co-ooi' Msjy o 3 �yoduc�d.
� O Covpct fV rVtHe
C��. ?p�evM�,tc� 3. 2
Coupon Value S2.99
I I
(C) I
igt.
I Cevoo May Ng' &e 'tj.c.hKH
lir.il CP Co.pot 9m rVrftOM
o- r.?�My.j- 3. i9?2.
CouponVolwe V"
I
VALUABLE COUPON
Hainsfeelet
i r
Hainsfeeter
-n
BUY ONE GET
ONE FREE a ,
When You Purchase One 4 Cl.
l.ill Ot CoupO '�� rVtl-Ol
0"o f �p.m Mfl.i- 3, 1902.
SeX W
sate
11
11
i
11
11
i
i
BUY ONE GET
ONE FREE
I When You Purchase One 64 0.
� Carton Of Any flovor Of Chtqwta
tk
Juice Mend
ii-
Coupon Value i�
VALUABLE COUPON
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
iSSSHBHBH
Prices Effective Through March 3, 1992
Wt rWv� The RiaNSmff OuoflRw None'3d o U� WeGwyctwtfPcxSfcrnp,





Title
The East Carolinian, February 27, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 27, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.862
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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