The East Carolinian, February 25, 1992






A positive step?
Plusminus grading system would not hurt students.
4
A comic industry
Former art student succeeds in the Comics business.
II
Qtttz �uBt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vot.66No.12
Tuesday, February 25,1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
8 Pages
President denies rape
The job performance oi University of
Southern Florida President Frank T.
Borkowski was recently questioned after I
star athlete was allowed to continue playing
after being accused of rape.
A report by the Florida Board of Regents
said officialsat the school knew that six women
had reported being harassed, battenl or raped
by athlete Marvin Taylor, but withheld infor-
mation to allow Taylor to continue plaving.
Marvin was the guv who got them to the
NCAA said Billy Newland, managing edi-
tor of the student newspaper. "He was the
best point guard we ever had (and) I think
these (administrators) were gixxi men mak-
ing Kid decisions
Two administrators resign
Two administrators at City College in
New York recently resigned their positions
after a mayor's report partially blamed them
tor the deaths of nine people at a celebrity
basketball game in December.
lean Charles, director of oo-curricular life,
and George McDonald, vice president for
student affairs, both stepped down from their
jobsal the school after the report was released.
The report blamed police, promoters, the
student government association, the crowd,
City College and Citv University for the
stampede that caused the deaths.
Officials offer apology
Western Montana College sent a letter of
apology to Rocky Mountain College and its
basketball team for racial slurs shouted at
black and Native American basketball play-
ers during two separate basketball games.
Witnesses said four or five fans taunted
two black players and two Native American
players from Rocky Mountain's team.
A formal apology has been issued to the
players said Monica Hildreth, a spokesper-
son for Western Montana College
The disruptive fans were not removed
from the game because security officials said
they did not hear them.
MTSU rejects condoms
Officials at Middle Tennessee State Uni-
versity recently rejected a student government
proposal to install condom machines in every
campus residence hall.
Vice President for Student Affairs Robert
LaLance said Health Services will provide
students with condoms if they need them.
"This has nothing to do with being
prudish or backward LaLance aid.
The proposal stated that the condom ma-
chines would provide protection from un-
wanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted
diseases.
"We're going to try to put it through
again said Toby Gilley, speaker for the SGA
Senate. "With AIDS and other sexually
transmitted diseases, l don't see how any
measure could be enough
N.C State student dies
A 21-year-old political science major at
N.C. State died recently of meningitis.
Nicole Nora Johnson planned to go to
law school after she graduated from N.C.
State next year. After this semester, Johnson
would have been only four hours short of
graduating.
"She was a very serious student said
Sanford H. Kessler, Johnson's academic advi-
sor.
The university plans to recognize
Johnson's degree work with a certificate of
scholarship, and Kessler is planning to meet
with school officials to decide whether to
award Johnson her degree posthumously.
Complied by Elizabeth Shlmnwl. Taken from
CPS and other campus newspopare.
Inside Tuesday
Crime SceneJ 2
Classifieds3
Editorial4
Satire75
EntertainmentIh
SportsJ7
Vandals destroy African-American display
By Jeff Becker
SUff Writer
A bulletin board in Jarvis
Hall depicting African- American
awareness was set on fire about 2
a.m. 'Ihursdav, Feb. 20.
The bulletin board, Unrated
in the west wing, displayed the
words"CietTigethertoCelebrate
A frica n- America n A wa reness"
written over black and white
pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. The fire
destroyed about half of the dis-
play before residents were able
to extinguish the flames.
Public Safety has no leads in
the crime.
Kara rermisohn, Jarvis 1 kill
council prosident,constructed the
bulletin hoard and planned to
enter it in a campus-widecontest
sponsored bv the Residence Hall
Association. Permisohn said she
believes the fire was racially
motivated.
"1 think that somebody was
obviously offended with the
bulletin board she said. "1 be-
lieve they took it upon them-
selves to do something about it
According to Brian
Brookshire, resident adviser of
the west wing, bulletin boards
are common targets for vandals.
"It is not uncommon for a
bulletin board to be ripped
down, but a fire is a little differ-
ent Brookshire said. "1 don't
know if racism was the motive,
but it is certainly a possibility.
There is a lack of respect for
property and people in residence
halls '
David Hunter is one of two
African-Americans who live on
the west wing. He said the fire
was a childish act that shows
racism still exists in society.
"Some people don't respect
African-American month or
blacks in general he said.
"In eight years we will be in
the 21st century. The same crap
has been going now for de-
cades
The remains of the bulletin
board have been left on display
by the residence hall staff. Four
copies of the Resident Fduca-
tion Hall Incident Report ex-
plaining the situation have been
stapled to the bulletin board
along with Permisohn's
Photo by Jill Ch.rry - ECU Pholo Lab
A bulletin board in Jarvis Hall promoting African-Awareness month fell victim to arson last Thursday.
Kara Permisohn. president of the hall council, stapled her thoughts to the board after the fire.
thoughts just after the fire.
"How is our society to suc-
ceed when some of its members
continue to take such irrespon-
sible actions she wrote. "It is
unfortunate that it takes an inci-
dent like this to really promote
awareness
A reward has been offered
for information leading to the
conviction of thearsonist(s). Call
Public Safety at 757-6150.
Hospitality club holds fair
By Marjorie Pitts
SUff Writer
The Hospitality Manage-
ment Association will hold its
first lob Fair im Tuesday, Feb. 25
with 17 booths and a guest
speaker.
The Hospitality Manage-
ment Association is anew clubat
ECU which represents students
who are studying hotel and res-
taurant management.
Although the Job Fair is for
hospitality students, but all in-
terested students are welcome.
The ob Fair will be held in the
Human Environmental Science
Building in the Van Landingham
Room. Booths will be opened
from 9 a.m. to noon, and from 3
p.m. to 5 p.m.
John Canterino, associate
professor of Human Environ-
mental Sciencosat ECU will speak
at 1:30 p.m.
Our speaker. Dr. John
Canterino, an industry mogul,
will share his experiences and
knowledge concerning the hos
pitality industry said Liralvn
Turk, president and founder of
the Hospitality Association.
"We're real excited about
our first Job Fair, Turk said.
"There are going to be repre-
sentatives from several lcKal and
state organizations, so it will be
a great opportunity for students
to get some valuable contacts
and information
Representatives from res-
taurantsand hotelsattendingthe
Job Fair include: Hvatt Hotel in
Charlotte, Sheraton Hotel in
Raleigh, Marriot Hotel in Ra-
leigh,The Hilton in Raleigh and
Promise Management in Ra-
leigh.
Some Greenville represen-
tatives include: Kentucky Fried
Chicken, 1 loliday lnn,Taco Bell
and Margeaux's. There willalso
be a booth representing Kings
Dominion, an amusement park
near Richmond, Va.
Since Turk started the
Hospitality Management As-
sociation in 1990 it has grown to
35 members. Last semester
some members of HMA trav-
eled to Richmond, Va stayed
at the Marriot Courtyard and
toured restaurants and hotels.
FJMA held a canned-food
drive for the Battered Women's
Shelter, and has had many car
washes. In March, some mem-
bers oi HMA will go to Wash-
ington, D.C. to tour fine restau-
rants and hotels.
The dues for the HMA are
$12 per year. The rest of the
money needed comes from SGA
funds and fund raisers.
New center presents
cultural showcase
By Angela DeRosia
Senior News Writer
On April 30 the Eastern
Carolina Multicultural Center
will present a Multicultural
Showcase at the Greenville
Hilton.
For15 per person, those
attending can expect a celeb-
rity ribbon cutting, a
multicultural dinner, enter-
tainment, door prizes and an
auction.
The Board of Directors
named a kickoff committee to
be headed bv Di Anne Bo wen
of WNCT-TV.
"Since we are planning
many more cultural events,
we will not attempt to cram
everything in this one show
Bowen said.
Membership opportuni-
ties will be available to those
interested. Proposed mem-
bership categories are: a do-
na tion of $5,000 for sponsors,
over $1,000 for patrons, $500-
$1,000 for supporters, $25-
$499 for members and $10
for students.
The event will be open
to the public.
Various cultures will be
represented on the menu as
well as in the entertainment.
On Feb. 28, members from
the center will appear on
Carolina Today to introduce
the event to the public.
The center hopes to pro-
vide understanding of the 40
different cultures within Pitt
County as well as others out-
side the county through ex-
hibits and activities for the
public.
Exchange programs offer
endless opportunities
Demolition derby
Photo by JIN CHorry - ECU Pholo Lab
Bulldozers demolished this house on Charles and Ninth streets Monday
in order to make way for a new parking lot.
I
By Elizabeth Shimmel
SUff Writer
Many students only dream of
spending part of their college career in
a foreign country or even another state,
but the opportunities for these kindsof
experiences are endless through ECU's
Center for International Programs.
The center offers more than 100
international exchanges around the
world, as well as over 107 national
exchanges.
Many of these exchange programs
require students to pay only their
regular ECU tuition plus the host
school's cost for room and board.
For those willing to pay out-of-
state tuition, there are "endless study
abroad programs said Stephanie
Evancho, Study Abroad National
Student Exchange coordinator.
Three years ago, approximately
five students per semester participated
in the program. Currently, ECU has
about 30 students participating in ex-
changes.
"It isa growing trend in the United
States to study abroad' Evancho said,
and she is hoping this will attract more
students to theexchange opportunities
available at ECU.
Not only do students receive ECU
credits for the courses they take while
they are at another university, but stu-
dents are also given a first-hand look at
cultural and geographic differences
within the United States and around
the world.
One good way to experience these
differencesisby travelingon weekends
or school breaks during the exchange.
ECU student Marjorie Bazluki
spent one year at the University of
Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland, and
said that traveling was one of the best
ways for her to leam about that part of
the world.
"During my year in Scotland, I
traveled to many Scottish cities, as well
as to England, Ireland, France, Monaco,
Belgium and Luxembourg, but that
travel is all part of education Bazluki
said.
Most exchange students also say
that learning about themselves is some
of the best education they receive.
"(My) year abroad taught me a
few thingsaboutmyself Bazluki said.
"I learned that I can do things that I
admire when other people do them,
and that I am the determining factor in
what I can achieve
Many students express an interest
in participating in the program, but I
think it is very difficult to be accepted
as an exchange student
Evancho said she wants students
to know the requirements include: a
cumulative 2.5 grade point average,
current full-time enrollment at ECU
and status as a sophomore, junior or
senior at the time of the exchange.
Besides personal growth and an
extensive cultural education, there are
See Exchange page 2





2 CBije gantqiarolinjan February 25, 1992
CRIMF S 'ENE
Two females caught urinating in
public; both given verbal warnings
Feb.18
0011�Flanagan: Investigative traffic stop.
0015 -Garrett Hall: Assisted Greenville officer with traffic
stop.
0213�Administered breathalyzer tests for Greenville
Police Department.
1409�College Hill Drive: Vehicle stopped for having
expired tags. Student given verbal warning.
Feb.19
0052 (ones Hall: Checked out vehicle on tow list. Vehicle
removed from campus.
0153�-arvis Hall: Fire alarm activated. Same caused by
someone setting a bulletin board on fire.
1108�College Hill Drive Vehicle stopped for investiga-
tion. Same car with no visible tags. Cleared.
1205�Police Department: Vehicle moved. Dispute settled.
1255 -Jones Hall: Non-student given verbal warning for
expired inspection sticker.
1559�Allied Health: Vehicle stopped. Student given
campus citation for speeding and one-way-street violation.
Feb. 20
2028�Scott Hall: Checked out subject soliciting. Subject
banned from campus.
2104�larvis Hall: Vehicle towed.
2127�Christenburv Memorial Gym: Assisted rescue.
Subject transported to Pitt Memorial Hospital.
2136�Tyler Hall: Banned subject reported on grounds.
0109�Fletcher Hall: Report of prank phone calls. No report
taken at this time.
0633 10th Street and College Hill Drive: Vehicle Stopped
for one-wav street violation Student given a campus citation.
1430 -Allied Health: Checked out reference to an animal
problem. Same cleared.
1630larvis Hall: Report of I skateboard violation. Student
given a verbal warning.
Feb. 21
0034 Mendenhall Student Center: Investigated two
females urinating in public. Both given verbal warnings
0037�Mmges Coliseum: Report of suspicious activity.
Same unfounded.
0045�Hardee's: Vehicle stopped for suspicious activity
and careless and reckless Subject given verbal warning
0109�10th Street. Vehicle stopped southeast of Lmstead
Hall Subject given verbal warning for suspicious activity bv
Mendenhall Student Center.
0123 lones Hall. Student given campus citation for
speeding and border-line DWI
Crime Scn� it taken from official Public Safety Logt
Racial Reconciliation . . .
Who Will Lead The Next Revolution?
Thursday, February 27, 1992
e
Mendenhall Student Center
Room 244
7:30 PM
Speaker
(.arland R. Hunt, Ksq.
Nauonal Director
New Generation Campus Ministries
Attorney at Law. Minister.
Former Chairman of the National Organization
of Black University and College Students.
Frequent Speaker on Campuses throughout the U.S
Sponsored by:
ECU Christian Fellowship
of New Generation Campus Ministries
Exchange
Continued from page 1
many other ways for students to
benefit from an exchange experi-
ence. "(An exchange) is especially
helpful in a now, more competitive
job market Evancho said. "Any
outside experience is going to be
helpful
Although many programs are
nearing their deadlines, students
are still able to become eligible for
many of them.
Those interested in further in-
formation on national or interna-
tional exchange programs should
contact Evancho at 757-6769.
THERE ARE TWO SIDESJO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
j as a member of the Army Nurse
I Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
I career advancement are the rule,
I not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means vou command respect as an Army officer. If vou re earn-
ing a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, PQ Box 3219, Uarm.nster,
PA 18974-9845. Or call toll free: 1-800-USA-ARMY, ext. 438.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE AUYOU CAN BE
Classifieds
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
3003 S. Evans 756-2011
Fresh Oysters, Flounder, Shrimp, Trout,
Deviled Crab Cakes, & Clam Strips.
� Small Shrimp � JJ �
I � iimrii � Regular Shrimp I
& $299 � Get One FreeJ
I Beverage not Included' Beverage not included"
M-F Erp March 17 j M-Th Exp March 17 �
r m �
PRiNG BREAK TO
Florida Beaches. Fun in the Sun!
Four per room prices!
Daytona $149 � Panama City $139
1
Call Alex
at
752-7973
Kitchen, Waterfront & Transportation Available
It can help you
organize your notes
j
design your party flyer,
and finish your class project
before spring break.
We're On The
lookout For The
SexUAtGfat
cuuttfo
The new Apple' Macintosh' QassJc" II
computer males it easier for you to juggle
classes, activities, projects, and term i.ts-
and still find time for what nuke's college lite
tval lite. �
It's a complete and
affonlable Macintosh Classic
system that's ready to help you
get your work finished fast.
It's a snap to set up and use
It lias a powerful 08030 micro-
pgoCCSSOC, which means you
can run even the most
sophisticated applications with
ease. Among its many built-in
capabilities Is the internal Apple
SuperDrive" disk drive
that reaeis from
and writes to
h
&
Prel.rnmones Fb Uth, Itth Mt
Finals Mot 3
$1 00Cov�' � $)00OflD�mis
Over $1500 will
be 9vn away to
cash and prim.
'9
L V
r
�-1:
i m
Y.Y.Y.YAto
I � V fc � � �t
f t t � i ml 1

Macintosh and MS-DOS formatted disks-
allowing you to exchange information easily
with almost anv other kind of computer.
If vou already own a Macintosh Classic, and
v �& want the speed and flexibility
of a Macintosh Classic II. ask us
about an upgrade�it can be
installed in a matter oi minutes
and it's affordable.
To make more time
for your personal life, get a
Macintosh Classic II for your
personal space. See us for a
demonstration today, and
while you're in, be sure to ask
us for details about the Apple
Computer Loan.
It'll be time well
spent.
im the
in!i CLisvk
PS Keep you� hMMMf o sec�e because we don't want to
tee anything but youi cnes' (men) ana yout legs (ladies)'
located R �� H�on mn
207SW Gf��'weHv3 � 365 5000
1(1 Sii(iL-nl V.w.s: Miur llum tusl b.ooks
XOlll
iolLiiy mi)'v! siiuirrn M'tclw:
Wrifht Buildinc Telephone: 757-6731
Stole Houns Mondey � Thuwfay, 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Frtdey, 8 Mfc - 5 p.m. Saturday 11 a.m. � S p.m.
v

OK KIM
LUXURY SUITE: A seventh
story luxury suite hanging over
the white sand and clear water of
South Florida's most beautiful
beach. Completely furnished,
sleeps five in unbelievable
luxury; minutes from Jai- .Ma
airport, horses, dogs, Ft. louder-
dale Beach, Miami Action. $800
for weekMarch 7 and March 14
at Hollywood Beach Tower
Call (305) 472-2870.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: For apartment half a
block from campus, 2blocks from
downtown, supermarket, and
laundromat. $220 per month, in-
cludes rent, utilities, phone and
cable. 758-6418.
KINGSARMS APART-
MENTS: 1 and Zbedroomapart-
ments, energy efficient, several
locations in town, carpeted,
kitchen appliances, some water
and sewer paid, washer and
drver hook-ups. 752-8915.
1
R1NGGOLD TOWERS
.
bedra n - be b m &
Effk � � .
CALL 752-2865
�All New �
IMMRSITV APARTMENTS
2S991 ; iuca
�Looted New ECU
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�Across From Highwas Patrol Siaon
Limited Offer - S330 a month
Contact 1ST. or Tommv Wdlums
756-7S15ort30-19T7
Office open - Apt. 8. 12-5 30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS'
God tal qstet one bcJnxsn � jc- ipmrsiaKa.
�a�Tfyeffita�at.fr�e���triniaww�r �after, drywv
cab �' Carpka .� ixtci or- 2Z motth. t
nnit SIOBCLE HOME RENTLS ci3i� jt
j�k pmrxsxxt �,c c h� Ajwa CWitesi
ikst Brook ��er Couiatrv Cub
Conua J-T rr. Will urn
736-7tlS
HtlP WAM
FAST FUNDRAIS
GRAM: Fratemiat
student clubs. Earn
m one week. Plus red
bonus yourself. Andj
justforcallmgl-800-c,
65.
POSTAL JOBS A1
Manv position- J
CaU 800-338-3388 Fj
FREETR.AVE1 I
cruise ships Stuj
needed Christinas
summer for amu
emplovment. Call
Ext. F-3464
TOPLESS
WANTED: Playho
inGoidsboro,
730716 or Sid
731-9962.
EAS WORK! E
PAY Assen
home Call toll fr
5566 Ext 592
500-1000 CAMP
AVAILABLE�
vices provid
camps r a
ICeys � '� is M
plication reac:
plications at Cart
Bloxton Housi
COURIER F1L3
WORKTART-Tl!
drivers licensi
transportation j
mthenaoming
Phone 758-1747
Rush or appl)
P A �' 5
Greenville NC
SFKFVlCtS OFFERED
GIRLS, YOU TENSE?
STRESSED? What vou need is a
practiced masseur to relieve that
everyday tension, through deep
muscle and full body therapeu-
tic massage. Call 758-6418 for
appt.
MODERN BEAUTY SHOP
OPEN under new management
at the Wolff Tanning Beds Spe-
cializing m spiral and piggyback
perms and mod em cuts. Call 5t
7414 (Tanning Bed Specials).
WANTED:
for business j
head etc -
message
APPLICATION!
Brady's for Men
application- I I
positions M
� sbentious
fashions. Saiar
discounts v. .
the ?aza ' J
Wednesday 1 pij
BABYSITTER:
nonsmoker wai
Announceme
QMMABEIAPHi
Attention students: Anyone with a
G.P.A. of 3.0 or better who is inter-
ested in Gamma Beta Thi. an honor
maternity and service orgamzar.or.
please call Dena Pr.ce at 931-8282
HQSXIIAUIllGMLASSQC
HMA is looking for a responsible and
dedicated person, preferably a Hos-
pitality mapr, interested in the secre-
tary assistant job for the dub. Great
opportunity and lots of fun' Call 931 -
7399 if interested.
(jQLyjjTlitACILaNJ
Be a volunteer timer at the CAA
Swimming and Diving Champion-
ships. ECU is hosting the Colonial
Athletic Association Swimming and
Diving Championships Feb. 26, 27,
28, and 29. Timers are needed for Feb
27, 28 from 10.15 a.m. to 2 p.m. and
from6:15 to9 pm. Also Feb. 29, from
10.15 to 2 p.m. and from 5:15 to 830
p.m. Refreshments will be provided
and if three sessions are worked you
will receive a CAA Swimming and
Diving T-shirt To volunteer please
call Stewart Esposito at 758-8415 or
Matt Maloney at 7574532
naoup ADVISING
KrBrBlH)T;TlTPENTS
There will be advising every third
Tuesday of eacfc month from 12 pm
to 2 p.m. in r �
Please see the
or Brouv Hbnaiej
for advisinc,
DjQWN-LASX
Local Cycling
members for 92-
levels and Cats
and limited perks I
informafion call M
758-8hi6Enc&30
gamma!
Gamma Beta Ph.
meeting is Feb
room 244 at 5 p :
4:15 p.m
lQUSi
Career Services
shop designed
graduates finder
job market. A vj
will be discussed!
be available,
held in Bloxton
p.m and Feb.
IKMAN
The Society for I
Management i
majors int
to our meeting I
3:30 in GC1028.
ers discussing
Refreshments'





JDES TO,
M THE ARMY.
.1 YOU CAN BE.
v
BREAK TO
b Beaches. Fun in the Sun!
lt per room prices!
149 � Panama City $139
ont
& Tra isportation Available J
i
:es,

fiver,
s project
3K.
rmationeasih
: ' mputer
acinti si Cl issk ,and
uit Lie mi and Bexibilit)
a Macintosh Qassii Q,ask us
iut an upgrade -it can be
ktalled in a matter of minutes
kl it s affordable
i( i make mx iv time
tr your personal life, get a
a intosh Classk II for your
?rs nal space. See us It t a
rmonstration today, and
Mle you're in, be sure to ask
lor detail about the Apple
Computer Loan
It'll be time wel
spent.
support stiuUnil scholars!
Irtrday 11a.m. -5 p.m.
mpuicr lm NHX&BtNaWNtMfcMI

Classifieds
C51l� �a0t Ear0ltman
February 25,1992
LUXURY SUITE: A seventh
story luxury suite hanging over
the white sand and clear water of
South Florida's most beautiful
beach Completely furnished,
sleeps five in unbelievable
luxury; minutes from Jai- Alai,
airport horses, dogs. Ft. Lauder-
dale Beach, Miami Action. $800
for weekMarch 7 and March 14
at Hollvwood Beach Tower.
Call 008 472-2870.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: For apartment half a
block fromcampus, 2blocks from
downtown, supermarket, and
laundromat. $220 per month, in-
cludes rent, utilities, phone and
cable. 758-641&
KINGSARMS APART-
MENTS: 1 and 2bedroom apart-
ments, energy efficient, several
locations in town, carpeted,
kitchen appliances, some water
and sewer paid, washer and
drver hook-ups. 752-8915.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
N.u Taking Leases for 1
bedroom. 2 bcAoora A
Efficiency ApartmenLv
CALL 752-2865
A Beautiful Pltce 10 Live
�All New
�Ar.J Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5ih Street
�Located Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�Across From Highwa) Patrol Station
Limited Offer S330 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 8301937
Office open - Apt. 8, 12-5:30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS'
QewD axd qtart one heJroon fumuhe�i apartments,
�ocryefrit�rc,frT�iier�Ti4ie��i.ther�,4T�rm,
cable TV Couples � ingles only $240 a monh. 6
mattfalt� MOBILE HOME RENTALS coopiei or
as�a)ca Apwncn tnj mobile horom at Aiaica Gantana
near Brook Vtt Couno Cub.
Conua J.T. or tommy Williams
756 7815
SFKFVICtS OFTFRrD
GIRLS, YOU TENSE?
STRESSED? What you need is a
practiced masseur to relieve that
evervday tension, through deep
muscle and full body therapeu-
tic massage. Call 758-6418 for
appt.
MODERN BEAUTY SHOP
OPEN under new management
at the Wolff Tanning Beds. Spe-
cializing in spiral and piggyback
perms and mod ern cuts. Call 756-
7414 (Tanning Bed Specials).
FAST FUNDRAISING PRO-
GRAM: Fraternities, sororities,
student clubs. Eam up to $1000
in one week. Plus receive a $1000
bonus vourself. And a free watch
just forcalling 1 -800-932-0528 Ext.
65.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE:
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call 800-338-3388 Ext. P-3712.
FREE TRAVEL Air couriers and
cruise ships. Students also
needed Christmas, spring and
summer for amusement park
emplovment. Call 800-338-3988
Ext. F-3464.
TOPLESS DANCERS
WANTED: Plavhouse nightclub
in Goldsboro, cash SSS. Call Paul
736-0716 or Sid 735-7713 or Club
731-9962
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT
PAY Assemble products at
home. Call toll free 1-800-467-
5566 Ext. 5920.
500-1000 CAMP POSITIONS
AVAILABLE: Staff Referral Ser-
vices provides a network of
camps, now hiring, from the
"Kevs" to Wise-Minn. One ap-
plication reaches all camps. Ap-
plications at Career Services -
Bloxton House.
COURIER FILE CLERK TO
WORK PART-TIME: Must have
drivers license and reliable
transportation. Hoursare mostly
in the morning (9 a.m. to 1 p.m.).
Phone 758-1747 and ask for Mr.
Rush or apply at Pitt Surgical,
P.A. 905 Johns Hopkins Drive,
Greenville, NC.
WANTED: Artist todo graphics
for business logo, labels, letter-
head, etc. Call 752-3788 leave
message.
two year old on occasional week
nights, weekends, and overnight
(6 p.m. to 8 a.m.). Call 321-0870
for information.
SUMMER IOB: The Gty of Ra-
leigh Parks and Recreation De-
partment is seeking enthusiastic
hard working individuals for
summer emplovment. Positions
include pool managers, life
guards,campcounselors,nature,
athletic, arts, and lake personnel,
park maintenance and thera-
peutic programs. EOE MFH
Contact: 2401 Wade Avenue,
Raleigh, N.C27601 Phone:831-
6640.
TO ALPHA DELTA PI: Thanks
a lot for joiningusat The Fizz. We
had a really great time. Let'sdefi-
nitely do it again. Sigma Pi's.
LARA WILLIAMS:
CONGRATS ON GETTING
PINNED! YOU AND SCOTT
ARE TOO CUTE. WE LOVE
YOU! YOUR ALPHA PHI SIS-
TERS.
ALPHA PHI: Good Luck in the
basketball and water polo play-
offs! We are behind you 100 per-
cent
PHI KAPPA TAU: Thanks for a
fOK SAIF
great time at the pre-downtown.
Love, The SLsters of Alpha Phi.
ANGIE PORTER: CON-
GRATULATIONS ON GET-
TING LAVAUERED ON VAL-
ENTINES DAY! WE ARE VERY
HAPPY FOR YOU! AS FOR YOU
TIM, GOOD LUCK! LOVE THE
ALPHA PHI'S!
NORMAN, Lets flip the tape
over four more times. 1 Love You,
leannie.
SIG-EP BROTHERS: "And in
the Back-House there were some
DISPLAY CLASSlUfD
chkkensE-I-E-I-Or ThePledges.
JOHN: Happy 21st Birthday!
Don't get too crazy - if s a school
night! Nicki.
CLIFFORD I miss vou! Love
your BIG SIS
ROB: The keg beer would have
tasted better in front of a bonfire.
So much for our "immature"
ideas. KEGS RULE!
ANOTHER QUOTE "Nothing
is a waste if it makes a memory
APPLICATIONS: Brady's and
Brady's for Men are accepting
applications for part-time sales
positions. Must be dependable,
conscientious, and enjoy finer
fashions. Salary and clothing
discounts. Apply at Brady's in
the Plaza Monday through
Wednesday 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
BABYSITTER: Responsible,
nonsmoker wanted to care for
SEIZED CARS: trucks, boats, 4-
wheelers, motor homes, by FBI,
IRS, DEA. Available your area
now. Call 800-338-3388 Ext. C-
5999.
FOR SALE: Sleeper sofa, re-
cliner, and chair. Please call 746-
3757.
UNBELIEVABLE: 1985 Dodge
Ram 50 Sport Pick-up Truck.
Excellent condition. Kenwood hi
power stereo, 5 speed, work box,
sport wheels. Book value $3700
without improvements first.
$2450 drives it home. 752-9641
FOR SALE: Used king size bed;
used sofa bed; picnic table with
four benches; Weiider Slant
board; large kennel cab II. Call
Jaquie before 12 p.m. or after 6
p.m. at 757-3031
StKVICiS OHrKFD
SPRING BREAK: Daytona
Beach Florida, 6 days only $69.
Call 1-800-344-8914
COME SEE GREAT STUFF.
Bud IightDaredevilswillbeJam-
ming at half time during ECU -
VA. Tech. game Monday March
2 at 7 p.m.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES
Students$2-00
Nonstudents$3.00
Display Ads:
Open Rate per column inch$5.50
DEADLINE:
Friday, 4 p.m for Tuesday issue and
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday issue.
M AP TO TH E FAST CAROLIN IAN
WE
ARE
HERE
JOYNER
LIBRARY
MENDENHALL
rlSTUDENT CENTER
SIGMA PI: "We're too sexy for
the Fizz Lef s do it again soon.
Love, Alpha Delta Pi.
KA, KAPPA SIG, TKE,
LAMBDA CHI, AND P1KA:
Thanks for a great time at Purple
Schoolbus. Love, Alpha Delta Pi.
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTS
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
Hours:
Mon - Fri 8:30-3:00
j Manager's Special
j every Sun, Mon, Tues
I $1.50 pitchers
I All pizza slices 1 top-
j ping 7St
j (with this coupon)
RESEARCH
� Largest Library ot Information
I
I
I
I
I
I
1
2 Large Pizzas
with 1 topping
$6.99
(with this coupon)
u.l
W.27S TOPICS ALL suiters
OrjM CiUlt6 Tooay :r VISA. MC or COO
800-351-0222
0' Rat C 00 io
11 m MUnc �t MB A Lo�
CA
BOOKTRADER
il V AM) TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50.000 TITLES
919 Dickenson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NOW! USED CDS
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Custom Logos, Colors
& Gift Wrapping
�TROPHIES
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1804 Dickinson Ave.
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I I S YOl R ORIHR
757-2476
Announcements
GAMMA BETA PHI
Attention students: Anyone with a
G.P.A. of 3.0 or better who is inter-
ested in Gamma Beta Phi, an honor
fraternity and service organization,
please call Dena Price at 931-8282.
HOSPITALITY MGMT, ASSQC.
HMA is looking for a responsible and
dedicated person, preferably a Hos-
pitality major, interested in the secre-
tary assistant job for the club. Great
opportunity and lots of fun! Call 931-
7399 if interested.
CATCH ALL QF THE ACTION!
Be a volunteer timer at the CAA
Swimming and Diving Champion-
ships. ECU is hosting the Colonial
Athletic Association Swimming and
Diving Championships Feb. 26, 27,
28, and 29. Timers are needed for Feb.
27, 28 from 10:15 a.m. to 2 p.m. and
from 6:15 to 9 p.m. Also Feb. 29, from
10.15 to 2 p.m. and from 5:15 to 8:30
p.m. Refreshments will be provided
and if three sessions are worked you
will receive a CAA Swimming and
Diving T-shirt. To volunteer please
call Stewart Esposito at 758-8415 or
Matt Maloney at 757-4532.
GROW ADVISING
FOR PFFrQT STUDENTS
There will be advising every third
Tuesday of each month from 12 p.m.
to 2 p.m. in room 203 Belk building.
Please see the video at either Joyner
or Brody libraries before you come
for advising.
DOWN EAST CYCLING CLUB
Local Cycling Team seeking new-
members for 92-93 racing squad, all
levels and Cats (Pv' -I). Sponsorship
and limited perks included. For more
information call Miles 752-0012, Bill
758-8616' Eric 830-0435.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi members: our next
meeting is Feb. 26 in Mendenhall
room 244 at 5 p.m. Officers meet at
4:15 p.m.
JOB SEARCH WORKSHOP
Career Services announces a work-
shop designed to help prospective
graduates find employment in a tight
job market. A variety of strategies
will be discussed and handouts will
be available. The program will be
held in Bloxton House on Feb. 25 at 4
p.m. and Feb. 27 at 2 p.m.
SOCIETY FOR
ADVANCEMENT
IN MANAGEMENT
The Society for the Advancement in
Management would like to invite all
majors interested in business to come
to our meeting Wednesday, Feb. 26at
3:30 in GC1028. There will be speak-
ers discussing today's job market.
Refreshments will be served.

SIGMA PI
Get read y for the Chili Bowl, Greeks!
Sigma Pi is sponsoring the first an-
nual chili cook-off. It will be a blast!
Thanks to all who are already partici-
pating. Feb. 27. Questions call 830-
9273.
SQqpi OC.1CAL SOCIETY
There will be a meeting of the ECU
sociological society on Tuesday, Feb.
25 at 12:15 p.m. in Brewster D-301. All
membcrsare expected toattend. Also,
anyone interest in joining ECUSS is
welcome. Lunch will be provided.
WINDSURFING I WORKSHOP
Interested in windsurfing? Recre-
ational Services will hold a
windsurfing I workshop on Feb. 27 at
7:30 p.m. in Christenbury Gym pool.
For more information, call 757-6387.
1992 at 5 p.m. in 218 Ragsdale. Any-
one interested is invited to attend. If
you have any questions contact Mel-
issa Smith, President, at 931-7569.
H.M.S. CAPTAIN
CONTROVERSY
On Friday,Feb.28,Dr.Stanley Sandier
will be giving his presentation on the
"H.M.S. Captain Controversy
Launched in 1869, this experimental
turret ship withstood concerns about
her stability until she capsized in a
severe gail in 1870, taking her de-
signer and 471 others down with her.
Dr. Sandier is the Command Histo-
rian of the Kennedy Special Warfare
Center of the United States Army,
located in Fort Brag, North Carolina.
He is also the author of The Emergence
of the Modern Capital Ship.
LIBRARY SCIENCE 1000
Second block classes of LIBS 1000 will
begin on March 2. This will include
sections 21-40. The following is a
schedule of when each class will be-
gin: March 2 (MW), March 3 CFTH),
March 2 (Monday night class), March
4 OWednesday night class).
AUrlA PHI SIGMA
Alpha Phi Sigma, National Criminal
Justice Honor Society, is scheduled to
have their next meeting on March 2,
INTERNATIONAL
STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
There will be a meeting on Thursday,
Feb. 27th at 5:30 p.m.
PHI SIGMA TAU
Phi Sigma Tau (National Honor Soci-
etyPhilosophy Club) is sponsoring
an Ethics forum on the question of
privacy, both from the perspective of
the studentsemployees and from the
perspective of the university em-
ployers. The panel will be made up of
two faculty members Dr. Rick
McCarty and Dr. Frank Murphy, of
the Philosophy department and two
students. All are invited and encour-
aged to attend. The Ethics Forum
will be held at Mendenhall Room
244, Feb. 25 at 7 p.m.
RFTURNING ADULT
STUDENT ASSOCIATION
T he Returning Adult Student Asso-
ciation (RASA) will have a meeting
on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 5:30 p.m. in
General Classroom Building, Room
3013. The purpose of this meeting is
to form committees and establish or-
ganizational goals. All interested
students are encouraged to attend.
CRAZY LAZY WATER DAYS
If you love the water, don't miss out
on Recreational Services Crazy Lazy
Water Days! Four person teams will
participate in wacky water games. If
interested please attend an impor-
tant information meeting on March 3
at 5 p.m in Biology 103. For more
information call 757-6387.
I
OF MUSIC EVENTS
FOR FEB. 25- MARCH 2.1992
THURS, Feb. 27, Mike Dixon, piano,
Senior Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall,7
p.m free), and Eric Greene, voice,
Senior Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 9
p.m free). FRI Feb. 28, Black His-
tory ConcertWorkshop featuring
Leslie Burrs, Guest artist in flute and
jazz, and the Leslie Burrs Quartet
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:15 p.m free)
and a Flute Workshop (2 p.m. to 4
p.m free) SUN March 1, Faculty
Recital featuring Charles Bath, piano
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:15 p.m free).
INTRODUCTION
TO MEDITATION
A four week class in meditation tech-
niques and philosophy will begin at 7
p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 27, in Room
N109 of the Howell Science Com-
plex. All are invited. Bring a cushion
and wear comfortable clothing. For
information call Stephen Jalickee at
830-3792.
SOCIETY
OF PHYSICS STUDENTS
The Physics Club will be meeting
every Thursday at 1 p.m Any stu-
dents interested are encouraged to
attend. Any questions call Steve at
830-3792. '
OFFICE OF
HfiAl TH PROMOTION
ANT) WELL-BEING
The Office of Health Promotion and
Weil-Being presents "The Lunch n'
Leam Series Wednesday, Feb. 26,
12:15 pjn. to 1 pm , MSC Multi-
PnrpnRnom "How the Grass Can
BeGreeneron Your Side Bring your
lunch and join us. Al Hight, urban
horticulturist, Pitt County Agricul-
tural Extension Service, will provide
us with tips on developing and main-
taining a healthy lawn.





uUfe Saat (Earoltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
Jennifer Wardrep, News Editor
Julie Roscoe, Asst. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Dana Danielson, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Jeff Becker, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Mannger
Steven Ollice, Classified Advertising Technician
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Jean Caraway, Advertising Technician
The East C 'arolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should be
limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C
27858-4353. For mom information, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, February 25, 1992
Grading system could be a plus
Last month, North Carolina State Uni-
versity, despite outcries from its student
body, took a step toward joining the ranks
of many colleges across the country which
use a plusminus grading system.
TheNCSU Faculty Senate's Academic
Policy Committee passed resolution in fa-
vor of the proposed grading system which
will allow professors to grade their stu-
dents from A plus to D minus. The reso-
lution will allow students to attain a 4.3
GP A, an average granted by only two other
universities in the country.
Shortly after the decision, the N.C.
State student government passed a resolu-
tion voicing their opposition to the newly
implemented system, citing studies which
show plus minus grading to hurt students
more than help them.
Proponents of a stricter system argued
that the study is flawed providing an inac-
curate picture of the system.
The debate of the plusminus system
on the campus of NCSU should cause our
students and faculty to examine our own
system. Would it prove beneficial for our
campus to follow in the footsteps of NCSU
and adopt a similar system?
Logic would purport that the plus
minus system should neither hurt nor
hinder students. The outcome of the
adoption would simply be a more accurate
description of one's work in a class. The
number of times a student's grade would
be worsened by a minus, would be coun-
terbalanced by the number of times a plus
would help a grade.
It would seem that the only people
who could object to the system are those
who enjoy being lazy in a class but do not
enjoy reaping their justified grade. Those
who should be angered by the plusminus
system's nonexistence are students who
excel in a course, but receive the same
grade as those who produce lesser work.
Regardless of one's position in the ar-
gument, the issue should be discussed. For
too long, this campus has gone without an
effective way to accurately portray the
grades of its students.
Letters to the Editor
Definition of
rape changes
To The Editor.
Mike Tyson's recent 'ape con-
viction stimulates thought about an
alleged phenomenon known as "date
rape" (or "acquaintance rape"). "Date
rape" doesn't refer just to forcibly
compelled acts of intercourse. Ac-
cording to some of those who believe
in date rape, such as the author of the
training manual for Swarthmore's
College Acquaintance Rape Preven-
tion Workshop, "inappropriate innu-
endo" is a form of date rape!
One of the more disturbing fea-
tures of the movement to persuade us
of the existence of this new "crime" is
that you don't even have to think
you've been raped to be a victim of
"date rape According to a typical
piece of radical feminist propaganda,
posted on an office door on the fourth
floor of Brewster Building, most
campus rapes are committed by
someone the victim knows, so she
may think it doesn't count So if this
has happened to you, please report
it
In my opinion, only someone
with a sick mind would want to en-
courage women who don't think
they've been raped (or perhaps ha-
rassed) to accuse men of "rape" (or
"harassment") But that is the mental-
ity of many feminists. Under the guise
of preventing rape they seek to so
widen the definition of rape as to
unfairly stigmatize normal hetero-
sexual interaction. The definition of
"rape" becomes so broad as to be-
come a meaningless rhetorical flour-
ish. Feministsaren't simply interested
in preventinggenuine violence against
women; they wish to exploit occa-
sional acts of violence in order to clai m
universal victimization. Only in this
way can they provide a pseudo-justi-
fication for their demands for prefer-
ential treatment.
The process is by now a familiar
one: First one creates a non-existent
crime, then one asserts that it is com-
' monplace, seeks law to counter it,
demands funding to fight it, and then
claims men have always been respon-
sible for it in the first place. As in most
feminist arguments, illusion and
rhetoric take the place of reality. As-
serting profound insight, their actual
goal is the incitement of antagonism
between the sexes. It's their chief raison
d'etre.
Radical feminists don't want
equality; they want division. They
don't want justice; they want to
criminalize traditional formsof sexual
interaction. They don't want social
harmony, since it's only by creating
d issonance between the sexes that they
can flourish.
They look at life through dirty
spectacles. Consequently, all they see
is dirt.
Steven Mandelker
Visiting Asst. Professor
Newspaper portrays
sexist tendencies
To The Editor:
I would like to say that 1 com-
mend The East Carolinian for equal
treatment of women in your publica-
tion. I would like to, but I cannot.
In the Feb. 18 issue of The East
Carolinian, there appeared The Fear-
less Primary Forecast. I think it is
terrific that you asked the female
mayor of Greenville for her "picks"
for the primary; however, no other
women were asked for their opinions
concerning the political race. If
Greenville's mayor was a male, you
would not have had any women rep-
resented in this political pick "contest
You could have asked a female news
caster, a female in the political science
department (yes, there are some), or
even a female from your own staff.
You have six women staff members
listed on your editorial page, yet it
seems that you do not value their
opinions much. If you don't respect
the women on your staff, it is hard to
believe that you value the opinions of
any of the women here at ECU. You
asked two editorial columnists for
their opinions, and you even asked
your director of advertising for his
political picks, but yet you did not ask
your female news editor for her opin-
ion, nor did you ask any of the other
female members of your staff for their
political picks.
I assume that your primary
forecast was a take-off of your Fearless
Football Forecast; no women were in-
cluded in that contest either. It seems
that you are selling women short on
this campus and in general. "You've
come a long way" at The East Carolin-
ian . Since the fall of last year you have
gone from having one or two women
in your staff to having a significant
number working for your paper. They
are significant in number, make them

significant in stature. If you showed
more respect to the women of your
staff, you would be making a good
start toward greater equality for
women in general. Come on Mr. Edi-
tor, the candidates may all be males,
but there are millions of women vot-
ers out there, thousands of women
politicians and government officials,
and over 7,000 women students on
thiscampus. They all need their voices
heard. Let your female staff members
be assets to your editorial content, not
just names listed on your editorial
page!
Shawna L. Ray
Sophomore
Psychology
(Editor's note � The editor apolo-
gizes for the careless oversight which has
justly angered Ms. Ray and probably many
other students on campus. Thanks to Ms.
Ray's (andother's) observations, this news-
paper will in the future concern itself with
the views of a more mixed-gender compos-
ite.)
Appeals board
defends decision
To The Editor:
This letter is written in response
to Richard ParaveUa's recent letter to
the editor concerning the Citations Ap-
peals Board. The Citations Appeals
Board reviewed Mr. ParaveUa's case
and ruled to uphold the traffic ticket.
Mr. Paravella stated in his letter
that hedid not intend to parkatMinges,
yet that is what he did when he left his
vehicle in the parking lot and went
inside the building. Mr. Paravella fur-
ther stated that he does not park on
campus, yet the traffic office has record
of a previous unregistered vehicle ticket
in his name.
Mr. Paravella referred to this
board as robots. The board members
took the time and effort, as we do with
all traffic appeals, to review Mr.
ParaveUa's case and his written appeal
statement The board further researched
traffic files to see if this incident was his
first unregistered vehicle offense. The
actions of the board in regard to Mr.
ParaveUa's case can hardly be charac-
terized as an automatic rubber stamp of
approval by robots.
Where do you draw the line be-
tween having to purchase a $70 parking
sticker and abusing the system for quick
stops on campus?
ECU Citations Appeals Board
You'll Get Nothing and Like It
Buchanan becomes democratic ally
Bully Boy bites again.
Editorial columnists have en-
joyed many good laughs at George
Bush'searlier scoff at beingchallenged
by "some columnist" now that the
president finds his campaign jeopar-
dized by a mere political writer. Pat
Buchanan's impressive showing of 37
percent in New Hampshire is still be-
ing dismissed by many Bush advo-
cates, but the threat is real.
The situation can be depicted
quite honestly by a metaphor for a no-
win situation: the president has a mean
little bulldog with a tight-jaw grip on
his ankle � if he kicks the animal he'll
lose face, and if he ignores it, his leg
will bleed. There is nothing that Bush's
strategists can do to campaign their
way out of it.
Buchanan won't win the Re-
publican seat with such percentages,
but now much attention is focusing
on what he will do to the party. Dan
Quayle has been begging Republicans
to not be so hasty in "sending the
president a message and on
Brinkley's show George Will plainly
asked Buchanan if he realized that he
was dividing the Republican party.
Here I have to confess of my
own misdeeds. Ever since Buchanan
appeared as a candidate with his anti-
Bush brigade, I've been pushing him
on my Republican friends. Secretly, I
hoped that Bush'screw would let loose
their infamous mud-slinging on the
willing Buchanan, angers would be
charged, spiteful votes cast, and
meanwhile my candidate (still Bill
Clinton) would slip past the furor and
head to the White House. I should
have known those wily Republicans
would eventually have caught on,
dam it.
Bush has been smart to not kick
the dog and stir up the pack, but he
By
Parker
Editorial
Columnist
cannot ignore the mutt and look good
either. Every sting Buchanan delivers
makes Bush shaky, and remember, he
still hasn't personally recovered from
that "wimp" image of four years ago
that made him take cheap shots at
Dan Rather. Instead of rebuking
Buchanan (or to use the now-trendy
word, "rebuff" as popularized by
George himself). Bush turns vehement
each time to those fall guys, "the
Democratic Congress, "and with each
avoidance, Buchanan capitalizes.
The Democrats couldn't have a
better hitman on their team. Years of
editorial work have honed Buchanan's
argumentative skills far beyond those
of the incumbent's team. For Bush to
debate Buchanan would be suicide.
Bully Boy is an excellent rhetorician-
he can turn any presidential state-
ment around to its weak side and uses
scathing yet clever analogies such as
the "King George" device to great
function.
So far the best Bush has offered
to deter the beast is to sick Dan Quayle
on him.
The best analogy I can give for
that is to say it's like sicking Dan
Quayle on Pat Buchanan.
So Bush finds himself in a
strange position, being attacked from
within. The IranContra fiasco was
easier to shake than this.
What it appears he will do was
foreshadowed last week when John
Frohnmayer was dismissed. Since the
National Endowment of the Arts made
The Right Side
such a good conservative target, Bj'r
canned its head to give Buch hi �
less firepower Now one wonders
what other changes and dismissals
the Bully will initiate through Bush
It's likely Buchanan will p �
each open nerve to see where Bush
will flinch, asserting control -
outside. The end result mav be .��
Bush denied early in the year �-�
possibility of ol' James Dar �
Quayle being ditched in favor ol
running mate with more credibility
What should King Georgi i
to save the castle7 Well it 1 were sur
I wouldn't tell anyone because want
the siege to triumph. But what may
seem like a very unlikelv venue but
nothing's impossible) is tor Bush to
lure Buchanan himself in as a run-
ning mate. Wouldn't that be a hoot
If, as some suggest, Buchanan i1- re-
ally running for office in then he
might try to force his way in that wa
as well. This would give Bush a
chance to consolidate a segmentirn
party, and probably make his lire
miserable as well, but hey, he war.t
to be president again.
The actual idea of Buchanara
president is quite scary in anv event
The Great Wall of America would
likely be erected, dividing the an-
tiguous United States from anv out-
sidecorrespondence. There is ahead)
a vast distance between the public
and the executive office that plagues
Bush now. Unless the President de-
vises some way out of his vicious
circle. Democratic candidates will
probably have ample time to spread
their ideas and find what works for
voters.
In the meantime, it will be ho
watching Bush run around the back-
yard.
Go on Pat, get im boy.
Pitzer too inexperienced for council
"Oh Golly! Someone help us
poor, weak students. We're being per-
secuted by the city under a policy of
containment
I'm really not sure what sec-
tion of the city Mr. Patrick Pitzer
lives in, but in mine I have yet to see
a Nazi-Storm Trooper attack inno-
cent little college pupils for contain-
ment purposes. What exactly is this
horrible relationship between the city
and the student body all about? Is it
the fact that we students aren't al-
lowed to blare insipid music until 4
a.m. waking everyone nearby and
not allowing them sleep?
Or could it be that we students
aren't allowed room around down-
town vomiting, urinating and beat-
ing on everything we see while in the
midst of alcohol and drug inebria-
tion? Maybe it's the third reich police
that are constantly abusing and ar-
resting innocent students who are
simply trying to acquire a whole-
someeducation. Yes, the list could go
on and on whah!
These cries from certain stu-
dents are really annoying to those of
us who are trying to gain an educa-
tion in four years or less. College is
neither meant to be an academically
stringent prison nor is it meant to be
some drunken free for all with classes
playing a minor part. I seriously
doubt the conversations during city
council meetings are along the lines
of let's see what else we can do to
piss the students off
There are reasons that these so
called "Policies of Containment" ex-
ist. We wonderful students have
shown in the past that we can't act
By
Nathan
Hicks
Editorial
Columnist
like normal, civil human beings and
thus have to follow mandated guide-
lines because of it.
The idea of Pitzer being a part
of the city council is completely ab-
surd; it's rather just another asinine
move by a student trying to make a
martyr out of himself for a completely
ridiculous cause. The city has done
nothing unfair. Things are fine
enough as they are without some stu-
dent, still wet behind the ears, jump-
ing into a situation in which at best he
could only further aggravate the city
council with inane requests from his
so called "student-body
It would be nice to believe that
a sophomore student is standing up
for his fellow classmates against an
evil empire, but the fact remains that
Pitzer-aged students are not
wisdomatic enough to help make de-
cisions that affect the broad-range of
student diversity that Greenville
contains. If that was the case, presi-
dents, senators, governors, etc
would not have age requirements t hat
have to be met. Sure this type of
student representation is on a differ-
ent scale than the state and federal
level, but still the city council is not
the forum for some bleeding-heart to
fight for his cause (which is a cause
that is not of wide-scale conviction).
The key word is student. We as
students have not finished learning;
therefore we can't possibly know all
we need to know to posses a strong
fundamental base that is essential in
making decisions whose ramifica-
tions affect several thousand people
Yet there are instances in which
younger people are incredibly intel-
ligent and make highly advanced
progress in all sorts of fields includ-
ing politics. And surely not to sav
Pitzer is a bonehead, but if this sort ot
political situation was his natural
forte then he would not need to be a
political science student today
The point being, Pitzer ha yet
to finish paying his dues and until
that time comes, his place, as is oth-
ers, is in the classroom learning. Stu-
dents should be represented and
treated fairly, but until the student
becomes the teacher, the tail is not
going to wag the dog. The thoughts
are heard around campus "What
would happen if Patrick Pitzer did
win the election and was placed on
city council?" The easiest answer
would be that he would wake-up
I whole-heartedlv believe that
the students of ECU are rational and
intelligent people who are not about
to go along with the implementation
of such a travesty.
The segment that follows Pitzer
is quite a minority. Contrary to popu-
lar belief, the liberal segment of ECL
is not that big, it simply is overtly
noisy. The idea of Pitzer winning is
completely preposterous, thus when
the time comes to vote for Patrick
Pitzer we students can settle back
into our couches put on our favorite
CD and say "I'm glad I finally didn't
do it
TheC
President
E are vis Pkjs1-
Retracting a proposal to con-
struct a time capsule. Senior Class
President Thomas Allen savs the
wooded "malareaotthecampus
should be razed to make room for
a real mall, complete with a Taco
GongandaSpvrwr sCheesy Gifts
"After thinking on it for a long
time, I decided that nobody n
gives a damn about a tirrn
sule Allen said, "1 mean �
from now, who's gonna care about
what happened in 1991 or 27 Do
you care what happened SO years
ago, in 1910? Gimme a break
And then
ot burritOS. rHI
"Why drive all ti
Piazza or nir
we can have' �
shopping mall d
Traditional!
has given some
For instance.
Chancellor Dicl
� n. The lame
time was a sal
the
So Allen kn
innovative � I
1992 class gift
standing in lint
NBC unve
predicting
Th; As
Press
The American public has an
insatiable appetite tor information
about the public's opinion of the
presidential candidates
In the past. TV networks and
other news organizations have
attempted to meet the public de-
mand bv repeatedly taking opin-
ion polls. That practice led to tak-
ing "exit polls which attempt to
predict the results of an election
by interviewing voter- a- they
emerge from the voting booth.
But now ev�
passe, accordinj
president G.E.
uptheelection-
of the '90s in one!
"Public opj
show vou the
the moment th
notes Pawn,
necessarily in
psychics, v.
results as far al
them
Pawn belie
can eventually,
altogether, pro
Rapper rev
secret of sue
The Amalgamated Press
At a press conference Mon-
day, rap star Hammer told re-
porters the secret of his phenom-
enal success.
According to the rich, fa-
mous and powerful recording
artist, the trick to writing a multi-
million-selling single is to repeat
the song's title as many times as
humanly possible.
"On mv first bighitL'Can't
Touch This 1 repeated the title
about 500 times Hammer told
the reporters. "And when it went
platinum about five hours alter
release, I knew 1 was on to some-
thing
Hammer tested his theory
on two recent smash-hit songs
"2 Legit 2 Quit" and the theme
from the movie The Addams Fam-
ily. On each track, Hammer re-
peated the respective songs' titles
about 1000 times. Proving
Hammer's theory, each song
went platinum in a matter of
hours.
Hammer'
the hit-makinj
will hencefoT
"Hammering I
Hammer:
mg with resea
just how maij
song's title cat
standard CD.
Current
appointing -
lion repetitio
Hammer thir
sible to use
titles and ad
pressionrout
figure bv a tal
With a bill
song, HammJ
ations shoi
within seconf
"And a-
proves Haj
sky's the In
repeated it:
the sky's the
limit, the skvl
ECU SNAPSHOTS
stupid statistics for stupid
We're Voting For More Colt
n
a
a
10000
8000
6000 -
q 4000 -
2000 -
1966 1967 1968 1969 �





Ting and Like It
js democratic ally

onservative target. Bush
d ts head to j he Buchanan
repower Now one wonders
r changes jnd dismissals
. nvill initiate through Bush.
�tBuchanan will poke
pel i rve to see whore Bush
iss rting control from
he end :v-ult m.iv be what
ed early in the year, the
lames Danforth
tied in favor of
ng matt with more credibility
IVhat should King George do
etht istle? Well if I were sure,
� ne because! want
� in ph But what mav
inlikely venue (but
ng'? mpo? : is tor Bush to
himself in as a run-
- ih Wouldn t that be a hoot
ggest Buchanan is ro-
lling foi �� i n'96 then he
try i ' rce his way in that way
� - would give Bush a
i to consolidate .i segmenting
make his lite
as well, but he) he wants
dent again.
' ideai I Bu� hananaa
� '� s iryinany event.
'� ' America would
i erected dividing the con-
us I nited States from anvout-
rn spondence rhereisalready
listai e between the public
tiv� ff ice that plagues
� ss the President de-
i m ij it A his vicious
� m era! andidates will
� imple time to spread
nd find m hat works for
�� v meantime, it will be fun
run around the back-
yard
n Fat, get 'im bov
jht Side
need for council
jEer being a part
(complete .
ike a
or a completely
1 - ;tv has done
ings are tine
trout some stu
the ears, lump-
� hich at best he
ftm tie the city
buests triim his
believe that
is standing up
Mea against an
let remains that
Ints are not
�help make de-
broad-rangeot
hat Greenville
pe case, MTCSi-
Ivornors eti
uirementsthat
this type ot
In isonadiffer-
Pt and federal
! council is not
Jeding-heartto
�hich is a cause
kle conviction)
I student. We as
Ished learning.
therel n ��� ir � possibly know all
�" " : � now to posses a strong
fundamental base that is essential in
� Rg decisions whose ramitica-
ect several thousand people
Vet there are instances in which
) inger people arv incredibly intel-
ligent and make highly advanced
progress in all sorts nf fields includ-
ing politics And surely not to say
Piter is a bonehead, but if this sort of
political situation was his natural
rh then he would not need to be a
tical science student todav.
I he point being, 1'iter has yet
ish paving his dues and until
that time comes, his place, as is oth-
ers in the classroom learning. Stu-
dents should be represented and
treated fairly, but until the student
becomes the teacher, the tail is not
going to wag the dog The thoughts
are heard around campus "What
would happen if Patrick Pitzer did
win the election and was placed on
city council?" The easiest answer
would be that he would wake-up.
I whole-heartedlv believe that
the students of ECU are rational and
intelligent people who are not about
to go along with the implementation
ot such a travesty
The segment that follows Pitzer
is cjuite a minority Contrary to popu-
lar belief, the liberal segment of ECU
is not that big, it simply is overtly
noisy The idea of Pitzer winning is
completely preposterous, thus when
the time comes to vote tor Patrick
Pitzer we students can settle back
into our couches put on our favorite
CD and sav "I'm glad 1 finally didn't
do it
Opinion
3Hje luBtdlarallnlan February 25, 1992 �
The Clearly Labeled Satire Page
Low in sodium; high in fiber
President of senior class changes mind on gift
I KI MS Prkss
Retracting a proposal to con-
struct a time capsule, Senior Class
President Thomas Allen says the
wooded "mall" area of the campus
should be razed to make room for
a red mall, complete with a Taco
(iongand aSpenser'sChecsy Gifts.
At ter thinking on it for a long
time. I decided that nobody really
gives a damn about a time cap-
sule Allen said, "I mean, 80 years
from now, who'sgonna care about
a hat happened in 1991 or '92? Do
you care what happened 80 years
ago, in 110? Gimme a break
And then it hit Allen like a ton
of burritos. He asked himself,
"Why drive all the way out to the
Piazza or to Carolina West, when
we can have the convenience of a
shopping mall on campus?"
Traditionally, the senior class
has given some really lame gifts.
For instance, the 1988 class gave
Chancellor Dick Achin a toaster
oven. The lamest class gift of all
time was a salt-lick post given by
the class of 1973.
So Allen knew he had to be
innovative when considering the
1992 class gift. And then, when
standing in line at the Fillet of
Chicks, the idea hit him like a ton
of feathers.
Allen's proposed $92-million
mall complex will dwarf theobso-
lete-before-it's-even-built $18-mil-
lion student recreation center.
Stores included in the mall: a
Sare's, a Blunder's and a Poison
Ivey's. The lingerie chain Vicky's
Dirty Secrets may also locate there.
Allen said that the mall will
ha' e extra-wide walking areas for
ciderly tenured faculty with a pen-
chant for speed-walking.
But the most exciting portion
of the mall will be the eatery sec-
tion, which will include a Darl's
(Anse's and Addie's boy), a
Koppel House (where each waffle
bears a striking resemblance to
Ted Koppel's face) and an Earlvis
Big Boy (in honor of the rotund
media giant).
For the sweet-toothed, there
will be an I Can't Believe I Really
Put That Nasty Crap In My Mouth
and a Submergin' Doughnuts (es-
pecially for Public Safety officers).
The only snag in the plan may
be parking. According to Allen's
critics, the three proposed park-
ing spaces will not fully serve the
needs of mall-goers.
"Parking may be a problem,
but who cares?" Allen said. "You
can't find a place on this deity-
forsaken campus anyway, so
what's the difference?"
Oneother problem with build-
ing the mall will be finding the $92
million required. As a first step in
tackling the funding problem, the
SAG has mandated that freshmen
be rounded up and forced to par-
ticipate in the building's construc-
tion.
"Of course, that won't totally
solve the problem said Allen.
"We'll take donations, too
When considering a name for
the mall, Allen and his committee
thought long and hard, and then
the decision hit them like a ton of
books titled WhontTo NameaBuild-
ing After. Although only Earlvis
Press is privy to the name, we will
divulge it right now, just to ruin
the unveilingceremonies. The mall
will be named after Ron Jeremy, a
former ECU student and thor-
oughly obscure film actor.
Allen defended his decision
to name such a huge and impor-
tant project after someone almost
completely unknown. "Look
around you said Allen. "Find
me one ECU graduate who's a
household name. Get my point?"
NBC unveils new method of Poll results
predicting election results
startle CEO
I i D A1 Al (.AMAH I) PRI-5S
The American public has an
Insatiable appetite for information
about the public's opinion of the
presidential candidates.
In the past, TV networks and
other news organizations have
.ittempted to meet the public de-
mand by repeatedly taking opin-
ion polls. That practice led to tak-
ing exit polls which attempt to
predict the results of an election
b) interviewing voters as they
emerge from the voting booth.
But now even that practice is
passe, according to NBC network
president G.E. Pawn. Pawn sums
up theclection-prediction method
of the '90s in one word Psychics
"Public opinion polls onlv
show vou the public's opinion at
the moment the poll was taken
notes Pawn, "and exit polls are
necessarily incomplete. With
psychics, we can know the exact
results as far ahead as you want
them
Pawn believes that psychics
can eventually replace elections
altogether, providing the Ameri-
can public with their ideal situa-
tion: a comfortablecertainty about
the future, and no responsibility
for it.
NBC currently is employing
psychics to predict election results
into the next century.
On the popular NBC morning
show Too Dazed, noted psychic
Jeanne Vixen predicted that Julia
Roberts would run for president
in 1996, but would be defeated by
incumbent Shirley MacLaine.
As a bonus, Vixen predicted
that Too Dazed co-host Brian
Gumball would succeed Supreme
Court Justice Clarence Thomas.
The seer further predicted that, by
a staggering coincidence, Katie
Curriculum (the show's other co-
host) would be confirmed as a re-
placement for Justice Sandra Day
O'Connor.
"And the person who is presi-
dent at the time will claim that
Gumball isn't being nominated
just because he's replacing a black
justice Vixen mysteriously in-
toned. "And that Curriculum isn't
being nominated just because she's
replacing a woman. Gee, that's a
shocker
The Amalgamated Press
A new Gallop poll released
Monday shows that more than
99 percent of all Americans were
not polled by the poll.
"Naturally, we'realittlecon-
cerned about this result said
Frank Secretariat,Gallop'sCEO.
"A little concerned, and slightly-
worried. A little concerned,
slightly worried, and a bit ap-
prehensive. A little concerned,
slightly worried, a bit apprehen-
sive, and just a tad scared. A
littleconcerned, slightly worried,
a bit apprehensive, just a tad
scared, and somewhat � well,
you get the point
Within minutes of the re-
lease of the poll data, an organi-
zation had sprung up to criticize
pollsters.
"These numbers just show
that pollsters are out of touch
with the majority of Americans
gibbered Lee Murr, founder of
Americans for Polling Every-
body. "We APEs demand that
all Americans be empowered to
participate in the process of be-
ing polled
When Secretariat responded
that polling all Americans would
be prohibitively expensive and
is mathematically unnecessary,
Murr called the CEO a "white
male fascist" and slapped him.
Rapper reveals New slogan means business
secret of success
The Amalgamated Press
At a press conference Mon-
day, rap star Hammer told re-
porters the secret of hi s phenom-
enal success.
According to the rich, fa-
mous and powerful recording
artist, the trick to writinga multi-
million-selling single is to repeat
the swing's htle as many times as
humanly possible.
"On my first big hit, U Can't
Touch This I repeated the title
about 500 times Hammer told
the reporters. "And when it went
platinum about five hours after
release, I knew I was on to some-
thing
Hammer tested his theory
on two recent smash-hit songs,
'2 Legit 2 Quit" and the theme
from the movie The Addams Tarn
try. On each track, Hammer re-
peated the respecbvesongs' titles
about 1000 times. Proving
Hammer's theory, each song
went platinum in a matter of
hours.
Hammer has since patented
the hit-making process, which
will henceforth be known as
"Hammering out a song
Hammer is currently work-
ing with researchers to find out
just how many times a single
song's title can be packed onto a
standard CD.
Current estimates are dis-
appointing � only about a mil-
lion repetitions, say some. But
Hammer thinks it might be pos-
sible to use one-syllable song
titles and advanced data com-
pression routines to increase that
figure by a factor of 1000.
With a billion repetitions per
song, Hammer believes, his cre-
ations should go platinum
within seconds of their release.
"And as CD technology im-
proves Hammer noted, "the
sky's the limit And then he
repeated it: "The sky's the limit,
the sky's the limit, the sky's the
limit, the sky's the limit
The Amalgamated Press
Thecrime-nddenGeorgeville
Apartments revealed their new ad-
vertising slogan Saturday:
"Georgeville: Never a dull mo-
ment
The slogan will be featured in
a series of television and newspa-
per advertisements, and will also
be blazoned acrossarea billboards.
The slogan is the brainchild of
Adman Sleazeball, an advertising
executive with a local company.
"The slogan's a basic adver-
tising technique Sleazeball said
modestly. "When all you have to
offer iscrime, that's what you sell
Georgeville has indeed been
plagued with crime in recent
weeks, and owner Sue Pervisor
was beginning to get a little wor-
ried. She pins her hopes for the
troubled apartment complex's fu-
ture solvency on the success of
Sleazeball'scampaign. So far, she's
pleased with the slogan.
"It's a nice slogan Pervisor
said. "Looks nice tattooed on my
arm like this, don't you think?"
Pervisor took time out of her
busy schedule to talk about the
nature of Sleazeball's plan. "A
catchy slogan, an ad vertising blitz,
sucker some dull-witted and im-
poverished students into signing
long-term contracts � and bang!
We're back in business explained
Pervisor.
There are already signs that
the catchy new slogan could bring
in more student residents.
Never a dull moment
huh?" mused ECU student N.
Genuous. "Catchy slogan sure,
I'd move there�it's gotta be more
exciting than the dorms
Student Barbara Hopper ech-
oed the sentiment. "As you've
probably learned from a local tele-
vision station, I, like most of my
fellow ECU students, spend most
of my timedrinking myself nearly
to the point of alcohol poisoning
and then staggeringaround down-
town bellowing semicoherent
curses until 1 get mugged or hit by
a car � but even I could do with a
bit of fun
TV lawsuits abound
ECU SNAPSHOTS
stupid statistics for stupid people
We're Voting For More Columnists!
�oooo
VT
�n
c
a
CO
8000 -
6000
5 4000 -
2000 -
The Amalgamated Press
Michigan "Suicide Doctor"
Jack Kevorkian, former heavy-
weight boxing champion Mike
Tyson, former Panamanian dicta-
tor Manuel Noriega and serial
killer Jeffrey Dahmer have all filed
suit against each other.
The news media have made
so much money from their cover-
age of the quartet's legal battles
that they have decided to jointly
sponsor a four-way "mega-law-
suit" unprecedented in legal or
television history.
"This is the future of TV said
enthusiastic NBC president G.E.
Pawn.
However, backstage quarrel-
ling may derail the show. Inside
sources have revealed to The
Amalgamated Press that
Kevorkian and Dahmer have
ganged up on their co-stars �
Kevorkian was to convince them
to commit suicide, then Dahmer
would eat the evidence.
1966 1987 1968 1989 1990 1991 1992
Y�ar
BRIEFLY
Mini-satire for readers on the go
MEDICINE: FDA panel vote shocks the nation, as a group
of men publicly declare that they don't want women to be able to
have bigger breasts.
CALIFORNIA: It just keeps raining, and raining, and
raining
ARTS: National Endowment for the Arts director John
Frohnmayer leaves the NEA for the far more lucrative business of
raising funds to oppose the organization.
It's Friday night
at ECU.
Do you know what your
local television station
is doing?
Chances are it's showing the
news � right now � engaging
in a favorite activity of
unscrupulous reporters faced
with poor prospects during
sweeps: misreporting
and exaggerating.
In fact, they're probably
exploiting a large segment of
their potential viewers �
college students � in order to
bolster their ratings and their
ad revenues, with no evident
concern for the truth or for
their own long-term
relationship with the
community they're supposedlyr
in business to serve.
A Nighty-night Extra
only on WTINcan-77
i





Entertainment
EJ?e 1-aat (Enrol! man
February 25, 1992
Former ECU artist breaks into comic book industry
By Jeff Parker
Staff Writer
The comic book industry ranks
as one of the hardest businesses to
break into, in this country at least.
Comics, despite its popularity, is
still a relatively small field, and
prospective writers and artists
would usually have an easier time
findingacting work in film. So when
someone does find an outlet for
their craft in the industry, then a
particular level of success has been
achieved.
The closest load bov makes
good" storv is that of Mike Iverson,
a former art student oi East Caro-
lina. Iverson is the artist and av
creator of Vigil tall fnnn grace, one oi
the latest products of Innovation
Comics
What is as interesting as
Iverson s success is that his debut
corractsmrnanywaysacontinuance
of a strip he did as an undergradu-
ate for The East Carolinian' Pirate
Comics, The Vampire.
"The 'ampin gave me a chance
to breaka way f mm schoohvork and
practice what 1 really liked, comics
Iverson said
Th Vampire was one of the
most memorable features ol the
Pirate Comics page, chronicling the
adventures of a policeman-tumed-
vampire, who continues his work
utilizing the abilities of the infa-
mous bloodsuckers.
Iverson had fun with the genres
o(superheroesand horror. The main
character chooses to fight for good
based on an omen of a satirical na-
ture a Batman comic falls out of
the skv and hits the vampire in the
head. Weekly episc�des often were
filled with exaggerated violence of
explicit nature.
"Basically, I tried to get one act
of violence in each strip. I always
hoped to provoke some reactions
from the readers
After graduation, Iverson left
the rain and cold of C.roonville to
live in thodrv heat of Pruvnix, Ariz
While working asa commercial art-
ist, he kept making efforts to work
in comics.
During an interview in the art
department at Tower Records,
Iverson met display artist Arvin
Loudenralk, who had similar inter-
ests in comics. The two quicklv es-
tablished a rapportand began work-
ing together.
Iverson and 1 oudermilk spent
some rime trying to sell a superhero
title they had developed, but noth-
ing came of it. "We took our idea
around at the San Diego conven-
tion thatyear,and didn't really make
any progress Iverson said. "On
the drive Kick to Arizona, Arvin
thought some more about The Vam-
pire and the character Grace, and
suggested we try to do something
with her. From there, the whole
idea just clicked
Finally, the winning connection
was made at the San Diego Comics
Convention held last year in July.
As Iverson visited one publisher
after another, he left eight-page
photocopy samples of the team's
latest endeavor, Grace.
The storv made use of a woman
police lieutenant introduced way
back in the final episodes of The
Vampire.
In October, the editor at Inno-
vation contacted Mike at home and
Started talking publication.
Vigil: fall from grace is described
in promotion as a "hard-boiled
blood sucking thriller leaning as
much toward detective fiction as it
does gothic horror.
Grace Kimble, the title charac-
ter, utilizes heavy weaponry in her
determination to keep the general
public sate from her undead peers.
She views her condition as some
sort of malady or affliction, and
struggles to keep her sanity despite
her new and unnatural urges.
With Vigil, Iverson uses tech-
niques experimented with in his
college strip, such as xeroxed photo
backgrounds. The process of creat-
ing each page requires various lay-
ers for each final image, with inks
done on hosted acetate and zip-a-
tone and airbrush mixed in.
For artistic direction, Iverson
often looks to acclaimed comics
artists Steve Rude and Dave Gib-
bons. "Among others I like, I really
admire Bill Sienkiwicz and Dave
McKcan. They show that you can
be an artist in a business-ruled me-
dium Iverson said. "Unfortu-
nately, too many companies are
more concerned with whether dead-
lines can be met rather than with
quality.
As the second issue of Vigil
prepares to come out, Iverson says
he has no plans to work on any
other projects yet. "We have more
story ideas � we'd like to do about
eight more Vigil miniseries. In the
future, I might liketodosome work
for DC comics, but for now I'm
happy with this Iverson said.
Vigil can be ordered at local
comics retail stores for $2.75.
Photo courtesy of Innovation Comics
nto the
Mike Iverson. a former ECU student, succeeds in breaking i
comic industry with Innovation's new title. Viju (all from grace
Folk singer to enlighten audience
By Pamela Oliver
Staff Writer
Once again the Greenville
Folk Arts Society has planned an
exciting evening of culture and
enlightenment.
Ada Kory, folk singer and
songwriter from Carrboro, N.C
will perform Feb 28 at the Upper
Crust Rakerv.
Originally from Houston,
Texas, korv began singing profes-
sionally in high school, where she
mostly sing other people's mate-
rial.
In! ugh school her band plaved
a diverse group of music. "One
night we would plav Country and
Western tunes like Wavlon
The Student Union's
Jennings and George lories Korv
said. "The next night we'd plav a
high school gig with typical dance
music or a private partv with mel-
low music like Bread and Linda
Rondstat
After graduating from high
school in Houston, Kory attended
Texas A&M University, where she
earned her undergraduate degree
and M.D in psychiatry.
Kory sud music took a Kick
seat to studies while in college.
It was not until she finished her
internship two and a half years ago
that Korv picked up her guitar and
started playing professionally again.
"1 never thought I would come
hack to my music Korv said. "But
I got my time back after finishing
Coffeehouse Commute Pre
mv internship. Plusmv friendssug-
gested I get back into it after heanng
me plav at their private parties
1 found my music to be a very
healing kind of thing" Korvsud. "I
could reach people more with lvrics
than psychiatry
The lyrics are the nicest impor-
tant element of her songs. Strong
words are the key to getting her
powerful message across.
The stmgs deal with personal
and socially responsible feelings.
They range from relationships to
how we respond to the environ-
mental needs of the world.
All Korv's recent material is
her own. She has written over 100
original songs. Her style is a blend
of several musical categories in-
sents:
eluding country, folk, rock and
blues.
Korv's debut album. Opportu-
nity Knocks More Than Once, was
released abouta year and a half ago
and was received locally and na-
tionally.
She produced, engineered,
mixed and recorded the album un-
der her own label. The album con-
sists of an all-acoustic band.
Kory's new album should be
released in two weeks. The album
is titled All Love Can Take.
Performance time is at 8 p.m.
Ad mission price is $5 for the general
public and $4 for members of the
Greenville FolkArts Society. Stu-
dents get in for half price with a
student ID.

1992 BSN
STUDENTS.

ter the Air Force
immediately after gradua-
tion � without waiting for the
results of your State Boards You
can earn great benefits as an Air
Force nurse officer And if selected
during your senior year, you may
qualify for a five-month internship
at a major .Air Force medical facili-
ty. To apply, you'll need an overall
2.50 GPA. Serve your country
while you serve your career.
I SAF HEALTH PROFESSIONS
COLLECT
(919)850-9549
� i y
7"
ALICIA QUINTANO
PERFORMANCE ARTIST I
STORYTELLER
'Exceptionally entertaining"
North Shore Magazine
DATE: February 25, 1992
TIME: 8:00pm
PLACE: THE UNDERGROUND
RTH
J3STJREET
QREFNVILLE fC
SUN-$1.00 Domestics
MON - 75? Draft
i
jj TUES - 50c Pony Bottles
I
' WED - $3.00 ALL Pitchers
i
J THUR-$1.25 Imports
"audacious and highly imaginative
Susan Waring Morris
Women's Interari I hc.itic. Y('
SPRING FEVER'
AT BOLI'S
� Daily Food Specials
� FREE Delivery (Open-11pm) &�$
752-BOLI
Quench Your
Thirst And Keep!?
Your Wallet
Happy W
i
1
I
1
I
I' K I C I I'
I) K I I I R IW I �: I I V IS I I N (,
WHY TOU SHOULD STMT PLANNING FOR
RETIREMENT WITH TOUR EYES CLOSED.
For retirement to be the time of your life, you
have to dream a little�about the things
you've always wanted to do: travel, explore,
start a business. Just imagine
With a dream and a plan, you can make it
happen. Your pension and Social Security
should provide a good
basic retirement income,
but what about all those
extras that make your
dreams possible? You'll
probably need some
additional savings.
THE DREAM IS YOUR OWN.
WE CAN HELP YOU WITH THE PLAN.
TIAA-CREF Supplemental Retirement
Annuities (SRAs), tax-deferred annuities for
people like you in education and research, are
a good way to save for retirement and save
on taxes now. SRAs are easy �you make con-
tributions through your institution before your I
taxes are calculated, so you pay less tax now.
You pay no tax on
your SRA contributions
and earnings until you
receive them as income.
And saving regularly
means your contribu-
tions and their earnings
can add up quicklv.
What eise makes SRAs
so special9 A broad range
of allocation choices, from
the safety of TIAA to the
investment accounts of
CREF'a variable annuity;
no sales charges; a variety of ways to receive
income, including annuities, payments over a
fixed period, or cash. You may also be able to
borrow against your SRA accumulation
before you retire
All this, plus the top investment manage-
ment that has helped make TIAA-CREF the
largest retirement system in the country.
So start dreaming and planning for the time
of your life. Because the sooner you start your
SRA, the greater your savings and your retire-
ment will be.
f
Ensuring the future
for those who shape it


&,
START PLANNING FOR THE
TIME OF YOUR LIFE, TODAY.
For your free T1AACRF.F Supplemental
Retirement Annuity Kit. lend tKi coupon to R
TIAA-CREF. Dept QC 73 Third Avenue
New York. NY lOOir Or cal 1 800 842-2733. Ext. 8016.
mePlease print )
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Urtitmlum (Full name I
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IM
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TIAA CMPPru,im�l
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�DSJaBSJ �piyomr umiimiwi plan mt the ttawyou ha m C�EF annum are dmnbuteri b TIAA CUFF Individual Imm, ! ii
For mm ��� -nrnHm. MMS rWpi �J nparn c4 I SS0MMM, Em &�Wfcw . pr�p�� Re � pr�peou. t��h hTT
f yum mv-ftt or �rnd
Sports
Lady Pirates d
By Chip Kline;
Sutt VAnter� i
It was old versus - � .
Ustad versus up-and-a-p��
The billing foi Saturd
match-up between the Lno tun
Monarch's of Old Dorntni r.
versitv and ECU'S Ladj�
could not haw been describe� '�
better. The Lady Ml narchs
est member of tht�
Association, found B- �� �
team to plav an
seum with a 71-57
OldDomir
oon of success � a na
pionship. peon
nonalrankin ; sri
tones over the Lad i
Ladv Pirates pa. k �:
labves into the ti
assured the lean i rsethai
second piaa - � soi
brush.
Itwasais rhi
two ot the oorti -
players�G -
Tonya Hare
"Hill is
match-up witr me n
enoe Hargr
g Hill on ha .
Tht s. -
cause EC v
jwavunnlt: ef
lation. luruor Rhoj
Gavnor O'Dorr �tr
pass. OTJor
and was in te
Ladv Monar. -1
C Donne, ttitb hire '
and Kathit. Kdd sonscor
mbounc- .
Recreational 5eH
BQJ Rea
histing an extramui
tournamer- March
danseRSsent is r msoni i ti
to mcreast relal

M
Offer Ends
Sun. Mar. 1
Open House 1-5






Entertainment
allie lEaat 2Iar0Hnian
February 25, 1992
Former ECU artist breaks into comic book industry
IU lotf Parker
Matt Writer
rhecomk bookindustr) ranks
,is one ol Ihc hardest businesses lo
break into in this country at least
Comics despite its popularit is
still a relative!) small field and
prospective writers and artists
would usuall) have an easier time
finding w rk in film. So when
d ies Mod an outlet I. r
theii
MM'
the industry, then a
rl of success has i- n
st Ick a! makes
that of Mike Iverson
Tu of 1 astaw
:s the artist and i�
goou � �
a fom
Una
the I
Comics
hat is as interesting a
' 111 ts 01 i n nova tion
ivcrs'

nv
- is that his debut
� v . is,honbnuantx'
� '�.A as an undergradu-
Eost Carolinian s Pu it.
' ' ' i
n idh � irorkand
illylikcd comics
was one t the
teal res ol the
1'iratei omk spage, hronk ling the
adventures of a policeman turned-
vampire, who continues lus work
utilizing the abilities ot the infa
mous bkxx1su kers
Iverson had fun with the genres
of superheroes and horror. The main
character Iihsn to fight tor i;(Hi
based on in omen of a s.uiru al na
turc a Batman i omk fails out of
the sk ,nd hits the vampire in the
head Uot'kK cpisKlesoften wen?
filled with exaggerated violence ol
expli� it nature
Basu �' � I tried to get one a t
ot violence in each strip I alwavs
hoped !� provoke some reactions
It T s
�d latiort Iverson left
the rail I - Ireom ille to
iiwmiln h M 'hoenix, Ariz
While worki as a comrKTc lal art
ist hi kept makingeftori to work
in i omit s
i 'imp
rsi �; nid
i oud "
l's'
tabli � . �
�� n in the art
, D ,(�. . It
irtisl rin
d similarinter
tuck 1 i' s
vtrsonand
titl- ���
ing came of it "We took our idea
around at the San Diego conven-
tion that war, and didn't rrallv make
any progress Iverson said. "On
the drive back to Arizona, Arvin
t he mght somemi re about he Vam
pire and the character (.race, and
suggested we try to do something
with her From then' the whole
idea iist�. licked
! mail), the winningc i mnectjon
was made at the San Diegoomics
( onvention held last year in uly.
As Iverson usited one publisher
after another, ho left eight page
photocopy samples of the team's
latest endeavor, (trace.
rhestory made useof a woman
police lieutenant introduced way
back in the final episodes of The
I impire.
In October the editor at Inno-
vation contai ted Miko.it home and
startii talking publication.
Vi � � � �. idostnlxl
in promotion as a hard-boiled
bl(d sucking thriller leaning as
mu h toward detei five fi tion as it
dvH-s gothu horror
i ira o Kimble the titlecharac-
ter, utilizes heav weaponn in her
determmatioi I - "cp the general
sate tri 'in
dead iwrs.
lows hor condition a;
sonv
sort ot malady or affliction, and
struggles to keep her s.init despite
her new and unnatural urges.
With Vigil, Iverson uses tech-
niques experimented with in his
college strip, such as xeroxed ph( tc i
backgrounds. The pnxvss of creat-
ing each page requm's various lay-
ers tor each final image, with inks
done on hosted acetate and zip-a-
tone and airbrush mixed in
lor artistic direction, Iverson
often looks to acclaimed comics
artists Steve Rude and Dave Gib-
bons. "Among others 1 like, 1 really
admire Hill Sienkiwicz and Dave
McKean "hov show that you can
be an artist in a busmesvnilod me-
dium Iverson said. "Unfortu-
nately, ftxi many companies are
mom concerned with whetherdead-
hnes can ho mot rather than with
quality.
As the second issue ot Vigil
prepares to come out, Iverson savs
he has no plans to work on any
other projects vet. "We have more
storv ideas we'd like to do about
eight more Vigil minisenes In the
future, I might h ke to do some work
tor IX comics, but tor now I'm
happy with this Iverson said.
Vigil can be ordered at local
i omu's retail stores tor $2 7
Ps.oto ccur'ps. ol "novation Comics
Mike iverson, ,i former ECU student succeeds m broamng into
comic industry with innovation's new title. Vij'i fall from : i �
Folk singer to enlighten audience
IU I
amela ()!iv or
�tut Writei
the Greenvilh
r mvintemship. Plusmv friends stig
i estevilgetKickintoitafterhcaring
dance mepla at their private parties
lennir �.
said
I found my musn tobeaverv
low n
ned ai
Istat
Aft
tolk singer and si hi ! in �
rrboi N. � � &M
- � �� ppor
n Housl �
r ittended
hero she
� iati legro
mdW
- �. said n �� k a h.u k
-�at ti stud vhileii
1 � nod her
' '� . � � II �
ad and Linda healing kind of thing" Korv said I
11 uld reai h p iplemore w ith h ri s
rori I igh than psv� hiatn
Tie Ivricsarc the most impor
tant olomont of hor songs Strong
word? �� ko to getting her
powerful message across
Tie songs deal with personal
and sociallv responsible feelings
� . range from relationships to
how we respond to the environ-
nai
thatKoi I up her guitar and mental needs of the world
In hi
a di
night we
� d plaved star � . -
ip ol musi
wi'uldplav t ountn and back to
All Korv s rci enl material is
hor own 5be has written over M)
nusii Korysaid Hut original songs Her style is a blend
ol several musical categories in-
cluding country, tolk rock and
Hues
Kory s debut album, I ypportu
'lift; Knocks 1r I'htin 0ht was
released about a year and a halt ago
and was received locally and na
tionally.
She produced, engineered,
mixed and recorded the album un-
der her own label. The album 11 in
sists ot an all acoustic band
Korv s new album should ho
released in two weeks, rhe album
is titled All Looe Cun Take
Performance time is at 8 p m
Admission price is$5 for the general
public and 54 tor members ot the
Greenville FolkArts Society Stu-
dents get in for half price with a
student ID.
�&
1992 BS
STUDENTS.
V!
tei � '�.�
immediatelx after i
tion � wit:
results ol your State B ai
can earn greal ts as an .An
Force nurse fficet
during: . ir. you ma
qualify tor a five-mi tl terns
at a man ir An I � � � u ili-
' io apph you
2.50GPA. Set try
while V'u scr vevi n ireei
I SAP HEALTH PROFESSIONS
COLLECT
919) 850-9549
The Studcni I nion s (
ehouse Commute Presents:
� ALICIA QUINTANO
P R I C I P I I S � SOI N O R E I I R E M E N T I N V KSIING
5street
PIZZERIA
M C .
m SUN-$1.00 Domestics
MON-75 Draft
TUES - 50 Pony Bottles
WED - $3.00 ALL Pitchers
SPRING FEVER
AT BOLI'S
� Daily Food Specials
� FREE Delivery (Open-11pm)
752-BOLI
THUR-$1.25 Imports
Quench Your
Thirst And Keep
Your Wallet
Happy
WHY TOU SHOULD STMT PLANNING FOR
RETIREMENT WITH TOUR EYES CLOSED.
For retirrmem to He the time of vour iit you
have to dream a little �about I he i hint's
vouve always wanted todo: travel, explore
start a business Just imagine
With a dream and a plan, vou ran make :t
happen. 'Sour pension and Social Security
should provide a good
liasn retirement income,
hut what about all those
extras that make our
dreams possible? You'll
-?"

prohablv need some
additional savings.
THF DREAM IS YOIR OWN.
WE CAN HELP YOl WITH THE PLAN.
TIAA-CREF Supplemental Retirement
AnnuitiesSRAs), tax deterred annuities for
people like vou in education and research, are
a good way to save tor retirement and save
on taxes now SRAs are easy � you make con
tributions through your institution betore youi
taxes are calculated, so you pay less tax new
You pay no tax on j
your SRA contributions
and earnings until you
receive them as income
And saving regularly
means your contribu-
tions and their earnings
. an add up qui k
X ' nakes SR -
spe
� u at ion i hou es from
the sat'et oi ! I. .
:n estment at i out I
(. Rl I s vaj iile .tnnuitv
no sales charges a vai et of ways to eceive
income, including annuities, pa ments o et
fixed period, or cash You ma � e to
borrotM against your SK ,i, un
before ou ret in
All this, phis the top ;n estment manage
merit that has helped make ! I l RE I
largest retirement system in die coumr
So start dreaming and planning rime
or your life Because the soonei you sta
SRA the greater oui savings and voui
ment will be
r


START PI.ANN1NC, Kt)R IMF
TIME OF YOl R LIFE. TODAY.
Fr w.ill Irrr I ! i HI I S
Wcliirmrnt nnu ty Kit. m t
riAACREI i Qi
n-V�n Or.j I 806(M3-2733. Eat.8016
Ensuring the future
for those who shape it T
�ftM Full nm


:&�&
R�!2R)
-
1 Vp�r.T� upon ,� n.l.iu plan ,oH lt�.f . � . �l�ln
�npinr orm� ,nc!�f . knp. ad npnn . ,11 I Wlfl IM'l 2TS K sS0�l
Sports
Lady Pirates d
By Chip K
sutt V-
It v.as ild �� �
listed versus
rhe �
matchup
Monarch s I
versify and
COUld not ha � � �-
tx-ttc-r heLa
estmember � ��
VssiH.iath'i �
team to pLi
M'um wil
OWI
tu n i t Mit i �
ron
bonal rai -
tori " �
; ady Pirate
ivesinfc �
assured tr-
t - nd ; . ;
finish
It was : -
� '� i

itch-u
Tr
. � �
lation ui -
CavnorI�
pass
and was ' '

and Kathu ' � -
ound
Recreational Sen
� �.
tournan � i I
dapartrni
M
Offer Ends
Sun. Mar. 1
Open House 1-5
�-��� "�ti-





Entertainment
3 lie itzast (Carolinian
February 25, 1992
Former ECU artist breaks into comic book industry
Hv left Iirkor
! Writ, r
' � �� - tulllStrv �
is 01 � li �� � I
' � nitr ,i!
. ik' it�� popularity is
� . I
I i r tunr
-
industry th
f
i
Pir.itt �( inu Sp�ge, hront. Inn thr
i.hrtituti ��, I i poln I'm,in hir'n d
v iimpifi w h his hi 'ik
lltlll t the
lilt 'I S Hi '
Ivtfsttnh.Klhin iththrgrnrrs
ofstip 'hi ;ti,nn
i lur.u ti i �� ��(�! t h)
' i sitim ,il n.i
Inn .i
- , ! in the
hi, Ivl - " AlTl
hikl kv oi
I I �
Hir. � .line nt it We Uk our i.ie.i
.iriniiivi .it tin Sen kv,( . niirn
fionth.it year ,intlt.lii)n trraliv make
,mv progress, IveTSOfl s,iui I hi
the drive hack to Arizona rm
thotighl some moreabt nit i '�� I .��
� and the ; h.ir.ii tcr.r.u c, and
It! wo try to do something
with her I ri 'in there the v h �le
idea iist Ik kit!
f m.tllv. the winning onnet tion
was made at the Sen! hi-fi ion in s
( oni'iition ht hi List vcir in lulv
As Iverson visited one publisher
moll� r he left eight �
- 11 samples of tfit- It ,iiii s
� 1 1 1 Tfl'11ss I'll, li .1 . � � . tor. m.ulrii icot i woman � in trod ik cd viv
� . '1 � , f 7 he

� n(1 ei the editor .it Inno
,1s. i � . � i tt-J Miko.it home and ttarti 1 talking puhln .itu-ii
1Dtu �lest nbed
�1 ' ���� i hard boiled � � ddettvtivi tr bond
�� �� � ��. � � ,r : - in her keep 1 : ' Ipeei
sort ot malady or affliction, and
struggles In keep her sanit despite
her now ,ind unnafur.il urges
Vith Vigil, iverson uses lei h
niiuos exprnmrnted with in his
i oilegcstrip,sir has weroxed photo
Ku kgnninds The prx ess of rc.it
ingeai h page requires various lav
CTS tor each final imam with inks
done on hosted acetate .md ip.i
tone and airbrush mixed in
for .irttsfu dim tion, Iverson
often looks to acclaimed comics
irtists Stove Rude and Dave (,iK
buns "Amongothers I like, I really
admire Bill Sicnkiwn and Dave
M Kcan They show th.it you tan
bean artist in a business ruled me
drum Iverson said i nfortti
nately for many corttpanies arc
more or (Ttieil with whether dead
lines (an hv met rather than with
quality
As the second issue ot Vigil
prepares to tome out, Iverson says
he has no plans to work on am
other proyei ti yet ' We have more
storv ideas we'd like to do about
eight more Vigil minisenes In the
future might like to di isome work
tor IH i omn s, but tor now I'm
happy with this Iverson said
I � t an be ordered at 1. n a
� li s retail ston s for -f.1
" � �
tiU
.
comic mdir try " ni ation's new til . -
Folk singer to enlighten audience
l. I' hi. e l.i Ol
� �
i luding i ountr) tolk, ro k and
: I ll kninnp Nues
� ;� : Kon s debut album, l t rtu
� � � � . � ��, � � . ��
hing"Kot �ud i released about a yearand a hall i
�� .tics and was received kvalh .mtl na
l Km tioi
ire the i M impoi "she produced engineer
mixed and recorded the album un
the key I getting net der her own label rhealbumeon
; - �'
K'� l li ; � i - ' i.ii
tin - �
' -
sistsot an all acoustk band
Kory s new alhum should be
;
- � ble feelings rckMsed in two weeks I he album
.
IPS to
environ
ir.irui � nt.il iic � e world
1 tartil Ml Korv's recent niati i al
is titUxi All Love i an Taki
Performani e time is at H p m
Admissit in pru' isi t, irthegeneral
pubht and S4 tor members ol the
her own vei 100 Greenville FolkArts Societv stu
- ' aid Iii onnn.il -ns Her style is a blend dents get in for half price with a

IW2 BnN
�n Df nis
V!
� � . � � � �
� . � �
" � �
r Air I
. .
PA Serve
� reei
I SAf HEA1 I'll PROFESSK �S
COLLEC1
(919) 85(1 95 19
I several musical citei
ic snuk'ni 1 I house 'ommittc Presents:
n stiitlent II '
?�
vSTKHT
MM.
SPRING FEVER
AT BOLI'S
FREE
Wj
&
SUN - $1.00 Domestics
MON - 75 Draft
TUES - 50� Pony Bottles
WED - $3.00 ALL Pitchers
THUR - $1.25 Imports
� Daily Food Specials
EE Delivery (Open-11
)elivery (Open-11 pm)
752-BOLI
Quench Your i
Thirst And Keep
Your Wallet $
Happy
l� R I C I l� I. K S �f SOU N 1) R K T I R E M E N T INVESTING
WHY YOU SHOULD START PLANNING FOR
RETIREMENT WITH YOUR FATS CLOSED.
For retirement to be the time of voui life, vo
h.i e to dream s little �about the things
mi ve uwayi wanted in tin travel, vU! t-
st.ii t .t butinest .lusi imagine
With a dream and .t plan. ou v an make it
happen Vim pension ami Stu i.tl Set urit
should pro ide a good
basu ret ii emeni in� vim-
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Sports
�Slc East (Carolinian
February 25,1992
Lady Pirates dethrone Monarchs, 71-57
By Chip Kline
Statt Writer
It was old versus new. Estab-
vcrsuaupand coming.
tie billing tor Saturday
nvttvh up between the Ladv
Monarch a of Old IVmmion Uni-
versit) and ECU'S Lady Pirates
!vt KivoKxmi described anv
, i holadvMonarchs,thenew-
- water ol the Colonial Athletic
Isaxiaoon. found ECL a tough
o ri.iN md lett Mtnget Colt
si with a "1-57 defeat
d IVminionhasalongtradi-
� success a national chanv
tshtp promanance in the na-
�ankingsand 12 straight ic-
esn or the 1 ady Pirates But the
. � rates pecked OPl s super
- ink) their treasure chest and
assured thv team no worse than a
id place regular season CAA
I w as also the tirst match-up ot
. : the conference's premier
. rs Celeste Hill of ODU and
v.i Hargroveot ECU.
Hill is the best defensive
h up with nx m the confer
i largnwosaid.eomplomont-
Hillon her plav
he score was deceiving be-
� ECU could not put the game
until thotinalsocondsotrogu-
n junior Rhonda Smith hit
v w nor CyDonnel with i baseball
pass OlVnnell made the lavup
� v v intentionally fouled by the
Monarch Rhonda Singleton.
0 Donnel hit both tnv throw s
vithie Addison sconxl 00 the
unds plav to push the lead to
69-S7 with 23 seconds to play. A
pair of tree throws bv Toina Colev
doted the scoring after she was
hacked following a defensive re-
bound.
The first half was a low-scor-
ing, turnover-plagued affair. At
halttime. the I ady Pirates led, 39-
21. but both teams had a total ot 39
turnovers.
'They (ODD) create a lot Of
turnovers with their defense be-
cause they're always in the passing
lanes 1 load avwh Pat IVrson said.
We got so wearied about going
backdoor that we lust throw the hall
awa)
bW consistently got their post
pi avers open, onlv to throw the ball
�way Hargrove SCOTCd from un-
derneath to bteak a 2 2 tie from the
outset, what h also started a 64) ECU
run Smith added two tnv thnnvs
and Connie Small hit a 12-ioot
jumper tor an S-2 lead
rhe l ady Pirates load climbed
to eight points m the tirst halt, but
the team could not gain much more
breathing room
Hargrove started the second
lult with a throe-point plav to boost
the load to 32-21. Small connected
from down low to give ECl its
biggest load at V24 with 17:23 left
in the game
The Lady Pirates couldn't de-
li vor a knovkout punch though.and
traded baskets with ODU until
Singleton cut the lead to five with
six straight points at the 11 17 mark
Of the second halt Hill hit a long
jump shot with f�:12 mmaining to
get ODU as dOK as it would ever
eat m tlx second halt at 2 4S Roth
When the Pirates are playing
Feb. 25: Baseball at College of Charleston (DH) (1 p.m.)
Feb. 26: Women's basketball at William & Marv (730 p.m.)
MEN'S BASKETBALL VS. WILLIAM & MARY (7 p.m.)
Baseball at Coastal Carolina (3 p.m.)
SOFTBALL VS. EASTERN MICHIGAN (DH) (2 p.m.)
MEN'S TENNIS VS. OLD DOMINION (1:30 p.m.)
� AH caps danoto homa gamaa
I
Photo by Jamas Browning � ECU Photo Lab
Tonya Hargrove sparked the Lady Pirates past Old Dominion Saturday
night with her third "double-double' of the season m a 71-57 win The
team is assured at least a second-place finish m the CAA
teams traded baskets until the Pi-
rates struck tor the key six-point
play in the final seconds
Hargrove led all scorers with
23 points. Q m the second hilt, and
grabbed 10 rebounds. Rhonda
Smith al Kid a double double
with 10 points and 11 mbounds.
ODU w is paced by Hill's 15 points
and 10 rebounds.
ECU raised its record to le6
(104 in the CAA), while DDL falls
to 13-10 on the season (6-5 in the
(A.M.
Recreational Services to host extramural tourney
I v I Recreational Services is
sting an extramural basketball
urnament March 20-22. The
apartment sponsoring theevent
increase relations with other
scruvls in the state
St �era! schools plan to send
intramural teams to participate in
the tournament, including: UNC-
v ha pel Hill. Western Carolina.
I avctteville State, Appalachian
State. Cambell. I INC Charlotte.
Davidson and BCU Not only will
plaversmmothersschoolsbecom-
me. but of finals from other schools
will boattendmg the tournament as
well.
I"ho tournament will he held in
Chnstenbury Gym, and games will
start as earlv as 10 a.m
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
MONTHS FOR $59
Offer Ends
Sun. Mar. 1
Open House 1 -5
The Club
for women only
� if
M I
301 Plaza Drive
Call 756-1592 Today!
Mon-Thurs 9-9 � Fri 9-8
Sat 9-1
TRIAL MEMBERSHIP
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Tanning Special
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c industry
Sports
ullrc lEast (Carolinian
February 25,1992
7
Lady Pirates dethrone Monarchs, 71-57
IREMKNT INVESTING
T PLANNING FOR
)UR EYES CLOSED.
iRTP!ASMM,Knil
IF in vniHiin i-

By Chip Kline
sutt Writ!
. .1- old orsus new Estab
rsus up and coming.
Ming tor Saturday s
between the I ady
s v't Old Dominion I m
and ECU's I ady Pirates
. �1 have been described any
be! -kK N4onarchs,thenew-
- 't the( bJonial Athletic
ition tiumd ECl a lougb
v and left Minges c oli-
i "l " defeat
minion has a long tradi-
ess a national ham
pi minenee in the na
��s and 12 straight i
verthcl ady Pirates But the
tespackedODl npcr
their treasure chest and
team no worse than a
� jular season A
ilso the first match upol
conference s premier
v elesteHillofODUand
irgroveol E I
is the bet defensive
ith me in ttie confer
. esaid complement

Mid not put the game
� �� . final ���� ' v.u
nior Rhonda Smith hit
Donnell with a baseball
onnell made the layup
as intentionally fouled by the
an hs Rhonda Singleton
� nnell hit both free throws
� � Addison yorixt off the
plav to push the lead I
69 with 23 stxonds to play. A
pair of tree throws by loina Coley
closed the scoring aftei she was
hacked following a defensive re-
bound.
The tirst halt was a kW-SCOr-
ing, turnover plagued attair. At
halrhmo. the Lady Pirates led, 79-
21 but both teams had a total ot 39
turnovers
They (ODU) create a lot ot
turnovers with their defense be-
cause they're always in the passing
lanes i lead coach Pat Piersonsaid
We got so worried about going
iu kdoot that we just threw the ball
awa
E( I consistently got their post
pla ersopcn,onl to throw the ball
awa Hargrove scored from un-
derneath to break a 2 2 tie from the
outset, which alsostarts! a6-0 E( I
run Smith added two free throws
and v onnie Small hit a 12-foot
jumper tor an S-2 lead
fheLadv Pirates lead climbed
to eight points in the tirst halt, but
the team could not gain much more
breathing nxm
1 largn e started the se ond
halt with a three point play to boost
I � nail ionnected
m � town low to pive E( I its
� � ad it i with 17 25 left
n � i me
� I ad Pirates couldn't de
livvr a knockout punch though,and
traded baskets with ODt until
Singleton cut the lead to five with
six straight pointsatthe H 17mark
ol the second halt Hill hit a lone,
� shot with 6:12 remaining to
as (lose as it would ever
cct in the second halt at 52 48 both
When the Pirates are playing
leb. 25: Baseball at v ollegeoiharteston (DHX1 pm.)
leb. 26: Women's basketball at William & Marv 17: v p m I
MEN'S BASKETBALL VS WIL1 I AM & MARY C p.m.)
Baseball at oastaK aroKna(3p.m I
9 STBALLVS EASTERN MK I IK iAN(DH)(2 pm.)
MEN'S fENNISVS (l I) IX IMINKDN (1:30p.m.)
� Ail caps denotes home games
� a:
.V. w V
1-
(

V

Wednesday
'a � m
m
Photo by jamas Browning ECU Photo Lab
Tonya Hargrove sparked the Lady P i it past Old Dominion Saturday
night with her third double double' ot H e eason in a 71-S7win The
(Si asecond-pl ice fit hin the Caa
11
teams traded baskets until the Pi-
rates struck tor the key six-point
play in the final seconds
Hargrove led all scorers with
23 punts, lin thesecond halt, and
grabbed 10 rebounds Rhonda
mith also had a double-double
with 10 points and 11 rebounds
)l was paced by 1 lill's 15 points
and 10 rebounds.
E L raised its record to 16-6
(10-1 in the AA), while PI l falls
to l; 10 on the season (6 5 in the
( A)
Recreational Services to host extramural tourney
rearional Services is
an extramural basketball
ols in the state
Several schools plan to send
ment March 20-22 fhe intramural teams to participate in
nentissponsoringtheevent the tournament, including I N
i relations with other hapel Hill, Western arolina,
1 avetteville State, Appalachian will be attending the tournament as
State ambell I N harlotte, well
1 fevidson and ECU. Not only will rhe tournament will be held in
plavors trom others shoo!s I v.om hristenbury Gym, and games will
ine but officials from other schools Mart aseartyas 10 a m
Ivf �
Progressive
Donee Night
10 Draft
$1.15 Tall Boys
$2.50 Pitchers
$ 1.00 Kamikazes
�ladies Free til 10:3f
� �
KM
. r
t-Vt-f
n
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
MONTHS FOR $59
Offer Ends
Sun. Mar. 1
Open House 1 -5
The Club
for women only
301 Plaza Drive
Call 756-1592 Today!
Mon-Thurs 9-9 � Fri 9-8
Sat 9-1
TRIAL MEMBERSHIP
Spring Break
Tanning Special
Two Weeks
Unlimited Only
$19.99
Call for Details
������
T





8 vIHe �a0t (Carolinian February 25, 1991
Track team finishes strong i
Lady Seahawk Invitational
NOBODY
DOMINO'S
By RickChann
Staff Writer
(xT)inr,thnr�,ancit theUM
Wilmington Seahawk Invitational,
fI s wornrn'strack team turned in
veral g�xi perfoTmanas over the
weekend
One of the team's strengths is the
hekJ events where Si isan Srhram wc n
both the shot pit ami chsnis MM
with throws of 40 " feet and 1322 1
2 M-t RSfM-tivetv. lame Kowe placeil
seomd in lxth events with thn�wsof
V 212 feet and KMofalt
'1 was pfettv happy with the per-
HwiimWB f the team Head ctvxh
( lvirlieiih(es,nr "(Oiir)spttxlisn t
U-rv iuite v(1, hut it will come with
time
nienxtlwaslowkev.butitgave
the ntnneTs a i Ivince t s;et M me idea
of where thevarein their training. Hie
K I spnntiTsran mainly against each
other, but Justice saki they kxked
"pretty strong
ranita Roseboroleti thesprinters
with two first place finishes. The first
win came m the KXVmeter dash with
a time of 12:49, while teammate Karen
Clay was second in 14:18 Rosebom
heW off a UN( W nmner in the 20O
meter and won with a time of 24:63
seconds, (lay was third m the 2(10,
nmning a 30.54.1 attren (.uy won the
4MVrr I fash in I Of 11 , followed
� M.irv'TVi I lamilton in 1 :fl&93.
rrcshman Starv (-reen was the
pp xTformer in the distance event
I radingagroupof five! C V ninners
in the 15 i meter, C ,mr pl,xed third
with a time of 452 minutes. She ran a
p tv naI best in the event and is only
I few seconds off the school record
"( was) extremely pleased with
Sta v m tix-1500 jtudcrMkl
Marianne Manni and Gretchen
I farley also had pereonal-best times,
nmning 457 minutes and 4.59 min-
utes respectively. These results are
positive because they are training to
peak la ter in the season. Green also ra n
a personal best of 2.24 minutes in her
fourth place finish in the 800-meter
Marini captured second m the
3XXVmeter nm in her sexond race of
theday. I kr 10.58 minutes wasagrxxl
time and should drop as the seasi n
develops Catherine Norstrand and
k-SMca M( mtgt nrry finished thirdand
fourth behind Manni nmning 11 24
mimites and 1133 minutes respec-
tively. Anne Mane Welch, returning
from an mfurv, ran well in the 5II-
meter, finishing in 1854 minutes.
Justice said the meet shower!
where the team stands with two to
three weeks to go before the season
gets into full swing.
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$6.00
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57c
152j
111 Red Hanks Rd.
Greenville, NC
Overton
355-5783
8am-7pm M-F
8am-6pm Sat
Student Government Association
Elections
for
Executive Officers:
Positions Available:
� Student Body President
� Student Body Vice-President
� Student Body Secretary !
� Student Body Treasurer
Requirements:
� Full-time student
� Overall 2.0 GPA
� 48 semester hours
� Enrollment in 2 previous semesters
at ECU
� Must be in good standing
Filing Date: Feb. 25 - March 3. Applica-
tions must be in SGA office by 5 PM,
March 3. Applications can be picked up
in SGA office from 8-5 in Mendenhall.
MANDATORY CANDIDATES MEETING MARCH 17 AT 4 PM





Title
The East Carolinian, February 25, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 25, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.861
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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