The East Carolinian, February 20, 1992






Film at 11
WITN hashes students in news segment
4
Over the fence
Dillon Fence's latest album is full of annoying tunes.
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ftmmm&semxm&Mvm&t
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�te iEerHt (Eamltman
Vol.66 No. 11
Thursday, Ffbruarv 20, 1992
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12.000
10 Paqes
Mound MtrCiM
-�sN
Campus tightens security
Officials .it a ksonv illc State University
are implementing a plan to tighten dorm
security after .i repeated iolence last semes
tor.
rhe school plans to use two new police
officers as armed night time patrol ofti ers at
the dorms. Unarmed security monitors will
also he used in all ol the dorms.
The university housing department
theirgoal istoensurethesafetvof the students
living in the dorms
"We're ust enforcing (the rules we al
ready had saidraig Schmitt, director ol
university housing
The changes in security came after last
semesters violence culminated in im
pus murder
Head made of roast beef
Police officers at the University ol III it i
at Chk age said they have solved the m I
riouscaseof an alleged human head wrapped
in plastk that appeared in an art exhibit
l.t. John Otomo, head ol I IC invest
bons, s.iij he is satisfied sith artist Rudv
Vargas' explanation that the head was a tu
ally carved out ol roast beet
Vargas originally i laimcd the hi
been stolen from the medical - �
visitorstotheexhibit said thev wen
the head actually came from a human N d
Vargas told police h . ' i
head story "to add to th- iti phen I his
piece Otomo said
Policcsaid they believe Vargas'roa I ��'
explanarionbecausethemedicalscho
reported any mi vsing adavet heads
Misdial causes trouble
A freshman at the l 'niversity of Nebra; ka
dialed the wrong number and was almost
arrested tor it
Eric kohles unintentionally called the
shentt soffice when he was trying to rea h a
friend
When a woman answered the phone,
Buffalo County Sherifl s i )ffi e, may I help
von. Knowlessaid hethoughl his friend was
playing a toke on him, s he de ided to play
along
"I ust killed some people on the sixth
floor of CTW (kohles' dormil � Kohl
said. He then hung up the phone, and realized
he had actually been talking to the police
Minutes later, 'these guys came up tome
in suits and asked me it I'd heard any gun
shots Kohles said. After 45 minutes of qucs
tioning Kohles. the sixpolii eofficersand two
resident assistants who responded to his i all
believed his story
Student meets Letterman
Millersville I niversity student Michael
(Ireci i and his dog, Auggie I Joggie, re entl)
appeared on David Letterman's 10th anniver-
sary special as one of Letterman's favorite
stupid Pet Tricks.
(ireco, 22, lay on the stage and let Auggie
Doggie drink milk out ol his mouth
(ireco said he lets the dog drink out of his
mouth all of the time 1 le drinks milk, eats
i anned dog food and, when I'm a little 1 inely,
I let him i lean my teeth (�re o said.
Smith delays residency
William Kennedy Smith has still not
shown up tor his residency at the niversity
of New Mexico and school offk ials said they
.i not know it Smith will enroll the school's
internal medicine program
Smith, 31, was acquitted ol rape charges
last December in Honda. 1 le was scheduled
to enroll last June, but delayed the decision
because of the trial 1 le said he would attend
the school in lanuarvor February after a rest.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shlmmei Taken from
CPS and other campus newspapers
Insidenme SceneThursday2
f ditorial4
Comics5
Classifiedsb
Entertainment11
Sports9
Fraternity dance ends in shooting
r Julie Roscoe
sMs.mt Nivvs I Jilor
� dan e sponsoied b
kappa Alpha 'si fraternity
ended � let w hen a late
comer prod eda weapon and
shot a non student
V . i irdinglt 'I t keithknox
ol l'u IMu Safety, the dance was
I Icrcmoved a small chrome
colored handgun from his waisl
band and, without saving a
word, tired several 22 caliber
shots into the ceiling and one
toward the floor
Fragments from the shut
riccx hetedofl the floor, striking
,i visiting, non-student from
Maury, N.C. in the right hand
between his middle and ring
held in the basement o
Mendenhall Student Center on finger and entering his right
Feb 15. Around 2 a.m. when side.
the dance was endit ; a male As the party stragglers ran
entered M i as the fromthebuildingaftertheshots
lights were turn d on. werefired,fiveorsixadditional
gun shots were heard being fired
on the east side of tht- building
According to witnesses, in
( luding publii safety officers,
these shots were from a larger
caliber weapon.
Knox said he is not sure it
the same person fired the se
ond set ol shots.
I �( I police officers arrived
on the s� one within minutes ot
hearing the shots o suspt ts
were tound upon arrival.
No one was arrested and
the victim ol the shooting was
treated and released from 1'itt
( ounty Emergency Room
Incidents involving weap
onsat parties have ot curred in
thepast Knox said non-student
attending on-campus functions
.iro the problem.
"We are requesting that
groups that open up their on
campus functions to non-stu-
dents have a lured policeofficer
present Knox said "Groups
holding functions anil unite
and charge money from non-
students have created mi idents
in which weapons have be i
involved
1 he university is look.
intopurchasii .� awalk through
metal detct t r ti � prevent v ii i
lent epist ides occurr
en. ampus.
i. 1'iu' 1 u . nfoi
mation im erningthisinc ident
ivlin h mi .� � id to the
assailant's identity is asked to
please call rune Stoppers at
758-7777 rhe suspect is a black
male, approximately 15 years
old. 5 fo t ' inch and 135
pounds v allers do not have to
eir names and ma) re
� Js up to 52 �
School sponsors
Commuter Week
.
Photo by Jill Cherry - ECU Photo Lit)
I i.t!i jr and a panel ot speakers discussed Atrocentncity and education during a forum
� Mendenhall The program was sponsored by the Student Minority Arts Committee
Panel discusses AfjXKentricity
By Ann 11umpries
snu Write!
Edu it nol minority c hil-
dren v the main c �n ern dis
v ussed m a forum on
Afrixentricity held Tuesday in
Mendenl ill Student . enter.
Air. n i tru it involves the in
corporation of black culture into
Amei it an history
I he forum presented by the
Minoritv Arts . ommittee in-
(luded seoral panelists from
different backgrounds Panel
istsdiscussed the need for blacks
to leam African hi .torj and
Afro American history so that
blacks as a group can become
unified.
"Blai k and white people
aren t unified because black
people aren't unified said Roy
Ennis, one ol the panelists
Sarah Hr ant, an ediu ation
tern in America is often one
skied and teachers often expet t
all i hil Iren to learn in the same
manner.
"S hools need to foster a
positivesell esteem in minority
c hildren Bryant said She said
one way to do this would be to
tea h bl.K k history.
There is a myth that the
' Negro is a man without a past
said I r i 'avid Dennard,apan
elisl from the history depart-
ment.
1 le said bla k children learn
of only �i few well known Afri-
can Americans but miss out on
learning ot the many great
achievements Afro-Americans
have made. Hacks have been
taught to love Europe and de-
spise Africa and blackness, he
said.
"Afrocentric discipline
seeks to establish authentic tacts
straight said Ozzie I lall,presi
dent ol the Institute of 1 unda
mental African 1 listory and
c ulture.
' It isoniy viewed as politi-
v al to the extent that truth over-
turns the established and ex-
pected lies and distortions that
ad voca te the inferiority of bla k
people I lall said.
"Afrocentricity is not an in-
tellectual fad Ennis said. "It is
a state ot your mentality and it
is how you live
Another problem that the
panelists discussed is that mi-
norities cannot face problems
ot economics, racism and edu-
cation without unification.
"Thecoloniesin Africa each
have power and rather than be-
ing unified, they would rather
each have power said panelist
Antonio Livingston,a student
The same is true with African
major, said th
duration SVS-
to set the records of history Americans now
By left Becker
sun v rtti r
Next week E I will
sp msor i. ommuter Week
five days ot tree programs
and special discounts avail
able to all students who live
ofl campus
I heommuter St i �
l Mtu p ali �ng with the Re i
ational Services Departrm i I
have put together a variet) ol
lectures, wort ; concerts
and fitness sessions in ai
tempt 1.1 get commuters m -re
involved in campusactivines
- immuters will also re
ceivc discounts throughout
the week on such items a
outdoor equipment rentals,
meelsat the Mendenhall and
oivs cafeterias and ping
pong and billiards at
Mendenhall Student Center
To qualify tor the week's
benefits, students must ob-
tain a special commuter
sticker available in Room 21H
ol the c hristenbury Gym, in
Room 212 of the Whichard
building or a! the Commuter
Booth that will be set up in
front of the student store from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. next week
According to Chrissie
Nuttle, resident coordinator
ol larvisand Hemming t lalls,
C ommuter Wai was de-
signed to help commuters
become awareof activities or.
campus as well as to get in-
formation on how to better
serve the commuter popula-
tion.
"Our goal is to promote
commuter student awareness
and set up a commuter stu-
dent organization Nuttle
said
"We would like to set up
at � � :
repn sent iterstudents
in theS
!r Lucy W i
� f student d
ment, saidommuter We �
will open a channel
munication between the
indl
tratii �
�� - �
lot from 1 mmutei - I
it their needs are as ��

with inform,i
sp it, she �-� '
' It is important for us 1
,cc the) � � - �
are needed
Wrigl � I n i it �
represenl the majority ot stu-
dents on campus
" I here are ' ' plus
students who live on campus
and there are over 16 O
students who attend the
university she said. "It a
commuter i- anyone who
does not live in a residence
hull, you could suv commut-
ers account tor over 1 0
students
Nuttle said commuters
are a varied group ol people
w hi �ha e different needs and
interests.
Ni u have a group who
livesin( .reenvilleandmaybe
atone time lived on campus,
she said. IrVn you havestu-
dents who do not live in
Greenville, or even in the
county, who have to drive a
good distance to get to
school
Nuttle said Commuter
Week will help determine
how to better support each
segment of the group and
show commuters what is
available to them on campus.
Lecturer stresses importance of learning
Bvolleen Kirkpatrick
Sl.ilt Writer
n assistant s retaryofthe
US Department ol Education,
lohn I MacDonald, stressed
educational excellence and the
Amenta 2000 program in his
lecture Tuesday night in Wright
Auditi �rium
MacDonald is particularly
interested m accreditation of
feather educational programs,
standards for teachers, educa-
tional reform, educational tele-
vision and child abuse.
MacDonald Mid the com-
mon goals of America 2000 are
"unitingbehind common goals,
commitment,and taking charge
of the schools
All of the goals listed above
are working to moot a specific
need bv the vear 2000. The
America 2tXX) strategy expects
change in the 110,(XX)pnvatcand
public school systems, change
in the American home, change
in national communities ,ind
change in attitudes on learning.
1 le sud the program is not just a
federal program, it is a strategy.
The program stresses the
importance of the challenge for
society to respect education and
learning.
Regardless of disability or
background, he said it is impor-
tant for children to learn.
MacDonald said every citizen in
the nation ill benefit if the pro-
gram is successful.
MacDonald estimated an
$83 billion budget for five pro-
grams: aimpcmsatory education,
school improvement, migrant
education, impact aid and Na-
See Learning, page 2
I
Photo by Jill Ch�rry � ECU Photo Lab
Dr. James W Batten, Dr JohnT MacDonald and Chancellor Richard Eakin were all present for the
James W Batten Distinguished Educator Lecture and Awards ceremony Tuesday night





2 CUlic �aBt(�arnltntan February 20, 1992
SPENE
Four males playing golf reported for
suspicious activity; contact was made
Feb. 14
2002 Scott 1 toll: Vehicle stopped. Student issued campus cita-
tion tor speeding and no headlights.
2025 CollegeHinDrrveand4thstreet:Vehtetestopped.Verbal
warning given for erratic driving.
2109- IVIk 1 Kill: Assisted hall stafl member with a loud party.
2244 RockSpriftgsand 10th streets. Assisted (reenville Police
Department with traffic accident.
Feb. 13
0014 AycockHall: Student given state citation for DWI. Same
advised to park his vehicle.
0037 AycockHall: Checked out a dispute between two mates.
Resolved
0058 Fletcher 1 fall: Checked out dispute between male and
female. Resolved.
032t 1 larrington Field: Reference to suspicious a ovity. C on-
t.ut made with four males playing golf.
0431 Cbtten Hall: Reference to a fight. Two male subjects
banned horn campus.
1:4 Assistexlc.rei'iHillcrolKvlVpartinentinthebroatkihver
room
1330 Jenkins Art Building: Reported person picking student
lot ker locks. Unfounded.
1411 Mendenhall Student Center: Follow-up report to shots
fired previous night
UmV Power Plant: Reported damage to a state truck.
2237 Public Safety Building: Criminal summons sorvovl
2245 Minges Freshman Parking Lot: Assisted motorisl with
keys locked m car.
Feb. lb
0245 Assisted ,reiMnillelVliadVpartmentinthebreathalver
room
f 23 Christenbury Cvm rrespasser sighted. Subject in cus-
tody
1NH I instead Hall: Fire alarm activated on third ftoor.Cause
unknown
1802 larvisHall RespondedtoapossiblehanBsingptKjnecall.
Unfounded.
1816 onesCafeteria: Responded to report ot damaged door
2116 Cotancheand 9thstreets: Assisted Greenville Police De
partment with accident
Feb. 17
0821 Power Plant: Reported damage to state property.
0827 Ragsdale: Assisted rescue. Subject transported.
0926 College 1 liH Commuter Lot: Minor accident
1 $55 Memorial C a m C becked out breaking and entering and
larceny report.
1721 Tyler Hal! Subject banned
Crime Scene is taken trom Official Public Safety Logs
Learning
Continued from page 1
tive American education.
MacDonald said America 2000
should bring about a "bold. King-
lasting, successful reform
MacDonald was the guest for
the 10th annual lames W. Batten
I )istinguished Educator lectureand
Awards Ceremony focusing on
educational excellence, the America
20XX) program and the six National
Education Goals that the program
stresses.
MacDonald hasearned degrees
from the University of Connecticut
and Northeastern University. He is
a former principal, superintendent,
teacher, and state commissioner of
education.
The six National Education
(ioalsot the America 2000 program
include: readiness for school, high
school completion,student achieve-
ment and citizenship, science and
ma thema tics, adult literacy and lite-
long learning and safe, disciplined,
and drug-free schools.
Theoeremony honored thecon-
tnbutions of an emeritus professor,
fames W. Batten, in the ECU School
of Education.
batten is known nationally for
his involvement in NASA's Mer-
cury Training Program at Chapel
Hill's Morehead Planetarium. He
lias also served as professor of re-
search in the School ot Education
and as the chairman of the Depart
menl of Secondary Education. He
retired in 19B6.
Theaward nvipientsat theoer-
emony included: Ann S. Burden of
Pitt County Schools; Hampton
Casebolt of Johnston County
Schools; Linda S.DawsonofKinston
Gty Schools; Debbie P.GokJbeck of
Rocky Mount City Schools; Karen
S. Gulledge of The State Depart-
ment of Public Instruction; Betty A.
Levey of East Carolina University;
lohn Collins Svkes. !r. of Rockv
Mount City Schools; and Sonia
Torres-Quinones ol Wake County
Schools
Harnsfeeter
HARRIS TEETER MAM
KM PRICES!
Tyson Holly FdrmsJj
Breast-
Quarters
Of cide A
Limit 3 Pack
With Addit
Purchase, Pi
Student Government Association
Elections
for
Executive Officers:
Positions Available:
� Student Body President
� Student Body Vice-President
� Student Body Secretary
� Student Body Treasurer
Requirements:
� Full-time student
. Overall 2.0 GPA
� 48 semester hours
� Enrollment in 2 previous semesters
at ECU
� Must be in good standing
White Grapes, Peaches
Plums Or
Nectarines
oo
Per Pound
Mix & Match
SPECTACULAR DOLLAR DAYS!
In Oil Or Water
Starkist Chunk
Light Tuna
6.125 Oi.
Selected Varieties
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Stokely's
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Filing Date: Feb. 25 - March 3. Applica-
tions must be in SGA office by 5 PM,
March 3. Applications can be picked up
in SGA office from 8-5 in Mendenhall.
Selected Varieties
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MANDATORY CANDIDATES MEETING MARCH 17 AT 4 PM
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Through February 25, 1992
Nursing progra
certifies midwrvi
By Amy Humphries Staff Writertent � . �itcon �r than ;
A new program at the 1 1
School of Nursing ma) :�, r �
affect the infant mortalit) i-
North Carolina 1 � ��
certify nurses tobe n urserrud v�
"Addinga erbfiedi urse mid-Mi: . �
wife to the hi altl �� �
have a positive efi I
morbidirvandrn rtalil rstal
and nation said Dr an . Mpita
assistant prol rofw ��
nursing and director of the nur -pre
midwifer) pr
The ECU pr - the first
in the state and ill received
'�- inquires sii
announi ement last fa
"A prm. il ot the : I
gram is to in rease essl;
care1 - - gn � i 1 pula-�
tion Moss said.
� - pite the demand 1 I
wivesand mid wife pt
are very few in number. It is ft i
hard' . � � peral i fph
sicians and bsteti-
midwives an lere�
economic threat
These healtl i pi

rural or ur'r o will ei
phasize teachii in
child- bea �' -
Infant mortalit i set�'�
blem m the nat�.�
irse-n Iwifery pt�: "
The Book of
REVELATIO
Come join us as we e
plore the hidden meal
ing of this fascinatin
book of Prophecy.
Thurs. Feb. 20. 7 P
GCB 2024
New Life Christian Fellows

iV.

y�
r
�.
i
P L
Prices In This Ad Effective Through Tuesday, February 25, 1992 in Greenvit Stoow Only
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities None Sold To Dealers We Glodly Accept Federal Food Stomps
Thursday
Student
Budget Nigh
$1.15 Tall Boys
$1.25 Imports
$2.10 High Balls
$2.85 Ice Teas
Ladies Free AH Nigi
Erf





February 20, 1992 (gfrc �afit Carolinian 3
r mm
CES!
&�!� "N
Grapes, Peaches
ms Or
clarities
oo
Per Pound
Mix & Match
MAR DAYS!
Selected Varieties
orn Or Green Beans
Stokely's
Vegetables
14.25-15.25 Ox. Cans
Glacier Club
Ice
Cream
Half Gallon
WUCID
SAVE
9�
00
Limit 2
With Additional
Purchase, Please
63 Sq. Ft.
Page
Paper towels
Rolls
or
� IDVCfO
SAVE
204
ON 3
February 25, 1992
1992 In Greenvil Stores Only
"vs We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps
Nursing program
certifies midwives
By Amy Humphries
Staff Writer
A new program at the ECU
School of Nursing may positively
affect the infant mortality rate in
North Carolina. The program will
certify nurses to be nurse mid wives.
" Adding a certified nurse-mid-
wife to the health care system will
have a positive effect on infant
morbidity and mortality in our state
and nation said Dr. Nancy Moss,
assistant professor of parent-child
nursing and director of the nurse-
midwifery program.
The ECU program is the first
in the state and already received
600 inquires since the program's
announcement last fall.
"A principal goal of the pro-
gram is to increase access to health
care for all segments of the popula-
tion Moss said.
Despite the demand for mid-
wivesand midwife programs, they
are very few in number. It is often
hard to get the coopcra tion of phy-
sicians and obstetricians because
the midwives are considered an
economic threat.
"These health care providers
will work in Strwtoftwed, whether
rural or urban, and also will em-
phasize teaching he?lth care to
child- bearing tanil.es Vosssaid.
Infant mortality is a serious
problem in the nation and espe-
cially North Carolina. Studies of
nurse-midwiferv practices consis-
tently show birth outcomes as good
or better than physicians' out-
comes.
There are fewer forceps deliv-
eries, cesarean sections,
episiotomies, stillbirths and low
birth weight babies during nurse-
midwife deliveries.
Midwives may be an answer
to the needs of women who want
to give birth in a natural environ-
ment or who cannot afford a hos-
pital birth. Certified nurse mid-
wives (CNM) specialize in normal
pregnancy and birth and in well-
woman care. They always work in
conjunction with a physician and
are trained to recognize problem
pregnancies.
CNMs work in their own pri-
vate practices, in private physician
practices, freestanding birth cen-
ters, hospitals, health departments
and sometimes homes.
The next group of students will
be admitted into the program in
September. Enrollment will be
limited to 10 students per year be-
cause of intense individualized in-
struction.
Graduates must pass a na-
tional certification examination
approved bv The Amorii.in Col-
lege o! Nurse Midwifery.
Grants from the Kate B.
Reynolds HeaUh Care Trust of
Winston Salem, N.C. and from the
N.C. Department of Environment,
Health and Human Resources will
support the program through 19W
The Book of
REVELATIONS
Come join us as we ex-
plore the hidden mean-
ing of this fascinating
book of Prophecy.
Thurs. Feb. 20, 7 PM
GCB 2024
Thought for the day:
Whenever a man has cast a longing
eye on office, a rottenness begins in
his conduct
�Thomas Jefferson
&t
1992 BSN
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Ball of Wax
mitt,
On The Fringe
�1te iEaat daroltuian Bush out of touch. E buys Condoms
nnx.i Uti' h net I ,ii:i iii.i . ,11111111; riimimuirw SIMV l4Jr w tr
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
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students The I isl Carolinian publishes 12,000copies every Tuesday ami Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
is the opinion of the Editorial Board, the Fust ('aroltnum welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should be
limited to 250 words oi toss For purposes ol decency and brevity. The.East (.aroltnum reserves the right tocdil or reject letters
for publication. Letters should he addressed to The Editor, I he last Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C
27858 4 J5 V For more information, call (919) 757 Moo.
Opinion
Page 4, Thursday, February 20, 1992
Local station bashes ECU students
It seems truil the Greenville community is
again releasing their frustrations on ECU stu-
dents This time, in the form of "The Night Cast
l"tra" on WI rN's I'Vb 12 newscast, college stu-
dents were bashed tor their nightlife ��Specifi-
cally drinking and frequenting the downtown
bars and clubs.
The segment, a cheap imitation of the Fox
Network's "Cops was produced to take a look
at ECU Public Safety and what the officers en-
counter on a "typical" Friday night. 1 lowever, it
on the segment are not a "typical" Friday night -
especially for one officer.
Whv did WITN not stop by joyner Library
or fenkins Art building to see how many stu-
dents were studying? Or whv not a random
check oi the Residence Halls to see how many
students were studying or sleeping? The fact is,
news can be made by the media � even when it
does not happen. Sure, there is a problem if
anyone drinks enough to get drunk, but why
show only the students? There are plenty of
was billed prior to its airing as a look at "what middle-aged and older adults that frequent bars
your college student is doing Mid clubs in Greenville every Friday and Sarur-
"It's Fridav night at FCU. IXi you know day night.
where vour college student is?" reporter Andy VVH N failed toshowthat PublicSafetydoes
Cordan said "Chances are he or she is out here � not patrol thedowntown area, they just work the
somewhere �engaging in a favorite activity of campus. Greenville Police handle the nightly
students � drinking and partying downtown traffic. Since when did it become a
Since when do all ECU students drink and crime to walk home (or wobble back as
party on Friday night? Maybe 1,000 or sostudents
spend money at the bars in downtown Greenville
on Fridav and Saturday nights, but the majority
of students Spend their weekend studying, get-
ting away from the day-to-day ritual of going to
class; others even work.
Most everyone knows that February is rat-
ings month for television stations. It's the time for
all the stations and networks to air the best mov-
ies, create crafty segments to put on their nightly
newscasts and put on their best faces to see who
is number one.
Was the segment done just to pull a few
more viewers to the station for those beloved
ratings? Probably so. Was the segment a good
example of unbiased reporting? Wecommunica-
tions students are taught to "show both sides of
the story and it is evident WITN failed to do so.
Why was the officer not followed around to
"secure the area at Jenkins Art Building" or to
"check fire alarm in Belk Residence Hall?" A
random look through The East Carolinian's Crime
Scene (reports taken straight from "official" Pub-
lic Safety's logs) proves that the instances shown
WITN so colorfully reported) through campus
� especially if you live on campus?
Public Safety has taken some rather harsh
beatings from local media lately, and maybe this
was an attempt bv WITN to "kiss and make-up"
fortheir fellow medium'sreporting. Whoknows?
Maybe it's the old "I'll pat you on the back, if
you'll pat me on the back" routine.
Either way, WITN cast an unnecessary,
unnewsworthy negative image on ECU and its
students.The deeds of the minority were brought
to light and that negative image was cast upon all
ECU students � even the ones who don't go
"out That's like saying every administrator at
ECU knew about the illegal wiretapping.
It was not too long ago that ECU students
had a "Purple day" � a day in which students
didn't spend their money in any Greenville es-
tablishment to protest unfair treatment from the
community.
Maybe the citizens of Greenville and the
surrounding area need to be again reminded of
the impact this university and its students have
on this Eastern North Carolina town.
WTTN-7
SHOWN ARE SOKfOf
MMOCZHT UtfTll-
PR0v�M 6UILTV
IN A CftiRT Ola
Letters to the Editor
Alumnus disagrees with columnist's views
To The Editor:
After reading Mr. Hicks' edito-
rial column in the Jan 28 issue of The
East Carolinian, I have decided to give
some comments concerning his
opinion about the freedom of speech
in this country.
I fully agree with the futility of
most of the issues raised (porno-
graphic magazines. Communism,
Anarchism, flag burning). However,
there is a big difference between ob-
jecting to something and prohibiting
the same. If you don't want your kids
to support pornography, violence,
etc talk to them about it. They will
hear about anything, legal or not.
But most of the time, things are
not that clear-cut. For example, al-
though Capitalism isa better economic
system compared to the state-con-
trolled economy run by Communist
governments, it is not perfect. Just ask
the thousand of unemployed Ameri-
cans who are desperately trying to
find a job before even their extended
benefits run out. Maybe the Commu-
nists in this country are merely trying
to introduce an improved system of
social security which has been in place
in many other Capitalist countries for
years. With the freedom of speech in
place you have every opportunity to
convince them to change their mind
with any arguments you may choose.
As long as neither of the sides are
going to suppress most or part of the
population, all arguments are fair
game.
I wouldalso like to urge Mr.
By Tim E.
Hampton
Editorial
Columnist
Out-of-touch George Bush
went grocery shopping last week
and couldn't believe the price of
pork rinds, the President's choice
snack, had escalated four-fold since
his last trip to Harris Teeter in the
mid70s.
George Herbert stood in the
express line with 12 items, instead
of the Harris Teeter mandate of 10
items. Under the clearly labeled
CASH ONLY sign, he extracted a
check book containing checks em-
bossed with the Presidential Seal
and a diminutive Millie.
Check-out person Louise
asked: "Paper, plastic or the worst
environmental track record of all
time?" Louise, who makes $5 an
hour with no health benefits, then
dragged the bags of pork rinds and
several jars of Gerber's Crushed
'N' Strained Peas (for Danny)
across that new, fangled techno-
logical advance called the price
scanner.
"Gee, what is that?" came the
whiny emanation from the non-
readable lips of the Bushman. Aids
(not the disease) quickly whisked
Bush away, explaining that: "No,
the electronic scanner isn't some-
thing out of Buck Rodgars, but m
fact, it is a devise which has only
added to grocery shoppers' inces-
sant waiting
The President's ignorance of
the price scanner, a prevalent su-
permarket fixture, is symptomatic
of the overriding out-of-touchness
demonstrated by the nation's lead-
ers.
Hicks to keep up with the current
events of a region he is going to write
about. I suspect that by writing
"Russia" he was referring to the Soviet
Union which ceased to exist at the end
of last year, partly because the new
governments arc trying to introduce a
market economy there. Is this the right
place "Ivan and his Revolutionary
Band" are suppose to go to? I abso-
lutely don't like this notion of "agree
or get out" anyway. Exactly this hap-
pened in the former Soviet Union with
dissidents until a few years ago. They
were sent to Siberia, if they were lucky
enough not to be executed.
Markus F. Fuchs
ECU Alumnus
Boston, Ma. m
Without taking weekly jaunts
through the canned and boxed
aisles of a Piggly Wiggly, politi-
cians can't have empathy for the
common person. Without writing
a $88.73 check with only a $17.56
balance, these fanaglers of billions
of dollars will never realize the true
dimensions of a budget crunch.
The reduced pork chops simi-
larly don't hold any bones to the
State dinner and the filet mignon
in the Senate Commissary.
Swept away by black limos
� mostly beautiful elongated
Cadillacs of Earlvene heritage
Senators, Cabinet members and
Herbert have no idea what is wrong
with Detroit (which is pronounced
"De-troit" in Chocowinity). Chauf-
feured around Capitol Hill, the
leaders literally have no 'hands-on
experience' of the American auto-
mobile industry. The last vehicle
Herbert actually drove was a golf
cart.
Also, George has no idea
about health care. His heart stop-
page � the one in which we all
feared the Sesame Street White
House � was revived in a Navy
hospital, free of charge. In a de-
mented form of socialized medi-
cine. Bush's bi-monthly check-ups
are administered by the best doc-
tors.
The free health care plan of
the rich and mightv law makers
can't compare to a �3,000 tax break
health plan for lower income fami-
lies.
The ailing auto industry,
health care and supermarket scan-
ners are but a few items the Bushian
regime doesn't have a grasp on. On
other issues, a callous effacement
is to blame rather than a total igno-
rance. Nightly, homeless cuddle to
collect warm stream near the White
House.
The largest homeless sheltor
in the world is an ear-shot trora
Capital Hill Still, the tinted-glaij
limos of Earlvene heritage cruise
by.
� � �
Detachment is becoming a
pervasive attitude Generalizations
are chosen in favor of concrete ex-
amples A report is deemed more
essential than actual experience-
Second-hand is preferred in this
sense; just regurgitate abstract re-
alitiesand provide ROactual proot
Policies are passed to atteit t,u.
less millions, because the policies
appear viable at lace value
(The previous paragraph is
an example of how a columnist can
become out ol touch when writing
in abstracts. We need no detach-
ment in language nor in politics
On the putting green I fi
naliv pointed the shopping art
with the one askew wheel into the
check-out line
As I do every week, 1 con-
templated buying a tabloid with
pictures of seven-inch tongues, but
decided instead on a park oi base
ball cards
The cart was laden with re-
duced porkchopsand twinkiesand
other fattening items to augment
my rotundage.
Behind me wereanxious pre-
drinkers with hands gripping large
containers of golden ale. The cash-
carrving line slanders let loosi
collec rive sigh when 1 whipped nut
the check book.
Louise, the check-out per -
had a difficult time scanning one
of the items from my cart So, she
bent over the intercom micropr
and yelled "Joe, 1 need a price
check on a 24-pack of Trojan Tick-
lers
Like a Peer Health Educa: r
I saw no humor in the situation
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Books on computer will replace paper
By Scott
Maxwell
Editorial
Columnist
Argh. Trade deficits, civil for-
feitures, the '92 campaign, the reces-
sion I need a break. I think I'll just
curl up with an electronic copy of
Alice in Wonderland and
Oh, yes. An electronic copy,
courtesy of Project Gutenberg.
What Project Gutenberg is, is
the brainchild of a loon named
Michael Hart (he prefers the term
"technofreak"). For 21 years, Hart,
some graduate assistants and a loose
confederation of computer users
around the world have labored to
transfer books onto computer disks.
Once a book has been transferred to
disk, the machine-readable copy is
called an "e-text" � and such e-
texts will be a big part of your fu-
ture.
By the year 2001, Hart hopes.
Project Gutenberg will have made
10,000 books available as machine-
readable text, with a cost to the user
of one cent per book. In other words,
within nine years, you'll be able to
get 10,000 books for about $100, plus
thecost of the disks (or CD-ROMs or
whatever) and mailing.
Today, that $100 will buy you
only 20 or 30 paperbacks. Think
about it.
What sort of books is Project
Gutenberg making available? Well,
everything. There's unexciting but
useful ituff, like Roget's Thesaurus
and The CIA World Factbook. And
there's interesting stuff, like Alice in
Wonderland and Peter Pan.
To avoid copyright hassles.
Project Gutenberg "e-publishes"
only works in the public domain,
and only works that have been pub-
lished in the United States. But that
still leaves a wealth of material.
Project Gutenberg e-publishes
all works in ASCII format. Put sim-
ply, ASCII is a standardized code
for representing text in a computer
� meaning that the same copy of
Alice in Wonderland works as well on
an IBM PC as it does on my Amiga,
or on the Macintoshes at The East
Carolinian. (Viruses are no threat;
they can't be spread via these ASCII
flies.)
The relatively few computer
systems that don't use ASCII nearly
always provide some easy way to
translate an ASCII file to a usable
format.
In short, practically anyone
with a computer, even an old or un-
usual machine, can use Project
Gutenberg's e-texts.
E-texts have numerous advan-
tages, not least to political colum-
nists like myself. A few weeks back,
I wanted to include one of the mor-
als from Aesop's Fables in a column,
but I couldn't remember how the
stupid thing was worded, and I
couldn't find it in my battered old
paperback copy. 1 must have looked
for ten minutes before giving up in
frustration.
Just for the heck of it, last week-
end I downloaded Aesop s Fables
from Project Gutenberg's archives.
My computer then found the fable I
was looking for in less than three
seconds That's less time than it took
me to locate my copy of the book on
my bookshelves.
Convinced?
Part of the larger goal of Project
Gutenberg is to help harness the
enormous power of computers to
assist in doing just what 1 was trying
to do: research. Most of the time
involved in writing any report. Hart
notes, is spent looking up the needed
material in a library.
Hart imagines being able to do
all the research you need for any
report, right at your own computer.
If you're writing a report on gastro-
pods, a few keystrokes will bring
you practically every word ever
written on the subject.
If your own resources aren't
sufficient, you might call a library
computer and have it search even
more works. You can even down-
load an entire book from the library
computer. Then it's yours forever �
no fines, no hassle.
For people who don't try to
write good papers anyway. Hart
notes, faster access to research mate-
rials won't make much difference.
But for the rest of us, it's an enor-
mous advantage.
Imagine tapping into encyclo-
pedia and dictionary entries, techni-
cal journals, stories and poems, all
on the same topic � in seconds. Not
only will you save time, you'll also
be able to do much more thorough
research than you could hope to do
in a present-day library with paper-
based books. Quotations will be per-
fectly accurate � just cut and paste.
Hart made me promise to as-
suage the fears of librarians who
may read this column. With the ad-
vent of e-texts, he says, we'll need
librarians even more. After all, you
can get lost in your personal copy of
the Library of Congress almost as
easily as you can get lost in the real
thing.
There's a lot of information in
there, enough to confuse even skilled
computer users on occasion.
Hart thinks librarians will
come to be more like computer con-
sultants, but their jobs will remain
essentially the same: they'll help
people find books containing needed
information. Better yet, librarians
will be freed from the drudgery of
circulation and re-shelving, and do-
ing all the other boring things librar-
ians have to do.
In addition to speeding up re-
search and taking some of the bore-
dom out of librarians' lives, e-texts
have less obvious advantages
They're never checked out when vou
need them. They don't useup papi -
of course, so they're environmen-
tally sound.
Publishing new editions ot
books is less difficult, because pub-
lishing itself is less difficult. Just re-
vise the original version as needed
� on disk � and let readers get the
new edition wherever they got the
old one. The end result is faster up-
dating of books, with mistakes cor-
rected sooner.
E-publishing also makes books
much less expensive, since electronic
publishing and distribution are so
much cheaper than today's meth-
ods. About 10 to 15 percent of a
book's cost is the actual cost of mak-
ing the book; the rest goes to the
people involved in getting that book
to you � the writer, the publisher
(and the editors he employs), the
distributor, and the retailer.
E-texts cut out everybody but
the writer and (one hopesi an editor,
thus saving more than 90 percent ot
the cost. The cost of media is nomi-
nal � under S2 for a CD-ROM,
maybe 50 cents for a diskette And
you can provide your own media,
perhaps downloading a book di-
rectly from the writer's computer
Think of how much less money you'll
spend at the campus bookstore
E-texts are great, but they're
not perfect. Yet.
E-texts are more useful for par-
ticular jobs, certainly.
But paper will remain the pri-
mary med ium for new works at least
as long as some problems remain
unsolved.
How, for instance, will ween-
sure writers are compensated for
their work, if everyone can cheaply
distribute copies of books as widely
as they please? The problem is being
attacked, but the solution is years
away.
Still, e-texts are the wave of
the future. And the future is excit-
ing.
If you want to find out more
about Project Gutenberg � perhaps
you'll even consider donating time
or money to the project; they'd love
you forever � you can e-mail Hart
at harrAvmd.cso.uiuc.edu. Those of
you still living in the real world can
just send your archaic paper mail to
the following address:
Michael S. Hart
Project Gutenberg
5700 College Road
Lisle, IL 60532-0900
If you think the outcome of the
1992 election will change your life,
just ponder the possibilities of e-
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Still, tho tmtrd-glasj
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� � �

Detachment is becoming
per asive attitude �onoraliations
n favor of com rote ex-
ampies report i. doomed more
essenl i lhan actual experience
ind is preferred in this
sense just regurgitate abstract vit-
alities and provide no actual proof.
P � passed to affect faco-
�r . ,iuse the polk ios
.i at table .it fa e value
prei K)U3 paragraph is
a ,1 columnist can
i touch when writing
A t need no dotach-
IgC nor in politics )
the putting green: I fi-
. d the chopping cart
. ne askew wheel into the
� I do e ery w eek, I cort-
: buy ing a tabloid with
�i sol seven-inch tongues, but
ui on a pack ol base
Is
jrt vv,i- laden with re-
� � ips and twinkles and
ng items to augment
' � IgC
e ��� i � i anxious pre-
tnds gripping large
. � ion ale. The cash-
. s.indcrs lot loose a
hen I whipped out

he k out person,
had .i difficult time canning one
my i art So, she
tercom microphone
I need a price
i 21 p,u K ol rrojan Tick-
I loalth Educator
I saw the situation.
Iver Hammer
ill replace paper
i old

. � � last wee!
I
up thi � i �
nood tor i
�vvn com Itei
x�rt or � ��
rd evei
iri t'v aren't
� � en
dowi
Iom th libi
)urs fore i �
on't trv �
�civ. Hart
feesean h mate
pch difference
' I an enor-
intoem vclo-
ntries, tec hm
pnd piK-ms, all
i seconds. Not
pe. you'll also
lore thorough
jld hope to do
Iry with paper-
tns will be per
cut and paste
�promise to as-
ibrarians who
With the ad
ys. we'll need
After all, you
trsonalcopy of
Ycss almost as
llost in the real
�information in
iseeven skilled
ttasion.
(brarians will
romputer con-
s will remain
they'll help
'ining needed
ret, librarians
le drudgery of
plving, and do-
things librar-

I i . I
f

��
nal
In addition to speeding up re-
seai � tne of the bore-
dom out ol librarians lives, e-texts
have less obvious advantages.
! h� rchecked out when you
�� I he I ��� � use up paper,
�' � r i n ironmen-
�i v sound
Publishing net editions of
is difficult recaiise pub-
lishing � less difficult. Just re-
� ginal version as needed
' � ind let readers get the
� ��� edition wherever thev got the
� I ' i end result is faster up-
with mistakes cor-
n ted so, - i �
1 iblishingalso makes books
much less expensive, si nee electronic
publishing and distribution are so
ipef than today's meth-
yl to 15 percent of a
� ICOSl is the actual cost of mak-
. ' � ' �1 the rest goes to the
pie involved in getting that book
" � writer, the publisher
hi employs), the
the retailer,
n out everybody but
�r hopes) an editor,
re than 90 percent of
?St ol media is nomi-
dor 2 tor a CD-ROM,
- tor a diskette. And
in pi . ide vour own media,
perl ips downloading a book di-
from the writer's computer.
rhinkothov nuuh loss money you'll
spend at the campus bookstore.
I texts are great, but they're
not porfei t Yet
E-texts are more useful for par-
tuuiar jobs, certainly.
But paper will remain the pri-
mary medium for new works at least
as long as some problems remain
unsolved.
How, for instance, will we en-
sure writers are compensated for
their work, if everyone can cheaply
distribute copies of books as widely
as they please? The problem is being
attacked, but the solution is years
away
Still, e-texts are the wave of
the future And the future is excit-
ing.
If you want to find out more
about Project Gutenberg � perhaps
you'll even consider donating time
or money to the project, they'd love
you forever � you can e-mail Hart
at hart�vmdcso.uiuc.edu. Those of
you still living in the real world can
just send your archaic paper mail to
the following address:
Michael S. Hart
Project Gutenberg
5700 College Road
Lisle, IL 60532-0900
If you think the outcome of the
1992 election will change your life,
just ponder the possibilities of e-
texts.
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Classifieds
UI?e �ast (farultntan
February 20,1992
Entertainment
ftMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
&&50 per month, 12 utilities. Near
campus. Available immediately. Call
$8-3311
LJUXURY SUITE: A seventh story
luxury suitehangingoverthewhitesand
afid dear water of South Florida's most
beautiful beach. Completely furnished,
neepa five in unbelievable luxury; min-
utes from ai- Alai, airport, horses, dogs,
lit 1 judordale Beach, Miami Actioa $800
for week 37-314 at Hollywood Beach
fewer. Call (305) 472-2870.
HEM ALE ROOMMATE WANTED: For
apartment half a block from campus, 2
tpocks from downtown, supermarket,
ajid laundramat. $220 per month, in-
cludes rent, utilities, phone and cable
aS-M18.
K1NCSARMS APARTMENTS: 1 and 2
bedroom apartments, energy efficient,
several locations in town, carpeted,
kitchen appliances, some water and
sewer paid, washer and dryer hook-ups.
752-8915.
EFFICIENCY AT RINGGOLD TOW-
ERS: Sublease immediately. Great view
and location, by Mendcnhall. Fully fur-
nished. $260 a month. Call 752-6993.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 1 2 block from
jampus. $125 a month, 13 utilities. 758-
3225 ask for Ginger or Wendy. Call
anytime.
ROOMMATES NEEDED: 2 people to
Share a 4 bodrxxim house. Ren is $175
and 13 utilities. 1 12 bath. 12 mile
from campus. Can move in anytime. Call
Stephanie at 758-9824.
(K SAI f
SEIZED CARS: trucks, boats, 4-wheel-
ers, motor homes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Available your area now. Call 800-338-
3388 Ext. C-5999.
FOR SALE: Macintosh Ilci cpu only. 8-
meg RAM; 120-meg hard disk $3500
firm. Will trade for Faberge eg or date
with that chick in the Pepsi commercial.
757-0065 ask for Stephen.
1986 TOYOTA CEL1CA GT: Black with
greyinterior,5-speed,AC,stereocassettc,
power package, very good shape. Call
Jeff and leave message. 752-8454.
FOR SALE: Sleeper sofa, reclincr, and
chair. Please call 321-0560.
FOR SALE: Mistubishi HS-400 U R Hi-Fi
stereo VCRS75.355-0141, leave message.
UNBELIEVABLE: 1985 Dodge Ram 50
sport pick-up truck Excellent condition,
Kenwood hi power stereo, 5 spd, work
box, sport wheels. Book value S3700with-
out improvements first. $2450 drives it
home 752-9641.
FOR SALE: Wilson Staff II Laminated
Woods with insets, hardly used. Orig.
$600. Will sell for $150. 321-2549.
FORSALE:CDs$5each,XLfullwctsuit
$100, 7'6" Action surfboard $225. 757-
1046.
FORSALE:Women'sskibibs,lightblue,
size small, wom once. $35. Call 830-6997.
A Duuuful Plce to Live
�All New
�And Ready To Rent-
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5th Si red
�Located Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
limited Offer - $330 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt 8, 12-5 30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS'
Qen and qvvt one bxSnxMn furajatatd apartrmti
cable TV Coipiu � Ma only SMinmh. t
montleaac MOBILE HOME RENTALi carpU. or
�angta. Aparmn and mobile Sanaa � Ajaiaa Cantem
neat Brook Villey Cowan Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
Spring Break Supplies
� Zinak Products
� Banana Boat Lotions
� Astro Deck � Fanny Packs
� Powell Pcralia Products
� Various Beach & Skate
Accessories
50 off retail
Why Pay Beach Prices?!
405 S. Summit St.
Sat. Feb. 22 10 AM - Unul
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for 1
bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
HUP WANHD
FAST FUNDRAISINC PRO-
GRAM: Fraternities, sororities, stu-
dent clubs. Eam up to SKXX) in one
week. Plus receive a $1000 bonus
yourself. And a free watch just for
calling 1-800-932-0528 Ext. 65.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE: Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 800-
338-3388 Ext. P-3712.
FREE TRAVEL: Air couriers and
cruise ships. Students also needed
Christmas, spring and summer for
amusement park employment. Call
800-338-3388 Ext. F-3464.
TOPLESS DANCERS WANTED:
Playhouse nightclub is Goldsboro,
cash SSS. Call Paul 736-0716 or Sid
35-7713 or Club 731-9962.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY
Assemble products at home. Call toll
free 1-800467-5566 Ext. 5920.
500-1000 CAMP POSITIONS
AVAILABLE: Staff Referral Services
provides a network of camps, now
hiring, from the "Keys" to Wise. -
Minn. One application reaches all
camps. Applications at Career Ser-
vices - Bloxton House.
HOUSE CLEANER NEEDED:
Overworked grad uate student needs
help with vacuuming, sweeping, lots
of dusting, windows, bathroom, etc.
$4 hour. 758-6998.
COURIER FILE CLERCK TO
WORK PART-TIME: Must have
drivers license and reliable transpor-
tation. Hours are mostly in the morn-
ing (9 a.m. to 1 p.m.). Phone 758-1747
and ask for Mr. Rush or apply at Pitt
Surgical, P.A. 905 Johns Hopkins
Drive, Greenville, NC
WANTED: Artist to do graphics for
business logo, labels, letterhead, etc.
Call 752-3788 leave message.
HELP WANTED: The Pirate Club is
looking for 2 work-study students to
perform various office duties and
functions pertaining to the Great Pi-
rate TurpleGold Pigskin Pigout.
Please call Nancv or Tripp at 757-
4540 ASAP.
SERVICES OFFERED
GIRLS, YOU TENSE? STRESSED?
What you need is a practiced massusse
to relieve that everyday tension, through
deep muscle and full body therapeutic
massage. Call 758-6418 for appt.
BABYSITTER: Retired nurse available
to babysit your preschoolers. My home,
$8 day. You bring their food and I'll
provide T.LC. Call Rose at 752-4358.
STUDY ABROAD IN AUSTRA-
LIA: Information on semester, year,
graduate, summer, and internship
programs in Perth, Townsville,
Sydney, and Melbourne. Programs
start at $3520. Call800-878-36.
BAHAMAS PARTYCRUISE:6days
$279! Panama City $99, Padre $199,
Cancun $499, Jamaica $399!Call Jasa
at 758-5165 or Wayne at 757-1369.
YOU'VE ONLY GOT ONE WEEK
TO LIVE! DO IT RIGHT! Spring
Break in Jamaica from only $429
Hotel, Air, Transfers, Parties! Sun
Splash Tours 1-800426-7710.
LEARN TO FLY NOW Aero Sales
flight training. Pitt-Greenville Air-
port. Introductory flight $20. Call 752-
1989.
INTERESTED IN SORORITY
LIFE? We're interested in you! Come
meet the sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha!
Feb. 24,25,26, at 7 p.m. Call Pamela at
752-8490.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA: We're
psyched for the fiesta tonite! See you
there! Love, the Sigmas.
SIGMAS & DATES: Stranger's
drawing near�Friday's almost here!
If you don't have a date if s getting1
f'f KSONAIS
really late! Formal sure was crazy,
but this will be even stranger Get
psyched
WHYPAYANDSTARVETOLOSE
WEIGHT? Save and eat to satisfy
hunger (even for sweets) and get fast
permanent weight loss to the size
thaf s right for you, and feel better
than ever while your drop 13-1
pound daily (diabetics and
hypoglyeemics, too). Maybe even
make a little money without over-
hauling your lifestyle to lose weight
or keep it off. Free information by
mail. 355-3789.
KIM: GOOD LUCK TEACHING! I
LOVE YOU AND I KNOW THAT
YOU WILL BE GREAT!�BAN ANA
MAN.
SIGMA PI: We look forward to be-
ing with you guys Thursday night!
Love, Alpha Delta Pi.
CUPID SHOTSIGMAS: A night 1
can't remember,but a night I'll never
forget, it was cool dancin' and gettin'
bent, we have to make it a yearly
event.
ALPHA PHI: Keep up your winning
record in basketball and water polo.
Love, your sisters.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
ALPHA PHI: Valentine's Cocktail
was a blast, too bad it went by so fast.
The room may have been small, but
cupid's arrow hit us all. Lefs get
psyched for formal.
SIGMA PL Thanks for the great time
lastThursdaynight! Let's get together
again. Love, Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA PLEDGES: Ifs been a
fun and mysterious week. Are you
ready for tonight? Get psyched to
meet your Big Sis!
ALPHA OMICRON PLGetpsyched
for Roseball Satuday night. It will be
a blast that will last and last.
CONGRATULATIONS: to the
AOPi basketball team for a great sea-
son! Good luck in the playoffs. Love,
the sisters.
DELTA ZETA: Hope your ready to
roll in the hay Thursday. See all
there. �Alpha Sig.
PAY IN-STATE TUITION? Read
Residency Status and Tuition, the
practical pamphlet written by an at-
torney on the in-state residency ap-
plication process. For sale: student
stores, Wright Building.
ROOKTRADF.R
BUY AND TRADE!
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickenson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NOW! USED CD'S
A MAP
TO THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JOYNER
LIBRARY
MENDENHALL
STUDENT
CENTER
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largtst Library of Information n U.I.
f�'J TOPICS ALL UMJtCTS
Orjaj Cjttioa Today �- VISA. MC or COO
800-351-0222
Of �I P 00 to a�1 Ha�JHH�a
Ifte 9fgiL Company
of Qnmvxiit Ltd.
-QREEMV1LLE-S FWST FULL SERVICE NAIL CARE SALON"
2408 S Charles St. Suite 5 � 355-4596
Every Monday:
$2 off Manicures
$5 off Pedicures
Tanning: $4.00 slngle visit
$15.00 - 5 VISITS
$25.00 - 10 VISITS
"The best bed in town
r
Sam's Trophies
Custom Logos, Colors
& Gift Wrapping
�TROPHIES
�RIBBONS
�PLAQUES
�NAME TAGS
�PLASTIC SIGNS
�DESK NAME PLATES
1804 Dickinson Ave.
Ac root from Pep
'57-1388
FAX l s yoi kORIIKK
757-2476

Announcements
C-AMMAPETAPHl
Attention students: Anyone with a
C P.A of 3.0 or better who is interested
in Gamma Beta Phi, an honor fraternity
and service organization, please call
Oena Price at 931-8282.
HOSPITALITY MGMT. ASSOC
HMA is looking for a responsible and
dedicated person, preferably a Hospi-
tality major, interested in the secretary
assistant job for the club. Great oppor-
tunity and tots of fun! Call 931-7399 if
interested.
ORIENTATION
TO CAREER SERVICES
The Career Services office invites se-
riorsand graduate students to attend a
program designed to acquaint them
with the services available to them as
they prepare to enter the work force,
included will be registration and inter-
view sign-up procedures, how to es-
tablish a credential file, and a tour of
theCarcerServices Center are included.
These sessions will be held in the
Bloxton House on Thursday, Feb. 13 at
?Pm
INTRODUCTION
TO CAREER EXPLORATION
This program introduces students to
areer planning services, assesses ca-
reer development needs and facilitates
career decision making process in a
Systematic manner. Students will be
given the opportunity to take the Strong
Interest Inventory and register for fol-
low-up workshop. Tuesday Feb. 11
from 2-4 p.m in 313 Wright Building.
CATCH ALL OF THE ACTION!
Be a volunteer timer at the CAA Swim -
fningand DivingChampionships. ECU
is hosting the Colonial Athletic Asso-
ciation Swimming and Diving Cham-
pionships Feb 26,27,28, and 29. Tim-
ers are needed for Feb. 27,28 from 10:15
a.m. to 2 p.m. and tram 6:15 to 9 p.m.
Also Feb. 29, from 10.15 to 2 p.m. and
If from 5:15 to 830 pm Refreshments
will be provided and if three sessions
are worked you will receive a CAA
Swimming and Diving T-shirt. To vol-
unteer please call Stewart Esposito at
758-8415 or Matt Malonev at 7574532.
GROUP ADVISING
FOR PRE-OT STUDENTS
There will bead vising every third Tues-
day of each month from 12 p.m. to 2
p.m. in room 203 Belk building. Please
see the video at either Joyner or Brody
libraries before you come for advising.
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
Volunteers of East Carolina Friends
should plan to meet from 3 p.m. -5 p.m.
on Thursday, Feb. 20 at Sportsworld.
Bring S2 for yourself and S2 for your
Little Friend. This price includes skate
rental. Bring extra money for videos
and refreshments. This is a mandatory
event. Call your Director of Services for
more information.
RESIDENT HALL ASSOCIATION
"RH A; A Homeless Pizza Social Pizza
and Pepsi for a buck! Central Campus
Mall, Feb. 26,1992 4 p.m. - 6 p.m. Come
out and show that Pirates care about
the Homeless Shelters of Greenville.
STUDENT LEADERSHIP
PEVELQPEMENT PROGRAMS
COUNCIL OF STUDENT ORGA-
NIZATION LEADERS MEETING
Mark your calenders for Wednesday,
Feb. 26,1992, at 5 p.m. to attend the next
COSOL meeting. Mayor Nancy Jenkins
and Assistant Director of Housing Inez
Fridley will share views on important
leadership qualities. The organization
speakout will follow the presentation.
COSOL will meet in the MSC Social
Room. All student leaders invited.
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS
Department of Physics Visiting Indus-
trial Scientist Seminar: "From Simula-
tion to Reality - The Thrird Wave of
Science" by Dr. Riaz Abdulla, Head of
tA
Supercomputing Applications and
Molecular Design, The Lilly Corporate
Center, India nopolis, IN. Friday, Feb.
28at3p.m. Room BN-109in theHowell
Science Complex.
PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY CLUB
A Social! All students who are thinking
about P.T. are welcome. Come join us!
Bring refreshments (sodas, chips, cups,
plates.) Come meet the membership
and join if you like! Feb. 24 in the social
room of Mendenhall at 7:30 p.m. Ques-
tions? Call Beth at 931-7853.
SENIORS
GRADUATING FALL 1992
Don't be stuck with a nine month lease!
If you are interested in a place to live
Fall Semester 1992 only, check out
Umstead and Slay Hall during resi-
dence hall sign-up Feb. 17-21. The De-
partment of University Housing will
close Umstead and Slay at the end of
Fall Semester 1992 to begin renova-
tions.TheSl OOdeposit will be refunded
to Umstead and Slay residents and the
contract obligation will be met at the
end of Fall Semester. For more infor-
mation, call the Department of Uni-
versity Housing, (919) 757-6450 or stop
by 201 Whichard Building to pick up
an Application-Contract and sign-up
information.
ECU SCHOOL
OF MUSIC EVENTS
FOR FEB. 18-24.1992
WED, FEB. 19 � Faculty Chamber
Concert featuring Fritz Gearhart, vio-
lin; Selma Gokcen, cello; Paul Tardiff,
piano; Lenny Schranze, guest violist;
with Nathan Williams, clarinet, and
Mark Ford, percussion (Fletcher Recital
HalL 8:15p.m free).THUR FEB.20�
Ashley Thorton, piano, David Gore,
voice, senior recital (Fletcher Rectal
Halt 7 p.m free). FRL, FEB. 21 �
Allison Gentry, trombone, and Paula
Elliot, clarinet, senior radial (Fletcher
Recital Hall 7 p.m free), and William
Bridges, saxophone, senior retitalJ
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 9 p.m free).
MON FEB. 24 � Faculty Chamber
Concert featuring Nathan Williams,
clarinet, Selma Gokcen, cello, John B.
O'Brien, piano (Fletcher Recital Hall,
8:15 p.m free).
DOWN EAST CYCLING CLUB
Local CyclingTeam seeking newmem-
bers for 92-93 racing squad, all levels
and Cats (IV -I). Sponsership and lim-
ited perks included. For more informa-
tion call Miles 752-0012, Bill 758-8616
Eric 830-0435.
NATIONAL
STUDENT EXCHANGE
ECU students It's not too late to apply
for NSE for fall or spring placements.
The deadline is approaching so stop by
the office NOW! Openings are still
availableNew Mexico, Maine, Cali-
fornia, Utah�ski countryspend an
exciting semester or year in another
state. And remember, you only pay
ECU tuition! Come by and seethe list of
universities available. Contact
Stephanie Evancho in Brewster A-117
or call 757-6769 for more information.
ECU POETRY FORUM
The ECU Poetry Forum will meet
Thursday Feb. 20 at 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall 247. Those attending
should bring 6-8 copies to be distrib-
uted. The meeting is open to all stu-
dents and townspeople. Listeners
welcome.
HEALTH
PROMOTION
AND WELL-BEING
Office of Health Promotion and well-
being kick-off! Donald A. Tubesing,
PhD, nationally recognized expert in
the field of stress management and
weUncM promotion, wiB be the kay-
note speaker. Plan to attend one or aD
of the following sessions: Thursday,
Feb. 20, 330430 p-m, MSC Great
Room "Hooked on Helping�the
Caregiver's Dilemaaa" How do you
prevent burnout? This session will teach
students preparing for care-giving pro-
fessions how to manage their everyday
challenges, maintain their personal vi-
tality, and continue to derive personal
satisfaction from their work. Thurs-
day, Feb. 20,7:30-8:30 pan MSC Great
Room "Staying Evergreen" Need your
batteries recharged? Attend this ses-
sion and leam how to carefully use
your time and energy resources for
maintaining, and as necessary, regain-
ing your personal vitality. Friday, Feb.
21, 10-11 a.m Hendrix Theatre
"Seeking Your Healthy Balance"
Maintaining a healthy relationship be-
tween the requiremtns of our work,
family and friends, while still having
time to take care of ourselves, requires
a continual process of balancing and
rebalancing. Learn key strategies for
maintaining balance in your life. This
session is open to all faculty and staff
and has the full endorsement of the
chancellor. Attendance time should not
be charged to annual leave.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi members: our next
meeting is Feb. 26 in Mendenhall room
244 at 5 p.m. Officers meet at 4:15 p.m.
OB SEARCH WORKSHOP
Career Services announces a workshop
designed to help prospective graduates
find employment in a tight job market.
A variety of strategies will be discussed
and handouts will be available. The
program will be held in Bloxton House
on Feb. 25at 4 p.m.and Feb. 27at 2 p.m.
INTERVIEW
SKILLS WORKSHOP
Students interested in learning how to
prepare for and present themselves in
an employment interview are invited
to attend one of the workshops spon-
sored by Career Services. Information
will be shared on interview questions
that maybe asked, questions the candi-
date may ask, and how to respond to
inappropriate inquiries. How to dress,
verbal and non-verbal communica-
tions, and follow-up activities will also
be addressed. The workshops will be
held in the Bloxton House on Thurs-
day, Feb. 20 at 4 p.m. and Wednesday,
Feb. 26 at 7 p.m.
SIGMA THETA TAU
Beta Nu chapter will have business
meeting on Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. in room 203
School of Nursing�ECU.
SOCIETY FOR
ADVANCEMENT
IN MANAGEMENT
The Society for the Advancement in
Management would like to invite all
majors interested in business to come
to our meeting Wednesday, Feb. 26 at
3:30 in GC1028. There will be speakers
discussing today's job market. Re-
freshments will be served.
LAW HONOR SOCIETY
Interested in the law? Planning to at-
tend law school? If so, you are invited
to attend East Carolina Law Honor
Society. Next meeting is Feb. 24 at 5:15
p.m. in 218 Ragsdale. If you have any
questions, contact Melissa Smith,
president, at 931-7569.
SIGMA PI
Get ready for the Chili Bowl, Greeks!
Sigma Pi is sponsoring the first annual
chili cook-off. It will be a blast! Thank
to all who are already participating.
Feb. 27. Questions call 830-9273.
SOCIOLOGICAL SOCIETY
There will be a meeting of the ECU
sociological society on Tuesday, Feb.
25 at 12:15 p.m. in Brewster D-301. AD
members are expected to attend. Also,
anyone interest in joining ECUSS is
welcome Lunch will be provided.
WINDSURFING 1 WORKSHOP
Interested in windsurfmg? Recreational
Services will hold a windsurfing I
workshop on Feb. 27 at 7:30 pjn. in
Christenbury Gym pool. For more in-
formation, call 757-6387.
Earth Mure
to celebrate
By Dana Danielson
Assistant Entertainment Editor
The Earth Murchants will celebrate a
milestone Friday rught at (Rockefellers�
the release of their first tape.
"We wanted to give a good product,
something that'll last said Johnny Barwick,
vocalist. "We've had people come up to us
after a show asking for a tape, and we did
have one, but it was recorded on a portable
stereo. We wanted to give our fans some-
thing that'll last more than two weeks
The album, self-titled and indepen-
dently released and distributed by the Earth
Murchants, includes a variety of songs.
Two were written by the present members,
one written by a friend, David Bradshaw,
and theother three were written with former
members. The tape will be available at local
record stores Friday.
Drummer Marc Petruska desenbes the
release as a "broad spectrum
In addition to Barwick and Petruska,
the members of this Greenville-based band
are: Bobby Phillips, guitar; Jay Thigpen,
guitar; and Enc Creta, bass.
The Earth Murchants formed in Kinston
in November 1989. The current five musi-
cians have been playing together since
August, because of a drummer and guitar-
ist replacemenL
The band plays progressivealternative
college-type music. Creta describes it as
"music that doesn't get played on highly-
commercialized radio
The group's musical influences range
from REM to Peter Gabriel and Song. Clas-
sic, country, bluegrass and old blues are a
few types of music they listen to.
The members write their own separate
parts of the songs, making it a group effort.
"I like to look at some of my favorite
artist's lyrics and see how that person looks
at things Barwick said. "We sort of have a
tough time writing songs because we wrote
some ar
therefor
the tir
(Phillip
theson
creauv
got a ba
to play
lotte,Gr
WilrranJ
Virginia
at the
"W
Barwici
"Wl
We'
Petrusli
begin i
the"ge
"If
and yoi
"You
haveb4
1 think:
tired,
7o'cloc
a quick
when
Bel
the fir
dedicaj
"Yl
bum�
awhilel
1:
The Earth Murchants, pictured from left to right:
Creta, Bobby Phillips and Marc Petruska.
ECU alumnus
Kenny Soule explains
to success
By Margi Morin
SUf f Writer
Former ECU student Kenny
Soule returned to Greenville Feb.
14 to perform at The Attic's Heart-
breaker concert featuring The
Original Nantuckett and Garden
of Souls.
Soule started his career while
a percussion-performance student
at ECU'S School of Musk. Together
with Eddie Blair, currently
Nantuckett's sax player, he formed
Brass Park which performed at The
Attic in the early '70s.
According to The Attic's
owner, Joe Tronto, Soule is one of
the best drummers to come out of
North Carolina.
Soule later went on the road
with Nantuckett in 1972. In 1977
the band became a national act and
signed with Epic records, produc-
ing reconis for the rext three years.
ml980,Nantuckettopened for
ACDC during their "Back in
Black" tour. The band also head-
lined at Carowinds, Minges and
Reynolds Coliseums and many
other colleges.
Souk left Nantuckett to start
the power trio, PKM. However,
the original Nantuckett members
decided to reunite two years ago.
"The O
roots go bal
bands Sou
sound is a
Tower of Po
Johnny Wint
for our own j
Soule sa
ied for toda
mats.
Nantucl
Reunited Ml
contains bot
Last ye�j
with former I
andPhilip
of Souls.
"We pi
stuff � A(
Fears
said.
Accordil
Souls has i
and a
The dr
in Asylum
band and ir
dents.
Soule st
be in the
saying.
"Makel
about pla)
there. The ol
playing is all





PERSONALS
MPHA PHI: Valentine's Cocktail
Wasab ist too bad it went by �fast
PI OM
l'he room
sKAI MM
(- been Mnall.but
us all Let's get
i greattune
s get together
m i i VZI i ri i DGES:It s been a
. wei k -re you
� psvehed to
urn VOMK RONP1 i tpsyched
� it will be
( ONGR M Ul MH'NS: to the
great w
ivoffs love,
4 1! t I I
i Sig
ready to
i n.v v all
N-S1 T rUlTION? Read
. . �. n the
� b) an it-
�� - dency ar
� - r sali student

RESEARCH INFORMATION
o formation l�s US.
� suffers
,�VISA. MCar COO
800-351-0222
� j, Of, P IPPW
Sam's Trophies
( ustom I ogos,olors
& (,iit rapping
� I ROPHIES
�RIBBONS
�PI ui h
�N M1 1 (is
�PLASTIC SIGNS
�DESK IS VME PLATES
1X04 Dickinson e.
ct � from PcmI
757-1588
FAX IS YOlR ORDFR
757-2476
� verba i ommunica-
� tties willalso
rkshopa wiU be
�- House en Thurs-
-rhur� 1 Wednesday,
l 1s (.rt-jtSIGMA IHI I TAL
Beta � will have business
� room 203
iui g�ECl
; Friday, FebSOCIETY FOR
In TheatrrADVANCEMENT
hv BalaflIN MANACI Ml NT
� ' i Advanctement in
ke to invite all
iiness to come
tii � �'� �� Feb 2b at
There will be speakers
� - job market Re-erved
St " ' ' ' ' �LAW HONOR SOCIETY
1 notiw1 Planning to at-
i: mi. you are invited
arolina Law Honor
� - � - Next � eeting is Teb 24at 5:15
lU'HI(agsdale If vou have any
rvrntac! Melissa Smith,
j� . ; v
IHKSHOI'
pive graduate
;ht ib market
Dlbediscu ���
ivailabie The
louse
27at2p m
v
tllQE
iming how to
themselves in
W are invited
rkshops spon-
Information
lew questions
ionsthecandi-
to respond to
How to dress,
SIGMA PI
Get -� :v tor the C hiii Bowl, Greeks'
i Pi is sponsoring the first annual
chili cook off It will be a blast'Thank
who are already participating
Feb 27 Questions call 8304273.
SOCIOLCCALSQCiEIl
There will be a meeting of the ECU
sociological society on Tuesday, Feb.
25 at 12:15 p m. in Brewster D-301. All
members are expected to attend. Also,
anyone interest in joining ECUSS is
welcome Lunch will be provided.
WINDSURFING I WORKSHOP
Interested in windsurfing? Recreational
Services will hold a windsurfing 1
workshop on Feb. 27 at 7:30 p.m. in
l hnstenbury Gym pool. For more in-
formation, call 757-6387.
Entertainment
Stye SaHt Carolinian
February 20, 1992
7 .
Earth Murchants
to celebrate release
By Dana Danielson
Assistant Entertainment Editor
The Earth Murchants will celebrate a
milestone Friday night at CXRockefellers�
the release of their first tape.
"We wanted to give a good product,
something that' 11 last said Johnny Barwick,
vocalist. "We've had people come up to us
after a show asking for a tape, and we did
have one, but it was recorded on a portable
stereo. We wanted to give our fans some-
thing that'll last more than two weeks
The album, self-titled and indepen-
dently released and di stributed by the Earth
Murchants, includes a variety of songs.
Two were written by the present members,
one written by a friend, David Bradshaw,
and theother three were written with former
members. The tape will be available at local
record stores Fridav.
Drummer Marc Petruska describes the
release as a "broad spectrum
In addition to Barwick and Petruska,
the members of this Green villc-based band
are: Bobby Phillips, guitar; Jay Thigpen,
guitar; and Eric Creta, bass.
The Earth Murchants formed in Kinston
in November 18U. The current five musi-
cians have been playing together since
August, because of a drummer and guitar-
ist replacement.
The band plays progressi ve alternative
college-type music. Creta describes it as
"music that doesn't get played on highly-
commercialized radio
The group's musical influences range
from REM to Peter Gabriel and Sting. Clas-
sic, country, bluegrass and old blues are a
few types of music they listen to.
The members write their own separate
parts of the songs, making it a group effort.
"I like to look at some of my favorite
artist's lyrics and see how that person looks
at things Barwick said. "We sort of have a
tough time writing songs because we wrote
some and Marc (Petruska) came in and,
therefore, he had to learn the songs and, by
the time he got them down pat, Bob
(Phillips) came in and, in turn, had to learn
the songs. So we're just now getting back to
creative, to writing. 1 finally feel like we've
got a band
The Earth Murchants have fanned out
to play all over the state, including Char-
lotte, Greensboro, Raleigh, Winston Salem,
Wilmington, Nagshead, Atlantic Beach and
Virginia Beach, Va. They hope to play next
at the Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill.
"We'll play anywhere that'll have us
Barwick said, laughing.
"We'll even play in your living room
"Well play anywhere
that'll have us!
Well even play in your
living room
Petruska added.
The Earth Murchants, like many other
beginning Kinds, are struggling through
the "getting established" phase.
"It's tough � if you ha vea daytime job
and you're out there working Creta said.
"You get home and ask, "Are we gonna
have band practice tonight?' lib yeah
I think so, let's try for 8 tonight Everyone's
tired, someone lays down for a nap at
7o'clock, then someone else decides to take
a quick nap. It's hard to be really creative
when vou're fired
Being in a band is much more than just
the final product; it takes hard work and
dedication.
"You can have practice too much � get
burned out, burned ou ton each other. After
a whileit only takesa few days where vou've
Music Notes
Photo by Jill Charry - ECU Photo Lab
"After awhile it only takes a few days where you've got to have it; it's fuel, it's a release,
you do it said Earth Murchanfs vocalist Johnny Barwick, pictured here at The Attic.
Photo by Jill Charry - ECU Photo Lab
The Earth Murchants, pictured from left to right: Jay Thigpen, Johnny Barwick, Eric
Creta, Bobby Phillips and Marc Petruska.
got to have it; it's fuel, if s a release, you do
it Barwick added.
The members are happy with where
the Earth Murchants are now, but all agree
that their ultimate goal is to quit working
and play all the time.
"Not a lot of people get the chance to
really do what they want to do Petruska
said. "You look around and see people in
their little 9 to 5 jobs. That's not for us
"As long as thev enjoy it Barwick
said, adding to Petruska s comment.
"There's a lot of people who do that and
that's what thev want to do, that's axil �
thev make a lot more monev than 1 do. Not
that money really matters, but I iio like to
eat once in awhile
"We want to do this thing Creta said.
"If it falls apart, that's cool, but we'll give it
a shot. If it can't work, at least we'll know.
You can't wait for it to come to vou � gotta
go out after it. I'm sure we'll be cruising it for
awhile
"From what I've seen, it seems that the
bands who actually do something are the
one's who have been around for a long time
and reallv done all thev can Barwick said.
"In the public eye that says a lot. You see
bands forming and thev give up and fall
apart � if thev had stuck together and kept
going and going who knows where they'd
be. That's what we're trying to do now
The Earth Murchants like Greenville,
but agree that the distance to other gigs is
almost too much. They hope to move to
Raleigh soon.
"I loveGreenville,but it's hard on driv-
ing Barwick said. "We're trying to get
there (Triangle area) because there are lots
of bands there doing well. We want to go
there and meet people, get a change of
scene
"The bast thingabout these(Greenville)
bandsis that if skind of a family�you see
them out on the streets and we're all kind of
tight Petruska said. "If s not competitive,
not a back-stabbing thing either.
Everybody's helping each other out. If one
band ma kesit thenit looks good for the rest
of us
'That kind of jealousy, that competi-
tion, 'Somebody else is in a band, well,
we're better than you and that sort of
thing, it's kind of screwed up Barwick
said. "That's no way to be
Barwick explained the origin of the
name, Earth Murchants, saying, "1 used to
landscape and one night we were all sitting
around drinking and I was drawing car-
toons on a newspaper. The symbol of the
place I used to work at was a shovel that
turned into a tree so I drew that in Daniel
Boone's hand. A friend of ours, Lee McGee,
came in and said, 'What is that? An earth
merchant?' That name kind of clicked, so
we wrote i t down. And then another friend,
Bill Whi taker, said that 'mur' in Russian
was world peace, so it's like a chant �
earth-peace
What is it like on stage for these guys?
'There's nothing in the world like it
Barwick said. "When ifs going really well,
and the crowd's great ifs like being free
"It's like eating a York peppermint
patty Petruska said.
See Earth, page 8
ECU alumnus hits big time with Nantuckett
Kenny Soule explains road trip
to success
Dillon
jumps
over
fences
By Mark Brett
Staff Writer
"Catchy Thaf s the first word
that comes to mind when thinking of
North Carolina's latest progressive
rock band, Dillon Fence. Their latest
album, Rosemary, is a hook-crazy
collection of tunes that induce an
annoyingly soulful humming for
hours after listening (if only because
of their familiarity).
Like many North Carolina bands,
Dillon Fence produces REM-influ-
enced progressive rock. Instead of
drawing extra inspiration from the
Ramones or Bob Marley, however,
Dillon Fence looks to classic pop for
its musical twist. These boys listened
to lots of Motown, and it shows.
Rosemary givesus40minutesofjangly
guitar pop, no excuses or apologies
offered.
Unfortunately,an apology might
be a good idea. For the most part, few
original spins are put on the source
material. The songs are weplayed,
but Rosemary still sounds like 50 or 60
other albums out there, a couple of
them by the Smithereens. All in all,
the music is pretty bland. But the
strength of the albu m is i n i ts 1 yrics, a s
is the case with most derivative prog-
rock bands. Stunningly innovative
musical questering is simply not of
prime importance here.
Dillon Fence takes the old stan-
dard theme of "love and lies" and
manages to inject some new life into
it. Rather than degenerate into angst-
ridden heartbreak or retreat onto the
safe-but-well-travelled ground of
woman-done me-wrong songs, they
write "1 Understand" or "Here'sSome
Advice" songs. While this kind of
sensitive male stuff has certainly been
prevalent in society for a while now,
applying it to romantic betrayal pop
tunes must certainly be something
new.
And mixing that sentiment with
romantic nature imagery, as they do
on the opening track "Daylight is
definitely something else again.
"Springtime slides, raining, 'cross that
bloom croons frontman Greg
Humphreys after the second bridge.
Addressed to some unidentified fe-
male, the song abounds with lines
like that, all to lament the passing of
"the hope in your eyes But rather
than depressing the listener, the for-
See Dillon, page 8
By Margi Morin
Staff Writer
Former ECU student Kenny
Soule returned to Greenville Feb.
14 to perform at The Attic's Heart-
breaker concert featuring The
Original Nantuckett and Garden
of Souls.
Soule started his career while
a percussion-performance student
at ECU'sSchool of Music. Together
with Eddie Blair, currently
Nantuckett'ssax player, he formed
Brass Park which performed at The
Attic in the early '70s.
According to The Attic's
owner, Joe Tronto, Soule is one of
the best drummers to come out of
North Carolina.
Soule later went on the road
with Nantuckett in 1972. In 1977
the band became a national act and
signed with Epic records, produc-
ing record s for the next three years.
In 1980, Nantuckett opened for
ACDC during their "Back in
Black" tour. The band also head-
lined at Carowinds, Minges and
Reynolds Coliseums and many
other colleges.
Soule left Nantuckett to start
the power trio, PKM. However,
the original Nantuckett members
decided to reunite two years ago.
"The Original Nantuckett's
roots go back to the '60s rock
bands Soule said. "The band's
sound is a cross of Aerosmith,
Tower of Power, beach music and
Johnny Winter. We're too colorful
for our own good
Soule said the band is too var-
ied for today's radio station for-
mats.
Nantucketf s latest product is
Reunited Nantuckett Live, which
contains both new and old songs.
Last year, Soule teamed up
with former PKM members Mike
and PhilipGardner to form Garden
of Souls.
"We play a collective mix of
stuff � ACDC meets Tears for
Fears meets John Lennon Soule
said.
According to Soule, Garden of
Souls has made some good demos,
and a cassette is on the way.
The drummer also performs
in Asylum Hill, a Raleigh-based
band and instructs percussion stu-
dents.
Soule stressed that you cannot
be in the business for the money,
saying.
"Make sure you're passionate
about playing. Money is rarely
there. The only way to survive is if
playingisallyouwant'Soulesaid.
Photo by Dot Rood
Former ECU student Kenny Soule returned with The Original Nantuckett
and Garden of Souls to The Attic Feb. 14 for the Heartbreaker Concert.
t
Upcoming
Events
Currently Running
Through Feb. 24
Several Greenville artists will be featured
in an exhibition titled "W-6
The Green Hall Gallery of Chowan College.
Murfreesboro, N.C Admission free and open to
the public.
Feb. 20
Joseph Covington of the N.C. Museum of
Art staff will present, "Province from the
Romans to Renoir a slide show and
presentation of the art and architecture
of Frances Provence region.
General Classroom Building Room 1031; 3:30
p.m Admission free.
Feb. 24
A screening of B-grade movies of the late
1930s-1950s will be presented by Dr.
Tinsley Yarbrough.
The Great Room of MSC, 8 p.m Admission
free.
t-
i-





PERSONALS
1 I'M THi
. oi ktail
� fast
ether
V VOU
. v fved
i us to the
.��( sea-
ivoffs 1 ove,
� n ad to
See v all
mov Read
u ii '� the
RESEARCH INFORMATION I'ormitlon In U 5 UMJICTS
EE� 800-351-0222
Sam's trophies
I'jiis. Colors
kv (ii(l W rapping
PH1ES
!U 1S
PI Ol I S
� wii i vc.s
�PI s i K SKINS
�DESKNAM1 PLATES
� Di kinson v�
757-1388
FAX I'SYOL'R ORDER
757-247
� � lca-
tiesw ils
p? Ex1
-
idav,
i
i n FOR
�ANQ MEN!
LMENT
ment in
ki � nvite all
� - iii come
, Feb 26at
'i speakers
rket Re-
8 &Oj 11 Q
inning to at-
. u are invited
: Lnv Honor
eehngis Feb 24 at 5 15
i'H � If vou have any ntact M. lissa Smith, SIGMA I'l
RKSH P � . Bowl, .rtvk' -st annual ���� � i rl tst! rhankr in ilready participating
. � - i ied. 1 KSW273.

, � � � �
'at2p.m WSOCIOLOGICAL SOCTETY be i meeting of the ECU � i igical society on Tuesday, Feb. 25 at 12 15 p.m in Brewster DT01. All
SJJOJJmembers are expected to attend. Also,
amin how toanyone interest in nining ECUSS is
themselves inwelcome Lunch will be provided.
e.v are invited
rkshops spon-WINDGURHNC I WORKSHOP
� InformationInterested in windsurfing7 Recreational
now questionsServices will hold a windsurfing I
ions the candi-workshop on Feb 27 at 730 p.m. in
' to respond toChnstenburv Gym pool For more in-
How todnMformation, call 757-6387.
Entertainment
2Hc lEast (Eutolxnian
February 20, 1992
Earth Murchants
to celebrate release
By Dana Danielson
Assistant Entertainment Editor
The Earth Murchants will celebrate a
milestone Friday night at (Rockefellers �
the release of their first tape.
"We wanted to give a good product,
something that'll last said Johnny Barwick,
vocalist. "We've had people come up to us
after a show asking for a tape, and we did
have one. but it was recorded on a portable
Stereo. We wanted to give our fans some-
thing that'll last more than two weeks
fhe album, self-titled and indepen-
dently released and distributed by the Earth
Murchants, includes a variety of songs.
Two were written by the present members,
one written bv a friend, David Bradshaw,
and theother three were written with former
members, rhe tape will be available at local
record stores Friday.
Drummer Marc Petruska describes the
release as a "broad spectrum
In addition to Barwick and Petruska,
the members of this Greenville-based band
are: Bobby Phillips, guitar; av Thigpen,
guitar; and Eric Greta, Kiss.
The Earth Murchants formed in Kinston
in November 1989, The current five musi-
cians have been playing together since
August, because of a drummer and guitar-
ist placement.
The band plays pnigTtivealternative
college-type music. Creta describes it as
"music that doesn't get played on highly-
commercialized radio
The group's musical influences range
from REM to Peter Gabnel and Sting. Clas-
sic country, bluegrass and old blues are a
few types oi music they listen to.
The members write their own separate
parts of the songs, making it a group effort.
I like to look at some of mv favorite
artist's Kricsand see how that person looks
at things Barwick said. "We sort ot have a
tough time writing songs because we wrote
some and Marc (Petruska) came in and,
therefore, he had to learn the songs and, by
the time he got them down pat, Bob
(Phillips) came in and, in turn, had to learn
the songs So we're just now getti ng back to
creative, to writing. 1 finally feel like we've
got a band
The Earth Murchants have fanned out
to play all over the state, including Char-
lotte, Grivnsbm, Raleigh, VVinston Salem,
Wilmington, Nagshead, Atlantic Beach and
Virginia Beach, Va. Thev hope to plav next
at the Git's Cradle in Chapel I till.
"We'll plav anvwhere that'll have us
Barwick said, laughing.
"We'll even plav in your living room
"Well play anywhere
that'll have us!
Well even play in your
living room
Petruska added.
The Earth Murchants, like many other
beginning bands, are struggling through
the "getting estalilished" phase.
"It's tough � if you have a davtime job
and you're out there working Creta said.
"You get home and ask, "Are we gonna
have band practice tonight?' 'Uh yeah
1 think so, let's trv for 8 tonight Everyone's
tired, someone lavs down for a nap at
7o'clock, then someone else decides to take
a quick nap. It's hard to be really creative
when you're tired
Being in a Kind is much more than just
the final product; it takes hard work and
dedication
"You can have practice too much �get
burned out, burned ou t on each other. Alter
a while it onlv takesa few davs when' you've
Music Notes
Phoro by Jill Ch.rry - ECU Photo Lab
"After awhile it only takes a few days where you've got to have it; it's fuel, it's a release,
you do it said Earth Murchant's vocalist Johnny Barwick, pictured here at The Attic.
Photo by Jill Crwrry - ECU Photo Lab
The Earth Murchants, pictured from left to right: Jay Thigpen, Johnny Barwick, Eric
Creta, Bobby Phillips and Marc Petruska.
got to have it, it's fuel, it's a release, you do
it Barwick added.
The memrATS are happy with where
the Earth Murchants are now, but all agree
that their ultimate givil is to quit working
and plav all the time.
"Not a lot oi people get the chance to
really do wKit thev want to do Petruska
said. "You Uxk around and see people in
their little 4 to 5 jobs. That's not for us
"As long as thev enjoy it Barwick
said, adding to Petruska s comment.
There's a lot of people who do that and
that's what thev want to do, that's cool
thev make a tot more money tKin 1 do. Not
that money really nutters, but I do like to
eat once in awhile
"We want to do this thing C "rota said
"It it tails apart, that's cool, but we'll give it
a shot. If it can't work, at least we'll know.
You can't wait for it to come to you gotta
go out after it. I'm sure we'll be chasing it for
awhile
from what I've seen, it seems that the
Kinds who actually do something are the
one's who have been around tor a long time
and really done all thev can Barwick said.
"In the public eve that savs a lot. Vou see
Kinds forming and thev give up and fall
apart if thev had stuck together and kept
going and going who knows where they'd
be. That's what we'a1 trving to do now
Hie Earth Murchants like Greenville,
but agree tKit the distance to other gigs is
almost ttxi much. Thev hope to move to
Raleigh soon
"I loveGreenville, but it's hard on driv-
ing Barwick said. "We're trying to cet
there (Triangle area) because there are lots
of bands there doing well. We want to go
there and meet people, get a change of
scene
'The bust thingabout thesefGreen ville)
bands is tKit it's kind of a family � you see
them out on thestreetsand we're all kind of
tight Petruska said. "It's not competibve,
not a back-stabbing thing either.
Everybody's helping each other out. If one
band makes it then it looks good for the rest
of us
TKit kind of jealousy, that competi-
tion, Somebody else is in a band, well,
we're better than you and that sort of
thing, it's kind of screwed up Barwick
said. 'TKit's no way to be
Barwick explained the origin of the
name, Earth Murchants, saving, "1 used to
landscape and one night we wereall sitting
around drinking and I was drawing car-
Uxms on a newspaper. The symbol of the
place 1 used to work at was a shovel that
turned into a tree so I drew that in Daniel
Boone's hand. A friend of ours, Lee McGee,
came in and said, 'What is that? An earth
merchant?' TKit name kind of clicked, so
wewroteitdown And thenanother friend,
Bill Whitaker, said tKit mur' in Russian
was world peace, so it's like a chant �
earth-peace
What is it like on stage for these guys?
"There's nothing in the world like it
Barwick said. "When it's going really well,
and the crowd's great it's like being free
"It's like eating a York peppermint
patty Petruska said.
See Earth, page 8
ECU alumnus hits big time with Nantuckett
Kenny Soule explains road trip
Dillon
jumps
over
fences
By Mark Brett
Staff Writer
"Catchy That's the first word
that comes to mind when thinking of
North Carolina's latest progressive
rock band, Dillon Fence. Their latest
album, Rosemary, is a hook-crazy
collection of tunes that induce an
annoyingly soulful humming for
hours after listening (if only because
of their familiarity).
Like many North Ca mlina bands,
Dillon Fence produces REM-influ-
enced progressive rock. Instead of
drawing extra inspiration from the
Ramones or Bob Marley, however,
Dillon Fence looks to classic pop for
its musical twist. These boys listened
to lots of Motown, and it shows.
RusCTrwrygivesus40minutesof)anglv
guitar pop, no excuses or apologies
offered.
Unfortunately, an apology might
be a good idea. For the most part, few
original spins are put on the source
material. The songs are weplayed,
but Rosemary still sounds like 50or 60
other albums out there, a couple of
them by the Smithereens. All in all,
the music is pretty bland. But the
strength of thealbum is in its lyrics, as
is the case with most denvabve prog-
rock bands. Stunningly innovative
musical questenng is simplv not of
prime importance here.
Dillon Fence takes the old stan-
dard theme of "love and lies" and
manages to inject some new life into
it. Rather than degenerate into angst-
ndden heartbreak or retreat onto the
safe-but-well-travelled ground of
woman-done me-wrong songs, thev
write "1 Understand" or" Here' sSome
Advice" songs. While this kind of
sensitive male stuff has certainly been
prevalent in society for a while now,
applying it to romantic betrayal pop
tunes must certainly be something
new.
And mixing that sentiment with
romanric nature imagery, as thev do
on the opening track "Daylight is
definitely something else again.
"Springtime slides, raining, 'cross that
bloom croons frontman Greg
Humphreys after the second bndge.
Addressed to some unidentified fe-
male, the song abounds with lines
like that, all to lament the passing of
"the hope in your eyes But rather
than depressing the listener, the for-
See Dillon, page 8
to success
By Margi Morin
Staff Writer
Former ECU student Kenny
Soule returned to Greenville Feb.
14 to perform at The Attic's Heart-
breaker concert featuring The
Original Nantuckett and Garden
of Souls.
Soule started his career while
a percussion-performance student
at ECU'sSchool of Music. Together
with Eddie Blair, currently
Nantuckett's sax player, he formed
Brass Park which performed at The
Attic in the earlv '70s.
According to The Attic's
owner, Joe Tronto, Soule is one of
the best drummers to come out of
North Carolina.
Soule later went on the road
with Nantuckett in 1972. In 1977
the band became a national act and
signed with Epic records, produc-
ing records for the next three years.
In 1980, Nantuckett opened for
ACDC during their "Back in
Black" tour. The band also head-
lined at Carowinds, Minges and
Reynolds Coliseums and many
other colleges.
Soule left Nantuckett to start
the power trio, PKM. However,
the original Nantuckett members
decided to reunite two years ago.
"The Original Nantuckett's
roots go back to the '60s rock
bands Soule said. "The band's
sound is a cross of Aerosmith,
Tower of Power, beach music and
Johnny Winter. We're too colorful
for our own good
Soule said the band is too var-
ied for today's radio station for-
mats.
Nantuckett's latest product is
Reunited Nantuckett Live, which
contains both new and old songs.
Last year, Soule teamed up
with former PKM members Mike
and PhilipGardner to form Garden
of Souls.
"We play a collective mix of
stuff � ACDC meets Tears for
Fears meets John Lennon Soule
said.
According to Soule, Garden of
Souls has made some good demos,
and a cassette is on the way.
The drummer also performs
in Asylum Hill, a Raleigh-based
band and instructs percussion stu-
dents.
Soule stressed that you cannot
be in the business for the money,
saying.
"Make sure you're passionate
about playing. Money is rarely
there. The only way to survive is if
playing is all you want Soule said.
Photo by Dall R��d
Former ECU student Kenny Soule returned with The Original Nantuckett
and Garden of Souls to The Attic Feb. 14 tor the Hearlbreaker Concert.

Upcoming
Events
Currently Running
Through Feb. 24
Several Greenville artists will be featured
in an exhibition titled "W-6
The Green Hall Gallery of Chowan College.
Murfreesboro. N.C Admission free and open to
the public.
Feb. 20
Joseph Covington of the N.C. Museum of
Art staff will present, "Province from the
Romans to Renoir a slide show and
presentation of the art and architecture
of France's Provence region.
General Classroom Building Room 1031; 3:30
p.m Admission free.
Feb. 24
A screening of B-grade movies of the late
1930s-1950s will be presented by Dr.
Tinsley Yarbrough.
The Great Room of MSC. 8 p.m Admission
free.
1





8 CPtie gflflt (Earoltntan February 20, 1992
Earth
Continued from page 7
Dillon
Continued from page 7
"Personally, sometimes if s al-
most possessive, something comes
over me Barwick said.
"Beer-goggling Phillips ex-
daimed, interrupting Barwfck. "But
it is energy, speedball, adrenaline,
like downhill skiing�you feel like
your insides are gonna pop out
"Forevery good showyou play
where a whole lot of people show
up, there's always two or three
where you're playing to the bar-
tender and the soundman
Petruska said. 'If s such a big dif-
ference when the crowd is into it
and when everyone's on that one
certain, similar wavelength and
everybody's into it. Doesn't matter
if you're on the stage or off it, it's
energy that's indescribable
"Sometimes it's really nerve-
racking, like when there'sonly three
people staring at you � it makes
you feel exposed Barwick said.
When asked if their work is
paying off, the band agreed it is
"covering expenses
It can get kind of tough said
Barwfck. "Sometimes you play a
bar and you're too broke to have a
drink. Most of the money goes back
into the band. Once in awhile we'll
treat ourselves, but just when
everyone's dying
The Earth Murchants are hop-
ing for a second album, if they write
enough songs and get enough
money.
"We don't have a label yet, but
hopetogetonesoon Barwick said.
"We're sending this one off to some
minor record labels, hoping to spark
some interest. If not, we'll just do it
again �'til they throw tomatoes
What is the band's ultimate
goal?
"Going on a date with Ma-
donna Thigpen yelled.
"Making it is being successful,
to support ourselves, getting by and
making a living out of it Creta
said.
"I just want George Michael's
respect Thigpen added.
lomly upbeat rhythm lifts the spirit,
leavingbehindanairof listless grati-
fication. Ain't love grand?
The beat goes on with Til
Wait a song that conjures images
of middle-aged white people
shagging across the floor of some
forgotten American Legion hall.
The story? Well, his woman left
him, but he's faithful and he'll wait
for her inevitable return. The song
is overly sentimental, far too de-
rivative (the Embers and the
Temptations lurk behind every
note), and thus the worst track on
the album.
Things pick up, however, wi th
the next track, "Playful Here
Dillon Fence actually does some-
thinginnovative. Lyrically, we have
another 'love and lies" song with
some marginally cool word play
going on. Musically, however, the
Fence boys come to life on this one.
Kent Alphin's guitar grows a
drunken grunge gland and jerks its
way through some genuinely bru-
tal riffing. The rest of the band
follows his lead and gives Rosemary
some guts. It keeps the listener off-
balance and makes the effort worth-
while.
The Fence also scores a high
point in "Guilty Humphreys
manages to leave the lovelorn stuff
and point his sensitivity guns at
society. Feelingguiltovernotbeing
able or willing to meet the roles he's
been told he should, he almost gets
angry. In the end, "If s enough for
me to just be This song hints that
Dillon Fence has done more than
ha ve a series of bad love affai rs, and
that makes them a little more in-
teresting at least.
Rosemary is a pleasant enough
musical experience. Dealing with
familiar thems in innovative ways,
if s certainly better than most of the
modem Top 40 charts. It is, how-
ever, a bit of a yawner. Hating
Dillon Fence is difficult; finding
them boring, however, is exceed-
ingly easy.
I
Future Stories:
Euphoria Interview
Les Paul Interview
"Medicine Man" Review
"Stop or My Mom Will Shoot"
Review
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During these Commuter Week events: February 23-27, 1992
Sunday, February 23
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Call Pamela:
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THOSE GREAT SATURDAY WESTERNS & SERIALS
A NOSTALGIC JOURNEY
LECTURE AND VIDEO DEMONSTRATION
BY
TINSLEY YARBROUGH
Dr. Tinsley Yarborough. Last Lecture Series 8pm MSC Great Room
Commuter "Cool Off" . 7:30-9:00pm Minges Pool tun1
ECU Bookstore. 10 oft all wearing apparel it you're wearing your commuter sticker1
Tuesday, February 25
"Job Search Techniques Career Services . 4pm Bloxton House
"Alisha Quintano, Storyteller" MSC Coffeehouse 8pm
Wednesday, February 26
"The Grass Can be Greener on Your Side Horticulturalist. Al Hight on growing a
healthy lawn 12pm MSC
"Interviewing Skills Career Services Workshop . 7pm Bloxton House
"Condom Sense presented by SHS Peer Health Educators (STD's HIV infection)
7pm . Belk Hall Lobby
Dr. Robert Harris "From Melting Pot to Multiculturalism" Lecture MSC
7:30pm . Great Room
Thursday, February 27
Jazz Concert, U.S. Army Volunteer Band . Hendrix Theatre
H I'M. Mond.n h'h.
(.rr.it Room, Mendenh.ill studententer
f.ist.uoliru Universih.impiis
Sponsored In the Student Union lOKUMom
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Serving East Carolina campus and community.
i
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Stop by and pick up your commuter stickers to be eligible for all the week's events m 204
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Information from many campus departments for Commuter Students will be available at the
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i
Sports
Lady Pirates
Team makes 48
By Lisa Spiridopolus
Staff Writer
Some things in life aren't free
� others are. Just ask ECU'sGavnor
CDonnell and the Lady Pirates'
basketball team.
CDonnell and the women's
basketball program entered the
NCAA record books Saturday night
as they connected on 48-04-58 free
throw attempts in their 100-81 vic-
tory over American University. The
old record was held by Northern
Arizona with4rSfreethrowsin 1986
"We shot our free throws real v
well and that helped us keep our
margin said ECU Head coach Pat
Pierson. "We played good defense
in the first half and we did a good
job of keeping our composure in the
second half
The team continues to roll
through the Colonial Athletic Asso-
ciation as they collected two more
victories over the weekend, which
improved their record to 9-1 in con-
ference play and 15-fJ
Lady Pirates gained
sion of first place withl
over American Umvj
day and Monday's f7
win against George M
sitv.
In Saturday'scontj
can, CDonnell hit forl
14-ot-14 free throws
mates Rhonda Smith
13 and Tonya Ha I
ot-ll The Lady Piraj
their own free thn v�
and free throws made
the contest. The old rtj
against N.C Stall I
and tied on Feb . �
UC�Chapel Hill
ECU jumped J
lead and never lookl
team built a 21 :
end ot the first halt
The Eagles had
pn 'blems Thev sh it;
the-held, had i2rumd,
tour players with mn
Michael
"Memphis'
Douglas
t
I
en
Ll
G
i
n
C 1992 Harlem Global rottara. International Broadcasting Corp
Helios to debut
By Amy Clapp
Staf f Writer
The ECU women's fnsbee
team, the Helios, begin their
spring season this weekend. The
team will travel to Charlottesville,
Va for a tournament hosted by
the University of Virginia. The
Helios will be competing with six
other women's teams from all
over the East Coas
Last semester
ished a strong fall
ning Ultimax, ECL
nament.
December grac
Helios without sevi
ans, but with theadj
new plavers this
unparalleled supj
coach John "W-1
Baseball team
By Chip Kline
Staff Writer
ECU'S baseball team began the season with a 5-3
victory over Pembroke State at Harrington Field Sunday.
It wasgood to finally play a game that counted in the
standings said junior first baseman Lee Kushner.
The Pirates opened up the scoring by pushing across
three runs in the bottom of the first
John Schultz (0-1) walked two of the first three batters
he faced and hit another to load the bases. Kushner walked
to force in Dave Leisten to make the score 1 -0. Then Oynn
Beck angled home Heath dark and Pat Watkins to give
ECU a 3-0 lead
Tom Outen singled home two in the top of the third to
cut the Pirate lead to 3-2, then Jay Shotwell singled in Greg
Kealey to tie the score at 3-3 in the sixth inning.
The Pirates rallied in thebottom of the inning. Follow-
iraChadTririettd�AieandawalktoStandlN4c�e,Pat
Barber doubled in Triptett with the game winningrun.lt
was Barber's first collegiate hit.
It wasacurvebaH" Barber said. 1 stuck with it and
stroked it to left-center"
Leisten added an RBI single in the eighth to finish off
the scoring for the Pirates.
Johnny Bedc(l-0)picked upthewin withtwoand two-
thtts innings in relief of pm Ambrosius. Lyle Hartgrove
pitched a pafcLlrarimmning to record the save





jre Stories:
loria Interview
aul Interview
he Man" Review
y Mom Will Shoot
Review
1
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Greenville
757-1666
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ostada Philly Mex Sand
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Is throughout the week
Jtqibte for aH the weeks events m 204
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College Hill Dming Hall or Mendenhaii
.Kdiovascular endurance muscular strength
Gym (a$l0 value FREE good through
located in 117 Chnstenbury Gym Great for
Sports
�he East Ear0ltnian
February 20,1992
Lady Pirates set NCAA record
Team makes 48 free throws in American win
By Lisa Spiridopolus
Staff Writer
some things in life aren't free
othefsare Just askECU'sGaynor
() Vnnell and the Lady Pirates'
basketful team.
O'Donnell and the women's
basketball program entered the
NCA A avord books Saturday night
as they connected on 48-of-58 free
throw attempts in their 100-81 vic-
tory over American University. The
out record was held by Northern
Arizona with 46 free throws in 1986.
"We shot our free throws really
well and that helped us keep our
margin said ECU Head coach Pat
I Vrson. "We played good defense
in the first half and we did a good
ion of keeping our composure in the
second half
The team continues to roll
through the Colonial Athletic Asso-
ciation as they collected two more
ictories over the weekend, which
improved their record to 9-1 in con-
ference play and 15-6 overall. The
Lady Pirates gained sole posses-
sion of first place with their victory
over American University Satur-
day and Monday's 67-57 overtime
win against George Mason Univer-
sity.
In Saturday's contest at Ameri-
can, O'Donnell hit for a career high
14-of-14 free throws, while team-
mates Rhonda Smith went 11-for-
13 and Tonya Hargrove hit eight-
of-11. The Lady Pirates also broke
their own free throw attempts (39)
and free throws made (26) record in
the contest. The old record was set
against N.C State on Jan. 20,1977
and tied on Feb. 26, 1977 against
UNC�Chapel Hill.
ECU jumped out to a quick 6-0
lead and never looked back. The
team built a 21-point lead by the
end of the first half.
The Eagles had their share of
problems. They shot 33 percent from
the field, had 12 turnovers and had
four players with three fouls at the
half.
Incomparison, the Lady Pirates
had all but one player score, were
shooting 81 percent from the foul
line and had 20 rebounds (eight by
Hargrove).
The Lady Eagles were able to
cut ECU'S margin to 13 after the
half, but that was as close as they
would get to a much stronger Lady
Pirate team.
By the end of the game, Ameri-
can had three of their players foul
out and committed over 20 turn-
overs.
Smith led all scorers with 25
points, one point shy of her career
best. Hargrove (12 rebounds) and
Gaynor O'Donnell (nine assists)
each had 16 points and Kcnneya
Wilson added 15.
Mondav night's win against the
Lady Patriots wasn't quite as easy.
ECU held just a six-point lead
at the half and could never build a
substantial margin over a tough
GMU team. Marcell Harrison nailed
her third three-pointer of the half
with :35 to go in regulation to tie the
game at 54. Connie Small's shot
with :05 left fell short and the game
went to overtime.
The Lady PiratesallowedGMU
to score just three points in theovcr-
time. Again it was sharp shooting
from the free throw line for ECU.
They hit five important shots in the
overti me to secure the 10-poi nt win.
Connie Small went 6-6 from
thelineand finished with20points,
a career high 16 rebounds and four
steals.
"I'm real proud of our girls
Piersonsaid. "It wasn'ta pretty win
for us, but we played hard and
pulled it out.
"Now we just need a break. I
think our team will be ready for
Saturday (ODU). We've heard all
about them and we're anxious to
finally play them
Smith had 15 points, 11 re-
bounds, Hargrove contributed 13
See Record, page 10
Fit photo by Dail Raad � ECU photo Lab
Gaynor O'Donnell led the Lady Pirates' attack on the NCAA record for
free throws made in a game against American Univers.ty Saturday
O'Donnell hit 14-of-14 free throws in the team's 100-81 win.
Michael
"Memphis
Douglas
Harlem Globetrotters
thrill fans inMinges
Ruggers place second
in home tourney
C 1992 Harlam Gtob�trott�r�, International Broadcasting Corp.
By Robert S. Todd
Staff Writer
Sweet Georgia Brown, the Yo-
Yo ball, the Weave and buckets
of confetti came to Minges Coli-
seum Wednesday night, along
with the Harlem Globetrotters.
Thousands of people lined up
to watch Michael "Memphis"
Douglas do such amazing things as bounce a
basketball off his butt and shoot behind-the-
back three-pointers.
Most people are familiar with the Harlem
Globetrotters' Curley Neal and Twiggy Sand-
ers, both of whom are North Carolina natives.
Unfortunately they were not with the team in
Greenville � their absence did nothing to
prevent Harlem's finest from bringing the
crowd to their feet all night long.
"Memphis" had the fans roaring with
laughter as he danced with crimson-faced
women and showed off one referee's porky
stomach. "Memphis aside from doingStevie
Wonder imitations, canalso play. He launched
himself into the atmosphere, on several occa-
sions, for reverse jams (thaf s jam as in dunk -
not as in Smuckers).
Tyrone "Hollywood" Brown awed the
crowd with his dribbling, bouncing the ball
between his legs with blinding speed. Heonce
co-starred on the hit television show "L.A.
Law" and is believed to be the fastest dribbler
in the world.
The team also features a quasi-local talent
from North Carolina Central University,
Donald Sinclair.
Jolette "Jazzy" Law, standing a scant 5-
foot, 4-inches, was the only woman with the
team. Despite her size she managed to sink
several half-court shots during warm-ups.
The Trotters' token opponent, the Wash-
ington Generals, were no match for the de-
signed plays of the red, white and blue. In
addition, the Generals were weighed down
with honorary players Todd Gibsonand Brian
Bailey, both of whom are television personali-
ties. Bailey and Gibson were fouled immedi-
ately and each hit the first of their free throws.
"Memphis" made it a bit harder on Gibson's
second shot from the charity stripe by deli ver-
ingan envelope to his mailbox (a wedgie to the
older readers).
The 'lean, mean, yellow and green" Gen-
erals were demolished by the Globetrotters
who maintained a lead of more than 20 points
most of the night and won, 84-71.
The children enjoying the game were a
littleyoung to remember the exploits of referee
Sly Thompson. This zebra never officiated a
NBA game � he was once a singer with the
popular 70s' group The Village People.
By Hiram J. Webb
Staff Writer
Helios to debut new team in Charlottesville
By Amy Clapp
Suf f Writer
The ECU women's frisbee
team, the Helios, begin their
spring season this weekend. The
toam will travel to Charlottesville,
Va for a tournament hosted by
the University of Virginia. The
Helios will be competing with six
other women's teams from all
over the East Coast.
Last semester the Helios fin-
ished a strong fall season by win-
ning Ultimax, ECU'S home tour-
nament.
December graduation left the
Helios without several key veter-
ans, but with the addition of seven
new players this semester and
unparalleled support from new
coach John "Wobble" Welch,
sights have been set on an out-
standing season.
The women have mixed en-
durance on offense with speed
and agility on defense giving
them a powerful combination.
"I feel we arc the strongest
we've ever been Kara Macalusa
said. "We have a lot of determina-
tion which hopefully will bring
us a chance to compete in the
National Collegiate Champion-
ships at the end of the season
After this weekend, the
schedule continues with tourna-
ments in Atlanta and Columbia,
S.C during Spring Break.
On March 21-22, the Helios
will be in Wilmington, N.C, for
Collegiate Easterns and then it is
back home April 4 and 5 for
Ultimax.
The ECU rugby team hosted
their first "The Ground Ain't
Frozen" rugby tournament over
the weekend. The seven teams
pU.ved in a round-robin fashion.
ECU was the first team to
plav.J.J. McCain and Jason Webb
each scored, but both conver-
sion attempts were unsuccess-
ful. Jerry Stephenson made a
penalty kick and ECU came
nwav with a hard-fought 11-0
victory.
Meanwhile, the Greenville
Reapers defeated Chnstopher-
Newport in the Reaper's first
gameasaclub. Virginia Military
Institute out-played and de-
feated South Carolina, and Cape
Fear was awarded a bye when
York University failed to show
up.
The Pirates next match was
not asdifficult as their first. David
"Fish" Parker and Webb each
had two tries to lead ECU in
scoring. Chris Camey, Mark
Grant and Richard "Opie" Moss
also scored. The most impres-
sive run of the day came when
Bert Hewitt juked the entire de-
fense for his first score of the
year. ECU made half of their
conversion kicks to win 40-4.
InotherSaturday games, the
Greenville Reapers beat
Longwood, and Cape Fear beat
South Carolina.
Sunday brought on the
semi-finals. Cape Fear handily
defeated VM1. ECU was paired
with the Reapers, a team which
was compiled of ECU alumni.
The Reapers came out
strong but a strong Pirate de-
fense, led by Rich Hooten, al-
lowed them only a penalty kick
after several toiled sconng at-
tempts. Webb intercepted a pass
to put ECU on the board. Moss'
kick was good and ECU had a 6-
3 lead.
The superior conditioning
of ECU was their advantage as
their lead continued to grow. J
Blair Bvrd rushed a penalty play,
then passed to Mark Grant for
another Pirate try. The kick was
good.
McCain managed to
strengthen the ECU lead when
he scored in the corner of the try
zone. Stephenson also made a
penalty kick. ECU won 19-3, and
retained bragging rights in
Greenville.
After a short break, the Pi-
rates took the field against their
sister club. Cape Fear. ECU be-
gan on a positive note when
Webb scored early. Moss' kick
was perfect and ECU had a 6-0
lead.
Fear would not let this last
long though. They scored twice
beforehalftime to regain thelead,
8-6.
After the five minute inter-
mission, ECU againcaptured the
lead. Aaron Back blocked a kick
and Mark Grant recovered it for
a try. Moss' kick was again good
and the Pirates led 12-8.
After this, Fear's experience
began to shine through. They
slowly backed ECU down the
field and finally tied the game at
12-12. They then continued to
make a penalty kick, score again
and make their conversion.
See Rugby, page 10
Baseball team opens season with wins over PSU, Campbell
By Chip Kline
Staff Writer
ECU'S baseball team began die season with a 5-3
victory over Pembroke State at Harrington Field Sunday.
'It wasgood to finally play a game that counted in the
standings said junior first baseman Lee Kushner.
The Pirates opened up the scoring by pushing across
three runs in the bottom of the first
John Sehultz (0-1) walked two of the first three batters
te faced and Wtanotltok thetese
to force in Dave Leisten to make the score 14. Then Grynn
Beck singled home Heath Clark and Pat Watkins to give
ECUa301ead.
Tom Outen singled home two in the topof the third to
cut the Pirate lead to 3-2, then Jay ShorweU singled in Greg
Kealey to tie the score at 3-3 in the sixth inning
TrePiratesralliedinthebottroftheiraMn
ingaOTriplettdbiibteandawalktoStarcUMorse,Pat
Barber doubled in Trtptett with the game winning run. It
was Barbs' firatoDtegiate hit.
It wasacurvebair BarbeT said. "I stuck with it and
strriori it to left-center'
Leisten added an RBI single in the eighth to finish off
the scoring for the Pirates.
khnmB�ck(l-0)pcked upthe win withtwoand two-
thirds innings in relief of Jim Ambrosius. LvteHartgrove
pitched a perfect ninth inning to record the save.
Photo by Da i
The ECU baseball team opened the 1992 season with wins over Pembroke State and CarnpbeM. The Pirates,
looking to defend their 1991 Colonial Athletic Association Championship, will host UNC-Greensboro today.

By Chip Kline
Staff Writer
The three essentials to winning a baseball game are
good pitching, solid hitting and defense. ECU Head
baseball coach Gary Overton saw all three Wednesday
at Harrington Field.
Behind an outstanding pitching effort from Jim
Ambrosius and Lyle Hartgrove, ECU defeated the
Campbell Camels 5-2 to improve their record to 2-0 on
the season.
"Our pitching was excellent today Overton said.
"It (pitching) has carried us so far this season
After escaping an early bases-loaded jamm the first
inning, the Pirates took a 2-0 lead in the bottom of the
second. Sophomore shortstop Chad Triplett's first
homerun of the year off Campbell starter Mike Griffin
(0-1) gave ECU a 2-0 lead.
The Pirates struck for three more runs in the fourth
inning. Pat Watkins was hit by a pitch with the bases
loaded to force in Stancil Morse. A single by Tom Move
scored Heath Clark and Watkins to give the Pirates a
comfortable 5-0 lead.
Still plagued by incortsistencies at the plate, ECU
has had to rely mainly on their pitching so far this
season.
" We need to put more pressure on the opposition
See Campbell, page 10
I





10 Slic �aat (Carolinian February 20, 1991
Rugby
Continued from page 9
Record
Continued from page 9
The game and tournament
ended with the score Ope Fear 21,
ECU I-1 Cape Fear took Ural place
and the Pirates were runners up.
1 his was ,i disappointing loss
tor EC1 but they showed a great
deal of heart and had a lot more
Campbell
depth than anyone expected. ECU
managed to out-score their com-
bined opponents 82-28.
I he Pirates are now 4-1-1 for
the year. Hie team will travel to
George Mason this week in an ef-
fort to improve their record.
Continued from page 9
points, 10 rebounds and CyDonnell
added 12 points (8-10 free throws).
ClXinnell continues to lead the
C AA m assists with over six per
game. I"he average keeps her in the
lop 20 in the NCAA.
Toma Coley remains second in
the league in steals. Hargrove is
tirst in rebounds, seventh in scoring
�id sixth in field goal accuracy
Smith also isamong league leaders,
at fifth in scoring, fifth in rebound-
ing and seventh in field goal accu-
racy.
ECU has two home games left
on their schedule with the first Sat-
urday at 7 p.m. against Old Domin-
ion. ODU and Richmond are Kit
tlmg tor second place behind the
l.adv Pirates.
offensively 0 erton s�id. "1 think
that, in time, the Kits will come
around tor us
Campbell got their runs in the
eighth inning on .in Andv Priest
KIM single. and he later scored on a
Pirate throwing error.
�Vmbrosuis 11 0) piU hod si m
nines, giving up ihnv hits while
strikinc out live 1 vie Harterove
closed the game by strikingout four-
it five batters to record his second
saveol the season.
c enter fielder Dave Leisten was
lost indefiniM. with a severe ankle
sprain
The Pirates take to the field
again this afternoon at 3 p.m. as
they host the UNC-Greensboro
Spartans .it 1 lamngton Field.
The East Carolinian
Read by more Italian Restaurant
owners than any other newspaper.
Slje ?�afit (Sardinian
is now accepting applications for
Assistant Sports Editor.
Apply in person at the office no
later than 5 p.m Feb. 21,1992.
Reporting experience is
preferred, but not necessary.
MILLIONS of DOLLARS
LEFT
UNCLAIMED
$ y y
$$$
During 1991, over
$85,000,000
in Scholarship awards
went unclaimed
I fow can you gel your share of many
more millions a . e foi 1992 93???
i ill details
WITIIOI 7 COST m OBLIGATION
call (toll free)
College Funds Unlimited
1-800-756-5054
IMMEDIATELY!
This Week's Entertainment
Fri Feb 21
Homeboy Madhouse
Sat Feb 22
Hootie &
The Blowfish
513 Cotanchc
(located across from UBE)
758-0080
Hours
MonThurs. 11 am-3pm
Fri. 11am-2am
Sat. 9pm-2am
ATTIC
752-73031209 E. 5th St.
The. . 1 The
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Every Wed.
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Thursday
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&H 32 oz Draft � .990 liuhballs � .99e Memberships
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$2.00 32 oz Draft
Saturday
The Battery
The Tribute to Metallica
$2.00 32 oz Draft
RECYCLING BASH!
in front of Student Stores on Monday, Feb. 24
Bring your recyclables
Read it and Recycle it
STRESSED OUT?
The Student Union's Coffeehouse Committe Presents:
ALICIA QUINTANO
PERFORMANCE ARTIST I
STORYTELLER
'Exceptionally entertaining"
North Shore Magazine
Then don't miss the Health Promotion and
Well-Being Kick-Off presentation!
DATE: February 25, 1992
TIME: 8:00pm
PLACE: THE UNDERGROUND
Nilin Y
The East Carolinian
Sure, we make mistakes, but so does the New York Times
I
Donald A. Tubesing, PhD,
nationally recognized ex-
pert in stress manage-
ment & wellness promo-
tion, will be the featured
keynote speaker.
"HOOKED ON HELPING - THE CAREGIVERS DI-
LEMMA" - Thursday, Feb. 20,3:30-4:30 pm, MSC Great
Room: This session will teach students preparing for care-
giving professions how to manage their everyday chal-
lenges, maintain their personal vitality, and continue to
derive personal satisfaction from their work.
"STAYING EVERGREEN" - Thursday, Feb. 20, 7:30-
8:30 pm, MSC Great Room: Attend this session and learn
how to carefully use your time and energy resources for
maintaining and, as necessary, regaining your personal
vitality! This session will be open to faculty, staff, students
and the community.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 757-6793





Title
The East Carolinian, February 20, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 20, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.860
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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