The East Carolinian, February 11, 1992






Rock the Boat
College voter apathy is a disturbing sign of the times.
4
The cradle will fall
The Hand that Rocks the Cradle fails to satisfy.
9
�fte iEant (Eartfltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.66 No.8
Tuesday, February 11,1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
8 Pages
. ' '
mM1 cm�Jes
Students locked out
Hiram College, a small liberal arts col-
lege, has a new, innovative approach to
handling delinquent tuition accounts.
Any student at the school with an over-
due tuition bill has been locked out of their
dormitory room.
The school warned students last fall of
the decision after estimating the unpaid bills
totaled hundreds of thousands of dollars.
Many students returned this year to find
the locks on their rooms had been changed.
In order for these students to get keys to the
new locks, they had to work out payment
plans with school officials.
Basketball player sues
A Syracuse University basketball player
is suing the NCAA for $13 million because
he was ruled ineligible to play for Syracuse
after a recruiting violation that took place
while he was still in high school.
Conrad McRae, a junior at Syracuse, said
theNCAA'sback-and-fortheligibility rulings
on his status at Syracuse caused him mental
anguish, loss of television exposure, distrac-
tion from academic studies, loss of starting
position and reputation and the opportunity
to play Division I basketball.
McRae was ruled ineligible Nov. 19, and
his challenge of the ruling caused him to miss
Syracuse's first six games.
Shortly after that, McRae was ruled cli-
gible again after the NCAA Eligibility Corn-
mi tteechanged itsoriginal rulingand restored
his right to play.
Officer accused of murder
A campus police officer at the L'ni versi ty
of Toledo has been charged with murdering
a 19-year-old student.
Police found Melissa Ann Herstrum's
body face down in the snow about one mile
from the university's main campus, Scott
Park. Herstrum had been shot 14 times.
Officer Jerry Hodge, 22, was arrested
and charged with the murder. Herstrum's
roommate said the victim left their apart-
ment Jan. 26 after she received a phone call
and never returned.
Athlete wins award
A student from Vassar College recently
won the Honda Inspiration Award at the
Collegiate Woman Athlete of the Year din-
ner.
Tracy Nichols, a cross country runner, is
the second athlete in the school's history to be
named an All-American.
She suffers from pandysautonomia, a
disease that destroys nerve cells and blocks
perspiration. "She has drive and goal Vassar
coach Ron Stonitsch said.
Stonitschdeveloped a "dousing" system
in order to keep Nichol's body temperature
under control. "I had her wearing wet sweat-
bands, headbands Stonitsch said. I would
station the men's team down the track with
quarts of water to throw on her. She'd look
like a wet puppy
Football player arrested
A University of Minneapolis football
player was arrested in his dorm room after he
twice failed to appear in a Pennsylvania court
on criminal charges.
Running back Tom Reid, 19, of Midland,
Pa was allegedly in a car from which shots
were fired at two men in another car. No one
was injured in the incident that
took place in Liverpool, Ohio.
Police said Reid is accused with supply-
ing the gun and the car, conspiring to commit
murder, as well as corruption of minors,
buying and using alcohol andcarryingagun
without a license.
CompMod by Elizabeth Shlmrrwl from CPS
�nd other collage newspapers.
Inside Tuesday
Crime SceneJ 2
Classifieds3
Editorial4
Satire5
Entertainment6
Sports77
Medical professor demands damages
By Matt Jones
Managing Editor
The Pitt County Sheriff's
department delivered a lawsuit
and a civil summons to the
Chancellor and various UNC
system officials which charges
retaliation against a medical
schwl employee.
Richard McReynolds, assis-
tant professor of pathology, filed
the complaint which demands
"injunctive relief with demand
for jury trial and motion for pre-
liminary injunction
The lawsuit charges that the
university retaliated against
McReynoldsby not following the
proper procedure used to deter-
mine an employee's tenure.
In his lawsuit, McReynolds
charges that the reason for the
rejection of his tenu re stems f mm
actions he took speaking out
against certain unfair university
actions concerning equal oppor-
tunity employment and access
to public records.
The lawsuit demands
$20,000 in punitive damages for
the university's alleged retalia-
tion and an unspecified amount
for McReynolds' loss of salary if
hisemployment is terminated at
the end of his 1991-92 term in
May.
The civil summons issued
to each of the defendants in the
la wsu it requires each individual
to reply to the charges presented.
"The university's response
will be submitted to court in ac-
cordance with the rules of civil
procedure" University Attorney
Ben Irons said. He added that
responses must be returned
within 30 days.
The foundation of the law-
suit centers around a combina-
tion of offenses which break
certain federal and state laws.
The first claim for relief is
based upon North Carolina
General Statute 126-83, the so-
called "whistle-blower" statute.
The law protectsa state employee
from retaliation after informing
authorities about the wrong-
doings of state agencies. The
lawsuit states that McRevnolds
informed theEqualOpportunity
Employment Commission abou t
a violation of code made bv
J
Chancellor Richard Eakin and
Dean of the Medical School
James Hallock.
The second claim for relief
points to a contractual obliga-
tion allegedly breached by the
univcrsitvand the University of
North Carolina system as a
whole. McReynolds' lawsuit
states that the defendants did
not follow contractual obliga-
tions by refusing to accept his
previousemployment at another
medical school which it coupled
with his service at ECU would
have entitled him to the protec-
tions of tenure.
"Unless enjoined by this
court, said breach will result in
irreparable injury to the plain-
tiff the lawsuit states.
The third claim for relief
refers to the Fi rst Amendment of
the United States constitution.
Specifically, the lawsuit states
that a written grievance submit-
ted by McReynolds about the
actions of Hallock and Eakin is
protected by the amendment
which guarantees "the people
the right to petition government
for redress of grievances
The fourth claim tor relief
centers around the North Caro-
lina Constitution which also
See Lawsuit, page 2
Minorities encourage student involvement
Students discuss minority issues in forum
By Christie Lawrence
Staff Writer
Student involvement was
the answer to many of the prob-
lemsand issues discussed Feb.5
at the minority forum held by
the Eta N'ii Chapter of Alpha Phi
Alpha. Reginald Booker, pro-
gram chair, and Steve Holmes
presented 10 issues facing the
minority student body.
'The basis for the forum was
to come to terms with our-
selves Holmes said. "We want
to make some changes on cam-
pus, but we need people to step
up and help us
Ronald Speier, dean of stu-
dents, encouraged the students
to seek positions on SCA and
other campus organizations so
the minority student body will
be represented and heard.
"If you motivate yourselves
in the same way that you have
tonight, you will get someone
elected Speier said.
One of the issuesdiscussed
related to the student's dissatis-
faction with the Cultural Cen-
ter. The center, designated for
minorities, isone of the smallest
buildingsoncampusand needs
to be renovated, according to
the students.
"1 think we should just for-
get about the present building
and try to relocate and open a
new Cultural Center by next
fall Speier said agreeing with
the complaint. Speier's sugges-
tion was accepted and a com-
mittee will be formed to put
together a search for a new
building.
Those present at the forum
were also concerned with their
inability to receive SGA fund-
ing.
Speier's response was to
encou rage the grou p to seek po-
sitions on the SGA so the mi
norities will have representa-
tion.
"Thisgroupal ways swings
the Homecoming Queen elec-
tions he said. "I'd just like to
see that same kind of pulling
together in all areas
The student's concern with
improving integration on cam-
pus was also expressed at the
forum.
Wanda James, assistant di-
rector of admissions, also gave
the same advice that the group
had heard a number of times
that night: get involved.
According to James, the
minority students are her best
recruiters for increasing the
number of minority students at
ECU.
"Go back to your high
schools and speak about ECU
James said.
In order to recruit more mi-
norities, Speier encouraged the
minority students to become
involved in the orientation pro-
cess. "Let yourselves be seen in
positions such as tour guides
during orientation he said.
Professors, members of the
minority student body and
members of leadership organi-
zations were invited to this fo-
rum.
Some students present at
the meeting were disappointed
to see that SGA members did
not come after giving verbal
Photo by Ksvin Amos � ECU Photo Lab
Professors, students and leadership organizations discussed 10
issues facing the minority student body during a torum Wednesday.
confirmation of their presence
to Booker. "We are here to talk
about issues that we wanted
SGA to hear, " one student at
the forum said. "I'm very dis-
appointed to see that they did
Administration
uses funds for
pay-offs, not staff
By Matt Jones
Managing Editor
Condom Sense
Photo by Jill Chorry� ECU Photo Lab
Freshman Shane Smithplays the "Count the Condoms"game. Student Health Center's Love
Shack booth will be open Thursday from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. in front of the Student Stores.
With the wiretapping
scandal pay-offs now totaling
over $138,000, some people
may be interested to know
what part of the university's
budget dolesout the settlement
money.
Dan Bishop, university
comptroller, said that the
money comes from state allo-
cated funds, not from student's
tuition.
Bishop said the funds are
taken from employment sala-
ries.
"The money for the settle-
ments comes from unfilled
positions Bishop said. "We
have in the neighborhood of
120 unfilled staff positionsand
non-teaching positions
Bishop said that the aver-
age salary for a university job
around $23,000 to $24,000.
With a total of over
$138,000 in wiretapping
settlements, the university has
spent the equivalent of sala-
ries of more than five posi-
tions.
Bishop said no money ex-
ists in the budget solely for the
See Pay-offs, page 2
Fantasy organization challenges residence hall policy
By Julie Roscoe
Assistant News Editor
The Science Fiction Fantasy
Organization challenged the
Resident Education policy of
prohibiting psychological games
in the residence halls during the
SGA meeting Monday.
Karen Greenwell, president
of the Science Rction Fantasy
Organization, referred to the
policy printed in theof ficiaJ guide
for students residing on campus,
Living Spaces.
The policy states, "Psycho-
logical games such as Ouija
boards, 'Dungeons and Drag-
ons and 'Killer' are all prohib-
ited in the residence halls
'This is a loose term �
psychological games Resident
Education is trying to prove there
is a correlation between playing
games and having disturbances
in the dorms Greenwall said.
"No court in the land has been
able to prove this
Greenwell explained games
such as "Star Trek Trump"
and "Monopoly" are all ex-
amples of board games that use
the mind and arc therefore re-
stricted from the dorms.
"1 see the reason for a policy
against ha vlng physically violent
games in the dorms; however, I
don't see where board games
come under enough of a threat
that they should be banned
Greenwell said.
An amendment was intro-
duced suggesting a change for
this policy which is written in
the residence hall guidelines
under the head "Disruptive Be-
havior
The amendment states:
"We, the SGA, oppose the ban
on psychological games in the
dorm, and wish the policy to be
amended only to restrict physi-
cally violent games in the
dorms
"I came to the SGA because
you are the leaders of the student
body and more of a voice to
overturn this rule than my or-
ganization Greenwell said.
The suggestion was made
on the floor that a resident edu-
cation representative should
speak in reference to the rule
and the legislative body voted to
send the amendment to the
Student Welfare committee.
"Instead of making an im-
med iatedecision today, thebody
voted to send it to committee so
the committee could review it
and send out a recommenda-
tion said Courtney Jones,
speaker of the house.
The treasury report given
See SGA, page 2





2 (Bl?e �a0t(Barol!nian February 11, 1992
CRIMfiSPENE
Flag reported missing from Joyner
Library; could not be located
Feb. 3
2021�Scott Hall: Responded to report of subject with weapon
Weapon not found.
0700�Joyner Library: Advised thai the flag is missing.
1415�White Hall: Checked out subjects in stalled elevator. On
duty electrician called.
14W GlUll Classroom building: Stopped vehicle west of
building for not wearing safety belt and having too many passengers
in the vehicle. Student given verbal warning.
1553�Wright Circle: Vehicle Mopped lor investigation. Subject
verbally warned.
Feb. 4
1990�Charles and 11th streets: Vehicle Stopped for driving
without headlights on. Operator given verbal warning.
2109' belk I lall: Checked out lire slarm. Same reset.
1386 Bilk Hall: Checked on loud subjects at the basketball
court. Subjects advised to leave area.
2340�Slay Hall: Checked the basketball court area lor loud
subjects. Siime unfounded
2344�Tyler Hall: Investigated area northofhall fbrloud subjects.
Subjects located and advised to leave area.
0006�Speight building: Checked i suspicious male subject.
Subject identified and released
1X120�Umstead Hall: Checked five suspicious subjects. No
action taken.
0900�Campus Police: Advised that l lag could not be located to
be raised north of joyner library.
0814�New East Hank Reference of tire alarm. Employee reset
alarm.
0954�Police Department: Report ot damage to personal prop-
erty report.
1222�Carretl 1 lall: Checked out trespassers in the ana. Subject
left the area.
1245�14th and Charles streets: Vehicle stopped. Passenger
arrested for having a weapon on state property. The motorist given
a Slate citation for displaying fictitious tags.
1342 14th and Charles streets: Took subject in custody to
magistrate's office.
0014 White Hall: Assisted in locating a male subject. Subject
gone on arrival.
114u Music Building: Vehicle Stopped for spoedingand failure
to wear safety belt Subjects given state citations.
1205 College Hill Drive: (necked outcommuter tot for report
of minor accident.
1324 Police Department: rook report for larceny.
1529 Police Department: Made damage to personal property
report.
0817 lenkms Art Building Checked out a maintenance prob-
lem.
Crlm� Scene la taken from Official Public Safety Logs.
Lawsuit
Continued from page 1
grants every person freedom of
Speech. The fifth and sixth claim for
relief is based upon the due process
portion of the 14th federal Amend-
ment and the North Carolina Con-
stitution, respectively. The lawsuit
states that by preventing
McKcynolds from the proper pro-
cess for attaining tenure, the uni-
sersity failed to meet the acquire-
ments of due process.
In addition to Eakin and
1 lallock, the defendants in the law-
suit are as follows: The University
of North Carolina and its constitu-
ent institution, PCU;C. D.Spangler
r president of the University of
North Carolina; several members
of the Board ol Trustees and several
membersof the Faculty Promotions
and Tenure Committee.
S�2
Gift Only'
For The
Romantic
At Heart
i i in:
DArVS
l � ' i .? 'loth i )lt).
.1, wiry, Coll'vtihhs.
lon-Sat 10-5
41" Evans St Mall
1 low ntou n
752-1750
i ens plentj of FREE
parking at our rear
entrance off of
('olanch
MkioHtyArls
Amiri Baraka - Pdet
HendixThecire &0ORM.
Object of Beauty
Afed,febl2
Scenes From A Mall
Fri and SatR�x 13-14
The Empire Strikes Back
Suvfeftxl6
� � a � 1
.arenHendh
at&ooPM
Travel:
T A flkn Theme Dinner
MSC Great Roam 6c30RM.
TAftn Kemdhlavvrenoe
Pacific Coast-
Top to Bottom
IhurvFebU
&0OPM
Arts:
lllumina Art
Competition "92
rtryDate Feb. 13-14,2-5d0ORM.
Roam244MSC $3Eryfee,
lsr3Enkies
19,7-900 PM
ECU Goes West!
Fetxtt
Payoffs
Continued from page 1
Classifieds
purpose of judicial settlements.
Therefore the university is forced
to make a "realignment of exist-
ing resources
Due to an executive order, a
hiring freeze exists at the present
time, Bishopsaid. The settlements
are the result of the illegal wire-
tapping which occurred on cam-
pus in the summer 1990. Any
person who finds their voice re-
corded on the written transcripts
of the wiretapping is entitled by
law to a $10,000 settlement.Thus
far, the university has settled with
eight victims of the wiretaps for
around $10,000 each. The univer-
sity granted Brooks Mills, the
employee whose phoneline was
tapped, a settlement of $62,411.
According to Richard Gaskins, the
attorney representing the wire-
tap victims, seven more indi-
viduals are awaiting settlements.
Continued from page 1
Monday by Eric W. Hilliard, SG
treasurer, said that $17,435 ibk-ttfoJ
appropriations for the semester, j
"We'd like to keep SI0,000 in
reserve at the end of the year, whirji
leaves us $7,435 to appropriate
Uilliard said.
The Feb. 3 SCA meeting mtro,
duced a resolution fordarifkatioJ
of election rule requirements fo
class officers.
JOIN US FOB
EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA S
HOTTEST
TPCDLP fl(D LPA1IB1E1
FEATURING
THE HOTTEST SOI XD AROVNB
"COLD SWEAT(V
sfti
AT
&
0&
PEPPER'S NIGHT CLUB
THURSDAY, FEB. 18, 199
8 PJH. UNTIL
MO ADMISSION FEE - - PARTY FREE AT
THE AREAS HOTTEST PARTY SPOT
� u id ust. ntqi IRE� WIST BE XI
PLEASE KO MANS, TENNIS SHOES OB SHOBTS
TOP SECURITY
HS. N.tiBEENE ST. eStSCNVBULB. NC 757-0715
Across from the Greene St. Bridge; the old King ond Queen bldg
NATIONAL CONDOM WEEK
February 10th -15th is National Condom Week. The Centers for Disease
Control estimate that 3 in 1,000 college students are infected with HIV, the virus
that causes AIDS. Barring abstinence, condoms are the next most effective means
of preventing AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. Take care of yourself
and your partner. Use "condom sense participate in National Condom Week.
"Sexual Myths & Facts"
Tuesday, February 11th � Room 244 � Mendenhall Student Center -5 00 pm
"Condom Sense"
Wednesday, February 12th � Room 244 � Mendenhall Student Center � 5:00pm
'The Love Shack"
Monday, February 10th � Mendenhall Dining Area � 11 00- 2.00
& Thursday, February 13th � Student Store � 10:00 -2:00
The University Media Board
editors and general managers
The University Media Board is seeking fulltime
students interested in serving in the following
stipended posts for the 1992-1993 academic year:
? Editor Expressions minority students magazine ($175month)
? Editor � The Rebel fine arts magazine ($175month)
G General Manager - The East Carolinian student newspaper
(estimated 1991-1992 stipend � $4,700)
G General Manager - Photo Lab ($175month)
? General Manager - WZMB student radio station ($200month)
? Day Student Representative to the Media Board (no stipend)
All applicants should have a 2.5 grade point average
Contact: University Media Board
2nd Floor, Student Publications Building
Telephone 757-6009
Deadline for Applications: 5 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19
fOK KIM
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
$162.50 per month, 12 utilities. Near
campus. Available immediately. Call
758-3311
ROOMMATE NEEDED. 12 block
from campus, 13 utilities, SI25 a
month. Call 758-8225 anytime.
FEMALE; Share "must see" house
and room free, plus utilities, private
room,$175 plusutilitiesdeposit both.
Call Scott 830-1461 anytime
LUXURY SUITE A seventh story
luxury suite hanging over the white
sand and clear water of South
Florida's most beautiful beach. Com-
pletely furnished, sleeps fivein unbe-
lievable luxury; minutes from Jai-
Alai, airport, horses, dogs, Ft. Lau-
derdale Beach, Miami Action. $���
for week 37 - 314 at Hollywood
Beach Tower. Call (305)472-2870.
FEMA LE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Non-smoker, upperclassman, 3 bed-
room town house $180 per month, 1
3 utilities. Call 355-1075.
HOUSE FOR RENT: 4 bedrooms, 2
baths, near campus, air conditioned,
across from Woodiawn Park.
EFFICIENCY AT RINGGOLD
TOWERS: Sublease imn
Great view and location, by
Mendenhall. Fully furnished S a
month. Call 752-6993.
A Beautiful Place 10 Ljc
�All New
�And Ready To Rent-
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5ih Street
�Located Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Center
�Acrois From Highway Patrol Station
Limited Offer - $330 a month
Contact J T or Tommy Wiiiiamj
756-8!5 or 830-193"
Office open - Ape 8. 12-5 30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS'
Qcao and qaet one bemoan Auruitoed tfjai'jum.
eoerfef!Y ml, troe �u;Lrn: �u.Tn f:i
estate TV Coaptel i � j.ei r Jj�C mush, i
monhe� MOBILE HOME RENTALS-cosptaa
ffnghct. AparVBRXwbsiotfckhciTMis Ajw�Gnteni
near Brack VaUry Country Cob.
Contact J.T orTommv Williams
756-7815'
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for 1
bedroom. 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FOK SA
SEIZED CARS:
wheelers, motorhorr
DEA. Available you
8(X)-338-3388 Ext. C-
FORSALE:Macintd
8-meg RAM; 120-
$3500 firm. Will trad
or date with that en
commercial .
Stephen.
FOR SALE: Quea
boxsprings, and fr
eluded SI00. CaJl
message.
FOR SALE: IBM PC ,
Color monitor, So
New Joysticks, "hi
Perfect for typing p
Call Armand I
FOR SALL '
clarinet. Gotx
Call Coni it -
SERVICES O
FUN LOVING M
has optr. i
year 11
cated rtc�I I
758478 �
HELP WA
MAKE $5001000
ing envelopes at hi
i h S.A.S.E. pi
Employers. 2301 Ke
M 88001.
FAST FLND-R
GRAM: Fraternititf
dent clubs. Earn uj
week. Plus receivi
vourself. And a M
calling 1-800-932-
YOUTH SOCCER I
Green vilie Reaeatii
partmer.t is recru q
nme youth indoor;
the spnng indoor I
Applicants mm
knowledge 11
have the ability anc
with youth. Appi.
to coach young M
soccer fundamental
3-7 p.m. with som
end coaching Th:s
from the first o; Mij
May. Salary rates
Annojunceme
1990 BUCCANEER!
Did you miss it? Some are still avail-
able at the Buccaneer office or the
Media Board Office at any time. Of-
fices are located on the 2nd floor of
Student Publications Building (across
from Joyner Library1).
imml"nizatlqn:
clinicsatthe
stitnt health center
Feb. 12, 1-7 p.m Feb. 19,8:30-11:30
a.m. and 14 p.m Feb. 21,8:30-11:30
a.m. and 14 p.m.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Attention students: Anyone with a
GP.A. of 3.0 or better who is inter-
ested in Gamma Beta Phi, an honor
fraternity and service organization,
please call Dena Pnce at 931-8282.
RETURNING ADULT
STtmENTS ASSOCIATION
The Returning Adult Students Asso-
ciation is a new organization on cam-
pus. Our goal is to help meet the
social and academic needs of ECU'S
returning adult student population.
All interested students are invited to
attend an organizational meeting on
Thursday, Feb. 6 in GCB Room 3013
at 530 p.m. For more information
call - 757-6882.
NATIONAL CONDOM WEEK
Feb. 10-15is National Condom Week.
The Centers for Disease Control esti-
mate that 3 in 1)00 college students
are infected with HTV, the virus mat
causes AIDS. Barring abstinence,
coradctnsare the most eftective means
of preventing AIDS and other sexu-
ally transmitted diseases. Take care
of yourself and your partner. Use
"condom sense participate in Na-
tional Condom Week. The Peer
Health Educa: I
theSGAarespor;xi
during the wo �
this paper I rm
coJo" may be
Student Hea
dozer
eastcarqU
Members of East
should plan to
Fnendstothearr.i
Cooking Baking tc
day, Feb. 11 from
Johnston Street
event. Call your D
for more informarj
LNTEj
SKILLS W
The Career Strvioj
duct a workshop i
2 p.m. and VVednJ
p.m.intheBloxtor
hour sessions wi'J1
on what one shot
ing and foilowir.j!
interview. A ideq
rials will be sharei
In support of Natid
(Feb. 10-15), the
tors in conjunchc
sponsoring the
Monday Feb. 101
p.m. and the pr
and Facts" on Ti
p.m. in room 244!
get educational
give-aways. Usel
participate in
Week.
The Pre-Physica!
hold its third or
on Feb. 11 at 8l"





jgei
SGA
Classifieds
�!?� icaat (Earultntan
February 11,1992
is entit ed in
tlement lhu�
er
Continued from page 1
Monday by Eric W. Hilhard, SG
treasurer said that $17,435 is lenfoj
appropriations tor the semester.
We ,1 like to keep $10,000 ir
set i .it theendoi theyear, whit
vas leaves us 17,435 to appropriate
Hilliardsa d
b , SGA meeting mtrc
olution for clarificatior
'lection rule requirements fo�j
aSSOtl
IS FOR
HflROUVS
TEST
HIM.
�I I� 1KOI D
I'Y
WEAT"�;
I�HT CLl B
ll EB- 13, 1992
TII
ii. P � RTYfREEAI
KSTPIRTYSPOT
IKI iHIM at i
Kms hhoih iik siioirs
� I-
: i rity
:i( II I E, 7-7-07 1 i
the old Kinq and Queen bldg
ndom Week. The Centers for Disease
Jtudents are infected with HIV, the virus
lioms are the next most effective means
imitted diseases. Take care of yourself
participate in National Condom Week.
hs & Facts"
JMendenhall Student Center -5:00 pm
i Sense"
Mendenhail Student Center � 5:00pm
e Shack"
nhall Dining Area � 11:00- 2:00
Student Store-10:00-2:00
Media Board
general managers
is seeking fulltime
ig in the following
2-1993 academic year:
students magazine ($175month)
igazine ($175month)
Carolinian student newspaper
id $4,700)
it ($175month)
ident radio station ($200month)
the Media Board (no stipend)
grade point average
Board
it Publications Building
)09
5 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
$162.50 per month, 12 utilities. Near
campus. Available immediately. Call
758-3311
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 12 block
from campus, 13 utilities, $125 a
month. Call 758-8225 anytime.
FEMALE; Share "must see" house
and room free, plus utilities, private
room, $175 plus utilitiesdeposit both.
Call Scott 830-1461 anytime.
LUXURY SUITE A seventh story
luxury suite hanging over the white
sand and clear water of South
Flonda's most beautiful beach. Com-
pletely furnished, sleeps five in unbe-
lievable luxury; minutes from Jai-
Alai, airport, horses, dogs, Ft. Lau-
derdale Beach, Miami Action. $800
for week 37 - 314 at Hollywood
Beach TowerA Call (305)472-2870.
FEMALEROOMMATEWANTED:
Non-smoker, upperclassman, 3 bed-
room town house $180 per month, 1
3 utilities. Call 355-1075.
HOUSE FOR RENT: 4 bedrooms, 2
baths, near campus, air conditioned,
across from Woodlawn Park.
EFFICIENCY AT RINGGOLD
TOWERS: Sublease immediately.
Great view and location, by
Mendenhail. Fully furnished. S260a
month. Call 752-6993.
()K SAI t
SEIZED CARS: trucks, boats, 4-
wheelers, motorhomes, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available your area now. Call
800-338-3388 Ext. C-5999. �
FOR SALE: Macintosh lid cpu only.
8-meg RAM; 120-meg hard disk.
S3500 firm. Will trade for Faberge egg
or date with that chick in the Pepsi
commercial . 757-0065 ask for
Stephen.
FOR SALE Queen size mattress,
boxsprings, and frame. Sheets in-
cluded $100. Call 758-6947, leave
message.
FOR SALE: IBM PC R (256 KB), IBM
Color monitor, Software (games),
New Joysticks, "Basic" Cartridge.
Perfect for typing papers. Price neg.
Call Armand at 758-4616
FOR SALE Used wooden Le Blanc
clarinet. Good Condition. Price neg.
Call Corrie at 931-7828 or 758-4616.
SEKVICFS OFFERED
FUN LOVING MOTHER: Of one
has opening for one child (over one
year old) in mv home, tor evening
shift. CPK and First Aid trained. Lo-
cated next to park. Call after 3 p.m.
758-4789.
HELP WANTED
I'f-KSONAIS
I'tKSONA. S
A Beautiful PUce 10 Live
�All New
�And Ready To Renf
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 F. 5ih Si reel
�Located Near FCU
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
I .united Offer � $330 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Ape 8. 12-5 30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
Qean and qaen a� bednwen fumiahrd apartment
energy efTa: ana, free water and aw waaheri. drjasra.
cabal TV Couple a- imeiei only J��0 � month. 6
month leaec MOBILE HOME RENT AX5 con plea or
ana. A.perVrBnarain�bUehariva in Ajuatv Garden
near Brook Valky Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for 1
bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
MAKE S500-S1000 WEEKLY: stuff-
ing envelopes at home. Start now!
Rush S.A.S.F. plus $1.00 to Home
Employers, 2301 Kent 8 LasCruces,
NM 88001.
FAST FUND-RAISING PRO-
GRAM: Fraternities, sororities, stu-
dent dubs. Earn up to SI000 in one
week. Plus receive a $1000 boms
yourself. And a free watch just tor
calling 1-800-932-0528 Ext 65.
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation and Parks IV
partment is recruiting 12 to In part-
rime vouth indoor soever coaches for
the spring indoor soccer program.
Applicants must possess some
knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and patience to work
with youth. Applicants must be able
to coach young people ages 5-18 in
soccer fundamentals. Hours arc from
3-7 p.m. with some night and week-
end coaching. This program will run
from the first of March to the first of
Mav. Salary rates start at $4.25 per
hour. For more information, please
call lien lames or Michael Daly at830-
4550.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE; Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 800-
338-3388 Ext. P-3712.
FREE TRAVEL: Air couriers and
cruise ships. Students also needed
Christmas, spring and summer for
amusement park employment. Call
800-338-3388 Ext. F-3464
HELP WANTED: Part-time recep-
tionist needed for surgical practice.
Flexible hours from 7:00 a.m. to 1:00
p.m three to five days a week. For
more information, call Vicky at 758-
431X1.
SPLIT DECISION MALE VOCAL
SEARCH: Audition over the phone.
Call Stephen Patrick (919) 455-0775
or 353-4646. Associate of New Kids
On the Block's producer Maurice
Starr.
TOPLESS DANCERS WANTED:
Playhouse nightclub is Goldsboro,
cash SSS. Call Paul 736-0716 or Sid
735-7713 or Club 731-9962.
HELP WANTED: Valentine help
needed, apply in person at Cynthia's
Flowers- E. HHh St.
EAS1. WORK! EXCELLENT PAY
Assemble products at home. Call toll
free 1-300467-5566 Ext 5920
500-1000 CAMP POSITIONS
AVAILABLE: Stati Referral Services
provides a network of camps, now
hiring, from the "Keys" to Wisc-
Minn. One application reaches all
camps. Applications at Career Ser-
vices - Bloxton House.
PARTY HOUSES- NORTH
MYRTLE BEACH: Welcome groups
of 4-34 people. Group-leader dis-
counts. Call Mvrtle Beach tours 9-4
p.m. (703) 250-2125.
BAHAMAS PARTYCRUlSE:6days
S279! Panama City $99, Padre $199,
Cancun $499, Jamaica $399! Call Jasa
at 758-5165 or Wayne at 757-1369.
CANCUN, CANCUN, CANCUN:
Spring Break,CANCUN, CANCUN,
SpringBrcak,CANCUN,CANCUN,
CANCUN, CANCUN, CANCUN
. (get the hint). Guaranteed lowest
prices. Call Scott or Paul tor more
information at 752-6681
SPRING BREAK '92: Don't pro-
crastinate, sign up now for your trip
to Cancun, Bahamas or South Padre.
Give us a call at 752-6681 and ask for
Scott or Paul.
YOU'VE ONLY GOT ONE WEEK
TO LIVE! DO IT RIGHT! Snng
Break in Jamaica from only $429
Hotel, Air, Transfers, Parties! Sun
Splash Tours 1-600-426-7710.
HEY DOC, Does bo still know? I
know Redoes because the Hilton will
never be the same The past year has
had a lot of ups and downs but it can
onlv get better now. 1 love you baby
but you have to beware of Atlanta's
stairwells. Happy Anniversary Baby!
You'rw my brown eyed boy! Love,
Grace.
CONGRATULATIONS TO
MARIE HOOPER on the office of
Panhel lenic secretary! We'reso proud
of vou! Love, your sisters.
TO ALL SORORITIES: Congratu-
lations on your achievements and
awards at the Panhellenic Banquet!
Love, Delta Zeta.
"PEE WEE" EZZELL In your (wet)
dreams! Lynn.
CHI OMEGA SISTERS: Thanks for
your support. We're glad to call you
our sisters. Love, The 1991-92 Pledge
Class.
ALPHA PHI: Great job at water polo!
Keep up the good work. Love, the
sisters of Alpha Phi.
PI KAPPA PHI: Wednesday was
great, work on your pool and we'll
play another date. Love, Alpha Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS: to all so-
rorities for your awards at the
Panhellenic Banquet. Love, Alpha
Phi.
LEARN TO FLY NOW Aero Sales
flight training. Pitt-Greenville Air-
port. Introductory flight S20. Call
752-1989.
ALPHA PHIS AND PI DELTS:
Thanks for coming out during our
rush. Lets get together. Love, Delta
Chi.
TRI-SIGS: You better watch out, you
better not cry, Thursday nights the
party with Cupid and Delta Chi.
PfKSONALS
t: The past few weeks have been the
greatest. Why don't we giveL'snum-
ber to K? Looks like we won't be
needing them anymore! Thanks for
being such a great study partner-
NOT! By the way, is it 4:30 a.m. yet7
Can't wait for formal and Road Trip
2. Anyway, Happy Valentine's Day
- I'm glad we're spending it together.
Pwooo Pweee! - Mouse. f
KIM MACANGAJhetime'salmost
near! Initiation is nght around the
comer. You're an awesome Lil' sis.
Love your big sis! Zlam, Amy B.
HEY LITTLE ONE! Less than 24
hours to go, then it's good-bye
Christine, Hello Cheryl! Happy 21st,
we love you! All your Homies.
JULIANNE, Get psyched for this
weekend. I luv ya. Your nght hip.
MARY ANN: Hey sweetie, 1 cant
wait till Friday. I hope you're ready
for the big one, 6 months is soon. 1
LOVE YOU! Brad
EYERYBODY READS M
CLASSIFIEDS, because it's the
coolest page in the East Carolinian.
Put in a Personal today! Love. Steve
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
ESEARCH INFORMATION!
Largest Library of Information In U.S. M
t�J7B TOPICS Alt SUBJECTS
Z'QV CM�Q 'set, e�r V'iiA. VC v ceo
WANTED: CHRIS IVEY. For. eat
ing opossum, reckless driving, con-
verting Bowzer into Dice Man, and a
slew of illegal drinking offenses.
Prepare vourself for a stiff sentence!
Happv 21st. Birthday. I love you,
Michelle.
800-351-0222
C H��� B X to R�a�ri.r, "m�ter.
� J7? MM - am not A le AgwaP�0C�
PERSONALS
STUDY ABROAD IN AUSTRA-
LIA: Information on semester, year,
graduate, summer, and internship
programs in Perth, Townsville,
Svdnev, and Melbourne. Programs
start at 53520. Call 1-800-878-3696
SPRING BREAK TO FLORIDA
BEACHES FUN IN THE SUN: 4
Rm. prices. Daytona $149, Panama
Citv $139 Kitchen, waterfront &
Transportation Available Call CM!
at 1-800-423-52O4.
Let the ones vou love know how much you
care vou care about them by sending them
a Love Lines message for Valentine's Day
on Feb. 13 in the East Carolinian. Come by
the office across from the library for more
details.
Deadline is Tuesday. February 11.1992
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTS
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
Hours:
Mon - Fri 8:30-3:00
Announcements
1990 BUCCANEER!
Did you miss it? Some are still avail-
able at the Buccaneer office or the
Media Board Office at any time. Of-
fices are located on the 2nd floor of
Student Publications Building (across
from Joyncr Library).
LMMUNJZAI1QN
CLINICS AT THE
;TT,mFrr HEALTH CENTER
Feb. 12,1-7 p.m Feb. 19,8:30-11:30
a.m. and 14 p.m Feb. 21,8:30-11:30
a.m. and 1-4 p.m.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Attention students: Anyone with a
G.P.A. of 30 or better who is inter-
ested in Gamma Beta Phi, an honor
fraternity and service organization,
please call Dena Price at 931-8282.
RETURNING ADULT
STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
The Returning Adult Students Asso-
ciation is a new organization on cam-
pus. Our goal is to help meet the
social and academic needs of ECU's
returning adult student population.
All interested students are invited to
attend an organizational meeting on
Thursday, Feb. 6 in GCB Room 3013
at 5-30 p.m. For more information
call - 757-6882.
national CONDOM WEEK
Feb. 10-15isNational Condom Week.
The Centers for Disease Control esti-
mate that 3 in 1,000 college students
are infected with HTV, the virus mat
causes AIDS. Barring abstinence,
condoms are the most effective means
of preventing AIDS and other sexu-
ally transmitted diseases. Take care
of vourself and your partner. Use
"condom sense participate in Na-
tional Condom Week. The Peer
Health Educatorsinconjunctionvvith
theSGAarcsponsoringseveral events
during the week. Look for the ad in
this paper for more details. PS. Latex
condoms may be purchased at the
Student Health Pharmacy for S2 a
dozen.
EASiCAROUNA FRIENDS
Members of East Carolina Fnends
should plan to bring their Little
Friends to theannual Valentine's Day
Cooking Baking to be held on Tues-
day, Feb. 11 from 7 p.m9 p.m. on
Johnston Street. This is an optional
event. Call your Director of Services
for more information.
INTERVIEW
SKILLS WORKSHOPS
The Career Services Center will con-
duct a workshop on Friday, Feb. 7 at
2 p.m. and Wednesday, Feb. 12 at 3
p.m. in theBloxton House. Theseone-
hour sessions will include guidance
on what one should do before, dur-
ing and following the employment
interview. A video and printed mate-
rials will be shared with participants.
NATIONAL CONDOM WEEK
In supportof National Condom Week
(Feb. 10-15), the Peer Health Educa-
tors in conjunction with the SGA an?
sponsoring the "Love Shack" on
Monday Feb. 10 from 11 a.m. to 2
p.m. and the program "Sexual Myths
and Facts" on Tuesday Feb. 11 at 5
p.m. in room 244 Mendenhail. Come
get educational materials and free
give-aways. Use "condom sense
participate in National Condom
Week
Mendenhail. We will be voting on
our constitution and club officers.
Please join us. Any questions? Call
Beth at 931-7853.
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student Cen-
ter invites vou to worship with them.
Sunday Masses: 11:30 a.m. and
8:30 p.m. at the Newman Center, 953
E. 10th St Two houses from the
Fletcher Music Building. For more
information contact Fr. Paul Vaeth,
757- 1991.
HOSPITALITY MGMT. ASSOC.
HM A is looking for a responsible and
dedicated person, preferably a Hos-
pitality major, interested in the secre-
tary assistant job for the club. Great
opportunity and lots of fun! Call 931 -
7399 if interested.
ence are encouraged to attend and
find out more about the toughest job
vou'll ever love. For further informa-
tion about overseas opportunities
with Peace Corps contact Holly
Christofferson, Peace Corps Campus
Recruiter, at 757- 4260, or stop by-
Speight 112 Mon. 8-12 p.m and
Thurs. and Fri. 8-4 p.m.
12243
RESIDENT HALL SIGN-UP
All students enrolled Spring Semes-
ter, 1992 will have priority for resi-
dence hall housing for school year
1992-93 if they reserve a space during
sign-up week, Feb. 17-21, 1992. On
campus students will receive infor-
mation regarding the procedures for
sigh-up in their residence hall mail-
boxes. Off-campus students may re-
ceive information from the depart-
ment of University Housing, 201
Whichard Building or call 757-6450.
ERErEalLLIB
The Pre-Physical Therapy Club will
hold its third organizational meeting
on Feb. 11 at 8:30 p.m. in room 244
ORIENTATION
The Career Services office invites se-
niors and graduate students to at-
tend a program designed to acquaint
them with the services available to
them as they prepare to enter the
work force. Included will be registra-
tion and interview sign-up proce-
dures, how to establish a credential
file, and a tour of the Career Services
Center are included. These sessions
will be held in the Bloxton House on
Thursday, Feb. 13 at 3 p.m.
EEAjCiiCQBK
RECRUITING AT ECU
The Peace Corps will be holding an
infonnationSessiononThursdayFeb.
13,inJoynerUbrary,RoomB-04from
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. People with majors
in Teaching, Skilled Trades, Nursing,
Health and Nutrition, Math, and Sci-
OF MUSIC EVENTS
FOR FEBRUARY 11-17.1992
Wednesday, Feb. 12 � School of
Medicine Noon-Hour Concert Series
'Student Showcase" Featuring out-
standing students of the ECU Schooi
of Music G3rody Auditorium, 12:30
p.m free). Friday and Saturday, Feb.
14-15 � ECU Opera Theatre;
CHISTOPHER COLUMBUS by
Jacques Offenbach, Clyde Hiss, Di-
rector (Hetcher Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
For ticket information call ECU Cen-
tral Ticket Office, 757-4788). Sunday,
Feb. 16 � David Oh, cello. Graduate
Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 7, free).
Monday, Feb 17 � Faculty Chamber
Concert, 'The Coastal Winds Quin-
tet" with pianists Paul Tardif and
Alisa Wetherington (Fletcher Recital
Hall, 8:15, free). Dial 7574370 for the
school of music's 24-hour "recorded

calendar
CHISTOPHER COLUMBUS
A zany opera based on the toe-rap-
ping musicof Jacques Offenbach, will
be presented Friday and Saturday,
February 14 and 15'by the ECU Op-
era TheatreunderdirectorClyde Hiss.
Performances begin at 8 p.m. in ECU'S
A. J. Hetcher Recital Hall on 10th
Street. Tickets are S6 (S3 for students,
in advance) and are available at the
ECU Central Ticket Office, 757-4788
or 1-8090-ECU-ARTS.
TIME MANAGEMENT
Gain controloveryour timeand your
life. Leam strategies to cope with the
demands of academics and univer-
sity life on Wednesday February 12
from 3 to 4 p.m. Call counseling Cen-
ter if you have questions at 757-6661.
This session will be in 313 Wright
Building.
INTRODUCTION
TO CAREER EXPLORATION
This program introduces students to
career planning services, assesses ca-
reer development needs and facili-
tates career decision making process
in a systematic manner. Students will
be given the opportunity to take the
Strong Interest Inventory and regis-
ter for follow-up workshop. Tuesday
Feb. 11 from 2-4 p.m. in 313 Wright
building.
recovery, taking care of your needs,
and developing a positive outlook.
This group meets on Wednesday
from 3-4 p.m. in 329 Wnght building.
For more information call the Coun-
seling Center at 757-6661.
MEN'S ISSUES
This group will explore current soci-
ety expectations of men and the pres-
sures men experience. The group will
focus on exposing stereotypes and
redefining what it means to be a man
in light of current ideas about emo-
tional health and well-being. This
group meets on Mondays from 3 to 4
p.m. in 329 Wrightbuilding. Formore
information call theCounseling Cen-
ter at 757-6661.
CATCH ALL OF THE ACTION!
Be a volunteer timer at the CAA
Swimming and Diving Champion-
ships. ECU is hosting the Colonial
Athletic Association Swimming and
Diving Championships Feb. 26, 27,
28, and 29. Timersare needed for Feb.
27, 28 from 10:15 a.m. to 2 p.m. and
from 6:15 to9 p.m. Also Feb. 29, from
10:15 to 2 p.m. and from 5:15 to 830
p.m. Refreshments will be provided
and if three sessions are worked you
will receive a CAA Swimming and
Diving T-shirt. To volunteer please
call Stewart Esposito at 758-8415 or
Matt Malonev at 757-4532.
COUNSELING CENTER
Gay and lesbian SupportGroup. Call
the Counseling Center for details at
757-6661.
TOPING WITH LOSS
This support group is designed for
those who have experienced the loss
of a significant other. The focus will
be on understanding feelings, reac-
tions to loss, how to move toward
laNTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS
Presents Dr. Roy Sieber, associate di-
rector forCollections and Research at
the Smithsonian Institution's Na-
tional Museum of African Art and
Rudv Professor of Fine Arts at mdi-
ana University in a lecture on "Afri-
can Art in the Cycle of Life The
lecture will be held Thursday Feb. 13,
1992 at Jenkins Fine Arts Auditorium
at 7 p.m.





�l?e
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
You'll Get Nothing And Like It
Accusations become America's truth
By Parker
Editorial Columnist
Jennifer Wardrep, Www Editor
Jit if Roscoe, Asst. Neivs Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Dana Dantelson, Ami. Entertainment Editor
Michafi. Martin, Sports Editor
MARGI MoRIN, AS9$. Sports Editor
Jfff Bfcker, C(ypy Editor
Bi AIR Skinner, Copy Editor
Richard Hasei.rig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Moaer
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Steven Ollice, Classified Advertising Technician
Stephen Schaubach, Systems Engineer
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Jean Caraway, Advertising Technician
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday The masthead editorial in each edition
is the opmion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Utters should be
limited to ISO words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The Ea.st Carolinian reserves the tight to edit or reject letters
for pMicmkm. Utters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C
2785S 4893. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, February 11, 1992
Voting establishes control of future
typically, one can count on The F.at
� to repeat certain themes in its
editorial capacity, despite the turnover of
political sympathies witheaiehchangeofstall
(and no, this does not mean wiretapping).
Each year the newspaper stresses the impor-
tance of students becoming involved with
their academic environment, usually about
the time SC.A elections roll around. Letters
pour in begging people to involve them-
selves. We all regurgitate cliches such as
"vour vote does count and much pleading
is made towards prodding potential voters
to expend the energy to make sure someone
remembers to bring their student D. to cam-
pus.
Lverv once in a while an election that
reallv matters draws near. Last vear Harvey
Cantt challenged the eternal senator, Jesse
lelms, and voters turned out in record num-
bers. Many college students remembered
their lessons learned from campus politics,
and ignored the whole affair. Many more
found themselves caring about issues they
had never seriously considered, and even
campaigning for candidates without first
checking to see what their parents thought.
But still more found themselves finallv inter-
ested m contributing to their government,
only to discover that the desire to vote means
nothing when the effort to register for voting
is not made. In essence, those eager voters
didn't bring their student I.Ds.
It is a constant that the age group 18-24 in
general does not see how their vote makes any
difference. Proponents of the young vote at-
test that the body politic likes things that wav,
M younger voters who have not settled into
the conventional process may throw some
new elements into the works, and "throw the
nwals out While its probably more true that
vounger voters are just lazy and too self-cen-
ter ed to become more aware of the power
struggle around them, that is still a good moti-
vating argument to spur potential voters.
Now, the next big chance to make the differ-
ence is coming. The line-up of Democratic
potentials looks more promising than the dis-
(rga ni ed lot ot 198ft, who appeared way out of
touch with the country's needs at the time. One
thing that Clinton, Tsongas, Kerrey, Harkin
and even lerrv Brown have in common are that
thev are addressing issues that are relevant and
ones the people want to hear about. So far, fluff
issues such as flag-burning are not being con-
sidered seriously, as they were at the time, and
definite answers are being demanded and
given. The economy is not in good shape as it
has been during past election times, so the
incumbents are not the shoe-ias that they have
been in recent years. For Republicans who
want tobeeven more conservative, there is Pat
Buchanan.
And now here is our forewarned plea. The
atmosphere for political change has not been
this favorable in a long time. The college-age
group is sizable and easily capable of making
the difference in the up-coming presidential
election. When one formerly indifferentperson
makes the effort to get involved, then it is a
certaintv that this new voter has counterparts
all over the country, prompted by whatever
conditions made the idea of voting plausible.
Yes, its still a cliche, but you can make a differ-
ence in a race that matters more than any other
toour country. Lven if you do not want change,
you mav stili have to become involved to en-
sure that stance.
But none of that is going to matter if you
neglect to register.
Get off Bill Clinton's back.
That seems to be the general
sentiment of the American public
where the governor of Arkansas is
concerned, even among many Repub-
licans. If Clinton and his wife have
reconciled their marital problems,
then the heck with what Gennifer
Flowers and The Star say. Who ever
listened to what someone who spells
Jennifer with a "C" and a tabloid that
regularly features UFO exposes had
to say anyway?
Yet now that this reaction is
surfacing, the Skeleton Excavation
Crew is unearthing evidence that
Clinton avoided Vietnam by joining
the ROTC and then continuing col-
lege. This too may be shrugged off by
the public. As no one is particularly
proud of our entire involvement in
Vietnam, many people may not blame
young Clinton for wanting to be in
school more than having his you-
know-what (to borrow from Ceorge
Bush) shot off. Having lost a leg does
not make Bob Kerrey a better candi-
date than Bill Clinton.
For the most, none of the larger
criticisms leveled upon Clinton are
relevant to whether he will make a
good president or not According to
opinion polls, voters don't think they
areeither. But as the New Hampshire
primaries impend, the pertinence ot
these credibility charges do not fig-
ure in as much as the simple tact that
they exist at all.
What may be the largest con-
sideration among Democrats is the
likelihood that their candidate will
continue to be an easy target for muck-
rakers. And in this, eventuality
Clinton will losehiscomtortableplace
in the polls due to the kind of specu-
lation performed at the horsetracks
by gamblers, rather than due to the
public's honest opinion of him.
What this indicates is a funda-
mental dysfunction in the American
psyche that even our ever-critical
friends the Japanese haven't pointed
out yet � we sim ply don't care about
the truth of things, to the extent that it
involves any effort. While teachers
struggle to convince students the need
for thorough documentation of
sources in their research work, the
student, like the rest of us, just can't
see the problem with making an un-
founded statement. Whether an accu-
sation is factual or relevant is unim-
portant;oncemadeit'sout there, good
as true. Though a jury found William
KennedvSmith innocentof rape, heis
branded as a rapist for life. Whether
he actually committed the crime is
irrelevant.
The charge of rape itself was
enough to convince many, instantly,
that Smith had raped. Ironically,
throngs of people surround thecourt-
room where Mike Tyson stands trial
for the same charge, cheering their
boxing champion and expressing
hope that he is acquitted despite a
well-publicized history of showing
violence towards his ex-wite
This is another syndrome that
was evinced by our attitiidi-Mards
television evangelists We as a public
want our villains to turn out to be
good guys underneath and our icons
of purity to reveal themselves as
rogues
Whatever strange subconscious
agenda we have, it is not servicing us
as a nation very well. The power of
tingerpointing is what allowed some-
one as ridiculous as Joe McCarthy to
ruin so many lives with Red Threat
blackballing What is it we're looking
for? If it's a person beyond all re-
proach, we're not going to find one in
the political arena, if anywhere. Part
of the problem does lie in our lairu'v,
in forming opinions. We like to be
able to sum up people in just a fe�
words. Bill Clinton cannot be a decent
governor concerned with education
and tax reforms whohad mantal prob-
lems, he'sawomanizingdrart-dodo -
This same laziness also leads to racial
and religious stereotyping, gender-
typing, age-ism and a whole ho
generalities that deny the complexitv
of humanity. If you're convinced that
human nature is a born loser, tr. �
don't worry about it Keep trusting
Current Affairto provide the low-dow r
on politics. Drop your newspaper sub-
scription and pick up The Star on tr.
next trip to the supermarket
If you were expecting this para-
graph to offer the solution to this Bam
lnthecountry, sorrv Perhapsthei
insurance against it is to thorou
educate i wp tple, but that mav Ki -
to wait another four years Bill Clinton
inthiscolumnist'sopinton.i r
candidate who has : pWKHl . I
unseat Bush, and hemaybei
by Tsongas. who hasn't drawn
racda hype B�l true to our .
opinionated native, we m
Twwra�bccnsehri h ifaan : �
An h � pa ��-� �
- tin - - I . - �
wg � � :ve to worry about ti
pabhc: ��- ' enlightened an v
soon.
y�W � !&
The Right Side
Maxwells Silver Hammer
US businesses contributes to recession woes
Without audience, racism disappears
By Scott Maxwell
Fditorial Columnist
One of the best-kept secrets of
this recession is the extent to which
American businesses are responsible
for it
One of the distinguishing fea-
tures of any recession is of course
extensive unemployment. And while
companies like Ford, General Motors,
and C hrysler have shrilly shrieked
about Japan's unfair trading practices,
those same companies have quutly
shipped thousands and thousands of
good American jobs overseas Can't
find a fob7 You're probably looking in
the wrong country.
Ifyouwerethinkingaboutlxk-
ing for a job at a CM plant, you'd
better learn Spanish and pack your
bag. That company has moved more
than 20 of its manufacturing plants
from the United States to Mexico, and
more will follow.
All told, CM and hundred1 of
other companies have sent half a mil-
lion American jobs over the border to
Mexico alone In the last few years
There, Mexicansdo jobs Ameri-
cans used to do, and the fruit of their
labor H schlepped back into America
far m R buy
In case it's not obvious why
these jobs are flying south, I'll tell you.
It's because labor and production costs
in some other countries are much,
much lower than in America, and
that's because we care more about
workers and the environment than
they do.
It costs a business money not to
pollute rivers. It's juM moreexpensive
to dispose of wastes cautiously than
incautiously. So it becomes a sound
business practice to make your prod-
uct in a country that's tex desperately
poor to care whether you pollute its
rivers
Similarly, it costs much more
money to pay an American worker to
do a job � because you must pay for
health care and other assorted ben-
efits�than to pay a Mexican to do the
same job. Even $2 or S3 per hour will
buy you a contented Mexican worker,
and that includes both wages and ben-
efits
So it becomes a sound business
practice to give that manufacturing
job to a worker who's too poor to care
whether you endanger his health.
There are two ways to keep
American businesses from moving
American jobs out of the country. One
way is to eliminate laws and regula-
tions that protect the environment or
benefit workers. Reagan and Bush
have tried to do this for years.
That's a dangerous approach.
People will die who shouldn't, simply
to make a few more widgets per hour;
land and rivers will be polluted that
shouldn't, just to save DuPont some
money. Besides, those worker- and
environment-related laws and regu-
lations will eventually return, for the
same reason they arose in the first
place, the kind of world an industrial
society creates without them is hor-
rific.
The other approach has two
steps F irst, make it illegal for Ameri-
can businesses to import pnxl nets they
have had made in other countries. If
CM has a car assembled in Mexico,
make them sell it in Mexico. If they
want to sell it in America, they'll have
to make it in America.
Next, institute tradepolicies that
enable A merican businesses to manu-
facture here and still profit.That means
slapping tariffs on products made by
foreign companies in countries with
cheaper labor costs.
Free-trade proponents will ob-
ject to the second part of the plan, but
let them object. They're wrong. The
point of free trade is, as I understand
it, to increase the choices available to
consumers by letting the free market
work without restraint.
But if maintaining a completely
free trading system meansthat Ameri-
cans lose jobs, those Americans can-
not benefit from the multitude of
choices available on store shelve.
They can't afford it.
This is an urgent problem, one
which neither George Bush noranyof
his challengers has the guts to solve.
Indeed, Bush is actively promoting
trade policies that would exacerbate
the problem � that's the free trade
agreement with Mexico that you may
have heard about.
America's economic strength
dcpcndsonbringingdeccnt, well-paid
American jobs back to America, and
ensuring that we retain the ones we
have Before we become too desper-
ately poor to care.
By Nathan Hicks
Editorial Columnist
A growing concern for many
people these days seems to be the so-
called "uprising" and growth of the
Ku Klux Klan.
Some people are afraid that the
Klan may very well grow to such an
immensity that they infiltrate public
office and administration, an occur-
rence which could only result in some-
thing completely disastrous. Such
thoughts are certainly not unfounded
considering that a former Grand Wiz-
ard of the Klan is running for presi-
dent and has actually won a seat in his
home state's public office.
However, these very same
people have been screaming about
their "ever increasing" membership
since they huddled together during
post civil war times. Unfortunately
enough, the Klan and other Neo-Fas-
cist groups areprotected by their right
to freedom of speech, but even with
such "rights" their manifestations
have been little more than aggravat-
ing parades.
Hate groups rant and ravcabout
their presence in American society,
how they are in the police force, and
how they are in public office, but
though there may be partial truth to
such statements the realistic numbers
are very small.
Some say in time these groups
could really become a problem and I
agree, but there are things that can be
done to thwart the "growth" of the
Klan and others. My first instinct and
solution would be to suppress the
rights of the�e bozos and many would
agree, hypocritically as it would be in
some instances, however, there is a
certain die-hard liberal element that
without a doubt would cry over such
an action. Therefore I reluctantly re-
sorted to another means of hategroup
contraception that can easily and
safely be practiced.
My ideas began with the initial
step of trying to understand what
makes these people tick. Searching
and discovering, I wondered what
could actually make these people vio-
lently hate other human beings and
actually publicly band together to do
so. Upon taking this initial step I fou nd
that such a psycho-analysis was not as
easy as I had perhaps thought. I
couldn't very well ask the Wanspeople
themselves because more than likely I
would have been arrested for beating
the interviewee with another member
�so I sat quietly and pondered peace-
fully.
What 1 concluded was that these
people are completely dissatisfied
with their lives and are simply not
happy campers. Reflecting back �o my
youth, I remember in grade school
there was always some little jerk that
sat in the back of the class, started
fights and made farty noises. Nine
times out of ten the little cretin was
discovered to be "acting out" because
of depression via problemsat homeor
within himself. Of course I had my
own methods of solving his behav-
ioral problems. They were not neces-
sarily illegal, just unorthodox; the
teacher usually had methods herself.
We were told to ignore the little hea-
then and more than likely he would
stop. Since his motivation was to get
?
attention in the first place.
Nine times out ot ten Mrs.
Gaddis was right and the monger
would settle down, but in some iso-
lates occurrences the infidel wouldn't
quit so the teacher would give me the
nod and I shot them.
Unfortunately we can't go
around shooting unwanted societal
menaces, but I truly believe that Mrs.
Gaddis' idea to ignore the pest may
very well be applicable Hate groups
receive way to much attention as it is.
They want people to shout at and call
them names so as to mate them fur-
ther and give them excuse to "fight
back They thrive on trying to make
others unhappy simply because they
are unhappy themselves.
As to whether this idea is fully
encompassing 1 don't know, but I do
believe that ignoring them and not
giving them the attention they want is
a much better strategy than bring up
the diametrically opposed and wag-
ing a verbal and physical war like a
bunch of beef laden hooligans.
It couldn't hurt to try, since
methods of the past have not been
terribly effective. Instead of going to
their silly parades, stay home and read
a book. Don't shout at them, that's
what they want � cast a look upon
them as if to say "you poor child" and
walk away. Surely its a start.
My cousin Geneand I frequently
speak of the problems among differ-
ent races and it seems the conclusions
are always the same. There are green
apples and there are red apples. Some
bad some good, but neither green nor
red is always the bad one of the two.
Apples is apples is apples.
s
The Cl
THE NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF LITER A
YOU'VE ALREADY READ A MILLION Tl
1992-93 �v� m
Stuff You Have Read
dies.
Leo Tolstoy
The Death of" Ivan Ilyich"
A mcxiel citizen dies.
W. H. Auden
"The Unknown Citizen"
A model citizen dies.
Edwin Arlington
Robinson
"Richard Cory'
A model citizen kills him-
self.
Herman Melville
"Billy Budd. Sailor"
A model citizen kills
someone else and then dies.
Author Unknown
Beomm I
A model citizen kills three
monsters and then dies.
Wiiham Faulkner
"A Rose tor Emily"
A spinster who lives in the
past kills her lover and then
Author Lr-
"Lord Rar I
Somebod
Randall.
Edgar Allen P
"The Tdl-Ta
The narrator
one, then content
Edgar Allen P
"A Cask of Ar
The nacnairx
some wine, the � I
Edgar Allen PJ
"The Black d
Thena - � i
and mutilates his
William S
"Shall IO
A Summer" Da
William Shi
compares her I
dav.
Marv Wollstonecraft
m
Mary Wollstonecraft was horn in 1759. and
pressed almost immediately afterwards.
Youne Man. struggled to appear cheerful throu
years, but all her efforts were to come to naught. "
five, Wollstonecraft lost a treasured marble to anothj
hood outh more skilled in the game. The loss of ih
a tragic turning point in Wollstonecraft's ife. throx
a black pit of despair from which she was never full
At the age of seven, Wollstonecraft misplaced!
Though neighboring farmers searched the surroundj
side tor several days, during which time their crops
their animals died of starvation and neglect, the h;
never recovered. The loss of the hairbrush was yet ai
turning point in Wollstonecraft's life, throwing hcJ
pit of despair from which she was never fully to ej
Things went on in pretty much this fashionJ
Wollstonecraft's life, leading her in 1792 to write
of the Rights of Woman. In that work, Vlstonecd
point that women are pretty much the same as me
such influencing factors as education were kept cj
boy, does she make the point. Not once, but mar
always in pretty much the same way. It is widely coi
Wollstonecraft had a singularly defective short-ts
which caused her to write virtually indistinguishabj
several times in a row. This is a fault which coj
forgiven if professors of English didn't insist on
treading all those repetitive paragraphs. It's an exj





e America's truth
ilk k.
' 1 vc� w i it i. not Strvtcing US
1 ni�II Itu� power of
iwl.it.illo oc MM id '�HIIHa arthy to
.with Iled threat
� h.it � i miH it WB - beyirv Uniking ?nd all re-11 mi MM In vheri Part
llXlie in out lazinen like to be jutl a few
i '
tornmnol!va iKvent
' l1 VV Itheducation
Ihad mint.ilpmb tit dodger
,idstO r,n lal
' t 'i�sping gender-
i a whoil' host of
. �. � V ' I 1omplexity
i inced that
�It klSloser, thon -p trusting us down
s� new spa per sub-
SUtt on the this para-� this flaw 1 �the only �roughly i have - t linton, the only - tial to � out iwn the V 1 l P. � oto tor :t ime 1 !Uv .1
ii the
lan time
Opinion
0C�& COMVgMTlOKf
�� TV
U w '
rs
r n7H6S� -n-iib Wfc
La
acism disappears
�� the first pKuo
� tnes out ot ten Mrs
- was right and the monger
town, but in some iso-
� -i nces the mtidel wouldn't
�� � tr.uher would give me the
md I shot them
I ntortunatelv we can't v;o
d shooting unwanted societal
is but I truly believe that Mrs
uiviis' idea to ignore the post mav
.r well be applicable Hate group
reo ive way to much attention as it is,
Ihev want people to shout .it and call
them names so as to incite them fur-
ther and give them excuse to fight
back Thev thrive on trying to make
others unhappy simplv because they
are unhappy themselves
As to whether this idea is tully
encompassing I don't know but I do
believe that ignoring them and not
giving them the attention thev want is
a much better strategy than lining up
the diametrically opposod and wag-
ing a V�fba and physical war like a
bunch it beet laden hooligans.
It couldn't hurt to try. since
methods ot the past have not been
terribly effective Instead of going to
their silly parades, stay homeand read
a book Don't shout at them that's
what thev want � cast a look upon
them as it to lay "you poor child and
ualk awav Surety its a start
My cousin Geneand I frequently
speak of the problems among differ-
ent races and it seems the conclusions
are always the same. There are green
apples and there are red apples. Some
bad some good, but neither green nor
red is always the bad one of the two.
Apples ;s apples is asptoi


what
�esc people ia
an beings anil
together to do
tial step I found
livsis was not as
ps thought I
lie Klans people
brethan likely I
pled tor beating
tot her member
bndered peace
I was that these
llv dissatisfied
ire simply not
Jtmgback tomv
grade school
little erk that
data, started
noises. Nine
ittle cretin was
kg out" because
lomsat home or
lurso I had mv
ping his behav-
NN not neces-
rthodox, the
efhex!s herself
the little hea-
Ikely he Would
tion was so get
Slje �aBt (Earolinian February 11, 1992 5
The Clearly Labeled Satire Page
��
THE NORTON ANTHOLOGY OF LITERATURE
YOU'VE ALREADY READ A MILLION TIMES
1992-93 Edition
Stuff You Have Read
dies.
Leo Tolstoy
"The Death of Ivan Ilyich"
A model citizen dies.
W.H. Auden
"The Unknown Citizen"
A model citizen dies.
Edwin Arlington
Robinson
"Richard Cory"
A model citizen kills him-
self.
Herman Melville
"Billy Budd. Sailor"
A model citizen kills
someone else and then dies.
Author Unknown
Beowulf
A model citizen kills three
monsters and then dies.
William Faulkner
"A Rose tor Emily"
A spinster who lives in the
pasi kills her lover and then
Author Unknown
"Lord Randall"
Somebody poisons Lord
Randall.
Edgar Allen Poe
"The Tell-Tale Heart"
The narrator kills tome-
one, then confesses.
Edgar Allen Poe
"A Cask of Amontillado"
The narrator buys a guy
some wine, then kills him.
Edgar Allen Poe
"The Black Cat"
The narrator kills his wife
and mutilates his cat.
William Shakespeare
"Shall I Compare Thee To
A Summer's Day?"
William Shakespeare
compares her to a summer's
dav.
Mary Wollstonecraft
Mary Wollstonecraft was born in 1759, and became de-
pressed almost immediately afterwards.
Young Mary struggled to appear cheerful through her early
years, but all her efforts were to come to naught. At the age of
five. Wollstonecraft lost a treasured marble to another neighbor-
IhhxI youth more skilled in the game. The loss of the marble was
a tragic turning point in Wollstonecraft's life, throwing her into
a black pit of despair from which she was never fully to emerge.
At the age of seven, Wollstonecraft misplaced a hairbrush.
Though neighboring farmers searched the surrounding country-
side for several days, during which time their crops spoiled and
their animals died of starvation and neglect, the hairbrush was
never recovered. The loss of the hairbrush was yet another tragic
turning point in Wollstonecraft's life, throwing her into a black
pit of despair from which she was never fully to emerge.
Things went on in pretty much this fashion for most of
Wollstonecraft's life, leading her in 1792towriteA Vindication
of the Rights of Woman. In that work, V'lstonecraft makes the
point that women arc pretty much the same as men would be if
such influencing factors as education were kept constant. Hoo
boy, does she make the point. Not once, but many times, and
always in pretty much the same way. It is widely conjectured that
Wollstonecraft had a singularly defective short-term memory,
which caused her to write virtually indistinguishable paragraphs
several times in a row. This is a fault which could easily be
forgiven if professors of English didn't insist on your actually
reading all those repetitive paragraphs. It's an experience.
A Note From the Editors
About the New Edition
Welcome to the 1992-93 edition of the Norton A nthology of
Literature You' e Already Read A Million Times. The editors of
the Norton Anthology have finally gotten it through theirwizened
old heads that students are fed up with having to carry around this
massive tome full of stories and poems that they' ve already read,
well, a million times.
Consequently, the 1992-93 edition of the Norton Anthology
has been considerably streamlined. Instead of including the
entire text of the various works of literature, we have just
provided the title, author, and a one- or two-sentence synopsis.
By this point in your life, you've read all this stuff so many times
that that's all you really need.
We have decided to retain our author biographies for the
time being, mainly because we get paid a lot of money for
writing them. Why do you think these anthologies are so bloody
expensive? It's not like the writers of the poems and stories are
alive any more, so we don't have to pay them royalties.
No, that cash goes straight into our pockets, after your
friendly neighborhood campus bookstore takes its 30 percent
cut, or whatever. We can't tell you how much we're ripping you
off for, because you'd kill us, but trust us, it's really obscene.
In closing, we hope you enjoy the 1992-93 edition of the
Norton Anthology of Literature You've Already Read A Million
limes. We know we'll enjoy the money you spent on it.
Signed, the 157.462 editors of the Norton Anthology of Etc.
William Butler Yeast � er, Yeats
Yeats was bom in Ireland, which explains a lot.
Yeats, a heavy drinker, had a very shiny nose. Indeed, if you
ever saw it, you would even say it glows. All of the other poets
used to laugh and call him names. They wouldn't let poor
William join in any rhyming games.
Ostracized so cruelly by his peers, Yeats was thrown into a
black pit of despair. That's not a figure of speech � some
townspeople really threw him into the local black pit of despair.
There Yeats was to remain for the rest of his life.
Yeast is best known for making bread rise and for causing
infections in � oops. Yeats is best known for "The Lake Isle of
Innisfree which is best known for making bread rise and
causing infections in � ah, forget it.
Emily Dickinson
Emily Dickinson's poems are cryptic and vague, and when
you have taken the considerable amount of time required to
deduce what the hell she meant, you have nearly always forgot-
ten why you ever wanted to know.
Naturally, literary critics love this kind of stuff, so Dickinson
is considered one of the finest poets America has produced.
The most interesting thing about Emily Dickinson's poems
is that nearly all of them can be sung to the tune of "Deep in the
Heart of Texas or whatever the name of that annoying song is.
There was also a one-woman play written with her as the
single character. It's entertaining.
Even More Stuff
Robert Frost
"Stopping By Woods on a
Snowy Evening"
A poet sits on a horse and
looks at snow.
James Joyce
"Araby"
An adolescent boy acts
like an idiot, then realizes it.
Geoffrey Chaucer
The Canterbury Tales
Pilgrims tell each other
some stories.
Edgar Allen Poe
"The Raven"
A guy talks to a bird.
Edgar Allen Poe
Knnabelle Lee"
A guy practices
necrophilia, sort of.
John Milton
Paradise Lost
Paradise is lost.
You Have Read
John Milton
Paradise Regained
Paradise is regained.
Stephen Crane
"War is Kind"
War isn't kind.
William Shakespeare
Othello
Everybody dies.
William Shakespeare
All's Well That Ends Well
Everybody gets married.
Nathaniel Hawthorne
"Young Goodman
Brown"
A Puritan discovers that
Puritans are usually hypo-
crites.
Walt Whitman
"When I Heard the
Learn d Astronomer"
Walt walks out of a lec-
ture.
William Shakespeare: Capitalist Dupe
Shakespeare's plays may be divided into four categories: the
comedies, the tragedies, the romances, and the histories.
The comedies and the tragedies are all exactly alike, except
that in the tragedies, everybody dies at the end, and in the
comedies, everybody gets married at the end. If you ask me, they
got the comedies and the tragedies backwards.
The romances reflect a more mature style for Shakespeare:
at the end, half the characters die, and the other half get married.
Which brings us to the histories. The history plays are all
about the kings of England, who apparently spent all their time
running around doubled over, screaming for a horse.
Today, Shakespeare is principally seen as a capitalist dupe,
intent on shielding the power structure of Elizabethan society
from the pent-up wrath of the oppressed masses. Also,
Shakespeare's play The Tempest was an attempt by the Bard to
assist in the subjugation of the noble peoples of the New World.
However, since a few old-fashioned canon-lovers still insist
on considering Shakespeare a great writer, we include the
following condensed version of all of Shakespeare's plays:
Act I. Scene I. Athens. Carvellus the Ice-cream Clown
enters and addresses the multitude.
Carvellus: Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your
horse!
My kingdom for a horse!
But soft! What light through yonder window breaks?
It is the stage, arid all the men and women merely players.
Alas, poor Yorick! He was a tale told by an idiot,
Full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.
Exeunt.
More Stuff You Have Read.
Robert Herrick earlier.
"To the Virgins, To Make
Much of Time"
Give it up, babe.
Andrew Marvell
"To His Coy Mistress"
Dylan Thomas
"Do Not Go Gentle into
That Good Night"
Dylan Thomas tells his
dad not to accept death.
� K, .vRichard Eberhart
John Crowe Ransom"The Groundhog"
"Blue Girls"A poet looks at a dead
Give it up, babe.groundhog and thinks about
death.
Herman Melville
Moby Dicke. e. cummings
An obsessive amputeeAnything he ever wrote.
chases a white whale.Totally incomprehensible,
even to us. Sorry.
Thomas Hardy
"Neutral Tones"Ben Jonson
Thomas Hardy gets"Inviting a Friend to Sup-
dumped.per"
Ben Jonson invites a friend
Edwin Arlingtonto supper.
Robinson
"Miniver Cheevy"George Eliot
Miniver Cheevy wishes heSilas Marner
had been bom a millenniumSilas Marner conforms.
Robert Frost
Robert Frost was born in California, but he preferred New
England. Nobody knows why. 1 mean, it's cold up there. On
USA TODAY'S weather maps, New England is the big, dark
blue blob. California is the pleasant, restful, medium-brown
blob. Or maybe that's die smog.
Frost was one of President John F. Kennedy's favorite poets,
and he has the distinction of being the only person alive during
JFK's presidency who has never been accused of being in on the
assassination.
William Wordsworth
Didja ever notice how many poets are named "William"?
Shakespeare, Yeats, Congreve, Collins, Cowper, Blake,
Wordsworth well, it was just an observation.
John Milton
John Milton is chiefly noted for being so extreme a misogy-
nist that he could make Charles Manson blush.
However, he also wrote some incredibly long poems, which
is supposed to be such a big deal because he was blind or
something. Our theory is, he wrote them that long because he
was blind. He wasn't satisfied with the Bible taking a few dozen
pages to tell a story, he had to make it a few hundred. He couldn' t
see all those reams of paper piling up, waiting to make genera
tions of TV-watchin English majors' lives miserable.
.
I
4





Entertainment
aUjc tEaat Cftarolinittn
February 11, 1992
Sports
'Boys Next Door' provides insight and humor Lady Pirates
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
The East Carolina Playhouse
opens the new year by providing
the audience with a look into the
.sometimes serious and often funny
lives oftour mentally impaired men
in lorn Grit tin's realistic The Boys
Next Door
Starting Thursday, Feb. 13 and
continuing until the Feb. 18, "The
Boys Next Ixir" is a compassion-
ate storv centering on the lives of
tour mentally impaired men who
live in a group home and are
watched by a sincere, but burnt-
out, social worker.
The play is told from the point
oi view (if Jack, the social worker,
played bv David IVrberian. The
audience watchesasnurnerousepi-
st vies th.it would otherwisbe taken
f i r gra n texd are shv) w n i n a new 1 igh t
pf child-like wonder.
The four protagonists give in
entertaining vet thoughtful look into
the often misunderstood world of
the mentally impaired. Arnold, the
ringleader of the group played by
lack Prattler, is a hyperactive chat-
terer who suffers from variousinse-
curities and delusions ot persecu-
tion.
Norman, played bv . Ayscue,
takes great pride in his job at a
doughnut shop and the great mass
of keys that dangles from his belt.
l.ucien. played by Derrick
I Yirkcr. is a huge man with the mind
pf a five-year-old, but thinks that he
can read and understand the intel-
lectual books he carries around.
Last, but not least, thea1 is Barry,
played by Bray Culpopper, a bril-
liant schizophrenic who fantasizes
that he is a golf pro.
When "The Boys Next Door"
first opened on Nov. 23,1987, in the
Lamb's Theater in New York City,
critics greeted it with gixxi reviews.
The Bovs Next Door' moves the
audience to an awareness of how
many things in everyday life we
take for granted, matters that can be
of major importance to those who
arc handicappedMel Gussow of
The New York Times said. Gussow
also commented that "Griffin has
written a sweet-tempered comedy
of social concern
Don Biehn, the director of The
BoysNextDoorsaid that "we I the
cast are all committed to the under-
lying theme of open love for the
mentally impaired
Biehn also commented that the
plav is about human beings, and
the comedy that is present comes
out of the audience's realization oi
their own insecurities and vulner-
abilities.
"The characters are not to be
laughed at, but to be laughed with
Biehn said. "The audience should
care tor these characters
A main source of the fun the in
plav, Biehn said, is the emotional
age of thecharactersand their child-
like view of life.
Though he admits that the play
is primarily m information plav
and slightly limited in plot, Biehn
chose "The Boys Next Door" be-
cause he "liked it and thought that
ECU could do it
Though research into charac-
ter development is always impor-
tant in any play, these actors and
actresses have gone above and be-
yond the call of duty in order to
achieve total reality.
The actors have visited men-
tally impaired homes, singly and in
groups, and have gone on outings
with the residents, with the biggest
event being a dance. The dance
helped the actors immensely, be-
causean integral scenein the play is
also a group dance.
Berbcrian said that when he
visited the home, "1 was apprehen-
sive at first, but after a while, it
becomes very comfortable
BertxTian'smuungoalinhisrcsearch
was to get to know the people and
feel comfortable around them.
"I wanted to see how the work-
ers deal with them and their behav-
ior Borbenan slid. "I realized that
at times vou have to really be stern
with them because they're so much
like children
The actors who plav the four
mentally impaired menalsogained
a lot of insight into their characters
ami their behavior.
Prather said that mentally im-
pai red people have "completeaban-
donment, there are no gray areas in
their lives I lea I so discovered that
their emotions are very clear, and
there is no cross-over between indi-
vidual emotions.
"They have the same reaction
to each emotion Prather said.
"When they're happv, they're
happv and nothing else The inter-
active research also helped Prather
Photo by JD Whilmir
J. Ayscue. Derrick Parker and Jack
serious but funny daily lives of the
plav the character and not the Ste-
reotype. "Mvcharacter is just a guv
with some problems, like everyone
else he said.
Culpepper found a different
means (t getting in touch with his
character. "1 talked toa social worker
who explained the behavior pat-
terns oi the type of schizophrenic
that I'm plavmg Culpepper said.
'This worked better for me because
thev are so self-conscious oi their
impairment that if 1 was just watch-
ing them and not interacting, 1
wouldn't have gotten an honest
view of their lues
Prather are just three of "The Boys Next Door" who will be portraying the
mentally impaired.
Culpepper also discovered an
unsettling fact about mentally im-
paired people. "They are actually
afraid of being normal he said.
"Thev' re so acclimated to being dif-
ferent, that the prospect ot normalcv
scares them
:th all the research and hard
work that these' actors have done
for their roles, the plav promises to
be one oi the best ol season
With a realistic and heartfelt
portrayal, the plav is sure to touch
the hearts and souls of everyone
whosoesit. As the poster advertis-
ing sivs, "The Boys ext lor'
will bring laughter and tears to the
eyes"
Tickets ma v be purchased Mon-
day through Friday from 10 a.m.
until 4 p.m. and on performance
nights until 8:30 p m
The plav will start at 8:15 p.m.
every night, except tor Sunday,
where there willbea2:15p.m. mati-
nee
Held in Met iinnis Theater on
the ECU campus, tickets will be
priced at $750 for the general pub-
lic and $450 tor students with a
valid ECU I.D. For anv other infor-
mation, call (919)757-6829.
Cradle fails to rock audience
By Majorie McKinstry
Staff Writer
Photo by Matthew McWay
Peyton Flanders (Rebecca De Mornay, left) appears to be the perfect nanny to Claire Bartel (Annabella
Sciorra. right), but the Bartel family will soon be turned inside out by Peyton's hidden agenda.
In TheHanJ that Rocks theCnidk,
Rebecca De Mornay portraysa preg-
nant widow (Peyton) whose disas-
trous miscarriage instigates her to
vengeful villainies.
In her deluded and depressed
mind, she decides to plant herself as
a nanny in the" Bartel's home, the
family who she blames for her loss
Asa nanny in the Bartel's home, she
quickly devises a way to make her
self indispensable.
Pevton pretends to retrieve an
earring - carelessly dropped by
Claire Bartel � from the newborn
son's mouth. This devious maneu-
vering is the first bit of villainv on
Peyton's part
After this, Peyton continues to
manipulate the Bartel family, but
instead of becoming frightening, the
movie starts to drag
In essence, Cradle manipulates
a masterpiece concept into an irri-
tating and seemingly endless
visualization o( Peyton's warped
mind.
The Hand that Rocks the Cradle
fails to satisfy the connoisseur of
stispensetul terror. ITie concept of
the movie is fascinating a two
career family exposed to evil from
the inside
Unfortunately, IX Momay's
interpretation of the malignant vil-
lain is discomforting, not chilling.
As one viewer commented, "It's
like watching a documentary of
s mo ne receiving a n (Ot C anal; un-
pleasant, but not scary
Although failing to achieve ter-
ror, the movie does present a great
character study of a mentally dis-
abled handyman. Played by Ernie
I rudson, Solomon displays all the
sterotvpical attributes of the men-
tally impaired warm.lovingand
childlike but he also plays with
our stereotypical notionsof "people
like him
When asked to build a fence, he
walks a tew paces, placing his feet
end to end .is if measuring. As he
M a!k he a urn tsout "one, two, three,
five, nine The family exchanges
panicked kxks until he grins and
s,ls. "just kidding
However, this brief moment of
original it v is not enough to warrant
seeing this movie. Cradle is slightly
y.ir at times, but the incredibly
tiresome hour and 15 minutes
before the pace increases leaves
the audience with nauseate stom-
achs, not edge of the seat gripping
terror.
Basically, Cradle is unable to
convince the viewer to willingly
suspend disbelief.
Westworld finds open door to America
By Lisa Williams
Staff Writer
If you are tired of waiting for
esus lonesor EMF to release a new
ilbum, mavbe vou should give the
new Westworld album a try.
London-based Westworld, af-
ter a 3- year hiatus, has released
their new album Mwers and Shak
'� whichcanbedescribedaswide-
screen technicolor pop with a mod-
ern rock kick.
"The kind of music that we've
always done and continue todo has
suddenly become popular in
America via English groups like
Jesus Jones and EMF said
Derwood Andrews, Wcstworld's
guitarist. 'There's a window now
open for Westworld that didn't ex-
ist when we released our latest al-
bum
Now that they are revitalized
and re-encrgized, Westworld can
re-enter the American music scene,
which is currently very open to cut-
ting-edge British rock wi th a dance-
floor groove.
The song "10,000 miles" opens
thealbum with a monstrous groove
that makes you want todance wher-
ever you are.
The music comes off soundi ng
likea post-modern road song foran
accelerated culture.
Another song, "Cheap and
Nasty, Pt.2 isan ode to their former
record label, RCA.
The opening lyrics of the song
� "There was a definite lack of a
CadillacI gave my soul to
rock'n'roll and thev gave it back
� describes the Kind's feelings to-
wards their former label.
Some of their ballads include
"CarefreeCustom Eyes" and "Star-
gazer which is an epic slice of
classic popdistinguished by a great
yearning vocal performance by
American-born vocalist Elizabeth
Westwood.
Westwood feels that music is
all about escapism. "The energy of
escapism is what America repre-
sents to the rest of the world she
said. With her voice and lyrics, she
proves it.
The first single from the new
albumDo No Wrong is accom-
panied by a stunning videodirccted
by Hiroyuki Nakano, best known
for his work with Dec-Lite.
And rewssumsup their styleof
music by saying, "Our music is made
for cruising around in a large auto-
mobile and having a good time,
too
Westworld is definitely a band
that reminds us the future is now,
and pop music lives because we
want it to.
Photo by Tim Wilkins
Westworld finds an open window to the American music scene and
hopes to ride the radio waves to the top of the charts.
Roses are red, Violets are blue A personal in Love Lines, Says I Love you.
Stop by the Publication's building(across from Joyner) today before five, to place a Love Line to someone special.
HANK'S HOMEMADE ICE CRaM)
316 E. 10TH ST. 758-0000 I J
What a sweeter way to say "I love you"
than to
send a cake and balloons on Valentine's Day (
Total price delivered $11.59
including tax )
jShow this coupon when placing cake order and receive a "free " kids cone j
LARGE DOMINO'S
PIZZA AS LOW AS
$6.00
Play "Beat the Clock" every Tuesday in February. Order any
LARGE pizza with up to 3.toppings between 6 PM and 10
PM. and the time you order is the price you pay!
DOMINO'S
ru Like Pizza At
v Mi.u.mkv (hvs
i piai vi . ii
ipplv
�o-
CALL 758-6660
Team gets
revenge
against
JMU, 69-55
By Joshua Doepke
Staff Writer
"It was a wild, wild game
Lady Pirate head basketball coach
Pat Pierson said
The Lady Piratescameout with
a 69-55 victory over Colonial Ath-
letic Association rival James Madi-
son University Monday night in
MingesColiseum. Even though the
Lady Pirates were ne er down bv
more than three points, there were
still some hair-raising moments.
Bad calls by the referees could
have hurt the team badlv. The bas-
ket didn't cooperate either, as ECU
shot only 40 percent, while 1ML
shot 35 percent from the field.
"I was really proud of how we
didn't back down Pierson said
"Thekidshad revenge in their hearts
tonight and scrapped on the floor
The win revenged the team's
onlyCAAiossoz:theseason,a71-69
overtime loss at JMU.
In the first eleven minutes oi
the game, the two teams were never
out of eachout of each other's grasp
However, ECU, after a time out
writh nine minutes left, went on a 9-
0 run when senior Tonya Hargrove
stolea ball and madean easy lay up.
GaynorCXDonnell added to the
ad with ECU'S only three pointer
of the game. The Lady Pirate run
lasted until JMU called a time out
with 4:15 left in the half and scored
immediately after the break. ECU
went into the locker room with a
five-point lead, whenitshouid ha ve
been a seven-point lead.
With under a minute to go, one
of the referees called back a shot by
ECU'S Kim Sanuels saying the shot
clock had expired.
In the beginning of the second
half, the Lady Pirates jumped out to
art eight-point lead before moreun-
favorablecaHsby the referees started
reducing the ECU lead. The recipi-
ent of these calls was mainly Gaynor
QDonnell, who received three fouls
in less than a minute and a half.
Senior Lady Pira:
Saturday in Mmge
With '
Ladv LXikes went
the run ended there
13-2 run over the
From that point, tl
lead was never tessl
"Westn �
defensive p
Don't send the same old tired th)
the Valentine that rises above
Balloon - A - Gram a friend
someone special
(Deliver) to
see our Air
We offer:
� Latex
� Candy
� Fundoms and key chain bottle openl
le sure to call us first for your special
delivery by a tuxedo ju or gal.
BOW TIE
BEAU
WE DELI V Kk I NTIL7:3fl PM
830-3796
0
Centi
GreenvilW
(I





Entertainment
Gllie Cast Carolinian
February 11, 1992
S p o rts
'Boys Next Door' provides insight and humor Lady Pirates
Bv loo Horst
suit Writer
Hie East Carolina Playhouse
opens the new yeat by providing
the audience with a look into the
imetimes serious and often funny
. t four mentally impaired men
I iriffin s realistic The Povs
Starting rhursday, Feb. 13 and
onrinuing until the Feb 18, "The
Next Door" is a compassion
ite storj centering on the Hves of
four mentally impaired men who
live in a group home and are
hed by a sincere, but burnt
out soc ial worker.
I he plaj i- told from the point
t a k, the social worker,
(avid Bcrberian the
� hesasntimerousepi-
mldotherw isebetaken
� r�ml Ian h ninancwlighl
! ike wondci
four protagonists give an
entert rtii ettl ightful look into
misunderstood world ot
: tired Arnold, the
ler of 1 ' up played b)
a hyperactive hat
� fromvariou!
�' ; - ' ��
Norman, plaved by I Avscue,
t Tide in his job at a
� h �pand the great mass
� tangles from his Ivlt.
� played by Di rrick
parki � � pirunwiththemind
ofafivi . eai i ild, but thinks that he
i an read and understand theintel
kstv in ies at und.
I ist, but not least, there is Parrv,
played by Bray Culpepper, a bril-
liant schizophrenic who fantasizes
that he is a e,olf pro.
When "The Boys Next Poor'
first opened on Nov. 23,1987,inthe
Lamb's rheatef in New York c Sty,
critics greeted it with gemd reviews
The Boys Next Door moves the
audience to an awareness of how
many things in everyday life we
take for granted, matters that can be
of major importance to those who
are handicappedMe1 (iussow of
Ihe New York Times said.Gussow
also commented thai "(iriffin has
written a sweet-tempered comedy
it social concern
Don Biehn, the director oi "The
Boys Next Door said that' we the
cast are all committed to the under
lying theme of open love tor the
mentally impaired
Biehn alsocommented that the
play i- about human beings, and
the comedy that is prcsenl comes
out ot the audience's realization erf
their own insecurities and vulner-
abilil �
1 he i harai Icrs are not to be
laughed at,but tobelaughed with
aid II" iitdieno hould
mam sow � f the fun the in
plav, Biehn said, is the emotional
ageol the i haractersand their child-
like view of lite.
rhough he admit .that the play
is primarily an information play
and slightly limited in plot. Biehn
chose "The Boys Nexl Door" be-
cause he "liktxl it and thought that
E l could doit "
Though research into charac-
ter development is always impor-
tant in anv plav, these actors and
ac tresses have gone above and be-
yond the call ot duty in order to
achieve total reality
The actors have visited men-
tally impaired homes, singly and in
groups, and have gone on outings
with the residents, with the biggest
event being a dance The dance
helped the actors immensely, be-
cause an integral scenein the play is
also a group dance.
Bcrberian said that when he
visited the home, "I was apprehen-
sive at first, but .liter a while, it
becomes very comfortable
Berbcrian'smaingoaiinhisresearch
was to get to know the people and
feel comfortable around them
"1 wanted toseehow the work
ersdeal with them and their behav-
ior Bcrberian said. "1 realized that
.it times you have to really be stem
with them because they'reso much
like i hildrcn
I he a tors who play the four
mentally impaired menalso gained
a lot ot insight into their characters
and th'ir behavior
I'r ither said that mentally im-
p iin I pi ; ehave o implcteaban
donment,then in no gray areas in
their livesHealsodis ovcred that
their emotions are '� �' � I Icar, and
then isnocross over between indi-
vidual emi itions
" I hey h ive the same reaction
to each emotion Prattler said.
When they're happy, they're
happy and nothing else Hie inter
,n tive research also helin-d I'r.it her
Pioio by J D hilmir
J.Ayscue, Derrick Parker and Jack Prather are just ihrei IThel ���� ��� ��� '� P rtrayii the
serious but funny daily lives ot the mentally impair-i
play the chara tor and not the ste
reotype "My harat terisjusta guy
with some problems, like everyone
else he said.
ulpepper found a different
: in touch with In i
haractei : talk d to a so ial ���. orkei
v. ho explained the behavior pat-
terns ot the t pe ot s� hiophrenu
that I'lft playingulpepper said
" I his worked better for mcbe ause
they are so sell i onscious ol their
impairment that it I was just watch-
ing them and not interacting, 1
wouldn't have rotten an honest
view ot their lives
('ulpepper als i dis � i � i an
unsettling fai t about menl . im
paired people 'The) n
afraid i �l being norm i
I � � �� �
. .
V ith all ti� reseai
work that thes ictoi I
tor their I : �
bei :
�'� it ell
portrayal, the ; ure to I
the heart � and ouls i t c eryone
who sees it s the piaster advertis
i . I � � ' . � � � - �
fiterand tears)
Picket � ' - : '
, jp
I .
;
� � . . t�p( U'T Sui
� l �� �

jll be
I � (for the general;
In ii � I tor students with a
valid Mi I P I or anv other infot-
. .
Cradle fails to rock audience
By Majorie McKinstrv
St�fl Wnl.r
n F I.
bCi
Photo by Matthew McWay
Hebecca De Mornay, left) appears to be the perfect nanny to Claire Bartel (Annabella
the Bartel family will soon bo turned inside out by Peyton's hidden agenda
In TheHand that Rocks theCmdle,
Rebecca DeMomayportraysapreg
nant widow (Peyton) whosedisa �
trous miscarriage instigates her to
vengeful villainies
In her deluded and depressed
mind, she dec ides to plant herself as
a nanny in the Bartel's home, the
family who she blames for her loss
As.i nanny in the1 Bartel'shome she
cUic klv devises a way lO make her
sell indispensable.
Pe) t 'ii pretends to retrieve an
earring carelessly dropped b)
( Lure Bartel from the newborn
sn's mouth llus devious maneu
vcring is the hrst bit ol villainy on
Peyton s part
Atter this, Peyton continues to
manipulate the bartel family, but
instead of becoming frightening the
movii tan I
ln enci � � �'� manipulati
,i m,i � �; tKcpt into an irri-
tating and seemingl) � ndless
visualiA)11 � i i'eton's �� irj
mind
I hi i : .�� ' � ��
fails t satisfy the connoisseur of
suspenseful terror lite ncept
the mi � ie is fasi inal ah
career family exposed to evil from
the in ide
I nfortunately, 1 '� M rna
intcrpretatii n t the mal
lain i ; i imforting, not i Hill i
�V
om
lik w at. King ad nl in oi
rcceivingai
pli . tnol ����
�lthough failing I evetei
ror, tl Iocs present a gi
� -tiuh irf a rm i I
abled I in I) man Hi. II Ernie
Hudsoi - ' mon displays all the
f the men
ind
childlike but he also pl.ivs with
our stef ' ' ' � � pie
When asked to builda fence, he
walksa fi ���� paces, placing his feel
� I to end as it measuring As he
kshecountsout "one, two, three,
five, nine Ihe family exchanges
panicked looks until he grins and
"just kiddii
1 lowevcr, tl brief n entof
ilityisnot enoughto warrant
ceu � ;htly
t tiilibly
ir and 15 minutes
� � , . leaves
. th i torn
� gripping
Baska . � ible to
� � kvillingly
suspend disbelief.
Westworld finds open door to America
B) I isa Williams
� a i Writer
It �. ii are tired ol waiting tor
r 1 Ml toreleasea new
ilbun be) u sh luld give the
tworld album a trv.
I ondon based Westworld, at-
� i 3 yeai hiatus, has released
new album Moven mul Shik
� w hi hi an be described aswide-
� entei hnicolor pop with a mod
�i k k it k
! he V mil ot music that we've
ii i) id rneandiontinuetodohas
suddenly become popular m
nca via English groups like
;� us (ones and I Ml said
I erwood Andrew We rtworl I �
guitarist. "There's a window new
open tor Westworld that didn't e
ist when we released our latesl a!
bum
Now that they are revitalized
and re-energized, Westworld can
re-enter the American music scene,
which is currently very open to cut
ting-edge British roc k with a dan e
floor groove.
The song "10,000 mites" opens
the album wirm a monstrous groove
that makesyou want todaiv owner-
ever von anv
The music cimies i rf t sounding
like a post-modern road song foran
accelerated culture.
Am�thi i it heap and
Nasty, Pt.2isan ode ti itheirformer
record label, RCA
I he opening lyrics ol the song
" lliere was ,i definite lack ot a
CadillacI gave mv soul to
rot k'n'roll and they yw it Kick
describes the band's fedingS to-
wards their former label.
Some of their ballads im hide
"CarefreeCustom Eyes" and "Star-
gazer which is an epic slice o!
classic popdistinguishodbva great
yearning vocal performance by
American-bom vocalist Elizabeth
Westwood.
Westwood feels that music is
all about escapism. "The energy of
escapism is what Amelia repre-
sents to the rest ol the world she
slid. With her voice and lyrics, she
proves it.
The tirst single from the new
albumI)o No Wrong is accom-
panied bya stunning videodirected
by Hiroyuki Nakano, Ivst known
for his wiirk with Dee-Lite
And rewssumsup their style of
music by saying, "Our musk is made
for cruising around in a large auto-
mobile and having a gixd time,
too
Westworld is definitely a Kind
that reminds us the future is now,
and pop music lives because we Westworld finds an open window to the American music
want to hopes to nde the radio waves to the top of the charts.
Photo by Tim Wilkint
scene and
Roses are red, Violets are blue A personal in Love Lines, Says I Love you.
Stop by the Publication's building(across from Joyncr) today before five, to place a Love Line to someone special.
HANKS HOMEMADE ICE CREaM)
316 E. 10TH ST. 758-0000 I J
What a sweeter way to say "I love you"
than to SarAy
send a cake and balloons on Valentine's Day J (
i
NOBODY
KNOWS
DOMINO'S
1 iHow You Like Pizza At Home.
LARGE DOMINO'S
PIZZA AS LOW AS
$6.00
Total price delivered $11.59
including tax H
jshow this coupon when placing cake order and receive a "free " kids cone j
r
Play "Beat the Clock" every Tuesday in February. Order any
LARGE pizza with up to 3.toppings between 6 PM and 10
PM, and the time you order is the price you pay!
30 minute guarantee does not apply
I pia per call
CALL 758-6660
Team gets
revenge
against
JMU 69-55
By Joshua Doepke
Staff Writer
"It was a wild, vil : b
Lady Pirate head bast
Pat Pierson said
The Lady Pirales am
a 69-55 victory over( bnial
lebc Association rival ai
son University '�'
Minges( oliseun hthie
Lady Pirates wen in
m)re th.in thn e point
still some haii t
Bad calls by t
have hurl ��
ket didn't coopci
shdt only 40 pei
shot 35 percei
"I w.i n
didn't ba k d -vn � . �
"Thekidshadn . � �� � �� rl
tonight and - � -
The win �
only( '
overtime !� �� it IML
In the first ek .
the game, th two)
outofeachoutofi i
However. E( L , atter a time
with nine minutes lift. �� ' i i9
0 run when sen� rl
stoleaballandma
(iaynort i onneUadde I
lead with E( U's only three po I i
of the game. The Lady Pirate run
lasted until IML called a tin
with 4:15 left in the halt and a I
Immediately atter the break
went into the locker room with a
five-point lead, when it should have
been a seven-point lead
With under a minute t g
of th referees called back a shot by
ECU's Kim Sanueis saying the I
clock had expired.
In thebetnnini; ot the second
half, the Lady Pirates jumped
an eight-point lead before more un-
favorablecaHsby the referees started
reducing the ECU lead. The recipi-
entofthesecallswasmainly laynor
QDonnell, win i received threefouls
in less than a minute and a halt
Ser
-

AFFftmS&GBE
Don't send the same old tired tl
the Valentine that rises above
Balloon - A - Gram a friend
someone special
toffer: i Deliver) to i
� latex see our ir � Cand � Fundoms and kej chain bottle open
f -T� Bf sure to call us first for your special l fir) deliver bj a lu
�0 BOW TIE V JBEAU 1 DEI IVERLNTU " ; PM 3
s1 1 830-3796

0 a
a
Cent
(Jreenxilh
(I





Entertainment
m?c iEast (Hamltnuiu
February 11, 1992
'Boys Next Door' provides insight and humor Lady Pirates
By o� Horsl
Last, but not lwst, there is Barry, Though research into charac
played by Bray Culpcppcr, .1 bril ter development is always impor
Kant schizophrenic who fantasizes tanl in any play, these actors and
1.1 1 Carolina Playhouse that he is a golf pro actresses have gore? above and be
ipen; the nev� yeai b) providing When The Boys Next Poor' yond the call ol duty in order to
dionce with a look into the first opened on No 23,1987,inthe achieve total reality
nes serious and often funny Lamb's "heater in New York City, rhe actors have visited men-
foui mentally impaired men critk s greeted it with good reviews tally impaired homes, singly and in
i .limn s realistic PheBoys rheBoysNext Door' moves the groups, and have gone on outings
� audience to an awareness ol how with the residents, with the biggest
rting Thursday Feb 13and many things in everyday life we event being a dance, rhe dance
ling until the Feb 18, The takeforgranted.mattersthatcanbe helped the actors immensely, be-
Next Pcxr" is.ii nmpassion of major importance to those who causean integral scenein the play is
� centering on the lives erf are handicappcdMel Gussow ol also a group dance
� !K impaired men who rhe New York Times said. Gussow Berberian said th.it when he
1 croup home and arc also commented that "Griffin has visited the home, Iwasapprehen
I bv a sincere but burnt written a sweet tempered corned) sive .11 first, but after a while it
� kei ot social on em
�ld Mom the punt
ich 1.il w 01 kei
,1 Berberian I In'
DonBiehn, thedirectorol rhe
Boys Next D001 saidtlwit we I the
cast! are all oimmtted utheunder tevl 1 omfortablc around tlu'in
becomes very comfortable
Berberian'smaingoalinhisrcsean h
was to get to know the people and
I wanted to see how the work-
ers deal w ith themand theirbeh.n -
sasnumorousepi Kins theme of o-n love foi the
rwiNe be taken mentalh impaired
ovvninanewlighl BiehnalsocommenKxi that the ior Berberiansaid 'I realized that
pla is about human beings and at times vou have to really be stern
nists give an tin- comedv th.it is present comes
Photo I . � -tmira
with them because they're so much
: 'Millook int out ol the audience's niliation of like children
j Aw ue. Derrick Parker and Jau Prathei istti
ei us bul tunny daily lives ol Ihe mentally imj
lerstiHxl world ol their own insecurities and vulner
I, the abilities
p plaved b 1 he 1 har.u lei - iUV not to be
h il bed a I bul to be laughed with
Biel 11 - I I � � audieiv e should
v .ue foi these chai � ti 1
m.nn soure 1 I the fun the in
plav, Biehn said, is the en '� 1 1
1 he a l �rs v ho plav the f�
plav the i li.ir.i. ter and not the ste-

tall vimpainxlmenalso gained rcotvpo
n 11 ter is just a r,uv unseti - I
a lot of insight into their characters with son
and then l iha k �i
� tl � akl that mentally im
paii - ; havi 1 mpletoaban
likeevervon�
, I v i
� 1 their lives
in his lib .u .1 agoof thecharactersandtheirchild their emo
there is no
I b Den I
a ith the mind
I butthinksth.it he
Jerstand the intel
tes around
like iew ol life
il the play
I � imarilv an ition plav
and slightlv limited in pl �l Bii hn
i hose " lhe B s Next 1 vr be
� - li's,l I
1 ilpepper t und .1 differ
�� : ; in touch will
m areasin 1 tall It - - tvorkoi
Healsodiscoveredthat who explained the behavior pat-
. �. clear and � terns ol the type of scl pi 1 1
erbetweenindi that I'm plaving, ulpeppei
� 1
.�� iid of b � ��
ill then
. �
: �
vidual emotions "This worked better ton ause be 01
�' 1 hey 1 1. � i. erea tion tin . in ell 1 I their
to each emotion Prat her said, impairment that if I was just watch portra
When they're happy, they're ing them and not interacting, 1 the heai tnd -
cause he "liked it and thought thai happyand nothing else Thcinter- wouldn't have gotten an honesl whosooMt �����
( coulddoil active resoai � o helped Prather view of their lives ing sav '� -
;

in tor-
Cradle fails to rock audience
By Majorie McKinstry
sun Write!
mo

. . .
tatii 1 .inglv f Pevtoi
. . f the 1
: a- an
: �
In : � . li � :� �� � tatinv:
Rebec a I leMomay portraysapreg
nant widow (Pevton) whose disas mind �'� - � 11
trous miscarriage instigates her to �� i tl ��� - feel
vengeful villainies I to satisfy th enrol nd I I as if 1 Vs he
In her deluded and depressed suspenseful � �� � �
mind, she decides to plant herself as the m ���:��
a nanny in the Bartel's home, the can r fan - sed U
familv who she blames for her loss
Asa nanny in the Bartel's hon nl rtui it
quickly devises a way to maki 1 intei
Iron
� � kill
md

selt indispensable
Pevton pretends ti
riev 11
earn careless!) dropp I I like
I I .ire Bartel from the new bon
stn's mouth fhis devious mai
.
rant
� chtlv
� �
� : I

Photo by MaHhew McWay
a De Mornay, � " ears to be the perfect nanny to Claire Bartel (Annabella
� Ian .� will soc � b lurrw I 1 le out by Peyl n's hiddei a lenda.
vering is the first bit of ��
Pev ton's part � ,
After this, Pej ton 1 onfinues I of n
manipulate the Bartel family, bul abl I hand)
instead of becoming frightening, the Hu Isoi olomon displav

� rip : .
I
1 � �
- I �
Westworld finds open door to America
Derwo d ndn V. tvvorld
guitai I (Tien i a wind ��� now
open for Westworld that didn't ex
ist when we released our latesl al-
bum
Now that the) are revitalized
and re-energized, Westworld can
ro enter rhe American music scene,
hiatus has released which iscurrently very open tocul
ting edge British rex k with a dance-
floor groove.
1 he song "10,000miles" opens
the album witha monstrous groove
that makes you want todance wher-
ever you an
rhe music comes off sounding
liv 1 isa Will iams
� Writer
in tired of waiting f r
� : Ml to release a n
be vou should give the
rid album a try.
ondon basfd Vi-sUvorld, at
bum Motors .iul Shak
i: be described as wide
icolor pop with a mod
Another sone 1 1 and
t) Pt.2 1 anodel tl�' irmer
record label, RCA.
1 he opening Ivrics 01the song
"There was a definitelack ot a
CadillacI gave mvsoul to
- � 1 ot music that we've
I ontinuetodohas
. become popular in
via English groups like tike a post-modem road song for an
nes ,md 1Mb said accelerated culture.
rock'n'roll and they gave it ba k "
describes the band's feelings to-
wards their former label
Some of their ballads include
"Carefrce( lustomEyes" and "Star
gazer which is an epic slice of
classic pop distinguished by a great
yearning vocal performance bv
American-bom vocalist Elizabeth
Westwood.
West wood kvls that music is
all about escapism. "The energy oi
es� apism is hal Kmei � rcpre
s'nts to the resl ol the world she
said With her voice and lyrics, she
proves it.
The first single from the new
albumDo No Wrong, is accom-
panied bya stunning video diret tod
by Hiroyuki Nakano, best known
for his work with 1 v 1 ite
Andrews sumsup their style of
musk?by saying, 'XDurmusic is made
for cruising around in a large auto
mobile and having a gixvl time.
too
Westworld is definitely a band
that reminds us the future is now.
and pop music lives because we
want it to.
Photo by Tim Wilkms
Westworld finds an open window to the American music scene and
hopes to ride the radio waves to the top cf the charts
Roses are red, Violets are blue A personal in Love Lines, Says I Love you.
Stop by the Publication's building(across from Joyncr) today before five, to place a Love Line to someone special.
HANKS HOMEMADE ICE CREaM
316 E. 10TH ST. 758-0000
NOBODY
KNOWS
LIKE
i IILSUJ DOMINO'S
� HHowYou Like Pizza At Home.
What a sweeter way to say "I love you"
than to VJ
send a cake and balloons on Valentine's Day )
Total price delivered $11.59
including tax i
I Show this coupon when placing cake order and receive a "free " kids cone
LARGE DOMINO'S
PIZZA AS LOW AS
$6.00
Play "Beat the Clock" every Tuesday in February. Order any
LARGE pizza with up to 3.toppings between 6 PM and 10
PM, and the time you order is the price you pay!
30 minute guarantee docs not apply
1 pizza per call
CALL 758-6660
Team gets
revenge
against
JMU, 69-55
By Joshua Doepke
"It was a �� '
Lady Pirate h ad basket!
Pat Pterson viid
TheLad)
a 69-55 '��' '
tetic Assodal
son Univer il. '�'
Minges
Ladv Pirates
rrxre thai thi
still some hair-r
Bad
have hurt thi
ketdidi I
I shot onl 4 : � �
shot : : � '
didn't back d
"Thekkj .1 di
tonight indsci

only
overtiri �
In the first ele
thegame,tl I
outofea houtol �
Howevir '� - tftei
with nine minutes ft
Onin wh - -
stole :
Gayrtoi
load witl threep
ot the game
lastid until ML called a tin
with 4:15 left in the ha I I scored
immediati . after the break
went into the locker r - i
Bve-pointleadfwhenitsh(
been a seven-point lead
With under a minut I
of the referees called back i
EC's Kim Sanuels sa
dock had expired
In the beginning ft
half, the Lady Pirates
an eight-point lead before n i
fevorablecallsby the refertes start -1
reducing the ECL tead. � re :
entoftheseca
CXDonnelLw i �
in less than a mir I a halt
����'
AFEMRS&CBEET
Dnn't send the same old tired t
the Valentine that rises above
Balloon - A - dram a friei
someone special
We offer:
� Latex
� ('and)
� Fundoms and kt chain In
11 k'liven
see tir ir
�U sure to call ii- first foi
(k liver) b) a ti �
BOW TIE
BEAU
I 1 1 lx I ill "
830-3796





nd humor
lon-
.1 in
k audience
t he
and
� !
II �
" �
"
3ioto by Tim WilKin
scene and
ays I Love you
to someone special.
�GE DOMINO'S
ZA AS LOW AS
$6.00
sday in February. Order any
sings between 6 PM and 10
he price you pay!
ipply
li
Sports
(Hire East (Earultman
February 11,1992
7
Lady Pirates capture two key conference games
Hargrove's second
'double-double'
sinks Spiders, 93-85
Team gets
revenge
against
JMU, 69-55
By Joshua Doepke
Suff Writer
It was i wild, wild game
Lady Pirate head basketball coach
Pal Pierson said.
The Lady Pbatescameoul with
9 55 victory over Colonial Ath
Association rival fames Madi-
� n University Monday night in
Minges Coliseum. Even though the
l ady 1 irates were never down bv
ire than thnv points, there were
till some hair-raising moments.
Bad calls bv the referees could
. e hurt the team badly. The bas-
ket didn't cooperate either, as ECU
I only 40 percent, while 1Mb
shot 35 percent from the hold.
1 was really proud of how we
in t back down Pierson snd.
The kids had revenge m their hearts
� night and scrapped on the floor
I he win revenged the team's
. i. AAlossofthe season, a 71-69
.crtnne loss.it MU.
In the first eleven minutes ot
game, the two teams were never
lUtofea lunitoteachother'sgrasp.
I lowever, ECU, after a time out
. ith nine minutes left, went on a 9-
run when senior Tonya 1 largrovc
st le a bal 1 and made an easy lay u p
GaynorODonnell added to the
id with ECU's only three pointer
o( the game. The Lady Pirate run
Listed until MU called a timeout
with 4:13 left in the Ivilf and scored
immediately after the break. ECU
went into the locker room with a
five-point lead, when it should have
been a seven-point lead
With under a minute to go, one
of the referees called back a shot bv
ECU's Kim Sanueb saying the sh 1
clock huid expired.
In the beginning oi the second
half, the I xid v Pirates jumped out to
an eight-point lead before more un-
favorabtecallsby lite refereesstatled
reducing the ECU lead. The recipi-
entofthesecallswasrnainryX laynor
CDonnell, who received three fouls
in less than a minute and a half.
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
Tonya Hargrove scored a game-
high 30 points and grabbed a ca-
reer-high 18 rebounds to lead the
Lady Pira tes to their second straight
win over the visiting Lady Spiders
(11-6) of Richmond 93-85 in Minges
Coliseum.
The win gives ECU stile pos-
session of first place in the CAA.
They now stand 6-1 in conference
plav and are 12-6 overall.
Hargrove's outstanding all-
around performance earned her
CAA Player of the Week honors,
and ECAC Player of the Week. She-
leads the conference in rebounding
with over 10 per game; she is fifth in
scoring and fourth for field goal
accuracy.
The 1 ady Pirates held as much
a 19-point lead over UR But the hot
shooting Lady Spiders came back
in the second halt hitting seven of
eleven from three-point land.
"This was a big win for us
said kKi coach Pat Pierson. "We
had lots of respect for them. We
knew they had a great perimeter
game. Both )ulie Jones and Ginny
Dovle can shoot with anyone
Jones connected on six three's,
for 26 points and Doyle contributed
23 points Doyle, who leads the
NCAA's with a 985 percent free
throw percentage missed just her
second free throw of the1 season on
Saturday.
ECU had sharp sruxiting per-
formances of their own. Senior
Kenneya Wilson came of f the bench
tohitseven-of-twelveshotsandfour
free throws for 18 points. Mechelle
Jonesalso contributed off the bench
toadd eight pointsoff perfect shoot-
ing.
"It was just a great team effort
Pierson said. "Kenneya and
Mechelle both came in and played
well and Janet (Rodgerson, two
points, three rebounds) gave us
some good time. 1 think our depth
really helped out today
GaynorODonnel continued to
orchestrate the offense, dishing out
five assists .md scoring 13 points.
She is the team's and CAA leader
with over seven assists per game.
RhondaSmithalsoputinagood
game underneath scoring 14 points.
ECU dominated the lady Spi-
ders on the boards grabbing 43 re-
bounds, compared to 29 for UR
Hargrove alone had 12 defensive
rebounds.
The Lady Spidersoutshot ECU,
31 percent from thefield,62 percent
three pointers compared to 48 per-
cent and 50 percent for Lady Pi-
rates.
ECU played their up-tempo
defense causing 25 UR turnovers
for 17 points. Toina Coley had five
steals and Hargrove had four.
Photo by Jam�s Browning � ECU Photo Lab
Senior Lady Pirate forward Tonya Hargrove drives to the basket for two ot her 30 points against Richmond
Saturday in Minges Coliseum Her 30 point. 18 rebound night was the second "double-double" of the year
With 110? left in the halt the
Lady Dukes went up by three, but
the run ended there ECU went on a
13-2 run over thenexl five minutes.
Prom th.it point, the 1ady Pirates'
lead wasneverlessthaneightpoints.
"We stressed our offensive and
defensive plays against (JMU's
Emily) Met racken said (oina
c olev It obviously worked because
she had h points, four fouls and
only four rebounds.
Connie Small tied her career
K'st 20 points (also a game high)
and set a new career high in steals
with six
The Lady Pirates are now 13-6
overall and 7-1 in the CAA. JMU
falls to l(W and 4-5 in the CAA.
The nex 11 w� Lad v Pi ra te games
will be on the road over the week-
end.The team plavsat American on
Saturday and at George Mason
University on Monday.
Hargrove receives honors
ECU's women's basketball
player Tonya Hargrove hasbeen
named the Colonial Athletic As-
sociation Player of the Week as
well asbeingnamed as the ECAC
Wonx'n'sBasketballPlayerofthe
Week.
Hargrove, a senior from Ra-
leigh, N.C led the Lady Pirates
to a 93-85 victory over Richmond
on Saturday scoring 30 points
and pulling down a career-high
18 rebounds.
Selected from more than 80
Division I schools for the EACA
honor, Hargrove also recorded
four steals and two blocked shots
for the win. Her "double-double"
was the ninth of the season.
1. e '9091 CAA Player of the
Year, Hargrovecurrently leads the
CAA in rebounding, averaging
10 rebounds a game. She is also
fifth in scoring (15.3 ppg)
Don't send the same old tired things, send
the Valentine that rises above all others
Balloon - A - Gram a friend or that
someone special
Delivery to all dorms
see our Air Walkers!
We offer:
� latex
� Candy
� 1 undoms and key chain bottle openers
'U- surt' to call us first fur our special Valentine
delivery by a tuxedo H" or gal.
BOW TIE
BEAU
WE DELIVER UNTIL 7:30 PM
830-3796
BLTs Valentine Special
One Dozen Long Stem Roses
arranged with greens,
babies breath and boxed
$29.95 plus tax
Wtt ordered our 5.000 Roses
to make sure nur Valentine's da gees as planned
so order in advance and save.
Price is very likely to go up Valentine's day!
To order come to
205 K. 5th Street
Downtown Greenville, or call
7S7-IW7 or 752-4953
I'avmcnt due upon ordering
East CaraHna 1991-1992
Playhouse P�� �?
son
Tom GRIFFIN'S
THE BOYS NEXT DOOR
"An extraordinary-
play that will bring
both laughter and tears
to your exes
.4"
N II IS I
FEBRUARY 13 14, 15, 17 and 18 at 8:15 p.m.
FEBRUARY 16 at 2:15 p.m.
ECU STL DENTS: $4.50
Live Theatre Eor Less Than A Movie So Bring A Date
Call: 757-6829
Don't Forget
Your
weetheart on
alentine's Day!
February 14
Central Book & News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open till 9:30 pm
7 days a week
756-7177
John's Flowers
Attention Lovers Everywhere:
Valentine's Day is Feb. 14
We at John's Flowers appreciate
everybody's business
In return, we are keeping our prices the
same for Valentine's Day
A Dozen Roses arranged $55.00
Half Dozen $36.50
One in a vase $12.50 Delivery
John's Flowers Gifts
2221 Stantonsburg Rd.
752-3311





!Q �hc c�iHt(Tarultntai February 11, 1992
'Voice of the Pirated finds job challenging
Charles takes ECU'S electronic media to higher level
By Chip Kline
SUff Writer
olt Charles. 'The Voice of the
Pit,itiV is taking the Pirate Sports
Network to new boundaries in only
his fourth vear at ECU.
'l"he job has changed a lot since
I've been here Chariessaid. "Its just
gotten bigger and bigger
IWoR'hisarrival, there were only
20 stations on the network for Pirate
athletics. Now, thorv are 40 and the
advetlismgRevenuehasdoubled He
uuvninaI irate basketball play-by-
play, along with the fixtKill and
Kisketball coaches shows which
until he arrived were done by the
coaches with help from local televi
sion stations.
Another first this year will be a
highlight film of the entire season
l his summer a new football league.
the Professional Spring Football
! ague will begin, and Charles will
be the voice of the Columbia. S.C ,
( ougars. The game will be aired on
dtherririmeNetworkorSportsChan-
nfi America
Previously, Charles was the
Voice of the Hotties" at Virginia
Poiytcchiucal Institute , and earlier.
h 'wasatFunranUnrversty During
the 1982 season he coined a now
famous phrase at ECU: 'Taint This
One Purple
'This will blow a hole in a lot of
people's minds Charles said. "At
Fiirnvin 1 was looking for something
catchy and for some reason Taint
This One Purple' just came into my
head
Actually, the idea came to him
after watchinganNBAgamein which
Dick Stockton said, "You can paint
this one Celtic Green
Not that Charles tries to pattern
himself after any one announcer.
"I takea little bitof thebestofalot
of different people he said.
Ovating your own style and al-
legiance of fans is very important in
broadcasting. According to Charles,
to gain the following of fans, you
must show different perspectives of
the game.
"1 trv to get an allegiance or fol-
lowing Charles said. "1 have to be
Objective. Peopledon't wanttoheara
biased announcer anymore
Charles said that actually an-
nouncing tlx' game is not tlx' hardest
part of the job - the prep work for
games is.
Hie preparation for tixithall be-
ginsonTuesday at tlx head coaches
press conference and runs right upto
game umo with player interviews
Hey Valentine:
Get your message in the classified page's Love Lines.
Stop by the office for more details!
Love is funny sometimes
especial!) with our Valentine's Da 78th Street
and Mi Bron cards
m
AMtRK Vs. (jRlUNGS
Student Stores
Wright Bldg.
East Carolina University
When you buy $5.00 of an
AMERICAN GREETINGS
PRODUCT Feb. 1 thru Feb. 14,
receive 4 oz bag of chocolates
free while supplies last.
Q TGIF
SWEETHEART SALE
SALE STARTS FEB. 10
Men's & Women's Name Brand
Merchandise
Q
REDUCED
UPTO
80
OFF w
CATALOG
PRICE
and the studying of players and sta-
tistics of both teams.
Basketball is not as comptica ted
Doing thebroadcast and learning the
statistics on everyone is much easier
than football.
Time is the key dcmenl in sports
broadcastingand therearenotenough
hours in the day to get everything
done.
"Having enough time to do
things like we want to do them is
vital said Charles. "We ha veso much
going on that there isn't enough time
to do everything we want
His most rewarding moment in
broadcasting was the 1992 Peach
Bowl.
"It was a great comeback he
said. "It wasa story biKk ending toa
dream season that only happensonce
in a lifetime
This was not the first Peach Bowl
in which the team that Charles was
announcing for came Kick to beat
N.CStatc.
"I guess that I'm N.C. State'sbad
luck charm he said.
Chris Kiner kicked i field goal
with no time left to beat N.C State
when Charles was at Virginia Ivh.
Evenwithallthesportschannels
around, and with the big money U -
ingin televi sion Charles still is a radio
9
man at lieart.
"I grew up on radio said
Charles. "It'sall we Kid besides three
channels on a black and white televi-
sion
But he will not ruleout the possi-
bility of doing more television work
in the future.
'Television is a new challenge
he said. "If s a gcxxl career step
I le announced the Old Domin-
ion basketball game in January for
HSPN, and he's been invited to do
another game later in the season.
Although work is both his voca-
tion and advocation, Charles finds
time to lift weights, run and above all,
spend quality time with his family.
Jeff Charles
.�

�ate.

�K
V
Wednesday
81

1
Progressive
Donee Night
10 Droft
$1.15 Tall Boys
$2.50 Pitchers
$ 1.00 Kamikazes
�Ladies Free til 10:30
m
�i
�J-
3? ��5i337
m
w
M
Pi1
w
We Are
Buying
Purchases of $10 or more eligible to
win one dozen roses r
Drawing held Feb. 13
I)o not have to be present to win
n
US TGIF Outlet
210 E. 5th St. (Across from Bogies)
Store hours: M-Sat. 10-6
758-8612
Used IMen's Clothing
$ WE PAY CASH $
SHIRTS SWEATERS T
PANTS SWEATS KNITS
JEANS SHOES ETC.
CASUAL & DRESS
LARGE & EXTRA LARGE ONLY
WINTER OR SUMMER
Park in the city parking lot behind Globe Hardware
and use our new reasr entrance!
THE ESTATE SHOP
416 Evans St.
(Across from Cubbies)
752-3866
10:00-5:00 Men-Sat
J We Also Buy & Sell Used Furniture
I
1991-92 BATTLE OF THE DORMITORIES
AYCOCK
BELK
CLEMENT
COTTON
FLEMING
FLETCHER
GARRETT
GREEN
JARVIS
JONES
SCOTT
SLAY
TYLER
U MS IE I)
TYLER
(JMSTEAD
WHITE
Look
k for weekly updates oi Intramural
events in The East Carolinian.
Chancellor's Cup standings and
finishes will be published on
Tuesday's, and Battle of the Residence
Halls will be published on Thursday's
� providing the amount of space we
have.
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
3S�J
3003 S. Evans 75&-2011
Fresh Oysters, Flounder, Shrimp, Trout,
Deviled Crab Cakes, & Clam Strips.
� Small Shrimp � f� �
� a hmrh � Regular Shrimp 1
at lunch
$2.99
I Dinner at $6.95 �
� Get One FreeJ
I Beverage not included' Beverage not included"
1 M-F Exp Feb 17 � M-Th Exp Feb 17 �
3 MONTHS
FOR69
USM ITRIAL MEMBERS
HURRY
BEAT THE
PRICE
INCREASE
MEMBERSHIP





Sex Love and Money
Band members discuss their style changes.
17
Give me all your lovin'
Students express themselves in Love Lines.
12
W$t lEaBt Caruliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.66 No.9
Thursday, February 13,1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
12 Pages
Student files for city council
Chaplain warns students
The student newspaper at the Illinois
Institute of Technology recently printed a
letter issuing warnings to students about cult
activities on college campuses.
Chaplain Anselm Amadio wrote the
warning and listed four common character-
istics oi cult activity that include: a sense of
spiritual superiority, isolationist activities, a
control-oriented leadership and making
scapegoats of those who leave the organiza-
tion.
"No one should be required to submit to
surrendering over these distinctively human
gifts (of dignity, freedom and autonomy) u.
any personality cult Amadio said "When
depression,anxicty and stressenterourlives,
we have recourse to various professional and
spiritual resources
Students hold strike
Two students at the University of Ver-
mont recently staged a hunger strike to pro-
test the school's administration, which they
say adheres to a racist agenda.
Pamela Smi th and Karl Jagbandhansingh
slid they are staging the strike to protest the
91 hoofs refusal to deal with the campus
problems of hate crimes and the concerns of
students of color.
According to the school's newspaper,
The Cynic, the students are among four who
face internal hearings at the university for
allegedly holding two students hostage after
thev threw a bottle through a window in the
Diversity University in October.
Campus delivers pizza
The Student Governmen t a t Appalachian
State University recently implemented a new
bill to provide free pizza delivery to all stu-
dents who live on campus.
"The inspiration for the bill came since
we had an on-campus pizzeria said Doug
Duncan, student affairschairperson forSGA.
The students have to call the campus
pizzeria to place an order, and the amount of
thepizAiisdeducted from their meal account.
"ITiedeliverv svstem is currently not run-
ning on weekends, but is running smoothly.
Minor pursues degree
A 10-year-old boy who wants to become
a doctor is planning to enter the University of
California at Irvine this fall to pursue a bio-
logical sciences degree.
Masoud Karkehabadi is currently en-
rolled at Orange Coast College, where he has
maintained a 4.0 grade point average.
Karkehabadi said he plans to use his medical
school training to become a brain surgeon
and find a cure for Alzheimer's disease.
Karkehabadi enrolled at Orange Coast
College last year when he was nine because
he said his father would not let him enroll
when he wanted to at age seven.
Professor found dead
A memorial service was recently held at
the University of Florida for an assistant pro-
fessor who was found shot to death in his
home.
Anthony Section, 37, taught building
construction at the school for eight years. A
neighbor discovered him slumped over in a
chair in his home. Investigations into the case
have led officials to a dead end.
"We still don't have a motive, and we
don't have any suspects said Lt. Spencer
Mann, a spokesman for the Alachua County
Sheriff's office.
In cases like this, a background check
will usually turn up some evidence, but
"we've not found anything out of the ordi-
nary Mann said.
Complied by Elizabeth Shlmrnel from CPS
and other college newspapers.
Inside Thursday
Crime Scene 2
Editorial 4
Comics 5
Classifieds 6
Entertainment 7
Spoils 9
Love Lines12
By Reid Parker
Staff Writer
On Feb.10, Patrick Pitzer,an
ECU sophomore, tiled his can-
didacy for theat large city coun-
cil seat of Greenville as the clock
chimed noon.
Pitzer was the first to enter
the Pitt County Board of elec-
tions. After his arrival, a number
oi prospective candidates gath-
ered in the Elections Board of-
fice, and Pitzer spoke amicably
with an incumbent Board of Edu-
cation officer.
Pitzerstudied thedocument
that would officially register him
as a candidate before signing his
name.
"I am glad I finally did it
Pitzer said as he walked out of
the Elections Board office.
Pitzer s�iid he will run for
city council in order to educate
students about their need to be-
come involved in the political
process, to represent the student
interest, and to pursue a per-
sonal goal to enter public life.
"1 would like to see a move
toward mutual cooperation be-
tween the two (city and students)
rather than the policy of contain-
ment that the city has exercised
on the students in the past
Pitzer said.
"I would like to show the
students that it is possible to ef-
fect a change in local politics by
active participation; the govern-
ment will not be responsive to
the needs of the students unless
the students are a force in the
government
"1 am in the process of or-
ganizing a campaign commit-
tee. Anyone who would like to
help is welcome
The city of Greenville is di-
vided into five wards with one
city council memberclected from
each ward, and one at large
candidate elected from the city
as a whole.
Pitzer said he chose the at
large seat because he wants to
represent all the students in the
city. He said felt he would have
a better chance of being elected
since ECU students are not iso-
lated in one ward of the city.
In the last election, the at
large candidate was elected by
some 5,000 votes. The popula-
tion of ECU is roughly three
times that number. Pitzer will
rely heavily on the student vote
to get him elected.
Pitzer is joining a growing
Photo by K�vin Amos � ECU Photo Lab
Patrick Pitzer, a political science student, files for candidacy for an at large position on the Greenville
City Council. Pitzer said he would like to see more cooperation between the city and ECU.
number of students and faculty
from East Carolina running for
public office this election, Wil-
liam Thorpe, a political science
graduate student, is running for
governor of North Carolina and
MaryWilliams,alibrananatJoy-
ner Library, is running for a seat
for State House 8th Chstnct.
Pitzer is a registered Repub-
lican, but that will not play into
Greenville city politics as the
elections are non-partisan. He is
a member of the Beta Theta Pi
fraternity and serves as the pub-
lic relationsofficer. Heisa politi-
cal science major and plans to
graduate in 1994.
Photo lab requests new equipment
By Christie Lawrence
Staff Writer
The ECU Photography Lab
is ready to move up into cur-
rent technology. At the Media
Board meeting Thursday, James
Browning, general manager of
the Photo Lab, presented a pro-
posal to upgrade the current
photography equipment.
Instead (if buying parts for
all of the old equipment, Brown
suggested replacing it with
new. According to Browning,
the system that was suggested
would be an "upwardly mo-
bile system" which, in the long
run, will save the photo lab
money and time.
With the proposed system
the pictures and the negatives
would be put directly on a
computer disk. 'This way you
can make changes on the com-
puter without wasting chemi-
cals and paper Brown said.
Although traditional cam-
eras will be used, the proposal
alsocallsforonesrillvideocam-
era. According to Brown, the
still video camera would be cost
efficient, especially when
shooting student identification
cards.
The Media Board will re-
view Brownings proposal and
discuss it at the next meeting.
The satire page, a renewed
addition in The East Carolinian,
caused some concern at the
Media Board meeting. Rudy-
Alexander, assistant vice chan-
cellor of Student Life, said he
was troubled with what he
calls, "the paper's crusade on
the wiretapping case This
statement was made by
Alexanderasan individual,not
as a Media Board member.
Since the wiretapping case
is in the courts, Alexander said
he feels that The East Carolinian
should not continue to "beat"
the case into the ground. "I re-
alize that I can't do any thing
about this he said. "But I just
thought that the paper should
know how I feel about the ar-
ticles that keep coming up
Tim Hampton, general
manager of The East Carolinian,
argued that satire articles are
opinionated. "It comes down
to personal opinion Hamp-
ton said.
"In mv opinion, no one
could misconstrue that James
DePuv was in the grassy knoll
on Nov. 2, 1963
New service
assists the
impaired
By Marjorie Pitts
Suf f Writer
Latex lessons
Photo by Jill Crwry � ECU Photo Lab
Cindy Long, a peer health educator, demonstrates how to put on a condom during the program "Condom Sense"
in Mendenhall Wednesday. The information session was scheduled as a part of National Condom Week.
Radio Reading Service of Eastern
North Carolina hopes to be on the air May
1, but they must first jump many obstacles
in order to begin broadcasting.
The purpose of RRSENC is to provide
information services and entertainment to
visually impaired and physically disabled
persons within an 11 county area of East-
ern North Carolina.
There are an estimated 3000 visually
impaired people in the area.
In Pitt County alone, 406 known cases
of visual impairment exist.
"The reading service brings people
back into the world again said Ramona
Van Nortwick, board member for the
RRCENC. Van Nortwick, who is legally
blind said, "This program is going
See Reading, page 2
WAVE program enhances well-being
By Christie Lawrence
Staff Writer
The WAVE is finally here,
and it is time for everyone todive
in.
The WAVE, Wellness Ad-
ventures for Virtually Everyone,
is a program to "enhance the
well-being of students, faculty,
and staff and support healthy
attitudes said JeanieTomkalski,
director of Health Promotion and
Weil-Being. "We will be trying
to do everything we can to edu-
cate students on how to make
responsible lifestyle decisions
According to Tomkalski,
students do not realize how im-
portant taking careof themselves
is because they do not under-
stand the difference between
healthy and feeling well. "You
don't just become healthy she
said. "It depends on the choices
you make
Many students do not fully
understand the term wellness
either. Traditionally it means
"freefromillness"butaccording
to Tomkalski, students do not
realize that there are several as-
pects of wellness other than the
physical state.
Emotional, intellectual,
physical, social, spiritual and
occupational developments also
impact a person's state of well-
being.
The kickoff for the WAVE
will be Feb. 20 and 21 featuring
Dr. Donald Tubesing as the key-
note speaker. Tubesing, presi-
dent of Whole Person Associate,
is a nationally recognized ex-
pert in the field of stress man-
agement and wellness promo-
tion.
Thursday, Feb. 20, Tubesing
will speak in two separate
See WAVE, page 3
Valentine's Day legend
We kiss good-bye, for luck, for love, for fun, under the
misdetc, to seal marriages, to show respect,and on Valentine's
Day, but not many people know when this lip-smacking
phenomenon began.
Legend has it the people of India were the first to indulge
in lip kissing, and when Alexander the Great conquered parts
of India in 326 B.C, his armies were said to have been im-
pressed with this show of affection.
And, although the Greeks first exposed Europe to kissing,
the Romans are really credited with popularizing this new lip
connection.
The Romans are also given credit for inventing the mod-
em-day Valentine's Day. During a springtime festival, the
Romans began feeding Christians to the lions.
On Feb. 14, one of the Christians fed to the lions was St.
Valentine, who was told to renounce his faith in God or die.
Valentine's choice of death made him a martyr and a symbol.





QJlje Caat(Tarnlinian February6, 1992
S?ENE
Reading
Traffic stop for public urination and
DWI near Outpatient Center
Feb. 9
' � ' i
for in insurant
' ' lh Mi �
Hill Pi vi Vi hicl� I
iSllt.1
I �. m .ssistii res ue.
I � - ssisUi resident advisor in reference to
subject drinkii ik1 was handled bv RA.
2 28 10th and College 1 lill Drive Vehi le stopped for speed-
ing campi �sued to student.
Feb. t(i
1 fl Ragsdale building: Vehicle stopped, staff i ber given
verbal warning for one vvav street violation.
01 (XI I rnsteadHall:Vehiclestoprvd Non-student given verbal
warning foi spt �oding
� !8 Christenbun Memorial Gvm: Vehicle st( i ped Staff
meml i .� . � n erbal v aming for improper equipment.
t Spilnwn building:Checked out refercn � I �l n �
1112 Christenburv Memorial vti Escorted V- sen i I
the bank
1114 Spilman building: Checked out reference I fin i
� il lassroomBuilding . heckedi ' rei too
ilsen I ntaci nude
1330 Ragsviale building: Checked out reference I fii ilarm,
I llied 1 lealth topped for oi
tion and exceed peed.Campu itkni
ind Rix'kspnnj raffi topfoi
stop iign vi , � i to produce driv ii
memb r wasi i tatioi
s -� � � � � �� top,verbalwai
srudei : ' peed
I Ragsdali nrv Ri :
w .i rest I
Feb. 11
0758 Spilman Building: Trafficstop, verbal warning given (or
student violating one-way street violation
1046 NearOutpatientCcntenTraffi for public urination
and DWI Subject was taken to Magistrate oft i
1148 Slay I Kill: Checked out damage to propcrtv report.
1254 West of Mendenhall Student Center: "raffi stopl ra
������ ' ausingai I
a i ampus i itation
ui ng:Cho ked out h n i phone ca i � ��
ly25 Riigsdali Responded to alarm reference. Sa
resel
� Mapl rrafficstop,campuscital led I
studenl � � peedim:
Crime Scc;ie is taken from Official Public Safety Logs
Continued from page 1
to mean s nuu h t i a K t l people
who .ire house bound
The Radio ReadingService
will broadcast on an I'M radio sta-
tion. The station will deliver a vari-
ety of information servi esnotavail-
able through other mediums.
Information that is printed in
local newspapers such as editorials,
soc ial events, grocery ads. obituar-
ies a ihK lassified ads will b� read on
the radio station,
( Ireenville should ha e a
public radio station bo ause ol our
sie Van Nortwick said. In New
Bern, public radio station WTEB,
89 I M, has made their transmitter
available lor the broadcast ol the
service.
Broadcast studio spa e has been
provided in loyner Librarv on the
campus of ECU. Radio Reading
Service equipment will be install vi
in tins space, from which produc-
tion will begin.
Broadcasts can beh rd wil
spiM.il receiver provided fret i I
charge to qualified in lividu ils bv
the Radio Reading St n ' t eiv-
ers will be put in nur: ing 1
libraries ,imJ indiv idual
1 unding is n ed
ment and a part-tim rdn toi
liquipment costs v. ill
with an additioi
tor the first � i I peral
Main voluntooi i ed
well All readers and committee
membersarc volunteers state and
federal funds are not availablt to
the Radio Reading Service at tins
tune.
The radio station hop 4. be
on theair24hoursadav, seven days
aweek. Inordertobt al I do this,
main' dedicated volunteers are
needed.
Anvone interested invt �lunteer-
ing to help shed light on tl - visu
ally impaired and physicallv handi-
capped should call 757 . � ��
FREE SNEAK PREVIEW
FREE MOVIE POSTERS AND T-SHIRTS
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18
8:00PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
PASSES AVAILABLE AT
MENDENHALL INFO DESK
PRESENTED BY
The Student Union
Films Committee
Hatusfeeter
HARRIS TEETER NiiAHS
LOW PRICES.1
U.S,D:A. Choice Whole
Sirloin
Tip
UNTRIMMED
Broccoli
HT Free Or
HT Ice Cream
'1.00
Half
Gal.
Diet Pepsi Or
Pepsi Cola
09
2
Ltr.
Harris fester
i r
i
Harris Teeter
1
SAVE $1.00
When You Purchase One 14 Oz.
I Bag Of President's Choice -
Decadent Or Decadent 2 Cookies I
I I
I
� . : � '
Purcl ise
SAVE 60c
I When You Purchase One 10 Oz.
I Bottle Of Presidents Choice
Premium Gourmet Steak Sauce
I I
1
Coupon Value jJLOO (Q j j Coupon Value 60C (C) j
I
I I
I I
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JL O
m
VALUABLE COUPON
Hairisfeeter
i
VALUABLE COUPON
i r
' SAVE 75 '
When You Purchase One 13 Ox.
I Jar Or President's Choice
Gourmet Jams
Hamsfeeter
�i
i
This Coupon Moy Not Be Repi
Limit One Coupon Per Purchase
Offer t - ires Febiuary 18 1992
75
I
1 Coupon Value
I
! L SAVE 50 '
I When You Purchase One 64 Ox. I
� Carton Of Presidents Choice
1 Orange Juice
I I
(C) I 1 Coupon Value 50
I I
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OSANM
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VALUABLE COUPON
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Prices Effective Through February 18, 1992
Prices In This Ad Effective Through Tuesdav February 18 1992 In Greenville nr(, rv,l
W� P�o� Tk� P.�k. T I ,m nn(,t,ot Nr,r� IA T Holor, Wo On i,rra� Pornl G V.nmn,
WAVE
lectui

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Don1
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M1 D.P
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pepper!
Tin its
xV
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1111� i.
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Across from the Greene St
TAKE
EXTRA
RACKRO
BRA N D E fc
BUYERS MARKET Ml





I
i he feast (Tarnlinian 1
6, 1992
Traffic stop for public urination and
IHVI near Outpatient Center
Reading
Continued Hornpage 1
to I1H will b tion I �i i'i � li� nuuli ��� 1 h iii.uk ,i ' iin hest.iti � v �� � l oplo in :
� 1� : ' �
'

FREE MOVIE POSTERS AND T-SHIRTS
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18
8.00'PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
PASSES AVAILABLE AT
MENDENHALL INFO DESK
PRESENTED BY
The Student Union
Films Committee
Harrisfeefer
HARRIS TEETER A1E4NS
LOW PRICES!
Whole Smoked
Picnic
19
Lb.




U.S.D.A. Choice Whole i
Sirloin
UNTRIMMED
Fresh
Broccoli
HT F
HT Ice
ree Or
Cream
Diet Pepsi Or
Pepsi Cola
-1
SAVE $1.00
f When You Purchase One 14 Oz.
I Bag Of President's Choice
Decadent Or Decadent 2 Cookies I
I
I Coupon Value $1.00
I
I
(C)
SAVE 60c
When You Purchase One 10 Oz.
Bottle Of President s Cho
Premium Gourmet Steak Sauce
Coupon Vaiue
60 c
OIL JL
VALUABLE COUPON
Harnsfeeter
VALUABLE COUPON
i r-
' SAVE 75 j
I When You Purchase One 13 Oz. I
- Jar Or President's Choice ,
I Gourmet Jams 1
Harnsfeeter
1
I
i Coupon Value 75
I
I
(C) ,
SAVE 50 C
When You Purchase One 64 Oz.
Carton Of President s Choice
Orange Juice
Coupon Value
50c
C
P- fl
VALUABLE COUPON
VALUABLE COUPON
Prices Effective Through February 1 &, 992
WAVE


X
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i

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i in
"COL
PEPPEI1
Till R'
W
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BUYERS MARKET Ml
Prices In This �'� I Em I .e Throuqh Tuesday February
w Pocnv '�. - �� � � .
Gr� envtlle





o lu- tast (Carolinian
1 QQ
S?ENE
raff it stop foi public urination and
P I neai Outpatient Center
Reading
Continued from pa
I
FREE SNEAK PREVIEW
FREE MOVIE POSTERS AND T-SHIRTS
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18
8:00PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
PASSES AVAILABLE AT
MENDENHALL INFO DESK
i'Rf Si Nil DB
The Student Union
Films Committee
Hairisfeeler
HARRIS TEETEff MEANS
101V PRICES!
Whole Smoked
Picnic
Lb.
79
t
V
U.S.D.A. Choice Whole '
Sirloin
Tip
UNTRIMMED
Fresh
Broccoli
HT Free Or
HT Ice Cream
Diet Pepsi Or
Pepsi Cola
09
Half
Gal.
Ltr.
i�ironm�i
! SAVE $1.00 '
I When You Purchase One 14 Oz.
� Bag Of President's Choice
I Decadent Or Decadent �2 Cookies I
SAVE 60c
When You Purchase One 10 Oz.
I Bottle Of Pr r t s Choice
Premium Gourmet Steak Sas.
I
i Coupon Value $1.00
I
I I
Coupon Vai
i y u
60-
VALUABLE COUPON
Hair is teeter
I I
I I
"i r

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VALUABLE COUPON
' SAVE 751 !
I When You Purchase One 13 Oz. !
- Jar Or President's Choice .
I Gourmet Jams !
I
Harnsfeeier
� ����� ��"I
I
SAVE 50
I When You Purchase One 64 Oz.
- Carton Of President s Choice
I Orange Juice
I I
I Coupon Value 75C (C) j Coupon Value 5Qc
I
I I
I I
I I
W�1

VALUABLE COUPON
VALUABLE COUPON
Prices Effective Through February I g, 1992
" .
WAVE
X
"COL
pkppi:
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Ml 1111
Till' HI S
"
RACKRC
B R A N D E C
BUYERS MARKET Ml






RMAHS
ICES!
4
.occoli
.
Diet Pepsi Or
Pepsi Cola
09
12
.tir.
IS FOR EXCEPTIONAL
S CHOICE PRODUCTS!
Hat r is feeler
SAVE 601
When You Purchase One 10 Ox.
Bottle Of President's Choice
Premium Gourmet Steak Sauce
Don F
OWp
Coupon Value
11
VALUABLE COUPON
Harrisfeeter
�i
SAVE 501 .
When You Purchase One 64 Ox. 1
Carton Of President's Choice
Orange Juice
This Coupon Mayklot Be Reproduced
Limit One Coupon Per Purchase
Offer E�pnes February 1 8. '992.
Coupon Value 50
6
JUKI
JSUKt
VALUABLE COUPON
February 18,1992
IIS 1992 In Qreenv�e StoraiOrf, ,
irWiWt W� CimHv Arrant f-mAmrri Priori Strimm
WAVE
Continued from page 1
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
seminars that will take place at
' Mendenhall Student Center. The
session will target students inter-
ested in health professions. The first
: lecture, "Hooked on Helping" will
i bedevotedtothepreventionofbum
ioxK among people committed to
: care-giving professions. Tubesing
will focus on teaching the students
how to manage daily challenges,
maintain personal vitality and sat-
isfaction from their work. The ses-
sion will be conducted from
1J3:30p.m4:30 p.m.
The same evening, Tubesing
i � will speak to students about how to
: carefully use their time and energy
j I in a lecture entitled 'Staying Ever-
f i green" that will take place from 730
: p.m830 p.m. As well as offering
lecture series, the WAVE program
will provide bi-monthly newslet-
ters and offer such services as health
screenings. For example, free skin
cancer testings will be conducted
from 9:00a.ml 230p.m April 9 in
the Student Health Center. Also, a
lecture on "Safe Sunning" will pro- with Food Services to further de-
vide students with the knowledge velop the Treat Yourself Right Pro-
of protectingthemselvesfromharm- gram and will offer services to en-
ful sunrays. The WAVE will work hance all aspects of healthy living.
DoiVt send the same old tired Things, send
the Valentine that rises above all others
Balloon - A - Gram a friend or that
. someone special
We offer: (Delivery to all dorms)
� Latex see our Air Walkers!
� Candy
�Jundoms and key chain bottle openers
lie sure to ca" us r,rst for your sPecial Va,entine
delivery by a tuxedo guy or gal.
BOW TIE
BEAU
WE DELIVER UNTIL 7:30 PM
830-3796
JOIN US FOat
EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA'S
HOTTEST
WDTP fl(D IPAIRTra
FEATURING
THE HOTTEST SOVHB AROVNB
"COLD SWEAT
w.
ss.
AT
i?V
CNV
PEPPER'S NIGHT CLUB
THIJmSIIAY.FER. 18, HM
S F JH. UNTIL
MO ADMISSION FBB - - FAiy,F-ELy1,
TUB AREAS HOTTEST PARTY SPOT
VALIB l-�. BEOjl IBEB MUST BE SI
PLKASE T0 JEANS. TENNIB �BOE9 OB SBOBTS
TOP SECURITY
699. m CBEENE ST. CBEENVILLE. NIC 7B7-S7I8
across from the Greene St. Bridge; the old King end Queen bldg
CLUB SPORTS
SPRING INTO ACTION!
FVs�rs
.rclvrv C luh
in it d�?vdoping stage, the ardwry ctae to �w�eantreting on I darting
shootinc sites The dub has an avid interest centered around toff and
amtpettttee shooting as well as developing skill r.fating l" balding.
Thr club is airrentiy partidpatinc. individu.il! v while w.irkinj M a ib
hsh a suitable working range.
Badminton Cluh
Badminton UWKhBUI opportunity- with Cbristonbur. i .vmnavim- tor
practice and ganv . Theciuthasbeeninexisteiv. oniyaf wshort v. arsai.d
h.is made brides in developing lead, rship and in ard.nl c.rotip ot fotiower
&
1992 Rugby Schedule
Sat. FebIS ECU Tourney 9:00am (H)
Sat. Feb. 22 George Mason
Sat. Mar. 21 Cape Fear
Sat. April 4 Fayettevllle
Sat. April 11 State Tourney
Sat. April 25 Alumni Came
2:00pm (A)
2:00pm (A)
1:00pm (M)
Away
1:00pm (H)
r h a
dub is � tvonif
�' tawmaUcna! student ai-
rthcra
vrt that is easy to loarn and fun Id pl.iv Darl safer :s promot-d i. Ba .��
pen. UOi and fHttHUB The club is - irren'lv I " �M � "T
(.row Club
A spc-r: tor ft trulv tltdt. iMd tOWtftg ioi
inW nouwn i'irl!ini pfO�l0B bvif ro.i:
�ndrapco Thi CWW � tub ro� 0U1 oi
WjantacNi. W!yf�n�wwly30BttBuW
v5V tr-va- V � aroh) Univ. -rsitv Thi
dubptacUcmto � � u?iandcoinpi t
igrtnrl i Utpji irv ;f in :i r.v n :
ai.dworat it !ours' nwdnk'SMlMMmito
to provUW cxi'Kpmiiit and mullwand par
Moipai.tsto.iccorarr.iHiii: �pprORifll itciv 50
ricn aid WMRMn
Oart t !ub
Darts MOtidr a OOmpttlttvi � tr.it. in a
s.xTtrin ThxtotBW��tnChr�unbun
( ,vrniUKtam two to thrcv ttXtM 1 wm W Of
tnate isdwlwd nwBBJxwtup l-
�.�.�tt i Kumtwnhip b m. n at �ttBW in a
quJsttonaf ski wludi wowi naturaBy with
OUcGnIK lub
DfeK i �(!( provi
as individual and group OPtnp HfttOTi I
na-nUivincx1 upkeep and Mi
avai3bl to a tndr ran �)( ( ui;y. ��! �lf :nd Midas
fe COM provide opportunities -or � MatkNUl ieisx.re tt.ncaota iMf � JJ ' �" " J
1992 Women's Soccer
3 " inb Prodn,�rvKt,on and �d tor a lev. I, hf� J �J"� bUd. J a
rrqSr and Ml expand to the Notional and � love Ku ttTMl :s a�aM b fa. bagaawi
Mon'sdratcsi and
Wiaaiana ffljlfciat fm�r- -��iMnir nrfi.�iw� a
Both tvms have -all flkd spring pi mi?. sason! The � il; I BM � � �� - - .
mintataai of four ��� lor i a.t iDurnaawrd ihe pmg Kwm�� �� n� a ,ndcna,D��oas tost
irenrh.pin.lod, enh m.vd.l.s, UVwMogfWk ph�a!c�1tMo.rJ manrfli le tmveftraJftMcoa
the top rank teams in the country UMfet U�U�d IVw � Asao. 9�i
Coju Shorin Karale
Covj yior.n - nt of the oldev and larjst
dut tMoaJaiad vsiih BOU Xocrcalional
SgHrtoa QHajjaaJBfJ 0� campus 17year
ago. thi club provides instruction and com
MMM r. the m.artial arts, fcw self de: BBC
pt.vv.cu and mutal RfeMBa and spint !r.
�-triichon xaii suvrvisiofi is provUh a
IfB Dntvc HUsck Ml kjiiati msrruc
�oi. lnfchuction if. piov.dtd troin boginner
levels thr-nip.h wKan.i'il levels cultmrut
ir.p -n black bdt �oaajBMaji
Kayak Club
These paddlers oftcr instruction. WKf
Mkmal opportunities aid Mknaahfp few
people f?r�ni cur.oiis butandrrl B ooatrl
Whitewater kayakers. The Club OWHB iti.
0WI1 AVJiprient mcUiding nianv i the
�tinilm brands and styles of Kayaks wt ich
ar; avjOabh for i: by Club niernivn
WockhriMwunn
Sun. Feb. 29 UNCW
Sat. Mar. 21 Ral. Club
Sun. Mar. 22 UNIDAS
2:00pm (A)
2:00pm (H)
2:00pm (H)
Sun. Mar. 29 UNC Pioneers 2:00pm (A)
Sun. April S Fayettevllle 2:00pm (A)
April 10-12 Va. Tech Tourney (A)
and pt Mttot Kaajcww art htld in Chris
ctive and KtMduk approxitru
arii and vx
� i- V4TV
mass
Rugbv
An evcmn; Mi iid oi aayeaatw football maaa uvan and the Mcllte al sooaar
k-ps thactiv.tv �Mkttnand few toplav Unvmol j !opi- m-cs and
skl!kvscanplavjaaknigrugbvenuan;toar;athet�v;hacui-iptihve
attnude Hie object n CBBpk oulBOawUairflglt�mby carryttg
kkkmg tiieba-l if. iheend KM I Mid WwdUTOJ N down form c-rtiaa! tr)
rHa iCU lUaaJfef Ciub operate, undtt tf.e saiBOB of the hfonh CaioMiM
Rugby UaaaM atKl the EaaMff) ttvfafoti ai th Untod SBIat ol America
Rugby ruoBall Union.
1 at Kwou Da
ioin ir, the BTtai the world most ppuiar m aaWfl gnnvuig martial art r?
(wr .ii Da teati actlaa is provided by � master in c sport wth an afraabaw oti
phw.cai ftMW and pariiawition � at- art !orm The d piodctes mst: UCOOB
and iuBiajna opportunities as well Uia Iff !����� to parf.cpatc to? run and
rccyuiiot'
UnSSoS
BMkal mak. o�techve cloves and a stvk varvim color .Kvordmt-tothetoam. uataseconpoedot Aai. tt�
tMTMUaljuan,Maa,ia,laaa.yandiallitotm�i
Underwater Sadatv of America
1992 Lacrosse Schedule
Sat. Feb. 22
Sun. Feb. 23
Sat. Feb. 29
Sun. Mar. 1
Sat. Mar. 21
Wed. Mar. 25 State
Sat. Mar. 2S OOU
Sat. April 4
Sun. April 5
Sat. April 11
William fc Mary
Liberty
George Mason
Georgetown
UNCW
VCU
U of Richmond
Elon
2:00pm (H)
1:00pm (H)
1:00pm (A)
1:00pm (A)
2:00pm (H)
7:00pm (A)
2:00pm (H)
3:00pm (A)
IOpm(A)
2r00pm(A)
Una Women � Socorr Leagutr. a memN oi the North Cuolina Amateur Soccer Assocutum
which nrheoffkia) state aaaodatkin of the linited SUtttaSud�T Federation The dub
plays in both indoor and outdoor noccer toumamenh. over the rait and spring
semesters phis a schedule of approxintatelv 16 home and away came under
league sanction.
Men' Soccer
AftlHamril with the North Carolina Men's Soccer league, thedub will play
in bothmdoor and outdoor tournament wttfc a irfandard fall and ifring
schedule. The dub team la not affiliated with the ECU Inlrrcollegtere
squad and will compete agpiiuft Club programs from other untveraibet
LacraaatCteb
Sanctioned by the National Collegiate lacrosse League. ECU cfob ptevs
in theSc4itharn Dlvisron uf the NCLL whwojord;natesptayor2f.tean�
from Pennayivanu so North CaroHna. The dub post a most favorable
record in oaaKpettaon and haa batora ona &e moat maetbrd chafee in its
fe aBMBWaKaaBk aMkaaaaak
IUITIKaR10MB�1
Water Skiing Club
ECU'S dub b a cr.penbve mcn.her ot
the National Cdhglata Wfat� 9a �aao
dadaa in theS-utf -vtlaitc Cottier-ice
CnBafteM water skims; often an OtBaM
opportumtv to baoaaat Bwolvad m coaj
petmve wateT skiing tc iiaiiuilian ID
the spc-?t a well as an opportunity to
( nkiv compttition on ;he cotlcgtatc 5evd
The ski dub attend" toun arr� nts u- SW
fall bepmnmg tot SepeniKT aiwi in Apn!
Urr the sprrag semceaBI. The dub i.ut
rentiy boMl the SAC VVomers Slalom
and Trick Record, .uvt has. sen! ma skier
to the Ml Stars Tournanwr.t in Oanga,
TX
Women's Soccer
The club to af nliatl with tm- Nortfi Caro-





r mm
ICES
Diet Pepsi Or
Pepsi Cola
�09
2
.tr.
MM�M2ll
S CHOICE PRODUCTS!
Harris teeter
SAVE 60�
When You Purchase One 10 Oz.
Bottle Of President's Choice
Premium Gourmet Steak Sauce
Coupon Value 60 �
(C) I
I
VALUABLE COUPON
Harris Teeter
SAVE 50
I
When You Purchase One 64 Ox.
Carton Of President's Choice
Orange Juice
Coupon Value50IC)1
j1
L � i 1 1 1 -fv. i � i1 1
VALUABLE COUPON
February IB, 1992
Greenville Store Onr,
� Urr Wo ryoHk A'ont f nriornl Pnvl Stnmm
WAVE
Continued trom page 1
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
seminars that will take place .it
Mendenhall Student Center. The
session will target students inter-
ested in health professions. The first
lecture, "1 Uked on Helping" will
bede voted to the prevention of bum
out among people committed to
care-giving professions, Tubosing
will Units on teaching the students
Inns' to manage dairy challenges.
maintain personal vitality and sat-
isfaction from their work. Hie ses
sion will be conducted from
3:30p.m4:30 p.m.
Hie same evening, Tubesing
will speak to students about how to
carefully u their time and energy
in a lecture entitled "Staving Ever-
green" that will take place f rom 7:30
p.m S V p.m. As well as offering
lecture series, the VVAVH program
will provide bi-monthly newslet-
ters and otter such services as health
screenings. For example, free skin
cancer testings will be conducted
from 4:00am-12:30p.m April u in
the Student 1 lealth Center. Also, a
with hxxl Services to further de-
velop the Treat Yourself Right Pro-
lectureon "SafeSunning" will pro
vide students with the knowledge
otprotectingtlnxselvesfromhami gram and will offer services to en-
ful sun rays. The W AVL" will work hance all aspects of healthy living
Don't send the same Old tireTthings, send
the Valentine that rises above all others
Balloon - A - Gran a friend or that
someone special
(Delivery to all dorms)
see our Air Walkers!
We offer:
� Latex
� Candy
� Fundoms and key chain bottle Openers
k'U sure to call us first for your special Valentine
delivery by a tuxedo ptj or gal.
BOW TIE
BEAU
WE DEI IVEB I Mil. 7:30 I'M
830-3796
JOI US FOR
EtSTER ttORTH C ROLIIV8
HOTTEST
IKDIP (KD .PAJi'J'Y
FEtTI'RI'fp
THF MOTTKST SOIMB tROt D
"COLD SWEAT"
AT
PEPPER'S MIGHT CHJB
THIRSDAY, FER. 13, 199
8 P.M. IA TIE
llljfllJrfis
wmum i.�. bmji ibkb mnww be i
PIMM 0 JI�.TFAM� MMJ OB NIIOBTN
TOP SECURITY
so.n.mwrnmnmvw. �wmmnmtm, 7&7-071&
Across from the Greene St. Bridge; the old Kinq and Queen hldg
TAKE
EXTRA
i
Friday.
Feb. 14
(Sale Starts Today!)
OFF OUR LOWEST
PRICES ON
ENTIRE
STOCK
RACK ROOM SHOES
BRANDED FOOTWEAR
IBUYERS MARKET MEMORIAL DRIVE 355-2519
CLUB SPORTS
SPRING INTO ACTION!
trrhen lub
ntt! ����� i�ar.� rtw avlwrv Sub i-ncontral
tlnpstt Th� dubha � � '
m-vti'tjvc sfuoKn m well as .tevriopii .� � '
&:
�-
rhi club i amen th partti ipat ' �� ' ' 1:s wna' w '
: ih i iblc - -r- in mi
t ,1-
Badminton C lol
tadmU tew rovicb-i ����,y ' " ' ' ' l,fT1 '
;� ticoandganva Ru dul '� � � ���:��
' ' �n P' ' ' "
1992 Rugby Schedule
Sat. FebIS ECU Tourney 9:00am (H)
Sat. Feb. 22 George Mason 2:00pm (A)
Sat. Mar. 21 Cape Fear 2:00pm (A)
Sat. April 4 Fayettevllle 1:00pm (H)
Sat. April 11 State Tourney Away
Sat. April 25 Alumni Came 1:00pm (IH
i i� i.i-l!luh
� It provid i '
Kr m.i r.ti n in; c u :
' � '
� � � � '
� in, " '�
Mi n s iti.i'i- -�iii
VVrtnv r�'� iH. lin) I risk � i


; ,1-m Shorin Karati
� �
.�� as.Kiat d wv�h
: . � ' ' '
�� � ' �' ' '�
� . : . � � :

�� � � . �
tiui Im- �- v. -ii ;i :rni I
-�� . : : �
!v.i .��. kEab
�� p ' - �-�: r " I ' I I
� � . : ' HA ! !
. ' � Hand
��:�
�wn Arjipr-i i � ' � � ����'
� � � � c :i- � : Kb
��'�.��
1992 WomenSoccer
Sun. Feb. 29 UNC W 2:00pm (A)
Sat. Mar. 21 Ral. Club 2:00pm (H)
Sun. Mar. 22 UNIDAS 2:00pm (H)
Sun. Mar. 29 UNC Pioneers 2:00pm (A)
Sun. April S Fayetteville 2:00pm (A)
April 10 12 Va. Tech Tourney (A)



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'SJ??
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.
��
. t,p, nines as, wi rtumtvl
i
UiuterMwUir Hockey t lob
��� (:�; :i,)k:a pl. o:vim" '�� - hi �-���
� M.Tkr: :ivkriat!vsr;d.i ; � irvinj R�
��� mdtoursubs�tutei A (gum: usual! iasis on�bo�
��Ml ThedubscnminajtM throm��ouTrw . � mdpani
, � -
with ���
� �
1992 Lacrosse Schedule
Sat. Feb. 22
Sun. Feb. 23
Sat. Feb. 29
Sun. Mar. 1
Sat. Mar. 21
Wed. Mar. 25
Sat. Mar. 28
Sat. April 4
Sun. April 5
Sat. April 11
William & Mary
Liberty
George Mason
Georgetown
UNC W
State
ODU
VCU
U of Richmond
Elon
2:00pm (H)
1:00pm (H)
1:00pm (A)
1:00pm (A)
2:00pm (H)
7:00pm (A)
2:00pm (H)
3:00pm (A)
1:00pm (A)
2:00pm (A)
w u ���'��
,
��� ltd
- :

.
-
I
tr the � ����:�( "� � : �'
rentr '� ' '

VV.im.�;�� '�� Soccer
�.�
IkuWunn Ssueoarl ��g��. a member oi :lvrtt.c .nin,) o luaufSoixw Vs � ci � �-
which is th�official stetaa�i.i!uin ���� i niterfSUtfesSutua Fecta rttun
ptaya hi both mdooi and ouh�-�; ��� i toomMMnb tw Bw Ml a�d i
a�(� ytaaacftetfaUeerfapprommreh iabaaae md m; t:v- un
league isofi.Ti
Mni'j sottci
AffUiefed wttfc ih�-N;rth CarutitM Men'vSeKCBf iMttgm theciub �vit!p
i b�;ih mBM and otBBMI luuviumioiUr with .� -t.ir.si.if J fall and svr,v
�o-hr-duJe Th" dufe tMm jr ;nt �fi!i.ited vv?: ili- EC : inlRicuUeftiate
tajiaad i;ui wtB ooaapeaa aajaiaBi Club fmagr&m baa etkef iaabenBhB
lafrcw Chafe
SfeM to:nvJ bv the Natfoimi C aBrfpal LacrsaM I c.icn- FL � ctai p iw
in afevSmBfeMR Diionot thNC.Li. whv-h euaBBaMtwafriay SteaeM
ivoiri PcaBaytvma U; NaeBi CatotbM Dm v:t; p�i� .i moat tanrwnabb
M Bed m i .�nip-finon .irn-1 Kaa lx-mv o:n- .f trie ;i�l :�- p- tri . !�� ui i; v
BBJpH BMWBBBBfea�BBiHe�mhajwefeseachiiiii1oreywer.tttwtxtutb ttr.iri XT"ij�'1
in tlu' .inniiai N-jrth v� Smth game, whuh MlBBBWi 'ihAt iiK-n





oUie i-aat (Karoltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
Jennifer Wardrep, News Editor
Julie Roscoe, Asst. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
DANA Danielson, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
MaRGI MORIN, Asst. Sports Editor
Jeff Becker, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
LARRY Huggins, Circulation Manager
CHANTAL WEEDMAN, Layout Manager
Steven Ollice, Classified Advertising Technician
Stephen Schaubach, Systems Engineer
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Jean Caraway, Advertising Technician
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students. The Eutt Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Utters should be
limned to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right toedit or reject letters
for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian, Publications Bklg ECU. Greenville. N.C.
27151-4353. For more information, call (91�) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Thursday, February 13, 1992
Eakin should right campus wrongs
With the latest charges brought against
the Chancellor and other collegiate officials
last week, this university seems more and
more like a giant lawsuit magnet.
The current trend of suing the univer-
sity started last summer when Johnny Rose
filed his now infamous suit against two
individuals who worked for the university.
The lawsuit revolved around an illegal wire-
tapping on which his voice was recorded.
Strangely, the university settled Rose's
'lawsuit for the individuals, opening the
floodgates tor a seemingly unending sup-
'��'� ply oi victims. Since then, an additional
gf seven people settled with the university for
damages resulting from the wiretapping;
five Of them did not even have to bother
filing a lawsuit.
While all oi the settlements were add-
ing up (adding tip to a sum of $138,000),
another lawsuit was filed. The new lawsuit
was brought up by the Public Safety officer
who exposed the wiretapping scandal to the
FBI
Stanley Kittrell alleges in his suit that
after turning over the evidence, the univer-
sity retaliated against him I le was stripped
of his staff, moved out oi the Public Safety
office ami forced to revert back to being a
uniformed officer.
Now, while Kittrell's lawsuit is still
underway, yet another suit charging retali-
ation has surfaced.
Dr. Richard McReynolds filed his law-
suit alleging retaliation for his own boat-
rocking actions. McReynolds states in his
complaint that after informing proper au-
thorities about an employment violation,
the universitv would not allow a proper
hearing for his tenure. According to
McReynolds, certain members of the Board
of Trustees were also negligent in helping
him receive due process for his tenure.
All oi these lawsuits produce disturb-
ing thoughts regarding our university.
One would think that weall go toschool
at a corrupt, vindicative university where
mendacitv and malicious intents run ram-
pant.
Some may argue that the two retalia-
tion lawsuits are merely allegations, and
nothing vet has been proved in court. How-
ever, the lawsuits are quite concrete and
seent to be based upon true fact. Even the
lawsuits' existence points toward some in-
trinsic problem concerning the way the uni-
versity is run.
The answer to our campus problems
falls upon the Chancellor.
Regardless of I-akin's personal involve-
ment in any wrong-doings on campus, he
must be the one held ultimately responsible.
The time is now for the Chancellor to
right the wrongs of this university.
He must step boldly toward the
university's reputation blackboard and wipe
the slate clean.
The image of our campus has for too
long been tarnished by the stains of corrup-
tion.
N
.Buy
AtERICAN.
Letters to the Editor
Williams gives final answer to political correctness
On The Fringe
Earlene answers economy's problems
By Tim E. Hampton
Editorial Columnist
In the frozen hell of February
shestarts with a click-click-click of her
valves and the heater has refused to
blow warmth for several years now.
On summer road trips, she, like
a downtown drink junkie, imbibes
profuse quantities of liquids: gas, oil,
transmission fluid and water. Between
guzzles, she has had some close calls
with tractor trailers due to a steering
malady � one that causes the wheel
to have as much play as a sugar-in-
duced hyper child.
Sometimes her speedometer
works, sometimes not. On occasion
her electric windows roll down. An
electrical short in the power seat switch
� another manifestation of her tem-
peramental nature � becomes shock-
ingly evident in the driver-side butt
padding.
But despite her leaky, wasteful
and dangerous existence, she is the
answer to the nation's economic prob-
lems.
(Clarifying Parenthesis: for
some macho reason, automobiles and
ships have been assigned feminine
personal pronouns, which is not to
say that most women resemble a '66
Coupe De Vile or the L'SS Arizona.)
Currently, the "Buy American"
campaign is accelerating at a fevered
pitch through showrooms and Wal-
Marts in all 26 Creenvilles (the most
popular name for a berg) of the US.
Butthis price-slashing hysteria fails to
considerthe"Buy01d American" plan
proffered by a curly, rotund colum-
nist.
An example of "Buy Old Ameri-
can instead of pouring SI 5,000 into a
new medium-sized American auto-
mobile, it makes much more sense to
purchase a S1.0O0 used pre-1975 full-
sized American luxury liner. Besides
saving SI4,000 to spend on gas, con-
sumers will have the mighty feeling
of tooling around town in two tons of
steel.
The major premise behind "Buy
Old American" is that the nation m u;t
revert back to its way of life in the '60s
and early '70s � times of economic
prosperity and daily evening news
carnage. In essence, Americans do not
waste enough � gasoline, monev,
human life � as we used to. The self-
ish '90s attitude of ecological conser-
vation, tight-walletness and overrated
value of human life has caused a dis-
mal downshift in the economy.
By spending more money on
gas, smooth-talking President Paul
Tsongascan tax the hell out of drivers
and � bingo � no more federal bud-
get deficit. Also, buying more gaso-
line would aid in the rebuilding ef-
forts in oil-rich countries like Iraq.
This in turn would allow Saddam
Hussein to reconstructa potent armed
force,and�boom � anotheru � .
L' N' action to stamp him out.
But this time, the war sho
prolonged over several years, ui
the short-lived Persian Gulf War
Another war would spawn military
spending, allowing big American. r-
porations to retool and provide more
jobs. In addition, a long conflict wou
result in more deaths of young, kw r-
class men and � yippie � the unerr -
ployment rate would drop.
And as more Delta NSs, Intpalas
and New Yorkers begin to roll or. the
streets again, Americans will have a
renewed false-sense oi power ftetl �
soon the Delco radios will be blaring
Charlie Daniels' "We we're talking
real proud and walking real k
again, in America And then blue-
collared workers will begin to rao
each other to the plant, especially on
Mondays and Fridays.
After the total takeover of Iraq,
gas will be real cheap and the neigh-
bors will begin toenvy thejones' 19� -
Electra 225. With the change in cor-
sumer habits, Detroit's best-seller be-
comes a remake of the 1959 Cadilla.
and � banzai � the Japanese can I
sell one Honda.
On the putting green: The
economv, patriotism and war-carnage
are not suitable topics for Valentine s
day. So let's send hugs and kisses to
Earlene and Earlvene, my Iwo
Cadillacs that graze in the backyard
Keeping Up With The Jones Boys
All we really need to know we learned at a party
To the Editor bate, that you look over both my col-
Dr. Steven Mandelker slings a Umn and Mandelker's letters to see
lot of mud in his letter of Feb. 4. Rather which is the more reasonable and pro-
than respond, I will only suggest, fessional. For the industrious, The East
should you be interested in the de- Carolinian carries back issues. 1 would
be glad to hear any questions, expos-
tulations, or replies.
Professor Jeffrey Williams
Department of English
2142 GCB
By Greg and Matt Jones
Editorial Columnists
(Editor's note � The following
column glorifies the art of drinking.
All those under 21 please refrain from
reading. All others, please present a
valid ID before proceeding.)
Although we have learned
much at this pristine academic insti-
tution, by far the most valuable lesson
to be learned in life we have discov-
ered at keg parties in a state com-
monly referred to as � The Drunken
Stupor.
Things we have learned.
Don't pour too much beer.
Those beer drinkers who come to a
party with a soup thermos have no
business filling their container to the
rim. When beer is poured into large
containers, the contents have a ten-
dency to become warm and stale be-
fore consumption may be completed.
Never bite off more than you
can chew (or drink as the case may
be), and always leave your 132-oz.
Pantry Guzzler cups at your house.
Always finish what you have
poured. Too many times we have
watched inexperienced keg-goers fill
their steins without the intention of
finishing the job. Beer drinking, like
all tasks in life, should be followed
through to its conclusion. In the im-
mortal words of the band Van Halen
� "Finish What Ya' Started
Always remember the correct
way to pour ale. It all depends upon
your angle. We have observed many
an over-zealous beer comrade pour
his ale into a vertical tankard. This
results in an unpleasurable foaming
effect To the other extreme � hold-
ing said tankard at too great an angle
will result in the spillage of beer. One
must find the happy medium between
too little and too great for proper en-
joyment.
Always pour beer for others.
Many times, a selfish attitude exposes
itself atakeg gathering. Whenever we
grasp hold of the holy tap we always
remember the Golden Rule. Enough
said.
Don't fight with others. We have
never been able to understand the
rationalebehindadrunken brawl. For
most peoplealcoholhasa calm, sooth-
ing effect; however, some people live
by the creed "Let's get drunk and
fight This has no place in regular
life, and especially at keg parties where
the people have come together solely �
for the purpose of having a good time.
If you live by the aforementioned
creed, go downtown and apply for a
bouncing position at one of the dance
halls. The job should suit you well.
Never show off at keg parties.
Many a time we have observed a nov-
ice kegger demonstrating his acro-
batic prowess with what is known as
a "keg stand This involves inverting
the drinker into an upside-down po-
sition above the keg and inserting the
beer tap into his mouth. In addition to
the awkward appearance of this act, it
also has the affect of disgusting future
tap-users. No one wants to pour a
beer from a tap entangled with drunk
spittle.
There is always an awkward
pause after the drinker comes down
from his perch because of the glares
from more mature party-goers. Many
a night we have noticed the party
come to a screeching halt. As we look
around in silence, we see a staggering
ex-keg-stander who has just com-
pleted the imbecile act. Nobody quite
knows what to say and it takes a few
minutes for the party to regain con-
sciousness. Meanwhile, the partici-
pant is left to deal with the embarrass-
ment of the situation. Showing off is
the fool's version of acting interest-
ing.
Some keg-antics, however, are
acceptable. The infamous "beer-bong
is an exam pie of such. Beer-bongs must
be used in moderation. Their use
should be limited to party-start-up's
and party-slow-down's, but not ev-
ery in-between moment. If we had a
nickel for every time we saw a teary-
eyed drunk who'd done one more
1
beer-bong then he should, we'd ha e
$8.45.
The lesson here is moderation
Too much of a good thing, will make
you pass out.
Many would argue that drink-
ing games would fall into the modera-
tion category. However, we find an
inherent problem with said games.
Whenever we find a lull in conversa-
tion, inevitably a spontaneous game
of three-man is suggested. Everyone
jumps at the chance to participate, in
lieu of searching for real conversa-
tion.
Drinking games are a cop-out.
Always be considerate of the
wi: hes of the host. Keg-guests should
refrain from changing the music at a
party. Many a night our keg-party-
enjoyment level has dropped sud-
denly when the smooth sounds of
Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon
was interrupted by the jarring drum-
beat of C&C Music Factory. This will
not do. Although dance music has its
place at certain downtown establish-
ments, nobody goes to a keg party
looking to shake their collective boo-
ties.
Here now is a complete list of
what keg parties are all about:
1) Socializing: meeting new
friends and enjoying the old ones.
2) Drinking: Alcohol helps with
number 1.
3) Discussing pertinent political
ideologies.
4) Drinking: Alcohol helps with
number 3.
5) Shmoozing: Looking for
babes.
6) Drinking: Alcohol helps with
number 5.
7) Relieving stress: Have fun;
let-loose; unwind.
8) Drinking: Alcohol helps with
number 7.
(Footnote � To the author's
shmoozees: number 5 does not apply to us)
In summary, the primary objec-
tive of kegging is to drink some, talk a
bit, shmooze a little, unwind a tad,
and above all else�havea good time.
iilii
"�til �
Temvi�J:
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Red or White
Fresh Cut Flowers Arrai
Bud Vase & Ai
Three Carnations in a Vas
Large Balloon
2 Mylar Balloons
Small Balloon
1 Mvlar Balloon
WE DELF
10 DIS
ORDER EARLY
BEST SELECT
. ���� ��





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nomv's problems
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the change in cen-
t's best-seller be-
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we learned at a party
. id we'd have
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we ixk

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Nobodyi
Id it takes a few
to regain
lie. the partKt-
ithoembarrass-
Showing off is
lact ng interest-
however, are
bus "beer-bong"
i-bongs must
lion. Their use
rty-start-up's
but not ev-
prt. If we had a
e saw a tearv-
lone one more
ould argue that drink-
themodeta-
�. However, we find an
i m with said games.
never we find a lull in conversa-
ibly a spontaneous game
suggested. Everyone
e to participate, in
tor real conversa-
Drinking games are a cop-out
be considerate of the
m -t keg-guests should
refi angina the music at a
� � rdght our keg-party-
.l has dropped sud-
, , � the smooth sounds of
� Dark Side of the Moon
was by the jarring drum-
Music Factory. This will
dance music has its
e at certain downtown establish-
ments, nobody goes to a keg partv
looking to shake their collective boo-
tfes
i re m m is a complete list of
parties are all about:
ocializing: meeting new
friends and er�)virK the old ones.
2)Dnnking Alcohol helps with
number 1
: rt inert political
ideologic
I � � . -kohol h�-lps with
number 3
5) Shmooing looking for
babes
(y) Drinking Alcohol helps with
number 5.
7) Relieving stress Have fun,
let-loose, unwind
8) Drinking: Alcohol helps with
number 7.
(Footnote � To the author's
shmoozees: number 5 does not apply to us.)
In summary, the primary objec-
tive of kegging is to drink some, talk a
bit, shmooze a little, unwind a tad,
and above all else�have a good time.
lliJ�lJ�J
By Steve Reid Kung Fu Master J
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Valentine Day Specials
fs?Qco
Dozen Roses (boxed) $29.99
Dozen Roses (in a vase) $35.99
One Half Dozen $19.99
Dozen Carnations (in a vase) $19.99
Half Dozen Carnations $12.99
Red or White Basket - $22.50
Fresh Cut Flowers Arranged in a Red or White Basket
Bud Vase & Animals - $14.99
Three Carnations in a Vase with Small StufTed Animal
Large Balloon Bouquet - $11.99
2 Mylar Balloons & 4 Latex Balloons
Small Balloon Bouquet - $8.99
1 Mvlar Balloon & 4 Latex Balloons
Candy & Flowers Basket - $19.99
Heart Candy with Red & White Flowers in a Basket
Animal & Basket - $19.99
Red & White Flowers with a Small Stuffed Animal
Mug Arrangement - $10.99 & up
Fresh Cut Flowers Arranged in a Mug
FTD Bouquet - $25.99
Red Mini Carnations, Daisies, Eucalyptus,
Alstromeria and Babv's Breath
WE DELIVER
Gift Baskets $9.99 & up
WE DELIVER
10 DISCOUNT TO ECU STUDENTS WITH VALID ID
VISA and
MASTERCARD
accepted
ORDER EARLY FOR
BEST SELECTION
355-ROSE
Inside Harris Supermarket
Bells Fork Square - Greenville
ns





lomv's problems
The Jones Boys
we learned at a party
. nave

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showing ott is
lasting interest-
however, are
pus "beer-bong"
ocr-bongsmust
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tv-start-up's
� but not ev-
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saw a tearv-
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7) Relieving stress: Have fun,
let-loose, unwind
8) Drinking: Alcohol helps with
number 7.
(Footnote � To the author's
shmoezees: number5 does not apply to us.)
In summary, the primary objec-
tive at begging is to drink some, talk a
bit, shmooe a little, unwind a tad,
and aboveall else � havea good time.
I . �f K t.
By Steve Reid Kung Fu Master J By Haselrig
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r Valentine Day Specials
Dozen Roses (boxed) $29.99
Dozen Roses (in a vase) $35.99
One Half Dozen $19.99
Dozen Carnations (in a vase) $19.99
Half Dozen Carnations $12.99
Red or White Basket - $22.50
Fresh Cut Flowers Arranged in a Red or White Basket
Bud Vase & Animals - $14.99
Three Carnations in a Vase with Small Stuffed Animal
Large Balloon Bouquet � $11.99
2 Mylar Balloons & 4 Latex Balloons
Small Balloon Bouquet - $8.99
1 Mvlar Balloon & 4 Latex Balloons
Candy & Flowers Basket - $19.99
m
Heart Candv with Red & White Flowers in a Basket
Animal & Basket � $19.99
Red & White Mowers with a Small Stuffed Animal
Mug Arrangement - $10.99 & up
Fresh Cut Flowers Arranged in a Mug
FTD Bouquet - $25.99
Red Mini Carnations, Daisies, Eucalyptus,
Alstromeria and Baby's Breath
WE DELIVER
Gift Baskets $9,99 & up
WE DELIVER
10 DISCOUNT TO ECU STUDENTS WITH VALID ID
ORDER EARLY FOR
BEST SELECTION
355-ROSE
Inside Harris Supermarket
Bells Fork Square - Greenville
VISA and
MASTERCARD
accepted





Classifieds
�lie iEaat (Earulinian
February 13,1992
m
FOK RENTK)K SAll
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
$16250 per month, 12 utilities. Near
campus. Available immediately. Call
738-3311
LUXURY SUITE: A seventh story luxury
suite hanging over the white sand and
clear watorof South Florida's most beau-
tiful beach. Completely furnished,sleeps
five in unbelievable luxury; minutes from
Jai- Alai, airport, horses, dogs, Ft. Lau-
derdale Beach, Miami Action. $800 for
week 37 - 314 at Hollywood Beach
Tower. Call (305) 472-2870.
EFFICIENCY AT RINGCOLD TOW-
ERS: Sublease immediately. Great view
and location, bv Mendenhall. Fully fur-
nished. S2l a month. Call 752-6993.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Forapartment half a block from campus,
2 blocks from downtown, supermarket,
and laundramat. S220 per month, in-
cludes rent, utilities, phone and cable
758-6418.
KINGSARMS APARTMENTS: 1 and 2
bednxim apartments, energy efficient,
several locations in town, carpeted,
kitchen appliances, some water and
sewer paid, washer and dryer hook-ups.
752-8915.
ROOMMATES NEEDED: 2 people to
share a 4 bedroom house. Rent is $175
and 13 utilities. 1 12 bath, 12 mile
from campus. Can move in anytime. Call
Stephanie at 758-9824.
FOR RENT: 3 Bedroom house, 2 blocks
from campus, $600 per month nog, 3rd
and library St. 830-6738
ONE BLDROOM APARTMENT: To
a-ntat Ringgold Towers. Furnished,$260
per month. Contact Tony 830-4968.
firm. Will trade for Faberge egg or date
with that chick in the Pepsi commercial.
757-0065 ask for Stephen.
SURFBOARD: 7'6" Action $225; Full
wetsuit XL Ripcurl $100; 50 CD's vari-
ousartists,Progressivecentered.$5each
Call 757-1046.
FOR SALE: Large portable dishwasher
in good condition. Must sell! Price nego-
tiable. Call Gloria at 321-1899.
1986 TOYOTA CELICA GT: Black with
grey interior, 5-speed, AC, stereo cas-
sette, power package, very good shape.
Call Jeff and leave message 752-8454.
SERVICES OFFERED
FUN LOVING MOTHER: Of one has
opening for one child (over one year old)
in my home for evening shift. CPR and
First Aid trained. Located next to park
Call after 3 p.m. 7584789.
GIRLS, YOU TENSE? STRESSED?
What you need is a practiced massusse
to relieve that everyday tension, through
deep muscle and full body therapeutk
massage. Call 758-6418 for appt.
RESUMES: Professionally composed
and typeset. Laser printer. $25.752-8595,
6 to 9 p.m. or leave a message.
PAPERS: Professionally typeset class
assignments and research papers. Laser
printer. 752-8595, 6 to 9 p.m. or leave
message.
HELP WANTED
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now T.ikiig Leases for 1
bedroom.2 bedroom &
Efficient-y Apartments.
CALL752-2865
MAKE $500-51000 WEEKLY: stuffing
envelopes at home. Start now! Rush
S.A.S.E. plus SI.00 to Home Employers,
2301 Kent 8 Las Cruces, NM 88001.
FAST FUNDRAIS1NG PROGRAM:
Fraternities, sororities, student clubs.
Earn up to $1000 in one week. Plus re-
ceive a SlOlX) bonus yourself. And a free
watch just for calling 1-800-932-0528 Ext.
65.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE: Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 800-338-
3388 Ext. P-3712.
FREE TRAVEL: Air couriers and cruise
ships. Students also needed Christmas,
springand summer foramusement park
employment. Call 800-338-3388 Ext. F-
3464.
HELP WANTED! Part-time receptionist
needed for surgical practice. Flexible
hou rs from 7:00a.m. to 1:1X1 p.m three to
five days a week. For more information,
call Vicky at 75843a).
TOPLESS DANCERS WANTED: Play-
house nightclub in Goldsboro, cash SSS.
Call Paul 736-0716 or Sid 735-7713 or
Cub 731-9962.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY As-
semble products at home. Call toll free 1-
800-467-5566 Ext. 5920.
500-1000 CAMP POSITIONS AVAIL-
ABLE: Sta ff Referral Services provides a
network of camps, now hiring, from the
FOR SALE: Macintosh Ilci cpu only. 8- "Keys" to Wise-Minn. One application
meg RAM, 120-meg hard disk. $3500 reaches all camps. Applications at Ca-
A Heauuful Place lo Live
�All New
�And Ready To Rent-
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E 5ih Street
�Located Near F.CL'
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
1 jmiled Offer � S330 a month
Coniaa J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. 8. 12-5:30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and quart one bedroon fumuhed �partmenn,
r - i. - - . fnx wattrandicwcr, waahcTi.dryeri,
t TV. Couples � in only $240 a month, 6
munlhlea MOBILE II- MF khNTALS-couplet or
atnflca. Apartment and mob Eh homoa in Ajulea Garden
near Bn� Valley Country Club.
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7S15
FOR SALE
SEIZED CARS: trucks, boats, 4-wheel-
ers, motor homes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Available your a ma now. Call 800-33&-
3388 Ext. C-5W.
HUP WANTED
recr Services - Bloxton House.
FUNDRAISER: We're looking for a top
fraternity, sorority, or student organiza-
tion that would like to earn $500-$1500
for one week on - campus marketing
project. Must be organized and hard
working. Call Lee at (800) 592-2121 ext.
115.
NSAP seeks poster rep. Four hours per
week. Great pay. No selling. 1-800-238-
0690.
PERSONALS
STUDY ABROAD IN AUSTRALIA:
Information on semester, year, gradu-
ate, summer, and internship programs
in Perth, Townsville, Sydney, and
Melbourne. Programs start at S3520.
ail 1-800-878-36.
PARTY HOUSES - NORTH MYRTLE
BEACH: Welcome groups of 4-34
people. Group-leader discounts. Call
Myrtle Beach tours 9-4 p.m. (703) 250-
2115.
BAHAMAS PARTY CRUISE: 6 days
S279! Panama City S99, Padre SI99,
Cancun S499, Jamaica S399! Call Jasa at
758-5165 or Wayne at 757-1369.
YOU'VE ON LY GOT ONI WEEK TO
LIVE! DO IT RIGHT! Spring Break in
Jamaica from only $42u Hotel, Air,
Transfers, Parties' Sun Splash Tours 1-
800-426-7710
LEARN TO FLY NOW Aero Sales
flight training. Pitt-Greenville Airport.
Introductory night S20. Call 752-1989.
ATTENTION MARK HONEYNUTT:
KRAFT CHEESE COMPANY' WILL
BE IN TOWN TO TAKE APPLICA-
TIONS AND AS FOR BRYON M. IF
YOU CANT HANG WITH THE BIG
BOY'S THEN STAY HOME THE
LAM DA I'OSSE.
TO THE ROCKIN" ECU AMBASSA-
DORS: The Distict HI Convention was
a BLAST! From "friends in low places"
to sking the slopes fast. Our spirit was
high and so were our tabs; But thank-s
to the buses we didn't need cabs. Lou-
isville, Mississippi, the Gators, and
State. Hung with us, no matter how-
late. So here's to our new found friends
from all over the Southeast; JMU was
Awesome and next year Georgia Tech.
will be sweet?!
SNUGGLES:Some "bunny" loves you.
STUDENT PIRATE CLUB: Come out
for the pro-game dinner social Mon-
day, Feb. 17 at 5:30 in the Pirate Club
building. S2 Members, S3 for Non-
members. Join the PEACH BOWLCEL-
EBRATION and lets support the Pi-
rates as they take on George Mason.
WANTED
BROTHERS OF SIGMA PHI EPSI-
LON: We look forward toseeingyou at
the Attic on Sunday! The ladies next
door.
LAMDA CHI ALPHA: We had an iric
time Thursday night. The reggae was
jammin Thanks a lot. Sigma Pi's.
AZD'S: We had a blast with you at
Splash. Let's get together soon. Sigma
Pi's.
ALPHA SIG: Looking forward to par-
tying with you tonight! You guys are
always a blast! Love - ZTA.
AZ: Anyone chewed on your bikini
line lately?
THE ECU COMPUSEX TEAM: We
blew up Mars, Badboy couldn't handle
us, and Hotel California lsgettin ready
to kick us out! Lets invade Lumberton!
Seahorse.
HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY
CHICKENBUTT! by the way, thank
God you finally got rid of that jerk!
What was his name, Mike or Dick I
forget?
RACHEAL: Happy 20th B-Day. Call
me and we'll drink one. Your brother,
Jim.
STUDENT PI RATE CLUB: Come out
for the pro-game dinner social Mon-
day, Feb. 17 at 5:30 in the Pirate Club
building. S2 Members, S3 for Non-
members. Join the PEACH BOWLCEL-
EBRATION and lets support the Pi-
rates a they take on George Mason.
CONGRATULATION'S! To the 1992-
93 officers of Alpha Delta I I President:
Brooke Driskill, Vice President Mary
pi KSONAI s
Reynolds, Mem bershipEducation Vice
President: Kellie Cunningham, Alpha
Education Chairman: Tristen Jones,
Treasurer: Lisa Fulcher, RecordingSec-
retary: Nikki Loomis, Corresponding
Secretary: Kathy Bedsole, House Man-
ager: WendySimpson, Rush Chairman:
Crystal Cross, Guard: Lynn Davis,
Panhellenic Delegate: Lisa DeNoia,
Senior Executive At Large: Connie
Hardce, Junior Executive At Large:
Monica Gongora, Sophomore Execu-
tive At Large. Jennifer Ryals, Scholar-
ship: Kerri Cummings and Melissa
Barbour, Chaplain: Caroline Doby,
Standards: Debbie Gamer, Registrar:
Melissa Barbour, Historian Reporter:
Ginajudkins, Activities Honors: Lara
Baumgarten, Social: Katrina Steinbeck,
Information sheets: Buffy Satterfield,
Music: Kathy Sawyer, Philanthropy:
Mindy Conrad, Spirit Chairman: Ami
Cotter and LoriCobb. Intramurals: Lisa
DeNoia, Gift Mart Chapter Represen-
tative: Pam Leffew. Good luck! We
know you'll do a terrific pb in leading
us! Love. Alpha Delta Pi.
CONGRATULATIONS! To Angela
Sutton for receiving the Outstanding
Greek Woman of the Year! We're so
proud of you! Love, Alpha Delta Pi.
ALPHA DELTA PI'S AND THEIR
DATES: Since Cupid is staking early
this year, watch out for those flying
arrows tonight!
PHI KAPPA PS1 COOL AID PARTY:
Feb. 19, at New Deli featuring Queen
Sarah Saturday. Buy tickets in advance
S4. None will be sold at door. Call 757-
1573.
CONGRATULATIONS! To Monica
Jones on your dance piece. You did a
great job' Good luck on Saturday in the
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
PI KSONALS
Miss Greenville Pageant' Love, your
sisters.
ANYONEinterested instartir ganAm-
nestvInternational (Human IvntsOr-
gamzation) student group on campu
please call 756-1962.
ALPHA PHI: Get psyched for a
some time at the Valentine's C, ktaj
CHRISTY BARBOUR:ongi
tions on becoming a new sister of ZT
this is the first of many more exciting
days. I know because 1 canalready see,
that ZTA means as much to you as it
means to me. Love, your big sjj
Whitney E.
STUDENT PIRATE CLLB( meotf
for the pro-game dinner social Mon-
day, Feb. 17 at 5:30 in the Rral
building. S2 Members, $3 for Noo-
membcrs.Join the PEACH BOW1EL-
EBRATION and lets support th I
rates as they take on George Masoj
TO MY LITTLE CHERUB: I:
21st was awesome. I know ih -
end will be too. Wish 1
help you celebrate! ! . i �
drink some for me, haw fun
bro; stav away from I
zipperhead! Oh)
cabdrivers! 1 kweyou Buff
HAPPY VALENTINE'S I) �
Mdanie(Gu�p-o-maniac),aIln broth-
ers (I haven't seen all of ya in
because I'm always typing or, :� -
puter), mv professors (browi
for that "A"), all the girts thai
like me anymore (who can and ev-
erybody that writes Persona1
my pb interesting (believe me ! lugj
a lot'). Take it easy, Steve
Alfredo's N.Y. Pizza
718 E. 5th St. � Downtown � 752-0022
Manager's Special
every Sun, Mon, Tues
I $1.50 pitchers
J All pizza slices 1 top-
ping 75 tf
(with this coupon)
2 Large Pizzas j
with 1 topping J
$6.99
RESEARCH INFORMATION
largest Library of Information In US.
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0'Off Bpjjjga, Ci, �.T VISA. MC ��: CC -
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with TASTY FRIES
n am to 2 PM and DRINK!
Sam's Trophies
Custom Logos, Colors
& Cift Wrapping
�TROPHIES
�RIBBONS
�PLAQUES
�NAME TAGS
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1804 Dickinson Ae.
Acroa from P�p
757-1388
FAX I SYOIR ORDF.R
757-2476
Announcements
Entertainment
GAMMA BETA PHI
Attention students: Anyone with a
G.P.A. of 3.0 or better who is inter-
ested in Gamma Beta Phi, an honor
fraternity and service organization,
please call Dcna Price at 931-8282.
NATIONAL CONDOM WEEK
Feb. 10-15isNational Condom Week.
The Centers for Disease Control esti-
mate that 3 in 1,000 college students
are infected with HIV, the virus that
causes AIDS. Barring abstinence,
condoms arc the most effective means
of preventing AIDS and other sexu-
ally transmitted diseases. Take care
of yourself and your partner. Use
"condom sense participate in Na-
tional Condom Week. The Peer
Health Educatorsinconjunction with
thcSGA are sponsoring several events
during the week. Look for the ad in
this paper for more details. P.S. Latex
condoms may ti purchased at the
Student Health Pharmacy for $2 a
dozen.
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student Cen-
ter invites you to worship with them.
Sunday Masses: 11:30 a.m. and 8:30
p.m. at the Newman Center, 953 E.
10th St.Jwohouses from theFletcher
Music Buildine. For more informa-
tion contact Fr. Paul Vaeth, 757-1991.
HOSPITALITY MGMT, ASSQC.
HM A is looking for a responsible and
dedicated person, preferably a Hos-
pitality major, interested in the secre-
tary assistant job for the club. Great
opportunity and lots of fun! Call 931 -
7399 if interested.
ORIENTATION
TO CAREER SERVICES
The Career Services office invites se-
niors and graduate students to at-
tend a program designed to acquaint
them with the services available to
them as they prepare to enter the
work force. Included will be registra-
tion and interview sign-up proce-
dures, how to establish a credential
file, and a tour of the Career Services
Center are included. These sessions
will be held in the Bloxton House on
Thursday, February 13 at 3 p.m.
PEACE CORPS
RECRUITING AT ECU
The Peace Corps will be holding an
in forma tionSessiononThursdayFeb.
13th in Joyner Library, Room B-04
from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. People with
majors in Teaching, Skilled Trades,
Nursing, Health and Nutrition, Math,
and Science are encouraged to attend
and find ou t more about the toughest
job you'll ever love. For further infor-
mation about overseas opportunities
with Peace Corps contact Holly
ChristoffersowPeaceCorps Campus
Recruiter, at 757- 4260, or stop by
Speight 112 Mon. 8-12 p.m and
Thurs. and Fri. 8-4 p.m.
1992-93
RESIDENT HALL SIGN-UP
All students enrolled Spring Semes-
ter, 1992 will have priority for resi-
dence hall housing for school year
1992-93 if they reserve a space during
sign-up week, Feb. 17-21, 1992. On
campus students will receive infor-
mation regarding the procedures for
sigh-up in their residence hall mail-
boxes Off-campus students may re-
ceive information from the depart-
ment of University Housing, 201
Whichard Building or call 757-6450.
ECU SCHOOL
OF MUSIC EVENTS
FOR FEBUARY11-17.1992
Wed Feb. 12 � School of Medicine
Noon-Hour Concert Series: "Student
Showcase" Featuring outstanding
students of the ECU School of Music
03rody Auditorium, 12:30 p.m free).
Fri. & Sat Feb. 14-15 � ECU Opera
rheatenCHISTOPHERCOLUMBUS
by Jacques Offenbach, Clyde Hiss,
Director (Fletcher Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
For ticket information call ECU Cen-
tral Ticket Office, 7574788). Sunm
Feb. 16 � David Oh, cello, Graduate
Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 7, free).
Mon Feb 17 � Faculty Chamber
Concert, 'The Coastal Winds QuirV
tet" with pianists Paul Tardii and
Alisa Wetherington (Fletcher Recital
Hall, 8:15, free). Dial 7574370 for the
school of music's 24-hour "recorded
calendar
CHISTOPHER COLUMBUS
A zany opera based on the toe-tap-
ping musicof JacquesOffenbach, will
be presented Friday and Saturday,
February 14 and 15 by the ECU Op-
era Theater underdirectorClyde Hiss
Performances beginatS p.m. in ECU's
A. J. Hetcher Recital Hall on 10th
Street. Tickets are S6 (S3 for students,
in advance) and are available at the
ECU Central Ticket Office, 7574788
or 1-800-ECU-ARTS.
TIME MANAGEMENT
Gain control over your time and your
life. Learn strategies to cope with the
demands of academics and univer-
sity life on Wednesday February 12
from 34 p.m. Call counseling Center
if you have questions at 757-6661.
This session will be in 313 Wright
Building.
COPING WITH LOSS
This support group is designed for
those who have experienced the toss
of a significant other. The focus will
be on understanding feelings, reac-
tions to loss, how to move toward
recovery, taking care of your needs,
and developing a positive outlook.
This group meets on Wednesday
from 34 p.m. in 329 Wright building.
For more information call the Coun-
seling Center at 757-6661.
MEN'S ISSUES
This group will explore current soci-
ety expectations of men and the pres-
sures men experience. The group will
focus on exposing stereotypes and
redefining what it means to be a man
in light of current ideas about emo-
tional health and well-being. This
group meets on Mondays from 34
p.m. in 329 Wright building. For
more information call the Counsel-
ing Center at 757-6661
CATCH ALL OF THE ACTION
Be a volunteer timer at the CAA
Swimming and Diving Champion-
ships. ECU is hosting the Colonial
Athletic Association Swimming and
Diving Championships Feb. 26, 27,
28, and 29. Timers are needed for Feb.
27, 28 from 10:15 a.m. to 2 p.m. and
from 6:15 to 9 p.m. Also Feb. 29, from
10:15 to 2 p.m. and from 5:15 to 830
p.m. Refreshments will be provided
and if three sessions are worked you
will receive a CAA Swimming and
Diving T-shirt. To volunteer please
call Stewart Esposito at 75843415 or
Matt Maloney at 7574532
THE CENTER FOR
INTERNATIONAL PROCRVMS
Presents Dr.Roy Sieber, Associate
Director forCollectionsand Research
at the Smithsonian Institution s Na-
tional Museum of African Art and
Rudy Professor of Fine Arts a: Imfr
ana University in a lecture or, "Afri-
can Art in the Cycle of Life The
lecture will be held Thurs. Feb
1992at Jenkins Fine Arts Auditorium
at 7 p.m.
"WHERE THERE
IS A WILL. THERE'S AN A"
This videotape desribes ways to en-
hance academic skills and perfor-
mance. Students mav come bv the
counseling center in 313 Wright on
Feb. 18 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. to view
the tape. Call 757-6661 for more infor-
mation.
GROUP ADVISING
FOR PRE-OT STUDENTS
There will be advising every third
Tuesday of each month from 12 p.m.
to 2 p.m. starring January 21st in
room 203 Belk building. Please see
the video at either Joyner or Brody
libraries before you come for advis-
ing.
SLAM DUNK MEETING
All interested in partidpating in Rec-
reational Services Slam Dunk contest
should attend an important informa-
tion meeting on Feb. 19 at 5 p.m. in
Biology 103. For more information
call 757-6387.
Sex Love an
By Dana Danielson
Assistant F ntertainment Editor
The band is Sex Love and Money. The-v describe
thense!vwasanMaltenwnvepowergTouprruxed with
a lot of stuff And theyopened their Jan. 31 showatthe
Attic with a word from their sponsor�a peanut butter
commercial
It was my first interview with a "real live band I
was excited, scared, and completely intimidated right
from their opening song.
After their frenzied performance, I followed Jim
Bury, bassist; lohn Bateman, lead guitarist; Chuck
Manning, vocalist and rhythm guitarist; ion Charnbhss,
drummer; two girlfriends and tech crew into the tiny
graffiti-laden dressii . - �� m After waiting until the
adrenaline slowed a bit, and everyone had found a
cigarette, we began an interview which provided in-
sight of the depth in which this band sw ims
TEC: 1 heard you went through a major overhaul
of your style What di es this mean?
Bury: We changed our format. We used to be kind
of heavy. We fit mc re of the ongi rials, which are a fusion
of a lot of stuff � acid funk, lots of heavy stuff. We're
trying to change our format to coincide with the origi-
nals. It didn't work tonight.
Bateman: We w erea staleQueensrychctvpe band
without a singer.
TEC: What kind of music do you play?
Bateman: We play an alternative power groove.
Sex Police said we were a mix between Metallica and
Sty St �
I i it influences?
Ai ' ' � : 'verkill. '
don
TEC: D gel ,i message across I
audier �
Manning:1 k justtalksab ut self,al
what we j
TEG Who writes ti - ngs?
Chambliss: it o mes from each of us. We all do a
partofead songtl tl ether.There'si I
asongthati ton fuspu omemmginto,everybi
individualistic flair. If you really pkkapartourgroi
there's some Latin stuff, flamingo stuff. All of us have
completely different influences It you put all our ongi-
naisinto a bucket thev wouldn't fit. Wed need our own
Agr
awe;
sep
fa
ir
I VALENTINE'S SPECIAL:
Brin" your Valentine
for a great dinner
110 I 4th St. �
Live Entertainment Featuring
BAD BOB & THE ROCKING HOK
Dinner Special For TWO
Coq Au Yin
(Chicken in Wine and Mushroom Sum
Includes Salads & Two Classes oi W ii
SI 2.95
Basking Robbins
Let Us Do Your! $2.00
Sweet Talking ! m vm
! (S12.00M1
-
Va dthroi :1
Baskin(?)
let 1 ream ,
756-41
(Next to
6-7 credits availat
ur, nr 2nd Sumrra
T ive and study in
(TTnivprsidadNacioJ
� rnnrses availabh
ngy. Spanish andii
� No prior Spanish
� Program fees inc!
portation, room an
sions to the Pacifi
and cultural centerj
. cal forests and volj
For More Information,
Dr. John Bort
757-6136 BA 439 or





PERSONALS
Miss Greei vi le Pfcgeant! Love, your
WYONI it rested in startingan Am-
rtal (Human RightsOr.
tuden! group on campus,
v l2
52-0022
Pizzas !
9
i
i
� upon
l)
ELSE!
DVVK H
Y FRIES
INK!
and
"nan
' emo-
I
J-4
I For
ired-
THt action:
mer at the C A A
Champion
ig th mial
j)r Swimming and
� F eb 26, 27,
peneeded for Feb.
I.m. to 2 p.m. and
A1so Feb. 29, from
from 5:15 to 8:30
l will be provided
is are worked you
Swimming and
volunteer please
Ji'o at 758-8415 or
74892.
JERFOR
PROGRAMS
iSieber, Associate
-t psyched foranatv.
e Valentine's Cocktai
ZHRIS"n BARBOUH Congratub-
ia ninganewasterolZTA
many more exciting
because I can already see,
ns .1- much to you as it
i 1 ove, your big sis,
. 1
DENTP1RAT1 CLUB: Come o�
d nner soda Mon-
� me Pirate Oub
j v, n bers S3 tor Non-
PiHBOWLCEL-
- upport the ft.
take on leorge Mason.
711 CHI RUB.lhopeyour
- - o this week-
uld be hereto
ist remember:
� � fun with your
fron boys with
� isvonthe
� Y; MINE'S DAY to
ill mybrouV
� ya in a while
� c on thiscom-
ors brownnosins
rls that don't
in and ev-
ilstomake
me, 1 lauch
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largeit Library of Information In U.S.
I SJBjfCTS
x jj , ' � . - . SA MC ar COD
EE 800-351-0222
tK f c x �; Nnwct U�
Sam's Trophies
( ustom I ogos, (olors
& ditt rapping
�1 ROPHIES
�RIBBONS
�PL Ol ES
�IS wii i ;s
�PI STIC signs
�DESK NAME PLATES
1804 Dickinson e.
� I ml rp4
757-1388
FAXISYOIRORDFR
757-2476
I Research
li stirubon'9 j-
fricar Art and
� '��� Arts at Indi-
i e hire on "Arn-
: lite The
I rhurs Feb. 13,
' � id i toman
M

"WHLKt THERE
IS A WILL THERE'S AN A
This videotape desribes wavs to en-
hance academic skills and perfor-
mance Students may come by the
- � g center in 313 Wright on
Feb. IS from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. to view
me tape.Call 757-6661 for more infor-
mation
GROUP ADVISING
FOR PRL-OT STUDENTS
There will be advising every third
Tuesday otcach month from 12p.m.
to 2 p.m. starring January 21st in
room 203 Belk building. Please see
the video at either lovner or Brody
libraries before vou come for advis-
ing
SlAMDUNICMEJETfiiG
All interested in participating in Rec-
reational fxTvices Slam Dunk contest
should attend an important informa-
tion meeting on Feb. 19 at 5 p.m. in
Biologv 103. For more information
call 757-6387.
Entertainment
&bz iEaHt Ear0linian
February 13, 1992
Money expose themselves
By Dana Danielson
Assistant Entertainment Editor
rhe Kind is Sex Love and Money. They describe
tlvniselvesasan "alternative power group mixed with
led stuff And they opened their Jan. 31 show at the
b with a word from their sponsor�a peanut butter
. mnvraal.
it was my first interview with a "real live band 1
,s i- excited, scaled, and completely intimidated right
their opening song.
After their frenzied performance, 1 followed Jim
Bur) bassist; John Bateman, lead guitarist; Chuck
Manning, vocalist and rhythm guitarist; Jon Chambliss,
drummer; two girlfriends and tech crew into the tiny
raffia-laden dressing room. After waiting until the
nahne slowed a bit, and everyone had found a
cigarette, we began an interview which provided in-
t oi the depth in which this band swims.
TEC: 1 heard you went through a major overhaul
tir style. What does this mean?
Bury: We changed our format. We used to be kind
� !hm VVcfitmoreoftheoriginals,whicharcafusion
� ,i lot of stuff � acid funk, lots of heavy stuff. We're
rying to change our format to coincide with the origi-
nals. It didn't work tonight.
Bateman: We were a stale Queensryche- type band
� ithout a singer.
TEC: What kind of music do you play?
Bateman: We play an alternative power groove.
x Police said we were a mix between Metallica and
� . Stone.
Hi: Who are your influences?
All: Everything! Primus, Overkill, Line's Addic-
TEC: Do vou try to get a message across to your
audience?
Manning: Our music just talks about self, about
vvliat we go through in life.
TEC: Who writes your songs?
Chambliss: It comes from each of us. We all do a
part of each song then we place it together. There's not
asongthatnotoneofusputsornetWnginto,eveiybodys
individualistic flair. If you really pickapartour grooves,
there's some Latin stuff, flamingo stuff. All of us have
completely different influences. Ifyou put all our origi-
nals into a bucket thev wouldn't fit. We'd need our own
across to these people. When they're screaming out
Metallica and Megadeath. What can you do but do
what they want.
BatemaruThegood thing aboutGreenville�we
get something to write about.
TEC: Where was your first gig?
All: Lisa's Drinking parlor. Atlantic Beach.
TEC: Do you like to play Greenville?
Chambliss: We have to face the fact that we
belong in those little bitty holes downtown thatcater
to teenagers, and not places like this who cater to
everybody. When we play here (Attic), people know
people are going to be here to drink beer. So there will
be a crowd here to drink beer, not to see us. There will
be 30 people up front havinga good time�30 people
who like us, but the majority of people here seem like
it's just a group to drink with. You go up north,
people are just dying for music up there. They want
to hear the original stuff, where you came from, what
you're doing. If you play a cover, they turn their back
Photo by Jill Ch�rry � ECU Photc Lat.
A group of faithful followers stand mesmerized by anj
awesome bass performance.
separate buckets.
Bateman: I'm from another country, Columbia,
so 1 get a different fee! for the music. You always carry
your heritage with yon.
TEC: How did you get together?
Manning: One of us boys has played with every
freakin' band in this freakin' town. We're the only
group who ever clicked.
TEC: Where are some places vou have played -1
All: Baltimore. Maryland Beach, Atlanta. Jack-
sonville 1 la.
TEC: Are most ot your songs originals?
Manning: We do about 70 percent o iginals, 30
percent covers. It's a rut. You can't face 30 people
screaming about something vou did six months ago.
It's just a nit we're in, in this town.
TEC: Where do vou want to play?
Manning: ("hit of town we're still fresh. We can
play anything we want. We get more interest.
Chambliss: It's not that we're against Greenville,
we're against closed-minds that trv to pigeon-hole.
Manning: Greenville doesn't support art. And
it's still an art form to i We just can't cot anything
Photo by Jill Cherry � ECU Photo Lab
Sex. Love and Money as much energy into their show
as they do in their music
on you.
Bateman: Up north people are more cultured,
more open-minded. Here is like the backlash. It's like
the Bermuda Triangle!
Manning: Don't get us wrong � we have some
people here who haveourT-shirtson, who have bought
our tape and they really do like our music.
Bateman: No band has ever come from North
Carolina, except Firehouse � Whew! We have to fight
the fact that you can't get there from here. We're trying
to forge our way there. If you try to be different, you
know, then you're not. We're just trying to be our-
selves, basically. (Trying to be different) alters you. In
music listeners if s all the little groups � the punkers,
the thrashers, the hippie ones, the deadheads � we're
trying to bring together. We have different parts for
everyone bring everyone together for once. I think
that's what being in a band is all about, going through
the shit, getting hit on the head, kicked in the ass.
Masochism, whatever you want to call it.
TEC: Your last album, released in October, is titled
Reignition. Does this have any significance?
Chambliss: It means everybody's gone though
hell, through life, everyone went through bands, went
through teenage 'waiting for the groupie' type thing I
suppose � and drinking. When we came together it
was like we really wanted to do music � regardless.
We beat it into the ground trying to find the format we
knew 'cause we knew gcxxi and well we weren' t gt ng
to stop 'till we absolutely knew we couldn't make it.
TEC: When is your new album coming out?
Chambliss: July, August.
TEC: Have you named it yet?
Manning: No. It's about people turning into them-
selves � developing elephant skin. The bet i n k like
everyone else, they don't want anything to come in-
side. We're (society) just cranking out people win i ire
so thick. They can't be reached anymore so they can the
human anymore. They don't know how to deal with
themselves. That's what society has become.
TEC: What is your ultimate goal as a band?
Chambliss: Making it to nie, personally, is being
respected for what I do. Being able to live, to do this ail
the time, to not have to worry about a part-time job. 1
just want to play. I get so pissed off because 1 go out and
see so many bands who deserve to be where the bands
See SLAM, page 8
VALENTINE'S SPECIAL:
Bring your Valentine
for a great dinner
110 K. 4th St. -752-5855
Live Entertainment Featuring
BAD BOB & THE ROCKING HORSKS
Dinner Special For TWO
Coq Au Vin
(Chicken in Wine and Mushroom Sauce)
Includes Salads & Two Glasses ot' Wine
$12.95
Baskin (p) Robbins
Let Us Do Your! $2.00 Off
Sweet Talking Any Valentine Cake
($12.00 Minimum)
ATTIC
��.Tie "M3"l�0�t�h�nje
CoMedf A C0M�ff
2PNE A 2PNE
Every Wed. V Every Wed.
Thursday
EGYPT
Power Funk
Special Guest - Gib Troll
Rock-N-Blues Guitar
.99032 oz Draft � .99? Highballs � .99? Memberships
Offw j jxi anfh coupo"1 at locjftow
itMWl rVip CCUDO't Pr v�S't VoiO w�f��
pfUfttWd or i�IHLttd by 'aw Net i"i
0HunCfcon wth any OthW dNsi
Valid through 22992
BaskinRobbins
Ice (ream & Yrtgurt
756-4477
(Next to K-Mart)
i
1
Friday

Heartbreak Concert
with the Oringinal Nantucket
New Album Release Party ,1
r Special Guest - Gardners of Soule y
$2.00 32 oz Draft
Saturday
INDECISION
Ksycneaenc kock
$2.00 32 oz Draft
Be our Valentine!
See our "hearty" selection of greeting cards!
S


AMERICAN GREETINGS
Student Stores
Wright Bldg.
East Carolina University
When you buy $5.00 of an
AMERICAN GREETINGS
PRODUCT Feb. 1 thru Feb. 14,
receive a bag of chocolates
free while supplies last.
You TOUCAN Spend Your
Summer in Costa Rica!
.hi i
� ft-7 credits available
� 1 st or 2nd Summer Session
� Live and study in Here(jia Costa Rica at the
I Iniversidad Nacional de Costa Rica
� Courses available in anthropology, bioloev. geol-
ogy. Spanish and independent study can be arranged
� No prior Spanish required
� Program fees include ECU tuition, air fare, trans-
portation, room and board with a family, plus excur-
sions to the Pacific Coast, Costa Rica's major cities
and cultural centers, museums, national parks, tropi-
cal forests and volcanoes.
For Mora Information, Contact:
Dr. John Bort
757-6136 BA 439 or ,
georges
hair designs
-FULL SEVICE UNISEX SALON
-EUROPEAN TRAINED STYLISTS
-WOLFF TANNING BEDS
-LATEST IN FACIAL & BODY WAX
-SKIN & NAIL CARE
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Stephanie Evancho
757-6769 Brewster A-117
;
THE PLAZA
Open Mon-Sat 9:30-9:00pm
Sun l:00-6:00pm
Tel:756-6200
$2.00 OI l MRK ISWIIH
STANTON SQUARE
Open Mon - Fri 10:00-8:00pm
Sat 9:00-6:00pm
Tel: 757-0076
IH)lH -Ki AIMRI s 92





8
alic iztrnt (Tnnilininn February 13, 1992
SLAM
Continued from page 7
who don't deserve to be there are
It's because they look a certain
way I his is just our own opinion,
but the way we all mvii is there sail
these unqualified people who have
our job and the) re taking up space
they don't write their own mu
sk, they're told how to plav, t(ld
how to .k t ! hey haveoned Ihose,
what are the) called, 'image con-
sultants telling them how to Uxk
Wc re gonna make it indepcn
dentK
Bury: rhewallwehavetocHmb
is so big, but it's a lot more run to
struggle than to give up and work
atMc 1 Jonalds htaveseen and done
things in .1 Kind th.it you can't leam
anywhere With,ill the experiences
up to now and we're really no-
where, it S enough to write five
!xh'ks 1 know people who v;o their
whole life and not live half of what
we've livil
Bateman: Write a book, have a
habv, plant a tree, that'bnlNhit' It's
alwavs been! The onlv reason I do
art tsbecauscifsanothw thing that's
tugging at my soul, going '1 lev' do
this, do this I'm a painter, thai 5
what I dt1 But what am I going to
tell someone w hen I graduate? 'ldo
� ires ' That's bullshit 1 enter
tain I like to entertain
111:1 l(�W did yOU ome up
Started at .1 party when a i;irl in a
nice car drove by and a guy said
'SI.AM baby I askixl him what it
meant anil he said 'sc, love and
money We kept the name because
if vou think about it, everything
revorvesaroundsex,loveormone)
Somebody hates somebody ause
ot sex, love they're jealous, or
money they're broke! You gel
tear out of SLAM.
TEC: Any closing statements'
AIM ometotheshows,damnit!
I his is important this is us! It
people don't like it, well, we'll play
tor ourselves. We're gonna keep
iloin until someone says 'Hev!
ou're dead! 'stop doin' it

ovc anil
Manning: "he name started
shall � bul ended real deep
BENEFIT CONCERT:
MANIFEST DESTINY
at the
ATTIC
752-73031209 E. 5th St.
This Sunday, Feb. 16th, 1992
FREE PIZZA from 9-10
(First Come, First Serve)
HANKS HOMEMADE ICE CREaM
316 E. 10TH ST. 758-0000 I
What a sweeter way to say "I love you"
than to y
send a cake and balloons on Valentine's Day I
Total price delivered $11.59
including tax
jShow this coupon when placing cake order and receive a free " kids cone
Study in England
Take your education on the road!
Pay ECU tuition while attending Leicester Polytechnic
Receive 30-36 credits for one year of study in England
Experience a new geographical and cultural setting
Visit Shakespeare s birthplace and some of the world s most
famous castles and palaces only 1 hour from London
Courses offered in a wide variety of subjects
Studying abroad can improve your chances in the job market
Scholarship support possible
Sound to good to be true?
Well, it is true and affordable!
You can participate in an ECU Exchange Program m
Come and meet the visiting British students to find out more
about Study in England
Join us on Wednesday. February 19 at 3 PM GCB 1001
or call Stephanie Evancho at 757-6769 for details
� 1 � � � - i' !
The University Media Board
seeks editors and general managers
The University Media Board is seeking fulltime
students interested in serving in the following
stipended posts for the 1992-1993 academic year:
J Editor - Expressions minority students magazine ($175month)
J Editor The Rebel fine arts magazine ($175month)
J General Manager The East Carolinian student newspaper
(estimated 1991-1992 stipend $4,700)
J General Manager Photo Lab ($175month)
J General Manager WZMB student radio station ($200month)
J Day Student Representative to the Media Board (no stipend)
All applicants should have a 2.5 grade point average
Contact: University Media Board
2nd Floor, Student Publications Building
Telephone 757-6009
Deadline for Applications: 5 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19
V
On February I i. Le
East (loast Music cV Viaeo
V
Pul ASong In
��jurValentines Heart.�
Let's face the facts about Valentine's Day. Flowers will only die.
and candy makes you fat. Why not give your sweetheart something
that can be enjoyed over and over again9 Something without all those
extra calories, like music. Put a song or two or three in your sweet's
heart this year. We've even got specials on selected CDs and
cassettes. Like Dillon Fence and Harry Connick Jr So don't be a
stupid cupid, and give the gift of music this Valentine's Day Oh. and
you might want to ask about our free movie rental offer while your
there.
V
1109 Charles Blvd.
758-4251
Open Nightly Until 11
V
Spring Break '92
North Myrtle Beach
Myrtle Beach
The Grand Strand
You've Got The Time
We've Got The Beach!
So, Pack your bags, grabyour
friends, find any mode of
transportation ,m join the
Spring Break Beach Blast in
North Myrtle Beach, Myrtle
Beach and The Grand Strand.
We have sun and surf, trendy
nightclubs, ,vm a festive party
atmosphere. Vou won't want
to miss this most excellent
adventure.
For more information about how you can join the
Spring Break Beach Blast call:
1 -800-356-3016, ext. 700
DRUG STORES, Inc
Quality � Competitive Prices � Service
Dickinson Ave - 752-7105, 2 Memorial Drive 758-4104
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FREE VALENTINE GIFT WRAP
FREE DELIVERY - s7.00 MINIMUM tcH,i.i
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3
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ljmi;lniriiV
Millionaires
Fresh Ptmw �- Honey Caramet
in Real Milk Cbocouwte
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� Novelty Valentine Gifts fi Perfumes
Sports
Coaches
junior collegl
to fill 1991 lo
By C hip Kline�
Folk) wi i � . � - . - .
son . �� r � �
Logan has ��� recruiting classe The greatest area�
were depth at lir 1
receiver 1 of starters Kei ��� �
Hunterall moi- � .� ,
sort
Rei n e mrd
sui'i' ����
tor sonx' imm
awaj ���� � � �
Dia Hid
Lowe and Rustv �
�� . .
Johns : �
� . �
ind avei �

1992 ECU Football Si
Wli
rosmo:
Uoy.
� John

Mon
i fan
��
� �
nnin
rren 1 tart
. is Hart.
�Dia Hicks
�Rusty HurleyLB
�Morris ietcherV. R
Mark hhianoOl
�Lewis LoweLB��
Mark Mc( allDL
Scott Richards-6-4 rl
Sean RichardsonTEfv-4 Z-
Daniel RussOLB�-��; 215
lohn ShlagerOTtT- . � �
Ron SuddithOL6-2
Allen WilliamsWR���
�DCTK fes I
For Your SundayReading P
r � 1 he Daily Reflector� The Baltird
� The News & Observer� The ChkaJ
� The Washington Post� TheAtlant
�The New York Times V� The Green
railokln Vxr r Sktirwi-ii �:
CENTRAL BO
& NEWS
Greenville Square Shopping Center � 756-71'
Open nil 9:30 Seven Days a Week
BBQ DINN
Sat. Feb. 15.1
METHODIS
STUDENT CEN
11:00-1:00 and 5:0i
PICK UP AVAILAI
$4.00plate includj
BBQ, Potatoes, Slaw, Ci
and Tea!





8
e he lEaul (Xarulinian
� � 13, W92
SLAM
Continued trom page 7
who don't deserve to be there are Started at a part) when a girl in a mone they're broke! You get
Its because they lock .i certain nice car drove bj and .i gu) said tear out of SI AM
w.i rhis is just our own opinion, sl M baby 1 asked him what il III: ny closing statements?
but the wavvveall see it is there's all meant and he said 'sex, love and iH:Oimetotheshows,damnit!
unqualified people who have nrtonc) We kepi th�- n.nni � I �� -i aii � I hi is important this is us! It
rjobandthex re taking up space il you think about it. everything people don't like it, well, we'll play
thi' don't write their own mu rcvolvesartuindsex,loveormone tor ourselves We're gonna kivp
su thev retold how to play, told Somebod) hates someboch 'cause doin until someone sas 'Hey!
,t sex, love thev're jealous oi You're dead! Stop doin'it
how to act I ho have one of those
vsh.it are tho v.ilK) 'image con
silt.ints telling them how to Uok
� i make it indepen
Bury: Phe wall we have toclimb
is so big but it's .1 lot more fun to
gle than to give up and work
at K 1 Hinalds 1 have seen and done
things in a band thai you can t learn
With all the experiences
and we re realh no
� s i-iivuigh to write five
books ' know people who go their
II d not live halt ol W ls.it
Bateman: Unto.) hvk have a
tree that sbullshit! It s
1 he onlv reason I do
it sanotherthingthat s
w soul, v.oin 1 le' d �
a painter that s
�lit w hat am I poii
� � ii
M.
BENEFIT CONCERT:
MANIFEST DESTINY
at the
ATTIC
752-73031209 E. 5th St.
This Sunday, Feb. 16th, 1992
FREE PIZZA from 9-10
(First Come, First Serve)
HANKS HOMEMADE ICE CREaM
316 E. 10TH ST. 758-0000 1
What a sweeter way to say "I love you"
than to r-A
send a cake and balloons on Valentines Day J (
� Total price delivered $11.59
including tax )
.Show this coupon when placing cake order and receive a free kids cone
Study in England
Take your education on the road1
Pay ECU tuition while attending Leicester Polytechnic
Receive 30-36 credits tor one year of study in England
Experience a new geographical and cultural setting
Visit Shakespeare s birthplace and some of the world s mos;
famous castles and palaces only 1 hour from London
Courses offered in a wide variety of subjects
Studying abroad can improve your chances in the job market
Scholarship support possible
Sound to good to be true7
Well, it is true and affordable1
You can participate in an ECU Exchange Program 4
Come and meet the visiting British students to find out more
about Study in England
Join us on Wednesday. February 19 at 3 PM GCB 100
or call Stephanie Evancho at 757-6769 for details
S3FTIK
in
The University Media Board
seeks editors and general managers
The University Media Board is seeking fulltime
students interested in serving in the following
stipended posts for the 1992-1993 academic year:
J Editor - Expressions minority students magazine ($175month)
J Editor - The Rebel fine arts magazine ($175month)
J General Manager The East Carolinian student newspaper
(estimated 1991-1992 stipend $4,700)
J General Manager Photo Lab ($175month)
J General Manager WZMB student radio station ($200month)
J Day Student Representative to the Media Board (no stipend)
All applicants should have a 2.5 grade point average
Contact: University Media Board
2nd Floor, Student Publications Building
Telephone 757-6009
Deadline for Applications: 5 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19
V
On February I . r
Easl Goasl Music & Video
4 Put A Song In
Your Vale'ii lines I Icirl.
v
Let's face the facts about Valentine's Day F lowers will only die.
and candy makes you fat. Why not give your sweetheart something
that can be enjoyed over and over again9 Something without all tho e
extra calories, like music. Put a song or two or three in your sweet's
heart this year. We've even got specials on selected CDs and
cassettes Like Dillon Fence and Harry Connick Jr So don't be a
stupid cupid. and give the gift of music this Valentine's Day Oh, and
you might want to ask about our free movie rental offer while your
there

1109 Charles Blvd
758-4251
Open Nightly Until 11

Spring Break 92
North Myrtle Beach
Myrtle Beach
The Grand Strand
You've Got The Time
We've Got The Beach!
So, Pack your bags, era Iv ur
friends, find an) m d 01
transportati n and join tl 1
Spring Break Beach Blast
North Myrtle Bea h, W 1
Beachnd The(irandStrand.
We ha e sun and surf, trentK
nightclubs, anda festive partv
atmosphi t �. V u v on ant
to miss this m st ex 1 il!ent
adventure.
For more information about how you can join the
Spring Break Beach Blast call:
1-800-356-3016, ext. 700
L-IlliT'
inson hvc - dz-7105, 2 Memorial Drive 758-4104
3 315 Stantonsburg Rd. 757-1076, 4 1631 SE Greenville Blvd. 752-00
FREE VALENTINE GIFT WRAP
FREE DELIVERY - 7.00 MINIMUM
(C itv I imits)
HAl l OONS r �
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Latex
H.50
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wM
ISP
r
iisstC)()VtX,
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ltd
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OTAE
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� Stores Only'
I
�lim�ilHiriis
Millionaires
1 �-� '�� tm i- ttontry tirttntcl
in Real Milk fMlitf
American Greeting Cards P Stuffed Animals
P Novelty Valentine Gifts F Perfumes
Sports
Coaches
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to fill 1991 lol
By(r

F �

rccruil��

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1 tan � �

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.
Dia ! �
1992 ECL lootballS
NAMI



� '
� no
tLcwI
v .
i
5, in -


1

For Your Simdax Reading 'I
-
� I he l)ail Reflector . The Baltii
� rhe News & Observer �TheChicai
� The W ashington Post . The Atlantl
� The New York limes . The Greenl
Available 1 ven Sunda) i
CENTRAL BO
& NEWS
Greene ille Square Shopping Center � 756-71
Open 'till 9:30 Seven lav� a eek
BBQDINN
Sat. Feb. 15.1
.
METHODIS
STUDENT CEN
11:00-1:00 and 5:0i
PICK UP AVAILAI
S4.00 plate includj
BBQ, Potatoes, Slaw, Ci
and Tea!





Is Lei
& Video
111 m-
Hearth

Mowers will only die.
sweetheart something
L mething without ail those
r three in your sweet's
-cted CDs and
I, ick Jr So don't be a
ilentine's Day Oh. and
rental otter while your
v
,ot The Beach!
kiui b. rabyour
. mode of
n and join the
Break Beach Blast in
Myrtle Beach, Myrtle
ind I he Grand Strand,
and surf, trend)
id a festive party
You won't want
is this most ex client
Irti.
ow you can join the
Blast call:
ext. 700
ES, Inc.
ices � Service
Memorial Drive 758-4104
Jl SE Greenville Blvd. 752�003
ilFTWRAP
INIMUM �itv limit)
Sports
�iE lEaat Carolinian
February 13,1992
9
CANDIES
�liuittlwirnr
Millionaires
ttrsh I'etntis & Hottcv Itttttrttrl
hi Real Milk llHHolatr
ds Stuffed Animals
Gifts Perfumes
Coaches turn to
junior colleges
to fill 1991 losses
By Chip Kline
Staff Writers
Following the Pirates' best sea-
son ev�f, new Head coach Steve
I oj�n has signed one of the best
recruiting classes ever at ECU.
l"he greatest areas of concern
were depth at linebacker and wide
iMMver. which werehurt by the loss
of sta tiers Ken Bumette, Robert Jones,
� luntor Callimorc and Dion John-
.n.
Recruiting coordinator Dale
i vie went to the junior college ranks
some immediate help, and came
. m ,1 v with receivers Morris Letcher,
i I licks, and linebackers Lewis
owe and Rusty Hurley.
I.etcher follows another
I vmevnllc product to ECU � Dion
hraon. An Honorable Mention
American last season, Letcher
accumulated 875 yardsin receptions
and avenged 17.2 yards per punt
� -turn.
Lowe follows ex-C.rand Rapids
Junior College teammates Ziam
Cunmulai and Eric Meyers to the
Pirates. He is a former High School
and Junior College All-American.
Theother JUCOsignee was John
Clevinger,an offensi velineman from
N.E. Oklahoma A&M. His team
won the Junior College National
Championship last season.
Letcher, Hicks and Hurley en-
rolled in the spring semester and
will participate in spnng dnlls.
Morris Freeman and Lloyd
Cameron highlight the high school
signees.
Foreman, the former Farmville
Central player and North Carolina
All-State pick, prepped last season
at Fork Union Academy. He will
play defensive back, and chose the
Pirates over NC. Suite.
Cameron, a 6'4 253-pound de-
fensive lineman, is a former Super
Pnp All-Amencanand pn'ppcxHast
See Recruits, page 11
Young ECU
baseball
team looks
to retain title
By Chip Kline
Staff Writer
Fit photo by Grr��t Killlan � RS
The ECU Rugby team Seated Ok. Dominion 20-4 Saturday tor their tirs. win o. .he season. The .earn wii.
host a tournament on the Allied Health tield .his weekend.
Ruggers crush ODU, 204
By Hiram J. Webb
Staff Writer
1992 ECU Football Signees
NAME
Brad Bunch
Uimont Burns
1 Joyd Cameron
ilohnClcvinger
Marcus Crandell
line Dalton
Morris Foreman
Mitchell Galloway
lakeGilray
lamie Gray
leff Griffin
E.J.Gunthorpe
Darren Hart
Davis Hart
�Did Hicks
�Rusty Hurley
�Morris Letcher
Mark hbiano
�Lewis Lowe
Mark McCall
Scott Richards
Sean Richardson
Daniel Russ
John Shlager
Ron Suddith
Allen Williams
POSITION
OTDT
LB
DL
OL
QB
DETE
DB
WR �
OL
OCNG
OT
RBFS
DB
DB
WR
LB
WR
OLB
LB
DL
QB
TE
OLB
OT
OL
WR
�Denotes
Ht.Wt. HOMETOWN
Bamberg, S.C.
Greensboro
Springfield, Mass.
Mechanicsville, Va.
Robersonville
Morgantown, W.Va.
Farmville
Bennettesville, S.C.
Sarasota,Ha.
Phoenixville, Pa.
Anderson, S.C.
Winston-Salem
Winston-Salem
Winston-Salem
Pensacola,Ha.
Boca Raton, Fla.
Kansas City, Kan.
Eastern, Pa.
Detroit, Mich.
Rochelle, Ga.
North Augusta, S.C
Durham
Shallotte
Waldorf, Md.
Miami, Ha.
Rock Hill, S.C
6-3235
6-5215
64255
64315
6-01�0
6-3250
61190
5-9165
64265
6-2280
6-7235
6-2180
5-175
5-9170
6-3185
6-3230
5-9165
6-3220
64245
6-5260
64220
64220
64225
6-7260
6-22811
6-1190
junior college transfer
Die ECU rugby team defeated
Old Dominion 204 Saturday at the
Allied Health fieid. Rookie winger
Jay McCain started the Pirafc.1 at-
tack by scoring early in the match.
The conversion kick was missed.
Old Dominion wasted no time
in retaliating. They scored their
only try off of a busted Pirate play.
Their kick attempt wasalso unsuc-
cessful, and the score remained tied
44 forover twenty minutesof play.
With onlv a few minutes to
play before halftime, ECU was
stopped on ODU'sone-meter line.
ECU called a two-man line out.
Bert Hewitt's throw-in was caught
bv Aaron Back who touched it
down to give ECU an 84 lead at
halftime.
The Pirates looked like a dif-
ferent team after intermission.
They began to control almost all of
the k�9e balls and rarely let ODU
have possession.
Winger Casey Craig scored his
first try of the year by simply out-
running the entire defense. Rich-
ard "Opie" Moss' conversion kick
was good.
Not to be out done by a winger,
scrummer Richard Hooten simply
ran over the Monarch defense for
his first score of the year. Again,
"Opie" Moss' conversion attempt
was successful.
The game ended with the score
ECU 20, ODU 4. The Ruggers were
now 1-0-1 for the year.
The Killcr-B's, ECU'S "B" team
ruggers,alsowontheirgame. Brian
Snow scored two tries to lead the
B-side in scoring. The final for the
second game was ECU 16 and ODU
4. TheKiller-B'sarenow2-0forthe
vear.
Next week, ECU will host the
first annual "TheGround Ain't Fro-
zen" tournament. Games will start
Saturday, Feb. 15 at 9 a.m. and
Sundav, Feb. 16 at 10 a.m.
Lo'ngwood College, the Uni-
versity of South Carolina, Virginia
Military Institute and Cape Fear
arc among some of the teams that
will participate.
ECU would like to continue
this tournament each spring.
Games will be played behind the
Allied Health Building.
team
By Rick Chann
Staff Writer
Sunday's Mobil- One Track
Meet at George Mason University
brought together some of the top
track and field athletes in the world
The ECU track team was repre-
sented at the meet by its 4 x 200 and
mile relays.
The 4 x 200 relay set a new
school record with its first place
finish. Therelayrana timeof 1:26.93,
breaking the old record of 1:27.87.
The Pirates' time was also the sec-
ond fastest time ever run on the
George Mason track.
Leading �! the relay was
Damon DeSue with a time of 225
seconds. Bnanlrvan ran the second
log in 20.4 and was followed by
freshman Danny Allettcin 22.3 sec-
onds. Charles Miles ran the anchor
login 21.1 which brought home the
victory as well as gold watches for
the first place team.
Head coach Bill Carson de-
senbed the mile relay as a "spirited
race all the way The Pirates fin-
ished second to UNC-Chapel Hill
by one good step. Chapel Hill's
relay ran a time of 3:1354 to ECU'S
3:13.63.
The relay was run by Junior
Danswithanoperung400-meterof
See, Track, page 11
The 1992 ECU Pirate baseball
team will be the youngest m eight
seasons under Head coach Gary
Overton. Gone from last year's team
is the heart of the batting order
John Gast, Tommy Eason, and
Corev Short.
Gast and Eason both left after
their junior seasons to sign with
professional teams.
This squad will have to rely on
strong starting pitching and timely
hittingtodefend theirColomal Ath-
letic Association Championship
from last year. That title was the
fourth in a row for the Pirates.
The pitching staff will undoubt-
edly be the strength of the team.
The starting rotation will consist of
senior Tom Moye, junior Jim
Ambrosius, sophomore Johnny
Beck, and freshman Richie
Blackwell. Beck was a First Team
All-CAA selection last season as a
freshman.
The bullpen will be anchored
by sophomore right-hander Lyle
Hartgrove and junior left-hander
Owen Davis.
Returning experience in the
field includes: second baseman
Heath Clark, shortstop Chad
Triplett, right-fielder Pat Watkins:
third basemanClynnBeck,and 199r
CAA Tournament Most Valuabld
Player David Leisten.
Junior Lee Kushner, a transfas
from Rice University will be thu
first baseman with freshman Chad
Puckett and Anthony Thompson
addingdepthatshortstopand third
base respectively.
The catcher's and left-fielder's
positions are still up in the air with
freshman Pat Barber and Grant
Harman battling for catching du�
ties,and jumorStancil Morse, sopho-
more Mike Sellers, and freshman
Kevin Wilhoit fighting for playing
time in left-field.
ECU expectsa strongchallenge
this year from pre-season favorite
Old Dominion and George Mason.
The Pirates began defense of their
CAA crown Saturday at 2 p.m.
against Pembroke State at
Harrington Field.
For Your Sunday Reading Pleasure.
199U992
lavnoic
t-nt . C
:aoson
i
"
. The Daily Reflector � The Baltimore Sun
. The News & Observer � The Chicago Tribune
. The Washington Post � The Atlanta Journal
. The New York Times . The Greensboro Record)
Available Every Sunday at.
CENTRAL BOOK
& NEWS
Tom Griffin s
THE BOYS NEXT DOOR
"An extraordinary
play that will bring
both laughter and tears
to your eyes
pisl
FKBRl RY 13. 14. 15. P and IS at 8:15 p.m.
KF.BR! fn 16 at 2:15 p m.
HI STimvNTS S4 50
,m- Iru-am r.�r I s Than V Movie So Bring Date
IF YOUR GOING SOUTH FOR SPRING BREAK
THEN
HAVE YOUR AIR CONDITIONER CHOKED
AT
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830-1779
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10 Bl?c t:aut (CarolinianFebruary 13, 1992
O'Donnell 'assists' Lady Pirates offense
Exchange student abhors Southern cuisine
By Rachel Watson
Staff Writer
America, it's known as the
melting pot of the world.
Tobacco Road, it's known tor
basketball, Southern cuisine, lease
(elms and agriculture.
Mi the melting pot theory
with tobacco Road,and you have
formed quitea combination �one
thai could eastlv describe ECU'S
Gaynor O'Donnell.
As an exchange student trom
Merseyside, England, O'Donnell
has risen to become the star point
guard for the Lady Tirates basket-
ball team. As a junior, her acco-
lades both on and off the court
runedefined student-athlete to the
tee
O Donnell broke the school as-
sist reCOfd of 413 in the game
against Richmond Ian. 11. She tal-
lied seven more Monday night in
the team's 6u-55 win over lames
Madison University to bring her
career total to 466. She also leads
the Colonial Athletic Association state rival UNC-Wilmington. She
with 7.00 assists per game. averages 9.2 points per game, is
Assists are not the only high fourth in the CAA in three-point
point of O'Ponnell's career. She accuracy at 41.3 percent, and is
reached her career high 27 points tenth on the ECU all-time steal list
Feb. I against conferenceand intra- See O'Donnell, page 11
dill
the long-awaited
full-length release
produced by
RON ST. GERMAIN
tutoring:
Hey Mockingbird
Oaf light � Will Break
mommOth
I I C O I 0 $
(til MU I IND noot
�n�.i nc jrsto
���������:
Nino
AVAILABLE AT
CD $10.98
CASS. $7.98
.
p
�:
:? v; "
r:


V
:�'�
7'
Thursday
Student
Budget Night
$1.15 Tall Boys
$1.25 Imports
$2.10 High Balls
$2.85 Ice Teas
�Ladies Free All Night
V
UNITED COLORS
OF BENNETTON
YOU WILL L VK THIS DEAL
SAVE AN ADDITIONAL
20 OFF FALL
MERCHANDISE
638 E. Arlington Blvd.
Arlington Village
Greenville, NC
(919)355-7473
TZ

We are now taking Trade Ins!
Come in and trade that pale winter complexion for a
Hot New Tropical Tan
from out new 30 bulb tanning center. We also
offer the best in men's &women's cuts, perms and
Matrix hair care products
758-5026
?dN
3N-
m
SALE ENDS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 16
Outdoor
Adventure
spring tritn and workslnps offend by ECU Recreational Services
Tanning nnckaye specials
5 visits - $15.00
10 visits - $25.00
20 visits - $45.00
IMjoc
107 Eastbrook Drive
758-7570
Located past Pizza Inn
in front of Eastbrook Apts
�.$�V
Registration Information:
� in) ol these programs
R 'it (Recreational Outdooi
Center I located m IP Christcnbuf)
Gymnasium Registration t�-i each
trip � bo Ik-UI through me pie trip meeting date and
through the daj before each scheduled workshop A
minimum deposit o( $10 is required for each tripand the
workshop fee must he paid ir full upon registration.
Weekend
Backpacking Trip
Spring Break Get-Away
Destination: Edisto Beach, SC
Dates: March "14
('osts: $14) tor students A SIr() Foi (acult). stall. guests
includes transportation, equipment and most meals,
Activity: Active outdoor oriented break canoeing the
scenic Edisto Ricr while enjoying the sand and sun ai
Edisto Beach Stale Park Paddle the world's longest tree
lowing black water stream and view low country
wildlife such as ueer. Fox, river
otter and alligators Overnights -lp
win be spent n natural carnpsites -
along the river's edge. Then en-
im J da s along a mite and a hall
ol oceanfront beach at Edisto a an
Beach Stale Park Explore Indian mounds composed ol D3V llK6
seashells. shrimp in the sail marshes, surf fish, day hike
and comb the beautiful beaches.
Destination: l.inville (Jorge, NC
Dates: April J-5
Costs: S30 for students A S3S tor faculty, staff and
guests Includes: transportation, equipment and most
food.
Activity: Spring is in bloom at Linville Gorge
Apr il 3-5. Phis backpackng adventure promises to be
an unforgettable scenic trip
STUDENT
PIRATE CLUB
IMP
�tiT.
X
Canoeing Day Trip
Destination: Cliffs of the Neuse, NC
Dates: April 11
Costs: S10 lor students and S12 for faculty, staff and
guest Includes- transportation, equipment ami food
Activity: Paddle through the beautiful Cliffs of the
Ncusc State Park in the
'i-i primeofsprmgb,oom
m
PRE-CAME DINNER
MONDAY FEBRUARY 17
5:30PM
PIRATE CLUB BUILDING
Beach Horseback
Riding
Destination: Barrier Islands, N
Datts: March 18
Costs: S45 for students & S50 for laci
guests includes transportation, guide fee
Activity:
Spend up to 3 hours walking and some
down sandy beaches while exploring tit
sand dunes. Pre-trip meeting will be held: Wednesday,
March 18 at I :00pm in BD101
5
fittfl and
c dinner
. racing
ols and
Destination: Cape Lookout National Sea
Shore, NC
Dates: April 26
Costs: SI 5 for students and S20 for faculty, staff and
guests. Includes: transportation, ferry ride, equipment
and lunch
Activity: Spend a day walking along the breakers with
miles of the beautiful North Carolina Coast in your
sight. A visit to the Cape Lookout lighthouse is planned
as well.
i
$2.00 MEMBERS
$3.00 NON-ME
Spring 1992 Workshops include:
Windsurfing I: February 27
RappellingClimbing: March 19
Climbing II: April 9
Tar River Clean-Up by Canoe: April 24
GEORGE MASON
O'Donnell
vrith 133.
Quite remarkable player con-
sidering she has only been playing
bjasketball since she was 15-vears-
old.
"England didn't have basket-
ball in their school curriculum
sid O'Donnell. "So we practiced
ohce a week in an after-school
league
It didn't take long for
Cf'Donnell to develop her talent
Spe went on to play in the England
trials and traveled all over Europe
whth the National Leagues.
O'Donnell was named Most
Valuable Player of the I ntema honal
Basketball Camp of London That
hfcnor won her a trip to the United
Siates to attend Southern Wayne
High School in CJ
She was a starter
Southern Wayne wl
in her senior year vf
During her
Southern Wavne
quired many awaj
Mid-Eastern4-AT
Greensboro Moos j
State Team, All An
able Mention and
North Carolina Ea
game.
O'Donnell w
scholarships to pi
U'NC-Chapel
Wilmington, UNCJ
palachian State,
ECU
"1 felt more at
Track
Continued from page 9
48.6 seconds. Fred Owens then took
the baton for a 48.82 leg which was
followed by Corey Brcxiks' leg of
49.1 seconds A great anchor leg
was run by Irvan and Reggie Hams
of Carolina who out-stepped Irvan
at the finish for the win. Irvan held
about a two-meter lead on Hams,
ranked second in the nation in the
400 meters, until the final step when
Harris went by for the win.
ECU's time in the mile relay
wasitsfastest ever on a tight-curved
track, beating its old time bv almost
two second i he members of the
mile reiav were awarded silver
watches for their second place fii
ish. Carson said he was pleased
with the way hi team ran and it
was the first time thev had come
awav from the meet with eight
watches.
On Friday night, at Chapel Hill,
Carlos Blake qualified for the FC4A
; meet in the 55-meter dash with a
; time of t40 seconds. He pins team
members DeSueand Milesasquah-
tiers for the meet in the 55m dash.
Ot her mernbersof the team who
have qualified for the meet are
DeSue, Miles, Allette, and Irvan in
the 200m dash, Irvan and Davis in
- the 400m, as well as the mile relay
team.
T
32
Recruits
Continued from page 9
vearat Bridgeton Academy in Maine.
Heoriginally committed with Michi-
gan.
Other key signees include: quar-
terback Marcus Crandall, wide re-
ceiver Mitchell Galloway, offensive
lineman RonSuddith,defensiveline-
man Mark McCall, and linebacker
Mark Libiano.
Crandell, from Roanoke High
SchcK.il. was an All-State selection
and passed for over 1,400 yards and
18 touchdowns. Wide receiver Gal-
lowav was a 4-A All-State selection
in South Carolina, and caught 42
passes for 750 yards and six touch-
downs
Defensive lineman McOll was
a Georgia Sportswnters All-State
selection and chose ECU over Geor-
gia Tech. Libiano was an All-State
selection in rennsvlvania as a tight
end but will play outside linebacker
for the Pirates.
Fri Feb 14
Manifest Destiny
SatFeb15
Wannabees
$1 Longnecks Wed Peb
Fraternity
Queen Sarah
$1 Longnecks � 7j
513 Cotanc
(located;
Hours
Mon 11 am-3pm
Tue. 11 am 3pm
Wed. 11 am-3pm
9pm-l am
Ttiurs. Ham-lam
Fri. 11am-lam
SaL9pm-lam
758-1





February 13, 1992 kUie feast(TaruliUlan 11
ITED COLORS
BENNETTON
1 L VE THIS PEAL
N ADDITIONAL
Wt OFF FALL
ERCHANDISE
E. Arlington Blvd.
rlington Village
jreenville. NC
919) 355-7473
i mm taking Trade Ins!
pah m intt r complexion for a
New Tropical Tan
� We also
perms aiul
� i n K.ic specials
Minabix
k Drive
asi Pizza Inn
" rook Apts.
ENT
CLUB
DINNER
RUARY 17
P
BUILDING
MBERS
MEMBERS
i I
ROLINA
i
�� �
MASON
ODonnell
With 133.
Quite remarkable player con-
sjvt�n ng she has only been playing
basketball since she was 15-years-
oid
England didn't have basket-
ball in their sehwl curriculum
o A O'Donnell. "So we practiced
-i . ,i week in an after-school
Itjague
It didn't take long for
0 1 mi noil to develop her talent.
si n w cut on to play in the England
and traveled all over Europe
the National Leagues.
O IVnnell was named Most
Vahiablo Haver of thelnternational
Basketball Camp of London. That
t won her a trip to the United
M.itcs to attend Southern Wayne
Continued from page 10
High School in Goldsboro, N.C
She was a starter for the team at
Southern Wayne which went 27-1
in her senior year vear.
During her senior year at
Southern Wayne, ODonnell ac-
quired many awards, including:
Mid-Eastern4-Ariaverof the Vear,
Greensboro News and Record All-
State Team, All American Honor-
able Mention and played in the
North Carolina East-West All Star
game.
ODonnell was offered full
scholarships to plav basketball at
UNC-Chapel Hill, UNC-
Wilmington, UNC-Charlotte, Ap-
palachian State, Mt. Olive, and
ECU.
"1 felt more at home here (at
ECU) when I visited, and I really
liked theclosenessof thecampus
O'Donnell said. I'm a physical
education major and ECU is the
best school for that
O'Donnell said the hardest
things to get used to here were the
hot, humid weather and the south-
ern food. She had never eaten col-
lard greensorbar-b-que before she
came to North Carolina, and nei-
ther are a part of her daily diet.
She said she misses her En-
glish breakfast, which consists of
fried eggs, bacon, baked beans,
black pudding, flat fried bread and
hot tea.
"I love this country, but I do
miss my family said ODonnell
"I'm not sure if I will stay here or
return to England after gradi
tion. It will be a tough decision
1.1
Gaynor O'Donnell
Weight Lifting
Leg Puss ('ompetition
Mlnges Weight Room
lit). 4. 1��2
Weight (lass
Men
146-164
197-217
1st: John I ink is 600 lbs.
2nd: Paul Lumpkin 595 lbs.
1st: Jimmy Rameriz 640 lbs.
2nd: Chris Cordon 600 lbs.
Heavyweight Neil Jefferson 1125 lbs.
Women
1st: (aria Joyner 405 lbs.
2nd: Menlanie Jollv 355 lbs.
�SencA prtSS rc-uS vtN be m the I rt ' - , : �: ,� Th
Grapic by Michael Martin
Track
Continued from page 9
S 6seconds. Fred Owens then took
he baton tor a 48.82 leg which was
followed by Corey Brooks' leg of
l' 1 seconds. A great anchor leg
. as run by Irvanand Reggie Harris
Carolina who out-stepped Irvan
it the tmish for the win. Irvan held
ibout .i two-meter lead on 1 larris,
ranked second in the nation in the
400 meters, until the final step when
I lams went by for the win.
1 CU's time in the mile relay
a.is us fastest ever ona tight-curved
k, beating its old time by almost
two second; � he members of the
mile relaj were awarded silver
watches tor their second place tin
ish Carson said he was pleased
with the wav his team ran and it
was the first time they had come
away from the meet with eight
watches.
On Friday ntght,atChapel Hill,
( arlos Blake qualified for the IC4A
meet in the 55-meter dash with a
time of 6.40 seconds. He joins team
members DeSue and Milesas quali-
fiers for the meet in the 55m dash
Other members of the team who
have qualified for the meet are
DeSue, Miles, Allette. and Irvan in
the 200m dash; Irvan and Davis in
- the 4(XVn, as well as the mile relay
team
f John's Flowers
Attention Lovers Everywhere:
Valentine's Dav is Feb. 14
We at John's Flowers appreciate
everybody's business
In return, we are keeping our prices the
same for Valentine's Day
A Dozen ftoses arranged $55.00
Half Dozen $36.50
One in a vase $12.50 Delivery
1
John's Flowers Gifts
2221 Stantonsburg Rd.
752-3311
Recruits
Continued from page 9
yearatBridgeton Academy in Maine.
Heongmallv committed with Michi-
gan.
Other key signees include quar-
terback Marcus Crandall, wide re-
ceiver Mitchell Galloway, offensive
lineman RonSuddith,defensiveline-
rnan Mark McCall, and linebacker
Mark Libiano.
Crandell, from Roanoke High
School, was an All-State selection
and passed forover l,400yardsand
1 s touchdowns. Wide receiver Gal-
loway wasa 4 A All State selection
in South Carolina, and caught 42
passes tor 750 yards and six touch-
�. ns
I Vlensive lineman McCall was
a Georgia Sportswriters All-State
selection and chose ECU over Geor-
gia Tech. Libia no was an All-State
selection in Pennsylvania as a tight
end but will plav outside linebacker
for the Pirates.
JSIO.99

J5
9sTo"
bl
&
aft00
e��V
e
S6.99$l1
tee
$6-
��
1.99.
03333303?
Fri Feb 14
Manifest Destiny
SatFetHS
Wannabees
U Longnecks WedFeb19
Fraternity Benefit
Queen Sarah Saturday
$1 Longnecks � 75c Draft
513 Cotanche
(located across from UBE)
758-0080
Hours
Mon 11 am-3pm
Tue. 11 am-3pm
Wed. 11 am-3pm
9pm-l am
Thurs. 11am- lam
Fri. 1 lam-lam
Sat. 9pm-lam
ORDER NOW
Payments
Date
,K )STEXS
Feb. 17, 18, 19
10-3
nm ������� Bfc- om$2000�e m
�W jm�"s we L� ul ��4j�c�'





�Unes
9? v?
C?
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9 9
3 3
9 9
i iiris W i rERSi I love you not only
eryday Yon are special
.will mr take Acpta
rOSl THWAIKIROT VIU A(,l
GREIN- Remember Aebotagnaaandwich
and the cake Rght and the time you said
voU kwi I inks for faking me to
md lot sei
eat of the Rabbit
the sweet thing" and
� I with Moot) Ptes
until llW end.
Dl BORAH JAN1 f M AN-
CHANTA1 JENNIFER, MARGE,
DANA I ISA NDESFE IALLYJULIE:
ualitiea May
d other
. .
H BOSWEl 1 YoM r
i � evefytl
ember that time in
ny dropped die I
� � u fell d
i laughed
, � idn ipped
good times like
WIP Rl (. ARTER, IK
I
� time
I mrdav night I will
.m(R VH: Thank 5 rS lh
rOt�AVIDOANIEI Happy Vakmtot'l
� husband and host friend tor
over 20 years Love you lunches and for
over 1 lug- and Bases, vour devoted wife,
Deborah
TO YATES: 1 lappv Valentino's I lay to a
ton who makes us craey and proud We
love vou 1 tavid and Dob
TO ROBIN, STACY, KIM, ANP Al 1
(ITIIFR B( TTY'S: Remember this dav of
love and friendship but remember it all
vear long. I lappv V ?� Alpha love 1
Norting "
1 0 LYNDA. 111 IF AND 11 Thanks for
putting up with me and thanks for the
DONNlEi You are mv lite, vou are my
world you are my kwe, Forever, '
SWIFT PlAi Happv Valont
ami I hop vou will �Be� vour
St () IT WHTTli Will you be my Valen
tine torever' Thank you far showing me
what true love li I love y.u Forever and
always, Kris I1
lov
life
with n
i?t
HFY "POOI) '�ank vou fot two the
meal wond � ot my We! it our
id not met. m BOB Would Still
e iov ol
houM-i-or the fulfillment ot. than-
twhat
krva i nu m
all " -our
good Bme9 and laugr
I lappv Valontr -
IOK. Rl.BC, S.C,
,r wittv humor
alitieS make work a
and interesting Hap
. for m ' I K
in the past year
, DD AND K All
and supor person
ot more enjoyable
I FIGH ANN: 1 want you to know how
i.il and important vou ire to mo 1
,v i sometimes forget to show you
my love, but pleas- accept these linos as
I svmK '1 of mv love 1 lappv Valentino
Day Greg
I DAMON: You stole mv heart
before IcoW givelt toyou i
love vou always Emilie
9? ?
9? 9?
vvh wrol SClfHOfHASTHl HAIRI-
CHEST? Stud n � w �' s
�� rtts see this Sfopp)
( herub
OIK M1 I I

amomucho Chico
f,i BS
i go k
COURTNEY: After J 12
. iralgtUlloveyouUcan't
wail forJurte5,1993 I ove,
Jeff
DtARI r,J
too Happ V.i"
OI AR It I KJ Happy Birthday! I la;
rha
(. HRfS V: Thank j for 1
ItthS I la; ' ne'sf ),r, � dVd
birthday! I Irnei -
i Kaisha.
Baby! I ove iuh
? 3
ID Hi i Villl STA1 LIONS: Thanks
H h tor taking care of me when mv
.�uldn t work You guvsaretb.
i md I will n.iss vou guvs'
goto Don't worrv, 1 won't do it again But.
,n eve on me Hugs and kisses, km
MONK AREA VIS: You 're the best thing
that has ever happened to me You are m �
rtuio.�vh . pv Valentine's
� ptlart'li.Av u GawyOudk)
HfllO KIRMI1 Happv Valentit
1) iv Thank von tor two wonderful years
had tho time of mv life 1 hold on M
IS well as tho future Y�M
n lor me and 1 hope we can last
per 1 love vou with all heart, soul, and
wgyMonh
H on G 1 lappv Valentine's Tav babv'
kaM two months have bMBI grea"
k vou for being the spocial per
�Making lite Mean
. fU, Molanie
BRAD Hap v lientinsDay'llo
I congr a ulations on b
coming se r. tary �t Iheta On 1 lugs and
I t iri'v Boar "
VtlCHAElNowthatwefoundoaeh other
again and have another chance, there's n. I
need to take a second glance Before I
tamed mv back and ran away, but Ma
time 1 plan to stav Happv Valentu
Day! Love always, Karm
JOHN: I am so luckv to have you, for vou
have made mv lite complete and al, I
dreamswmotrue'HArrYVAl.ENTr.
DAY BUDDY'1 love you! I ia
SOMFRFDHFAf)GIRL:Thefirstsvmp
torn of love m a voung man is timidity, m
a girl it is boidns- ma two ISM the
have a tendency to approach, and ea I
assumes the qualities of the other
MilkdudsthisvearM lappv Vr'mored
Brvan
MOUSE: Oh �! what
canlsv vouiidFVFKYTHlNGiD.xki'
The w.s'keru! was i.Mt Why Ml I
atdl?) Oianksforir. �
2,bnngthetaps 1 �fWBJ tol �
trv' Can't wait for the � a�d road
tnpl (,ri Happv '� 0
Wll I IF; Fhsr � wear,
through wffl itxm H promi-
make it last forever li
Roslin
(.1 OR1A It has beef) � great aU r,
theN-stest K.vpup that GREAT
PA" 1 love you more than you w
know Love, your I �
POOKIF Thanks for making m�
and smile more each ,i. Happv
Valentine's Day' 1 1
door has a kn�h -T
I.ORI US TIS: I'm gUv!
with mo through everything F �r o ia I'm
grateful ! love you Love. Brvan.
HAPPY VALFN TINE'S DAY
BABUSHKAH
tome Tvelx-e
Will you plea
MICHAF.I Oui r.endshipn
mo. You tell me not to worrv about vou but
when it com. � 1 eaae at
thoninomatt.
are and if things change it
bet'
and hav ;ay'
MARTIMOOSE: Happy Valentit
Day�AU I can Ml
more try bs
: now more thanev
ATTENTION III CfcEENl
,n tn Red
C HI R11 1 vvish i
-
� be, I'm counting ot
DEARTRAO
tioo-
? V
V ?
v7 ?
o(.i aara, l wendefed m
N vours Sow 1 know,
rvth.ng I've always �
the wail 1 love you,
v7 7
1 gog ame into my lift
. htrne noting butjoy I cannot
nHl THE DAY'I LOVE YOU'The
amount of love I havo for you is unimag
Will vou be tnv valen
. .� dd
HEIDI:Fl mChl - wehavowalVwllor
three and a haH through do
nut-glaed streets and live drama The
�id the ride
th't I little friction but
Ight toot massages and late night
it ! en
lOVes you more and you
want to borrow my commode for some
uajfvelsg irt v.ui are still mv favorite anal
I While nightmares I have
ou area good dream come true Earl
� is
V7 ?
BRIAN 1 miss you much and wish we
aOUJ I be together On our lirst Valentino's
Dav. but there will he many more. Happy
Valentine's Day I love you Nancy
? ?
ANN A: You've given mesomuch to make
the past eight months s ial We've had
our ups and downs, but our love keeps us
together You havematle me a better, more
complete person Sweetheart, youseeonly
words on paper but vou k now the feelings
behind them in my heart When all else
(ails, vou keep me going You at. my light
at the end of tunnel I love vou very much
Brian
DAVf Ih. past two vearsandfivemonths
have ban the happiest times of my life
You are the most special person I knov.
Thank you for making mv life Complete,
and for being my best friend lovealwas
Nkki
I Happv V day, roomie1 Congrats on
I, .sing the crutches- good luck on the cane
(I mean, the oar) �'ster
AMY WATERS: I bpa vou have a I lappv
Valentine's Day' lie on the lookout for a
Valentine's treat coming vour way' Luv
ya. your secret sis
KATHRYN:Can'l believe 1 did it on vour
special davdidn'tcall,didn't send birth-
day greetings your way1 feel so badmy
head's hanging love wrote this classi f ied
just to toll you so' 1 lappy belated birthday
Happy Valentine's Day" love, J PS
1 ook out for red lights
! is no secret how I felt
ago about getting
RTEPHANII
tho .
down " ihen 1 met vou auii � haatftd al
my feelings 1 want to thank you for the
beat lhr e months of my Wa Kevta
K) K ol I 1 � w words to l.l
. know how much I love you and ap
predate your companionship Happy
Valentine s Day Love, Paul
(.INDY 1 luv u with all my heart Happy
Valentines Day From, Fati
v7 9
? 7
Pf ill f alentme s 'My'
After ' � and levefl months, my
U still gTOWa stronger evi-ry-
, All mv love, "Dart
? ?
STACEY t: I couldn't ask for a better
person t � spend my life with I love you
with all of my heart, valentine. � JTK
JOHN fMY PADLOCKED-JARVIS
BABYV. 1 LOVE the times we share to
got her and hope there will be many mote!
Uts of LXWE from ytmr CHAPEL HEEL
babl � D PS Joan keep Cliristina outta
trouble!
v? 9
st Hey fluffer' Do you miss mo vet'
What is your outhx)k on Valentine's Day
this veai' Missing you in DC Love,
Mich.v-1
HONEY: Big kisses, little kiss happv
kisses, stale gummicsandbighugs 1 lappv
Valentine's Dav I love you lots Mon-
key PS Good lurk Saturday on P CAT
SAILOR: A year and a half ot Cosby naps,
I know jerk oils, towels, unremembered
and unanswered 2 am phone calls, fruit
loops, burnt bacon and I'm sute love
Peanut
V? $
JTF, MY FAVORITE FIR ATE. 1 believe u
t wonderful! Love. D
TO THE EAST CAROLINIAN: Happy
Valentine's Day. Who loveaya, laby? �
Mom.
HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY TO: Greg,
Lisa, Beau, Richard, Andy and )lm Bob
Love, Jammin' Janet
WARMEST VALENTINE GREETINGS
TO: P D Berry, Jane and Arthur!
TRICIA CREEGON: I don't think I could
have made tt these past few months with
out ou to talk to You're a real life saver
Thanks. �Mitch
HEY STRANGER: Not' Not anymore
anyway, that waamonths ago. Just wanted
to let you know that the past week has
been absolutely unreal�the hips" But not
to Wony oven better timea are waiting
ahead Cant wait for April 4th. Hugs,
kisses, and maybe even a little bit ol
"trouble " I lappy Valentine's Day! Love,
me. PS I'm VERY aure Truat me on this
one.
BOOGIK Hope you have a happy
Valentine'l Day, That's all we havo to say,
'Cause we love you any way�or we'll kill
you � "Marge" and Steph
LISA: The last two months have been
great You' ve become a special and impor-
tant part of my life ia vea great Valentine's
Day Thinking of you always, Tom.
FOR CHARIENE:Sho follows thepath of
her heart to theharbor whore she finds me
sly waitingAs we set sail her pros
ance fills my soul as the wind does the
�a,ls!t is with her that 1 spend mv davs
sailing and my nights gently gliding upon
the brilliant dancing diamonds which the
moon so graciously bestows to usShe is
truly my sunrise and sunset; and I love
her John
THEREAREMANYGIRLSATECU,but
none are quite like you I want to be with
you until the end of time. 1 LOVE YOU
HMD IVase be my Valent
inc. Love, Steve.
PAUL: Asthestarsiaded while we walked
to the pier, the sun rose with each step we
took 111 never forget PM Dawn, 100 mph
and Eric's snoringtn the back! It was pretty
intense, wasn't it? I lappy
V day. �Sarah
JENNY: Second time around, let's do it
right, and for ail the times I'vescrewed up,
I'M SORRY. Love ya, Sox.
HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY: to the two
hottest 40 or FREE AGENTS on and off
the court! Love, Ltl Deb and Stephanie.
DEAREST JASON Happv Valentine's
Dav' Surprised'You are the beat that has
over happened in mv life r � i I
love you. All rnvLv tor. ear, Anne
TO JONATHAN Just wanted to �ay 1
love you and I hope you have a Happv
tine's Day Your swcvthcrt, Kim
JILL F: To a very special person on a very
special day Happy Valentine's Day from
someone who really cares a lot �D
BIG BUBBA: I love you more than you
could possibly imagine Thanks for every
thing Let's have a repeat of last weekend
forever. OK Happy Valentines' .
your Jlnglin Baby
JENNIFER: Wc have be-m going out now
for t year and 5 months and I still want
you to know. "You are very special to me,
you brighten upmydaysandalwavs make
me smile Happy Valentine s Day Jen
n.ferM Jonesa.k a "Boobo " I love you
From, Michael Carnes

ot Al iiki . know it's hard
.ist we'll have
end .
FROM no QUOT1 MASTER: "The
. .t doth a lamp " By any
- �
WAYNE: Moments with you,
momont's of you, remain dear
in my heart. I'll love you al-
ways, Cbell.
v? 9
HEY THERE LAURA W: with the big
brown eyes and beautiful smile I love
you
�Sean
HAITYVALENTINESDAYEIke:Cood
luck with the tennis team' I know you can
do it. I love you! �Sister Aim
MICHELLE: I Uppy Valentine's Day baby
I'm ready for the beach, are you? 1 can t
wait to be alone with you. Don't forget
your camera. I love you. �Thomas.
STEPHEN: Don't you know it is really
Y( )U that 1 want to be with for the rest of
my life! No one can fix the computers like
you can1 Won't vou pleav be MINE'
ALBIE, LARRY, TIME, MATT, BLAIR,
LEWIS, MIKE,STEPHEN and all thcother
guys at TEC I'm Sorry I've been such a
witch about all this computer stuff - you've
been great Please know how much 1 like
working with you' Best of luck with your
individual Valentines Schmoozing Love,
Chantal
JENSTER: Even though you have a new
Valentine, I still like vou 'cause 1 know-
that you still have an appreciation for the
absolute worthlcssnessof this thingcalled
love! I love you. Beth.
TOM BERRY: I ley Valentine Buddy CT
Mine! Let's do dinner and dancin' soon!
You're the greatest wild dance partner
I've ever had. Remember to dip often! AU
my love! Chantal (aka Honky Tonk
Woman) PS I will teach you the 2 step -1
o V
MUSCLE MAN: 1 think I'm In like!
Thought about ya! �Tereaa.
E
ANA: 1 k� wanted to let you know
how wonderful m y world has been since
1 met you. How very special It is to
arwmd this time together. You have
made such a difference in my life I will
love you always on this Valentine s
Day and everyday after. - Lindsay
v? V
? 9
swear!
JIM, BEAU RICHARD, ANDY. GREG
A N D LI SA: This semester has been great.
Thanks for being easy to work with.weU
most of you. 1 love you guys! Jean.
STEVE: It's been a trip working with you!
I know you do well this summer with my
job. Will I have to train you AGAIN?! We
will have a good time anyway. Jean.
TO THE MEN OF SLAY HALL: You're
all hunks, especially my buddies! Have a
wonderful V-day. Good luck schmoozing
on women downtown or wherever' Love,
Chantal.
M A R KDOODLES: Although you'reieav
ing in May and we'll be apart, you wiU
always have a spei ial place In my heart.�
Wendy
KEVs The time we've spent tafether has
been wonderful I hope it laata forever. I'H
love you always. Love, Terri Lynn.
SNOOKUMSs WlH you be my Valentine?
Some say It'auaeleae to wish upon a star,
but 1 can Mil them how wrong they are.
You are very special to me and t tove you
with all my heart �Cootie.
� T � Wendy. .����.�-�-�w��������
HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY!
DON: Hey you SEXY THING! Do you
ever think we will make it out tothestabtea?
Have a grant VatenHne't Day Love al-
ways, Jean.






Title
The East Carolinian, February 11, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 11, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.857
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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