The East Carolinian, January 28, 1992






Roe, Roe, Roe, the boat, but don't rock it
Editor examines Roe vs. Wade controversy.
4
Tempting tunes 6
Temptations cut new album, entertain new generation.
QJJre iEaHt (Eanrltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.66 No.5
Tuesday, January 28,1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
8 Pages
Students exposed to PCBs
The start of the spring semester at the
State University of New York at New Platz
was delayed two weeks after five transform-
ersexploded,exposing22peopletoextremely
high levels of cancer-causing PCBs.
The explosion occurred after a car hit a
telephone pole, which caused a power surge.
Two dormitories and two classroom
buildings are now closed because of the ex-
plosion, but no possessions can be removed
from the contaminated buildings.
Toi Carter, president of the student asso-
ciation, said she has heard from many stu-
dents that, "their first concern is about their
possessions but peopleare concerned about
their safety, too
A university spokeswoman said she was
not sure if the students' belongings inside the
dorms will ever be recovered.
Fraternity adds chapter
A new progressive fraternity recently
opened a chapter at the University of Arizona.
The fraternity, Delta Lambda Phi, declares
itself open to men of all sexual orientations.
Donald D. DeCarlo, president of the fra-
ternity, said he started after he was asked to
leave two other fraternities at the University
of Arizona.
DeCarlo, a pre-med senior, said the new
fraternity will have songs, colors, pledgesand
secrets like all the other fraternities, the only
difference is it will be open to all men, regard-
less of their personal sexual orientation.
About a dozen students joined the frater-
nity, which has chapters at 24 other schools.
Three golfers killed
Three members of the Universi ry of Texas
at San Antonio golf team died Jan. 10 when
thecarthey were traveling in ran head-on into
a pickup truck.
Mark Bruchmiller, DerrickSteinbruckand
Lance Mullins were on their way home from
a preseason tournament, traveling on a south
central Texas highway, when the accident
occurred.
Both the driver and passenger of the truck
were also killed in the accident.
Steinbruck and Mullins earned all-con-
ference honors in golf last season.
Atheists hold forum
A new organization at the University of
Mi. nesota called the Atheists and Unbeliev-
ers recently held its first public event for
members on the school's campus.
According to the organizers, the purpose
of the group is not to convert anyone to athe-
ism, they just want atheists to know they are
not alone, and there are many people who
share their beliefs.
'If s harder to get an atheist out of the
closet than a gay Michael Valle, organizer of
the public lecture said.
Michael Martin, a professor of philoso-
phy at Boston University, spoke at the first
meeting on hisbook titled, "Atheism: A Philo-
sophical Justification
Lefties given scholarship
A small liberal arts college in Hunting-
ton, Pa. is offering a scholarship for if s left-
handed students.
Currently, one student receives money
from the "Fredrickand Mary F. Beckley Schol-
arship Fund for Left-Handed Students" at
Juniata College.
Mrs. Beckley died in 1978,leaving$20,000
to fund the scholarship.
Mr. and Mrs. Beckley met on the tennis
courts at juniata in 1919 when they were
paired only because they were both lefties.
The two fell in love and married.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shlmmd from CPS and
othar oampua nawpapf
Inside Tuesday
Crime SceneJ 2
Classifieds73
Editorial4
SatireV5
Entertainment�
SportsJ7
Activists mark Roe vs. Wade decision
By Elizabeth Shimmel
Staff Writer
Activists from both sides
of the issue participated in a
candlelight vigil on the steps of
the Pitt CountyCourthouse Jan.
22 to mark the 19th anniver-
sary of the Supreme Court Roe
vs. WaVdecision that legalized
abortion.
While pro-life supporters
sang religious songs, a smaller
group of pro-choice activists
chanted "Keepabortion legal
Manv students stood for
J
the pro-choice side, while the
pro-life supportersconsisted of
entire families standing to-
gether against abortion.
"I've been to a lot of these
rallies, (and) there's never a
family-oriented group with the
pro-choice side, and it's always
a family-oriented group with
the pro-life side senior Arielle
Sturz said.
"I feel many of the pro-
choice supporters think they
will always be given a choice
because of Roe vs. Wade ECU
Photo by Jill Cherry � ECU Photo Lab
Activists for both Pro-Choice and Pro-Lite groups gathered on the steps ot the Greenville courthouse
to rally around the Roe vs. Waetedispute. The rally marked the 19th anniversary of the ftoedecision.
student Cheryl Vionsaid. "But
the pro-life supporters are
fighting to take away that
right
And, no matter what side
ofRoevs. Wadelhe activists were
on, many people had their
mindson a new Supreme Court
case.
The day before the Roe vs.
Wade anniversary, the Court
agreed to hear a Pennsylvania
case that will make it more dif-
ficult for a woman to have an
abortion.
The Pennsylvania law goes
against many of the principals
of the Roe vs. Wade decision,
which states; "A woman's
constitutional right to privacy
encompasses her decision to
terminate her pregnancy
But, when the Supreme
Court justices review the new
law's provisions in April, the
landmark Roe us. Waiedecision
may be changed.
The provisions of the
Pennsylvania law include: A
woman must wait 24 hours
before an abortion can be per-
formed and the woman must
tell her husband about her
decisionprior to having the
abortion.
The Pennsylvania law also
requires doctors to tell women
seeking an abortion about fetal
development and alternatives
See Roe, page 2
Thieves hit fraternity houses during breaks
By Christie Lawrence
Staff Writer
CD players. Stereo systems
and telephones are hot items this
year. Hot as in stolen. Theft has
become a problem on and
around campus. The Sigma Phi
Epsilon fraternity house. Alpha
Sigma Phi house and several
residence halls have recently
been victimized.
Kevin Alexander Smith, a
member of the Sigma Phi Epsi-
lon fraternity, finished serving
in Desert Storm last summer and
moved his belongings into the
house in expectation of living
there in the fall.
Between summer session
and fall, when the house was
vacant, his room in the front
house of 505 E. Fifth St. was
broken into.
Dayslaterhediscovered that
most of his belongings had been
stolen.
Smith changed all of his
locks, hoping to keep future
thieves out. His door frame was
demolished, so he had it re-
placed.
"1 thought that the newly-
built metal frame would keep
them out he said. But it didn't.
There was a second break-in.
During the second break-in,
Smith'scntiredoorwaspunched
in. Along with the CD player
and stereo that was stolen.
Smith's shoes walked away with
the thief and a pair of old shoes
were left in their place.
The Alpha Sigma Phi house
has also experienced a number
of break-ins. Two or three days
before the semester began, a CD
player, bicycle and telephone
remotes were stolen from the
house at 422 VV. Fifth St.
Since then, several break-ins
have been attempted at the
house, but none have been suc-
cessful.
In addition to the fraternity
house brcak-ins, Scott and Belk
residence halls were broken into
over Christmas break, and sev-
eral telephones were taken. Eight
rooms were broken into on the
third floor of L'mstead residence
hall.Several phones werestolen,
among other items.
Evidently, the thieves were
interrupted. White bags filled
with valuables were found in
the hallway, but several other
bags made it out the door.
If anyone has information
on this or any other break-in,
please contact Crimestoppers at
757-6266.
Theft prevention offered
By Christie Lawrence
Staff Writer
Reporting the model
number of stolen merchan-
dise to the police is not the
best way to insure recovery
of stolen items.
Public Safety offersa free
service called Operation ID
to ECU students to trace
stolen merchandise more
effectively. Operation ID in-
volves a public safety officer
visiting a student's hall or
home to take a complete in-
ventory of all valuables.
Then theowner'sd rivers
licenscnumberiselectrically
engraved into the merchan-
dise on a non-removable
surface.
Lt Keith Knox offers sev-
eral other economical tips for
preventing thefts.
Lock your rooms at all
times, even when you are
sleeping, Knox said. "After
all, it only takes 30 seconds
for someone to walk into a
room and take something
he said.
Do not leave small items
laying around the room. It is
easy for a person to steal, even
if you arestandingin the same
room. Invest in an inexpen-
sive footlocker, or lock up
your valuables in some other
way, such as in a filing cabi-
net or desk.
See Report, page 2
SG A initiates
new campus
clean-up project
Photo by Kevtn Amoa � ECU Photo I
Just charge it
Cold weather brings students inside The Wright Place between classes for warm food and
drinks. The popular campus spot served many students fending off the cold.
By Julie Roscoe
Assistant News Editor
Alex Martin, SGA presi-
dent, announced a new pro-
gram to clean up ECU'S cam-
pus at last night's SGA meet-
ing.
"Adopt a Part of Campus"
is the slogan for the clean-up.
Based on the "Adopt a High- last night, saying the SGA
way" program, Martin said only has$19,302 available for
and any necessary equip- �
ment.
Any organizations inter-
ested in joining the program ,
should call the SGA secretary
as soon as possibly to sign up
for their piece of campus.
Eric W. Hilliard, SGA
treasurer, gave his financial
I?
rs
report on the spring semester a
Joe Camel ad sparks controversy
he got the idea from N.C.
State's SGA president when
the two last met.
The program will consist
of campus organizations re-
ceiving a pre-di vided portion.
appropriations.
Several changes were
made in class offices last night
due to resignations and a
graduation of former officers.
Kevin A. Smith is now se-
ft-
is
7-
jr
le
By Elizabeth Shimmel
Staff Writer
According to advertising
research, "Old Joe the Camel a
cigarette advertising logo, is as
familiar to six-year-olds as
Mickey Mouse from Walt Disney
ads.
'The results show that to-
bacco advertising is as effective
in reaching young children as is
Walt Disney's' said Dr. Adam
Goldstein, clinical instructor and
fellow in family medicine at the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill and one of the re-
searchers in vol ved in the study.
The study, which origi-
nated at the Medical College of
Georgia, recruited 229 children
ages3 to6fromarea preschools.
Researchers interviewed
the children, and then created a
board game requiring the chil-
dren to match 22 different logos
without brand names with one
of 12 pictures of various prod-
ucts.
See Joa, page 2
The organizations must then nior class vice president, Kim
deanuptheirassignedareasonce Ross is junior class vice-
a month. president, Troy Dreyfus is
"It's good for the campus sophomore class president
and good advertising for the and Richard Paravella is
organizations Martin said.
Martin spoke to the
Council of Student Organiza-
tion Leaders, and will speak
to other organizations such as
fraternities, sororities and
dormitories who he says can
benef i t and provide assistance
with this project.
The groups will be work-
sophomore class vice presi-
dent.
ECU Gospel Choir was
awarded $650 for expenses ss
and the vice president of es
Gospel Choir, Sheri Wingate, 5
spoke to SGA about the
organization's purpose and
goals.
"We travel to different
Old Joe
ing with the grounds division, high schools to promote ECU
who will provide trash bags �ee SGA, page 2
er
3-
�-
all





2
OJI?e �00! (Earolinian January 28, 1992
PIKE vehicle stopped for
speeding, verbal warning issued
Jan. 21
0853�Croatan: Assisted a rescue, subject not transported.
1125�Brcwster:Assistedrescue, subject was transported.
H41Austin and Raul buildings: Vehicle stopped for one-
way street violation, student given campus citation.
1305�Bclk Hall: Vehicle stopped tor expired registration,
student given state citation.
1354�Jenkins building. Vehicle stopped for exceeding safe
speed and having no license on person; student given verbal
warning.
1435Theatre Arts building look subject in custody to
magistrate's office. Offenses Obstruct and delay and pre-medi-
tated trespassing.
2208�Tyler Hall: Checked out reference to no heat. Same
noted on maintenance report
(XH1 � Ringold Towers Vehicle stopped south of building for
speeding, careless and reckless driving and two stop sign viola-
tions. Non-student given a state citation
0114�Spilmanbuildmg:Vohiclcstopped,student given ver-
bal warning for one-way street violation.
2246�Slay Hall: Took missing person report, subject re-
turned to the dorm, no report was taken.
0226� White Hall: Keterem ctodisturbance;sameunfounded.
0239�Avcock Hall: Checked out scene in reference to four
male subjects in basement, all subjects given verbal warning for
disorderly conduct.
1417�College Hill Drive: Escorted female to commuter lot;
Also assisted subject with her vehicle.
Jan. 22
1039� Move Boulevard: Vehicle stopped for expired tags;
student given verbal warning.
1120�Belk Dorm: Checked out reference to an assault inflict-
ing serious injury report; rescue transported subject.
1330�Outpatient center: Vehicle stopped for a stop sign
violation and exceeding a safe Speed; staff member was given a
campus citation.
1540�Power Plant: Vehicle stopped, staff member given
campus citation for stop sign viola tion and cxceedinga safe speed.
2311�College Hill Drive: PIKE vehicle stopped and verbal
warning givento student tor speeding.
0020�Graham Building: Provided transportation for intoxi-
cated male to Mm street
0040� Belk Hall: Responded to area in reference to loud
subjects at basketball court. Subjects gone on arrival.
0352�Mall. North of Student Health, recovered numerous
banners, on the mall, which had been tom down.
1151Wnght. Attempted to locate a subject; same unable to
locate.
Crime Scene is taken from official Public Safely Logt.
Flu epidemic stuffs up
campuses during finals
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
"1 felt like 1 had a three-day-
long hangover said ECU jun-
ior Todd Georgcl. Georgel is one
of those who have suffered from
the widespread epidemic of the
flu.
The flu hit the nation, but
only 20 cases have been reported
at ECU'S infirmary since No-
vember.
"Many students know they
have the flu and treat themselves,
so we do not have a count on
how many students have had
the flu, just the number of diag-
nosis given in the infirmary
said SuzanneTurnageat the ECU
infirmary.
Only 60 flu shots were given
at ECU and there are no longer began on the eastern seaboard
flu shots available. and in the southeastern states
Tumage said there were not said Judy Conner, CDC's im-
enough vaccinations due to the munization program coordina-
infirmary's underestimation of tor. "It now involves the entire
the severity of the flu season. country
Doctors say the only way to
avoid theflu is to be immunized
against it.
"Anyone whodoesn't want
the flu should get a flu shot
said Dr. Walter Gunn,epidemi-
ologist for the Centers of Dis-
ease Control (CDC) in Atlanta.
According to the Weekly
Report of Influenza-Like Sur-
veillance of North Carolina,
North Carolina State University
reported 159 cases of the flu
during the finial exam period.
UNC-Charlotte reported 55,
UNC-Chapel Hill reported 43,
while ECU only reported seven
flu cases during the exam pe-
riod. These are only the cases of
the flu that were reported to the
schools' infirmary.
"This year's flu epidemic
Roe
SGA
Continued from page 1
to abortion.
"What everyone is hoping for,
and that's people on both sides, is
for there to be a clear-cut deci-
sion Dr. Marie Farr, director of
women's studies at ECU said. "If
thedecisionisagainst Roe us. Wade,
the pro-choice people will go to
Congress and ask that a law be
enacted to give women the right
again
People on both sides of the
abortion issue were happy to have
a peaceful demonstration in Pitt
County, but many people were
wondering what issues may be
surrounding abortion on the 20th
anniversary of Roe vs. Wade.
Continued from page 1
and get students who want to
attend ECU interested Wingate
said. Courtney Jones, speaker of
the house, said that the Gospel
Choir was not given funds last
Spring in the annual appropria-
tions because their constitution
had expired. It has since been
renewed.
Jones said, "I'd like to see
more group representatives
speak about their organizations
and be interested enough with
SGA to come to a meeting
Martin also asked the body to
think of suggestions to encourage
student voting in the national and
SGA elections.
9
j
Report
Joe
Continued from page 1
Another inexpensive way to
protect yourself is to make your
own little alarm system around
window ledges.
"Everyone has little trinkets
they can throw together Knoxsaid.
'That way if someone tries to get in,
they may hear the noise and run
away. At least it will make their
presence known
During summer months, for
those in off-campushousing, should
make sure that the windows can
not be opened more than five or six
inches.
"Pin them with a nail or any
other method that works Knox
said. 'Then the window can't be
broken into
Continued from page 1

fts Only
For The
Romantic
At Heart
&M
Wednesday
The logos came from prod nets
considered to be well known t
adults, such as cameras, comput-
ers, and cigarettes, and from
children's products such as break-
fast cereal, and the Disney televi-
sion channel.
Thirty percent of the 3-vear-
olds correctly matched "Old oe
the Camel the logo for Camel
cigarettes with the pnxiuct.
In contrast, almost 90 percent
ottheh-year-cdsmatchedthetwo,
Goldstein said, and this same
number of 6-year-olds matched
Mickey Mouse with Disney.
"From this study, we have
concluded that very young chil-
dren see, understand, and remem-
ber tobacco advertising Goldstein
said. "Thechildren knew thisciga-
rette logo independent of whether
or not their parents smoked ciga-
rettes
He added that Camel has be-
come one of the most heavily ad-
vertised cigarette brands.
Researchers said they believe
that advertising exposure may in-
fluence children later in their lives
because product knowledge en-
courages purchasing the product
later in life.
"We have coined a term to de-
scribe this; environmental tobacco
advertising Goldstein said.
IAN
I'itifag Chtthing,
. u ll'lfollt �' ilih S,
nt itiut s. � " t'n la'�
41
Evans St Mall
v ntow n
752-1750
lere's plenty of FREE
parking at our rear
entrance off of
Cotanoh
'�
h.
Progressive
Donee Night
10 Droft
$1.15 Tall Boys
$2.50 Pitchers
$ 1.00 Kamikazes
�todies Free til 10:3f
krv
ti
,i
f�
P
F
W
IS COMING

L
"EpiscopaCStudent JdCozoship
Invites you to Join Us "Each iMdnesday
5:30 pm Celebration of Holy 'Eucharist
followed By supper and conversation
St. PauCs "Episcopal Church
401 E. 4th St.
(cross 5th St. in front of garret 9(at; wafdoum "Matty St. to 4th St.)
'you !re Vhtrtl

review
t
Summer Student
Leadership
Opportunity
Available
Ft Carolina University
Orientation
Staff
Applications Available in 203 Erwin Hall
Jan 21 through Feb 21,1992
Deadline for completed applications is
February 21, 1992 (4:00 pm)
Classifieds
FOK RENT
TWIN OAKS: Three bedroom, 21 2
bath, fully-furnished townhouse.
Upperdassman preferred. Jason 830-
5173.
HOUSES FOR RENT: One block
from campus. Five bedroom, two
bath, $8007month. Also, three bed-
room, two bath, $500month. Call
353-3195.
EFFICIENCY AT R1NGGOLD
TOWERS: available for rent imme-
diately. Great location, dose to cam-
pus and downtown. $260 a month.
February rent is f ree! Fully furnished.
Call 757-3347.
FEMA LE ROOMMATE WANTED:
to share quiet river view apartma I
1 futilities. Prefer older student. Ca
758-3311.
ROOM FOR RENT: Tar River apl
$140, 13 utilities, cable and phone
Call 752-1854.
TWO MALE ROOMMATES
WANTED: SI 25 per month 14
utilities each. 505 W. 4th St. Behind
Zeta house, next to Phi Tau.CA -
5130 or 355-1813. Move in Feb. 1.
FEMALE ROOMMATE: wanted
February. Best location in town. 1II
block fr :r can is, 2 blocks fr a
downtown, supermarket and
laundromat. S225 monthly inludes
everything. 758-6418.
NEEDED: Female roommate to share
three bedroom apartment, $135.00
rent 13 utilities. Available now.
830-5383. Leave message.
ROOMMATE DESIRED: To share
house in awesome location. Across
from campus Unfurnished room in
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
FORREt
furnished home. I
13 utilities. For a ch:
this unique opporti
Mike or Dave at T
Feb. 1.
ROOMS FOK RLl
withk i
Rinj�tiold
Now Tai
1 Bedroom,
i Efficient
CALL
IMUJN'h
�AZALEA

I
INFORMATION FOR
STUDENTS WHO NEED
FREE
SCHOLARSHIP MONEY
1-800-238-0690
RESEARCH INFORM
Largest Library ot Information In U S
13 2'? TOPICS - Ail Siie.fCTS
C'acf Zilazj ToCiy wir. VSA. VC or COS
EE 800-351-0222
0' Rw C X to II�I �irKf
� 272 Hi ��t mt A -0� AfgWW O 90K
I
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTS
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville C
Hours:
Mon - Fri 8:30-3:00
FORS
SPRING BRIM
" - .
in luxury at ai
Loren foi
Deadline for depo
WHY CHANCE
with a By-by i j
Travel with Si
the north ea-1
tor. Travel h
Florida
for details at �
video.
FOR SALL: Qu
waterbed witii
$150, Dresses
colored -
$175. Call 756-32
SPRLNG BRl A
Florida. Sixdav i
344-8914.
FOR SALL: I
speakers. Two w
100W, oi
Call 758-7824 -I
FOR SALE: DP,
Six months
tronic monitor
Best offer. Call
DON'T RISK
BREAK FUN! ll
party you can truj
Student Trawl
at931-794C for
Deadline
SEIZED CAR?
wheelers, motor
DFA. Available
800-338-3388 BJ
FOR SALE; Cc
Paid SI 10, ask:rt
tor perfect for
1814, leave me
Announcemen
Mmuxmuaam
M rnHOl 1CS WORKSHOP
Tuesdays, Jan. 28, Feb. 4 and Feb.
11,3-5 p.m.at the Counseling Cen-
ter. 329 Wright Building. Learn
about how growing up in a dys-
functional family affected you then
and the impact it plays on your life
now. The workshop may also be
helpful for people in the dose rela-
tionship with an ACOA. The
workshop will include informa-
tionabout alcoholism, familyrules
and roles and suggest goals to
work on. Call 757-6661 or stop by
316 Wright for more information
or to register.
ROWING TEAM
Row, row, row Join ECU Crew
Team. All persons welcome.
Friendly team atmosphere. Call
Chris 752-8613or Angle 830-3926.
attBEMi
Did you miss it? Some are still
available at the Buccaneer office
or the Media
time. Offices
2nd floor of S
Building (ac
brarv).
The Greenvi
rial Olympics
an athletics
coaches trau
day, Feb. 8 fnj
all individual
unteeringto
We are also lc
coaches in tfc
swimming,
roller-ska tine
volleyball. NJ
essary.Forml
tact Greg EpJ
Hosprrj
MENT
HMA meetij
29at3p.mi
ing includesi





SGA
le 1
hoping tor
xth sides is
ut deci
LX1
Continued from page 1
and gel students who want to
attend (XL interested Wingate
said. Courtney lones. speaker of
the house said that the Gospel
Choir was not given funds last
Sprine in the annual appropria-
tions because their constitution
had expired It has since been
renew ed
lones said Id like to see
more group representatives
speak about their organizations
be interested enough with
me to a meeting
Martin also asked the body to
.uggestionsto encourage
ne in the national and
vV

dnesday
� r
� w
ogressive
nnce Night
0 Draft
1.15 Tall Boys
2.50 Pitchers
0 Kamikazes
i Free til 10:30
V
�VI
mfh r-
3r�
'Jetfoiusfiip
f 'Eac Ti dues day
of Sioly 'EuchaHjt
nd conversation
opaCChurch
tli St.
t to 4th St. I
s
i e w
2
It title ill
hip
riity
le
fniversity
it ion
203 Erwin Hall
b 21, 1992
applications is
�.4:00 pm)
J)
Classifieds
Hilt Safit (Earulinian
January 28, 1992
fOK RIM1FOR KENTIFORSALE1HELP WANTEDIHI IP WANTFD1PI RSONALS
TWIN OAKS: Three bedroom, 21II
bath, fully-furnished townhouse.
Upperclassman preferred. Jason 830-
5173.
HOUSES FOR RENT: One block
from campus. Five bedroom, two
bath, $8007month. Also, three bed-
room, two bath, 5500month. Call
355-3195.
EFFICIENCY AT RINGGOLD
TOWERS: available for rent imme-
diately. Great location, dose to cam-
pus and downtown. $260 a month.
February rent is free! Fully furnished.
Call 757-3347.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
to share quiet river view apartment.
12uhlities. Prefer olderstudent. Call
758-3311.
ROOM FOR RENT: Tar River apts.
$140, 13 utilities, cable and phone.
Call 752-1854.
TWO MALE ROOMMATES
WANTED: $125 per month 14
utilities each. 505 W. 4th St. Behind
Zeta house, next to Phi Tau. CA11830-
5130 or 355-1813. Move in Feb. 1.
FEMALE ROOMMATE; wanted in
February. Best location in town. 12
block from campus, 2 blocks from
downtown, supermarket and
laundromat. $225 monthly inludes
everything. 758-6418.
NEEDED: Female roommate to share
three bedroom apartment, $135.00
rent 13 utilities. Available now.
830-5383. Leave message.
ROOMMATE DESIRED To share
house in awesome location. Across
from campus Unfurnished room in
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
furnished home. Female preferred.
13 utilities. Fora chance to cash in on
this unique opportunity, call Cathy,
Mike or Dave at 752-2968. Available
Feb. I.
ROOMS FOR RENT: Furnished
with kitchen privileges. Call 757-1798.
Ringgold Towers
Now Taking Leases for
1 Bedroom, 2 Bedroom,
& Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
MATCHING COUCH AND
CHAIR: $175. Matching coffee table
and end table $50. Glass top dining
room table set $75. Call 321-2448.
YOU'VE ONLY GOT ONE WEEK
TO LIVE! Do it right! Spring break in
Jamaica from only $429! Hotel, air,
transfers, parties! Sun Splash Tours
1-800-426-7710.
HELP WANTED
A Beautiful Place to Live
� All New
�And Ready To Rent
IMVKRSITVAFARTMK.MS
2899 E 5ft SiriTt
�Located Neai ECU
�Neat Major Shopping Ccnten
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
Limited Offer � $330 a month
Contact J. I. rr "ommy Williami
56 7815 oi 830 193 '
Office open - Apt 8,12-5 30pm
?AZALEA GARDENS
Clean ind mint ���c bedroma EWotafaed sfartmaati
e:�ergy rffWjetit, fire vtj:r: and �eer. - it ten, �' vr: .
cable TV. Coupes or tingles col) �'�
monthleaK. MOBILE HOME REKTM S-cob
fir.glca. Apirtrnrntk:H.Jr�brh.�t:aT�vAlraCiarile:ia
nfat Brook VaUej Can -v CUb
Contact J.T. Of r mim Williams
FOR SALE
FREE
INFORMATION FOR
STUDENTS WHO NEED
SCHOLARSHIP MONEY
1-800-238-0690
RESEARCH II
gest Library of
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at' Cj:a Toaa
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FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTS
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
Hours:
Man - Fri 8:30-3:00
SPRING BREAK IS COMING!
Travel to Jamaica, Cancun and Florida
in luxury at an affordable price! Call
Loren for details at 931-79). Hurry!
Deadline for deposits - Feb. 7.
WHY CHANCE SPRING BREAK;
with a fly-bv-night travel company?
Travel with Student Travel Services,
the north casf s premier tour opera-
tor. Travel to Jamaica, Cancun and
Florida in style and safety. Call Loren
for details at 931-7940. Check out our
video.
FOR SALE: Queen size bookcase
waterbed with semi-flow mattress
$150. Dresser and mirror $75, creme
colored sofa in excellent condition
$175. Call 756-3331
SPRLNG BREAK: Davrona Beach,
Florida. Six days only $69. Call 1-800-
344-8914.
FOR SALE: 1989 Kenwood home
speakers. Two wav speaker system,
100W, only used for one year. $200.
Call 758-7824. Ask for Jeff.
FOR SALE: DP Airgometer stepper.
Six months old. Rarely used. Elec-
tronic monitor with fan resistance.
Best offer. Call 758-4458.
DON'T RISK YOUR SRING
BREAK FUN! Travel with a com-
pany you can trust. Go first class with
Student Travel Services! Call Loren
at 931-7940 for information. Quick!
Deadline for deposits is Feb. 7!
SEIZED CARS: trucks, boats, 4-
wheelers, motorhomes, by FBI, IKS,
DEA. Available your area now. Call
800-338-3388 Ext. C-5999.
FOR SALE- Cobra Radar detector.
Paid SI 10, asking $70. Also refrigera-
tor perfect for dorm $40. Call 757-
1814, leave message.
MAKE $50O-$1000 WEEKLY: stuff-
ing envelopes at home Start now!
Rush SASH, plus $1.00 to Home
Employers, 2301 Kent 8 LasCruces,
NM 88001.
ADDRESSERS WANTED IMME-
DIATELY! No experience necessary.
Process FHA mortgage refunds.
Work at home. Call 1-405-321-3064.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at home. Call toll
tree. 1-800-467-8585 ext 5920.
FAST 1UNDRAISING PRO-
GRAM: Fraternities, sororities, stu-
dent clubs. Earn up to $1000 in one
week. Plus receive a $1000 bonus
yourself. And a tree watch just for
calling 1-800-932-0528 Ext. 65.
SPEND A SUMMER IN NEW
HAMPSHIRE: Outstanding boys
girls sprorts camps are hiring for all
positions. Camps are located on New
England's largest lake, near film site
of "On Golden Pond A variety of
programs are offered. Contact Kyle
at 919-847-8047 for information.
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation and Parks De-
partment is recruiting 12 to 16 part-
time youth indoor soccer coaches for
the spring indoor soccer program.
Applioantsmust possess some knowl-
edge of the soccer skills and have the
ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-18 in soc-
cer fundamentals. Hours are from 3-
7 p.m. with some night and weekend
coaching. This program will run hnaa
the first of March to the first of May.
Salary rates start at $4.25 per hour.
For more information, please call Ben
James or Michael Daly at 830-4550.
DID YOU BELIEVE? Do you enjoy
talking on the phone? If so, we have
the job for you! Telemarketing posi-
tions open for spring semester start-
ing immediately. Work for ECU and
get paid while you gain valuable
telemarketing skills. Hours are 7-9
p.m. daily; earn extra spending
money without cutting into study
time Call Laura at 757-4215 or 757-
6072 . an appointment
MATURE STUDENT: to work part-
time as telephone receptionist for lo-
cal law firm. Hours are S30 to 1:00
Monday thru Friday. Send resume
to: P.O. Box 5026, Greenville, N.C
27835.
FREE SPRING BREAK VACA-
TION: Organize a group, earn com-
missions and free trips! Call 800-826-
9100.
FREE ROOM: and board available
near campus for female non-smoker
willing to assist housewife with
household duties. Call 757-1798.
BEGIN STARTING YOUR NEW
SPRING WARDROBE: with a part-
time sales position at Brady's. Sal-
aryclothing discount. Applications
are now being accepted. Apply
Brady's, The Plaza, MonWed 1-4
p.m.
BRODY'S FOR MEN: is accepting
applications for part-time sales posi-
tions. We're looking for fashion for-
ward salesoricnted individuals. Sal-
aryclothing discount. Apply
Brady's, The Plaza, MonWed 1-4
p.m.
BRODY'S: is accepting applications
for a part-time office position. A.M.
only, variety of work induding data
entryentry level accounting. Apply
Brady's, The Plaza, MonWed 1-
4p.m.
PART-TIMECLERICALWORKER
NEEDED: Hours are MonThurs. 5-
9 p.m. and Sat. 8-12 a.m. Must be
trainable and responsible. Apply in
person. Credit Bureau of Greenville,
1206 Charles Blvd.
POSTALJOBS AVAILABLE: Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 800-
338-33SS Ext. P-3712.
FREE TRAVEL: Air couriers and
cruiseships. Students also needed
Christmas, spring and summer for
amusement park employment. Call
800-338-3388 Ext. F-3464.
SEE JAMAICA, CANCUN AND
FLORIDA: for yourself Check out
our video. Travel to spring break in
styleand comfort with Student Travel
Services. Call Loren at 931-7940.
Hurry! Deadline for deposits Feb. 7!
TO ALLFRATERNrnES:Hopeyou
had a successful rush! Love, Delta
Zeta.
TRAVE L WITH THE BEST! Student
Travel Services offers fun in the sun
with round trip air, hotel, seven
nights, taxes,all inclusive partiesand
more. Jamaica, Cancun $469. Panama
City, Florida, Disney World. Call
Heather or Johnny 757-0573 for de-
tails and reservations.
TO M.H I realize that I haven't done
a lot of the right things in the pafit. I
am also aware that "I'm sorry" is not
that you want to hear from me. I'm
honestly going to try to make our
friendship better in the future. I hope
you'll let me begin with a clean slate.
It is said that "you are only as good as
your word I will be faithful to this
statement from thisdayfoward. From
A.M.
BREAK FOR SPRING: To Jamaica,
Cancun or Florida. All inclusive par-
ties and more. Call John or Heather
for details. Space is limited. 757-0573.
PHI TAU, SIG TAU, SIGMA NU,
SIGEP:UmbdaChi,ThetaChi,Delta
Chi, PKA, TKE, Delta Sig and Alpha
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Sig: We really enjoyed helping you
with rush. Hope we can get together
again soon. Love, Alpha Phi.
DELTA CHL SIG TAU, PHI PSL
We had a great time with rush. You
all have a great bunch of pledges.
Love, Pi Delta.
PARTY HOUSES: North Myrtle
Beach. Welcome groups of 4-34
people. Group-leader discounts. Call
Myrtle Beach Tours 9-4 p.m. 703-250-
2125.
CONGRATULATIONS: to the new
sisters of AOPI Jennifer Behr, Lisa
Berting, KateBott, Leslie Brown,Stacy
Carroll, Shawn Fenimore, Robin Lee,
Kim Kelly, Ashley Ratliff, Colleen
Sullivan. Welcome to the sisterhood!
Love, the sisters.
A BAHAMAS PARTY CRUISE: Six
days $279! Panama City $99, Padre
$199, Cancun $499, Jamaica $399! Jasa
758-5165, Wayne 757-1369 or 1-800-
638-6786.
DELTA SIG: Friday nighfs pajama
party was a blast. Lef s do it again
soon. Love, Pi Delta.
PRATT BRATT: You need to get
your butt out of that apartment and
start having a good time. The ball and
chain is in D.G Get a life!
JILL AND SCOTT: If your going to
get married then just admit it! Your
roomie.
VALENTINE'S DAY IS
COMING!
Let the one you love know how much
you care about them by sending
them a love line in The East Carolinian
on February 13.
� Personals ad without any graphics - $2.00 for the
first 25 words and $.05 for every word after.
� Personals ad plus an outlined shadow of a heart
over personals ad - regular price for ad plus $1.00 for
heart.
� A special boxed design with a cupid and short
message - $5.50.
DEADLINE FOR THIS SPECIAL
SECTION IS FEB 11!
Announcements
Am n.T CHILDREN OF
AT CQHQUCS WORKSHOP
Tuesdays, Jan. 28, Feb. 4 and Feb.
11,3-5p.m.at the Counseling Cen-
ter. 329 Wright Building. Learn
about how growing up in a dys-
functional family affected you then
and the impact it plays on your life
now. The workshop may also be
helpful for people in the close rela-
tionship with an ACOA. The
workshop will include informa-
tionarxutalcobolism,familyrules
and roles and suggest goals to
work on. Call 757-6661 or stop by
316 Wright for more information
or to register.
rowing; TEAM
Row, row, row Join ECU Crew
Team. All persons welcome.
Friendly team atmosphere. Call
Chris 752-8613 or Angle 830-3926.
1?on BUCCANEER!
Did you miss it? Some are still
available at the Buccaneer office
or the Media Board Office at any
time. Offices are located on the
2nd floor of Student Publications
Building (across from Joyner Li-
brary).
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt County Spe-
cial Olympics will be conducting
an athletics (track and field)
coaches training school on Satur-
day, Feb. 8 from 9 a.m4 p.m. for
all individuals interested in vol-
unteering to coach track and field.
We are also looking for volunteer
coaches in the following sports:
swimming, bowling, gymnastics,
roller-skating, power lifting and
volleyball. No experience is nec-
essary. Formoreinformation,con-
tact Greg Epperson at 8304551.
HOSPrTAUTY MANACE-
MENT ASSOCIATION
HMA meeting: Wednesday, Jan.
29 at 3 p.m room 237 HES. Meet-
ing includes: election for E-board
and T-shirt logo contest. Anyone
interested in joining HMA. Come
to the meeting or call 931-7399.
UNIVERSITY STUDENT
MARSHAL
Any student interested in serving
as a university marshal for the
1991-92 school year may obtain
application from A-12 Minges.
Student must be classified as a
junior by the end of spring semes-
ter 1992 and have a 3.0 academic
averagetobeeligible. Return com-
pleted application to A-12 Minges
by Jar 31,1992.
ECU LACROSS TEAM
The ECU LacrosseQub will begin
practice for the spring season on
Monday, Jan. 27. Practices will be
held at 4 p.m. behind the Allied
Health Building. Anyone inter-
ested is welcome to attend. For
additional information, call Lake
at 752-2050 or Wes at 830-5554.
RFTURNINC ADULT
STUDENT ASSOCIATION
The Returning Adult Student As-
sociation invites you to an open
house on Thursday, Jan. 30 in
Mendenhall 244at 12:30p.m. and
or 5:30 p.m. The purpose is to
provide you with information
about what is available to you on
campus, give you a chance to meet
other returning ad ul t students and
an opportunity to speak with rep-
resentatives of various non-aca-
demicofficesoncampus. For more
information, cali 757-6881.
IMMUNIZATION
CLINICS AT THE STUDENT
HEALTH CENTER
Jan. 29 and Feb. 4,8:30-1130 a.m.
and l-4p.mFeb.l2,l-4p.mFeb.
19andFeb.21,8:30-ll:30a.m.and
1-4 p.m.
INTERVIEW
SK1I1�S WORKSHOPS
Students interested in learning
how to prepare for and present
themselves in an employment in-
terview are invited to attend one
of the workshops sponsored by
Career Services. Information will
be shared on interview questions
that may be asked, questions the
candidate may ask, and respond-
ing to inappropriate inquiries.
How to dress, verbal and non-
verbal communications, and fol-
low-up activities will also be ad-
dressed. Interview skills work-
shops will meet in the Bioxton
House on Tuesday, Jan. 28,2p.m
Wednesday, Jan. 29,3 pjn. and 7
p.mand Thursday, Jan. 30,4pjn.
ECU WATERSK1 CLUB
ECU Waterski Club is looking for
men and women join the dub.
Please call: Jason Hemrick 931-
8945.
WOMEN'S ISSUES GROUP
Have you been sexually assaulted?
The Counseling Center is offering
an on-going group for survivors
of sexual assault. Issues to be ad-
dressed include self esteem, rela-
tionships, body image, life goals
and coping skills. Please call 757-
6661 or stop by 316 Wright for
more information or to schedule
an appointment.
ROUNDBALL
RAMA MEETING
If you love basketball, don't miss
out on Recreational Services
Roundball Rama on Feb. 4 at 5
pjn. in Biology 103. This thriller
consists of free-throw contests, 3-
point con tests and slam dunk con-
test. For more information, call .
757-6387: j





$l?e
Scrtnng the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
Jennifer Wardrep, Neu Editor
Julie Roscoe, Asst. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Dana DanIELSON, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
MARGI MoRIN, Asst. Sports Editor
Jeff Becker, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
CHANTAL Weedman, Layout Manager
Jean Caraway, Classified Advertising Technician
Stephen Schaubach, Systems Engineer
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Margie O'Shea, Advertising Technician
My Way Or The Highway
College great time to drop racism
� " i� in ihwjirl minorities screj
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The Eos, Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
Made �a The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead cd.lonal in each edition
is the opinion of the Edi.onal Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Utters should be
lim.tcd to ISO words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU. Grcenv.Ue. N.C
27838-4353. For more information, call ((19) 757-6366.
Court threatens abortion rights
In the near future, the Supreme Court
will hear a case concerning the abortion
issue which may undermine, if not over-
turn, their 1973 Roe v. Wade decision.
The purpose of this editorial is not to
question the morality oi abortion, it merely
questions the rationale behind the propo-
nents for its outlaw.
Since the lc73 decision, abortion has
been legal in the United States. Last year, the
Supreme Court ruled that individual states
have the right to set laws restricting abor-
tions.
Louisiana became the first state to
implement those new laws.
Thestateoutlawedabortionsin all cases
except for those involving rape or incest.
Their decision raises question to the reason
for its ban.
If the ban is implemented because one
views that abortion is murder, then it is
illogical to purport that abortion is not mur-
der in the case of rape and incest.
Obviously the politicians who chose to
implement the stringent laws forgot the rea-
son for choosing their actions. The law left
the realm of morality and entered the politi-
cal circus.
The arguments against the abortion is-
sue are extensive and intertwined and could
not possibly be resolved in this editorial.
Because of these prolonged arguments, the
issue should not be resolved by government
intervention.
It is ironic that the latest poll showed 60
percent of the American people are in favor
of their right to abortion; however, because
of the conservatively slanted Supreme Court,
this right may soon be taken away.
The government has no right to dictate
the individual actions of its citizens, espe-
cially when their laws are based on contra-
dictory notions and their views do not agree
with the majority of the nation.
By Matthew Bulley
Editorial Columnist
When I was a tiny tyke I hated
tomatoes. Slimy, oozy seeds. Strangely
textured meat. Ugh.
There was no logical explana-
tion for my dislike. No psycho-trauma,
like a tomato truck killing my favorite
pet. No clearly fosterd fear, or philo-
sophical debate. I hated tomatoes.
Wouldn't eat them. No way. Never.
Read my lips. No new taxes.
Taco Bell, the only restaurant
that serves my fast-food needs, came
out with the Chicken Fajita in 1989.
Tomatoes, finely chopped as they
were, came in the neatly rolled torti-
lla. A hidden scourge among the deli-
cious ingredients.
Though Einstein claimed that
we only use a third of our minds, I
could never break into the unused
two-thirds, and remember to scream
"Hold thetomatoes at thedrivethru.
Oncctheordermadeit through
the window of my car, filling it with
that scrumptious pseudo-mexican
smell, 1 put aside my differences with
ftom�OtI I ignored the foreign tast-
ing red chunks as I savored the deli-
cious chicken, cheddar, lettuce and
Pico sauce.
Now, tomatoes re no big deal
Grand ma used to say, "He'll grow out
of it She was right. We grow out of
some things without much et tort, and
other things take a little more work.
Prejudice and hatred can be that way.
College is a good time to grow out of
both.
Children aren't born seeing
problems with our biological and eth-
nic differences. It is cultured and so-
cialized into their tiny brains. Caring
moms and dads and racist uncles make
subtle yet lasting impressions. Televi-
sion reinforces negative images. Ad-
vertising shows a glistening world of
smiley white people. Friends contrib-
ute with subtle remarks.
Forget for a moment the things
that make an Eskimo different from a
Jamaican, a Jew different from a Bap-
tist,and a man different troma woman.
Listen to the things we have heard,
and probably said about those other
people.
They can't drive. They dress
weird. They hardly speak English.
You've seen how they live. They're
lazy. They are dumb. They smell
funny. They. They. They.
The fact is "they" are us. The
United States is, by everyone'sdefini-
tion, a melting pot. That is to say, that
those who come here do not lose their
national origin or ethnic heritage, but
meld into a new and stronger nation
composed of all the strengths of those
who come here. Along with those
strengths are differences.
There are those who see the dif-
ferences among us as so much a prob-
lem that they band together to hate.
The Ku Klux Klan, that festering pus-
tule of ignorant hatred, showed its
face in Wilson a couple of weeks back.
The scene was sad. Ignorant
whites in tailored, queen-sized
waterbed sheets, chanting their col-
lective hatred. Equally-ignorant, emo-
tionally-charged minorities scream-
ing hatred right back. What wa, ac-
complished? Zero.
The point of all this banu-r is
this. There is no bet tor time than today
to leave racism and hated in your
past. College is a period of transition
New friends, new surroundings and
new attitudes. There is no rule that
savs that if your parents hate K-ws that
you have to hate Jews, if your father
makes prejudiced remarks about
women voudopthavctodothesarriv
As vou leave school and look
fora job, you decrease your flewl
to be employed if you cannot convtivu
of working harmoniously with a m;x
of ethnic backgrounds. Racism is a
millstone around your neck.
Somewhere in those coffee-
stained documents they keep ui r
four inches of bullet-proof glas
Washington DC. are the words "
men are created equal Won i n,
too.
No better time than the pn
to decide, "I am going to treat evu ry-
one tairlv, no matter what D i
associate with people who foster ha-
tred. Don't give your money to b
nesses that offer subtly different ser-
vice because they believe that dm. r-
ent people deserve less than the best
service. Stop using the word "they
I don't buv tomatoesat the store;
thev still are not my favorite 1 eat
them,and enjoy the gixxi things about
them, instead of focussing on the
things I don't like. It's made my menu
choice a lot freer when 1 "run for the
border
Campus Spectrum
Fish's arguments misunderstood
By Dr. Jeffrey Williams
Special to tht East Carolinian
V
I
:
jL
T'mgtiLT Tims casing unbiased '
TVSONRArEL CASE �
The Right Side
Limit to freedom of speech questioned
By Nathan Hicks
Editorial Columnist
"Help! Help! I'm being sup-
pressed! My freedom of speech has
been molested and thrown into the
Tar River
As of late, this kind of cry is
being heard more and more. In the
early goings on of these wonderful
United States such pleas seemed to
carry some sort of validity; however,
current times have given the Supreme
Court the wonderful honor of trying
such no no's as Hustler magazine.
Communists, Anarchists and my per-
sonal favorite � flag burners.
To begin with, the right grant-
ing freedom of speech was created
during a period that printed nudity
would probably have cost the pub-
lisher a hayride to some Colonial
prison hell. I seriously doubt Madison
would have argued to such exagger-
ated lengths to make possible the pub-
lic viewing of some naked bimbo de-
claring artistic expression while "pos-
ing" with Mr. Ed. Decency and self-
integrity have simply become obso-
lete words.
Communists quite possibly
could be dealt with the easiest of all.
The options are clear:
Get with the program or get the
hell out! In essence, if communism is
so great, why don't these people
saddle up and socialize to Russia.
The courts would be less burdened
by such likes as Ivan and his Revolu-
tionary Band. And most importantly,
it seems clear the majority of Ameri-
cans are quite happy with the present
society of Capitalism.
Anarchists seem to fall in the
same boat as that of our red com-
rades. The teaching of street warfare
and MolotovCocktails in a jiffy should
result in exile, but alas freedom of
speech (so as not to incite clear and
present danger).
When the United States is oc-
cupied by such morons that kill based
upon books like Catcher in the Rye,
literature on home terrorism has no
place
We need our rights, but we also
need a home free of filth that plant
ideas in our children's heads that
cause them to believe pornography,
violence and the undermining of our
government are acceptable modes of
behavior.
Yet we still have our good
hriendstheflagburners.They hurt no
one; they simply protest in peace.
What kind of ignorant jerk does it
take to destroy the symbol that stands
for hisher defense when heshe's
arrested?
We don't �eed these kinds of
idiots roaming the streets looking for
obnoxious things to do that they can
get away with. We need tighter laws
thatenforcetheadherenceof what the
Bill of Rights was originally intended
for, not lame rationalizations that
manipulate, distort, and all-out bas-
tardize the rights that have created a
truly unique and well-developed na-
tion.
Freedom of speech, freedom of
speech, freedom of speech. A truly
wonderful right that has been
trivialized and demoralized. The
whines range from bozos who dress
in eye-sore outfits with racially and
sexually discriminating thoughts
printed across theirnarrowshoulders
to "artists" that cry freedom of speech
when their sexually graphic "art-
works" are banned whah!
To these people, I have but a
handful of words to say: Grow up and
find some ethics! The world would be
a much more pleasant sphere without
you morally ignorant gottersnipes
turning society into a modern day
Sodom and Gomorrah.
Liberty, in its true essence, is for
all to pursue happiness, not for some
to thwart the pursuit of others. The
trash that support such "freedom of
speech" need answer but one ques-
tion � "What can you do for your
country?"
lEditor's note � The following
column is the second of a two part
series concerning thecontroversy sur-
round ing Dr. Stanley Fish's recent lec-
ture on free speech.)
To get it straight for those who've
been following the Fish vs. National
Association of Scholars debate, Fish's
famous "letter" against N AS at Duke
was not one but three letters, back and
forth between the provost and him,
and these letters were made public by
Fish himself. In them. Fish draws out
the line of argument that members of
the NAS, although declaring them-
selves to be in favor of objectivity and
open-mindedness (in theory, if you
will), in practice might do the oppo-
site. He suggested no action against
them but was offering cautionary ad-
vice to the Provost, for him not to
consider their statementsat face value.
As you might be able to tell from my
brief sketch of Fish's pragmatism, thi;
argument (about the disparity be-
tween theory and practice) is not a
surprising one for him to make.
This is obviously much different
from the news story that implicates
Fish in a covert web of conspiracy
against the NAS, claiming that he in-
sidiously circulated a notorious letter
and one of his friends exposed him in
disgust.
My point here is not to argue for
Fish's views, but to show that
Mandelker's argument is inaccurate,
misleading, and not at all fair.
Let's summarize: He starts by
slurring Fish without actually refer-
ring to anything Fish has said, then he
castigates him by making vast gener
alizations on sketchy evidence, and
this evidence turns out to be inaccu-
rate. Although 1 am not in a philoso-
phy department, 1 think that I can
recognize that this does not adhere
very closely to the protocols of logic.
1 say all this not just to take
Mandelker's logic to task, but because
his reaction seems to me to violate the
genuinely beneficial and positive ef-
fects ot Fish's visit. 1 think that bring-
ing Professor Stanley Fish to campus
was an event to be celebrated rather
than decried. Stanley Fish isoneof the
foremost scholars currently working
in the humanities. He is a leading
critic of Milton (considered the scholar
of his generation afterthe publication
of hisbook Surprised by Sin); a leading
critical theorist, the first to argue that
texts are not icons and for the signifi-
cance of the reader's response (in his
book h There a Text in this Class?); a
leading "new pragmatist arguing for
the primacy of practice over theory, as
mentioned above (in Doing What Comes
Naturally); a provocative legal critic,
publishingand teaching in law as well
as literature departments; and an ac-
tive public figure, tirelessly present-
ing his views on shows like Crossfire in
contrast to those like Dinesh D'Souza.
In short. Fish is one of the most
eminent figures working in the hu-
manities now, and I think that it rep-
resents an achievement for ECU to
have someone of his stature speak
here.
Further, 1 consider it very much
our privilege and a reflection of Fish's
generosity that he spoke here. He re-
ceived roughly one tenth of his nor-
mal speaking fee to come here, and
did not know if he was receiving ar J �
thing until he got here. He had man-
dated only that we get a basketball
game together for him. In light of these
facts, 1 think that Dr. Mandelker's re-
sponse was not only unfounded jJ
pxrlv reasoned but extraordinarily
ungracious to Professor Fish.
One final point. Since Professor
Fish's talk occurred under the aus-
pices of the Theory Colloquium 1 ec-
ture Series, I personally resent
Mandelker'saspersions.l invited Fish
here and work very hard to organize
the Theory Colloquium, which is no
easy task in these under-funded ai
hard economic times. Despite occa-
sional disagreements resulting from
these talks, 1 think that they are in-
deed valuable and in fact the only
forum on campus where people from
several departments and repres
ing a spectrum of views can talk, de-
bate, and even learn about a new
proach or different perspective Mind
you, it is the only campus organiza-
tion that has presented public ta!l� bj
both NAS members (including Dr.
Mandelker's talk last yevr) and so-
called "pc's" or r.iuiti-culturalistv
Perhaps I retain a naive academic
ideal, but I would like to think that a
university at its bc-st should offer such
interchange, exposure to new ideas,
and openness to opponents' argu-
ments.
From the intervention of his let-
ter, I can only adduce that Dr.
Mandelker does not value such inter-
change. That's unfortunate because it
closes off the possibility of any useful
dialogue or debate before it even gets
the chance to start.
Letters to the Editor
Comic review
upsets reader
To the Editor.
Since when did the East Caro-
linian become a Reader's Digest news-
paper? Lewis Coble's article on John
Romits Jr. (Jan. 14) was mostly a re-
statement of the Overstreet's Price Up-
date interview.
1 found Mr. Coble's views
slightly tiresome reading and a touch
racist.
Who cares that an Italian is writ-
ing a black character? Many writers
have handled other races in their work
without a parade announcement.
I don't know what race Mr.
Coble is, but I'm guessing he's white,
otherwise I don't see how he'd come
to a realization that John Romita Jr.
was breaking new ground, as the ar-
ticle suggests.
f Larry Hama (an Oriental) cre-
ated a character. Rage, for the Aveng-
ers story he was working on. Rage got
a lot of praise and is now in the Aveng-
ers line-up. Mr. Hama did not get an
commendation because he used a
black character.
The Black Panther, the Black
Goliath, Luke Cage, the Bronze Tiger,
the Prowler, the Green Lantern's John
Stewart, the Falcon, and the X-Men's
Stormareallblackcharacters.but their
creators did not receive a hero's wel-
come to the press because they broke
the racial barrier in comics. They were
simply characters invented for the
story.
Deathlok is a black man turned
into a cyborg killing machine; the
masterminds behind thischiracter are
Gregory Wright and Jackson Guice,
neither of whom are black.
Deathlok is currently enjoying
his own comic (which is a year into its
run). No one presented Mr. Wright
and Mr. Guice with an award for us-
ing the black race as the main charac-
ter.
John Romita Jr. is an excellent
artist, but his work should stand on its
own, not given false credit because he
created a black character. Mr. Coble
should give this some thought the
next time he wants to write an article
on a comic book or its creators.
I've read Mr. Coble's articles in
the past (the Todd McFarlane article
and the X-ForceRob Lief eld article
most notably) and have been equally
disappointed. While it's refreshing to
read about comics in a news medium,
I do not enjoy reading a rehash of
anotherarticle,oranedited version of
another article, if you will.
Mr. Coble should have enough
confidence in his won knowledge of
comics that he shouldn't need to take
directly from another article. His work
should stand by itself, and that takes a
real understanding knowledge of
comics, a knowledge that can't be
learned with only a few years experi-
ence.
Jacob Zorn
The Cle
Bush vomits
Tut Amalgamated Press
President Bush returned from
a whirlwind round of trade nego-
tiationsSunday,cappingoffasolid
week of vomiting on Asian politi-
cal leaders.
"Well, everyone was really
nice to me after I threw up all over
everything at that dinner Bush
said, explaining the unusual ne-
gotiating tactic. "So I said, hey �
I'm on to something here
The next day at the trade talks.
Bush revealed, he and his top ne-
gotiators puked on Japanese Prime
Minister Kitchikitchicoo
Mechagodzilla, "and from that
point on, they were in our pock-
ets
Using the threat of further
staining the prime ministe
expensive suit, the preside
able to gam several astoi
tradeconcessions, which a
in an unnecessary fake-3-
the right of this news storj
So successful w
president's visit to Japan
Bush plans to extend the
diplomacy" technique U
eas of foreign policy. As tl
went to press, Secretary
James. ButcheH
Candlestickmaker was i
to meet with Iraqi Prl
Saddam Hussein, carryini
bucket of the president's
The vice president,
on condition that he not b
revealed to ECU Toda
president also will mak
Institute helps
Tin Amalgamated Ptess
Good news, America! At last,
there's an organization out there
dedicated solely to protectingyou
from yourself.
The Institute for a Risk-Free
America is actually a tight-knit
coalition of groups � chief among
them the Partnership for a Drug-
Free Amenka, the Liberty Lobby,
and Operation Rescue � that
know what's best for you and in-
tend to make you do it.
"We start from the premise
that human life is the most sacred,
important thing in existence, that
nothingoutweighs the importance
of human life said IRFA founder
Reed Pressed. "And then we just
follow that premise to its logical
conclusion
One of lRFA's more contro-
versial positions is its opposition
to inheritances.
"After all, people are some-
times killed for their money or
whatever explained Pressed.
"But it people couidi
money from dead relati
killings would stop. S
inheritances saves hei
human life is the most if
thing there is, then yc
people inherit stuff
IRFA also has caliec
cal improvements in at
standards. Originally,
demanded that cars be d
stvrofoam and have a toj
ten miles per hour. Bi
IRFA researcher oOtic
discovery.
"It's well known tl
cars travel more -
people die said Presj
ourresearchermadea rJ
and he discovered thai
ber of deaths should d
as car speed drops b
he immediately went o
thisstartlingcaJculatio
carefully observing I
cars caused nodeath.
vinced.
"But then Press
O'Connor clai
Thomas up to
Tuk Amalgamated Press
Supreme Court Justice Sandra
Day O'Connor filed a sexual ha-
rassment lawsuit against Justice
Clarei e Thomas yesterday.
With unprecedented celerity,
the Senate set up a hearing, and
the case was before the American
TV-watching public in no time.
Justice O'Connor was the first
witness to appear before the Sen-
ate Judiciary Committee, detail-
ing a surprisingly long list of of-
fenses committed by her recently
appointed colleague.
"Last week, we were in his
office, discussing a case began
the tearful O'Connor. "And
Clarence went over to the book-
shelf, pulled out a
opened it up. and saidl
used a pubic hair j
mark
O'Connor also
Thomas had regaled
tailed descriptions ol
phy lawsuits, amonj
Dong Silver v. The He
When OConnor I
with her petty little
Clarence Thomas w,
chance to clear his
the charges against,
lutelv true in every
absolutely folsel Falsj
twisting my words.
I'm black
The committee, oj
pressed with ThomJ
ECU SNAPSHOTS
stupid statistics for stupid peoj
We're Tapping More Wires!
10000
y
8000 -
6000
:
tn 4000 -
I
2000 -
1986 1967 1988 1989 1990 1991
Year





, I
Highway
IU VH VJ J-ritiea i mm.
� 1 - V hat w&s ac-
� � i this banter i
v r time than today
, � ��� ,1 J hated in your
i p � .i t transition.
w sun uundinas and
H - no rule that
pai � v- itc lews that
v .s- if our lather
i i "irks about
� i the same.
,i s tuHl and look
u , � flexibility
� � s u anno) conceive
u ith a mix
- inds Ra wn i. a
d) rneck
' thi ise i. offee-
. ki ep under
' glass in
ireth words" .all
. ii Women,
he present
treat every-
at Don't
who foster ba-
rn ne) to busi-
� . different mt-
� i that differ-
� in the beat
� � � i word "they
� is, it the store;
� . � i orite 1 �at
: � � ngs about
ing on the
iidemymenu
� �� � i � � 1 run tor the
ectrum
isunderstood
' � 1 ,� , inganv-�� He had man-� isketbaH
t of these
1v �� � i ri re-� led and rdinarily i Professor the aus-im 1 ec-
�. resent
, . .nvit� dl ish � inize
'rent is no 1 '� �pitc occa-n . � ng from e) arc in-� t the only � :rom : reprt sent-� talk, Jo-tan .s ap-erspc live Mind organiza-� ilksby s (including Dr. . � r) and so-ilturalists.
retaili naivt ,u ademic keto think that a
If in the
uch
' I ish's
� here He r�
h ot his nor
to here, and
best sho iid offer such
� exposure to new ideas,
and openness to opponents' argu-
Fi m the intervention o! his let-
'�" I in onlv adduce that Dr.
- � r does not value such inter
(hange That's unfortunate becauseU
� soft the possibility oi anv useful
dialogue or debate before it even gets
the chance to start
he Editor
the Aveng-
Ion. Rage cot
In the r- �
id not get an
he used a
h the Black
Jrone Tiger,
intern'sohn
ttheX-Men'a
pen, but their
hero's wel-
I thev broke
Js They were
ited for the
man turned
i a chine, the
Icharacterare
tkson Guice,
Ck.
jttlv enjoying
vear into its
Mr. Wright
lard for us-
utfrt charac-
lohn Komita r is an excellent
artist, but his work should stand on its
own. not given false credit because hi
i reatsd a black character Mr. Coble
should give this some thought the
next time he wants to write an article
on a comk b(xk or its creators.
I ve read Mr C oble's articles in
the past (the Todd McFarlane article
and the X-ForceRob Liefeld article
most notablv) and have been equally
disappointed While it's refreshing to
read about comics in a news medium,
1 do not enjoy reading a rehash of
another article, or an edited version of
another article, if you will.
Mr Coble should have enough
confidence in his won knowledge of
comics that he shouldn't need to take
directly from another article. His work
should stand by itself, and that takes a
real understanding knowledge of
comics, a knowledge that can't be
learned with only a few years ex peri-
Opinion
(Ulje lEflBtOIarfllmian January 28, 1992 5
The Clearly Labeled Satire Page
Bush vomits on world leaders
no AmalgamatedPmm
President Bush returned from
i w hirtwind round of trade ncgo-
tjations Sunday, capping off a solid
week of vomiting on Asian politi-
cal leaders.
Well, everyone was really
nice to me alter I threw up all over
,r thing it that dinner Bush
$aid, explaining the unusual ne-
gotiating tactic. "So I said, hey �
m on to something here
The next day at the trade talks,
Bush revealed, he and his top ne-
otid tors puked on Japanese Prime
Minister Kitchikitchicoo
Mechagodzilla, "and from that
point on, they were in our pock-
ets
Using the threat of further
staining the prime minister's very
expensive suit, the president was
able to gain several astonishing
trade concessions, which are listed
in an unnecessary fakc-3-D box to
the right of this news story.
So successful was the
president's visit to Japan that Mr.
Bush plans to extend the "vomit
diplomacy" technique to other ar-
eas of foreign policy. As this issue
went to press, Secretary of State
James Butcher-Baker-
Candlestickmaker was on his way
to meet with Iraqi President
Saddam Hussein, carrying a hefty
bucket of the president's spew.
The vice president, speaking
on condition that he not be named,
revealed to ECU Today that the
president also will make the puk-
ing issue central to his troubled
1992 campaign.
"When it comes to throwing
up on the Japanese, nobody can
top Bush slobbered the vice
president. "Not any of those
wimpy Democrats, anyway. 1
mean, have you ever seen Bill
Clinton try to blow chunks? He's
pitiful, absolutely pitiful. Not
presidential material at all
But the vomiting may back-
fire. Republican presidential chal-
knger Pat Buchanan is already
attempting to steal the issue from
Mr. Bush, noting that he's been
making Crossire and Capital Gang
viewers sick for several years.
"If vomit is what you want,
I'm your man Buchanan said
with oleaginous sincerity.
Highlights of Japan's
trade concessions
� Japanese agree to buy
Detroit's entire output
for the next ten years.
� Japanese agree to finance
America's immoral
invasions of foreign
countries.
� Japanese agree not to
bomb American harbors.
� Japanese agree not to
threaten our arrogant,
adolescent national self-
image.
ECU settles yet again
Tin: Amalgamated Press
As even the dimmest soul
expected, East Carolina Univer-
sity has expanded its wiretap-
ping scandal payoffs even fur-
ther.
"Well, we were just paying
more and more money to more
and more people said ECU
Chancellor Dick Achin, who au-
thorized the payoffs on the ad-
vice of University Attorney Ben
Ironingyourshortshoney. "We
were spending a lot of late nights
trying to figure out if there were
anybody else whose laps we
wanted to drop large amounts
of cash in. We weren't getting
much sleep, you know? And fi-
nally we just said, to hell with it,
let's put this baby to bed
Under the new arrange-
ment, ECU will pay $10,000 to
every single man, woman and
child on the planet Earth. Also to
exceptionally intelligent Rhesus
monkeys and several Alpha
Centaurians secretly visiting our
government.
The news provoked joyous
rioting in the streets of
Greenville. Happy Emerald City
residents enthusiastically plot-
ted what they would do with
their winnings in the "ECU
Rights-Violation Lottery as the
snowballing payoff scheme has
come to be called by highly repu-
table newspapers like this one.
Most students planned to get
really, really smashed, and still
others relished the prospect of
finally having enough money to
buy a pencil at the Student Stores
without going in hock up to their
eyeballs.
Institute helps save people from themselves
1 I Amai CAMATED Pki ss
Good news, America! At last,
there's m organization out there
dedicated solely to protecting you
trom vourself.
The Institute for a Risk-Free
America is actually a tight-knit
coalition of groups � chief among
I hem the Partnership for a Drug
1 ree Amerika, the Liberty Lobby,
and Operation Rescue � that
know what's best for you and in-
tend to make you do it.
"We start from the premise
that human life is the most sacred,
important thing in existence, that
nothingou t weighs the importance
of human life said IKFA founder
Reed Pressed "And then we just
follow that premise to its logical
conclusion
One of lRFA's more contro-
versial positions is its opposition
to inheritances.
"After all, people are some-
times killed for their money or
whatever explained Pressed.
"But if people couldn't inherit
monev from dead relatives, those
killings would stop. So banning
inheritances saves lives, and if
human life is the most important
thing there is, then you can't let
people inherit stuff
IRFA also has called for radi-
cal improvements in auto safety
standards. Originally, IRFA had
demanded that cars be made from
styrofoam and have a top speed of
ten rrulys per hour. But then an
IRFA researcher made a startling
discovery.
"It's well known that, where
cars travel more slowly, fewer
people die said Pressed. "But
eatrresea rcher made a nifty gra ph,
and he discovered that the num-
ber of deaths should drop to zero
as car speed drops to zero. Well,
he immediately went out to verify
thisstartlingcalculation, and after
carefully observing that parked
carscaused nodeaths, he wascon-
vinced.
"But then Pressed pressed
�� 1000 i
fjr
3
Lives Created by Driving Backwards
y m 10x FU 1.00
500 -
0 -
� -500
I
I
1000
100
50
�r
50
-1
100
Automobile speed in MPH
on, "he continued extrapolating
the line down the negative axis,
and he found that, if cars went
hickwards, people would actually
be created
The IRFA researcher's graph
is unnecessarily reproduced be-
side this news story, and we have
to say it convinces Ml,
So IRFA changed its line on
auto safety. Now the organization
demands that everyone be re-
quired constantly to drive their
cars backwards at full speed,
thereby creatingas many precious
human lives as possible.
"Remember said Pressed,
"since human life is the most im-
portant thing in the world, you
just can't have too much of it
Along similar lines, IRFA
wants to mandate that all citizens
have sex as much as possible. "This
one's pretty obvious said
Pressed. "If you're not having sex
� unprotected heterosexual sex,
that is � as often as possible, then
you won't be having children as
often as possible. And if you're
not having children as often as
possible, then you're robbing your
fellow citizens of the most pre-
ciouscommodity thereis. And you
don't think robbery should be le-
gal, do you?"
lRFA's proposal to ban inher-
itance is still the most controver-
sial item on the organization's
agenda. But, as Pressed noted, "In
lRFA's ideal world, with every-
onein the country ha vingsex while
driving their cars backwards at
100 miles per hour, who's going to
notice a little thing like that?"
BRIEFLY
Mini-satire for busy readers
LAW: William Kennedy
Smith is arrested for raping a
blue blob.
ECONOMY: The reces-
sion: it just keeps on going, and
going, and going
SPORTS: The Super Bowl
was played this weekend. But
ECU wasn't in it, so who cares?
MEDICINE: Take two
aspirin and call us in the morn-
ing.
WEATHER: Partly sunny
with a chance of showers. Or, if
vou prefer, partly cloudy with a
chance there won't be showers.
Hey, we're flexible.
POLITICS: Polls show an
unnamed Democrat would beat
Bush in an election. Trouble is,
most Democrats have names.
O'Connor claims Judge
Thomas up to old tricks
Wiretapping scandal reaches new low
Tin Amalgamated Press
Supreme Court Justice Sandra
I ay O'Connor tiled a sexual ha-
rassmenl lawsuit against Justice
( larei e Thomas yesterday.
With unprecedented celerity,
the Senate set up a hearing, and
the case was before the American
rV-watching public in no time.
lustice O'Connor was the first
v itness to appear before the Sen-
ate Judiciary Committee, detail-
ing a surprisingly long list of of-
fenses committed by her recently
appointed colleague.
"Last week, we were in his
thee, discussing a case began
the tearful O'Connor. "And
Clarence went over to the book-
shelf, pulled out a law book,
opened it up, and said, 'Hey, who
used a pubic hair for a book-
mark?
O'Connor also alleged that
Thomas had regaled her with de-
tailed descriptions of pornogra-
phy lawsuits, among them Long
Dong Silwr v. The Harrriy Hooker.
When O'Connor had finished
with her petty little accusations,
Clarence Thomas was given his
chance to clear his name, calling
the charges against him "abso-
lutely true in every detail � er,
absolutely false1. False! You're all
twisting my words, just because
I'm black
The committee, obviously im-
pressed with Thomas' thorough
rebuttal, decided to put the matter
to an impartial, scientific test. The
senators bound the hapless
O'Connor and weighed her down
with rocks, then threw her into a
deep well, noting that, if she were
telling the truth, God would sec to
it that she floated.
Unfortunately, the petite jus-
ticediJ float. Undaunted, thesena-
torsheld O'Connor's feet to a blaz-
ing fire until she confessed to the
heinous sin of false accusation.
Since this washer firstoffense,
O'Connor will receive a light pun-
ishment: she will merely be re-
quired to wear a scarlet "A" (for
"accuser") at all times � just as a
little reminder that this is still, in
many ways, a man's world.
The Amalgamated Pkkss
The ECU wiretapping case
took a surprising twist yesterday,
as Director of Public Safety Pepe
DePew testified in federal court
about "the true purpose" of the
illegal act.
"1 know we said we were lis-
tening in on Vic's (former Public
Safety employee Vic Timme's)
phone conversations because we
thought he was dealing illegal
drugs DePew said. "But that was
a lie. We figured you'd just let us
off if we said it wasall about drugs,
but 1 guess even North Carolina
isn't quite that hysterical yet.
"Anyway DePew continued
unrelentingly, "the reason we
were tapping the phone was, Vic
was calling a bunch of those
phone-sex lines, and we wanted
to get in on the action for free
DePew went on to admit that
"pretty soon, 1 had half the cam-
pus in on it. We knew when Vic
made the calls � it was every day
atlunch,onthedot.Well,thechan-
cellor would come over, and we'd
sit in my office and listen to Vic
talk to Tina or Suzi or Barbi or the
Swedish Bikini Team or whoever
for half an hour, and then we'd, er,
retire to the bathroom for a while
In an apparently unrelated
statement, DePew also revealed
that his hair is not his own.
DePew was about to say more,
but a pretty, black female cat with
a white stripe painted down its
back ran by, and the portly rent-a-
cop wasoutta that courtroom like
Dr. Pepper in a shook-up can.
ECU SNAPSHOTS
stupid statistics for stupid people
New non-nude posters
to adorn RSU walls
We're Tapping More Wires!
0000
y
8000 -
� 6000 H
once
Jacob Zorn
v 4000 -
I
2000 -
The Amalgamated Press
Running Scared University
soon will be proffering pumped-
up posters to professors of the fe-
male persuasion, a university
press release revealed yesterday.
Last month, RSU officials re-
moved a classic nude painting
from a classroom when a female
professor complained that she
couldn't manage to appear pro-
fessional if there was a nude paint-
ing in the room.
RSU has since discussed the
incident with female faculty mem-
bersand hasinstituted a new policy.
From now on, RSU classroom walls
will be plastered with posters of
heavily muscled, fully clothed
women, like Madonna and wha t's-
her-name from Terminator 2.
1986 1967
1988 1989 1990
Year
1991 1992
Are you tired of voting
for the lesser of two evils?
Then vote for
David Duke in '92!
There are lots of good reasons
to own an
American Excess Card.
The best one is that
you enjoy your health.
You see, these days, we
corporations can get our hands
on any information we want.
Like your name.
Your spouse's name.
Where your kids go to school.
And if you don't buy an
American Excess Card, we just
might have to put that
information to use.
Unfriendly use.
The American Excess Card.
Because we know where you live.





Entertainment
Wife lEaHt (Earulinian
January 28, 1992
Exhibitions Run at Jenkins
By Cortrinna Home
Staff Writer
Threshold'
Helen Sear, a multi-media art-
ist from Great Britain, has brought
her photograph spectacle to the
Wellington B. Gray Gallery at ECU.
The exhibit, "Threshold is a
slide projection. The main focus is a
rock formation and a view of the
artist's head with fading colorful
images reflecting from a series of
mirrors.
Sear's talent extends through-
out her career. Her work was Re-
cently published by the Reader's
Digest Collection.
The "Threshold" exhibit will
be featured from Jan. 14 to Feb. 8.
The public may view the slide pro-
jection Monday through Saturday
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m with ex-
tended hours Thursday until 8 p.m.
'Recent Sculpture'
Linda Threadgill, internation-
ally acclaimed artist and mctalsmith,
will exhibit her finely crafted wall
constructions entitled, "Recent
Sculpture
T. 2 exhibit consists of a series
of picturesque shadow boxes con-
structed of wood. The use of acrylic
paint, and a combination of metals
enhances the etched images on the
boxes illustrating valuesot'light and
dark.
The exhibition will run Ian. 14
through Feb. 8.
'Recent Paintings and
Drawings'
Leading abstract artist Pat
Colville will present the 18-piece
"Recent Paintings and Drawings"
exhibit at the Wellington B. Gray
Gallery at ECU.
The artist uses vibrant color
with a hot wax overlav to enhance
the array of color in the oil paints.
The exhibit is new for 1992 and
Temptations hit a 'Milestone'
Jam�s BrowningECU Photo Lab
Innocence 2 by Pat Colville
takes the abstract art form to a now
dimension.
The most recent exhibit was in
Canada in 1991. It was the contem-
porary art show, Entre A L'Art
Contemporain.
The "Recent paintings and
Drawings" exhibit can be viewed
Jan. 14 to Feb. 8.
'Just Type W
The "lust Type 11" display at
ECU deals with graphic design and
advertisement. The entire exhibit is
an 81-piece layout consisting of a
wide variety of materials illustrat-
ing different designs and literary
art forms.
The American Institute of
Graphic Arts organized the
exhibition's debut eight years ago.
The coordinator, Peter Good
(also a professional graphics de-
signer), said of the exhibition, "As
film has liberated the letter form
from the restraints ot metal casting,
digitization has lifted type from the
flat surface, enabling contortion of
forms that are virtually limitless
All exhibitions are located in
the Gray Gallery in fenkins Fine
Arts Center. The gallery is open to
the public Monday through Satur-
day tnmi 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. with
extended hours Thursdavs until 8
p.m.
There is no admission fee for
any of the exhibits or lectures. For
more information, contact Charles
l.ovell, the director of the Cray Gal-
lerv, at 757- 6336.
By Cortrinna Home
Staff Writer
Few performing groups
have the longevity or natural
talent that is typical of The
Temptations. Milestone, the
band's latest album, is more than
just a name. It is an achievement.
The Temptations began their
career in the early '60s and are
still performing worldwide 31
years later.
The five-member group of
Melvin Franklin, Otis Williams,
Richard Street, Al i Wood son and
Ron Tyson is extraordinary be-
cause of each member's will-
power.
The first cut from the record,
" Eenie Meenie M inie Moe kicks
with a club beat and is up-tempo
for the dance scene.
The mid-tempo cut, "We
Should Be Makin' Love has a
bluesy feel familiar to early fans,
but a short and verv sweet saxo-
J
phone solo in the song will cap-
ture a younger audience.
The undeniable mellowness
of The Temptations is heard in
"Whenever You're Ready" and
"Do It Easv
The LP ends with "Cel-
ebrate a slow jam with heavy
harmonies.
The rock of the group, Wil-
liams, has always kept The
Temptations on track and mov-
ing forward. He hasdone this by
taking the good and leavingany-
thing negative behind in their
work.
Street recalls his dream ot
the group coming together. His
mother kept telling the cousins.
Street and Franklin, that they
could achieve their goals, no
matter what.
The group set standards in
the'60s for male singers and other
bands with hits like "Get Ready"
(1966) and "Cloud Nine" (1969).
The group remembers
struggling to be recognized. "We
came from an era in recording
when the studio was small, was
in Detroit, and was done entirely
on a two-track recorder" said
band members in a press release.
"Recording would have to stop
every time the bathnxim com-
mode was flushed during ses-
sions.
"Now, here we are 3,000
miles awav, recording on state-
of-the-art equipment in world
class studios, using48 tracksand
completing albums in less than
90daysThisistrulyaMiesortf
for The Temptations.
This album is significant for
The Temptations because it
shows distance covered by
highlighting the groups' career
historv. Milestone is the 50th LP
in The Temptations catalog.
The Temptations have
much to celebrate. These five
men, who have traveled the
distance together for so long,
have definitely passed a great
milestone.
Photo courtesy Motown Racords
These five men, who have traveled the distance together for so
long, have detmately passed a great Milestone.
f
Singer Songwriter
Lisa Pawlak
Apearing live at the Underground
Starting at 8:00 pm
Tuesday January 28th
Free admission with valid ECU I.D.
Sponsored by the Student Coffeehouse Committee
Preview
� 9 2
Summer Student
Leadership
Opportunity
Available
East Carolina University
Orientation
Staff
Applications Available in 203 Erwin Hall
Jan 21 through Feb 21, 1992
Deadline for completed applications is
February 21, 1992 (4:00 pm)
Sports
Pirates fall
toODUon
national
television
11

IN CONCERT J3
J3

J3
TRUTH"
America's Premier Christian Group
n
We Are
we Are ,
Buying
Used Men's Clothing
$ WE PAY CASH. $
R Thursday, Jan. 30th At 7:30 P.M. P
f Wright Auditorium - ECU �
f Greenville. N.C. JJ
R $6.00 In Advance, '8.00 At The Door Jt
. Tickets Available at p,
� . Mendenhall Student Center ��
X
Sponsored by GRACE
Christian Fellowship
of ECU
SHIRTS SWEATERS
PANTS SWEATS
JEANS SHOES
CASUAL ft PRESS
LARGE & EXTRA LARGE ONLY
WINTER OR SUMMER
Park in the city parking lot behind Globe Hardware
and use our new reasr entrance!
THE ESTATE SHOP
416 Evans St.
(Across from Cubbies)
752-3866
10:00 -5:00 Mon- Sat
We Also Buy & Sell Used Furniture
By Robert Todd
Staff Writer
Lester Lyons' career high 33
X)ints was not enough as Old Do-
Tiinion snapped its own three-game
osing streak. ECU lost its eighth
straight game, falling to 5-11 on the
5easort
'Lester had to d i way hi much
said Head roach Eddie Payne. "Our
other plavers aren't carrying their
re. They aa-n't executing. Let's
pe some other players can p k up
e slack
TheMonarchs.downbyasmanv
as five points midway thmugh the
first half, went on a W- sa ning run
and led 31-23 at halm me. Both b
vvtreshtxibngunder 40 percent at tlv
break.
Lyons scoring 25 of his 33 points
after intermission, opened the �
ond half with back-to-back tl i
pointers in the opening minute of
plav.
The Pirates mai aged b keep the
game dOK most ot the second half.
Anton Gill's basket, with 11.4
cut ODU's lead to two, 45-43. The
Piratescould not contain ODU a the
Monarchs went on a 30-1 brun, open-
ing a 16-point lead, with 206
to

i




the 1
led
ie tc

Swimmers split me
Ereshman John Donavin paced
the ECU men'sswimmingteam past
Old Dominion, 156-84, Saturday in
Norfolk, Va.
The team captured nine of 11
events en route to the convincing
win. ECU'S record improves to 7-2.
I

I






Entertainment
ultie SaHt (Earoltntan
January 28, 1992
Exhibitions Run at Jenkins
By Cortrinna Home
Staff Writer
Threshold'
Helen Sear, a multi-media art
ist from Great Britain, has brought
her photograph spectacle to the
Wellington B. Cray Gallery at ECU.
The exhibit, 'Threshold is �
slide projection. The main focus is a
nvk formation and I view of the
artist's head with fading colorful
images reflecting from a series oi
mirrors.
Sear's talent extends through
out her career. Her work was re
centlv published by the Reader's
Digest Collection.
The "Threshold" exhibit will
bo featured from Jan. 14 to Feb. H.
The public may view the slide pro-
jection Mondav through Saturday
from Id am. to 5 p.m. with ex-
tended hours Thursday until 8 p.m.
'Recent Sculpture'
Linda Threadgill, intemation-
aByacclaimed artist andmetalsmith,
will exhibit her finelv crafted wall
constructions entitled, "Recent
Sculpture '
The exhibit consists ol a series
of picturesque shadow boxes con
strutted ot wood, the use of acrylic
paint, and a combination of metals
enhances the etched images on the
boxes illustrating valuesof light and
dark
The exhibition will run fan. 14
through Feb. 8.
'Recent Paintings and
Drawings"
Leading abstract artist Pal
Colville will present the 18-piecc
"Recent Paintings and Drawings"
exhibit at the Wellington B. (Iray
Gallery at ECU.
The artist uses vibrant color
with i hot wax overlay to enhance
the array of color in the oil paints
The exhibit is new for 12 and
Temptations hit a 'Milestone'
James BrowningECU Photo Lab
Innocence 2 by Pat Colville
i- the ibsti let rt term toa new
dim' I
fhe most recent exhibit was in
Canada in 1991 It was the ontem
porary art show, Entre A I 'Art
I � temporain.
The "Recenl paintings and
i iii) exhil ' I I � �- ii
Ian. 14 to lob. 8.
The
lin.itor.
Peterkxxi
Just Type II'
The ' lust rype II" display al
E( 11 deals with graphic designand
advertisement, rhecntireexhibit is
an 81-piece layout consisting ol a
wide variety o( materials illustrat-
ing differenl designs and literary
art forms
The American Institute (it
Graphic Arts organized the
exhibition's debut eight years aeo
(also a proti-sional graphics de-
signer), sud ol the exhibition, "As
film has liberated the letter form
from the restraints ol metal casting,
digitization has lifted typefrom the
tl.it surface, enabling contortion of
;i-rins tint are virtually limitless
A exhibitions are located m
� i, i illen in knkms Fine
Artenter I he gallery is open to
the publii Monday through Satur-
da from IP a m to 5 p.m. with
extended hours Ihursdays until 8
p in
I here is no admission fee for
any ol the exhibits or lectures. For
more information, contact Charles
I ovell. thedirectorol the lray( .al-
lerv, at 757 f�336
By Cortrinna Home
Staff Writer
Few performing groups
have the longevity or natural
talent that is typical of The
Temptations. Milestone, the
band's latest album, ismore than
just a name. It isan achievement.
The Temptations began their
career in the early '60s and are
still performing worldwide 31
years later.
The five-member group of
Melvin Franklin, Otis Williams,
Richard Street, AliW(xxJson and
Ron Tyson is extraordinary be-
cause of each member's will-
power.
The first cut from the record,
"Fenie Meenie Minie Moe kicks
with a clubbeat and is up-tempo
for the dance scene.
The mid-tempo cut, "We
Should Be Makin' Love has a
bluesy feel familiar to early fans,
but a short and very sweet saxo-
phone solo in the song will cap-
ture a younger audience.
The undeniable mellowness
of The Temptations is heard in
"Whenever You're Ready" and
"Do It Easy
Tin- LP ends with "Cel-
ebrate a slow am with heavy
harmonies.
The rock of the group, Wil-
liams, has always kept The
Temptations on track and mov-
ing forward. 1 le hasdonethisby
taking the good and leavingany-
thing negative behind in their
work
Street recalls his dream of
the group coming together. His
mother kept telling the cousins.
Street and Franklin, that they
could achieve their goals, no
matter what
The gnnip set standards in
the 'ri()s for malesingersand other
bands with hits like "Get Ready"
(1966)and "Cloud Nine" (1969).
The group remembers
struggling to be recognized. "We
came from an era in recording
when the studio was small, was
in Detroit, and wasdone entirely
on a two-track recorder" said
band members in a press release.
"Recording would have to stop
every time the bathroom com-
mode was flushed during ses-
sions.
"Now. here we are 3,000
miles away, recording on state-
of-the-art equipment in world
class studios, using48 tra ksand
completing albums in less than
90days 1 his tstruly a Miestont
tor The temptations.
This album is significant tor
I he Temptations because it
shows distance covered by
highlighting the groups' career
history Milestone is the 50th LP
m The Temptations catalog
The Temptations have
much to celebrate These five
men. who have traveled the
distance together tor so long,
have definitely passed a great
milestone
Pnoto courtesy Motow"1 nacords
These five men, who have traveled the distance together for so
long, have detmately passed a great Milestone.
Singer Songwriter
Lisa Pawlak
Apearing live at the Underground
Starting at 8:00 pm
Tuesday January 28th
(T

P r e v i e
. 9 2
w
Free admission with valid I CU I.I).
Sponsored by the Student Coffeehouse Committee
Summer Student
Leadership
Opportunity
Available
East Carolina University
Orientation
Staff
Applications Available in 203 Hruin Hall
Jan 21 through lob 21. 1992
Deadline for completed applications is
February 21, 1992 (4:00 pm)
Sports
Pirates fall
toODUon
national
television
IN CONCERT J3
A lLa
fi "TRUTH"
k America's Premier Christian Group F
R Thursday, Jan. 30th At 7:30 P.M. J
�� Wright Auditorium - ECU
f Greenville. N.C. JJ
J s6.00 In Advance, $8.00 At The Door Jfc
Tickets Available at pq
� . Mendenhall Student Center J
J3 Sponsored by GRACE f
- A Christian Fellowship pq
J of ECU JJ
We Are
we Are ,
Buying
Used Men's IClothing
$ WE PAY CASH $
SHIRTS SWEATERS T
PANTS SWEATS KNITS
JEANS SHOES ETC.
CASUAL & DRESS
as
3 MONTHS
FOR �69
LAST CHANCE
OFFER ENDS
SAT FEB 1ST
TRIAL MEMBERSHIP
LARGE & EXTRA LARGE ONLY
WINTER OR SUMMER
Park in the city parking lot behind Globe Hardware
and use our new reasr entrance!
THE ESTATE SHOP
416 Evans St.
(Across from Cubbies)
752-3866
10:00-5:00 Mon-Sat
We Also Buy & Sell Used Furniture
By Robert I odd
Staff V
Lester I �� � i
points was note
minion snapp- lit mthre
losing streak D
Straight game I
season.
"Lester had!
said 1 lead
other players ire I
share They iren'l
hope some otl
the slack.
The � :
as five points n
first huilr went
Sidled 31-23 at h: �
wereshoofingun I i -
break.
Lyons � i
after intenmissj -
and hall witl back-t
pointer �
plav.
ThePiral - � -
game closer
Anton Gil
cut ODL
Pirates could notcontainC
Monarchswentoi - pei
ing a 16-p nt lead
Swimmers split me
Freshman John ;
IheECUmeri ssv imn ii
Old Dominion, 156-84, Sal rd
Norfolk, Va.
The team captur d I
events en route to
win. ECU'S record impi





a 'Milestone'
completing albums in less than
vmized We - lhisistrulva Vs.V
tor 1 he lemptations.
� is squall w as1 his album is significant for
-nptations because it
�ows distance covered by
. .Ishting the groups career
1 �ve to 5sk � Milestone is the 30th LP
i om-in rhe Temptations catalog.
" s1 he remptations have
a ebrate rhese five
,�ave ttaveled the
ther tor SO lone.
passed a great
Pxlo coul�sy Motown Records
�' together tor so

iew
niverMi
on
Erwin H
l 1992
plications is
H) pm)
YOUR
ONTHS
R$69
'trial members
MEMBERSHIP
JUST IN TIME TO
USE OUR NEW
POWERCISE
AND STEPS
The Club
for women only
301 Plaza Drive
Call 756-1592 Today!
MonThur. 9-9 � Frl �-8 � Sat t-1
-I
-5)
'Flnt-tim members only.
Sports
dJlic lEaat (Earolmtan
January 28,1992
Piraiesfall
toODUon
national
television
By Robert Todd
SUtt Writer
I ester I vons' career high 33
points was ixt enough as Old Do-
minion snapped its own three-game
losing streak. ECU lost its eighth
sc i t game, falling to 5-11 on the
season.
i ester tvni to do wav to much
said I lead coach Eddie Payne Our
r plawrs aren't earning their
hey a rent executing, let's
i some other pbyerscan pick up
slack
rteMkatarch&,downbyasinany
s ,i' points midway Ihrough the
half, went on a 19-6 scoring run
and led l -23 at haWrne Both teams
w v v shootingundcr 40 percent at the
break.
. j otvs.sconng 25 ot his 33 points
� - intermission, opened the sec-
ond halt with back-to-back three-
nters in the opening minute of
pla
lT�e Pirates managjrd to keep me
game close most of the second half.
Anton Gill's basket, with 11:40 left.
cut OfXTs lead to two. 45-13. 11 v
Pirates could not contain ODD as the
Monarchs went on a 30-16 run, open-
ing a lr-point lead, with 2:08 left.
Washington outscores Buffalo
37-24 for Super Bowl crown
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) � The
no-nameson Washington'sdefense
were too muchSunday for Buffalo's
no-huddle offense.
The Redskins won their third
Super Bowl in 10 years, 37-24, put-
ting the gameaway with 24 straight
points after a scoreless first period
in which they blew two touchdown
chanees.
The Bills, one-point losers to
the New York Giants in the Super
Bowl a year ago, never were in this
one, although they made it closer
with two touchdowns late in the
fourth quarter.
This Washington win was as
much the work of obscure defend-
ers like Kurt Gouveia, Brad
Edwards, Fred Stokes, Jason Buck,
Alvoid Mays and Andre Collins as
anv of the team's stars.
J
Sure, MVP Mark Rypicn threw
for 292 yards and two touchdowns
as Washington ran the NFC's streak
in the NFL'smarqueegametoeight
straight.
Sure, the "Posse" � receivers
Art Monk, Gary Clark and Ricky
Sanders � led a 17-point explosion
in fine minutes, 45 seconds of the
the second quarter after a scoreless
first period. That surge saw the
Redskinsusetheno-huddleoffense
themselves in a modified reprise of
their record 35-point second quar-
ter in their Super Bowl rout of Den-
ver four years ago.
And sure, Rypien hi t Clark with
a 30-yard TD pass with 1:24 left in
the third quarter after Buffalo had
cut a 24-0 lead to 24-10.
But just as important was the
work of a blitzing defense that shut
See Redskins, page 8
Photo by Dail H��d� ECU Photo Lab
Pirate basketball player Anton Gill crashes the boards in Saturday's loss
to conference rival Old Dominion The game was telecast on ESPN.
ECU could not overcome tlv deficit
Monarch forward Rieardo
Leonard, leading theCAA in scoring
and steals, scored Hot his 21 points in
the List M0 of regulation. Leonard
lev! ODD in scoring and added six
rebounds, while teammate Petey
Sessoms finished with !7pointsand
a ganv high 11 boards.
"I think (the team) didn't feel we
amid win the ball game today said
Lvons after the game. "It's a chaotic
state nght now. I've been looking to
find more consistency in myself
The Pirates next game is at Wil-
liam and Man Jan. 29.
Swimmers split meet with Monarchs
Freshman John Donavin paced
the ECU men sswimming team past
Old Dominion, 156-84, Saturday in
Norfolk, Va.
The team captured nine of U
events en route to the convincing
win ECU'S record improves to 7-2.
"We totally dominated Old
Dominion 1 lead awch Rick Kobe
said "We won nine of 11 events
over a very good team
The Lady Pirate swimmers
were not as fortunate, as they fell to
the Ladv Monarchs 95-132.
"Our lad ies had a good, consi s
tent swim Kobe said. "We won
our share (of events), but the depth
chart is what killed us
The team will host UNC-
ChapeJ Hill Wednesday in Mingos
Aquatic Center.
De La Sierra
falls short in
Rocky Mount
competition
By Brad Wiese
Staff Writer
Rocky Mount � Denise De
La Sierra became ECU'S first
female to enter kickboxing
competition Saturday night at
a packed Gateway Convention
Center in Rocky Mount.
I n the first contest between
two females in North Carolina,
De La Sierra fell by a unani-
mous decision to Diana Stanton
of Raleigh.
De La Sierra fell victim to a
punishing attack from the
largcrStanton.Theearly stages
of the bout wereonly a glimpse
of things to come. Stanton
forced De La Sierra into a stand-
ing eight count mid-way
through the first round, then
continued attacking a retreat-
See Fight, page 8
Photo by Jill Cherry� ECU Photo Lab
ECU'S first female kickboxing competitor, Denise De La Sierra, fell
short of winning in Saturday's match in Rocky Mount, N.C.
(r
s
1
Summer Student
Leadership
Opportunity
Available
East Carolina University
Orientation
Staff
Applications Available in 203 Erwin Hall
Jan 21 through Feb 21,1992
Deadline for completed applications is
February 21,1992 (4:00 pm)
Jf





a 'Milestone'
: bums in less than
" Lll a
- ' v .uit tor
� � because it
� ups career
estone is the 50th i P j
� itatog
A � ��
a'i Records
e w
on
YOUR GOALS IN '92
ONTHS
R $69
WTRIA

TRIAL MEMBERSHIP
JUST IN TIME TO
USE OUR NEW
POWERCISE
AND STEPS
The Club
tor women only
301 Plaza Drive
Call 756-1592 Today!
MonThur� 9-9 � Fri. 9-8 � Sat 9-1
-A-
5)
'First-time members only,
Sports
CEUje lEaut (Earnlinian
January 28,1992
7
Pirates fall
toODUon
national
television
B) Robert lodd
st.itt Writer
� ster 1 yons' career high 33
a.i- no! enough as Old Dr
n snapped itsown three-game
streak. I'Cl lost its eighth
I game, (ailing to 5-11 on tlx-
n.
I ester had to do way tomuch
ad coach Eddie Payne. 1Our
players aren't carrying their
rhey aren't executing. Lefs
- tmc i ither players can pick up
K
heMonarchs,dovvnbyasmany
points midway through tlx
went on a 19-6 scoring run
23 at halftime. Both teams
- tingunder40 percent at the
. �ns scoring25oi his33points
intermission opened the sec-
half with back-to-back three-
ters in the opening minute of
Washington outscores Buffalo
37-24 for Super Bowl crown
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) � The
no-namesonWashington'sdefense
were too much Sunday for Buffalo's
no-huddle offense.
The Redskins won their third
Super Bowl in 10 years, 37-24, put-
tingthegameaway with 24 straight
points after a scoreless first period
in which thevblew two touchdown
chances
The Bills, one-point losers to
the New York Giants in the Super
Bowl a year ago, never were in this
one, although they made it closer
with two touchdowns late in the
fourth quarter.
This Washington win was as
much the work of obscure defend-
ers like Kurt Gouveia, Brad
Edwards, Fred Stokes, Jason Buck,
Alvoid Mays and Andre Collins as
any of the team's stars.
Sure, MVP Mark Rypien threw
for 22 yards and two touchdowns
as Washington ran theNFC'sstreak
in the NFL's marquee game to eight
straight.
Sure, the "Posse" � receivers
Art Monk, Gary Clark and Ricky-
Sanders � let! a 17-point explosion
in tine minutes, 45 seconds of the
the second quarter after a so mHess
first period. Thai surge saw the
Redskinsuse the no-huddle ot tense
themselves in a modified reprise of
their record 35-point second quar-
ter in theirSuper Bowl rout of Den-
ver four years ago.
And sure, Rypien hi t Clark with
a 30-yard TD pass with 1:24 left in
the third quarter after Buffalo had
cut a 24-0 lead to 24-10.
But just as important was the
work of a blitzing defense that shut
See Redskins, page 8
Pira
toe
Photo by Dail Re�d� ECU Pholo Lab
player Anton Gill crashes the boards in Saturday's loss
� - al Old Dominion The game was telecast on ESPN
fhe Pirates managed to keep the
me dose most ol the second half.
v ;ill - basket, with 11:40 left,
)1 - lead to two, 4543. The
�s could not contain ODU as the
narchswentona30-16run,open-
a 16-point lead, with 2is left.
E I not .ercome the deficit,
irch forward Ricardo
Leoi theC AAinscoring
and steals, scored I lofhis21 pointsin
thi i gulabon. Leonard
led Oi . in coring and added six
rebounds, while teammate Petey
� - ms finished with 17 points and
,i game high 11 boards.
"I think (the team)didn't feel we
could win the Kill ganx today sud
Lyons after the game. "It's a chaotic
state right now. I've been looking to
fnxl more consistency in myself.
Ihe Pirates next game is at Wil-
liam and Man Ian. 29.
Swimmers split meet with Monarchs
I reshman ohn I mavin paced
v Umen'sswimmingteampast
Old I ominion, 156 84, Saturday in
N rfolk,Va.
The team captured nine of 11
ts en route to the convincing
win. ECU s record improves to 7-2.
totalh dominated Old "Our ladies had a good,consis-
Head coach Rick Kobe tent swim Kobe said. "We won
said i nine ot 11 events our share tot events), but the depth
over a d team chart is what killed us
Pirate swimmers The team will host UNC-
wcromate, as they fell to Chapel Hill Wednesday in Minges
the I '�' � hs95 132 Aquatic Center.
De La Sierra
falls short in
Rocky Mount
competition
By Brad Wiese
Staff Writer
Rocky Mount � Denise De
La Sierra became ECU'S first
female to enter kickboxing
competition Saturday night at
a packed Gateway Convention
Center in Rocky Mount.
In the first contest between
two females in North Carolina,
De La Sierra fell by a unani-
mous decision to Diana Stanton
of Raleigh.
De La Sierra fell victim to a
punishing attack from the
larger Stan ton. The early stages
of the bout were only a glimpse
of things to come. Stanton
forced De La Sierra into a stand-
mg eight count mid-way
through the first round, then
continued attacking a retreat-
See Fight, page 8
Photo by Jill Ch�rry� ECU Pholo Lab
ECU'S first female kickboxing competitor, Denise De La Sierra, fell
short o winning in Saturday's match in Rocky Mount. N.C
(T
review
� 9 2
Summer Student
Leadership
Opportunity
Available
East Carolina University
Orientation
Staff
Applications Available in 203 Erwin Hall
Jan 21 through Feb 21, 1992
Deadline for completed applications is
February 21, 1992 (4:00 pm)
V
J





8
Lady Pirates roll by
Campbell 79-64
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
The Lady Pirates KOtcd 53 sec-
ond-half points to bou nee Kick from
� three point halftime defecit and
boat the Lady Camels of Campbell
University 79-64 in Buies Creek.
The win is the third striaght
victory for ECU. They are 10-5 over-
all and are in first place in theCAA
with a 4-1 record
"We had a gtxxi second-half
said Head coach Pat Pierson. "We
wore more patient, and we hi t thnv-
three pointer; that helped us a lot
Gavnor CDonnel connected
for 14 second-half points and hit the
team's lone three pointers. She fin-
ished with 18 points and five as-
sists.
Tonya Hardgroveled the Lady
Pirates with a team high 20 points
and 10 boards.
ECU trailed the Lady Camels
2-26atthehalf.Campbellstretched
their lead to fi ve off two quick buck-
ets. CDonnel then drove in for a
layup, nailed a three and then had a
steal, dishing it to Toina Coley for a
lay up giving the Lady Pirates the
lead.
That was the turning point for
ECU and the Lady Camels never
held another lead.
"We decided to switch up on
the defense Pierson said. "I didn't
know if it would work, but obvi-
ously it did. It kept them confused.
"Despi to being down a t the half,
we kept our composureand played
well as a team
ECU went on a nine point run
before Campbell's Lisa Allison
snapped the streak with a 10-foot
jumper. Allison had a game high 23
points and nine rebounds.
The LadvPiratesagain went on
another run. They scored 13 points
and held Campbell scoreless for
almost four minutes.
ECU had45rebounds, 14 steals
and shot 73 percent from the free
throw line.
Coley again had a strong de-
fensive performance for the Lady-
Pirates. She had four steals, and
remainssecond in theC AA insteals.
ECU plays number 21-ranked
N.C. State Wednesday night at
7p.m. in Minges.
To date, the Lady Wolfpack
leads ECU in the series 19-5. So far,
the Lady Pirates are 6-1 in Minges
Coliseum, averaging 78.1 points at
home.
Redskins
Continued from page 7
Fight
Photo by Dail Road � ECU Photo Lab
Tonya Hargrove for the Lady Pirates blocks a shot in the team's 78-60
win over George Mason Jan 20 The Lady Pirates defeated Campbell
Saturday. 79-64. and are in first place in the CAA
Continued from page 7
ing De La Sierra for the remainder
of the fight.
There wasa bit of controversy
to end the match.
Early in the third round, ref-
eree Terrv Rich halted the fight,
giving Stanton an apparent TKO
after she knocked De La Sierra
down for the third time. Rules
state that about should be stopped
if a contestant is knocked down
three times in the same round.
After conferring with the
judges, Rich agreed to let the la-
dies finish their match. De La Si-
erra proceeded to show great de-
termination and heart in finishing
the fight.
"Denise completely aban-
doned her game plan com-
mented BUI McDonald, De La
Sierra's trainer and promoter of
the event. "She had planned to
kick and move, not gi ving Stanton
a target. She just got nervous
In other fights, Mark Chang
won a decision over Phil 1 lolmes,
in the 150 pound class. In the 125
pound match, C.rady Crumplert
knocked Earl Sullivan out in the
first round. Keith Emanuel regis-
tered a third round TKOof Dereck
Longlev in the heavy weight divi-
sion.
Daniel Bradley tell to ohn
Royal in the 165 pound class. An-
other heavyweight match saw
Ronnie Copeland win a decision
over Ronnie Simpson. Danny
Daniels of Greenville dominated
Leon 'The Rabbit" 1 linnant in the
Super lightweights.
Theevening's main event was
the Hast Coast Middleweight
Championship match featuring
Ronnie Weaver and Mike
Hopkins. Scheduled for seven
rounds. Weaver controlled the
fight and won on a third round
tko.
The next event in this area
will be held April 4, in Rocky
Mount, tor the North American
Title.
down the NFL's most explosive of-
fense until the Redskins had that
lead.
It sacked Jim Kelly five times,
got four interceptions � two by
Edwards, one of five Plan B free
agents who start on defensive coor-
dinator Richie Petitbon'sunit.Italso
forced a fumble in helping coach
Joe Gibbs to his th.rd Super Bowl
win, tied with San Francisco's Bill
Walsh and one behind Pittsburgh's
Chuck Noll on the all-time list.
It held Thurman Thomas, the
league's MVP this year, to just 10
yards in eight carries through the
first three quarters, limiting the
league's leading running game to
just 15 yards over that period and
without a rushing first down until
midway through the third.
And it set up 13 second-half
points that helped put away the
game.
One defensi ve key came on the
first play of the second half when
Gouveia returned an interception
forced by Collins' blitz to the one.
That set up Gerald Riggs' second 1 -
yard TD run for a 24) lead.
The next came when Mays
sacked Kelly, forcing a fumble that
was recovered by Stokes. That set
up Chip Lohmiller's 25-yard field
goal that made it 34-10 six seconds
into the fourth quarter. And the
third was Edwards' second inter-
ception, tipped to him by Martin
Mavhew and returned 35 yards.
That set up Lohmiller's39-yard field
goal for 37-10.
That more than made up for
Buffalo's one quick offensive spurt
� a run of 10 points that followed
the Gouveia-Riggs touchdown.
And even then the defense con-
tributed, stopping the Bills at the
three-yard-line and forcingthem to
settle for Scott Norwood's 21-yard
field goal that made it 24-3.
Then Thomas capped an 55-
yard TD drive with a 1-yard run.
The score was set up by a 29-yard
pass interference call.
The game got off to a bizarre
start and continued that way
through the first quarter.
First, Buffalo's Brad Daluiso
was forced to kick off twice because
his first was ruled an "inadvertent
kickoff" because referee Jerry
Markbreitwasoutof position. And,
Thomas missed the Bils' first two
offensive plays because he couldn't
find his helmet under the Buffalo
bench.
Washington then blew two
scoring chances.
Rypien hit Monk in the back of
the end zone, but replay official Cal
Lepore overturned the TD because
Monk's foot was on the rear line. It
was the first touchdown reversed
by replay in Super Bowl history.
Lohmiller camein fora 19-yard
field goal attempt, but the snap was
mishandled.
Bu t B uf f alo wa s goi ng iio where.
Even though the Bills got good
field position early, they didn't get
into the Redskins' territory until
3:10remainedinthehalf.Thatdrive,
typically, was aborted by an 11-
yard sack by Buck.
Becbe also dropped a pass in
the end zone in the third quarter
drive.
Washington finally made it 3-0
1.58 into the second quarter on
Lohmiller's 34-yarder.
The Skins got the bal 1 right back
after a 23-yard punt by Chris Mohr
and finally took it to the end zone,
going to theno-huddleand driving
51 vards on five plays. Rypien hit
Byner in the flat, he caught it at the
7 and dove into the end zone.
Then Green picked off Kel1 v on
his own 45 and five plays later it
was 17-0. Riggs went over from the
1 after Rypien hit Gary Clark for 34
vards.
MARGI,
Will you marry me?
You know who
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Carry-Outs
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FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
1 3003 S. Evans 7$6-20ll
Fresh Oysters, Flounder, Shrimp, Trout,
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AUTOMOTIVE
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I In Original, Nonfat and Sugar Free Nonfat.
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Behind Parker's Barbeque
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752-5043
OIL CHANGE,
(CHASSIS LUBEj
OIL FILTER
$995 J
SPRING fQ
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A SLIDE PRESENTATION
Mendenhall �7:15 pm � Jan 28,29
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Apostolic Campus Ministry (Refreshments)
Drain oil. refill with up to five quarts I
major brand oil. lubricate chaaala �
and install new oil filter Moat �
vehicles. Includes Preventive
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TO COLLEGE STUDENTS
WITH ID
The East Carolinian
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�Application Deadline February 28,1992
Period of Program: May 26,1992 to July 31,1992
UNC-CH Contact is: Associate Dean Henry T. Frierscn
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200 Bynum Hall CB 4040
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hil
Telephone: 966-2611
For application Forms and Additional Information Contact:
Dr. Larry Smith
204 Whknard Building � East Carolina University
CALL 1-800-6-BAHAMA
d-MO-Sia-aMD





Title
The East Carolinian, January 28, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 28, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.853
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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