The East Carolinian, January 23, 1992






Wedding Bells
Father of the Bride' amuses audiences.
IS
Grand Slam
Indoor facility offers games, recreation.
7
�!j� iEaBt (Eamltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vot .66 No.4
Thursday, January 23,1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
8 Pages
Students march in honor of King
Dukakis gets new job
Michael Dukakia, the former Democratic
presidential candidate, will begin teaching an
undergraduate course called "Public Policy
Analysis" at Honda Atlantic University tins
winter.
In addition to teaching Dukakis will also
discuss national health care Issues as a guest
Uvturer.
A $4 AW private donation will pay for
ttvingexpenscs, housing andacar for Dukakis
and his wile kittv.
Kutv tnk.ikis is studying lo become .1
counselor at the University erf Massachusetts!
and will be doing an internship as an alcohol
and drw, counselor while husband Michael is
teaching
Judge ends desegregation
A federal judge has ruled th.it Alabama
must erase all traces ot segregation m its
university system.
US. District Judge Harold Murphy wrote
a 1.OOOpage order specifically telling the state
wh.it must bo done to improve conditions at
all of the state institutions.
judge Murphy is demanding$20 million
for Alabama AJkM and Alabama Suite to in
order to instill the changes,
Attorney Rob Hunter, who represents
the governor, state education and finance
offieials,sudst,ihHtfkialsarvcvrxvmilabiut
finding the funds in this time of budget cut-
backs.
"We are trying to determine il we can do
this Hunter sik! "It will be difficult to come
up vith these funds
Novelist receives honor
Toni Morrison, 1 professor at Princeton
University, recently received the University
ot Chicago Roscnborger Modal tor outstand-
ing achievement in creative aixl performing
arts
Morrison received the award for his five
novels, two of which have already won inde-
pendent awards.
"Beloved" (1987) won the Pulitzer Prize,
and "Stmg of Soloman" (lu77) won the Na-
tional Book Award.
Philip c iossett, 1 committee member aixl
dean of the humanities division, says
Morrison's books "illuminated the lives of
A fncan Americans in complex and profound
ways
Two students raped
Two rapes involving University of North
Carolina students were reported within 24
hoursofeachotheratapirtmentcomplexesin
Chapel Hill over the winter break.
Polkv have arrested Thomas Brandon
Stephens, W, and charged him with the Jan. 1
MM of a 19-year-old woman. Brandon did
not use a weapon, which lessens his charge to
second-degree rape.
No arrest has been made in the second
rape, that took place in th vichm'sapartment
Dec. 31, but the victim said she knows her
attacker.
UNC receives donation
The University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill recently received the second-larg-
est donation for their bicentennial campaign
from Burroughs Wellcome Co.
Five UNC schools and the Ackland Art
Museum will benefit from the $1.45 million
donation.
The money will be divided between the
School of Medicine, the School of Social Work,
the schools of pharmacy and public health,
the Kcnan-Flaglcr Business School and the
Ackland Art Museum.
Compftod by Elizabeth SMmmal
Inside Thursday
Crime SceneJ 2
Editorial4
Classifiedsb
EntertainmentJS
SportsJ7
Comics8
By M.irjorie Pitts
SUM Writer
tn Monday night Alpha Phi
Alpha and the Minority Arts
Committee celebrated Martin
l.uther King r. Day witha march
and I ceremony in Mcndenhall.
Hie event uplifted spints and
allowed the people present to
show their love aixl apprecia-
tion to the late Martin l.uther
King Jr.
"1 here should be nxro cul-
tural a waronossonourcampus
slid MichelleTerrv,president of
the Minority Arts Committee.
The committee represents all
minorities on campus, not ust
Atro Americans, Terry slid.
The inarch across campus
began at 600 p.m. ECU Police
escorted about 50 people who
walked bv candlelight singing
and praising the late King.
Among the marchers was
Cheryl 1 lams, a member of Delta
Sigma ThetS Sorority, who slid
she wanted to see more people
attending the march.
"Everyone should be hem
Harris snd. "All the football
plavers 'Who lVlievcd the stv
rontios, the fraternities, every-
one. Today is not just a dav tor
blacks, it's for everybody
The Eighth Annual Martin
l.uther King )r. Leadership
Awards Ceremony was held in
Mendenhall Student Center at
7:30 p.m. Approximately 700
people attended the ceremony
sponsored by the Eta Nu c hap
tor ot Alpha Phi Alpha Frater-
nity.
The ceremony titled, "The
Dream. The Struggle, The
See King, page 3
Photo by K�vln Amos - ECU Photo Lab
Media chair donates stipend to charities
By Christie Lawrence
Staff Writer
'I "ho spirit of giving is often
neglected after Christmas, but
not for Mary IVth Morde. For
her duty as media boani chair
this Semester, she wasen titled to
a $2(X) stipend; however, at the
Media Board MeettagonTues-
day, six- asked the board to do-
nate her stipend elsewhere.
lhe motion was nude and
approved that $1(X.) of the sti-
pend be donated to the United
Corebal Palsy Inundation and
Fire
leaves
three
homeless
By Matthew Bulley
Suff Writer
Sunday at 5 am, is nor-
mally a peaceful time in
Greenville, but for throe college
students this was not the case.
Troy Yarborough. a Pitt
Community College student,
awoke when he felt a burning
sensation on his arm. r lis nxwn,
at 415 B East 3rd St was on fire.
Yarborough tried to put out
the blaze with a towel. Realizing
the magnitude of the fire, he be-
gan pounding on hisroommatcs'
bedroom doors trying to evacu-
ate the house. All the residents
escaped the house without ma-
jor injuries. Patrick Carroll and
Chip Bartlett an? Yarborough's
roommates, and arc ECU se-
niors.
Carroll, an industry and
technology major, said, "We
were basically frantic. My (aca-
demic) advisor, Dr. David
Gobesski, lives in the other half
of the duplex, and we wanted to
make sure he got out. Troy ran
next door and called 911, and we
tho remaining $l(X) bo donated
to the United Negro College
Pund. Morde siid. "I strongly
Support these!woorganizations
and would like to help them in
any way that 1 can. 1 know that
it's not very much, but every
little bit helps"
Last semester the Media
Boani approved funding of the
eyewash systems for The East
Cawlmian and the Photo lab.
Eyewash is first-aid treatment
for chemical contamination of
the eves from photography
chemicals.
Greg Brown, media advi-
sor, informed the Media Board
that the eyewash systems should
be installed within the next three
or four weeks.
A computer request for The
Last Carolinian was also dis-
cussed at Tuesday's meeting.
The existing computers were
bought in 1987, according to
Greg Brown.
These systems have been
causing probk'ms with the news-
pa perand a request for revamp-
ing the entire system was made.
Currently, only three of the ex-
isting computers are fully oper-
able. Many hmes, the staff a iThe
East Carolinian has touseExpres-
sions' computers.
Greg Brown stated he was
hoping the system would last
until the end of the fiscal year,
but the equipment hasfailed sev-
eral times, and "it is ti me to move
up
The media board chair sug-
gested that all members of the
board look over the proposals
thoroughly and cast a phone vote
by 4 p.m. today.
The committee reports con-
firmed that all of the media
sources are running smoothly
this semester and some other
announcements were made.
Tim Hampton, general man-
ager of The East Carolinian, con-
gratulated Matt Jones, Manag-
ing Editor, for his recognition by
Channel 9 on his continued cov-
erage of the wiretapping case.
WZMB will be hosting a
Benefit show for the Real Crisis
Center Feb. 6. Although the
Center is not a campus organi-
zation, many of the volunteers
are ECU students.
Students return for
degrees, experiences
Photo by JIM Cherry - ECU Photo Lab
The damaged remains of a Third Street house stand as reminder of
a brutal fire. The tire destroyed the house early Sunday morning.
went around the back and we
were just pounding on the win-
dows and screaming, trying to
wake him up
After breakinginGobesski's
back door, the men made their
way into the smoke-filled
kitchen. "We couldn't make it
any farther Carroll said. "The
smoke was so thick 1 couldn't
draw a breath. We knew he
couldn't be in there, as loud as
we had screamed, and pounded
See Fire, page 3
Board approves abuse center
By Angela DeRosia
Senior Newt Writer
The board of trustees gave
their approval for the new Cen-
ter for Alcohol and Drug Abuse
on Dec. 6,1991, joining ECU in
the national fight against alco-
hol and drug abuse.
This center will be the
fourth "Center of Excellence"
based in the School of Medi-
cine for addressing Eastern
North Carolina health issues.
Cancer, diabetes and cardio-
vasculardiseasearethe focuses
of the other three.
The formation of the cen-
ter wasannounced by Dr. James
A. Hallock, ECU vice chancel-
lor for heal th sciences and dean
of the medical school.
The creation of the Center
for Alcohol and Drug Abuse
recognizes three important
facts: the magnitude of the al-
cohol and drug abuse problem
in eastern North Carolina and
elsewhere, the significant clini-
cal and scientific expertise
present in and around the uni-
versity, and the need for in-
creased emphasis on the edu-
cation of future health profes-
sionals in the field of substance
abuse Hallock said in a press
release.
Dr. WallaceR. Wooles, pro-
See Center, page 3
By Colleen Kirkpatrick
Suff Writer
There are currently 383
students enrolled at ECU this
spring semester under the sta-
tus of a non-traditional stu-
dent.
A non-traditional student
must be 25 vears or older and
an undergraduate without a
bachelor's degree.
There are a total of 2600
students enrolled at ECU who
were once non-traditional stu-
dents.
An extra performance base
admissions system is set up
for the non-traditional student
who may not have met the re-
quirements.
Students may not declare
their major or enter the gen-
eral college program until they
have reached a 2.2 GPA and
have successfully completed
28 hours.
The U ni versity College be-
ganintheearlyl960sasaadult
night-time student program
through the Division of Con-
tinuing Education.
In 1984 the campus based
program integrated into the
Academic Affairs and became
a funded program.
Since 1984, the non-tradi-
tional students have been able
to attend class during the day
as well as in the evening. Dr.
Robert Denney, Associate Di-
rector for the University Col-
lege said, "The university
wants to be able to accommo-
date them
Denney said the non-tra-
ditional students preferences
in degrees are parallel to the
general college students. Busi-
ness, Nursing, Education and
Industrial Technology are the
most sought-after degrees by
the students.
"Not many non-tradi-
tional students audit classes
Denney said.
He said that they are moti-
vated students who are ready
to receive their degree and
move on.
"As a whole they are very
successful Denney said.
According to a Census Bu-
reau report in 189,3.3 million
college students were over 30
years old, twice as many as 15
years ago. One of every five
students enrolled in college in
1989 were women.
According to Denney, up
until five years ago most non-
traditional students went to
school at night. Now the ma-
jority of students are day stu-
dents and also fulltime.
The National Center for
Education Statistics said43
percent of all students enrolled
in college are over 25 years
old.
It has been estimated that
the enrollment of students
over 25 will increase in 1992 to
the 7 million mark.
With the economy reach-
ing it's lowest level in years
many feel attending college is
a good idea.
"We have seen for a long
time that when the economy
goes dow a lot of people cycle
back into the university said
Kay Holmberg, adult student
program coordinator at Iowa
State University.
Holmberg said that stu-
dents know going back to
school "increases their chances
in the job market" while times
are tough.
However, the economy is
not the only reason students
decide to go back to school.
Many students said they are
making up for the missed op-
portunities and self-improve-
ment are their reasons for com-
ing back.





2 dJIjc �aat(�ariilitlian January 23, 1992
CRI
S;ene
Zs
Vehicle stopped near Jenkins
Building for fictitious license
Jan. 17
1007�Memorial Gym: Vehicle Mopped south of Christenbury
Gym for driving left of center. Student given a campus citation.
1057- -Mendenhall Student Center: Vehicle stopped tor speed-
ing and having fictitious license. Student was taken into custody.
1238 Jenkins Art Building: Vehicle stopped tor having ficti-
tious license and no insurance.
123College 1 li 11 Drive: Vehicle slopped in commuter lot for
speeding. Student given campus citation.
13. 1 Theatre Arts Building: Attempted to locate banned sub-
ject. No contact.
1409�Greene lorm: Tried to retrieve keys from elevator shaft.
Housekeeping staff assisted the student.
1421V ones l lall: Checked out reference to open line (911) on
one room. Cleared.
1421 Spilman Building Responded in reference to locating
banned subject. Nocontact.
1457 Tyler 1 lall: Vehicle stopped for impelling traffic, student
given campus citation.
Jan.18
014a Fifth and Reade streets; Checked out two intoxicated
mate subjects in the parkinglot .Subjects found to have been involved
in a tight in the downtown area. Subjects transported to Pitt Emer-
gency to be treated tor minor injuries.
0211 � Fleming Dorm: Responded to report of a female subject
having damaged .i door in .i dispute with .i male. Female issued
campus citation for damage to state property nd underage con-
sumption of alcohol.
0215�Mendenhall Student Center Responded to report of a
disturbance in the Social Room. C rowddisrxrsedandallsubjectsleft
the area.
0234 -Fleming Dorm: Provided transportation for an intoxi-
cated female from Fleming to Clement and subject turned over to
dorm staff.
0342 lovner Library: Checked on severely intoxicated male
subject south ot lovner Subject requested 24 hour inebriating assis-
tance
Jan.19
0857- Cotten 1 lall: Assisted the housekeeper find a water le.ik
in the kitchen Same was found to be coming from icemaker. On-call
plumber was called out.
1424�Jones Hall: Checked out Room 139 to take report of
threats received. Also issued campus administrativecitations to two
students for a fight in hallway the night before.
1S4 -Garrett Hall: Vehicle stopped east of Garrett, student
given a campus citation for speeding and no operator's license.
lu10�The Pantrv: Vehicle stopped for not using his headlights,
student given a verbal warning.
Crlm� Scmrm Is taken from official Public Safety Log�
Student Union hosts forum
The Student Union will host a forum titled, "Politi-
cal Correctness: Progress or Paralysis?" The facilitator will
be Alan Hoffman of WNCT-TV Channel 9. The panelists
will include Dr. Marie Farr, women's studies; Dr. Tinsley
Yarbrough, political science; Dr. Larry Smith, minority
affairs; Dr. Steve Williams, english; Bill Carroll and Kevin
Smith, political science students; Mr. Kevin Osley, sociol-
ogy graduate student.
The forum will be held on Monday, Jan. 27 from 8
p.m. to 9:30 p.m. in the Mendenhall Student Center Great
Room.
City blames many
for stampede
(AP) A mayoral report on the
deaths of nine people in a Stampede
at a basketball game spread blame
on police, college officials, organiz-
ers and a crowd that showed "total
disregard for one's fellow men and
women
"A review leads to the ines-
capable conclusion that almost all
ot the individuals involved in the
event demonstrated a Kick of re-
sponsibility said Deputy Mayor
Milton Molten, who prepared the
report released Wednesday.
The deaths occurred when
people trying to get into a Dec. 28
basketball game featuring rap ce-
lebrities surged toward thedoorsof
the gymnasium at the City College
ol New York in Harlem
The report said the Police De-
partment used "highly question-
able" judgment in responding to a
surging crowd
The report also quoted a police
transmission from an unidentified
person at the scene as saving,
"They're not people they're ani-
mals "
This transmission bv an offi-
cer reflects an attitude which ((early
is to be condemned Molten said
The crowd, Mollen said, was
another cause of the tragedy when it
showed "total disregard for one's
fellow men and women" by push-
ing to get in
Mullen's report also concluded:
The college's security tone
was too small lor the estimated 3.1M H)
fans I h' student organization in
charge of the event refused too i
eiate w ith college officials in i
III! ,
I )ispat hers for polu c .md
the Emergenc) Medical Service
needed greater claritv in then com
miinu atii �ns
Mayor David Dinkinscalled th�
v on lusions about polt� c ina I
serious findings' and ordered Po
licet ommissionerl ee Brown to re
view procedures tor handling
i row ds Br w n said police are i
dui ting their ow n in estigation
theit ol lege of New I'ork, and
it College President Bernard
Harleston said in a statement that
the � I ih�I hasalread done a studv
ind i n aking t hangos similai I
ommonded
Special thanks to:
B U R T , 3 t c p h c n
Schaubach's Macintosh llci
with eight megabytes ot
RAM and a 120 megabyte
hard drive.
?GRAND OPENING
THE WINDMILL RESTAURANT
1011 CHARLES BLVD. (BEHIND KRISPY KRKMK)
OPEN MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 11AM - 10PM
DAILY LINCII SPECIALS
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Break.
The Florida Keys
Under $400.00.
Unbeatable.
Register beginning December 2 in
117 Christenbury Gym - The ROC.
Questions? Call 757-6911.
Deposit of $125.00 upon registration required.
Activities include:
� sailingwindsurfing
� snorkelmg
� sea kayakmgcanoeing
� camping - John Pennikamp State Park
� visit to Key West
Cost covers:
� transportation (van)
� lodgirxj
� activity fees
� equipment
� most food
Sponsored by ECU Recreational Services
Harris teeter
Harris mm mm
SUPER 101V PRICES!
Boneless
Chuck Roast
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3UFFALO BAKERS
BAKING
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Prices Effective Through January 28, 1992
Prices In This Ad Effective Thiouqh Tuesday, January 28, 1992 In Stores Oniv
Fire
on the place Gobesski was not
home at the time
"It was unbelievable Carroll
said Tireand smoke was pounng,
no, she mtin 1(1 feet i r more out 14
our front door. I rust stood in the
51 n t i screaming at the fire in disbe-
liefVThe cause of me fire was listed
as ino -ni lusive due to the total de-
stnutn m ot the room where the fire
started
fire was si i here e (ne ntngh-
t- r aid she thought the house was
exploding as the lnterno raged,
peratures in the house soared to
over 12.X1 degrees, destroying ev-
erything the three owned.
i 140 gallons of aquari-
ums, about $4,500 in stereo equip-
ment, all 'ur clothes, turnitua-
Center
everything Bark
ning ma)or said: '
wearing now lsei
a gift. We all got
boxers on, basic all
According td
bnght spot
was when arount.
Al Matthews, vW
Student Late arnvi
"In the rruc
tion, there was fjj
Carroll said. "It wi
that Matthews haj
bed and GOT)
us so much he)
didi � - � thatl
sitv (inally, I
thim- . -
Continued troml
fessor an I - hairman of the De-
partment ol Pharmacology, will
lirectoroi the center
rectorol ilsi rviceswill be
Dr.Jai '�' : proressorand
-avin of the Depart-
mer . hiatric Medicine.
The center will build upon a
hoi Study Group
been meeting formally for
; ��� reai rgai izariu i - repre-
gn up include the
I Medicine, Allied
�� ial Work, and
�the Put
Cbui
Countv
the Walter E

hoi and Ir
m(t h� .
eas at the
$7 � �
tra �
(n fel I
hol-indu


'Jazz Cabaret 'Dinner'Hit
'Friday, February 14 2��J
MendathaQStudent Center �- �
tan ttntu
.a entine's Day treat - 3t:re for you �rtter C rtnei
Mee"a 3ce"t Ce:er anFr :a. -ear.
This speoa' lazz Cacaret" m 'eate '
dancirfg pieasure the ECU Schoc of Music .azz Cor 1
Dasniell. Jr i-eaas up trus quintet compr se:
saxocone. ana a vocalist.
The menu for tne eve" ng nc udes
: s s e:
han
. ea "aesan
n roast cont er:a
� a se potatoes ea a
Gree pears a tfi S'r:ors
Patrons age a7 br :e - awr tat e
T dtets for this ever: are on sa e a: v
:�' ;e - Me-ce-a Student Center on the campus
Jn .ers j T diets are $35 per coup e 2Z for
$'3 for ECl students and youtti Oft :e hours a-e ?
6:C0 p.rr Monday through Fr day. The phone numl
T5T-4T88 or toil free 1-80C-ECARTS.
; te your ace m tfi s. the r jht spai
spec a someone to join you for a romart : eve :
pa ng at the va ent ie s Da -azz Cabaret tfi
The
East
Carolinian
U 've didn't print it
who would?
Qrculating 12,000
newspapers twice a week





January 23, 1992 Tbc taut (Tarolillian 3
HHHHHHHHHBHi
Iff MEANS
PRfCESf
-

f
-
INS
3F
rOES
SfV
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inter All Natural
Ice Cream
rv1.

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i
I
Ax
2"
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2"
Diet Pepsi Or
Pepsi Cola
IRAL
ICED HAM
IASTA SOFT
INKS
INE
OLERS
Ltr.
January 28, 1992
Fire
King
Continued from paqe 1
the place c iobesski was not
homea! the time
It was unbelievable Carroll
! ire ami smoke was pouring,
no shooting 10 toot or more out ot
' loot 1 just stood in ihe
-� reaming at the fire indisbe
rhe auseol the fire was listed
lusivedue to the total de
� the room where the fire
led
rv was so fierce one neigh
� thought the house was
Vs the inferno raged,
� i tures in the house soared to
� degrees, destroying cv
trv threeowned
A 140 gallons o! aquari
� iX in stereo equip
� i kthes, turnihm-
Center
everything Barkit, an urban plan
ning major said: "Everything I am
woai ing now is either borrowed or
a gift We all got out with ust our
boxers on, basically
V cording to the three, the
bright st ot the whole morning
w as w hen around 8 a m. when I )r
AI Matthews, vice chancellor tor
Student Life arrived
In the midst ot the destruc
tion, there was this ray ot light
c an oil said "It was pretty ob ious
that Matthews had nist rolled out ot
Ivd and come right overte gave
us so much help and support. I
didn't expect that from the Univer
sit I malls,E( I wasgri ingsome
thing ba d
Continued from page 1
Prize. tilled tlu' auditorium with
love and the inspiration to at hieve.
Iho Rev Sidney Locks, pastor of
( omerstone Baptist( hurch,gavea
sermon after 1C Is (iospel Choir
,n. Iistnot Union Wl Mass (hoir
ot 1 armville performed. A presen-
tation it awards followed.
Mmthor Reginald Gibbs, mas-
ter of ceremi ny, when introducing
the choirs said slaves usJ, "Songs
tt hope and rHH.l will to sproad
glad tiding tearing down ethnic
walls . slaves usil musk to relay
messages knowing one day they
would be free"
1 he E 1 iospel (. hoir and tin-
I istrH t I nion 1C hoir had peoj le
i lapping and darn ing to the beat of
the musi Ihe i hoir master of
I armville said to the I In ir mem
bersandtheaudieni e, "Sing it while
vou feel it
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin
introduced links and said, "Rev
lxvks is an important part of our
community
Locks began his sermon by gel
tjngtheaudieni etoshout with him,
"1 am Somebody! I am Hl.u k, I
am Red, I am Brow n, 1 am V lute, I
dm . . Somebody
links said hate is on tin- rise
tin).iv and that we need to solve the
problem and reconstruct America
"1 late ison the rise today. What
are they called Skinheads, the
KKK If you're a hater you're part
of the pnHem to la) Loi ks said
"(ur minds must V built up We
i h tirman of tin" IV
�t Pharmacology vs 111
� rof the enter
iwillbe
is, pmfessorand
�i of the Depart
� v ill build y a
ihol Stud (In
iallvf
u ludi
Countv Mental HealtM enter,Pitt
Counts- Memorial Hospital and
the Walter H ones Alcoholic Re-
v enter
lew people realize that alco
hi! and drug abuse is one ol the
most hcA ilv funded resean h ar
eas the 1Intversity c H or
� in K five grants and
ne to resean h studies
i'ii I � I ndiiime, a
hoi indu( ed h pel tension, etha
, . , . . .
� �
izz Cabarti
-0- t-o,v e ret
� � I . ' 4t at 6:30
i ei: ire foi ' lining and
js : tzz n � � ari
ni " . bass, c
:ssed salad
Cherry c�e
ea witl
ftee
� t� es
East Carolina Tae Kwon Do Academy
Grand Opening
(Relocated from Buyers Market on Memorial Dr.)
'Tae 'Xjvon g
r355-3033
I (Across from Belk at Carolina East Mall (on Memorial Dr.)
IN CONCERT
J3
J3

"TRUTH"
America's Premier Christian Group
J3
�. �
nets 1 ' event are now on sale at the Centra "
tudent Centi the can pus of E ast Care
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� t�� Jht spark, invite .
for a romant e er ig of dining aa
� e'sDay Jazz Cabaret this February 14th
The
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Carolinian
J3 Thursday, Jan. 30th At 7:30 P.M.
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J GreenviUe, N.C. JJ
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jt Call 355-3500 For Ticket Info fl
J5 Sponsored by GRACE J
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J of ECU JJ
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must reconstruct our minds. We
must reconstruct tho protection t
our communitv. The nth an- gof-
ting richer and tho fx��r are getting
poorer
links, involving politics with
his spii h said, "Jesse Holms said
vou vote tor 1 larvey (lantt, but vou
gonna loseyourjob In my opinion
(nintt wouUl have won if economic
times worm t so tough "
Locks said all Americans
should all be grateful tor what they
have and have tho chance to be
come "Amen" and "Praise the
liinf wen'hollend asLcx kss,ikf,
"I amgraterul tot ni 1 am thankful
for what Cod has done for me We
must havea relationship with . �i
1 � s -n i;ot�d to all ot us . you
t not be M.H k, but God's been
gl lOd tO VOU tl Kl "
Loci � led his 10 minute ser
monwithThesea n ireconstrut
tior ti America. It begins with a
dream,a dream with what Amoru
ought ti �be make a positivediffer
ence c )nedav wh�'n wedoil wei an
say, Tree at last! Free at last' Thank
( nl almighty, we are free at last
I"he last remarks were givei
bv Adrian E. Bamhill, Program
C hairman, and Alpha I'hi Alpha's
Vice-President
"The program has nade r.rtii
stndos this year .hnly halt these
people won- here two years ago
After the ceremony, Charm !
lor Ku hard Eakin said, "This was
an uplifting experieni e
)) U a
Thursday
Student
Budget Night
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On The Fringe
�be Saat Carolinian Democrats require ciinton for"
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 192 S Vll IVW1CJL kD X. w VI M' � "
Sening the East Carolina campus community
Tim C. HA.virioN, General Managet
Mai ihivv D. Jonks, Managing Erfifoi
Grkc.OIO E. JONES, Director of Advertising
NNlFUt VVardkh N�ws ErftftH
Jl i if Roscot, Ass. News Editor
LEWIS COBLE, Entertainment Editor
Dana DANIELSON, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Marvin, Sports Editor
MaRGI MORIN, AsSt. Sport Editor
Jkff Bfckfr, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Richard Hash rig, Staff Illustrator
Michafl Albuquerque, Business Manage
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Chantal WEEDMAN, Layout Manager
Jean Caraway, Classified Advertising Technician
Stephen Schai bach, Systems Engineer
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Margie O'Shea, Advertising Technician
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information thai affects ECl
students. The East Carolinian publishes 1 2.IXX) copies even' Tuesday anil Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
is the opinion o( the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should be
limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, I he Easti 'arolmian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECL. Greenville, N.C
27858-H5L For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Thursday, January 23, 1992
J
University needs equal salaries
Much concern has risen in recent weeks
over the issue of salaries for our campus
instructors. Certain employees and former
employees of our University have voiced
their feelings of mistreatment surrounding
their wages.
Cathy Wickern,of the communications
department, filed a discrimination com-
plaint with the University last month after
she learned that some of her "less qualified"
office workers received more pay than her-
self. The complaint did not pan out.
per earlier this week in which she related
her own story of unfair pay.
Hopkins noted that because salaries
are decided partly upon evaluations oi stu-
dents, the method is not fair. It makes sense
that a student that did not do well in a class
would give the instructor a poor evaluation,
regardless of the job performed.
She also pointed out her hiring salary
was significantly lower than those instruc-
tors hired a year later.
In short, the practices used to base the
The University's employment officer salaries at this Univeristy are lacking in
looked into the complaint and admitted logic. The University should not rely (or at
that some equally qualified males in the least not rely heavily) upon student evalua-
department do receive higher salaries. How- tions when making decisions about who
ever, one woman in the department re- gets paid what.
ceives higher wages than Wickern, and one The University should not allow people
man is paid less. with comparable qualifications and abili-
Thus the University found no evidence ties to receive unequal salaries,
for discrimination. If the University can not attribute the
A former employee of the University, difference in Wickern's salary to discrimi-
By Tint E. Hampton
Editorial Columnist
Kwrv tour ywrs New Hamp-
shire becomes the impetus lor the
Greet Political Carnival coming to a
town near you. Hopefully, in 1992,
the first state primary will yield the
success of a tall resolute Arkinsasuin
and a hard-tore journalist named
Buchanan.
Ik-tore readers write this col-
umn off as another pansy neo-liberal
spake ot trite rhetoric, please have
patience as we attempt to promul-
gate the necessity for a power-shitt in
thiscountryisof thee. In short,George
Bush is a whining-momma's boy-
sissv who will not be able to weather
the premonitory winds of change
In the past, American presi-
dents have emanated some heart-
chortling words. "Yesterday, Decem-
ber 7, 1941, a dav that will live in
infamv said that great Delano guy
"Ask not what your country
can do for you, ask what you can do
tor vour country the topic of a new
Oliver Stone movie which argues that
JFK did not write these words alone
And of course. Tricky Mil house
said "Let me make this perfectly
clear, I am not a crook or a wiretap-
per"
With these eloquent and
memorable utterances as the back
drop, here is a paraphrase from a
Bosnian speech last week "1 wish
thosecarping liberal, smart-aleck col-
umnists would get ott ot my you
know what IfCeorgie had one sinew
of withal, he would just say "get off
of my butt" or maybe "get off of my
gluteus maximus" or "get off of my
nice Texas hinny
Also a real President does not
whine. For all the senility references
made to Ronald Wilson Reagan, the
Great Communicator never whined.
Even Millard Fillmore, whose sole
contribution was inventing the Ho
Ho, never complained when histori-
ans summarized hi
in 20 words or less
s administration
AH pukeagejokesasidc, George
1 lerbert isnothing but a non-lip-read
ing cry babv who must retr.u t every-
thing he�versaidO.K. I was wrong
about the economy, so sue me. is
another paraphrase from last week's
initiation of the great 11-month Po-
litical Carnival coming to a town near
you. Many were disheartened by the
President's admittance of economic
tumult and by the realization that
now isn't the perfect time to buy a
house, a car or a case of Shaeffer
So Republicans must back
Patrick Buchanan of "Cross-Fire"
fame OK, the last Buchanan in the
White House � James Buchanan �
was a wifeless weirdo, but please do
not prejudge the name. Pat is a little
abrasive. Pat is also a little too swept
under a paranoid shroud of isola-
tionism and anti-Hispanic immigra-
tional racism, but not on the lines ot
David Duke.
But at least Pat has a stance and
a conviction that is unwavering. And
even though few will admit it, Ameri-
cans like that quality of unwaverage
in politicians. The fact is � whether
one agrees with Pat or no � there is
no question where he stands
Mot many Capital Hill
stompers can align themselves in the
same staunch category Maybe Jesse
Helms (E's favorite vignette) and
Strom Thurmond (of "ludgeThomas,
you ain't no intidel is ya?" fame)
could be considered unswerving. But
then again, their staffers must ad-
minister anti-senility dosages to as-
sure the southern gentlemen will re-
member their platforms.
Turning to the ever-so berated
Democratic party, there is not much
question. Paul Tsongas � out be-
cause most voters can not pronounce
his name. Sen. Bob Kerrey � out
because, when debating, he sounds
as if he just hit Happy Hour. Brown
that lerrv guy
tame - out because I
M rote a song at" i ll
Which by virtui
leaves Arkansas C
that's right Iheonh cai I
thy ot WHOLE HEART! i
Why7 All thi
Tsongas singing al
lerrv while Kerrev buys at
round - are ganging
c hnton This is not ai
reader's compassion
points to the fact that whet
views are the focal point � .
between live, then the outca it n
have a legitimate stand (r hy ,
would the other tour becomi .
huffy?
Clinton calls tor a mi I I
tax cut lo take some of the hi it �� �
middle class parents who an �
to send their kids througi
take some ot the heat oft ro i i I
legegraduates who have not n i �
the marred Yuppiedom
Clinton � with h:s app
subtle southern accent I
cizes the recent $23,IN ngn
pay raise Savs it Senators ���
have two homes - one in
Chase, Md. and one in Raleigl
then tough Believes public m n
just that � public sen . i
Clinton also may be a tr .
cation President. His edu
plans worked in Arkansas Let
him a try
Final note on the contemptu-
ous rollercoaster of polit
soundbvtes and incessant rebuttals
on the putting green: disgruntled
Bush fans please vote for Buchanan
or place a write-in vote for Rush
Limbaugh. As far as Bill Clinton, let's
just predict he will be a shoe-in tor
the Democratic Nomination.
This being the case, Clinton
now has the endorsement of one carp-
ing, over-sensitive, night-ragirg col-
umnist.
Campus Spectrum
Professor supports Fish, free speech
Pamela Hopkins, wrote a column in the
Campus Spectrum section of this newspa-
nation, then the University needs to find
why the difference exists.
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
Because trade with Japan
will be a big campaign issue this
year, it behooves us to examine
some of the common misconcep-
tions and lies about that issue.
The most egregious mislead-
ing claim is that the United States
loses billions ot dollars per year in
trade with Japan. But we don't
"lose" billions of dollars per year.
We have a multi-billion-dollar an-
nual trade deficit, which is differ-
ent A trade deficit is not a loss, nor
is a trade surplus a profit. And, for
several reasons, trade imbalances
arc a virtual certainty.
That may require some ex-
planation. First, observe that the
United States does not trade with
Japan. The United States is a politi-
cal entity, not a business, and it
does not engage in business deal-
ings (apart from the occasional il-
legal arms-for-hostages deal, that
is). Same with japan.
So when we talk about the
United States trading with Japan,
we are really talking about a col-
lection of generally unrelated trans-
actions in which U.S. businesses
sell products tu Japanese consum-
ers, and Japanese businesses sell
products to Americans.
At the end of the year, U.S.
businesses will have sold X dol-
lars' worth of goods and services
to the Japanese, and the Japanese
will have sold Y dollars' worth of
goods and services to us. If X is
bigger than Y, then America has a
trade surplus with Japan; if Y is
bigger than X, then America has a
tradedeficit with Japan; if X should
magically happen to equal Y, then
we would have a trade balance
with Japan.
This determination says noth-
ing about profit or loss. In tact, every
single business involved inthecollec-
tionoftransactionsmightturna profit
But if Smith's Carpet Exporters hap-
pened to take a loss, it's probably not
because Miyaawa's Chopstick Co.
turned a profit The same is true tor
companies thai are competing with
each other It IBM loses money while
Japanese computer companies make
money, it's almost certainly not be-
cause American businesses, in aggre-
gate, sold less to Japan than Japanese
businesses, in aggregate, sold to us.
St) why is a trade deficit with
Japan a bad thing? Well, in itself, it
isn't. All else being equal, we should
expect to have a trade deficit with Ja-
pan, if only because there are fewer
Japanese consumers than there are
American consumers If trade were
"perfect" � that is, if every Japanese
consumer bought one of everything
made in America, and every Ameri-
can reciprocated � there would be
more American buyers than Japanese
buyers, so we would still have a trade
deficit with Japan, and so what?
As it happens, there are other
reasons we should expect to run a
trade deficit with lapan and other
countries that are smaller than the
United States. America is a big mar-
ket, oneof the biggest in the world, so
American businesses tend to sell to
other Americans. (If you must have a
number, nearly 90 percent of
America's sales go to Americans.)
They can get rich selling exclusively
to a domestic market.
But a Japanese businessman
who sells only to a domestic market
has a much smaller consumer base. If
he wants to make more money, he's
got to look for bigger markets, and
we're one of thp biggest (if not the
biggest). In short, small countries have
a greater incentive to export than big
countries, precisely because their do-
mestic markets are smaller.
So it trade deficits are no cause
tor alarm, why is there such a fuss
over them1 Most ot the fuss appears to
be generated by politicians, and most
ot them point to Amencancarcompa-
niesas the primary victims ot Japan's
unfairness So let's talk cars.
American car manufacturers
claim that the lap.ineSG are unfair trad-
ing partners; like any good lie, this
one has an element of truth. Tlv Japa-
nese government has imposed some
trade restrictions and tariffsthat ought
to be lifted
While tariff's are a factor, the big
reason thejapanesedon't buy Ameri-
can cars is that, like most Americans,
they think Japanese cars are better.
Worse yet, American car companies
haven't even tried some obvious and
fairly low approachesthat would
undoubtedly boost their overseas
sales. 1 ask you: would American con-
sumers buy Japanese cars if the steer-
ing wheels were on the wrong side
and the cars were painted in colors
they found unattractive? Hell, no,and
no one would fault them for it, either.
Yet American car companies
think it's unfair of the Japanese not to
buy American imports that have the
steering wheels on the wrong side
and are painted in colorsthat the Japa-
nese find unattractive.
Yeah, those Japanese are pretty
unfair, all right.
All in all, I think the criticism of
Japan's trading practices results from
a mixture of political demagoguery
and honest misunderstanding, with
only a tiny pinch of truth. Just remem-
ber, as the cam paign heats up, to sepa-
rate the rhetoric and the mistakes from
the facts
By Dr. Jeffrey Williams
Special to the Last Carolinian
(Editor's note � The following
column concerns Dr. Stanley Fish and
his recent political correctness debate
on campus.
The issue will be discussed at a
forum Monday For more informa-
tion see the related news story.
This column will be run in two
parts, the second of which will be
printed in Tuesday's paper.)
To hark back to last semester and
a letter to the editor in the Dec. 10
issue, I find it a slightly twisted irony
that Dr. Steven Mandelker waves the
banner of free speech and then at-
tempts to say that Stanley Fish should
not have been supported to speak here
on Nov. 21. He imputes that Fish, or
rather "people like Fish wish to "at-
tack the fundamental freedoms of
Americans The odd thing about
Mandelker's letter is that he doesn't
address any of the issues that Fish
raised in his talk here or in his work in
general in making this claim
Evidently, as far as I can tell, he
dravs some of his conclusions from
Fish's title, 'There's no such thing as
free speech, and it'sagood thing too.
Admittedly a provocative title, but if
Mandelker had bothered actually to
attend Fish's entire talk he would have
found out that Fish's point was not
quite so shocking.
If I got it right, Fish's point was
Student voices
anger towards
University
discrimination
To the Editor:
In Jeff Becker's article "Profes-
sor Charges Discrimination" (Jan. 14,
1992), we learned that discrimination
is still alive and well even here at
ECU. I read the article with interest,
concern and disbelief. So call me na-
ive, but 1 gave the state of North
Carolina and this university far more
credit than they have earned.
Mr. Becker obviously did quite
a bit of digging in order to come up
with the numbers he presented. This
is not to imply that these numbers
aren't accurate, but what about the
rest of the story?
Obviously there is discrimina-
tion in the way male and female fac-
ulty are compensated. Mary Ann
Rose, the chancellor's assistant and
director of Equal Employment Op-
portunity may hesitate to say that it's
across the board discrimination, but
that speech is always constrained by
the community one is located in and
by the protocols of that community.
Thus, it is never absolutely "free' and
in fact that word has very little mean-
ing. Arguable perhaps, but not Un-
American, as Mandelker dubiously
imputes. A slightly different way to
put this is if Mandelker says he ad-
heres to the ideal of free speech but
denies funding for Fish's talk (the
normal and accepted practice to set
up such a talk), he is denying Fish the
normal channel to practice his right of
speech and thus his purported ideal
isn't worth very much.
Fish's argument was in keeping
with his generally pragmatic position
� a position that is very much de-
bated � that claims that principles (in
law as well as in philosophy or in
theory) don't really govern practice.
Instead, they are only projections de-
rived from practice (law is what a
judge does, not what legal principles
apply; by the same token, in literary
criticism, criticism is what a critic docs,
and is not governed by what theory he
is using i Now, as a professor of liter-
ary theory, 1 have some serious objec
tions to this position, and I think with-
out too much presumptuvn tha-
Mandelker would as well, but only b
reading Fish, by hearing him, by care-
fully sorting through his arguments
win we justly and reasonably maki
those objections.
Mandelker makes no effort to do
this. So Mandelker is irresponsible to
imply that Fish, or, as he vaguelv puts
it, "people like Fish wish "to attack
the fundamental freedoms of
Americans.
How does Mandelker then pro-
ceed?
He goes on to make vast generali-
zations about Fish's "method of op-
eration" � again, without citing
Fish and I suspect without ever hav-
ing read a word of his work � (a
method which) has been widely re-
ported by newspapers such as the
New York Times" and so on
Let's take a look at this. As the
venerable Richard McKeon was wont
to thunder at students, "What is the
evidence?" "Widely reported?" Isn't
this kind of vague and insubstantial?
Would Mandelker accept such a
phrase in an argument submitted to
him for a class paper1 What a student
has heard to be "widely reported"
about Kant? And while the 'Times is
a respectable paper, this does not teen
a very scholarly way to proceed, to
depend entirely on newspapers for
such charges
As w, - � sometime
arernisrepresci ted
in the news In the wis.
the media stories wen nac irati I
Mandelker obvioush was i
of this, but perhaps I i
investigated furtru r before n
potentially libellous . harg -
Fish by intoning phrases lik�
deceit
(Continued fanuan
Letters to the Editor
whatdootherfaculty members, male
and female, have to say on this is-
sue? Why did men average S6,787
more in earnings than women in
1990? Can someone explain why at
the level of lecturer men averaged
over $2,000 more than women? Why
the lack of consistency?
I've had male and female pro-
fessors, associate professors and lec-
turers for a variety of courses here at
East Carolina. The fact that some
were male and some were female
had nothing to do with their ability
to teach.
Rose's statement that some
people can just negotiate better than
others seems to be a poor attempt at
rationalization. If it does boil down
to negotiation, are we to believe that
the two newly hired male lecturers
just happened to negotiate identical
contracts? Rose seems not to be
searching for discrimination even as
it is handed to her. She should stop
making excuses and tighten her fo-
cus on the discrepancy in male and
female salaries. Or is it an adminis-
trative thing that the rest of us just
wouldn't understand?
What happened to fairness? I
know Cathy Wickern. I know she
plays bv the rules. I also know she is
one of best teacher m the i partmenJ
of communication. She is ai bservi t
of the contemporary scene fl 'l ;
of communication. Such a I
turer" should not have to tok ra
inequality. No one should
I find it amusing that the univer-
sity hands over monev at the drop
hat when it comes to illegal w��rcta�
ping, but equal pay for equal wart
seems to get the reply "some things '
life we must endure I'm sure this is
not a conspiracy to discriminate, how-
ever this doesn't make it any less r
As for why I care, consider this It
vou sit on the sidelines, vou rob your-
self. Youdon't profit by doing the obvi-
ous.
Being a student at ECU gives me
permission to be angrv Being a citucn
of this state gives me the right to expect
better. Being an American means I have
a duty to work to change things now so
that the next generation has it better
than the current one. I am hopeful that
justice, like cream, shall always rise to
the top. Bravo Cathy Wickern.
Steve OGeary
Senior
Communication
Entertainment
Urban
Dance
displays
cultural
fusion
By Pamela Oliver
Staff Writer
In 1990, Americans felt the im-
pact of the legendary alliance of
Anthrax and I'ublic Enemy. 1 low-
ever, even before this new wave of
entertainment swept over America,
another band across the world was
tumingouttherevolutionaiy lunj
in early 1987.
The band is Urban Dance
Squad, who for years has been
breaking the hi triers bet ween many
different types of music. Audiera es
flock to hear their fusion of rock,
rap, metal, soul and funk.
According to Arista records.
Urban Dance Squad was originally
a temporary side project for mem-
bers D.J.D.N. A Kudeby,Si,Tres
Manos and Magic Stick. In
each had left his own band k r what
they thought was a one-time gig in
Amsterdam. However, that per-
formance unexpectedly attracted
heavy media and large numbers of
record company executives. Only
after all the attention they gener-
ated with their first gig did the mu-
sicians realize what they had
stumbled onto and decide to stay
together.
The next obvious step was to
record an album. Consequently, a
mere two years later, their debut.
Mental Floss for the Gbbe, was bom.
It received rave reviews from the
public and the media.
Spin magazine described Ur-
ban IDance Squad's sound as "men-
acing, urgent, angry and powerful
the most now music since rap's

Spin magazine I
urgent, angry and p
explosion
Since then, I j
workingdiligcntl) I
which has final! �
rspecti 1
produces th ;
of styles but isevt

Sure, Urban D
style is a a over
ent types oi musi
Rudehoy explau 1
crossover as it appeJ
is "anv individual v,
haw a backpack ot i
with a lot of dittej
thought. Everything
is from the heart
sense This is the I
wishes to convey
simply a cross rver i 1
but of the different
an individual's pen
The members q
txind bring diftervr
to the gmup, alo dif
as well. D.I.D� A
I SKIPPER BILL1
m Seafood Restaurant
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On The Fringe
mt ftwt (Earo! intan Democrats require ciimon for -92
1 ii C H iru, ��,tl Marw��� �
Mai iihw I). Jois, vhmainfl fil
Gregory E. Jones, Director ofAdverti
Rk hard H M
i win i Wardrep, V;S '
i 1 u Roscoe, Assl News Editoi
I i vis Com 1. I ntertainmenl I ditoi
DanaDanielson, ssi Entertuit I . �
Mu 11 m 1 Martin, Sp rts I lit
Margi Morin, ssl Sports Edit �
Fl Hi 1 ki r, Copy ditor
Bl air Skinni R, tVj'v Editoi
Pt BORAH DaNII
Kl'
. itrator
siness Manage
Manager
1
Mil HAI 1 Al Bl Qt 1 RQI I ;
LarR Hi i.(.is ,� ilatt �
CHANTA1 VVl DM IN, Lay
Ij an; CARAWAY, Classified .i ertising Technician
STEPHEN Si HAI BA H, Systems I ngineei
CHRIS NoRMAN, Darkroom Technician
MARCH CSHEA, Advertising Technician
, Secretary
The East Ca,
students Tfu
is the opinio
dto25
. Union has served the l.isi.1
East.ir 'Itntan publishes 2
Fthe Ed orial Board Tht I
.ommuiniv since 1925,emphasizii
�r 1 uesday and Htursdaj 11 e n
welcomes letters expressing .ill pi
mation ih.n affects lCl
head editorial in eac h edition
us ol v ie� 1 etters should lv
de ere v and bre ity. The Easti 'arolinianrc ervi the right to edit or reject letters
? should he addressed to F"he 1 ditor, The Easti arolinian, Public ations Bldg . E 1 . Greenville, N.C
r more information, s all (919) '57-6166
By rim r. Hampton
I dHorial l ohimni!
I 1 rv four v ears New f lamp
n � � � .will's the impetus foi th
(.riit Politicalarnival coming to .1
ton n near you 1 fopefull), in 1992
� I . � � � � tti primary will yield th
success of a tall resolute Arkansasian
and ,1 hard-core journalist named
Buchanan
Before readers write this col-
umn off as another pansy neo-liberal
spake ot trite rhetoric, please have
patience .is we attempt to promul-
gate the necessity tor .1 power-shift in
thiscountry isof thee. In short, George
Bush if
unin�rrumma s
b
1
rpos
Opinion
Pagi 4, Thursday, January 23, 1992
University needs equal salaries
Much concern has risen in recent weeks
over the issue of salaries tor our campus
instructors. Certain employees and former
employees oi our University have voiced
their feelings of mistreatment surrounding
their wages
Cathy VVickern,ol thecommunications
department, filed a discrimination com-
plaint with the University last month after
she learned that some of her "less qualified"
per earlier this week in which she related
her own story of unfair pas-
Hopkins noted that because salaries
are dec ided partly upon evaluations ol stu-
dents, the method is not fair It makes sense
that a student that did not do well in .1 class
would give the ins t rut lor 1 poor evaluation,
regardless of the job performed.
She also pointed out her hiring salary
sissy who will not be able to we.it her
� premonitory winds of change
In the past, American presi-
dents have emanated some heart-
chortling words 1 estcrday, Deo n
�;i. .1 day th.it will live in
famy said thai great DeJanoguy
'Ask not wh.it your country
11 do tor you, ask what vou win do
for your country the topic ol a nevi
OliverSt nen �vi I h arguestl it
II K. did not write these words alone
nd of course, i"ri kyMilhouse
said Let me make this perfectly
clear 1 am not .1 crook or .1 wiretap-
With these eloquent and
memorable uttei mces .is the ti. �
Iroi hen 1 paraphrase fi 1
mart-alec I
vo
those 1 !�: � � ' � � �
ists would �
know what IfGi n nc ���
of withal, he would just s.iv "gel off
of mv butt" or m.ivhr "gel off of my
fllutous maximus" or "get off of my
nice Texas hinny "
Also a real President does not
whine. For all the st-nihtv references
made to Ronald Wilson Keagan, the
Great Communicator never whined
Even Mi Hard Fillmore, whose sole
contribution was inventing the Ho
was significantly lower than those instruc-
office workers received more pay than her- tors hired a year later.
self The complaint did not pan out. In short, the practices used to base the
The University's employment officer salaries at this L'niveristv are lacking in
looked into the complaint and admitted logic. The University should not rely (or at "�� "�� complained when h.ston
that some equally qualified males in the least not rely heavily) upon student evalua-
departmentdoreceivehighersalaries.How- tions when making decisions about who
ever, one woman in the department re- gets paid what.
ceives higher wages than Wickern, and one The University should not allow people
man is paid less. With comparable qualifications and abili-
ties to receive unequal salaries.
If the University can not attribute the
difference in VVickern's salary to discrimi-
nation, then the University needs to find
why the difference exists.
immanzed : '�
; words or ess
1 �� � :
I krl ertisnotl
. -v baby wl mustreti �� ' �
thingheeversaid O.K.Iwa ����
al out the ei oro n � w �� '
� erparaphra 1 fi 1 ' ���
� �: ition ol the j n l
liticaK arnival coming to a towi 1
you Many were disheartened byth
President's .idimtt.in. I I �
tumult and by the real zation
now isn't the perfect time 1 1 b �� �
house, .1 car or .1 case of SI � "� 1
s Republicans must baei
Patrick Buchanan of " ross-Fire"
fame O.K the last Buchanan in the
hite House lames Buchanan
was .1 wifeless weirdo, but pleas. :
not prejudge the name Pal is � i'1
abrasive Pat is alsoa little too ����� pi
under ,1 paranoid shroud ol
tionism and anti-Hispanic imn
tion.il r.n ism but not on the n
David Duke
But at least Pat hasa stanceand
1 com tioi �� it inwaverii .� "��� �
even though fewwilladmit it. Ameri-
cans like that �� lality ol u ��� iveragi
in politicians, rhefactis whether
one agrees with Pat or no there is
tuestion where he stands
Not many Capital Hill
stompersc an align themselves in the
iamc staum I iti gory Mayl 1 l �
(lelms (E's fav orite vign tt ind
Strom I hurmond (of' fudge rhon 1
you ain't no inl ya ' fan 1
. 1 � : i . i i leredui wen g-Bui
then again, their staffers must ad-
minister anti-senility dosages to as-
sure the southern gentlemen will re-
member their platforms.
Turning to the ever-so berated
Democratic party, there is not much
question Paul Tsongas � out be-
cause most voters can not pronounce
his name. Sen. Bob Kerrey out
because, when debating, he sounds
as it he just hit Happy Hour. Brown
1

� . WHOLE HI
. � 1 Kei
ind � �

'
. ; � � ther I
1
� -
� '
endl

legi . �
� � . � � :
pay i ' � �
hav 1 � ���
Chas
then � . �
t that �
Clintoi
ition Pi
� -
Final note on the ntei
ous roller oaster � :
soundbytes and incessant n I
on the putting gre. -
Bush tans please vote for
or place a write-in �� � - -
Lirnbaugh. AsfarasBil 1 �
just pnifM he will be a shoe r I -
the Democratic Nominal 1
This being the i' I
now has the endorse mentofoi
ing. over-sensitive night rag 1 .
umnist
Campus Spectrum
Thus the University found no evidence
for discrimination.
A former employee of the University,
Pamela Hopkins, wrote a column in the
Campus Spectrum section of this newspa-
Professor supports Fish, free speech
bLfl; KlTH T� 5
Tne ttAVeS' loo r&te fc
E.ve; Top o WJEJ& 0
TM6 60AK.D
;s�3&
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
By Scott Maxwell
i d iturl.il I olumn is!
Because trade with lapan
be a big can p lign issue this
. 1 � eho .���.�!�"��
.�- e ot the vi mon misconci p
tions and lies about that issue
1 he most egregious mislead-
ng lain is tl it the I nited States
loses billions ol I i
trade with lap 11
I
sini
jlebusi
� ftrai
ars per year in
But we don t
11 � il dollars per year
'� 1 have a mull billion-dollaf an-
nual trade defu it, which is differ-
ent h trade deficit is nota loss, nor
is a trade surplus .i profit And, for
several rea soi tradi m ilan� es
ire 1 virtual certainty
That m.iv require some ex-
planation First, observe that the
United States does not trade with
la pan. The United States is a politi-
cal entity, not a business, ,md it
does not engage m business deal-
ings (apart from the occasional il-
legal arms-tor-hostages deal, that
is) Same with lapan
So when we talk about the
United States trading with lapan,
we are reallv talking about a col-
lection of generally unrelated trans-
actions in which U 8. businesses
sell products to Japanese consum-
ers, and apanise businesses sell
products to Americans
At the end of the year, U.S.
businesses will have sold X dol-
lars' worth of goods and services
to the Japanese, and the Japanese
will nave sold Y dollars' worth of
goods and services to us If X is
bigger than Y, then America has ,1
trade surplus with lapan, if Y is
bigger than X, then America has a
tradedeficit with Japan, if X should
magically happen to equal Y, then
we would have a trade balance
with Japan.
This determination says noth-
ir loss. In la l e t r
� nvolvedin the i ollc
ins n eht turn a profit
; � � : �. � 1 �; rters h Ip
pel to take ! loss l �pr ibabh not
�� M . iwa's Cl ipstic k i o
turned a ptofii rhi an i s tru� foi
, otnp mu � it are ci in p� ting w �
each RM loses miney while
Japanese omputef companies niiik'
mofie). it's � nost certaii I il I i
Cause Amciii i isincs es -i aggre-
gate, sold less to lapan than lapanese
businesses, in aggregate sold to us
Si) why is a trade deficit with
lapan a bad tl I g? Wi II in itself, it
isn't All else being equal, we should
expect to have a trade deficit with la-
pan, if onlv because there are fewer
Japanese consumers than there .ire
American consumers It trade were
"perfect" - that is, it every lapanese
consumer bought one ol everything
made in America, and every Ameri-
can reciprocated there would be
more American buyers than lapanese
buvers, so we would still have a trade
deficit with lapan, and so wh.it1
As it happens, there are other
reasons we should expect to run a
trade deficit with lapan and other
countries that are smaller than the
United States America is a big mar
ket, oneot the biggest m the world, so
American businesses tend to sell to
other Americans (If vou must have a
number, nearly ull percent ol
America's sales go to Americans.)
They can get rich selling exclusively
to a domestic market
But a Japanese businessman
who sells onlv to a domestic market
has a much smaller consumer base. It
he wants to make more money, he's
got to look for bigger markets, and
we're one of thf biggest (if not the
biggest). In short, small countries have
a greater incentive to export than big
countrn - t. -i bet ause their do
: . nerai ed v
�f t hen I � l ��
niesas thi pi in
untairnes- s
Amern in
k laim that thi :
ing partners j)
ii tims onapai
k cars
manufat turers
e arc unfair trad-
ie, this
any good
one has an element ot truth The lapa-
nese government has imposed some
trade res trie tions and tariffs that ought
to be lifted
While ta nils are a factor, the big
reason the apanesedon'i buv Ameri-
i an cars is that, like most Americans,
they think lapanese (irs arc better
Worse vet, American car companies
haven't even tried some obvious and
fairly tow ost approaches that would
undoubtedly boost their overseas
sales I ask you would American con-
sumers bin lapanese cars if the steer-
ing wheels were on the wrong side
and the cars were painted in colors
thev found unattractive? Hell, no;and
no one would fault them tor it, either
Yet American car companies
think it's unfair ot the lapanese not to
buv American imports that have the
Steering wheels on the wrong side
and are painted incolorsthat the lapa
nese find unattr �ctiv
1 eah, those lapanese are prettv
unfair, .ill right
All m all, I think the criticism ot
lapan's trading practices results from
a mixture of political demagoguery
and honest misunderstanding, with
only a tiny pinch of truth Just remem-
ber, asthecampaign heatsup, tosepa-
rate the rhetoric and t he mistakes from
the facts
By Dr. Jeffrey Williams
Special lo the t-�t C arolinian
(Editor's note � The following
column concerns Ir Stanley Fish and
his recent political correctness debate
on campus
The issue will be discussed at a
torum Mondav For more informa-
tion sv the related news story.
This column will be run in two
parts, the second of which will he
printed in Tuesday's paper.)
To hark back to last semester and
a letter to the editor in the Dec. 10
issue, I find it a slightly twisted irony
that Dr Steven Mandelker waves the
banner of tnv speech and then at-
tempts to s,iv that Stanley Fish should
not have been supported to speak here
on Nov. 21. He imputes that Fish, or
rather "people like Fish wish to "at-
tack the fundamental freedoms of
Americans The odd thing about
Mandelker's letter is that he doesn't
address anv ot the issues that Fish
raised in his talk here it in his work in
genera i making tl � clain
1 � � . is far as 1 , an tell, I
draws some of his conclusioi -
freespeech it I l �a good thing too
&dmitt dl) i pi vex ative titli but il
Vlandelkei ithcred act .ills, to
attend 1 ish'scntiretalkhewould have
found out that Fish's point was not
quite so shot king
It I got it right, Fish's point was
Student voices
anger towards
University
discrimination
lo the Fditor
In left Becker's article "Profes-
sor Charges Discrimination" (Jn-14.
1992), we learned that discrimination
is still alive and well even here at
ECU. I read the article with interest,
concern and disbelief So call me na-
ive, but I gave the state ot North
Carolina and this university tar more
credit than they have earned
Mr. Becker obviously did quite
a bit oi digging in order to come up
with the numbers he presented This
is not to imply that these numbers
aren't accurate, but what about the
rest of the story?
Obviously there is discrimina-
tion in the way male and female fac-
ulty arc compensated Mary Ann
Rose, the chancellor's assistant and
director of Hqual Employment Op-
portunity may hesitate to sav that it's
across the board discrimination, but
that speech is always constrained by
the community one is located in and
bv the protocols of that community
Thus, it is never absolutely "free' and
in fact that word has very little mean-
ing. Arguable perhaps, but not Un-
American, as Mandelker dubiously
imputes. A slightly ditterent wav to
put this is if Mandelker says he ad-
heres to the ideal of free speech but
denies funding tor Fish's talk (the
normal and accepted practice to set
up such a talk, he is denying Fish the
normal channel to practice his right of
spevth and thus his purported ideal
isn't worth very much
Fish's argument was in keeping
with his generally pragmatic position
� a position that is very much de-
bated � that claimsthat principles (in
law as well as in philosophy or in
theory) don't really govern practice.
Instead, they are only projections de-
rived from practice (law is what a
judge does, not what legal principles
apply, by the same token, in literary
criticism, criticism is what a critic does,
and is not governed bv what theory he
ising Now, as ,i profi I u �
ary theory. I have son i
tions ti- this position,and Itl ftkwii
it t m uch presurr pi u �
Mandelker would as wi .
r ading Fish,by hearing I n
� . a sorting through his irguments
i an wc justly and reasoi ibl n il
those objections
Mandelker makes no effort to do
tl is So Mandelker is irresponsible to
imply that Fish, or, as he vagi . �. its
it, "people like Fish wish I
the fundamental freedoms
Americans
How does Mandelker tht" . n
ceed?
H�' goes on to make vast g
zattons about Fish's met! d
eration" � again, without
Fish and I susptvt witl
ing read a word ot his v - �
method which) has btvn v � - -
portixi bv newspapers su h is thi
New York 1 imes ' ai i ��
Let's take a look at is '�- thi
venerable Richard McKeoi h
to thunder at M .d. �� t is thi
evidence?" Widely reported?"
this kind of vague ai I i
Would Mandelker accept s
phrase in an argumi I I
him for a lass i p� i �'�
has heard to be "v I � " '
about Kant And whili
a respectable paper, th sdoesi i en
a very scholarly wav � . - eed t
depend entirely on : ��� .
such charges
'�

� �
Mai
f this, but pei
� � � . �.
de i
( ntinued lai � ?
Letters to the Editor
what doot her faculty members, male
and female, have to siv on this is-
sue' Why did men average $6,787
more in earnings than women in
1990? .n someone explain whv at
the level ot lecturer men averaged
over $2,000 more than women7 Whv
the lack of consistency7
I've had male and female pro
fessors, associate professors and lec-
turers tor a variety ot courses here at
East Carolina The fact that some
were male and some were female
had nothing to do w ith their ability
to teach.
Rote's statement that some
people can just negotiate better than
others seems to be a pmr attempt at
rationalization It it does boil down
to negotiation, are we to believe that
the two newly hired male lecturers
just happened to negotiate identical
contracts? Rose seems not to be
searching tor discrimination even as
it is handed to her She should stop
making excuses and tighten her fo-
cus on the discrepancy in male and
female salaries. Or is it an adminis-
trative thing that the rest of us just
wouldn't understand?
What happened to fairness? I
know Cathy Wickern I know she
plays by the rules I al
one of best ,v
� �� communicatioi
of the contemporary scei i
oi communication S .
turer should not fiavel I
inecjualitv No one sh
I find it amus �
sity hands over mone) at i
hat when it comes to illeg
ping, but equal ya for eq
seems to get then; .
lite we must endure I'm sun
not a conspiracy to discriminat I
ever this doesn't make it an) � :
Astor whv I care cons di
vou sit on the sidelines you rob yoi
self. You don't profit by doing the
Oils
Being a student al ECl givesrw
permission to be angry Being a cil �
Of this state gives me the right toexpe I
better Ik'ing an American means I K.o
a duty to work to change things no� so
that the next generation has it better
than the current one lam hopeful that
lustice, like cream, shall always rise to
the top Bravo Cathv Wickern
Steve OC.eary
Senior
Communication
Entertainment
.
Urban
Dance
displays
cultural
fusion
Bv Pamela Oliver
j
Stjft V;
In 1991 '����'
pact of the
Anthrax and Pul
ever, even befor
erttertairunci
another
turning! mtt ei
in early I �
The band is -
Squad, wh I -
breaking th - � .
different type
flock to 1 r I f roe I
rap, mel i �
A ' to Arista i
Urban Dane -
a temp-rar.
bers D.J.I N '
Mam is ind Ma
thev I
Amsterdan
formajv �
heavy media ai d large nut
record i
after all the attentior �-
ated with their first - mu-
sicians realize wh � had
stumbled onto and dead I
together
The next obvious
record an album. Conse
mtTe two years later, their debut.
Menial Floss for On I ! � was bom.
It received rave a'views from the
public and the mec:
Spin magazine described Ur-
ban Dance Squad s sound as "men-
acing, urgent, angry and pov.
the ithm now music since i
t
sim;

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i 758-8550
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The East Carotin
The only newspaper on campi
that doesn't cost a dime.





Clinton for '92
k'sK�"
as
re-
.�� be
rt
sounds
Brown
� ' " 8 Btendw
� 1 inda Ronttadi
v v ' ii deduction
Bill Clinton
eonl candidate vor-
VVHM 1Hl Kll Dsupport
� other Democrats i ' u Blenders to
� � re) bu) s another on Bill � ippeal to the on but march fact that when one's � it o( ,� dobau Ihe outcast must � �� Or why else i Foui be ome so for.) middle class leot the neat offof r nts (h are trying oughcollege To i t of 1 recent coj-t enot reached � his appealing r�l also v ritt-
i congressional
pay�SaiSenators wish to
one in Chevy
:� Raleigh �
i i s public service is
i service
��� n bea trueEdu-
His educational
v - vs,is i s give
Rna! note on the contomptu-aster of political
51tes ai�A incessant rebuttals
� puttin green disgruntled
BusIim- vote tor Buchanan
)� aw. in vote tor Rush
�s�,ir.is Bill Clinton,let's
r .� will be a shoo-in tor
. i men. mination.
'txng the case, Clinton
nowKasthdorsementofone carp-
!C i' u ns- night-raging col-
umnivt
ish, free speech
instrained by
csted �
comn
� �� K and
mean-
i s hi
sition
mih de-
ncir
isVhat a
ra;Fr�-�ciples
n.inerary
lcrii ?cs,
rt th11r he
that Fish or, as he vaguely putt
� peo I � ; sh wish "to attack
the fundamental freedoms of
Americans
How does Mandelker then pro-
ceed?
He goes on to ma k vastgenenaY-
ibout I ish s method of op-
era: again, without citing
ish .i i suspect without ever hav-
ing read � wi rd oi his work � (a
method whichi has Kvn widely re-
ported by newspapers such as the
New York Tina s"ai I so on.
1 et s take a look at this. As the
vere � McKeon was wont
- �� � .At s What is the
evidence?" "Widely reported?" Isn't
this kind of vague and insubstantial?
Would Mandelker accept such a
ment submitted to
himfora tssj per? What a student
has hi ird t tx "widely reportad"
about Kant? And while the 'Times" is
respectable pa per, this doaa not �����
a very m h itaity way to proceed, to
depend em �� . on newspapers for
harges
� ��� srept "ted
� � fStanley I ish,
� curata Dr
� rol not a tvara
ild have
Fish'
he Editor
ibers, male
i this s
women in
ia:n why at
avert
bmen' Whv
Ifemalepro-
Brsandlec-
prseshaeat
that some
Sere female
their ability
that some
! better than
r attempt at
boil down
believethat
le lecturers
te identical
not to be
tionevenas
should stop
iten her fo-
fr male and
in adminis-
5t Of US )USt
fairness? I
know she
lays by the n
aKo know she is
the department
imunication She is an observer
' " ntemporary scene in the held
in cal . " a fine "lec-
irer ihoukl not hae to tolerate such
�� No one should
1 -md it amusmmhat the univer-
� � Is over money at the drop of a
i' when it comes to illegal wiretap-
ping, but equal pav for equal work
seerr j to get the replv "some things in
life we must endure " I'm sure this is
not a conspiracy to discriminate how-
ever this doesn't make it any less real.
As for why I care, consider this: If
you sit cm the sidelines, you rob your-
self You don't profit by doing theobvi-
ous
Being a student at ECU gives me
permission to be angrv. Being a citizen
of this state gives me the right to expect
better Being an American means I have
a duty to work to change things now so
that the next generation has it better
than the current one. I am hopeful that
justice, like cream, shall always rise to
the top Bravo Cathy Wickem.
Steve CrGeary
Senior
Communication
Entertainment
�1te �a0t (Uarultntnn
January 23, 1992
d
Urban
Dance
displays
cultural
fusion
By Pamela Oliver
Staff Writer
In 1990, Americans felt the im-
ptd of the legendary alliance of
Anthrax and Public Enemy. How-
es or, even before this new wave of
en tert.t inmen t swept over America,
another band across the world was
turningout the revolutionary sound
tn early 1987.
The band is Urban Dance
Squad, who for years has been
breaking the barriers between many
different typesofmusic. Audiences
Bock to hear their fusion of rock,
rap, metal, soul and funk.
According to Arista avords,
Urban Dance Squad was originally
a temporary side project for mem-
bers D.J.D.N. A Rudeboy, Sil, Tres
Manos and Magic Stick. In 1987,
each had left his own band for what
they thought was a one-time gig in
Amsterdam. However, that per-
formance unexpectedly attracted
heavy media and large numbers of
rocord company executives. Only
after all the attention they gener-
ated with their first gig did the mu-
sicians realize what they had
stumbled onto and decide to stay
together.
The next obvious step was to
record an album. Consequently, a
mere two years later, their debut.
Mental Floss for the Gbbe, was bom.
It received rave reviews from the
public and the media.
Spin magazine described Ur-
ban Dance Squad's sound as "men-
acing, urgent, angry and powerful
the most now music since rap's
Pawlack to perform at ECU
By Dana Danielson
Assistant Entertainment Editor
Lisa Pawlak, said by Pacific
magazine fo have the voice of a
sultry angel, will perform at turned to the guitar at age 10 for a
Mendenhcll Student Center Under- more melodic instrument
trie guitar by the engineer, Joel
Patrick
Pawlack said she was a music
fanatic as a child. She toyed with
playing the violin and drums, but
ground )en. 28.
Pawlack isn't afraid to label her
current musical tendencies as "soft
rxk according to Pacific Maga-
; ir.e.
Keep it Simple, released last
March under her own Rex Records
label, is Pawlack's latest album.
"Basically the way 1 learned
was to take a songbook and � you
know those little chord charts?
Thaf s how I learned she said.
Pawlack began writing songs
after falling in love, then falling out
again.
"The music and the feeling that
time off from college to sober up at
a halfway house. As a result, she
puts all her energy into music
"When I drank, I didn't do
music she said.
"1 write songs about bulemics,
because I was a bulemic. I write
songs in certain ways about alco-
holism, thedisease, dis-ease. They're
all coming from that kind of back-
ground because singing and sobri-
ety are the same for me
Pawlak, with her spunky hair-
do and Nautilus body (from which
the name Hex Records is derived),
Tveputoutothertapesbefore, comes through is what I'm attracted has been paralleled to female bal-
Pholo courtesy Arista Records
Spin magazine describes Urban Dance Squad's sound as "menacing,
urgent, angry and powerful the most now music since rap's explosion
are from Holland, Rudeboy and Sil
originated from Surinam, and Tres
Manos is from Indonesia.
Urban Dance Squad has come
but not like this � spending a lot of
money on a graphic artist so it will
look good she said.
"Originally the tape was going
to be solo, but it's ended up being
me plus harmonies plus a little elec-
to in a song she said.
"People think I'm writing about
love � it's more a spiritual thing;
it's that hole inside me. If s more a
soul-searching kind of thing
At the age of 21, Pawlak took
ladeers such as Suzanne Vega and
Tracy Chapman. She also admires
Bonnie Raitt.
Tuesday's concert at
Mendenhall should prove to be a
musical experience to remember.
Father of the Bride not cerebral food
explosion
Since then, the Kind has been
workingdiligently on its next album
which has finally arrived. Life 'N
Persptxtkvs Of A Genuine CflMMWr
produces the sa me conglomeration
of styles but is even more powerful
than its debut.
Sure, Urban Dance Squad's
style is a crossover of many differ-
ent types of music. However,
Rudeboy explains that a "genuine
crossover as it appears on the title,
is "any individual who happens to
have a backpack of different views
with a lot of different frames of
thought. Everything he or she does
is from the heart not from non-
sense This is the idea the group
wishes to convey on its album; not
simply acrossoverof musical styles
but of the different perspectives of
an individual's personality.
The members of this talented
band bring different personalities
to the group, also different cultures
as well. DJ.D-N.A.and Magic Stick
Staff Writer
cess.
CriticsblastFafierofJu?Brufcas Attempting to join in on the
a sentimental mish-mash of sight wedding plans, he offers to hold the
up with some strange combos. For gagsandoedipalanger;theseinsults reception down at the steak pit It
example, the song "For the Plas-
ters" blends thecalypsosound with
elements of rap creating a truly un-
usual sound.
"Bureaucrat of Haccostreet
the first single off Life 'N Perspec-
tives, includes part of a monophonic
Gregorian chant underneath a
strong hip-hop rhythm.
"Careless" brings together a
slow jam tempo writh a touch of soul
and classic nxrk through the guitar,
reminiscent of Stevie Ray Vaughan.
For the most part, the musi-
cians look into themselves to find
the source of their music. "It just
flows Rudeboy says.
"There ain't no concept or for-
mula within this band Every-
thing comes naturally � from the
heart � and if it ain't perfectJt
ain't no big thing
. ing oaf. Therefore, they try to ease and destroys buns until a timid bag
By Marjone McKinstry him through the ceremonious pro- boyaskshimwhathe'sdoing. Mar-
tin erupts into a maniacal frenzy
about the great hotdog and hotdog
bun scam.
The manager attempts to rea-
son with Martin, but Martincharges
off with the cart insisting he's not
going to pay. One scene later, his
wife (Diane Keaton) bails him out
of jail.
Another amusing part of the
movie is the attempt to be modem.
The movie is almost too "poli tically
are puaMy juvenile. Of course the
movie is sentimental; it's about a
wedding, and try to imaginca Steve
Martin film that does not use sight
gags-
Basically, this movie is great to
sec if one has ever suffered through
a wedding, been in a wedding, or
known someone who has gotten
married. However, the film is not
suggested for anyone who will soon
be paying for a wedding.
Martin's performance is hilari-
ous He reacts with a rage and ab-
surdity when he finds out his
takes him an incredibly long time to
realize this wedding is not going to
be a $1.90 affair. But, his dreams of
the barbecue wedding are barely
titillating compared to his intro-
duction to the wedding coordinator.
The coordinator (played by
Martin Short) is an effeminate for-
eigner who has taken well to correct" regarding the bride. She's
American society, but not too well independent, educated, intelligent,
to the language. athletic and she refuses to have veal
Perhapsthebestscenedefining at her reception dinner because the
the insanity of the wedding process calves are treated badly. The major
occurs in a grocery store. Martin fight between the bride and groom
has just had a showdown with the is over a blender. He presents it to
daughter will soon be leaving the designers who are tearing apart his her as an anniversary gift, and she
nest Physically seeing hisdaughter house, and, in a fury, drives off to accuses him of trying to keep her in
asa 10-year-old,hetellsher, "You're calm down. He finds himself wan- the kitchen and countless other
not getting married, and that's fi- dering down the aisles of a grocery chauvinistic impulses,
nal store, and he becomes incensed FarierqftteBrideisnotcerebral
Everyone in the family treats again. food, but it is not supposed to be. It
himasanignorantbuta well-mean- He grabs a bag of hotdog buns is, however, fun.
SKIPPER BILL'S
Seafood Restaurant
CONGRATVIATES THE PEACH BOWL CHAMPIONS
WE ARE THE NEW GUYS ON THE BLOCK
WITH THE FINEST SEAFOOD & STEAKS
ftZESK? 758-8550 s Est
Conveniently Located Beside Hastings Ford
.Tar Landing Seafood
Rntsnrui .
ALL - U - CAN - EAT
FRIED SHRIMP
$6.95
(DAILY SPECIAL)
II AM 9PMMOSAT
10 AM PM SUNDAY
r

Interested in a
Career
as a Paralegal?
Legal Assistants Program
a A certificate program open to qualified women
who have a baccalaureate degree
a Approved by the American Bar Association
a Intensive summer schedule May - August,
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Our placement service for graduates is without fee to
employer or graduate.
Applications Deadline for the 1992 Summer Program: March I. 1992. For details,
contact: Legal Assistants Program. Continuing Education. Meredith College, 3800
Hillsborough Street. Raleigh. NC 27607-5298 (919) 829-8353.
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USl ll&R BLOCKS RAPID REFUND PROGRAM
It's available whether H&R Block
prepares vour lax return or not.
IT'S FAST!
For more details or to see if you
qualify call H&R Block now.
COMPACT DISCS & TAPES
(No Single Album CD Over $13.98)
IMPORTS
CASSETTES
COMPACT DISCS
SPEWCIAL ORDERS
USED CDS. TAPES & LPS
RARE & HARD TO FIND MUSIC
EXTENSIVE HARD CORE, ALTERNATIVE & REGGAE
r
I
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OCOUPON Expires Jan 31,1992
5th Street between Cubbies & Crandaddy Rosser's
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Buver's MarketMemorial Drive 756-1209
Univcrciiy SquarclOth St. 757-2400
SearsCarolina East Mall 355-9700
Money For Nothing And
Your Flicks For Free.
The East Carolinian
The only aewspaper on campus
that doesn't cost a dime.
From January 27- February 16, East
Coast Music & Video is celebrating
the American Music Award artists. So
we're going to give you $2.00 off their
compact discs and $1.00 off their
cassettes. And during this time, when
you buy a cassette or CD, well give
you a coupon good for a free video
rental when you rent one at the
regular price. Thafs two for one.
That's a free flick. And it's good all
through February. What a bargain
1109 Charles Blvd.
75&4251
Open 7 days a week until 11pm
�,





Classifieds
�lie EaHt Carolinian
January23, 1992
Sports
K)K Kf M
TWIN OAKS: Three bedroom,
2 12 bath, fully-furnished
townhouse. Upperclassman
preferred. Jason 830-5173.
HOUSES FOR RENT: One
block from campus. Five bed-
room, two bath, $800month.
Also, three bedroom, two bath,
$500month. Call 355-3195.
NEED TWO PEOPLE: to share
a four bedroom house. Rent is
$175and 1 futilities. 11 2bath.
12 mile from campus. Can
Ringgold Towers
Now Taking Leases for
1 Bedroom, 2 Bedroom.
& Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
A Beautiful Place to) ivc
� All New
INn'KRSITVAIRTMKVrS
�Neai Majoi Shopping Ccmcn
Across From Highway Patrol Static
Limited Offer $330 a month
Contact I.T. or Tommj Williams
756 78i 511' s
Office open - v S, 12-5 50pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
Clcvi �nd quiet �c br.lrnon ruraobed afattna
e: efgyelTk cl, fr WC1 -irwler. - -iv-w-rv.fcyc
C�bk i V CoJcs �w � � r $340 i I
3�- MOBILE HOME RENTAl S-coypteoi
� c A iraneciandroobUchoineiia v itei ci�nic:i�
iicjl- Brae i'n i on j dob
Contact J.1 mim 'A jams
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
RESEARCH INFORMATI
Largest Library o� Informallon In US.
19 2"3 TOPICS � ALL SUB.BCTS
Qrger Cata.cfl Today with VISA. VC or COD
EE 800-351-0222
11372 3� �vt 70f -0� �-��� C 90C�S
FOK KfL
move in anytime. Call 758-9824.
Ask for Stephanie.
EFFICIENCY AT
RINGGOLD TOWERS: avail-
able for rent immediately. Great
location, close to campus and
downtown. $260 a month. Feb-
ruary rent is free! Fully fur-
nished. CaU 757-3347.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: to share quiet river
view apartment. 12 utilities.
Prefer older student. Call 758-
3311.
ROOM FOR RENT: Tar River
apts. $140, 13 utilities, cable
and phone. Call 752-1854.
TWO MALE ROOMMATES
WANTED: $125 per month
1 4 utilities each. 505 W. 4th St.
Behind Zeta house, next to Phi
Tau. CA11830-5130 or 355-1813.
Move in Feb. 1.
NON-SMOKING FEMALE:
seekingsame toshare three bed-
room, two Kith house. $216
13 utilities. 355-3392.
FEMALE ROOMMATE:
wanted in February. Best loca-
tion in town. 12 block from
campus, 2 blocks from down-
town, supermarket and
laundromat. $225 monthly
inludes everything. 758-6418.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
K)K SAIE
I OK SAL!
I OK SAIL
PERSONALS
Attention AOPT1992 Spring Rush
Jan. 27,28,29
Any girls interested please RSVP by Jan. 23.
Rides will be provided. Please meet at
Mendenhall at 7 p.m.
Call 757-0769
YOU'VE ONLY GOT ONE
WEEK TO LIVE! Do it right!
Spring Break in Jamaica from
only $429 Hotel, air, transfers,
parties! SunSplash Tours 1-800-
426-7710.
SPRING BREAK IS COM-
ING! Travel toJamaica,Cancun
and Florida in luxury at an af-
fordable price! Call Loren for
details at 931-7940. Hurry!
Deadline for deposits - Feb. 7.
A BAHAMAS PARTY
CRUISE: 6 days $279! Panama
City $99, Padre $199, Cancun
$499, Jamaica $399! Jasa 758-
5165, Wayne 757-1369 or 1-800-
638-6786.
FENDER SQUIRE
STRATOCASTER Red with
white pick guard tremelo and
one double coil Gibson
Humbucking pickup $190 neg.
Also Kay Acoustic six string,
black,$125. Please call 752-7490.
Ask for Greg.
FOR SALE: Double bod, mat-
tress, box spring and frame -
$ 100, microwave oven - $45,13'
black and white TV - $20. Call
752-2261 evenings.
WHY CHANCE SPRING
BREAK with a fly-by-night
travel company? Travel with
Student Travel Services, the
north easfs premier tour op-
erator. Travel to Jamaica,
Cancun and Florida in styleand
safety. Call Loren for details at
931-7940.
FOR SALE Queen size book-
case waterbed with semi-flow
ma ttress$150. Dresser and mir-
ror $75, creme colored sofa in
excellent condition $175. Call
756-3332.
IIS THE SEASON TO BE
SKIING For sale: Olin 700 se-
ries -170 cm; Solomon bindings
- 647; Kerma poles; Nordica
boots - size 10. $100 negotiable.
758-6748.
DAYTONA BEACH
FLORIDA: Six days only $69.
CaU 1-800-344-8914.
KING SIZE WATERBED for
sale. $170. Will negotiate. 758-
5978.
ARMSTRONG FLUTE FOR
SALE: Great playing condition.
$125. Call Christen at 931-7853.
PARTY HOUSES: North
Myrtle Beach. Welcome groups
of 4-34 people. Group-leader
discounts. Call Myrtle Beach
Tours 9-4 p.m. 703-250-2125.
FOR SALE: 1989 Kenwood
home speakers. Two way
speaker system, 100W, only
used for one year. $200. CaU Kozak, Dawn Leviner, Andrea
758-7824. Ask for Jeff. Parham and Jennifer Vaughn.
FOR SALE: DP Airgometer TO ALL FRATERNITIES: The
stepper. Six months old. Rarely sisters and pledges of AOPI
used. Electronic monitor with wish you a successful rush!
fan resistance. Best offer. CaU
7584458. AOPI BETA Os: Do you know
the Big I yet?
DONT RISK YOUR SRING
BREAK FUN! Travel with a
company you can trust. Go first
class with Student Travel Ser-
vices! CaU Loren at 931 -7940 for
information. Quick! Deadline
for deposits is Feb. 7!
HELP WANTED
WE BELIEVE: If you care
enough to help others get what
they most want, you can have
everything you want in life. If
vou still believe. Call 355-3789.
CONGRATULATIONS: to
the new pledges of Delta Zeta:
Julie Albergotti, Melissa Bul-
lock, Susan Howell, Amy
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
AOPI BETA Os: The week
you've aU been waiting for is
here Keep up the good work.
The sisterhood is watching!
ALPHA PHI AND SIG TAU:
We aU had one heU of a great
time last Fnday. Thanks for aU
the special help in making the
social a huge success. Your bud-
dies at Sigma Nu.
SIGMA NU AND SIG TAU:
The social last Friday was awe-
some. We definitely started (nit
the newyear with a ban. Uive
the Alpha Phib.
Let the one you love know how much
you care about them by sending them
a Love Lines message for Valentine's
Day onFeb. 13th mTheEast Carolinian.
Come by the office across from the
library for more details.
Deadline is Tuesday,
February 11,1992.
Announcements
1990 BUCCANEER!
; Did you miss it? Some are still
; available at the Buccaneer of-
; fice or the Media Board Office
at any time. Offices are located
on the 2nd floor of Student Pub-
� Ucations Building (across from
; Joyner Library).
I
I
SELF ESTEEM
This six session group explores
the origins of self-esteem and
provides suggestions for en-
hancing your self-image. This
group wUl begin Monday, Jan.
27 from 4-5 p.m. in 329 Wright.
Please call the Counseling Cen-
ter at 757-6661 for registration.
EDUCATION MAIORS
The Department of Speech-Lan-
guage and Auditory Pathology
(SLAP) will be providing the
speech and hearing screening
for aU students eligible for ad-
mission to Upper Division of
Teacher Education on Monday,
Jan. 27; Tuesday, Jan 28; and
Wednesday, Jan. 29. The de-
partment wiU be testing from 5-
6p.m.each day. NO APPOINT-
MENT IS NEEDED (first come
basis). The SLAP Department
is located in Belk Annex on
Charles Street.
COUNSELING CENTER
The Counseling Center wants
to PUMP YOU UP! Attend our
; self esteem workshop and put
j some muscle into celebrating
' yourself. Improved self esteem
� can positively affect relation-
ships, physical health, attitude,
body image and academic per-
formance. Our self esteem
workshop will begin on Mon-
dav, Jan. 27, at 4 p.m. in room
329 Wright. Please call Coun-
seling Center for registration at
757-6661.
EASJ CAROLINA
TENNIS TEAM
Anyone interested in playing
varsity women's tennis in the
spring should contact the ten-
nis office as soon as possible.
7574609.
PHI SIGMA PHI
FELLOWSHIPS
ECU'S Phi Sigma Phi chapter is
accepting appUcation from stu-
dents who wish to be nomi-
nated for competitive scholar-
ships worth up to $7000 a year
for first year graduate or profes-
sional study. Applications are
invited from students who have
a least junior status, who have
applied to enroU as a candidate
for an advanced degree in a
graduate or professional school,
and who have superior aca-
demic records. Application
forms available from Dr. Mary
Glascoff, 105C Memorial Gym.
Scholarship committee mem-
bers are Glascoff, David Sand-
ers (Honors Program), Eugene
Ryan (philosophy) and George
Broussard (music). AppUca-
tions deadline is Feb. 12.
REAL CRISIS
INTERVENTION
We need your experience! Your
achievements in everyday situ-
ations can be useful to others.
Earn that feeling of accomplish-
ment. Real Crisis Center is re-
cruiting volunteer crisis coun-
selors for our telephone hot-
line and walk-in center. We wiU
be offering training classes in
this enriching field beginning
Jan. 27. CaU 758-HELP or come
by 312 E. 10th St.
REAL CRISES
INTERVENTION
Teens! DIAL-A-TEEN is inter-
ested in your valuable time. We
are looking for special teens,
between the ages of 15 and 18,
who would like to volunteer
their invaluable listening skills
to help others in crisis. We are
offering training classes for our
teen hotline beginning Jan. 27.
CaU 758-HELP or come by 312
E. 10th St.
graphics package used in busi-
ness courses.
EAST
CAROLINA FRIENDS
There will be a full membership
meeting of ECF on Thursday,
Jan. 23at 6p.m. in GCB1031.AU
volunteers and prospective
members should attend. Don't
forget to bring $10 for a T-shirt.
If you cannot attend, contact
your director of services imme-
diately. This is a mandatory
meeting.
NON-CREDIT
EXCEL COURSE
The Decision Sciences Depart-
ment wiU offer a non-credit
EXCELcourse at nocost Classes
are 2-4 p.m. Fridays from Jan 24
-Feb. 21. Enrollment is limited;
preference wiU be given to stu-
dents that received transfer
credit for DSCI2223 (Introduc-
tion to Computers). To register
caU 919-757-6893 by Jan. 23.
EXCEL is the spreadsheet and
CHI ALPHA OMEGA
Chi Alpha Omega wiU hold
spring brothers rush Tuesday,
Jan. 21-Thursday Jan. 23, 7-9
p.m. in MendenhaU great room
three. AU interested rushees are
invited. Psalm 133:1.
RUSH ANGEL FLIGHT
Angel Flight is an alternative to
greek life that's fun and excit-
ing. We are a service organiza-
tion that works with the Air
Force ROTC but with no mili-
tary affiliation. Angel Flight is
for those who want to get in-
volved but have not found the
right organization for them.
Rush is Jan. 21-23 at 7 p.m. on
thethird floor of Wright Annex.
Next to Wright Soda Shop.
FRIDAY FITNESS FUNG
"Get Fit" by attending one of
Recreational Services' Friday
Fitness Flings on Jan. 24 from 4-
6 p.m. in Christenbury Gym
108. These special fitness classes
are held free of charge and prizes
wiU be given to participants.
For more information, caU 757-
6387.
WATER POLO
REGISTRATION
MEETING
Recreational Services wiU be
holding a H20 Polo Registra-
tion meeting on Jan. 28 at 5 p.m.
in Biology 103. AU interested
should attend this important
meeting. For more information,
caU 757-6387.
PHI SIGMA PI NATIONAL
HONOR FRATERNITY
Phi Sigma Pi Smoker. If your
G.P. A. is 330 or higher and you
have between 32 and credit
hours, Phi Sigma Pi wants you!
An introductory meeting
(smoker) wiU be held on Mon-
day, Jan 27 at 7 p.m. in GCB
1031. Dress is semi-formal (skirt
and tie), and refreshments wiU
be served afterwards. If you are
unable to attend, please contact
Brenda Smith at 931-9480.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
TheGreenviUe-PittCounty Spe-
cial Olympics wiU be conduct-
ing an athletics (track and field)
coaches training school on Sat-
urday, Feb. 8 from 9 am.4 p.m.
for aU individuals interested in
volunteering to coach track and
field. We are also looking for
volunteer coaches in the follow-
ing sports: swimming, bowl-
ing, gymnastics, roller-skating,
power Liftingand volleyball. No
experience is necessary. For
more information, contact Greg
Epperson at 830-4551.
HOSPITALITY MANAGE-
MENT ASSOCIATION
HMA meeting: Wednesday,
Jan. 29 at 3 p.m Room 237 H ES.
Meeting includes: election for
E-board and T-shirtlogo con-
test. Anvone interested in pin-
ing HMA. Come to the meeting
or caU 931-7399.
ADULT CHILDREN
OF ALCOHOLICS
WORKSHOP
Tuesdays, Jan. 28, Feb. 4 and
Feb. 11,3-5 p.m. at the Counsel-
ing Center. 329 Wright Build-
ing. Learn about how growing
up in a dysfunctional family
affected you then and the im-
pact it plays on your life now.
The workshop may also be help-
ful for people in the close rela-
tionship with an ACOA. The
workshop wiU include infor-
mation about alcoholism, fam-
ily rules and roles and suggest
goals to work on. CaU 757-6661
or stop by 316 Wright for more
information or to register.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The next meeting wiU be on
Jan. 29,5 pm. Officers meet at
4:30. The room will be an-
nounced in the next paper.
Lawrence's d
By Michael Ashley
Staff Writer
ECU diver Matt Lawrence
knows what it means b �
cated He also knews what it I
to be one of the best, and he r
In Saturday's swim n
Duke, he took first pi � the
one-meter dive and thethn-e-r
j dive. It was iust another day at the
; office for Lawreru e
"It means oin to the p �
lervdav, " Lawrence said in r
lenee to being dedicated "Some-
times vou just don't want I
I�you know,quit Bus �. ilookat
your accomplishments in the
'andknowto what vourp I
!then there's no reason not I
f your best everyday "
Years tit practice ha eb�
Lawrence to this level of competi-
tion. He began diving in Marlboro,
J.J when he was nine-years-old.
Hebegan diving for fun
ing the local YM(
a couple of years, then
spot on the U.S. unii
� during high �
led aixi eon �
United States and
team.
ng and see
trv was tun he -
nst the best divers)
try in my a
rtg high . I
finals!
J
the suite. He
Conference champio
- .
La -

junior, he is
you m team.
Lawrence hold
555L
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Grand Slam USA a new indoor sports facility c j
everything for the sports enthusiast. The adjustable bastf
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;
PERSONALS
n and fenrufer Vaughn.
rOALI FRATERNITIES
lK

! BI 1 IK
-
i I'M nil i I i
i
know how much
by sending them
for Valentine's
lie East Carolinian.
'oss from the
ils.
Tuesday,
11,1992.
1 VQ
IAT11

i
�:���: '
1 in join-

-
i l QX l- CHILDREN
01 M �.(.)! lUUCS
WORKSHOP
days, (an 28, Feb and
p m .it the ounsel-
l ' entei 29 Wright Build-
! eam about how growing
in a dysfunctional family
' affei ted you then and the im-
l a plays on your lite now
'its Willworkshop may also be help-
ful for people in the i lose rela
p with an A I �A rhe
workshop will include infor-
� about a fam
rules and roles and su
KMEICS�- �� -6661
t iunityor stop by 116 Wright for more
information or to register
i k and field)
"h(Hl on Sat-GAMMA HI 1 A I'M I
3 i m4p mrhe next meeting will be on
i terested infan 2'K 5 pjru Officers meet it
ichtrackand1 �l The room will be an-
toV it g tornounced in the next paper.
Sports
dUre iEast �ar0lintan
January 23,1992
7
Lawrence's dedication shines with diving records
Bv Michael Ashley
sutt Writer
I diver Matt I awrem e
ws wh.it it means to be d
ated 1 ie also knows what it takes
. me of the best, and he has it
Saturday's swim meet at
betook first place in both the
. ter dive and the three metef
� . as just another dw at the
for I awretuv
11 means going to the pool ev-
I awrence s,)id rn refer-
to being dedicated "Some-
u just don't want to go on
; know,quil But i f you look at
accomplishments in the past,
v to whal your potential is,
there's no reason not to trv
est everyd i
� practice have brought
� � this level of competi-
Hi began diving in Marlboro,
n he was nine years old.
1 kbegandiving for fun before join-
ing the l(Kal YMCA swim team for
a couple of years; then he found a
spot on the U.S. junior Olympic
team during high sctx A. 1 i wrence
traveled i competed all over the
United States and Canada with the
team.
'Traveling and seeing thecourv
trv was fun he said. "Competing
against the best divers in the i oun-
trv in mv age group was a true
challenge
During high school, I awrence
reached the state finals three' times.
As a junior, he finished second m
the state He also won the Shore
Conference championships twice
during high school career.
Following graduation,
Lawrence saw ECU as a good op-
portunityforcollegiatediving. Asa
junior, he isneof thestarsofa very
(ung swim team.
1 awrence holds the varsity
" Some days you just don't want to go
on�you know, quit But if you look at
your accomplishments in the past, and
know what your potential is, then there's
no reason not to try your best everyday
Matt Lawrence
nxrord in the three-meter event,
boasting a 414.00 on 11 dives in the
Colonial Athletic Association meet
in 1W1. He also holds two fresh-
man records one in the three-
meter, six dive event (281.40) and
theothermthe three-meter, 11 dive
(432.13) event. Lawrence is second
in the varsity one-meter (11 dives)
and three-meter (six dives) events.
For the past two years, he has
finished fourth and fifth in the con-
ference in his events. He says he
hopes to improve on that mark this
year.
"It's maturity � as far asbeing
older Lawrence said of the CAA
Championships. "Knowing the
pressure, I'll he going in with confi-
dence insiead of intimidation
Lawrence said he also knows
that there will be life after diving.
"As far asdiving, it pretty much
ends at college, unless y w're good
enough to compete in the Olym-
pics he sud.
But this diver doesn't plan to
take it that far.
"I'm happy with my progress
he continued. "After my final sea-
son, I plan go on with my educa-
tion
La wrencegivescreditto ECU's
athletic and academic programs for
much of his success out of the pool.
Heiscurrentlyonscheduletogradu-
ate in the Spring of 1993 with a
degree i n cri mi na 1 ju srice, a nd pla n s
to attend graduate school before
returning home to work with the
New Jersey State Police.
La wrence says he is happy with
the support fromfamily and fnends
that he receives during competi-
tions. His family travels to his com-
petitions whenever possible, as well
as his Theta Chi fraternity brothers;
both are always behind him at
meets.
For now, Lawrence is looking
forward to a strong season with the
team and a good finish in the con-
ference cham pionshi ps. He is shoot-
ing for a top three finish in both of
his events
"1 think I can do it he said.
"Ifs not an unrealistic goal at all.
"1 know (the conference meet)
is not as big as the Peach Bowl he
siid with a smile. "But we'll be in
Minges, and I just hope people will
come out and support the team
Matt Lawrence
New indoor sports facility offers
games, batting cages to Greenville
By Majorie Pitts
Stjff Writer
"It's Fun, Exciting, and Dif-
ferent reads a sign in Grand
Slam U.S.A a new sports facil-
ity located on 14th Street and
Evans.
The indoor sports palace of-
fers an vthing from Ms. Pac-Man
ball, air hockey, slam ball, an
indoor basketball court and a
pro shop are offered. Private
hitting and pitching lessons are
offered by the half hour for$30.
Batting cages are a big at-
traction
There are three adult cages
and one child's cage. The cages
to batting cages. Manager Tom can be adusted to softball or
baseball. The baseball cages are
the same type of cages that the
major league players use dur-
ing their spring training.
Grand Slam U S
everything for the
t'bolo by K�vin Amos� ECU Photo
A a new indoor sports facility on the comer of 14th Street and Evans has ust about
spols enthusiast 1 he adjustable basketball goals are one of the most popular attractions
ones said he would like to see
more ECU students come join
the indoor fun.
"Students are welcome, and
I encourage them to partici-
pate said Jones.
Besides video games and
batting cages, pool tables, skeet
The indoor basketball court
is an attraction as well.
On Feb. 3, a tournament will
begin. Everyone is encouraged
to play. There can be four or
five players per team. In order
to enter the tournament, par-
ticipants should sign upat least
a week before the event.
Grand Slam is looking for
eight teams which will play
seven games. At the end of the
tournament, trophies and T-
shir will be awarded.
Instead of watching the
sports on a lazy day, go be a
part of the sports. Try some-
thing new and become a better
athlete in the comfort of the
good indoors at Greenville
Grand Slam U.S.A.
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�"�
from Harris Supermarkets
DELI
Football Sub -Serves 4-6
Virginia Baked Ham
Cuddy Turkey Breast
Brie Cheese
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Bucket Deli-Fried Chicken
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$9.99
Potato Logs
12$1.00
BAKERY
Cinna mon Rolls - 6 ct 1.39
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Hoagie Rolls $1.19
Harris Famous Chocolate
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Super Bowl Bread loaf$ 1.29
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By Steve Reid Kung Fu Master J
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Frj Jan 24
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Sat Jan 25
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Tuesday January 28th
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 23, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 23, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.852
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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