The East Carolinian, January 21, 1992






Student Support 4
Columnist commends SGA for standing behind Kittrell.
Family Stand
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Wz Eaat (Earultman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Voc.66 No.3
Tuesday, January 21 1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
18 Pages
Laundry on credit
Students at Rutgers University will no
longer have to collect quarters to do their
laundry at the local laundramat. The univer-
sity has installed the first computerized
laundry system, which allows students to
open an account with the college housing
officer or building manager.
The students must deposit at least $50,
which allows them to carry a "Umndercard
Each time the student does a load of laundry,
the card is credited, and the student receives
a printed receipt indicating the account bal-
ance. The card also opens the door to the
laundrv room, which promotes a safer envi-
ronment for the students.
Editors argue censorship
The editor and managing editor of the
student newspaper at Palm Beach Atlantic
College were finxl for publishing "sexually
suggestive" poctrv, and an anonymous letter
poking fun at the school's policy prohibiting
homosexuality.
Lou Maglio and Kittic Stuart were told
they were fired after an unsigned letter ran in
The Rudder, with permission from the ad-
ministration. Large parts of the letter were
blackened with "censored" printed on the
top.
'They don't teach free thinking here
some of these people threw out 801) copies oi
the newspaper, like it's their constitutional
right to decide what people can read Maglio
said.
Two students murdered
A Fresno State University football player
and his girlfriend were found dead in an
apartment Jan. 3.
Police sav Melvin Johnson, 21, was shot
in the chest, and his girlfriend, Lisa Kelly,19,
was shot in the head as she was trying to leave
the apartment.
Police do not know all of the details yet,
"It was a domestic dispute. Basically what
happened was there were two men fighting
over the same girl Sgt. Robin Heizenrader
said. Johnson wasan offensive lineman and a
starter on the team.
Female reporter restricted
Indiana University basketball coach
Bobby Knight barred a female reporter from
the men's locker room in December, stirring
controversy in the NCAA.
Associated Press reporter Beth Harris
tried to enter the locker room after Indiana
plaved Notre Dame to get an interview with
some of the players. Harris said she has in-
terviewed players there before.
According to the sports information of-
fice, school policy prohibits reporters of the
opposite sex to enter football and men's and
women's basketball locker rooms. But the
policy allows for players to be available for
interviews outside the locker rooms.
NCAA rules encourage equal access to
locker rooms but allows for schools to decide
what their individual policies should be.
Burglars choose Greeks
Several fraternity houses were burglar-
ized and vandalized at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill over the Christmas
break.
Bill Taft, a Beta Theta Pi member, said the
burglar brokea window and then kicked inall
but three of the doors inside the house.
"We had been broken (into) over
Thanksgiving, so we knew we were a high
risk Taft said. "We nailed the doors shut
The estimated damage to the house was
$1,000.
Complied by Ellnbvth Shlmnwt
Inside Tuesday
Crime Scene 2
EditorialM
Classifieds6
Entertainment9
Sports13
University denies discrimination
By Jeff Becker
Staff Writer
The university's Equal Op-
portunity Officer (EEO) has
found nil evidence to support a
sexual discrimination Gomplainl
filed bv an install tor m the de-
partment ol communication.
Catherine Wickern, who is
in her fourth year ot teaching in
thecotnmunicabon department,
brought a discrimination com-
plaint totheattention of Dr. Maty
Ann Rose, the EEO officer, on
Oct. 14 Tie complaint charged
unequal payforequal work dat-
ing Kick to the summer oi 1990.
In a letter sent to Wickern
dated Dec. 3, Rose stated her
findings in the Investigation
1 examined the salaries ot
other members of your depart-
ment who are incomparable po-
sitions, i.e having a lectureror
instructor rank, holding the
master's degree but not thedoc-
torate,and holding a nine-month
contract
I lie salary data demon-
strates that, while there are men
incomparable-positions making
a higher salarv than ours, one
woman makes a salary higher
than theirs and the salary of one
man is less than yours. Based on
these data you do not appear to
he the victim ot illegal discrimi-
nation on the basis of gender
Rose slid she could not dis-
cuss the issue. "1 cannot com-
ment (m sped tic cast's she said.
"The results are confidential
Wickern said she first be-
came concerned about her sal-
arv m luneof 1990. She said her
office mate glanced over her
shoulder as she read her pay-
check, laughed,and smi hemade
more monev than she did. Ac-
cording to Wickern, the co-
worker had Brushed hismaster's
degree the semester before and
had li ss professional experience
tha Vhad.
ckern Uok the matter to
the acting-chairperson of the
communication department. Dr.
Marie Farr. who gave Wickern a
small raise. W ickem si id the raise
led her to believe the issue was
resolved.
Then in August of 1991, the
communication department
hired two male instructors.
Wickern slid alter she learned
the salaries of the new instruc-
tors, she again went Id the chair-
person of the department, a po-
sition now held by Dr. Harrell
Allen.
The discussion with Allen
led toa seriesof lettersand meet-
ings with several university ad-
ministrators in an effort to re-
solve the matter, Wickern said.
According to documents
Obtained from the department
of human resources, the two new
instructors were hired on a tern
porary basis and both signed
four-month contractsforSn.(XK).
Wickern signed a nine-month
contract for $25,625.
'I his is my fourth year
here Wickern said. "There is
no way after four wars that two
new people should be making
more money than I'm making.
There is no justification for it and
they can't blame me for that be-
cause I am not a g(Hd negotiator.
What does equal pay for equal
work mean, nothing?"
See Wickern page 3
Community salutes local heroes
By Elizabeth Shimmel
Suit Writer
Street vendors siJ pop-
corn and cotton candy, police
cars sounded their sirens, and
15.000 people lined the streets
of Greenville to pay tribute to
a group ot local heroes; The
1992 Peach Bowl champ;
ECU Pirates
Vhe football team was
honored Saturday in a victor)
parade that started on Elm
Street and wound its waj up
Fifth Street to its end at
Mendenhall Student v. enter
"1 think the parade gave
the town of Green vil tea chance
to recognize the team for their
accomplishments and gave
fans a chance to show their
appreciation Pirate fan Chip
O'Rear said
And show their apprec ia
tion, they did
Fans packed the parade
route wearing anything purple
and waving yellow sabers
while chanting the words that
are now common in any foot-
ball tans vocabulary, We
Believe
The Pirates returned home
from the New "tears Day
Peach Bowl with an 11-1 record
lor the season and ranked
ninth in the nation in the As-
sociated Press poll
Head .oach Bill lewis,
who led the Pirates through
their dream season was not at
the parade.
He had already left tor
Atlanta and his new oaching
lob at Georgia I"ech lewis
went to Atlanta only a lew
days alter the Peach Bowl and
did not return to be with his
pla eis tor their day ot home-
town glory.
But the tans were- not clis
appointed.
See Parade, page 3
Photo by Kevin Amos
The ECU Marching Pirates led the football team m their victory parade on Saturday. Fans honored
the team with the parade in conclusion of their 11-1 season and a triumphant Peach Bowl win.
SGA passes
resolution in
favor of Kittrell
Fallen Timber
Photo by Jamas Browning � ECU Photo Lab
Alison Lafoon took time out of her busy schedule to study a tree knocked down during high
winds last week in the area between Jarvis Hall and the Jenkins Art Building
FDA bans breast implants
By Amy Humphries
Staff Writer
The nation has suddenly
become concerned about the ef-
fects of silicone bnast implants.
A moratorium issued by the
Food and Drug Administration
no longer allows silicone breast
implant operations.
Silicone gel-tilled breast
implants have been used for
about20 years. Atprescnt,about
two million women in the U.S
have them.
After several problems with
the breast implants were re-
ported . the FDA asked the maker
of the implants, Dow Coming
Corporation, to initiate studies.
It is possible that silicone
may trigger problems in some
woman who are especially prone
to immune problems, according
to the FDA.
One problem is that the in-
sertion of silicone into the body
can cause fibrous tissue to grow
around the implant. The growth
makes blasts hard and some-
times causes pain. This condi-
tion, called capsularcontracru re,
occurs in about 10 percent of
women with implants.
Another more serious con-
cern is that breast cancer cannot
bedetected asquickly in women
with implants because X-rays
cannot pass through the silicone
gel.
The Dow Corning study
repotted that, "It is important
for women to tell the examining
physician of X-ray technician the
type of implant and its placement
(in front orbehind the chest wall
muscle)before the mammogram
is taken
Researchersalsolooked into
the hazards of silicone leakage
See FOA. page 2
By Julie Roscoe
Assistant News Editor
A resolution in support oi
Capt. Stanley Kittrell was
passed Jan. 13inSGA withonly
one vote against it.
The resolution states that
the ECU SGA goes on record in
support of Captain Kittrell and
questions the soundness oi any
retaliation, if such hasoccurred
against Captain Kittrell for his
stand against unethical and il-
legal acts at our university
Kittrell reported the illegal
w'iretapping of an ECU
employee's phoneand has tiled
a lawsuit against the Univer-
sity, Chancellor Richard Eakin,
Vice-Chancellor for Business
Affairs Richard Brown. Chiet
Of Police for Public Safety Ron
Avery and Public Safety direc-
tor James DePuy.
The suit concerns retalia-
tions Kittrell alleges occurred
after he reported the wiretap-
ping to the FBI.
Matthew Gilbert, vice-
chair of Rules and Judiciary
Committee, is the author of the
resolution.
This resolution was
amended from an earlier edi-
tion.
"I'm glad that it finally
passed Gilbert said.
Gilbert said he wants
Kittrell to know that the stu-
dent body to through the SGA
legislation supports him.
'The SGA is more than a
rubber stamp for appropria-
tions Gilbert said. "It is a body-
that can make a statement for
students on campus issues
Theonginal resolution said,
"that the ECU SGA goes on
record in support of Captain
Kittrell and in so doing con-
demns the action of certain ad-
ministrators who would punish
a person for his brave stand
against unethical and illegal acts
at our Universitv
There are five mandates
listed on the resolution They
are the officials involved m the
wiretapping settlements. Copies
of the resolution will be sent to
those people.
The questionable retalia-
tions stated in the resolutv. a
concern actions taken by
Kittrell's officials after he con-
tacted the FBI.
The lawsuit says that Kittrell
was stripped of his 42-officcT
statt, had his office relocated to a
rarelv used building, and be-
came a uniformed officer.
Gilbert said after he read
the court records oi the Kittrell
case he decided to rewrite his
resolution.
'The main reason I wrote
the resolution is for publicity
Gilbert said.
"1 hope in the future other
members of SGA will come out
and make a statement on other
issues





2 B:fc gnat Carolinian January 21, 1992
Service offers career guidance
Intoxicated males create disturbance;
subjects given verbal warnings
Jan. 15
1345MU sic Building: Vehiclestoppod tor an equipment viola-
tion. Student given a verbal warning.
1390 Evans and Reade streets: Vehicle stopped tor expired
tags, no insurance, and displaying fictitious tags. Student given a
state citation. Vehicle impounded.
1505�Greenville Police Department: Checked out a report of
larceny.
1556 Clement Porm: Checked out thereof tor a security check.
1743�lones Dining Hall: Checked out the dining office tor
report of damage to property.
OCftV-Fletcher Porm: Checked two intoxicated males tor creating
a disturbance. Subjects given verbal warning.
0138�Slav Dorm: Responded to Slay to assist rescue with an ill
student. Female student transported to Pitt Emergency by rescue.
0213 Mendenhall: Checked on a report of several intoxicated
males. Subjects gone on arrival.
0996 Belkl tail: Vehicle stopped east oi Befit Hall tor a moving
violation. The student was given a verbal warning.
1247�Umstead Dorm: Checked out east of building to assist a
motorist with his locked vehicle. Unable to unlock. Second officer
also assisted.
IkV�Fifth and Summit streets: Vehicle Stopped and state
citation issued to student for expired tag.
2015�Jones Hall: Checked out a reference to maintenance.
Locksmith called out on same case.
2055�Minges Coliseum Checked out a report of water run-
ning. Stime was turned off.
2203�Fleming Porm: Vehicle stopped south oi building Ver-
bal warning given to student for one-way street violation Hack up
called and Responded.
Jan. 16
1055�10th Street: Vehicle stopped near Brewster tor an illegal
left turn. The non-student was given a verbal warning.
1100�Greenville Police Oepartment: Checked out a report of
larceny.
003Q�Music Building: Assisted a motorist with a disabled
vehicle south of the Music Building.
1049�College Hill Drive: Directed confused traffic.
1055�10th Street: Vehicle stopped near Brewster for an illegal
left tum. The non-student was given a verbal warning.
1656�ECU Police Department: Assisted a motorist north of
building bv unlocking a vehicle.
0054�Fletcher Dorm: Vehicle stopped south oi building tor
speeding. Student given verbal warning.
0221�Clement Dorm: Provided an escort for a female from
Clement to Fleming Dorm.
Crime Scene is taken from official Public Safety Logs
By Julie Roscoe
Assistant News Editor
Career Services has helped
over 70 percent oi ECU students
who register with them receive jobs
in past years, and especially in this
economy, students need al I the help
they can get.
Last year, 1600 students regis-
tered with Career Services, which
is located in the Bloxton House,
said Margie Swartout, assistant
director.
"It's not the sole purpose of
Career Services! to place students
in jobs but to be between the stu-
dents and the employer and help
students with the skills to enter job
market Swartout said.
The first step in receiving the
assistance Career Services offers is
to register. TViS is possible Mon-
day throueh rida between8a.m.
and 5 p m.
The following services and in-
formation are available to regis-
tered students: a directory of em-
plovers hiring college graduates, a
career planning guide, a monthly
newsletter, career counseling and
ad vice, resume and interview skills
workshops, reterralsot resumes to
employers, access of files with em-
ployment references and campus
interviews.
"Starting here is a really great
wav to get a job Swartout said.
"The workshops will help tremen-
dously in job search strategies, to
enter the workforce and to better
able students to make the transi-
tion from college student to ca-
reer
Career Services, located m the Bloxton House, offers students interview
assistance in locating employers hiring college graduates.
On-campus interviews are
available and an advantage for
students Pre-scroening and open
sign-ups are the two proced ures to
follow in obtaining these inter-
views
lor the pro-screening inter-
view process, a student must turn
in their resume approximately two
weeks before the interview date.
Employers will then select the stu-
dents thev want to interview and a
list of names will bo posted
A second wav to participate in
an inten iewisto sign up. Employ-
erslist the criteria that thev want in
an applicant and post thisinCareer
Services. Those who meet the
qualifications may sign up tor an
interview.
C arovrSor ius is available for
all majors but according to
Swartout. the health care field is
the one where the most jobs are
available and there is the lowest
supply of applicants. Also, special
educators and teachers are "m-
demand majors
Photo by Dail Re�l �ECU Po:
skills worksnops. career advice
"Those students m pr. . i
or areas where jobs are not in � r
much demand need to look I
ternative careers where the
usetheskillstht vhavedeve: : �
Swartoutsaid. "Theyneedtosi .
from the standpoint of skills -
stead oi major
Swartoutsaysthatthepurp. sc
of Career Services is to assist an;
student who wants to deveU ;
skills thev need to better ma l
themselves in the vervcompetir.
job market
FDA
into the bkxxi stream of women
with implants. There is not a large
enough sample of women available
for a stud v, however, and the effects
of any leakages are still unknown.
"Thebiggest preblem that most
women with breast implants face is
'disease' caused by unnecessary
alarmover implants said Kenneth
McCarty of Duke University
Medical Center.
A woman who is considenng
silicon breast implants should dis-
cuss the situation with her physi-
cian.
"In weighing the possible long-
term nsksot silk oneNeast implants
it is important to bear in mind that
not being able to completely rale
out a nsk doesn't necessarily mean
there is one the FDA reported.
Continued from page 1
Millions oi women around I
world havehad breast implant- .
are happv with them. For womer
who already have silicon bre.s
implants the FDA recommends that
the implants be left in unless pnvr
lems occur.
The East
Carolinian
The best
newspaper
printed solely
for ECU'S
campus
v
3 MONTHS
LIMITED
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Only 35 memberships left at this price.
Phone for reservations.
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Mon-Sat 10-9
Sunday 1-6
Wickern
After receiving no help from
university administra tors, Wickern
said she took the advice of a co-
worker and .vent to the Equal Em-
ployment Opportunity Office. Ac-
cording to Wickern, even the EEO
investigation has not resolved the
issue.
'There is no discrimination be-
cause a woman in our department
made mure than 1 made, with the
samequahheanons Wickern said.
"So therefore, it is not based on sex;
so, therefore, the EEO cannot do
anything about it.
"I felt ;ust like another door got
slammed in my face. F.verybody is
saving too bad but nobody is do-
ing anything about it
Wickem said the results of
Rose's investigation contain some
discrepanck In the Dec 3 letter to
Wickern, Ri se staled that Wickem's
salary lscomparativek
"I do note, howevi
spite your high perfo
praisal ratings you apf
mand a low salarv reij
other individuals wi
made the compansor
unable to account fot
would suggest tha- .
matter with your chaw
Harrell Allen
Wickern said she
wait until next vea:
knows if her eft i
'There is nothing (Al
because the dean's off
himdoanything until 1
a contract she said
Allen said Rose
determined there was
nation based on gen
matter isout of his han
the time ot Wid
TUES
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Mjc �mu (Enrultnian January21, 1992
Service offers career guidance
Intoxicated males create disturbance;
subjects given verbal warnings
m. is
l M- MusicButlding Vehicle slopped for an equipment viola
tion Student I'juii .i verbal warning
1159 1 vans and Reade streets: Vehicle stopped tor expired
tags, no insurance mI displaying fictitious t.ns Student given .1
state citation Vehicle impounded.
1506 Cfreenville Police 1 Vp.irtnvnthei kol out.) report ot
larceny.
1556 CIcmentDorm hecked out theroof tor a security check
1743 ones Dining Halltuxkivl out the dining office tor
report ot damage to pmpertA
H netcherDormhecked two intoxicated males for creating
a disturbarx e Suhiects given verbal warning.
0138 5la Dorm Responded to Slay toassist rescue with an ill
student i cmale student transported to Pitt I mergerw v by res ur
(1211 Vli i Irnl - � n a report of several intoxicated
males Subjn ts
V h BelkHall Vehiclesl - islofBelk Hall for a moving
violation Hie stud nl ena v rbal wamii
1247 Umstcid 1 ked out east of building to assist i
motorist with his kx k tWe to in k. Second fficer
,ilso assisted
163(1 Fifth and Summit streets Vehicle stopped and tate
citation issued to student for expired I
2015 ones Hall hecked out .1 reference lo mainten�t
1 ocksmith called out on same case
2055 Minges oliseum hecked out a report ot water run
ning Same � I "ivl oft
3 Fleming Dtirm Vehicle stopped south (if I Vei
bal warning given ti one-way street
i ailed an.) responded
Jan.16
1055 10th Street Vehicle stopped near Brcwster for an illegal
left turn. The non-student was given .i verbal warning
1100 ireenville Police 1 lepartmenthecked out a rcpofl of
larceny
0039 Musk Building Assisted a motorist with a disabled
vehicle south ol the Musk Building
KM" College Hill Drive Directed confused trafl
1055 10th Street Vehicle stopped near Brewster for an i
left turn. The non student was given a verbal warning
1656 H I Police Department Assisted a motorist north ot
building by unlcn king .1 vehk le
0054 Fletcher Ivrm Vehicle stopped south ot buildii
speeding Student given verbal warning
; lemenl Dorm Provided an escort tot a female from
( lemenl to Fleming t orm
By ulie Koscoe
('areer Sei k es has heij
over 70 percent (�t E U stuck cs
who register with them receive jobs
m past years, and especially in this
economy, students need all the help
Ihcy an get
I ast year, I600students regis
lered withareer Servkcs, whkh
is located in the Bloxton House,
s.iki Margie Swartout, assistant
Jiroi tor
"It's not the sole purpose lot
Career Sen ices to place students
in jobs but to be between the stu
dents and the employer am) help
students w ith the skills to enter job
market Swartout saui.
fhe first st,p in n eiving the
assistance an er Services offers is
to register I his is possible Mon
daythrough! ridav between8a m.
and 5 p m
i he follow ing -t i esand in
fTfmation are a ailaHe to rcgi �
tered students a dire lory ot em
ployers hiring ollcge graduates, a
areer planning
nidi . a nionthlv
, i - Services, loc.iv hnthe Bloxton I lud
a lance in locating emi ers hiring
Photo �
( m � ampus inti � , � ��� are
available and an .iii image fr
� nts Pre si reening and i pcn
ups are tl �'���� pi lures to
� intei
newsletter career counseling ind
advice,resumeand intervkw ski IK
workshops, referral ioI n sumesto
employers, m essol files w ith i m
plovment references and campus I � in
interviews
"Starting here is a really great For lh pr reening intei
way lo get a )ob Swartout said, view process, a student must turn
" rhe workshops will helptremen- in their restimcapproximately two Swan
dously in job search strategies, lo ���� � � before the interview date the
enter the workforce and lo better Employers will then select Ihestu a i
able students to make the transi deni theywanti interviewanda su
ii
qtial '
,i
all �
ip.Fm
that I
. � � � i ireer
rd i n
� eld i �
n t jobs are


rtouts


, I to better
rJon from college student to ca list of names will be posted educator; �chei ire "in-
reer socondw ivi irticipatein demai ;
FDA
Continued from page 1
us�) i . uni � � irv cian
Crime Scene is takpn from official Public Salely Logs
into the blood stre mi ot wimen
with implants rhere is not a large alan �� mplanl �i IKi
cni �ugh sample of women available
for a study, however, and the cffci ts
ot any leakages are still unknxm n
"Thebiggesi problemthat mosl
women with breast implants face is
�'
. � � Ibi I implant
irty ot Duke University tcrmi � ebreastimplants an
Medical Center itisimp� bear in mind that ilready I n bi
ivpmai . I is considering not beii � rrrpiei r commend
n breast I cii oul . � � - th�
cuss the situation with her physi- therei FDA report
1
The East
Carolinian
The best
newspaper
printed solely
for ECU'S
campus
" ��
3 MONTHS
FOR ,$69
mTRIAL MEMBERSHIP
The Only
newspiper
printed solely
for ECU'S
campus
Get Tan & Stay Tan
Special Student Rate Tan All Semester
Only $75.00
iy � new Wolff tanning beds
tt �unlimited visits
OiiCr: �open 7 days a week
� Conveniently located in the Carolina
I ast Mall behind Baskets by Choice
Only 35 memberships left at this price.
Phone for reservations.
321-0709
We
Deliver
Mon-Sat 10-9
Sundav 1-6
Wickern


a - j
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i
idance
January21, 1992 Ht taut (Carolinian 3
Wickern
i i in en ing no help from
university administrators, Wickem
sud sin' took the advice ot .1 o
workei unt went to the Equal Em
ploymenli Opportunity 1 Kfice Ac
cording to Wk'kem even the EEO
invet it ition has no! resolved the
1SS
tsnodiM 1 iinm.ition Iv
cause.� woman in our department
made more than I made, with the
Mil itions, w i( kern said.
"So therefore it is not based on sex;
s therefore Ihe i I �) �annol d(
am thti t!� ml it
1 tt'lt jusl like another door gol
slan med in m face I verybod) is
sn had hut nobody is .o
ing invtl 11 .�. aboul it
Wickem said the results of
Rose's investigation contain some
cHsj �� 1 in thel Vi lletterto
ii k stated that Wickern's
salary is comparatively low.
"I do note, however, that de-
spite vour high performance ap-
praisal ratings you appear to com-
mand a low salary relative to the
other individuals with whom I
nude the comparison. Since I am
unable to account tor this fact, 1
would suggest that you discus the
matter with vour 1 hairporson, lr.
Harrell Allen
Wkkcrn said she will have to
wait until nexl year before she
knows it her efforts have paid off.
There is nothing (Allen) can do
because the dean's office won't let
himdoanythinguntil 1 re negotiate
a contract she said
Allen said Rose's investigation
determined there was no discrimi-
nation based on gender and the
nutter isout ot his hands. 1 le snd at
the lime ot Wickern's re negotia-
tion he will nuke a recommenda-
tion to the dean ot the College ot
Arts and Sciences concerning
Wickern's salary.
The dean looks at what I rec-
ommend, and we go from there
he said. "As tar as I am concerned,
the issue is behind us and we can
now go forward
Wickem slid the University
blames her for earning a low silary
because she signed a contract.
However, she snd she cannot be
held responsible because the uni-
versity does not pay her an equal
silary.
"It's mv fault because I'm not a
negotiator Wickem snd. "Hut von
know what, they hand vou a con
tract with a number On it I didn't
know that you could siv 'No, I
don't want that one
Wickem said she will be inter
Continued from page 1
estcd inhov Ihe si hool handles hei
contra Ire negotiation this summer
There is a figure thai I will not
accept a dime less than, and they
will lose one hell of a lca her it they
don't give it to me she snd
She said if she does ha veto find
another job, at least she will know-
how lo handle her salary ncgOtia
tion.
I will i ertainh km to go in
and say 'oh, no, that number isn t
big enough, give mea bigger one
she saut
Wit kern said she does not re
gret anything she has done "1 te.u h
ethu s, and it 1 didn't stand up for
what I believed in, then I wouldn t
teel like I was capable ol trying lo
teach young people how to deal
t.urlv in the business world and
deal fairlv with individuals she
Slid
Parade
lnie.id, ihe) rallied behind
Steve I ogan, Lewis' offensive
coordinator who was recently
named to rcplat e Lewis a head
I 11,11 It
Signs along the parade route
read, "Congratulations to the
I�'( l Pirates and I leado.n h
Steve Logan showing Pirate
tans hopes tor another winning
.in in I ' �
"1 veseen almost every game
tor the past 14 years, and I'm
happy they've had a really good
� mi I hope next vear will be
jusl as good tor them, they've got
i ;ood thing going )'Rear said
I he future ol the football
proe,ram was nut the issue Satur-
dav as the Marching Pirates band
led the 1991 football team through
the streets filled with s ream i
fan
Continued from page 1
When th� parade rea bed its
end, the senior Pirate players
planted a tree at Mendenhall to
mark their victory,and naturally,
it was ,i peat h tree
1 heend ol the paradedid not
mean Iheei dof a .iv of ret ogni-
tiun tor the players and coaches.
I ater that evening, they were all
honored at a football gala, a ban-
quet at Mingesoliseum that m-
i luded a rue t speaker
It was only fittinr. that the
t spt iker should be football
e.urn. Lee( orso, who predicted a
lo .5 tor the Pirates in the Peach
I In day ofelebration was
sponsored bv the Piratelub,
with the c ity i f (Ireenville
Greenvillehamber ol (. om-
� � ind EC1 mtnbuting
niOVIES
D F
FORUm
Attic Society
Revisited
DOLITICflLC0RRECTnESS:
Progrf. Prrrlysis
IT. n 27
ftlSC l R.orn
B- 9.30 pm
COFFEEHOUSE:
Lisa Phwlrk
SmGERSonGWRITER
Tuesday Jnn 28
FT1SC UnDERGROUHD
800 p m
Pike is it!
Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity
i
CHANCELLORS
CHAMPS
1991 CHAPTER OF
EXCELLENCE
M
GENTLEMEN WELCOME
TUES
MEET THE LADIES
OF AAII
SHISH KABOB NIGHT
WED
MEET THE LADIES
OF AEA
SUB NIGHT
THURS
MEET THE LADIES
OF III
SUB NIGHT
FBI
MEET THE LADIES
OF At
INVITATION ONLY
LOCATED AT PIRATE CLUB BESIDE FICKLEN STADIUM. 8-11 PM
EACH NIGHT
FOR RIDES CALL 758-3704 OR 355-1256





Jan
. 199, elu- tast (Carolinian 3
Wickern
in
sal an is omp
I do not
sp
nu

lh
.il de
c ap
to the
il . Sin� e I .nn lie
tu 11 � the dean iif the Collej
Ai ts and s irik s i erninp
Wu kei n s salar
i .in I, t iks .it w it 1 u
itmrnend and we ro from there
� snd As t.ir as 1 am 101
Continued h i m pa
I!
Parade
� � � i
mini loi this fact
It YOU dlM ISSl
edtl
the issue is behind us and we i an
ni u ai ti rward
, � � i T Wii kern slid the I niversit
blames her tor earning a luwsilan
bet ause ' � . � J a conl
she Howevei In �ud ' � innot be
i j otl held rosponsihli bei ai uni
i . .in do versit d t pay her a
won t let silan
� .�, It sinvl Ibevausol'nii
nej A u"kern si I vou
what. I � � �
ict with hei n it. 1 did
� � ,nj tir aid si
.�'
Pike is it!

CHANCELLORS CUP
CHAMP

1991 CHAPTER OF
EXCELLENCE
GENTLEMEN WELCOME

MEET THE LADIES
OFAAn
SHISH KABOB NIGHT
WED
MEET THE LADIES
0FA5A
SUB NIGHT
THURS
MEET THE LADIES
OF HZ
SUB NIGHT
MEET THE LADIES
OFAO
INVITATION ONLY
OFFEEHOUSE:
3 P '
LOCATED AT PIRAJE CLUB BESIDE FICKLEN STADIUM. 8-11 PM
EACH NIGHT
FOR RIDES CALL 758-3704 OR 355-1256





Ill )
v
rn
Parade

Pike
.�
- �
EXCELL
HM
GENTLEMEN WE

MEET THE LADIES
OF AAn
SHISH KABOB NIGHT
WEB
MEET THE LADIES
OFA5A
SUB NIGHT
MEET
- of m
SUB NIGHT
INVITATION ONLY
TED AT PIRATE CLUB BESIDE FICKLEN STADIUM
EACH NIGHT
FOR RIDES CALL 758-3704 OR 355-1256





Ill
Parade
NTLEMEN
THE LADIES
OF A An
SHISH KABOB NIGHT
MEET THE LADIES M
OF ASA OF LSI
SUB NIGHT SUB NIGHT
INVITATION ONL
LOCATED AT PIRATE CLUB BESIDE FICKLEISTADIUM
EACH NIGHT
; $rkr&0 .v'
FOR RIDES CALL 758-3704 OR 355-1256





�ije iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
Jennifer Wardrep, Neivs Editor
JULIE ROSCOE, Asst. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Dana Danielson, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
MARGI MORIN, Asst. Sports Editor
Jeff Becker, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Jean Caraway, Classified Advertising Technician
Stephen Schaubach, Systems Engineer
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Margie O'Shea, Advertising Technician
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should be
limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C
27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, January 21, 1992
SGA's support shows integrity
At last week's SGA meeting, our stu-
dent government took an active step con-
cerning the policies of our University with
their acknowledgment of the scandalous
incidents which have surrounded this cam-
pus for over a year.
The student government passed a
resolution in support of Capt. Stanley Kit-
trell of the Public Safety Department for
contacting the FBI after discovering that
illegal wiretapping had occurred on cam-
pus.
The resolution also questions the ac-
tions of any campus administrators who
might retaliate against Kittrell for his ac-
tions. SGA's support clause revolves
around Kittrell's lawsuit which alleges
retaliation from University officials.
The resolution is mandated to Chan-
cellor Richard Eaken; Richard Brown, vice-
chancellor for Business Affairs; James
DePuy, director of Public Safety; and Ron
Avery, chief of police for Public Safety.
Those individuals, as well as the Univer-
sity itself, are the defendants in the law-
suit.
The SGA resolution should come as a
welcome sign of relief for the students of
our campus. With a University which ille-
gally wiretaps phonelines, has doled out
settlements of over $138,000 for its illicit ac-
tions and is possibly involved in retaliation
against an individual for his honorable ac-
tions, it is a pleasant sight to see our student
government shy away from the same type of
corruption.
Kittrell did the right thing, and now the
voice of the students has done the same.
But let's not stop there. Why should we
merely support Kittrell and question the ac-
tions of our administrators for alleged retalia-
tion? We know that the University illegally
wiretapped phonelines, how about a resolu-
tion condemning that action.
And why must the SGA be the only voice
for the students? Every member of our cam-
pus (faculty and students) should be up in
arms over the issue. We should all be involved
in finding the facts.
Who authorized the wiretaps? Why is the
University (and subsequently, the taxpayers)
paying for the mistakes of a few individuals
acting above the law? Was the chancellor truth-
ful when he told the state auditors he learned
of the wiretapping only after the FBI was
contacted?
Questions like these must have interest-
ing answers.
And answers will not be found through
apathy.
University inconsistent in policy
This University uses a policy that ap-
pears to be contradictory. Some could even
call it hypocritical.
The SGA Documents Handbook, the
code which every student must follow, states
that the University may press charges
against a student for breaking various rules.
These rules are guidelines dealing with
stealing, cheating, illegal drug offenses and
assault.
The handbook also states that disci-
plinary actions can be taken against stu-
dents whose conduct, on or off campus,
breaks these rules.
This seems easy enough to understand;
break a rule on campus or downtown or in
an apartment, and the University can in-
voke charges.
The one important fact the handbook
leaves out is a Federal Court precedent
which disallows universities to act like par-
ents and punish students for actions which
do not concern the school. This law is called
a nexus.
In simpler terms, a nexus requires a
university to have some connection in an
incident which happens off campus.
Two recent occurrences related to the
nexus issue have piqued campus interest.
The first incident was an assault case
involving a group of men belonging to the
Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity.
Because there was no nexus between the
incident and the University, the case should
have been settled outside the campus system.
But somewhere along the way, school offi-
cials learned the four men were all members of
the same fraternity. Therefore, the officials as-
sumed it must be a hazing incident. Although
the victim was not in the fraternity, this made
no difference to University officials. The Board
of Governors has deemed hazing a serious of-
fense, and it should be stopped. The University,
however, ignored the nexus law in its prosecu-
tion.
The second case involved an occupational
therapy student who was assaulted off-campus
by another student. Angela Marlote tried to
press charges through the University but was
prevented because of the nexus limitation.
The University seems to pick and chose
when to use the nexus.
Should the University follow what is writ-
ten in the handbook or follow the law? And if
they choose to follow the law should it not be
printed in the handbook?
The University minks if the real restric-
tions were printed in the handbook then they
could not prosecute cases like the fraternity
incident, downtown crime or drug related
cases.
But at least the students would know
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01 WHAT AUOcy
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My Way Or The Highway
Students should learn drinking etiquette
By Matt Bulley
Editorial Columnist
Ah, the beginning of a new
semester. That means that there are
some new faces wandering aimlessly
around ECU.
To ease their transition to life
here in the Emerald City, here's a list
of helpful hints. Those of us who
have been here a while will also ben-
efit from a glance through these
guidelines. After all nobody is per-
fect; some of us are just above the
law. More on that later.
First off, you are here at ECU
for a reason; find your classes and
go. If youdon't, you won't meet people.
and parties will be an awful bore for
you.
ECU offers a splendid pallet of
people to meet and fall down with.
Go to your classes, and meet people.
More on falling down later.
Next, enjoy our beautifully
bricked and paved campus. Not so
long ago, it was tough to get the
classes you needed to graduate,
tough to park, and tough slogging
through muddy paths to the few
classes you had. Campus Brick-a -
facation is spending a quillion dol-
lars a year on bricks and grass, and
after tearing down nice neighbor-
hoods for the sake of parking, things
are now much better. Now it is just
tough to get the classes you need to
graduate.
Next, start looking forward to
the brand new SI 8 million recreation
center that will soon fester in the
Mendenhall parking lot.
At last check, this wonderful
oasis of recreation, replete with pools,
racquetball courts, a sports shop and
rooms by the hour, was still rolling
along like a Greyhound bus with no
brakes. With our money as thedriver,
it should arrive by the turn of the
century. It will replace the recently
renamed Christenbury Memorial
Gymnasium, which will become the
new ECU Divinity School and Con-
vent.
More importantly though, a
groupof prospective recruits for ECU
were recently heard saying, "We
don't care if we can get the classes we
need, we just want a new recreation
center. Do ya have one?"
Next, don't waste those after-
school hours. Go out and get a job.
Our fair President (see "Pukes on
Japan" below), has declared the re-
cession (that he said we weren't hav-
ing) is now over (even though we
were "Never in a recession") Plenty
of jobs. Just gotta get one. Do it today.
Hold your breath until you have one.
Another important part of your
life at school will be parties. This is
where you build the "network" that
will aid you in your career. Later in
life, an old college party pal may
recognize you on a street corner in a
far off city, saying:
"Hey, aren't you Mitch
Cumstein? We were in Sigma Mango
Mango together
"Wow! Bob Barfbubbler! I re-
member, you puked on my shoes at
the Alpha Taco Stucco party! So what
are you doing these days?"
"Well, I am a successful entre-
preneur, making millions of dollars a
day. How about you?"
You say, "Well, since you're a
'brother' I guess I can tell you, 1 am a
little down on my luck right now,
and really need a job
"You're in luck! One of the
workers just died in my Hazardous
Industrial Waste Containment and
Handling division. Can you start to-
morrow?"
As the evening rolls on at par-
ties, you may decide to consume al-
cohol. There is a magic formula that
helps you know when you have had
too much to drink.
It goes like this. First, take your
weight and multiply it by your age,
divide that by the number of drinks
you have consumed raised to the
power of the dividend of the hour
you began drinking subtracted from
the hour it is when you decide to
figure if you have had too much to
drink. Got it?
Another way is the "pave-
mentfist" method. If you feel pave-
ment or a fist against your face, you
have probably had enough to drink
Do not have another drink if you are
face down, or are getting your head
caved in.
If you decide to fall down with
someone else, have a sober friend
check things out for you. Don't do
things you might regret, and don't let
your friends do the same.
AH kidding aside, ECU is I
pretty terrific school. We have our
problems, like wiretapping cops and
lack of funding for necessary classes,
but there's a lot to enjoy.
The beach is close, the weather
is mild and the ratio is still 2 girls for
every guy, or is it the other way
around? Who cares!
Have a great semester! See ya
around. Gringos!
Campus Spectrum
Unfair salary affected former teacher
By Pamela Hopkins
Special to The East Carolinian
(Editor's note�The following
Campus Spectrum column is written
by a former employee of the Univer-
sity.
Campus Spectrum is a periodic
column which offers students and
faculty, past or present, the opportu-
nity to voicetheir opinion on issuesof
University concern. 1
I am writing in reference to the
article published in the January 14
edition of the East Carolinian titled
"Professor charges discrimination
As a former full-time, tenure
track instructor at East Carolina Uni-
versity, I'm proud that Cathy Wickern
chose to come forward with her com-
plaint. This has nothing todo with her
being a woman, but it is an issue of
fairness and upholding the belief that
ECU truly is an "Equal Opportunity
Employer" where equal pay for equal
work is upheld.
Anyone who believes that their
rights are not being upheld should
come forward.
I read with amusement Mary
Ann Rose's comments in the article
that the University gives more money
to those teachers who have a higher
performance rating (on their student
evaluations).
Generally, it was my experi-
ence, as both a teacher and a one-time
student, that students making good
grades in classes they enjoy will give
those teachers good evaluations.
Students taking required classes
or doing poorly in a class will often
give the professor a poor evaluation.
In addition, many students do not
take those evaluations seriously or
take the time to really think about
their responses, and not all students
are present on the days the evalua-
tions are given.
My point here is that evalua-
tions from students should never be
the sole basis for judging a teacher's
abilities or hisher salaries. Ms. Rose's
comments indicate that in many cases,
ECU students dictate cur professors
instructor's and lecturers' salaries.
I also read with amusement
Rose's comments that "some people
can just negotiate (salaries) better
Perhaps when someone has been in
an organization a while, they can ask
for more money, but we're also talk-
ing about hiring salaries here. When I
was hired at ECU in December 1985,1
was quoted a salary and there was no
indication that there was room for
negotiation. This salary was fixed as
far as I knew, and I was never told
differently.
In the three and a half years I
worked at ECU, salary increases came
once a year when the legislators voted
on that issue. Our chair was given a
certain amount of money which he
doled out according to his own mas-
ter plan. Some of us were given 2
percent while others teaching the same
or different courses were given 5 per-
cent. No justification or explanation
was ever given. At the time, we were
happy to get any increase. It was
common knowledge in our depart-
ment that certain people always got
more money than others. And, be-
lieve me, these were not necessarily
the best teachers.
When I was hired at ECU, 1 was
25 years old. I had an M.A. from Penn
State and a B.A. from Clemson Uni-
versity. I had held a full-time teaching
assistantship for two years at Penn
State in one of the finest programs in
the country. We were taught how to
teach, we were observed teaching, and
we were evaluated many times by our
peers, advisors and the head of the
department. I also taught as a gradu-
ate assistant at Clemson for one se-
mester and taught part-time at a tech-
nical colkgein South Carolina. I came
to ECU with excellent qualifications.
Yet, I was hired at a salary that
was significantly lower than some
other instructors were a year later. In
my three-and-a-half years at ECU as a
tenure-track instructor, my chairper-
son never once asked to see my syl-
labi, lesson plans, tests or even uiked
with me about what went on in my
classroom. The only time we ever
talked about teaching was (a) if a stu-
dent com plained about a low grade in
which case the meeting was one in
self-defense; or (b) at our end-of-the-
year evaluation where the chair dic-
tated to us Ms rating and we signed
the paper whether we agreed with the
evaluation or not. My chairboss had
no idea what caliber of teacher I was
and yet he set my salary and decided
on our "merit" raises. I found this
situation pitiful from a teaching stand-
point and often wondered whether
anyone really cared about teachers
teaching at ECU or whether the issue
was only how many grants can we get
or how many papers can we publish.
And the sad fact is that 1 was
and am a very good teacher. I tried to
always be fair, and I rarely missed
meeting a class. I stayed on top of my
field and planned activities to involve
the students in the department. I also
kept office hours, graded my own tests
and papers and tried to stimulate stu-
dents' minds and get them fired up
about the material. Ontheotherhand,
I expected my students to take re-
sponsibility for their actions and to
come to class and meet assignments.
They didn't always like those rules,
and 1 didn't always get superior evalu-
ations.
I support Ms. Wickern 100 per-
cent, and I feel that her daim is a tip-
off that other problems exist. Ms.
Wickern says that she's learned a lot
from this experience, and I suppose
that will have to suffice for now.
1 learned a lot also at ECU, Ms.
Wickern. I learned that teaching is not
always emphasized at ECU and takes
a back seat to creative activities and
publishing papers.
I learned that some tenured pro-
fessors get paid a lot no matter how
poorly they do their job. I learned that
part-time instructors can be hired to
help out even when they have no
teaching qualifications. I learned that
some chairpeople simply don't care
what goes on in their departments
and I learned that the good guys and
gals don't always come out on top.
EOJ can say that there is no jus-
tification for Ma. Wkkern'sccwplaints.
What they should do is take a good.
hard look �t some of the people whoare
teschinghere Check into how they're
teaching and whetheror not their salary
is equal to tneir performance. I think
there rrughtbesormsui pi iauuverthere
Goodforyou, Ms. Wickern! You
may learn a lot from this experience
arjoutryuvesa, but ifECUi. smart, they
can team a lot from you! �
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50 active brothers who pride thems
Chi strives among the top in athietj
challenge you to he a pan of out c �
location is 312 East l lth St. 751
Delta Sigma Phi was chartered x i
better the ECU Greek system
Scholarship, and Brotherhood. Bro
i; can be explained. It is a deep frit
is a need, and to be here to share thcl
nKA
Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity was In
fraternity that takes great pndc m I
rechanered at ECU six years tfpf
If you're thinking of going Greek
of your college fife
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The Kappa Alpha Order was chart
a deep tradiDon in preserving the I
for its consistent rate of success,
attend rush at our house We are
Phi Kappa Psi is the newest
February of 1852 at Jefferson CoSci
a working pan of the Campus (
Kappa Pst We might be just whatl
Ben
Beta Thcta Pi is one of the oldest
in Ohio has stemmed one of the
of fraternity life: social, academic I
of a very right brotherhood
AIO
The Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity wi
has been a strong growing chapter i
Lung Association and enjoy a very!
a fraternity go by and visit .Alpha j
AXA
Lambda Chi Alpha is a fraternity (
a Lambda Chi means becoming a"
a Lambda Chi means knowing f
be anxious to help vou over those I
association. Come by and look us
DKT
Your college yean are aprime I
people and situations you
involved in a wide range of campus!
across the country and about jO.0
advantage of fraternity i
together a the house every year at i
involved with a fraternity.





Of "B KW 7�1fiK
SMC THOUSANDS'
M WMr A uocy
Highway
ing etiquette
; shop and little down on my luck right now,
jstiU rotting and really need a job
us with no "You're in luck! One of the
Isthedrivcr, workers just died in my Hazardous
Itjrn or the Industrial Waste Containment and
) e recently Handling division. Can you start to-
Memorial morrow?"
11 ecome the As the evening rolls on at par-
and Con- ties, vou may decide to consume al
coho'l. There is a magic formula that
though, a helps vou know when you have had
utsforECU too much to drink.
ng, "We It goes like this. First, take your
lr .lasses we weight and multiply it by your age,
v recreation divide that by the number of drinks
vou have consumed raised to the
those after- power of the dividend of the hour
pd get a job you began drinking subtracted from
Pukes on the hour it is when you decide to
a-ed the re- figure if you have had too much to
renthav- drink Cot it?
though we Another way is the "pave-
lon) Plenty mentftst" method. If you feel pave-
l)o it today ment or a fist against your face, you
u have one. have probably had enough to drink.
t part of vour Do not have another drink if you art
ties. This is face down, or are getting your head
twork" that caved in
?r. Later in If you decide to fall down with
tv pal may someone else, have a sober friend
corner in a check things out for you. Don't do
things you might regret, and don't let
rou Mitch your friends do the same.
Jgma Mango All kidding aside, ECU is
pretty terrific school. We have our
lubbler! 1 re- problems, like wiretapping cops and
my shoes at lack of funding for necessary classes,
irtv So what but there's a lot to enjoy.
The beach is close, the weather
stul entre- is mild and the ratio is still 2 girls for
Is of dollars a every guy, or is it the other way
around? Who cares!
Ince you're a Have a great semester! See ya
1 vou, lama around. Gringos!
actrum
Id former teacher
:
a
ies) better "
I has been in
Ithey can ask
're also talk-
ere. When I
jjmbcr 1985,1
there was no
is room for
Iwas fixed as
s never told
half years I
creases came
Islators voted
was given a
which he
us own mas-
ere given 2
hing the same
t given 5 per-
� explanation
me, we were
ise. It was
our depart-
always got
And, be-
lt necessarily
at ECU, 1 was
from Perm
emson Uni-
me teaching
ars at Perm
programs in
lught how to
aching, and
r times by our
head of the
tt as a gradu-
for one se-
limeatatech-
lina. I came
alifkations.
I a salary that
than some
year later. In
at ECU as a
my chairper
i see my syl-
r even talked
it on in my
pme we ever
is(a)ifastu-
i low grade in
was one in
x end-of -the-
he chair dic-
we signed
I with the
evaluation or not. My chair boss had
no idea what caliber of teacher I was
and yet he set my salary and decided
on our "merit" raises. I found this
situation pitiful from a teaching stand
point and often wondered whether
anyone really cared about teachers
teaching at ECU or whether the issue
was only how many grants can we get
or how many papers can we publish.
And the sad fact is that I was
and am a very good teacher. I tried to
always be fair, and I rarely missed
meeting a class. I stayed on top of my
field and planned activities to involve
the students in the department. I also
kept office hours, graded myown tests
and papers and tried to stimulate stu-
dents' minds and get them fired up
about the material. On the other hand,
1 expected my students to take re-
sponsibility for their actions and to
come to class and meet assignments.
They didn't always like those rules,
a nd I d idn't always get superior evalu-
ations.
1 support Ms. Wickem 100 per-
cent, and I feel that her claim is � tip-
off that other problems exist. Ms.
Wickem says that she's learned s lot
from this experience, and I suppose
that will have to suffice for now.
I learned a lot also at ECU, Ms.
Wickem. I learned that teaching is not
always emphasized at ECU and takes
a back seat to creative activities and
publishing papers.
I learned that some tenured pro-
fessors get paid a lot no matter how
poorly they do their job. I learned that
part-time instructors can be hired to
help out even when they have no
teaching qualifications. I learned that
some chairpeople simply don't care
what goes on in their departments
and I learned that the good guys and
gals don't always come out on top.
ECU can say that there is no jus-
tification for Ms. Wickern'scomptaints.
What they should do is take a good,
hard lookat some of the people whoare
teaching here Check into how there
teaching and whet her or not their salary
is equal to their ptrkmmncm. I thank
there might besomesui pi Issauwenhare
Good for you, Ms. Wkkernl Ye�
may ham a lot from mi experience
about naivete, but tf ECU teens ��
can learn a tot from you!
�RST CAROLINA UNIV6RSITV
FRRT6RNITV LOCRTIONS
1991 RUSH
January 21 -24, 7-11pm
GRCCK
t L
u
�.l
y.
y
AX
Sth Street
l)ov mown
Grccnx ilk
LE
Sth Street

IOth street
M.I' i ampii
tkeI
Arlington Boulevard
E3 Ben
ex
H .
Ilth Street
Pirate
Club
HE3
riKA
ex
Theta Chi was first chartered at East Carolina on March 15J 958. Wc arc mwublishedFratanity with over
50 active brothers who pride themselves on the concept of urutyarel closeness within the Btothcrhood-Tncu
Chi strives among the top in athletics and scholastics and is a catalyst for individual accomplishment. We
challenge you to be a part of our continued success and extend an invitation to rush Theta On. Our new house
location is 312 East 11th St (758-6XeX). Be a pan of the Greek leader of the 90s. ROLL CHI!
AID
Delta Sigma Phi was chartered at East Carolina in April of 1971, and has continually given what it could to
better the ECU Greek system. Delta Sig is based on three simple, but loyal principles: Leadership.
Scholarship, and Brotherhood. Brotherhood is a phenomenom thai can be felt ana witnessed much better dun
it can be explained. It is a deep friendship with men who can always be depended upon to help when there
is a need and to be here to share the experience of self growth in the incredible complex world ofccliege life.
nKA
Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity was founded on March 1,1868 at the University of Virginia. Pika at ECU is a
fraterruty that takes great pride in their involvement on the campus and around the community. Pika was
rechanered at ECU six years ago and has flourished to be one of the great supporters of the Greek system.
If you're thinking of going Greek this year, check out Pi Kappa Alpha. it may be one of the best decisions
of your college life.
KA
The Kappa Alpha Order was chartered on September 26,1958 at East Carolina University. At KA there is
a deep tradition in preserving the quality of the Southern genuemeaKaprjaAlr'sathk program is kmwn
for its consistent rate of success. Our brotherhood would like to exterid an irMdacon to all interested men to
attend rush at our house. We are looking forward to meeting you during rush.
Phi Kappa Psi is the newest fraternity on the ECU campus still in colony status. Nationally founded in
February of 1852 at Jefferson College, Phi Psi has been on the ECU campus for two years awl is fast becoming
a workingpart of the Campus Greek system. Dunngrush, if you are iniensted ui rushing a fraternity, try Phi
Kappa Psi We might be just what your looking for in your college life.
Ben
Beta Theta Pi is one of the oldest fraternities in the nation; founded on August 8,1839. From a small town
in Ohio has stemmed one of the greatest fraternities ever. Here on tnisunnrjus we strive to combine all aspects
of fraternity life: social, academic, athletic as well as many other activities which show the day-to-day life
of a very tight brotherhood.
AIO
Lung Association and enjoy a very i
a fraternity go by and visit Alpha Sigma Phi.
AXA
LamoaaChiAlpruttafriienotfraieafr
a lambda Chi mearu becoming a pan of a biott
a Lambda On means knowing that there will always be someone who cares about you, i
be anxious to help vou over those rough spots in life. The Lambda'smviieyouiobecoineapofaeir
. Come oy and took us over, we dank you wil be glad you did!
dKT
Your college yean am �prim opportunity to chaUrsge yourself. This mum making the most of the
people and iitiuuctu yon encounter. Pwwhuum esjooomge this; KT it comprised of
involved ins wide range of campus activities. We am also very itnoasiialionalleveL widi over lfJO chapters
across the country and about �0.000 � at adsmsi n Sinlaa shins awarded �many through cwhswdoaartars. The
advanugtsoffrsiemtyinemcmTliinsdoswleBdopoa graduation, �:T graduates have die oppotta
together at the house every
involved with a fraternity
KI
Kappa Sigma was founded on the East Carolina CammmNmm&m22,9tkMmBmUtt6mmig
has strived to represent the Greek system of ECU well. Located on Tenth Street directly across from
campus, the fraternity offers a convenient spot for its membentojpdw between classes, weUmbeinf
in easy walking distance from the residence halls. The basts of Kappa Sig fraternity is is brotherhood;
and through brotherhood we will continue to grow and prosper long kuo the future.
nKO
Pi Kappa Phi was chartered as East Carolina in 1963. Since the begiruune. we fiave proven to be a strons
force in the development of fine young men to serve our campus. We offer a variety of acovio� to excel
in, ranging from a strong athletic program to community service and projects for the handicapped. We
are known to have a very strong social program and hold many major events throughout the year. We
have a very strong alumni association that helps in our endeavors. Our scholarship program helps to
develop our brothers as students. So remember, when you're in a rush to the only wsy.GO PI KAPP!
IN
At East Carolina, Sigma Nu is a combination of rich tradition and new uaaiibaihjp. First chartered in
1959, the Eta Beta chapter of Sigma Nu is among the oldest of ail Fratertuties e FiX Frattrrsty are at
Sigma Nu offers many things for all its members: an active social life, strong support for I
community service and academics. Nationally, Sigma Nu is among the best in aU caatgories, With over
230 chapters and 130 thousarri brothers, it is the third largest frsterary interruak�ally. hsconmrehensrve
Educational Foundation (LEAD.) provides many scholarships and offers rnany mat leaderstap
development programs. We encourage you to rush Sigma Nu and above all GO GREEK!
IOE
At Sigma Phi Epnton we believe that as well as providing numerous eypatunincs during the college
years, the fraternity experience continues throughout ones life Sig Ep provides m environmeoi wbare
a brother develops and learns many iinportant social skills such as sportsmanship, schohrtup sad
communication among many others. We pride ourselves on btM one of the best irsssrnioes � East
Carolina as well as in the nation. Sigma Phi Epsilon hat been named ECUsmoaou�sWhn frasereay
two out of three years. On a national level the North Carolina Kara cbjp�erh� been recognla
of the best all- around Sig Ep chapters in the nation. Sig En is Icokmgfa balanced mm who exed not
only in academic, but in athletics, leadership and social skills as well. We extend so invihation to all
interested, qualified men with a desire to become pan c4 Sigma Phi Epntos.
in
The Eta Kappa chapter of Sigma Pi was the second fastest mapw m Signu Pi Insmatkmd
Sigma Pi currently has forty members and is the up-and-comtnafratenaty on campus
for m diversity among members yet has a very strong bnimrrhnod Sigma Pi is vcryoompcopveiwkh
each and evrcy frsrrruty on campus and with your hetpwiBbecoa� even more domaaampm
Greek system a East Carotins. If you want KpOmk,expeheaatpmi�uiiahood,mmkaat
people, and have a good tune then go Sigma Pt
rrr
Sigma Tau Gamma has a long and
lhrritagrftf'rffriintwwwtm1
lives through fraternal brotheYhood. Wim ova 100 chaptere aaosi the i
recognizednaoonally and hat its home office m Wanxnsbtax MO.
with our chapter here at East Carolina which mawmsamew hash �
Come see what makes 2
Tau Gamma- taking tad
loacrj
as
TKE
T� Kappa Eptflco,fcuwfed�lW,ajsb
efaaaesiguSiidCsss
penatipaJaSS'rasfa ffyeafteweeiyee
? tebonaanofWioskTKEho
AX
Delta Chi is the newest fraternity on the ECU cantpm-CoinriasdmAprilof 1W1 AXslraady
enjoys a ntambsrsbip in excess of 50 j
athletics, and have aneama
t





Classifieds
oHie iEajat (Earoltman
January21, 1992
FOR KENT
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Immedutelv. To share Wilson Acre
Apt. Tav 1 4 of rent and utilities. Will
have own bedroom. Call 757-0458.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
for Febniarv tor apartment within an
apartment. 12 bkvk from campus.
Call 756-6418. $225 per month in-
cludes rent, utilities, phone and cable.
TWIN OAKS: Three bedroom, 212
bath, fullv-furnished townhouse.
Upperdav-man preferred. asonS30-
5173.
EFFICIENCY: 3 blocks from cam-
pus. Utilities, kitchen, bath included
Available Feb. 1 .$150. Call for NOW)
or 1221. Keep trving. Close tit laun-
dfy and market.
HOUSES FOR RENT: One bkvk
from campus. Five bedroom, two
Kith, SSOOmonth. Also, three bed-
room, two bath, SotXVmonth. Call
355-3195.
NEED TWO PEOPLE: to share a four
bedroom house. Rent is $175 and 1
3 utilities. 1 1 2 bath. 12 mile from
campus. Can move in anytime. Call
756-9824 . Ask tor Stephanie.
FOR SALE
Ringgold Towers
Now raking I cases tor
Bedroom, 2 Bedroom,
A Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
SEIZED CARS: trucks, boats, 4
wheelers, motorhomes, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available your area now. Call
8115-682-7555 ext. C-5999.
REPOSSESSED AND IRS FORE-
CLOSED HOMES: available at be-
low market value. Fantastic savings!
You repair. Also S&Lbailout proper-
ties. Call 805-682-7555 ext. H-6314.
YOU'VE ONLY GOT ONE WEEK
TO LIVE! Do it right! Spring Break in
Jamaica from only $429 Hotel, air,
transfers, parties! Sun Splash Tours
1-800-426-7710
A BAHAMAS PARTY CRUISE: 6
days $27! Panama City $99, Padre
$199,Caneun $499, Jamaica $399! jaat
758-5165, Wayne 757-1369 or 1-800-
6366786.
FENDER SQUIRE
STRATOCASTER: Red with white
pick guard tremclo and one double
aMlGbsonHumbuckingpickup$190
nog. Also Kav Acoustic six string,
black, SI 25. Please call 752-7490. Ask
for Greg.
1986 HONDA REBEL: 9,112 miles,
well maintained, new tires, brakes
and battery etc. $995 or best offer.
7324428. '
FOR SALE: Double bed, mattress,
box spring and frame - SI00, micro-
wave oven - $45,13' black and white
TV - S20. Call 752-2261 evenings.
FOR SALE Nintendo and five games
- $125. Call day or night 752-2575.
Leave message.
FORSALE
TIS THE SEASON TO BE SKIING
For sale: Olin 700 series - 170 cm;
Solomon bindings-647; Kerma poles;
Nordica boors - size 10. $100 nego-
tiable. 758-6748.
DAYTON A BEACH FLORIDA: Six
days only $69. Call 1600-346914.
KING SIZE WATERBED: for sale.
$170. Will negotiate. 758-5978.
ARMSTRONG FLUTE FOR SALE:
Great playing condition. $125. Call
Christen at 931-7853.
PARTY HOUSES: North Myrtle
Beach. Welcome groups of 4-34
people. Group-leader discounts. Call
Myrtle Beach Tours 94 p.m. 703-250-
2125.
HELP WANTED
MAKE $300-51000 WEEKLY: stuff-
ing envelopes at home. Start now!
Rush S.A.S.E. plus SI .00 to Home
Employers, 2301 Kent 8 LisCruces,
MM 88001.
ADDRESSERS WANTED IMME-
DIATELY! No experience necessary.
Process FHA mortgage refunds.
Work at home. Call 1-405-321-3064
FREE TRAVEL: Air couriers and
cruiseships. Students also needed
Christmas, Spring and summer lor
amusement park employment C all
805-682-7555 ext. F-3464.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE; Manv
positions Great benefits. Call 805-
682-7555 ext. P-3712.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at home. Cull toll
HFLPWANTED
Jasa 758-5165, Georgia 931-9363, Jeff
830-5367, Wayne and John 757-1369.
MUSICIANS NEEDED: Keyboard
or percussion to accompany ECU
dance classes. Good pay. Call 757-
6390.
MATURE STUDENT: to work part-
time as telephone receptionist for lo-
cal law firm. Hours are 8:30 to 1 p.m.
Monday thru Friday. Send resume
to: P.O. Box 5026, Greenville, N.C
27835.
FAST FUNDRAISING PRO-
GRAM: Fraternities, sororities, stu-
dent clubs. Eam up to SI000 in one
week. Plus receive a $1000 bonus
yourself. And a free watch just for
calling 1-00-932-0528 Ext. 65.
SPEND A SUMMER IN NEW
HAMPSHIRE: Outstanding boys
girls sprorts camps are hiring for all
positions. Camps are located on New
England's largest lake, near film site
of "On Golden Pond A variety of
programs are offered. Contact Kyle
at 919647-8047 fo reformation.
PERSONALS
PERSONALS
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
I lours:
Mon-Fai 8:30-3:00
FOR SALE: Queen size bookcase
waterbed with semi-flow mattress
SI 30. Dresser and mirror $7" creme
colored sofa in excellent condition
$175. Call 756-3332.
tree 1-800-467-8585 ext 5920.
SPRING WEAK: Bahamas Tarty
Cruise $27! Panama City $w & Pa-
dre $199! Cancun $460! Jamaica $399.
RUSH LCU'S: 1 fraternity Sigma
Phi Epsilon. For into, call 752-7641,
830-9324.
V ALLNTINL'S DAY: The big day is
coming soon. On Feb. 13 you will be
able to publicly tell the one you love
how much vou care about them in
The Eot Carolinian. The deadline is
Feb. 11 so come by the office to put an
add in.
WHY CHANCE STRING BREAK;
with a fly-by-night travel company?
Travel with Student Travel Services,
the northeast's premier tour opera-
tor. Travel to Jamaica, Cancun and
Florida in style and safety. Call Loren
for details at 931-7940.
ECUSTUDENTPlRATECLLB.will
meet tomorrow at 4 p.m. in the Tirate
dub social room. This will be an
important planning meeting.
GOOD LUCK; to all fraternities in
spring rush. Order of Omega.
ORDER OF OMEGA: meeting 5
p.m Wednesday, Jan. 22 in the Mul-
tipurpose room of Mendenhall.
WE BELIEVE; If you care enough to
help others get what they most want,
you can have everything you want in
life. If you still believe. Call 355-3789.
DON'T RISK YOUR SPRING
BREAK FUN! Travel with a com-
pany vou can trust. Go first class with
Student Travel Services. Call Loren
at 931-7940 for info. Quick! Deadline
for deposits is Feb. 7.
LOST GOLD ROPE NECKLACE:
with 2 charms (football and mizpah).
Sentimental value. Reward offered.
Tlease, please return. Call 757-0458.
GOOD LUCK: toall fraternities with
spring rash' Love, Alpha Delta Ti.
ECUSTUDENTPIRATECLUB. will
meet tomorrow at 4 p.m. in the Tirate
dub social rcxim. This will be an
important planning meeting.
PIKSONAIS
SPRING RUSH 1992: Sigma Nu.
Rush a fraternity with strong ideals
of brotherhood and honor.Sigma No,
Rush a fraternity that is against haz-
ing. Sigma Nu. Rush a fraternity with
excellence that has become a tradi-
tion. Rush Sigma Nu. 752-967, 752-
6681. We make the difference. Broth-
ers of Sigma Nu.
PIRATES: Congrats on an awesome
Teach F3owl victory' We're proud to
be Pirates Love, the Sigmas.
FRATERNITIES: Good luck thia
week with rush! Love, the Sigmas.
CONGRATULATIONS: to the new
Mstersof Sigma SigrnaSigrna: Heather
Bates, Phyllis Caruso, Elizabeth Gark,
Virginia Duncan, Tara Friedman,
Laura Hampton, Laura Hunrril -
Kimberly Ladd, Heather Lamer,
Renee Mauney, Megan McCartj
Brandi Nixon, Jennifer O'Connor,
Cathleen Rivenbank, Angel Warlick,
Laune Warner, Amy Wizowaty and
Jennifer Wright We are so proud to
call you a sister! Love, your S
sisters.
SPRING BREAK IS COMING!
Travel to Jamaica,Cancunand Florida
in luxury at an affordable price' Call
Loren for details at 931-7940. Hurry!
Deadline for deposits is Feb. 7.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
ALPHA PHI: would liketocor.grare-
late its new intiated members: Kr
Anderson, Kris Barbour, Velvet Bed.
Elizabeth C rd, Michelle C �
Shelly Dwbenspeck. Dahlia Dimitri
Aleta Dunbar, Debbie Hogge, Emily
Hughes, Amy Lassiter, Knsten L -
Charlotte Matthews, Melod)
MeCarver, Lauren McCutchecn.
Nicole Meloche, Melame Oakley,
Kimberly Parker, Christine RanscY
Betsv Smith, Monica Sweet, Nicole
Trent, Leigh Whitley, Lara Williams
and Stephanie Yoder. Weareso pr
to call you our sisters. Love, Alpha
Phi
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Itired of dorm living??
Then Call
ECU'S Rental Specialist
remco
east,
1B07 S. Charles Blvd. j wry f
(919) 35S-1313 " " ���
Let the one you love know how much you care
about them by sending them a Love Lines mes-
sage for Valentine's Day on Feb. 13th in Vie East
Carolinian. Come by the office across from the
library for more details.
Deadline is Tuesday,
February 11,1992.
Announcements
i�Q BUCCANEER!
Did vou miss it1 Some are still avail-
able at the Buccaneer office or the
Media Board Office at any time. Of-
fices are located on the 2nd floor of
Student TuLiiicationsBuilding (across
from Joyner Library).
COUNCIL OF STUDENI
ORCVNIZATIOXLEADLTLS
The Council of Student Organization
Leaders first spring meeting is
Wednesday, Jan. 22 from 5 p.m6:30
p.m. in Mendenhall's Gaat Room.
JeannieTomkalski,Director of ECU'S
Health Promotion and Wellness is
this month's speaker. The agenda for
Tuesday's meeting will also include
a leadership inventory and the orga-
nization speakout. For more infor-
mation, please ran tact Lisa Shibley at
757-4881.
RESUMtWQKKStlQES
Workshops on resume writing will
be conducted by the Career Services
staff to help students develop or re-
vise their resume. They will be held
in the Bloxton House on Jan. 21 at 3
p.m Jan 22 and 23 at 4 p.m.
ECUifilQLOGXCLUB
The first meeting of spring semester
will be held on Wednesday, Jan 22 at
6 p.m. in room BN109 of the Science
Complex. New members are always
welcome.
QUIEMATLORATIQN
This program introduces students to
career planning services, assesses ca-
reer development needs and facili-
tates career decision making process
in a systemic manner. Students will
be given the opportunity to take the
Strong Interest Inventory and regis-
ter for follow-up workshops.
Wednesday, Jan 22 and Thursday,
Jan. 30 from 34 p.m. in 313 Wright.
Tlease call the Counseling Center at
757-6661 for registration.
TJLM B MANACMEWT
Gain control over your time and your
life. Learn strategies to cope with the
demands of academics and univer-
sity life. Thursday, Jan. 23 from 1-2
p.m. in 313 Wright Building. Tlease
call the Counseling Center at 757-
6661 for registration.
TEST PREPARATION
AND TEST TAKING
Learn effective techniques to prepare
for and take tests. Tuesday, Jan. 21
from 1-2 p.m. in 313 Wnght. Tlease
call the Counseling Center at 757-
6661 for registration.
This six session group explores the
origins of self-esteem and provides
suggestions for enhancing your self-
image. This group will begin Mon-
day, Jan. 27 from 4-5 p.m. in 329
Wright. Tlease call the Counseling
Center at 757-6661 for registration.
EDUCATION MAJORS
The Department of Speech-Language
and Auditory Tathology (SLAT) will
be providing the speech and hearing
screening for all students eligible for
admission to Upper Division of
Teacher Education on Monday, Jan.
27; Tuesday, Jan 28; and Wednesday,
Jan. 29. The department will be test-
ing from 5-6 p.m. each day. NO AP-
POINTMENTISNEEDED(firstcome
basis). The SLAP Department is lo-
cated inBelkAnncxonCharlesStreet.
rOIINSEl INC. CENTER
The Counseling Center wants to
PUMP YOU UP! Attend our self es-
teem workshop and putsomemuscle
into celebrating yourself, improved
self esteem can positively affect: rela-
tionships, physical health, attitude,
body image and academic perfor-
mance. Our self esteem workshop
will begin on Monday, Jan. 27, at 4
p.m. in room 329 Wright. Tlease call
Counseling Center for registration at
757-6661.
UNIVERSITY
STUDENT MARSHAL
Any student interested in serving as
a university marshal for the 1991-92
school year may obtain application
from A-12 Minges. Student must be
classified as a junior by the end of
spring semester 1992 and have a 3.0
academic average to be eligible. Re-
turn completed application to A-12
Minges by Jan. 31,1992.
EASTXAROUNA
TENNIS TEAM
Anyone interested in playing varsity
women's tennis in the spring should
contact the tennis office as soon as
possible. 7571609.
OJLDEJLOl-QMEGA
Meeting in the multipurpose room of
Mendenhall, Jan. 22,5 p.m.
PHI KAPPA PHI FELLOWSHIPS
ECU'S Thi Kappa Thi chapter is ac-
cepting application from students
who wish to be nominated for com-
petitive scholarships worth up to
$7000 a year for first year grad uate or
professional study. Applications are
invited from students who have a
least advanced degree in a graduate
or professional school, and who have
superior academic records. Applica-
tion forms available from Dr. Mary
Glascoff, 105C Memorial Gym. Schol-
arship committee members are
Glascoff, David Sanders(HonorsPro-
gram), Eugene Ryan (philosophy)
and George Broussaxd (music). Ap-
plications deadline is Feb. 12.
RFAl. CRISIS INTERVENTION
We need your experience! Your
achievements in everyday situations
can be useful to others. Earn that
feeling of accomplishment. Real Cri-
sis Center is recruiting volunteer cri-
sis counselors for our telephone hot-
line and walk-in center. We will be
offering training classes in this en-
riching field beginning Jan. 27. Call
758-HELPor come by 312 E. 10th St.
RJAJLXRISJES-INIERVENTIQN
Teens! D1AL-A-TEEN is interested
in your valuable time. We are looking
for special teens, between the ages of
15 and 18, who would like to volun-
teer their invaluable listening skills
to help others in crisis. We are offer-
ing training dasses for out teen hotline
beginning Jan . 27. Call 758-HELP or
come by 312 E. U)th St.
NQN-CRFDIT EXCEL COURSE
Tne Decision Sciences Department
will offer a non-credit EXCEL course
at no cost. Classes are 2-4 p.m. Fri-
days from Jan 24 -Feb. 21. Enrollment
is limited; preference will be given to
students that received transfer credit
for DSCI2223 (Introduction to Com-
puters). To register call 919-757-6893
by Jan. 23. EXCEL is the spreadsheet
and graphics package used in busi-
ness courses.
GAMM BETA PHI
Attention students: Anyone with a
G.P.A. of 30 or better who is inter-
ested in Gamma Beta Thi, an honor
fratcrnitv and service organization,
please call Dena Trice at 931-8282 by
Jan. 29.
EASJLCAfiOLLNAJRJENDS
There will bea full membership meet-
ing of ECF on Thursday, Jan. 23 at 6
p.m. in GCB1031. All volunteers and
prospective members should attend.
Don't forget to bring SI 0 for a T-shirt.
If you cannot attend, contact your
director of servicesimmediately. This
is a mandatory meeting.
DECISION SC1EN
The Decision Sciences Sodety would
like to invite you to its first meeting
this semester. Wednesday, Jan. 22, in
GCB room 3007 at 4 p.m. Elections
willbeheld and refreshments served.
CHI ALPHA OMEGA
Chi Alpha Omega will hole spring
brothers rush Tuesday, Jan. 21-Thurs-
day Jan. 23, 7-9 p.m. in Mendenhall
great room three. All interested rush-
ees are invited. Psalm 133:1.
RUSH ANGEL FLIGHT
Angel Flight is an alternative to greek
life thafs fun and exciting. We are a
service organization that works with
the Air Force ROTC but with no mili-
tary affiliation. Angel Flight is for
those who want to get involved but
have not found the right organiza-
tion for them. Rush is Jan. 21-23 at 7
p.m. on the third floor of Wright
Annex Next to Wright Soda Shop.
CO-RFC BOWLING
REGISTRATION
Two men and two women team co-
rec bowling registration will be held
Jan. 22 at 5 p.m. in Biology 103. All
games will be played in the
Mendenhall Student Center. Teams
will be eligible to competes in com-
petitiveand recreational leagues. For
more information, call 757-6387.
4.
SPRING INTO
FITNESS WORKSHOP
Recreational Services' Spring Into Fit-
ness Workshop will be held Jar. 23
from 12-1 p.m. in Chnstenbury Gym
107 A. Fitness issues will be discussed
at this informative workshop. For
more information, call 757-t387.
FRIDAY FITNESS FLING
"Get Fir" by attending one oi Recre-
ational Services' Friday Fitness Flings
on Jan. 24 from 4-6 p.m. in
Chnstenbury Gym 108. These spe-
cial fitness classes are held free of
charge and prizes will be given to
participants. For more information,
call 757-6387.
WATER POLO
REGISTRATION
MEETING
Recreational Services will be holding
a H20 Polo Registration meeting on
Jan. 28 at 5 p.m. in Biology 103. All
interested should attend this impor-
tant meeting. For more information,
call 757-6387.
PHI KAPPA PI NATIONAL
HONOR fRATERNITY
Phi Sigma PI Smoker. If yourG.P-A.
is 3.30 or higher and you have be-
tween 32 and 96 credit hours, Phi
Sigma Pi wants you! An introduc-
tory meeting (smoker) will be held
on Monday, Jan 27 at 7 p.m. in GCB
1031. Dress is semi-formal (skirt and
tie), and refreshments will be served
afterwards. If you are unable to at-
tend, please contact Brenda Smith
at 931-9480.
m
Administration settle
wiretapping lawsuit:
(Editor's Note: The folio
mg article was compiled from
reports written by Matthew
Jones, The East Carotbaan's man
aging editor, and published bv
College Tress Service)
(CPS)�ECU has settled tw
lawsuits for $10,000 each and
mav deal with at least 1? more
after a wiretapping scandal in-
volving more than a half d a �
admirustrat -
Now, some believe that the
wiretapping discovered la
in the school's Public Safety and
Human Resources department
was not an is. -la ted incident.
A private attorney is invest
gatingallegati. � - I
taps across campus that are
related to the l1"1 wiretap as
involving the former chief I
Public Safety.
The initial lawsuit, filed
former CruetotPublic Saretv John
Rose, claimed that several ad-
ministrators illegally re rd -
his telephoned mversations wit)
Brooks Milb, a former tele n
munications employee, without
his consent dunnp the summer
of 1990.
A - �- � � the N rtl
Car. liter's report
ontheinbdenl ledRi :� rsi i ��'
the time thedirectorof telecom-
munications, said he tapped and
taped conversations on Mill's
phone line because he suspected
Mills had dealings with ill-
drugs. Those allegations were
never substantiated.
ThisOcti ber, the uni versi ty
stepped in to settle the lawsuit,
filed bv Rose against Robers i
and Mills, to save time and
money and beca �
to university attorney Ben j
the university found j
emploveeoftheunivt i
with actual knowledge thi
she was violating the lav
The univers
settlement and t'r � -
therempli .�-
on the same charj j
� I
i
han:
-
trap ript f tl
tap, at least 15 Idil i

Caj
.
-

ma�
In
contactt I
1991 Pri
t his staff I

the ' '
plaii
isreauiredt ���
S A V E
When You buy a medium or large cup o froa
In Original. Nonfat and Sugar Fr
Can't Believe If s
.gtxrtl
THETASTE TH ATSWQHJH E WORLI
830-393
1414 Charlel
W& foil
If vou don't think you belong-any here, you bel
OUR PURPOSE
Weseektopnwideate�Mnero
chdknges its members .
become bold in response to Jesus, the
Weundersunditatttisr rposei
ty�ofCririsri�Bbutioproiretr�
individual! �n� � relinaRship with H
I
WHERE:
Methodist Student Center
COl Kast Fifth Street
Corner of 5th & HoBj
WHEN:
WHO
Wej
at 3
The East G
If you reai
it was wort
East Carolina
Student Union B
is taking Ap
STUDENTJJNl
a
b
b
-l
for the 1992
Deadline: Thurs
Interested students may
Mendenhall Student Cenfc
Room 236 - SI





m
January 21, 1992 Bfre Eagt (Earoltnian 7
�nun and
ball loron
ll BswUl
fee Pirate
i i bv an
m
voting
heMu
all
st want
want in
j5 -
SPRING
It .)
isswitn

( KLACt
PI KS( )NAI S
SPRING RUSH 1992: Sigma Nu.
Rush t tratemitv with strong ideals
ofbrotherhood and honor. Sigma Nu.
Rush I tratvrnitv that is against haz-
ing Sigma Nu Rush a traternity with
fuvliiiuY that has become a tradi-
tion Rush Sigma Nu. 752-07,752-
668 I Wo make the difference. Broth-
er, of 5igflM Nu.
PI R n & Congmts on an awesome
Patch tVnvl victory' We're proud to
be Pirates! I OVt the Sigmas.
FRATERNITIES! Good luck this
week with rush' leve, theSigmas.
CONGRATUlATKWSi to the new
sistersof Sigma St gnu Sigma: Heather
Bites, PhyiitoC JtfvaoJ liMbethOark,
Virginia Duncan, Tara Friedman,
Laura Hampton, Laura Hunniford,
Kimberl) Ladd, Heather Lanier,
Renee Mauney, Megan McCarty,
Brandi Nixon, lenniter O'Connor,
C athleen Rivenbank, Angel Warlick,
1 aurie Warner, Ann- Wiowaty and
�or Wright We are so proud to
call you a sister! Love, your Sigma
- sters
I I'll PHI: would like tocongraru-
vs �� ii members: Kristine
Kris Barbour, Velvet Beck,
i v-
ne at
rOMING!
I lorida
ibeth Clifford, Michelle Cox,
I taubenspeck. Dahlia Dimitri,
bar, 1 Vlbie I logger Emily
s my Lassiter, Kristen Lott,
�o Matthews, Melody
McCarver Lauren McCutcheon,
Nicole Meloche, Melanie Oakley,
Kimberl) Parker Christine Ransdell,
IV -v smith. Monica Sweet, Nicole
In Leigh Whitiey, Una Williams
tiueYoder Wearesoproud
you our listers. Love, Alpha
how much you care
m a Love Lines mes-
Feb. 13th in Vie East
iftice across from the
liiesday,
L1992.
ne n
. an h
I tion,
931-8282 by
�KILNPb
?rshipmeet-
, an 23 at b
untversand
hould attend.
Lir a T-shirt,
on tact your
diatelv.This
hole spring
an.21-Thurs-
Mendenhall
?rested rush-
r33:l.
irive to greek
ing. We are a
it works with
twithnomili-
Flight is for
involved but
;ht organiza-
an.21-23at7
r of Wright
: Soda Shop.
.ING
Imen team co-
in will be held
)logy 103. All
Ived in the
i'nter. Teams
petes in com-
1 leagues. For
757-6387.
SPRING INTO
HTNLSS WORKS1IQE
Kii n v :a. services' Spring IntoFit-
ness V. � - op will be held Jan. 23
from 12-1 p.m. in ChnstenburyGym
107A. Fitness issues will be discussed
at this informative workshop. For
more information, call 757-6387.
FRIDAY FJTNESSJUNG
"Get Fit bv attending one of Recre-
ational Services' Fndav Fitness Flings
on
)an. 24 from 4-6 p.m.
in
Chnstenbury Gym 108. These spe-
cial fitness classes are held free of
charge and prizes will be given to
participants. For more information,
call 757-6387.
WATER PQLQ
REGJSTRAI1QN
MEETING
Recreational Services will be holding
a H20 Polo Registration meeting on
Jan. 28 at 5 p.m. in Biology 103. All
interested should attend this impor-
tant meeting. For more information,
call 757-6387.
EHLKAPPA PI NATIONAL
Phi Sigma Pi Smoker. If your G.P.A.
is 3.30 or higher and you have be-
tween 32 and 96 credit hours, Phi
Sigma Pi wants you! An introduc-
tory meeting (smoker) will be held
on Monday, Jan 27 at 7 p.m. in GCB
1031. Dress is semi-formal (skirtand
tie), and refreshments will be served
afterwards. If you are unable to at-
tend, please contact Brenda Smith
at 931-9480.
Administration settles
wiretappi
(Editor's Note: The follow-
ing article was compiled from
reports written by Matthew
lones, The East Carolinian's man-
aging editor, and published by
College Press Service)
(CPS)�ECU has settled two
lawsuits for $10,000 each and
mav deal with at least 15 more
after a wiretapping scandal in-
volving more than a half dozen
administrators.
Now, some believe that the
wiretapping discovered last fall
m the school's Public Safety and
Human Resources department
was not an isolated incident.
A private attorney is in vesti-
gatingallegationsof illegal wire-
taps across campus that are un-
related to the 1990 wiretap case
involving the former chief of
IXiblic Safety.
The initial lawsuit, filed by
tormerChiefofPublicSafetyJohn
Rose, claimed that several ad-
ministrators illegally recorded
his telephone conversations wi th
Brooks Mills, a former telecom-
munications employee, without
his consent during the summer
Of 1990.
According to the North
Carolina State Auditor's report
on the incident,Ted Roberson.at
the time the director of telecom-
munications, said he tapped and
taped conversations on Mill's
phone line because he suspected
Mills had dealings with illegal
drugs Those allegations were
never substantiated.
This October, the university
stepped in to settle the lawsuit,
tiled bv Rose against Roberson
and Mills, to save time and
i
State searches for more organ donors
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
money and because, according
to university attorney Ben Irons,
the university found that "no
employeeof the university acted
with actual knowledge that heor
she was violating the law
The university paid Rose's
settlement and the settlement of
another employee, LoisBraxton,
on the same charge of an illegal
wiretap out of a special univer-
sity account that specifically
handles legal settlements.
According to copies of the
transcripts of the original wire-
tap, at least 15 additional people
areentitled to settlements. Under
federal law, a party whose oral
communication is intercepted
over a phone line wi thou t consent
is entitled to $10,000 punitive
damages. An additional lawsuit
has resulted from the wiretap.
Capt.Stanlcy Kittrell of thepublic
safety department, the man who
discovered the transcripts of the
wiretap and reported the infor-
mation to the Federal Bureau of
Investigation, claims he was
punished by superiors for re-
porting the crime.
According to confidential
information sent to The East
Giwlinum, Kittrell's office was
moved from the Iiblie Safety
Building to a rarely used cam-
pus building shortly after he
contacted the FBI in November
1990. Prior to theincident Kittrell
wa s i n cha rge of 42 sta ff members,
but his staff was reduced to zero
after internal reorganizations in
November last year. Also, before
the incident, Kittrell was a
plainclothes officer, but now he
is required to wear a uniform
Every 30 minutes a person is
added to the donor list in need of
a heart, kidney, lung, pancreas or
liver. A third of these people will
die each year.
In the United States right now,
there are 24,795 people waiting
for an organ. In North Carolina on
Nov. 30, 1991 there were 673
people waiting for an organ.
Laura Richard, public and
professional relations manager for
the Carolina Organ Procurement
Agency said: "Being an organ do-
nor gives you the chance to save
someone's life. Give someone
their life back
It is recommended that po-
tential organ donors should dis-
cuss donation with their families.
All donors should register at the
Department of Motor Vehicles. A
"Yes" will then be inserted in the
box marked "Donor" on your
driver's license. Organs are often
used after someone has died in a
tragic death such as a car accident.
Most people in America say
"No" to organ donation because
they have no concept of the plan.
Being an organ donor costs no
money a nd saves another person's
life.
Many people believe the body
will be mutilated after the death of
an organ donor; that is untrue.
When a person who is an
organ donor dies, they are kept
alive by life support systems until
after surgery. After the person
dies, blood tests are performed
that check for the HIV virus,hepa-
titis and infectious diseases.
After the tests are performed,
surgery is conducted. An incision
in the chest cavity is made and the
organs are taken out. The chest
cavity is then sewn up. This pro-
cedure takes from 24 � 36 hours.
After the organs are taken out of
the body, the regular procedures
for death are taken.
Organs are placed according
to medical emergency, blood tis-
sue and geographic location.
There were 1338 transplants
performed in 1990. If all of the
potential donors said yes, the
number of transplants would be
much higher.
Because of ignorance to the
concept of organ donation, many
people will die.
ECU student Nicole Pratt
strongly supportsorgan donation.
"My boyfriend's father has been
waiting for a heart almost two
years shesaid. "Peopleshouldn't
die selfishly
For more information about
becoming an organ donor, contact
Richard at 757-0090.
tifc
1992 BSN
STUDENTS.
MP" Enter the Air Force
? immediately after gradua-
tion � without waiting for the
results of your State Boards. You
can earn great benefits as an Air
Force nurse officer. And if selected
during your senior year, you may
qualify for a five-month internship
at a major Air Force medical facili-
ty. To apply, you'll need an overall
2.50 GPA. Serve your country
while you serve your career.
USAF HEALTH PROFESSIONS
COLLECT
919-850-95-19

$�
WHY WAIT
FOR YOUR
TAX REFUND
WHEN YOU CAN
GET YOUR MONEY FASV.
USE ll&R BLOCK'S RAPID REFUND PROGRAM
It's available whether H&R Block
prepares your tax return or not.
H&K BLOCK
IT'S FAST!
For more details or to see if you
quality call H&R Block now.
I Buyer's MarketMemorial Drive 756-1209
University Square 10th St. 757-2400
SearsCarolina East Mall 355-9700

I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
$ A VI
5 O !
We Are
uying
When You bJy a medium or large cup of frozen yogurt
In Original, Nonfat and Sugar Free Nonfat.
'l Cant Believe Itfs
JYbgurtL
830-3933
1414 Charles Blvd.
Coupon not valid with any other otter
1 THE TASTE THAT'S WO N T H EWORIPOVEIV
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Used IMen'slClothing
$ WEPAY�AS1L$
SHIRTS SWEATERS T
PANTS SWEATS KNITS
JEANS SHOES ETC.
CASUAL & DRESS
If vou don't think vou belonganywhere,you belong with us.
OUR PURPOSE
We seek to prov.de a Christian environment that not only accepts, but
ehcn� ta&mbm to act and react tn iheir struggle w,ih God and to
JSttSEK �nouV puSSo mold people uito a parttcular
typTofSSStS to promote Jauthonty of Chnst to call each person
individually into a relationship with Htm.
LARGE & EXTRA LARGE ONLY
WINTER OR SUMMER
WHERE:
Methodist Student Center
501 East Fifth Street
Corner of 5th & Holly
WHEN: Wednesday Nights
at 5:00 pm
WHO: Dan Earnhardt
758-2030
Park in the city parking lot behind Globe Hardware
and use our new reasr entrance!
THE ESTATE SHOP
416 Evans St.
(Across from Cubbies)
752-3866
10:00- 5:00 Mon- Sat
We Also Buy & Sell Used Furniture
The East Carolinian
If you read it here
it was worth reading
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking Applications for
TTTDFNT UNION PRESIDENT
for the 1992-1993 Term
Deadline: Thursday January 23
Interested students may pick up applications at
Mendenhall Student Center's Information Desk and
Room 236 - Student Union.





(3
January 21. 1992 Oitic East Carolinian7
PERSONALS
SPRING KlsH 1992: Sigma Nu.
� with strong ideals
od ii d honor. Sigma Nu.
ythal is against haz-
lk'rnitvwith
is become a rradi-
maNu 752-9607,752-
i - fference Broth-
riu
-
its on an awesome
victory! We tv proud to
, m the Siemas.
AM It s
lood luck this
theStgmaa
T!ONS:tothenev�
a Heather
� ; tzabeth Clark,
I ara Friedman,
i Hunniford,
� l it her Lamer,
Megan McCartv,
ifer O'Connor,
. :v,eiVarlick,
A waty and
SO proud to
ove your Sigma
-1 tocongratu-
� rs Kristine
� Velvet Beck,
le Cox,
� I lahlia Dimitri,
e Hogge, Emih
- sten Lett,
Melody
McCutcheon,
Melar e Oakley,
Ransdell,
5weet, Nicole
, Lara Williams
� � kVearesoproud
ters. I ove, Alpha
how much vou care
n a Love Lines mes-
Feb. 13th in Tlic East
rtice across from the
lesday,
L1992.
,G INTO
WORKSHOP
� toFit-
� � : an. 23
� buryGym
- discussed
. rkshop. For
757-6387.
EKIPA1 FITNESS FLING
attendingiine of Recre-
Fitness Flings
I fi im 4-h p.m. in
bury Gym 108. These spe-
isses an held free of
pr res will be given to
ts fr men? information,
.10 HI
intza-
tLINO
IUN
It- � im pq.
r nvill be held
ogy 103 Ail
ed in the
nter. Teams
Ipetes in com-
leagues. For
57 �87.
WATER POLO
REGISTRATION
MILTING
� r ices will be holding
Registration meeting on
� it 5 p.m. in Bkkgy 103. All
� uld attend this lmpor
tant meeting. For more information
call 7! �
PHI KAPPA PI NATIONAL
HONOR FRATERNITY
Phi Sigma Pi Smoker If your G.P �
isJO or higher and you have be-
I 96 credit hours, Pr i
a Pi wants you! An introduc-
tory meeting (smoker) will beheld
on Monday,Jan 27 at 7 p inGCB
1031 Dress is semi-formal (skirtanci
tie and refreshments will be served
afterwards If you are unable to a
tend, please contact Brenda Smitt
K931-9460
-�
Administration settles
wiretapping lawsuits
State searches for more organ donors
(Editor's Note: The follow-
ing article was compiled from
reports written by Matthew
jones, The East Cflroftnaw's man-
aging editor, and published bv
, ollege Press Service)
(CPS�ECU hassettledtwo
lawsuits tor $10,(XX) each and
mav deal with at least 15 more
atter a wiretapping scandal in-
volving more than a half doen
administrators.
Now. some believe that the
wiretapping discovered last tall
in the school's Public Safetv and
Human Resources department
was not an isolated incident.
A private attorney is in vesti-
eatingallegationsot'illegal wire-
taps across campus that are un-
related to the 1990 wiretap case
involving the former chief ot
Public Safety.
The initial lawsuit, filed by
formerChiefof PublicSafety John
Rose, claimed that several ad-
ministrators illegally recorded
his telephone conversations with
Brooks Mills, a former telecom-
munications employee, without
his consent during the summer
ol 1990.
According to the North
v arolina State Auditor's report
n the incident, lev! Roberson,al
. time the director ol telecom-
munications, said he tapped and
taped conversations on Mill's
phone line because he suspected
Mills had dealings with illegal
drugs rhose allegations were
never substantiated.
This October, the university
stepped in to settle the lawsuit,
filed by Rose against Roberson
and Mills, to save time and
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
money and because, according
to university attorney Ben Irons,
the university found that "no
employee of the university acted
with actual knowledge that heor
she was violating the law
The university paid Rose's
settlement and the settlement oi
another employee, 1 oisBraxton,
on the same charge of an illegal
wiretap out of a special univer-
sity account that specifically
handles legal settlements.
According to copies of the
transcripts of the original wire-
tap, at least 15 additional people
areentitled to settlements. Under
federal law, a party whose oral
communication is intercepted
overaphonelinewittioutconsent
is entitled to $10,000 punitive
damages. An additional lawsuit
has resulted from the wiretap.
Capt.Stanley Kittrell ot the public
safety department, the man who
discovered the transcriptsof the
wiretap and reported the infor-
mation to the Federal Bureau of
Investigation, claims he was
punished bv superiors tor re-
porting the crime.
According to confidential
information sent to The I asl
Carolinian, KittreH's office was
mmeo! from the Public Safety
Building to a rarely used cam-
pus building shortly after he
contacted the FBI in November
1990. Prior to meincident Kittrell
wasinchargeof 42 staff members
but his statt was reduced to zero
after internal reorganizations in
November last year. Also,before
the incident, Kittrell was a
plainclothes officer, but now he
is required to wear a uniform
Every 30 minutes a person is
added to the donor list in need of
a heart, kidney, lung, pancreas or
liver. A third of these people will
die each year.
In the United States right now,
there are 24795 people waiting
for an organ. In North Carolina on
Nov. 30, 11 there were 673
people waiting for an organ.
Laura Richard, public and
professional relations manager for
the Carolina Organ Procurement
Agency said: "Being an organ do-
nor gives vou the chance to save
someone's life. Give someone
their life back
It is recommended that po-
tential organ donors should dis-
cuss donation with their families.
All donors should register at the
Department of Motor Vehicles. A
"Yes" will then be inserted In the
box marked "Donor" on your
driver's license. Organs are often
used after someone has died in a
tragic death such as a car accident.
Most people in America say
"N'o" to organ donation because
they have no concept of the plan.
Being an organ donor costs no
money and saves another person's
life.
M a n v people believe the b d y
will be mutilated after the death of
an organ donor; that is untrue
When a person who is an
organ donor dies, they are kept
alive by lite support systems until
atter surgery. After the person
dies, blood tests are performed
that check for the HIV virus, hepa-
titis and infectious diseases.
After the tests are performed,
surgery is conducted. An incision
in the chest cavity is made and the
organs are taken out. The chest
cavity is then sewn up. This pro-
cedure takes from 24 3h hours.
After the organs are taken out ot
the body, the regular procedures
tor death are taken.
Organs are placed according
to medical emergency, blood tis-
sue and geographic location
There were 13398 transplants
performed in 1990. It all of the
potential donors said yes, the
number of transplants would be
much higher
Because of ignorance to the
concept of organ donation, many-
people will die.
ECU student Nicole Pratt
strongly supportsorgan donation.
"My boyfriend's father has been
waiting for a heart almost two
years she said. "Teople shouldn't
die selfishly
For more information about
becomingan organ donor, contact
Richard at 757-0090.
W immedi
1992 BSN
STUDENTS.
Enter the Air Force
immediately after gradua-
tion � without waiting for the
results of your State Boards You
can earn great benefits as an Air
Force nurse officer And if selected
during vour senior year, you mav
qualify for a five-month internship
at a major Air Force medical facili-
ty To apply, you'll need an overall
2.50 GPA. Serve your country
while you serve your career
I SAF HEALTH PROFESSIONS
COLLECT
9I9-W0-9949
m&
&
SAVE
5 O :
WHY WAIT
FOR YOUR
TAX REFUND
WHEN YOU CAN
GET YOUR MONEY FASV.
USE ll.tR BLOCK'S RAPID Kill NI) PROGR M
It's available whether H&R Block
prepares your Ui return or not.
ITS FAST!
or more details or to see it you
I
quali
H&R BLOCK
tv call llAiR Block now
Buyer's Market Memorial Drue
University SquarelOth St r5"
Sears Carolina East Mall 555 (i1(
(6-1 . n
2400
I When You buy a medium or large cup of frozen yogurt. f
In Original. Nonfat and Sugar Free Nonfat. (
Cant Believe If s
gurtl
830-3933
1414 Charles Blvd.
We Are
Buying
Used IMen'slClothing
1 THE TASTE THAT'S WON THE WORLD OVETL J
$ WE PAY CASH $
SHIRTS SWEATERS T
PANTS SWEATS KNITS
JEANS SHOES ETC.
CASUAL & DRESS
If you don't think you belong an v here, you belong ith us.
Ol RPl RPOSK
Christi.il but to promote the authority ol C hnsl to call each pensn
illy into a relationship iih Hun.
LARGE & EXTRA LARGE ONLY
WINTER OR SUMMER
WHERE:
Methodist Student (enter
501
C
Fast Fifth Street
orner of 5th & Holly
WHEN: Wednesday Nights
at 5:00 pm
WHO: Han Farnhardt
758-2038
Park in the city parking lot behind Globe Hardware
and use our new reasr entrance!
THE ESTATE SHOP
416 Evans St.
(Across from Cubbies)
752-3866
10:00 - 5:00 Mon - Sat
We Also Buy & Sell Used Furniture
The East Carolinian
If you read it here
it was worth reading
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking Applications for
ST1THKNT UNION PRESIDENT
for the 1992-1993 Term
Deadline: Thursday January 23
Interested students may pick up applications at
Mendenhall Student Center's Information Desk and
Room 236 - Student Union.
Seagcrobj
aw t





8
Wht gaatOIaroHnfan January 21, 1992
Private collection agencies
search for deadbeat dads
(AP) � Peggy MacMillan's ex-
husband hasn't paid a penny of the
$35,000 in child support heowes his
10-year-old son. But she can't count
on financially strapped Massachu-
setts to help her collect.
So she and hundreds like her
are looking to a new breed of debt
collectors: professionals who hunt
down thedeadbeats�fathersin92
percent of the cases � and firmly
urge them to pay up.
The private collection agencies
gained considerable clout this win-
ter by forming a national network,
the Child Support Collection As-
socia uon, that enables them to track
deadbeat dads from state to state.
The network has 29 affiliates.
Nearly half the women in
America who should be receiving
child support aren't. Deadbeatdads
owed$19billionbytheendofl989,
according to the most recent statis-
tics available from the Census Bu-
reau.
Debt collectors, once recipients
of scorn and abuse, say the new
business is improving their image.
It's their chance to do good � and
make a bundle.
"We're so confident in our
ability to collect, our fee is based
onlyonoursuccess, "said Bill Lodge,
president of Hoit, Winston & Carter
of Norwood, which is tracking
MacMillan's former husband.
Like other members of the
network, Lodge's firm charges a
percentage of the money it collects.
The cut ranges from 20 percent to33
percent and sometimes includes I
$25 application fee.
'Tor me, getting i percentage
is better than nothing said
MacMillan, 38.
Association members say they
rely on professional and often se-
cret methods to find absent parents
and persuade them to pay. Collec-
tors will negotiate payment plans if
the parent truly can't afford the
court-ordered amount.
"But a person who tells you
they're broke and owns I Mercedes
� that tells you something Lodge
said.
Armed with little more than a
name. Social Security number ind
perhaps the man's favorite maga-
zine, the agency starts hunting. It is
not uncommon for Lodge to find I
debtor by examining client lists
bought from such companies as
Sports Illustrated and Domino's
Pizza.
Jim Jones, president of Child
Support Services, which has 390
active cases, said once the father is
found, his staff of seven goes right
for the heartstrings � mentioning
the children's names repeatedly in
conversations with the parent.
"We want those children to be
on his mind Jones said.
Charles Drake, the Texan who
came up with the idea for the na-
tional network, takes it one step
further.
"1 can make his life literally a
nightmare, like he's been doing to
his own children Drake said. He
said he doesn't hesitate to call dead-
beats in bars, at work, or in the
middle of the night. '1 am not only
a thorn in their side, but probably
their worst nightmare
Some fathers argue it's unfair
for businesses to get money in-
tended for their children.
"The thing that hurts is it's
supposed to be going for my kids
said RonShirley of Portsmouth, Va
who is paying through a collection
agency. "That's 25 percent going
down the drain
Drake's business, Children's
Support Services, ishandlingabout
1,400 cases and expects to collect
$1.5 million this year.
The product of a divorced
couple who watched his mother
become a "part-time bill collector
Drake views unpaid child support
as mac h mrc than an overdue bill.
"This isn't a credit card debt or
a car loan he said. 'This is their
kids
Library offers unique resources
From Staff Reports
Students looking for current
information concerning hot topics
like hazardous waste disposal,
public school reform, adolescent
pregnancy, child abuse, day care,
coastal resources management, or
wateT pollution in North Carolina,
there is a good chance you will find
it in the North Carolina govern-
ment document microfiche collec-
tion.
The collection can be found in
Joyner Library's North Carolina
Collection.
The North Carolina Collection
is a complete depository for state
documents on microfiche.
Since 1988 the North Carolina
State Publications Clearinghouse,
located at the State Library in Ra-
leigh, has sent the North Carolina
Collection regular shipments on
microfiche.
The collection includes annual
or biennial reports, research stud-
ies, and journals or newsletters
published by major state agencies,
including universities and com-
munity colleges.
For the first time since the pro-
gram began, monographic titles in
the collection are now accessible
on-line through Joyner Library's
LS2000 catalog.
Subject, author or title searches
will turn up documents in the mi-
crofiche collection.
Nation celebrates Martin Luther King Day
, (AP) � Martin Luther King
rs widow called for an end to
poverty, residents of Oakland,
Zalif demanded an end to
drugs, and a New York con-
gressman urged stiffer penalties
for bias crimes as Americans
marked King Day.
Coretta Scott King chal-
lenged the Bush administration
!to erase poverty and rc-awaken
Ihope in the poor. In her annual
State of the Dream" speech
�Sunday, she called on the gov-
ernment and the private sector
to increase job-training and child
and health care programs.
"Our nation cannot do less
!she said. "The time has come for
!us to civilize ourselves for the
�total, direct and immediate abo-
lition of poverty
Mrs. King and Winnie
�Mandela, wife of African Na-
;tional Congress leader Nelson
Mandela, planned to lead a
I march through the city today.
Elsewhere:
� New York Gov. Mario
'Cuomo planned to attend a
j march in Albany, N.Y accom-
' panied by actor Harry Belafonte
j and Shen Tong, chairman of the
1 Democracy for China Fund.
"We not only honor the
! memory of Dr. Martin Luther
i King Jr we re-affirm our vow to
j stem racism and pursue social
; justice through reconciliation
; and healing, just as this extraor-
; dinary man taught us Cuomo
1 said Sunday.

� A "Freedom Train" with
� an estimated 4,000 riders wasex-
; pected to kick off the holiday in
; California, it was to travel from
; San Jose to San Francisco, where
; a march was scheduled. In Los
! Angeles, a 14-foot sculpture
i honoring King was to be un-
'� veiled in the city's Watts section.
march through New Haven, 35
miles northeast of Detriot. Every
year the march concludes with
his impersonation of King deliv-
ering his "I Have a Dream"
speech.
King was assassinated on
April 4,1968, in Memphis, Tcnn.
He would have been 63.
In Oakland, Calif about 80
residents marched Sunday to re-
claim their neighborhood from
drug dealers. "Drugs are just an-
other form of slavery. 1 can't
think of a better way to honor
Dr. King than to do this said
Gilda Baker, 39, a mother of two.
Rep. Charles E. Schumer, D-
N.Y proposed legislation to in-
crease prison terms for federal
offenses motivated by racial,
ethnic, religious or gender bias.
Mrs. King on Sunday pre-
sented Mrs. Mandela with an
award from the King Center for
Nonviolent Social Change for the
progress the Mandclas made in
fighting apartheid.
Mrs Mandela accepted the
award and left. Mrs. King said
Mrs. Mandela was ill, but didn't
elaborate.
In her speech, Mrs. King
stopped short of directly criti-
cizing President Bush, who
traveled to Atlanta on Friday and
laid a wreath at King's tomb.
Instead, she told about 850
people that government hasn't
done enough � especially for
young Americans.
"Brothers and sisters, it's
time for an all-out campaign to
put America back to work she
said.
IN CONCERT J3
J3

n

"TRUTH"
America's Premier Christian Group


� In Arkansas, Daisy Bates,
who was an adviser to the nine
black students who integrated
Little Rock's Central High in
1957, was to be honored with a
portrait in the state Capitol.
� In Michigan, William
Harris, 37, planned hit annual
f Thursday, Jan. 30th At 7:30 P.M. �
�f Wright Auditorium - ECU '
f Greenville. N.C. JJ
fl $6.00 In Advance, $8.00 At The Door Jt
Call 355-3500 For Ticket Info jg
J3 Sponsored by GRACE eT
1 Christian Fellowship ca
�T ofECU Jj
Woman serial killer enjoys
power, control over men
(AP) � An admitted prosti-
tute who told of killing seven men
who picked her up along Florida
roadways repeatedly shot one
victim ou t of a need to feel power
over men, a prosecutor said Fri-
day.
The defense countered that
Aileen Wuomos killed business-
man Richard Mallory in self-de-
fense because he subjected her to
hideous abuse.
In opening statements in the
first of five murder cases brought
against her, State Attorney John
Tanner contended that she shot
Mallory four times "because she
didn't want to leave a witness
"She liked control tremen-
dous power. She'd been con-
trolling men for years and she
took everything Richard Mallory
had, including his life Tanner
told jurors.
Wuomos, 35, was charged
with first-degree murder in the
death of Mallory, 51, whose de-
composed body was found near
Ormond Beach, north of Daytona
Beach, in December 1989. Mallory
owned an electronics repair shop
in Clearwater.
Prosecutors said they will
seek the death penalty if she is
convicted. Although Florida has
never executed a woman, there
are three women on death row.
Investigators say Wuomos
went on a 13-month killing spree
of men,and havedesenbed hcras
the nation's first female serial killer
to be brought to trial.
Wuomoshasbeen jailed since
her arrest in January 1991.
Authorities say Wuornos
confessed in a lengthy videotaped
statement to killing seven men.
As yet, she is charge in five of the
deaths.
Assistant Public Defender
Tricia Jenkins said Wuomos shot
Mallory in self-defense after ac-
ceptinga nde from near Tampa to
Daytona Beach.
"Mallory was inflicting
abuse. He wanted to see her pain
Ms. Jenkins said, telling the jury
they would "hear evidence of
bondage, rape, sodomy and deg-
radation
"Lee Wuornos is not guilty
Ms. Jenkins said. "She defended
herself. She had had enough
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Moon-nt walks along the Seine in Paris
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or Ms. Evoncho (Browster A-1117.757-6769)
KAPPA ALPHA
KA, like all gentlemen,
uphold chivalry as did
the ancient crusaders,
the knights of old.
RUSH:
Jan. 21 - Pig Pickin'
Jan 22 - Hickory Hams
Jan. 23 - King Sandwich
Jan. 24 - Invite Only
Rush Kappa Alpha 50011th St. 757-0128
ntertainmen
ese art e




s$
Photo by Jill Ch�rl
Nuwa painteci by Hui Zhang, is proof that a person
o hear to appreciate beauty and mystery in the � c
King's Dominion
holds open auditi
By Lisa Williams
Staff Writer
Kings Dominion theme park
is hosting a 10 city talent search
and they have chosen ECU as
one of their stops. The auditions
are being held today in the A. J.
Fletcher Musk Building from4-6
pjTL
The auditions are limited to
two minutes and a piano accom-
panist is prep-
are not necessary
The Entertair
merit began its to
Washington, DCl
ether cities the M
are Philadelphia,
Md.and Ricfanra
The departr
proximately 150
able for the 1��
See Auditionl
Family Sta
By Dana Danielson
Assistant Entertainment Editor
A mix of jazz, rhythm and
blues, rock and hip-hop?
Unpleasing to the ear would be the
first imaginable result, but New
York based band, The Family
Stand, has made an art of this seem-
ingly odd melding.
Released in October 1991,
MooninSoorpioCEastWest Records
America) is the band's third al-
bum.
Each one of the 16cutsoff Scor-
pio provides the listener with ful-
filling lyrics, melody and rhythm.
The unusual mix of music styles is
responsible for the uniqueness and
individuality each song presents.
"If there's a theme to our al-
bums as a whole, if s that of regen-
eration and resurrection said Pe-
ter Lord, keyboardist and lead
backing vocalist. "It also relates to
�he idea of exposing and seeing
things that have been hidden. Some
erf the songs deal with politics, but
underneath even those, mere are
fcuman relationships. Thafs the di-
chotomy that The Family Stand
ideals with
A refreshing aspect of this lat-
est album is the way in which the
iband approaches controversial is-
sues from different anglesandper-
�pectives.
Issues dealt with in Scorpio in-
idude global change, media con-
L cultural apartheid, intimate
itionships, the need for cultural
rtity, adoption and child mo-
itkm.
"It's one heDacious sonic ex-
. packing killer grooves,
guitar and stirring, sensual
als said the band members.
As musicians, The Family
JStand claims to draw upon an ever
widening array of rhythm and
irockpop traditions.
irtarkenmgbacktothe'60s
i m the band keeps their feet
firmly to me present.
Mmm in Scorpio also boasts
S,

m Vernon Reid (from Living
v - Drayton (from
The Family SU
influences fror
Mother's Fine!
trumpeter Tyro
Guy Routte (frc
Theband'si
tars; A Novel B$
The Stand, ieatu
and Deliver"
Hurt When W
followed by a:
From this, thj
Heaven" ascenJ
US rhythm a
Britain, it climt
10 and topped





Her enjoys
iver men
Wuomis has boon (ailed since
St inlanuan '
ities i Wuornos
. � .ilrin;(h videotaped
sewn men
� the
efender
' Krnosshot
i iftei ac
pa to
m
rt ,is intlu ting
�tvhei pain
-the iir
J( no oi
i : iuilt
,1 She defended
� i,
in London
ssion)
ace
able low prices
I. and turtion
I
� t
LPHA
entlemen,
ry as did
usaders,
of old.
Pickin'
ry Hams
ISandwich
te Only
11th St. 757-0128
Entertainment
(HI?e SaHt Gkirultntan
January 21, 1992
m
Chinese art exhibit provides new perspectives of Far East
By Jim Shamlin
Staff Writer
Photo by Jill Chtrry � ECU Photo Lab
"Nuwa painted by Hui Zhang, is proof that a person need not be able
to hear to appreciate beauty and mystery in the world
The Far East has always fas-
cinated Westerners. We attempt
to appreciate the beauty and sim-
plicity of an exotic culture, only
to be confronted by aesthetics that
are diametrically opposed to our
own.
As a result, a conflict arises
that generally results in frustra-
tion or in awe � an erpericnce
that defies verbal expression.
This experience has been
brought to the United States by
the Global 2(X)0 project of the
Carter Presidential Center, which
has sponsored an art exhibition
by deaf students of the people's
Republic of China. The exhibi-
tion will be on display in the
Mendenhall Student Center gal-
lery through Jan. 31.
The exhibition features an ar-
ray of works created by students,
ages 16-20, at the Shanghai Voca-
tional Technical School for the
Deaf. The paintings on display
demonstrate a variety of styles
and media.
Zhenfei Lin's "A Beautiful
Girl of Ancient Times a Chinese
watercolor, represents the tradi-
tional artwork, while Weiping
Li's "Mother and Son a lacquer
painting, eneorporatcs modern
stylistics more familiar to West-
ern audiences.
Inaddition to the typical land-
scapes and portraits, there arc ab-
stract and expressionistic works
that one might not expect to find
in a gallery of Oriental art.
Several of the works contain
religious and political overtones
� sentiments that would seem
impossible to express under the
watch of a totalitarian govern-
ment.
Regardless of style or me-
dium, each work contains a dis-
tinctly non-Western elements that
defy Western criticism. Audi-
ences who look for meticulous
planning and complex composi-
tion will be confounded by works
based on simplicity and sponta-
neity.
Geometric perfection is ut-
terly absent in works that are de-
signed to be asymmetrical by art-
ists who believe that negative
space around the objects in a work
are as important as the objects
themselves.
Like Chinese philosophy,
these works of art seem to violate
every principle in Western
thought, yet they posses a myste-
rious beauty that can only be un-
derstood through experience.
Photo by Jill Charry � ECU Photo Lab
"Ma Gu a traditional Chinese painting, was created by Lu Xie, a 17-year-
old student from the Shanghai Vocational Technical School for the Deaf.
King's Dominion
holds open auditions
By Lisa Williams
Staff Writer
Kings Dominion theme park
is hosting a 10 city talent search
and they have chosen ECU as
one of their stops. The auditions
arc being held today in the A. J.
Fletcher Music Building from4-6
p.m.
The auditions arc limited to
two minutes and a piano accom-
panist is provided. Reservations
AVi not necessary to audition.
The Entertainment Depart-
ment began its tour Saturday in
Washington, DC Some of the
other cities they will be scouting
an Philadelphia, Pa Baltimore,
Md. and Richmond, V.i.
The department has ap-
proximatoly 150 positions avail-
able for the l()u2 season, and
See Auditions, page 11
'Ramblers' perform folk music
By Pamela Oliver
SUff Writer
For those looking for a place to
escape the downtown Kir scene
and find a groupof friendly people
with which to unwind, search no
further than the Folk Arts Society.
The FolkArtS Society of
Greenville has the answers for this
search. Every month, the society
hosts a performance of dance,
Storytelling, music and anything
else involving folk art.
Last Thursday, the society
hosted a live musical performance
at the Upper Crust Bakery, located
downtownon fifth Street Theshow
was a group of four folk musicians
who call themselves "Swamp Cat
Ramblers
The musicians have been play-
ing together for about fifteen years
around the( Ireenvillearca and vari-
ous other areas in North Carolina
and Virginia. Just recently, they
made a name for themselves in
Galax, Virginia, at the Galax Fid-
dlers Convention.
The members of "Swamp Cat
Ramblers" are a warm, friendly
group of guys. During the break
and after the performance, they
talked to almost everyone in the
bakery. They seemed to know ev-
eryone and everyone seemed to
know them, because all four live
around Greenville and all have
regular jobs. "If we didn't have
other jobs John Booker chuckled,
"we wouldn't have any money. You
just can't make a living playing in a
band
Booker sings the lead vocals on
most of the songs and plays acous-
tic guitar. His home is in Ayden,
which is where the band usually
practices; however, he worksa regu-
lar nine to five job at Courtney
Square Apartments here in
Greenville.
Lane Holl i s provides tenor har-
mony and plays the fiddle and the
banjo. HcisfromWilliamston,N.C,
which is near Farmville.
See Folk, page 10
Family Stand offers variety
By Dana Danielson
Assistant Entertainment Editor
A mix of jazz, rhythm and
blues, rock and hip-hop?
Unpleasing to the ear would be the
first imaginable result, but New
York based band, The Family
Stand, has made an art of this seem-
ingly odd melding.
Released in October 1991,
MxnmSoorpio(EastWest Records
America) is the band's third al-
bum.
Each one of the 16 cutsoff Scor-
pio provides the listener with ful-
filling lyrics, melody and rhythm.
The unusual mix of music styles is
responsible for the uniqueness and
individuality each song presents.
"If there's a theme to our al-
bums as a whole, if s that of regen-
eration and resurrection said Pe-
ter Lord, keyboardist and lead
backing vocalist. "It also relates to
the idea of exposing and seeing
things that have been hidden. Some
of the songs deal with politics, but
underneath even those, there are
human relationships. Thaf s the di-
chotomy that The Family Stand
deals with
A refreshing aspect of this lat-
est album is the way in which the
band approaches controversial is-
sues from different angles and per-
spectives.
Issues dealt with in Scorpio in-
clude global change, inedia con-
trol, cultural apartheid, intimate
relationships, the need for cultural
identity, adoption and child mo-
lestation.
It's one hellacious sonic ex-
perience, packing killer grooves,
lethal guitar and stirring, sensual
I vocals said the band members.
As musicians, The Family
Stand claims to draw upon an ever
widening array of rhythm and
blues rock pop traditions.
Though harkeningback to the'60s
and 70s, the band keeps their feet
'planted firmly in the present.
Moon in Scorpio also boasts
: some noteworthy guest stars such
as Vemon Reid (from Living
Colour), Ronnie Drayton (from
Comedian finds
humor in Hamlet
By joe Horst
SUff Writer
Photo courtesy of Michael Lavtna
The Family Stand provides their listners with a wide variety of music and lyrics. The group's music contain's
influences trom every form ot music. As a result, the album has a little something for everyone.
Mother's Finest), Dave Fields,
trumpeter Tyrone Cox and rapper
Guy Routte (from Aftershock).
The band'sinitial release, Chap-
ters; A Novel By Evon Gaffries And
The Stand, featurescuts like "Stand
and Deliver" and "Why Does It
Hurt When We Kiss This was
followed bya second album,Chain.
From this, the single "Ghetto
Heaven" ascended to No. 2 on the
US. rhythm and blues chart; in
Britain, it climbed i jto the pop top
10 and topped the dance charts.
During the summer of 1990,
The Family Stand assembled their
support group and performed live
for the first time. In addition to
opening for Ziggy Marley and the
Melody Makers on a string of US.
dates, they performed on their own
in the States and Japan.
Despite this, The Stand is best
known for the songwriting and pro-
duction team for Paula Abdul's
"Spellbound.
Striving to be known as a
"black rock 'n' roll band The Fam-
ily Stand is made up of V. Jeffrey
Smith (lead and backing vocals,
keyboards, bass, drum program-
ming, saxophones and the flute)
and Sandra St. Voctor (lead and
backing vocals), in addition to Pe-
ter Lord.
The Family Stand has lived up
to the challenge of transcending
categoriesand stereotypes to make
music on their own terms. Moon in
Scorpio reflects the band's imagi-
nation, intelligence and, in the
broadest sense of the word, soul.
Last Wednesday night, the
Attic held another of its side-
splitting Comedy Zone nights
to an overflowing crowd.
The Attic hosted Lorenzel
Wilson and Lance Montalo for
its acts. Wilson has worked the
Comedy Zone tour before and
Montalo appears regularly on
the Arts and Entertainment net-
work comedy shows.
Wilson opened the night
and kept the audience laughing
throughout. Talking about his
trip down to Greenville, Wilson
related the one thing he hates
about highways in North Caro-
lina.
"Road construction. Ifslike
two miles of cones and one guy
withabroom. Of course, there's
seven guys in the truck with a
joint, you know. They're pass-
ing it around and going, 'Hey,
one of those cones moved
Wilson then went on to talk
about politicsand the candidates
running for the presidency. He
also commented on the Thomas
hearings and the Kennedy-
Smith trial.
"I think they should have
him (William Kennedy-Smith)
in one of those car commercials.
You know, first you see this
bridge in the background. Then
the camera moves to a shot of
this car slowly sinking into the
river. Kennedy-Smith is swim-
ming away from the car, saying
"That's not my father's
Oldsmobile
"Heck, if he'd been really
smart, he would have had Unde
Ted drive the girl home. No
witnesses
Wilson finished hisact with
his version of the Leon Jackson
Black Acting Troupe Medley.
Doing bits likeLil' Hamlet" -
"What it be or what it not be
- and "Lil' Julius Caesar" -
"Friends, Romans, countrymen,
lend me yo'ears. I come to bury
Caesar - because he's dead
Wilson left the crowd to thun-
derous applause.
Montalo took the stage and
began what will hopefully be a
trend � both comedians being
funny. Montalo talked about the
Gulf War to start his routine.
"These missiles are great
Mantalo said. "They're laser-
guided with cameras on them
They go right up to your door
and then, Knock-knock You're
like, 'Who's there??' They an-
swer, T)ominoes' Tizza Huf
Xand Shark
"TheGulf War had tochange
its strategy for the new breed of
soldiers Mantalo said. "Drill
seargents are going, 'Okay, now
which one of you boys was good
at Nintendo's Duck Hunt?
You? All right, you'll shoot the
Stingers
Montalo continued with talk
aboutcelebritiesand Hollywood.
"Did you hear the new joke?
RayCharles goes into thedoctor's
office for a checkup. The doctor
comesoutafterifsdoneandsays,
Tm sorry, Mr. Charles, but I've
got good news and bad news
Charles goes, 'Whaf s the bad
newsr The doctor says, 'Well,
you have cancer in your left tes-
ticle and if s gonna have to come
off So Charles goes, 'Well, then
what's the good news? You
got the right one. Baby. Huh-
huh
Having lived in Louisiana,
Montalo then went on to talk
about Cajunsand their lifestyles.
"Cajuns are the only people
you'll see with loaded shotguns
standing on the side of the high-
way r�xt to a deer crossing sign.
'Ayup, this here sign's a damn
good idea"
Montalo finished his act with
See CoflMdy, page 11





Her enjoys
iver men
Entertainment
m?c Saat (Earultntan
January 21, 1992

LPHA
mtlemen,
ry as did
usaders,
of old.
Pick in'
ry I lams
ISandwich
te Only
11th St. 757-0128
�Chinese art exhibit provides new perspectives of Far East
�.
By Ji"i Shamlin
Staff Writer
Pfwto by J ii Ce t J Pfwto L.ih
a,i" painted by Hui Zhang, is pre. ' �� tapei
to heat to appreciate beauty ana my � �. i tl ���
1 he Far 1 iasl has always fas-
cinated Westerners. We attempt
toapprei iate the beauty and sim-
plicity ot an exotic culture, only
lobe confronted by aesthetics thai
at Itametrically opposed to our
own
As .t result, a conflict arises
th.it generally results in frustra-
tion or in awe an erperience
that defies verbal expression.
I his experience has been
t to the United States by
bal 2000 project of the
� � "residential Center, which
has sponsored .n art exhibition
deal students of the people's
public ot t hina. The exhibi-
tion will bo on viispl.iv in the
MendenhaU Student Center gal-
lery through Ian. 51.
1 he exhtbitton features an ar-
r.n 't works created by students,
aces 16-20, at the Shanghai Voca-
tional Technical School for the
Deal The paintings on display
demonstrate a variety of stvles
and media.
Zhenfei Lin's "A Beautiful
Girl of Ancient Times a . Chinese
watercolor, represents the tradi-
tional artwork, while Weiping
1 i's "Mother and Son a lacquer
painting, encorporates modern
stylistics more familiar to West-
ern audiences.
naddition to the typical land-
scapes and portraits, there are ab-
stract and expressionistic works
that one might not expect to find
in a gallery of Oriental art.
Several of the works contain
religious and political overtones
- sentiments that would seem
Impossible to express under the
watch of a totalitarian govern-
ment.
Regardless of style or me-
dium, each work contains a dis-
tinctly ron Western elements that
defy Western criticism. Audi-
ences who look for meticulous
planning and complex composi-
tion will beconfounded by works
based vn simplicity and sponta-
neity.
Geometric perfection is ut-
terly absent m works that are de-
signed to be asymmetrical by art-
ists who believe that negative
space around theobjectsina work
are as important as the objects
themselves.
like Chinese philosophy,
these works of art seem to violate
every principle in Western
thought, yet they posses a myste-
rious beauty that can only be un-
derstood through experience.
Photo by Jiil Cherry � ECU Photo Lab
"Ma Gu a traditional Chinese painting, was created by Lu Xie, a 17-year-
old student from the Shanghai Vocational Technical School for the Deaf.
King's Dominion
holds open auditions
i
Bv Lisa Williams
Staff Writer
Kir.g Dominion theme park
is hosting a 10 city talent search
xAd thev have chosen ECU as
one of their stops. The auditions
an- being held today in the A. I.
Fletcher Musk Building from4-6
P m
Hie auditions am limited to
rw o minutes and a pianoaca m-
panisl is provided. Reservations
are not nm'ss.irv to audition.
Hie Entertainment Depart
merit began its tour Saturday in
Washington, DC. Some of the
sthey will be scouting
are Philadelphia, Pa Baltimore,
Md. and Kk hmond, Va.
The department has ap
proximately 150 positions avail-
able tr the 1992 season, and
Se Auditions, page 11
'Ramblers' perform folk music
By Pamela Oliver
suit Writer
For those looking for a place to
escape the downtown bar scene
and find a groupof friendly people
with which to unwind, search no
further than the Folk Arts Society.
I ho FolkArts Society of
(Ircenville has the answers for this
search. Every month, the society
ts a performance of dance.
storytelling, music and anything
else invoh nn; tolk art.
I ast Thursday, the society
hosted a live musical performance
at the Uppert rust Bakery, located
down to wnonRfth Street Theshow
was a croup of four folk musicians
who call themselves "Swamp Cat
Ramblers
The musicians have been play-
ing together for about fifteen years
aroundthe Ircenvilleareaandvari-
ous other areas in North Carolina
and Virginia, lust recently, they
made a name tor themselves in
Galax, Virginia, at the Galax Fid-
dlers Convention.
The members ol ' Swamp Cat
Ramblers' are a warm, friendly-
group of guys. During the break
and after the performance, they
talked to almost everyone in the
bakery. Thev seemed to know ev-
eryone and everyone seemed to
know them, because all four live
around Greenville and all have
regular jobs. "If we didn't have
other jobs John Booker chuckled,
"we would n't have any money. You
just can't make a living playing in a
band
Booker sings the lead vocalson
most i the songs and plays acous-
tic guitar. 1 lis home is in Ayden,
which is where the band usually
practices; however, he works a regu-
lar nine to five job at Courtney
Square Apartments here in
Green viHe.
kineHolhsprovidestenorhar-
mony and plays the fiddle and the
banjo. 1 leisfromWilliamston.N.C
which is near Farmville.
See Folk, page 10
Family Stand offers variety
By Dana Danielson
Assistant Fntertainment Editor
A mix oi ynz, rhythm and
blues, rock and hip-hop?
I'npleasing to theear would be the
� rst imaginable result, but New
York based band, The Family
Stand, has made an art of this seem-
ingly odd melding.
Released in October 1991,
Moon in Scorpio (East West Record s
America) is the band's third al-
bum.
Each one of the 16 cuts off Scor-
pio provides the listener with ful-
filling lyrics, melody and rhythm.
The unusual mix of music styles is
responsible for the uniqueness and
individuality each song presents.
"If there's a theme to our al-
bums as a whole, if s that of regen-
eration and resurrection said Pe-
ter Lord, keyboard;st and lead
backing vocalist. "It also relates to
the idea of exposing and seeing
things that ha vebeen hidden.Some
of the songs deal with politics, but
underneath even those, there are
human relationships. That's thedi-
chotomy that The Family Stand
deals with
A refreshing aspect of this lat-
est album is the way in which the
band approaches controversial is-
sues from different anglesand per-
spectives.
Issues dealt with hi Scorpio in-
clude global change, .nedia con-
trol, cultural apartheid, intimate
relationships, the need for cultural
identity, adoption and child mo-
lestation.
'It's one hellacious sonic ex-
perience, packing killer grooves,
lethal guitar and stirring, sensual
vocals said the band members
As musicians, The Family
Stand claims to draw upon an ever
widening array of rhythm and
bluesrockpop traditions.
Though harkening back to the '60s
and 70s, the band keeps their feet
planted firmly in the present.
Moon in Scorpio also boasts
some noteworthy guest stars such
as Vernon Reid (from Living
Colour), Ronnie Drayton (from
Comedian finds
humor in Hamlet
By Joe Horst
SUff Writer
Photo courtaay of Michal Lavln
The Family Stand provides their listners with a wide variety of music and lyrics. The group's music contain's
influences from every form of music. As a result, the album has a little something for everyone.
Mother's Finest), Dac Fields,
trumpeter Tyrone Cox and rapper
Guv Routte(from Aftershock).
The Kind's initial release,Giap-
ters; A Hood By Evon Gaffries Ami
The Stand, features cuts like "Stand
and Deliver" and "Why Does It
Hurt When We Kiss This was
followed bya second album,Chain.
From this, the single "Ghetto
Heaven" ascended to No. 2 on the
U.S. rhythm and blues chart; in
Britain it climbed i to the pop top
10 and topped the dance charts.
During the summer of 1990,
The Family Stand assembled their
support group and performed live
for the fust time. In addition to
opening for Ziggy Marley and the
Melody Makers on a string of U.S.
dates, they performed on their own
in the States and Japan.
Despite this, The Stand is best
known for thesongwritingand pro-
duction team for Paula Abdul's
"Spellbound
Striving to be known as a
"black rock 'n' roll band ITie Fam-
ily Stand is made up of V. Jeffrey
Smith (lead and backing vocals,
keyboards, bass, drum program-
ming, saxophones and the flute)
and Sandra St. Voctor (lead and
backing vocals), ir. addition to Pe-
ter Lord.
The Family Stand has lived up
to the challenge of transcending
categoriesand stereotypes to make
music on their own terms. Moon in
Scorpio reflects the band's imagi-
nation, intelligence and, in the
broadest sense of the word, soul.
Last Wednesday night, the
Attic held another of its side-
splitting Comedy Zone nights
to an overflowing crowd.
The Attic hosted Lorenzel
Wilson and Lance Montalo for
its acts. Wilson has worked the
Comedy Zone tour before and
Montalo appears regularly on
the Arts and Entertainment net-
work comedy shows.
Wilson opened the night
and kept the audience laughing
throughout. Talking about his
tnpdown to Greenville, Wilson
related the one thing he hates
about highways in North Caro-
lina.
"Roadconstruction, lt'slike
two miles of cones and one guv
with a broom. Of course, there's
seven guys in the truck with a
joint, you know. They're pass-
ing it around and going, Hey,
one of those cones moved
Wilson then went on to talk
about politics and the candidates
running for the presidency. He
also commented on the Thomas
hearings and the Kennedy-
Smith trial.
"I think they should have
him (William Kennedy-Smith)
in one of those car commercials.
You know, first you see this
bridge in the background. Then
the camera moves to a shot of
this car slowly sinking into the
river. Kennedy-Smith is swim-
ming away from the car, saying,
"That's not my father's
Oldsmobile
"Heck, if he'd been really
smart,he would havehad Uncle
Ted drive the girl home. No
witnesses
Wilson finished hisaet with
his version of the Leon Jackson
Black Acting Troupe Medley.
Doing bits like'Lil' Hamlet" -
"What it be or what it not be
- and "Lil' lulius Caesar" -
"Friends, Romans, countrymen,
lend me yo' ears. I come to bury
Caesar - because he's dead
Wilson left the crowd to thun-
derous applause.
Montalo took the stage and
began what will hopefully be a
trend both comedians being
funny. Montalo talked about the
Gulf War to start his routine.
"These missiles are great
Mantalo said "They're laser-
guided with cameras on them
Ihev go right up to your door
and then, 'Knock-knock You're
like, 'Who's there??' They an-
swer. Dominoes' 'Pizza Hut'
'Land Shark
"The Gul f War had to change
its strategy for the new breed of
soldiers Mantalo said. "Drill
seargents are going, 'Okay, now
which one of you boys was good
at Nintendo's Duck Hunt?
You? All right, you'll shoot the
Stingers
Montalocontinued with talk
about celebrities and 1 lollywood.
"Did you hear the new joke?
Ray Charlesgoesinto the doctor's
office for a checkup. The doctor
comes ou t after it's done and says,
'I'm sorrv, Mr. Charles, but I've
git gixvl news and bad news
Charles goes, 'What's the bad
news?' The doctor says, 'Well,
you have cancer in your left tes-
ticle and it's gonna have to come
off So Charles goes, 'Well, then
what's the good news?' You
got the right one, Baby. Huh-
huh
Having lived in Louisiana,
Montalo then went on to talk
about Cajunsand their lifestyles.
"Cajuns are the only people
you'll see with loaded shotguns
standing on the side of the high-
way next to a deer crossing sign.
'Ayup, this here sign's a damn
good idea
Montalo finished hisaet with
See Comedy, pagel 1





: 10 �lie �� Caroltntan January 21, 1992
according to Billboard magazine.
Printed with permission.
Dance Tracks College Albums
Folk
Continued from page 9
vv-s tee s i j f "� S
1. COWSOMOT0
"This is Fascism
2. NIRVANA
"Smalls Like Teen
Spirit"
NettwerkI.R.S.
3. MC 9 00 FT, JESUS
"Killer Inside Me"
tfettwerlkI.R. S.
4. LA STYLE
"James Brown is Dead"
Watts Arista
5. LORDS OF ACID
"Take Coritrol"
Caroline
6. DIE WABEAO
"Funkopolis"
AtlanticFiction
7. THE SHAMEN
"Move Any Mountain
(Progen '91)
Epic
I8. RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS
"Give it Away"
Warner Brothers
9. FORTRAN 5
"Heart on the Line"
MuteElectra
10. QUADROPHERIA
"Wave of the Future"
RCA
1. 2TX&&
Tronpe 2e Honde
4ADElektra
2. NIRVANA
Nevermind
DGC
3. U2
Acntungr Baby
Island
4 . RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS
Blood Sugar Sex Magik
Warner Bros.
5. PRIMAL SCREAM
Screamadel'ica
Sire
C. SWERVEDRIVER
Raise
A & M
7. MATTHEW SWEET
Gi rl fri end
Zoo
8. BILLY BRAGG
Don't Try This at Home
Elektra
9. THE DYLANS
The Dylans
Beggars BanquetBUG
10. DRAMARAMA
Vinyl
ChameleonElektra
Howard Hill, a farmer from
Ayden,playsthefiddleupon which
the rest of the music is played.
Charlie Pickford plays banjo
and mandolin for the band. He is
originally from up north, but has
since moved to eastern North Caro-
lina.
The rest of the crew love to give
him a hard time about being a Yan-
kee.
Themembersof theSwampcat
Ramblers have grown up with folk
music. "All of us have Booker
explains, then grinning, "except for
maybe Charlie over there, seeing as
how he's from New York or New
Jersey or somewhere up there
The Swamp Cat Ramblers play
a variety of styles. They perform
bluegrass,old time traditional and
country to name a few. Bluegrass
and old time tunes, however, are
their favorites.
Some of their favorite compos-
ers of Bluegrass and old time are
Flatt and Scruggs, Monroe Brothers
and Stephen Foster.
They also like to play country
tunes by George Jones, Merle Hag-
gard and Vern Gosdin. "I don't
reckon you can get much more coun-
try than Vern Gosdin Pickford
joked as he introduced Gosdin's
"Walkin' the Floor
They also played a song called
"Greenville Trestle High written
by Jim Jett from Clayton, a small
town close to Raleigh. Jett had
grown up in Greenville watching
the trains roll by every day. His
songisasentimentaloneabouthow
there aren't as many trains coming
and going these days. Plus, now
that he has grown up, the trestle no
longer seems so high.
The Swamp Cat Ramblers
played a handful of fiddle
tunes,which are tunes written
especially to allow the fiddle play-
ers to be in the spotlight
Hollis and Pickford got a
chance to show off their talent. It
was truly amazing to watch the
dualing fiddles fly through the
pieces, not missing a single note.
The audience was quickly
caught up in the spirit of the
evening and participated in the
show. Sharon Bowen, a friend of
the band, sang harmony on "Songs
of Life by Ronnie Crowell.
Near the end of the perfor-
mance, the band played a waltz at
the request of a member of the audi-
ence. Consequently,severalcouples
pushed back their tables and chairs
and waltzed.
On another accasion, a faster
tune was performed and two
doggers jumped upand performed
one of their routines.
The next performance hosted
by The FolkArts Society will be on
Feb. 20.
Storyteller JoyceCrear will give
a free performance at the Parks and
Recreation Teen Center.
For more information, call Judi
Orbach at 752-8281.
East Carolina Tae Kwon Do Academy
(Relocated from Buyers Market on Memorial Dr.)
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
3003 S. Evans 756-2011
Fresh Oysters, Flounder, Shrimp, Trout,
Deviled Crab Cakes, & Clam Strips.
Small Shrimp
at lunch
$2.99
Beverage not Included
Good M-F Jan 31
BUY ONE i
Regular Shrimp �
Dinner at $6.50 �
GetOneFreeJ
Beverage not Included �
M-Th Exp Jan 31 �
u
Shoot" On Over To
�7V
m
s&
-fc
� if & 3M

Pirateland
Flea Market & Consignment Gallery
Open: Saturday 8-5 Sunday 12-5 400 E. Moore St.
(Actom Irom Belk at Carolina East Mall (on Memort.1 Dr.)
�Courteous Staff 'Neat & Clean
�All Heated Indoors 'Low Law Prices
�New & Used Furniture Si Products
Call 919-757-1641
Located 12 mile North on Greene St. Bridge
off N. Greene St. Behind Farmer's Warehouse
Mexican Restaurant '
521 CotanchcSt �757-1666
And Enjoy The
Game Along With '
These Drink
Specials
� Mori. -
� Tues. -
� Wed. -
� Thurs
12 Price Pitchers
of Beer $1.25
Sangria $1.25
Imports $1.25
Margaritas $2.50
Qaportxriity is Knocldjng. �
fkret
L
Ecu

m


m
rm4l
So Get Off Yer Ass!
ALL RUSH EVENTS:
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER'S
MULTIPURPOSE ROOM
8PM-11PM
TUES: MEET THE BROTHERS OF OKT
WED: MINGLE WITH THE SISTERS OF
ZETA TAU ALPHA SORORITY
THURS: ENJOY THE COMPANY OF THE
PI DELTA SORORITY
(INVITATION ONLY)
RUSH
Phi Kappa Psi
For information or rides call 757-2573 For Rides & Info: Call 757-0128
KAPPA
ALPHA
Dear Rushee,
As you are contemplating rushing a fraternity
this spring, a number of doors will be opened to
you. Here at Kappa Alpha, we offer the door like
no other.
As a rushee, you must choose the organization
which you wish to join. A fraternity of men with
whom you will live for the next four years, and
whom you will call your brothers for the rest of
your life.
We believe that you will agree that, in fact,
Kappa Alpha is the most unique and traditional of
any college fraternity. We strive for both unity and
selection.
Won't you come by and sample a bit of South-
ern Tradition?
Good Luck Rushees!
The Brothers of Gamma Rho,Chapter
of Kappa Alpha Order
ISO and the H
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
ISO and the BOBS gave a rous-
ing performance Friday to a near-
capacity crowd at Wright Audito-
rium.
The modem dance and song
troupe started out on a high note
and sustained it magnificently
throughout the night. Combining
fast-paced songs and intncately cho-
reographed dances, the show kept
its initial pace and captured the
audience's attention and love
straight from the beginning. With
their marvelous range and fluidity
of movement, ISO and the BOBS
treated the audience to a show that
is sure to be remembei
ished.
Their opening pil
Beginning entertairi
ence with eve-catchinl
fects. Silhouetted be
curtain, the perfor
and out of view, dra w
tion to their entrance!
the show with a bang
ISO's first singuk
"I Do mixed harv
overtones to create a
piece. Peter Schulth
of deep cello-like no
spirited violin swin
with the dancers to di
that captured sight ai
fectlv.
Comedy
Continued from page 9
reasons why he stopped getting
stoned.
"The last time I got strned, I did
the stupidest thing you can ever do
Yeah, that's right, I went grocery
shopping. You know you're stoned
when you walk into the dog and cat
food aisle and there's this cat in the
middle going, 'Meow, meow,
meow,meow I just couldn't take
it anymore when that damn
chuckwagon started chasing me
either
All in all, the night proved to be
one of the best that the Attic has
offered yet. If they can bring more
headlinersas funny asMontaloand
keep the openers like Wilson, the
Attic can be sure to have overflow-
ingcTOwdsevery Wednesday night.
Auditions
Continued from page 9
they arc looking for all kindsof peopte
to fill these jobs.
They will be looking for "atmo-
sphercentertainerswhich are stroll-
ing rrformers, such as a barber-
shopquartet, jugglersand musicians.
The talent scouts from Kings
Dominion and Kings Productions
are hoping to fill openings for 11 live
shows. The live shows are made up
of Broadway-style stage produc-
tions, traditional song and dance with
magic shows, illusions show and
character shows for children.
Kings Dominion also has coun-
try and western shows and pop
music shows.
The newest production at the
theme park is called "If s Magic
"It's Magic" is a music and magic
extravaganza co-produced by na-
tionally acclaimed magician Mark
Wilson
The newly selected performers
and technicians should enjoy excel-
lent growth and opportunities at
Kings Dominion.
"It's a great place to practice
your craft and working at a theme
park can be a gpotf Stepping stone
said Paul Haught,Kdngs Dominion's
manager o: entertainment. "Our
performers have gone on to work on
Broadway touring shows, cruise
ships and Las Vegas revues
R'n'RHallof
Fame inducts
new members
NEW YORK (AP) � The
Yardbirds, the Jimi Hendrix Experi-
ence, Johnny Cash, the lsley Broth-
ers, Sam and Dave, Booker T and
the MGs and Bobby "Blue" Bland
were inducted into the Rock and
Roll Hall of Fame on Jan 15.
The namesof the seventh year's
inductees were announced Nov. 4
in Cleveland, where a Hall of Fame
building is to be built They all made
recordings at least 25 years ago.
Also inducted at a Waldorf
Astoria dinner were songwri tor Doc
POmus; Leo Fender, creator of the
lender guitar; rock impresario Bill
Graham, who died in a helicopter
crash Oct 25; and two early influ-
ences on rock 'n' roll, Hues guitarist
Elmore Jamesand NewOrleanspia-
nist Professor Longhair.
The Yardbirds formed in 1963
inEngland.TriebaiKl'sinfluencewas
greater than its success. Its records
are now collector's items.
The Jimi Hendrix Experience
comprised Hendrix, the legendary
guitaiisLandBritishrnusiciansNoel
Redding and Mitch Mitchell
TU
WEI
T!
FRI
T!
L





January 21, 1992 �be Eaet (Earoltntan n
Continued from page 9
a) His
hov
the Kind, sang harmony on "Songs
ol Life by Ronnie CroweU.
Near the end oi the perfor-
mance the band played a waltz at
the request ofamember of theaudi-
lMVl. . equenti) severalcouptes
,�: v their tables and chairs
casion .1 faster
rmed and two
iped upand performed
formance hosted
l( �,�� 5o� iet will be on
Irearwillgive
� 'arks and
.callludi
:si
t" On Over To
pne rushine a fraternity
prs will he opened to
we offer the door like
choose the organization
raternit) o men with
next tour years, and
others for the rest of
ill agree that, in fact,
nique and traditional of
strive for both unity and
d sample a bit of South-
ima Rho Chapter
ha Order
ISO and the BOBS tantalizes audience's imagination
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
ISO aixl the BOBS gave a rous-
pcrformance Friday to a near-
ipacity crowd at Wright Audito-
num.
fhe mtdem dance and song
troupe starttvi out on a high note
sustained it magnificently
ghoul the night. Combining
iced songs and intricately cho-
iphed dances, the show kept
initial pace and captured the
ue's attention and love
;ht from the beginning. With
air marvelous range and fluidity
movement, ISO and the BOBS
d the audience to a show that
is sure to be remembered and cher-
ished.
Their opening piece, "In The
Beginning entertained the audi-
ence with eye-catching lighting ef-
fects. Silhouetted behind a white
curtain, the performers flashed in
and out of view, drawing rapt atten-
tion to their entrance and starting
the show with a bang.
ISO's first singular dance piece,
"1 Do mixed harsh and smooth
overtones to create a mesmerizing
piece. Teter Schulthorpe's mixing
of deep cellolike notes and high-
spirited violin swings combined
with the dancers to develop a piece
that captured sight and sound per-
fectly.
"The Blind Venetians" treated
the audience to a snapshot effect
about humanity. Cleverly using
life-sized Venetian blinds on stage,
the troupe took a break from dance
and song to present a hilarious view
of life in general.
One of the highlights of the first
act, as well as the night, came with
the troupe'sdual ensemble, 'Temp-
tation Hymn" and 'Temptation
A foot-tapping and hand-clapping
feat, these two pieces combined to
bring smiles and laughter from the
crowd, famey Hampton danced
su perbly, and with a little help from
an audience member in the front
row, f rolkked his way into the hearts
of the audience.
"Drive By Love" delighted the
assembly with a hip-hopbeat,bring-
ing back memories of the '70s. The
age-old story of love from afar,
"Drive By Love" showed the many
talents of the BOBS' range and abil-
ity.
The trourx finished the first act
with a marvelous dance routine,
"Captain Tenacity performed by
Ashley Roland. Richard Wagner's
heart-rousingmusic joined perfectly
with the dancer's poses and move-
ments. The height of the piece oc-
curred when Roland struck various
poses on a black backdrop, seem-
ingly suspended in mid-air. Clev-
erly engineered, with Roland'scos-
tume somehow adhering to the
backdrop, the poses served as the
climax of the first act.
"HelterSkelter theband'ssec-
ond piece in the second act, regaled
the viewers with an eclectic dance
and song piece. With the dancers
moving in perfect time through a
plastic sheet, they held the audience
spellbound.
"Linguini Arms" gavea perfect
example of the high degree of talent
that these dancers have. Clad in
body suits with streamersconnected
at the hands and feet, Jamey Hamp-
ton and Morleigh Steinberg moved
in silent fluidity to perform a spec-
tacular dance. Hampton and
Steinberg concluded the piece in a
symbolic version of birth and life.
"DNA" enthused the audience
with three separate parts that ran
along the runes of the Big Band era.
The dance troupe finished the
night with their rousing finale, "My
Shoes that left some audience
members on their feet in apprecia-
tion. This piece showed the troupe's
exemplary skill and their obvious
years of experience.
ISO and the BOBS exceeded all
expectations and performed with
theaudience's pleasure always first
in mind.
It's no wonder that they have
been playing in the United States
and Europe for so long; and hope-
fully repeat performance is not far
in the future.
Comedy
Continued from page 9
asons why he stopped getting
icd.
'The last time I got stoned did
1 upidestthingyoucaneverdo.
ah, that's right, I went grocery
hopping. You know vou're stoned
v hen w ui walk into the dog and cat
n d aisle and there's this cat in the
iddle going, 'Meow, meow,
meow,meow I just couldn't take
it anymore when that damn
chuckwagon started chasing me
: Call 757-0128
All in all, the night proved to be
! the best that the Attic has
ffered yet 1 f they can bring more
adlinersas funny asMontaloand
the openers like Wilson, the
can be sure to have overflow-
crowdsevery Wednesday night.
Auditions
Continued from page 9
they arelookingforalkindsofpeople
these jobs.
Thev will be looking for "atmo-
sphere entertainerswhichare stroll-
sng performers, such as a barber-
shopquartet, jugglersand musicians.
The talent scouts from Kings
Dominion and Kings Productions
are hoping to fill openings for 11 live
shows The live shows are made up
� Broadway-style stage produc-
traditional song and dance with
magk shows, illusions show and
racier shows tor children.
Kings Dominion also has coun-
try and western shows and pop
; u shows.
rhe newest production at the
me park is called "It's Magic
� s Magic' is a music and magic
(travaganza co-produced by na-
nallv acclaimed magician Mark
son.
The newly selected performers
I technicians should enjoy excel-
� growth and opportunities at
�s "Ximinion.
"It's a groat place to practice
a craft and working at a theme
� can be a groat stepping stone
. 11 aulHaught.KingsDiminion's
inager of entertainment. "Our
perfi imers have gone on to work on
tdway touring shows, cruise
;is and Las Vegas revues
R 'n' R Hall of
Fame inducts
new members
NEW YORK (AP) � The
Y. Jbirds, the JimiHendrix Experi-
ence, johnny Cash, the Isley Broth-
ers, Sam and Dave, Booker T and
the MGs and Bobby "Blue" Bland
were inducted into the Rock and
RolIHallofFameonJanl5.
The names of the seventh year's
inductees were announced Nov. 4
in Cleveland, where a Hall of Fame
building is to be built. They all made
recordings at least 25 years ago.
Also inducted at a Waldorf
Astoria dinner were songwri ter Doc
Pomus; Leo Fender, creator of the
Fender guitar; rock impresario Bill
Graham, who died in a helicopter
crash Oct. 25; and two early influ-
ences on rock 'n' roll, blues guitarist
Elmorelamesand New Orleans pia-
nist Professor Longhair.
The Yardbirds formed in 1963
in England.Therjand'sinfluencewas
greater than its success. Its records
are now collector's items.
The Jimi Hendrix Experience
comprised Hendrix, the legendary
guitarist, and British musiciansNoel
Redding and Mitch Mitchell.
5v
5m
RUSH EVENTS
TUESDAY JAN 21ST "LADIES OF ZETA TAU ALPHA"
WEDNESDAY JAN 23RD "A VIEW TO A SNU MOVIE-
THURSDAY JAN 23RD "LADIES OF ALPHA PHI-
FRIDAY JAN 24TH "NU GENERATION PARTY WITH
����� INVTTE ONLY
ALTERED EGO
TAKE 5TH STREET, AWAY FROM CAMPUS.
THRU DOWNTOWN TO PITT STREET. LEFT AT LIGHT
ONTO PIH STREET. FOURTH BUILDING ON RIGHT.
For further information or rides, please call
LEE or TOM at the Sigma Nu house 752-9607 or 752-6681
Spopnsor: Pepsi of Greenville





RUSH
ECU'S 1 Fraternity
Sigma Phi Epsilon
I
ytomplisliments;
SK 19S9-W We
again honored by
nc the award for
landing fraternity
chsaptef at East Caro-
l mversity.
s"7-H( Honored as
one of the top 20
overall chapters (out of
KX� in the na-
tion, receiving the
Buchanan Outstanding
Chapter Award.
K4-89 Completed
5 year dominance ofl
ECU mtramurals by
A lodge, a crest, a handshake - none
of these ever made a fraternity. The
things that are seen are merely the
beginning. The invisible things - the
brotherhood, the friendship, the
loyalty, the honor - are the
foundation. Together they develop
the fraternity, and strengthen the
individual. Sigma Phi Epsilon is not
looking for just anyone. We are
searching for a man who is willing
to commit himself to the principles
and goals of our fraternity. A man
who wants to associate with an
outstanding brotherhood. We are
looking to the future - your future
and our future.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON:
TOMMORROWS FRATERNITY - TODAY
j
f
ko

T:
r.
� �. �"
2S?
winning the
Chancelloi s s Cup 5
years straight.
1984-90 We have
been represented on t
Student Governmant
oeiation by the pi
two SOA presidents.
1991 Won the Order!
Philaa Brotherhood
Cutty Award � Only
second award ever SS
given, received by our
chapter over 300 oth-
ers.
1991-92 Brothers'
currently involved on
CtmpUfl as BPC Presi-
dent, Sr. Class and
SME Presidents.
i'ii
m
��.
Xr
Trr
�.�?
r Ht V ,v r.r
m
w
fW
5
X
&
(
��-
m
"fv
BEST LOCATION ON CAMPUS
(Across from Garret Hall)
Call
757-0487 or 757-0305
or 830-9647 or 830-9646
for Information or a Ride
Information
Jan 21 - Meet the
ladies
of Chi Omega
Jan 22 - Meet the
ladies
from Alpha Phi,
Delta
Pi
Jan 23 - Brothers
and
Rushees Only
Jan 24 - Bid Night





Title
The East Carolinian, January 21, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 21, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.851
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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