The East Carolinian, January 16, 1992






The Cannabis Question
Columnist explores the legality of hemp.
4
We believe in Steve
Logan is named new Pirate head coach
9
oiift lEaat (Earaliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925.
Vol.65 No.69
Thursday, January 16, 1992
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12.000
10 Pages
University blocks assault charge
Sleepover not popular
University officials al rhe UrUversity of
Nebraska l incoin invited students to steep
over in a huge indoor uvthall practice field,
after their team pl.n i) against Oklahoma in
the Big Eight championship game Nov -0
l he practice stadium holds 76,000, and
organizers braced themselves tor thousands
ol parrying students to arrive, but only two
students showed up
Officials hel more students would
havvshownupbtxausethcdormsweJTCclosed
due to rhanksgiving Officials said the
weather foi game da was unexpectedh
pi i making itcasici tor students to travel to
the game, which explains the poor showing.
Army honors instructor
Opt fohn Bucciaret)i,head of the Moth
vhst College Department of Military Sci
ence was recent!) awarded an Arm) Com
mendation Medal tor revising the curricu-
lum guides used by the Army's ROTC Pro
grams.
1 did not like the training manuals I
found when I came here Bucciarelli said.
thev contained errors, duplications and in-
consistencies in format, which made teach
ing difficult
Bucciarelli spent 1400 hours typesetting
cutting and pasting to create six volumes of
training rramualsforeightsemestersofcourse
work
l updated and revised the content to
nuke it more complete and provide a better
image of the Army in the classroom
Bucciarelli said
Weapons concern ISU
Hie Indiana State I nivorsitv I Ypartmont
of Safety and Security is concerned about the
mimberol weaponsstudentsarebringingon
campus and keeping in their dorm rooms
Chris 1 ester, directoro( the department.
said that in the past two semesters five tire
arms have been confiscated on campus
"Anytimeyou'vegota firearm or deadly
weapon in an educational setting, you've got
a problem. I ester said.
Records from Safety and Security show
the number of weapons is not declining, hut
mstoad has increased in the past several ears.
Throe deadly weapons were confiscated in
1968, eight in 1989, and by UK the number
of confiscated weapons pimped to 14.
Salary increase disputed
Despite budget cuts and student tee in-
creases at the University of Missouri, the
university Board of Curators approved a
$39,000 pay increase tor UM's president
George Russell.
State Representative Ken Jacob, D-Co-
lumbia, said S3u,tXX) would beenough money
to till a full time faculty position.
"People who work in the public sector
should realize certain financial sacrifices will
have to be made, and if he wants us to make
sacrifices, then he should be willing to make
one as well
Student dies in crash
A North Carolina State University stu-
dent and his family died when the twin-
engine plane thev were incrashod near Hilton
Head Dec. 26.
Donald Brandt Wemhold, 19, Salisbury,
wasa sophomore majoring in business and a
member of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity.
The brothers in his fraternity have de-
cided to establish a memorial scholarship
called the Brandt Weinhold Memorial Fund
that will award in-state tuition to the brother
with the highest GPA each semester.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shlmmel
Inside Thursday
Crime Scene 2
EditorialIA
Comics5
Classifieds 6
Entertainment 7
Sports9
By lulie Roscoe
tttistMIt News I Jilor
l niversity officials recently
blocked an ECU student from
pressing assault charges against
another student
Angela Morlote an OCCU
pational therapy major, was as-
saulteddov ntovs nin the spring
of 1991 b anothei ECU student
The assault resulted in perma-
nent damage to her ear canal
I nicrsit otticialssaid ttu
cannot press charges against the
student because there is no con
nection between the University
and the assault.
Basically, a student is a
private citizen, saidDr Alfred
Matthews. ice chancellor lor
Student I ite "We cannot take
.k lions that courts have said is
basically against the law "
Morlote said that she was
mulct the impression that she
could press charges alter read-
ing the Code ol Conduct
Disciplinary Offenses tor Stu
dents in theSGA Documents
The code states that am
student whose conduct vn ir
ott campus, becomes unsatis-
factor) in the judgment of the
university officials will be
subject to appropriate disci-
plinary action
I he appropriate action
usually taken is a hearing be-
fore a ECU Judicial") board.
according to the SGA docu-
ments.
ben Irons, universit) attor-
ney, explained the court prece-
dent the administration was
following in Morlote's case.
1 he law requires us to find
Some nexus, some connection
between the action and the uni-
versity other than the fact that
the two people w ere Students
Irons s.iui
Morlote said she was con-
cerned about the code She said
it wasmislcadingforhertoread
in theSc A Documents thai she
had a right to prosecute the
Other student and then to find
out that the code was wrong
The controversy with the
boundaries ol the nexus in-
volves off-campus illegal drug
related and fraternity incidents
"I he university has an in-
terest in sending a fraternity a
message. Irons said. "The line
has been blurred in respect to
drug cases because of the con-
cern of the Board cf Governors
When asked why theSC -A
c ode t (. onduct is not clearon
the rights of the students, irons
responded that if the nexuscon-
dition was worded in the docu-
ments, a would limit the attor-
ney to prosecute those students
the university wanted to.
"Sometimes it's better not
to havespecific guidelines writ-
See Assault page 3
Center launches
new programs
Girl with dog
PKolo by 3a i 3��d - ECU Photo Lib
As the Hood waters ot the Tar River rose, a new beach was created on the town commons
Many local Citizens, both human and canine strolled along the water
By Angela DeRosia
Senior News Water
In order to bring together
the estimated 40 different cul-
tures present in Pitt County,
three1 people began the forma-
tion oi the Eastern Carolina
Multicultural Center. This group
will launch educational 'pro-
grams, exhibitions and film fes-
tivals about various cultures.
"Funding will besought for
conducting a national research
conference on a selected culture
and other educational pro-
grams Dr. Mohammed A had.
president of the board of direc-
tors, Stated in a press release.
Ahad,a former ECU profes-
sor from the Graduate School of
Nursing, conducted a cultural
round table discussion m 1989-
u0 and would like to be able to
do others in the future through
the Multicultural enter.
The center hopes UI be able
to provide a place for students
to research tor papers and for
professors to research for
classes. 'If mv dream comes
through, it will he like a mu-
st-urn where anyone can learn
about another culture Ahad
said.
Other members of the
boardof directors include Terrv
I a) lor(v ice president; 11 mo thy
Albritton(secretary) and Javier
Castillo I treasurer). New board
membersand committee charr-
men are DiAnne Bow en i pub-
lic relations committee) and
Marshall Hivatt (membership
committee).
Added to the original in-
corporatorand executive corn-
See Center page 3
Peace Corps begins
recruiting at new office
By Colleen Kirkpatrick
stall Writer
ThePeaceCorpshasopened
a recruiting office at ECl tor
anyone interested in learning
more about the program. Holly
Christotterson. a graduate stu-
dent in Psychology, will serve
as ECU'S resident recruiter.
"The Peace Corps is re-
sponding to the changing
world's needs and increasing
requests tor volunteers in the
90s saidHelen Davenport
O'koefe, area manager for the
Recruiting Office.
The regional Peace Corps
office in Washington, D.C. is-
sued a (10,000 grant to the ECU
Sdtoorbf Education to assist in
opening the office.
Recruiting offices havealso
been opened at N C. State, West
Virginia University and Vir-
ginia 1 ech.
ECU'sSchoolof Education
is sponsoring the Peace Corps
program. I he corps is the lead-
ing teacher of English as a sec-
ond language. C Her five million
people from around the world
have learned to Speak English
through volunteorsot the Peace
Corps and more then 3lXl edu-
cational textbooks have been
developed through PeaceCorps
instructors.
The goals of the Peace
Corps are to promote a better
understanding of different cul-
tures Christofferson said.
The Peace Corps was es-
tablished in 11 and has now
expanded'to over 90 countries.
There are currently 6,000 active
volunteers around the world.
Its really good experience.
You get to travel to
another culture
and live as some-
one else lives
Christofferson
said.
Only 14-20
percent of the
people that apply
to the PeaceCorps
are accepted. A
college degree and
teaching experi-
ence are almost al-
ways necessary.
"Joining the
Peace Corps is a
very competitive
process she said.
"The highest de-
mand is for pxxple with skillsor
degrees in forestry, engineer-
ing, math, science, and nutri-
tion
Photo courtesy Jarry Evarhart
This Kenyan woman sells jewelry in her village to provide food for her child.
Peace Corps volunteers help foster understanding and respect ot other cultures.
"We do encourage tlexibil -
itv said Stantill, a recruiter
from the Washington D.C. ar-
eas Recruitment Office. The
Peace Corps volunteers experi-
ence a training program in the
country in which they are as-
See Peace, page 2
College Bowl solicits students
Academic games return to campus
By Frances Powell
Staff Writer
The ECU College Bowl
Competition will return to
Mendenhall Student Center on
Jan. 24-Jan. 27, 1992.
The College Bowl was de-
veloped in the late 1940s by
DonReid. He applied the rules
and game structure from Ca-
nadian basketball to academia
and trivia.
In 1953, the game was so
popular that it began being
broadcast on the radio. In 1959,
its popularity expanded into
television with the General
Electric College Bowl Hour
which ran until 1970. The
game is still successful at col-
lege campuses across the
country.
Each team is made up of
five players including one al-
ternate. Teams are recom-
mended to have coaches, al-
though it is not mandatory.
Each player must be a f ull -
time graduate or under-
graduate student in good
academic standing at the uni-
versity.
Teams interested in en-
tering should fill out a Team
RegistrationPlayer Applica-
tion form at Mendenhail Stu-
dent Center.
The forms must be re-
turned by Jan. 22 at 5 p.m.
The team that wins the
ECU tournament will receive
$25 per player and will be
named the College Bowl Var-
sity Squad.
Five players will be se-
lected from all competitors to
be on the Varsity Squad (All-
Stars).
These five players will
compete in the Regional
Championships at Virginia
Tech. The players will travel,
all expenses paid, to
Blacksburg, Virginia, from
Feb. 28 to March 1,1992.
Seniors must register soon
In order for seniors to be guaranteed a di-
ploma and to be on ECU'S official graduation list,
thev must have completed their applications for
graduation and have paid the $25 diploma fee by
Tuesday, Jan. 21. Application forms are available
at the Registrar's office.
Students that have just been classified as se-
niors this semester should consult with their
advisor immediately to complete a senior sum-
mary sheet. The summary sheet will be sent to the
Registrar's office along with the completion of the
application for graduation.
N





2 3K?e �aatQ!aniltnfan January 16, 1992
CRIMP SENE
Center
Officers direct confused vehicle
traffic on College Hill Drive
Jan. 13
0135�5th Street and Rotary: Vehicle stopped and verbal warn-
ing given to staff member in reference to speeding, stop sign viola-
tion.
0841�College Hill Drive: Checked out reference to directing
confused vehicle traffic.
1123�Fletcher Hall: Checked out in reference to delivering
reports and a legal service, no contact was made.
1252�College Hill Drive: Vehicle stopped for exceeding a safe
speed. Student given campus citation.
1500�Tyler DornvChecked in referralofabreakingand entering
larceny.
1530�South of Brcwster Building: Vehicle stopped for exceed-
ing posted speed. Student given verbal warning.
1720�Flanagan: Checked in reference to a water leak. On call
plumber called.
1742�Tyler Dorm: Checked out reference to unlocking a door
for access to radio service.
1810�College Hill Drive, small lot: Vehicle stopped and cam-
pus citation issued to student for one-way street violation.
2053�Rawl: Checked out reference to locked door. Unable to
assist. No one called.
Jan. 14
0259�Belk Hall.Checked out reference to report of an unescorted
male in the 3rd floor restroom. Subject gone on arrival.
1022�Ninth Street and James Street: Vehicle stopped for stop
sign violation and expired tags; staff member given a state citation.
1052�Public Safety: Checked referral to larceny report.
1112�College Hill Drive: Checked out situation in reference to
an auto accident.
1318�Clement Dorm: Checked out reference to a damage to
propertv report.
1412�Police Department: Checked reference to larceny report.
1423�Magistrate's office: Checked out magistrate's office with
a prisoner in custody.
1444�White Dorm: Checked reference to damage to property
report.
1508�Public Safety: Checked referral tolarceny report.
1723�East of Spilman Building: Assisted motorist in reference
to unlocking a vehicle.
1814�East of Hanagan Building: Assisted motorist in reference
to unlocking a vehicle.
1848�West of Minges: Assisted motorist in reference to unlock-
ing a vehicle.
2042�loyner Art Building: Checked reference of no lights.
Maintenance advised of same.
2053�Rawl Building: Checked reference to unlocking � door.
2389�Chancellor's house: Two units checked out the premises.
Crime Scene la taken trom official Public Safety Log
corporator and executive commit-
tee members will be Mayor Nancy
Jenkins, ECU Chancellor Richard
Eakin,Ed Walker, former president
of the Pitt-Greenville Chamber of
Commerce, Dr. Emmitt Floyd, Pitt
County superintendent of schools.
Randy Knofsky, Brenda Jones,
Anne Hamze and Dr. Prabha
Khazanie.
The first meeting of the board
of directors will be Jan. 16 at 3:30
p.m. in the City Utilities Building
Board Room. Summaries of activi-
ties and recommendations of sev-
eral sub-committees will be read.
Jenkins will give :the opening
welcome, followed by a report on
the last meeting by Albritton.
Mac McCarley, attorney, will
report on the progress of a tax ex-
empt status application. Brenda
Jones will discuss identified tem-
porary office space and possible
building for permanent office.
Other topics are the consider-
ation of a contest for a logo for the
center,recruitrnentofmembersand
funding strategies as well as sug-
gested programs.
Establishment of priorities
and decisions on various recom-
mendations will also be given. The
Peace
'The training is really good
Christofferson said. 'There is a
week-long orientation in the U.S.
and then a three-month training
program in the country which you
were assigned
Stanfill said the Peace Corps
has two main categories of ben-
efits. He said the first benefit is
"the nuts and bolts of applying to
the Peace Corps
All travel expenses, living ex-
penses and medical expenses are
paid for while working with the
Peace Corps. The Corps also gives
24 paid vacation days a year to the
volunteers in other countries.
Volunteers receive a $54,000 pay-
ment at the end of their two-year
commitment. The program asks
that all volunteers give a 27-month
commitment to the Corps.
Stanfill said the other benefit is
a personal one. He explained that
the relationship formed with
people of other cultures is very
rewarding.
"I feel as close to my adopted
brother as my real brother Stanfill
said. "1 have also learned 'Wolof
which is the national language of
Senegal (West Africa). The lan-
guage is the vehicle of a culture
Joy Wilkins Helfnch, an ECU
alumna of 1986, is currently a Peace
Corps volunteer in Belize. "I be-
came interested in this region after
participation in ECU'S exchange
program with the University of
Heredia in Costa Rica and had my
first Peace Corps interview on
campusattheCareerPlanningand
Placement office Helfrich said.
Gretchen Journigan is another
ECU graduate who is currently in-
volved in the program. "I applied
for the corps when I was in my last
semester at ECU, but I didn't cx-
Continued from page 1
meeting is open to interested i
ticipantsand invitees
Volunteers are needed forth
program, finance, buildingandlfJ
gal committees, but volunteer
be used in any of the other area.
"The volunteers will r .t hjJ
to really do a lot of work y,
said. Duties will includeattcndin
one meeting every two rm nthsa
some work between meetings.
Continued from page 1
pect to be accepted she said
Journigan said that ii she�j
going to do something like
Corps, now was a gixni time su
shedid not haveany commitment!
Aribboncuttingcen-m, r.
be held January 16, at 3 p.m. mt
Speight Building in Roon
ceremony will be conducted tr.1
ma ke people a ware that 1 i m here,
Christofferson said
Information sessions through!
The Career Planning and Place.
ment Center will aIs �� .j
campus for interested students,
Does a year or semester of study in England. Scotland, Wales,
Ireland, Belgium, France, The Netherlands, Finland, Sweden,
Hungary, Malta, Kenya, Mexico, Argentina, Costa Rica, Cyprus,
Korea, or Hong Kong sound interesting?
Sounds fantastic? But it's just not possible because: It's loo
expensive; or it will delay graduation; or you aren't fluent in a
foreign language?
The truth of the matter is that many institutions offer programs in
ENGLISH. If, of course, you do have a fluency in another language,
then your choices of study sites will be even greater.
The cost? The cost of attending a participating institution in the
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAM (ISEP)
is, except for travel costs, cxacUy the same as attending ECU. And,
in most cases, credits earnrd abroad can be transferred back to ECU.
It is a fact that some of the finest universities in the world are
available at ECU prices to qualified ECU students. For more
information about ISEP and other programs of exchange, both
national and international, contact immediately
Dr. Robert J. Hursey, Jr.
ISEP Coordinator
Austin 222
PH. 757-6418 or 756-0682
Stephany Evancho
Office of International Programs
Brewster A117
PH. 757-6769
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UNC study shows
By Elizabeth Shimmel
Staff Writer
A University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill study shows three
out of four North Carolinians feel
protecting the environment is more
important than promoting eco-
nomic growth.
'The �me survey found that
North Carolinians are feeling the
effects of the recession Dr. John
Shelton Reed, director of the UNC-
CH Institute for Research in Social
Science, saidSahsf action with their
family finances is at the lowest point
The best News,
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The best Sports,
The best of it all
The East Carolinian
ADVERTISE WITH
CAROUNIAN
in three years. But ei
hard times, they are
sacrifice the environ
mote economic growl
The survey show j
liruans are mure conl
the sta te' s en vironme J
environmental probw
percentof the respond
worried a great dej
"greenhouse effect,
cent said they worrid
about drinking pollul
Not only are mof
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more people arc takij
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January 16, 1992 gftg EflBt (garolftlfan 3
dentified lem
n and possible
tent office
e the cons
� .1 kn;p tor the
fmembers
is well .i- sup
it ol priorities
� bee
Continued from page 1
meeting is open to interested
Hcipants and invitees.
ohinteers are needed for tf
program, finance, building and M
gal committees, but volunteersca
be um.x1 in m of the other area?
Fhe volunteers will not ha
t really do a lot at work Aha
stud Duties will include attendir
etingeverytwomonthsai
h between meetings.
Continued from page 1
pect to be accepted she said.
loumigan viul that if she wal
to do something like th
now was a good time sine
lid not have any commitment
ribbon cutting cenfitutty i�
d January 16, at 3 p.m. in tn
tBuildinginRoom2CQTM
v will be conducted tc
- pi opie a ware that lam here
� ��� rson nikI.
mation sessions through
areer Planning and Place
� tei will also be hold or
� ntcrested students.
1 WHY WAIT
j,d FOR YOUR
TAX REFUND
III A YOU (AN
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UNC study shows interest in environment
Assault
Continued from paga 1
By Elizabeth Shimmel
Suff Writer
A University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill study shows three
out of four North Carolinians feel
protecting the environment is more
important than promoting eco-
nomic growth.
"The same survey found that
North Carolinians are feeling the
effects of the recession Dr. John
Shelton Reed, director of the UNC-
CH Institute for Research in Social
Science, saidSatisf action with their
family finances isat thelowest point
in three years. But even in these
hard times, they are not willing to
sacrifice the environment to pro-
mote economic gTowth
The survey shows North Caro-
linians are more concerned about
the state's environment than global
environmental problems. Only 28
perccntof the respondents said they
worried a great deal about the
"greenhouse effect while 65 per-
cent said they worried a great deal
about drinking polluted waters.
Not only are more people con-
cerned about the environment, but
more people arc taking action as a
result of these concerns. Eighty-
seven percen t of the adults su rveyed
said they voluntarily recycle
newspapers, glass, aluminum,
motoroil,orotheritems,and would
avoid purchasing a specific item if
it was not recyclable.
Seventy-one percent of the re-
spondents also said they cut their
household's use of energy by im-
proving the insulation of their home,
or by changing their heating or air
conditioning system.
"These results suggest that
concern about environmental qual-
ity is very strong Dr. Reed said.
The state residents surveyed
were split evenly on their approval
or disapproval of the job President
George Bush is doing to reduce
pollution and protect the environ-
ment, according to the survey. But,
Republicans were more likely to
approve of Bush's record on the
environment than Democrats, while
white people were more likely to
approveofBush'scfforts than black
people.
Thepoll war conducted by the
School of Journalism and Mass
Communication and the Institute
for Research in Social Science.
ten in a policy because it limits the
ability to draw fine lines Irons
said.
Irons said Morlote's case is a
matter of jurisdiction, not a matter
of lack of sympathy.
In Morlote's case. Dean of
Students Ronald Speier was pre-
pared to issue charges and began
the hearing process until Chancel-
lor Richard Eakin decided that the
matter was not a university concern
and stopped any action, Morlote
said.
Morlote consulted Bill Carroll,
chairman of the SGA rules and
judiciary committee, in the matter
and Carroll said he wanted a re-
sponse from officials as to why the
decision was made by the admin-
istration.
"Failure to file charges at the
bequest of Mrs. Morlote implies
that the university condones ac-
tivities such as sexual assault and
assault against women Carroll
said.
"He (the assailant has not vio-
lated anything that concerns us
Matthews said.
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The best Sports,
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RATES PER COLUMN INCH
Local Open Rate $5.00
Student $2.50
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(Hire iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
Jennifer Wardrep, News Editor
Julie Roscoe, Ass. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Dana Danielson, Ami. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Margie Morin, Assf. Sports Editor
Jeff Becker, Copy Editor
Blair Skinner, Copy Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
CHANTAL Weedman, layout Manager
Jean Caraway, Classified Advertising Technician
Stephen Schaubach, Systems Engineer
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Margie O'Shea, Advertising Technician
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The Eiist Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,(XM) copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition
is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should be
limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters
for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C
27858 4 53. For more information, call ()19) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Thursday, January 16, 1992
Blame officials; not Kittrell
Of all of the players in the wiretapping
scandal perhaps the person least understood is
Capt. Stanley Kittrell.
Kittrell was the Publk Safety officer who
late insummer of 1991 discovered the tran-
scripts of the Illegal wiretapping carried out by
KCU officials. After he realized what the tran-
scripts were, Kittrell delivered them to the
proper authorities � the FBI.
He was bound by a federal law which
commands employees of the government to
report any criminal activity. The federal gov-
ernment has authority over the incident be-
cause unauthorized wiretapping is a federal
crime.
The interesting footnote of this scandal is
that some people are blaming Kittrell for his
actions. Now that the University has paid over
$138,000 in settlements to victims of the wire-
tapping, some people think that Kittrell should
have kept his findings to himself.
Here's the point. If Kittrell had not gone to
the FBI, he would have committed a crime
himself by not following the federal law which
deems notification of authorities about crimi-
nal activity.
Kittrell was not looking for trouble when
he found the transcripts. In fact, according to
the affidavit in his retaliation lawsuit, he was
simply looking in the Public Safety computer
for a football game security plan when he found
the transcripts.
Kittrell did the right the thing. He was
bound by law.
Anyone who might blame him for the
money we have since paid out or the conse-
quent blemish on the University is sadly mis-
taken.
If looking for someone to blame for the
scandal, look no further than the people iden-
tified for their involvement. Or blame the ill-
informed Chancellor who says he was not no-
tified about the wiretapping until after the FBI
was contacted.
We must not miss the forest by looking at
the trees.
Kb MAVW ITS NOP6 UM,
- thf SOKRi, I JUST CAN'T
Ten- WHO TM�Y AE i
gowG PEOPLE OUST
STfU ponY fteo6rvl tzE
TM� iMDfPEPEMT STATES
Another Column With a Nifty Title
Columnist clarifies Jan. 14 article
By Blair Skinner
Editorial Columnist
An old editorof mine taught me
that news writers clean up the messes
they make, and if the reporter feels a
mess has been made, a clarification
should be published as soon as pos-
sible.
After I read the column I wrote
for the Jan. 14 opinion section in print,
I felt I had made a mess because my
writing was not clear. Like my editor
said, if you feel you've made a mess,
clean it up yourself. So here goes.
First off, for those who don't
know, what appears on the opinion
page of a newspaper is just that �
opinion. These articles, as opposed to
those in other sections, are argumen-
tative. And both sides of a storydonot
have to be presented in opinion pieces.
If a writer presents opposing view-
points, he or she detracts from the
point of the article. Readers who dis-
agree can write letters to the editor to
voice their opinion. That's the way an
opinion page works.
In the column, I wrote that four
students broke the law. I said they
were stupid to do so, as is anyone who
intentionally breaks the law.
I attempted to draw a parallel
between the student's actions and
those of the administrators involved
in the wiretapping scandal. The idea
was to draw attention to the illegal
wiretapping and its cost to the Uni-
versity.
The conclusion held the point
of the article. I felt it was ironic that the
University punished four students for
their apparent actions off of campus,
while on the other hand, the adminis-
trators remain unpunished and em-
ployed, even after the University has
paid mere than $130,000 because of
the wiretapping which occurred on
campus.
Also, I feel my column, because
of unclear writing, offended people
not directly involved in the assault
that police say occurred �n Ash Street
in late October.
The column was not intended
to do so.
In addition, I did not intend to
single oi I .raternities as a source of
disruption of the peace on our cam-
pus.
The paragraphsabout reporter's
biases were intended to show that a
personal bias against senseless vio-
lence drove me to cover the stoiy of
the assault.
Those paragraphs were not
written clearly, and unintentionally
lead readers to believe that reporters
see each story they cover as an oppor-
tunity for a personal attack. That is not
true, and I never meant for readers to
make that implication.
Letters to the Editor
Alumnus cheers
for ECU fans
To the Editor
From the small town of Jackson
Hole, Wyoming, I would like to give
three cheers to the student body of
ECU for the great support of the Pi-
rates. I graduated in 1990, and I'm
now living out here. I was able to
attend several home games this past
season and was impressed not only
by the power of our players, but by the
power of our fans as well.
On Jan 1,1992 several other folks
from ECU (I met them by chance) and
1 got together to watch the game. It
was truly great. We were a shining
star in the west pulling for one alma
mater.
To theptudents, why not show
school spirit when it come to school
elections, other sports, or other activi-
ties? We proved to the country and to
thestateof North Carolina that we are
a force to be reckoned with, why not
prove it to ourselves?
Stephen McDonald
Snow King Resort
Employee Housing 8
Jackson Hole, Wyoming
S3C01 �
On The Fringe
Florida Turnpike leads way to hi-jinx
By Tim E. Hampton
Editorial Columnist
SOMEWHERE IN NORTH
AMERICA � Somuch has happened
since we last saw each other. Fourth
quarter comebacks, speeding tick-
ets, impromptu meetings with the
Cuban Mafia ami sleeping hands
fisting through window panes.
Instead of forging an epic
wanderlog, maybe short slices of the
journey will better suit the busy
reader's needs.
Mill in North Carolina, heading
South.
On New Year's Eve in the
Monroe, N.C. Taco Bell, where upon
orderingthreeChilitosanda Burrito
Supreme (nothing like those post-
Holiday diets) the semi-moronic
chock-out person looked at the ECU
Peach Bowl sweat shirt and said
"1 lell, yeah, the Pie-rates
And although gambling is no
longer a part of my daily rituals, E
still reverts back to gamblers' idio-
syncrasies in hopes of artificially safe-
guarding a fortuna futuru. One of
those idiosyncrasies involves never
stooping for a penny on tails. An-
other is never looking straight at a
solar ellipse.
Still another is never stopping
to get a bite to eat in Jesse Helms'
birthplace and having one of the
Senator's supporters mispronounce
the mascot of our college football
team. Any deviation from these rules
constitutes an irreparable jinx which
somehow leads to misera futura.
Just when and where the jinx
would hit was no telling. Jinxs are
like time bombs with a defective
clock, probably because the
clockmaker was placed under a jinx.
As the white Isuzi rolled into the
rolling Carolina twilight and a
bounding doe raced in front of us,
we wondered just when and where
the jinx would hit.
Through the lowly state of
South Carolina and onto Hot 'Una
Another lame New Year's Eve.
Wcwereontheoutkirtsof Atlanta at
11:45 p.m a good 30 miles from the
happeningsoene at theUnderv round.
Giving up on the idea of kissing any
Bettys with Pirates to usher in the
New Year, we (Tobin and F) pulled
over to the first bar we saw.
So while 200,000 (dazed revel-
ers watched as the huge Peach
dropped in downtown Tana, we saw
the big Red Man pouch fall at Bob's
Country Bunker. Aftermidnighi, men
with beards and boots and women
with cakes of make-up and l-arrah
Fawcett hairdo's darned to a Mow
Randy Travis song; Tobin and F just
took shots of Dickel.
Fulton-County Stadium and the
cheerless sports writer
In the press box, no one can
demonstrate any bias � since all
members of the press hold an ethical
integrity which disavows any Wanted
views. No ECU paraphernalia was
on my person. In addition, a total
refrain from blasphemy andor any
reverberations of the Ed McMahon
"Yesssss
So when Jeff Blake and com-
pany calmly orchestrated the great-
est comeback ever in the history of
sports and the greatest feat ever in the
1 billion years of the earth's extence
(no bias here), so when all this was
taking place on the field before me.
blood trickled from my lips a teeth
gnawed the twitching tongue.
After Luke Fisher's touchdown
with 1:46 remaining, E could take it
no moreand ran from the silent press
box to field level. Once there, the
loudest "YceeHaw" known to hu-
mankind echoed through the stadium
causing a brief stoppage of play.
Banana licker drinkers and theCu-
ban Mafia.
Following a brief layover at
Nipss place in Olando . . ar
raced to Miami so we could meet our
clandestine ties. With � run
drinks in hand, we v. e
low-ridingChevyspasse lontheb �
levard, jumping and si
Tobin had a su i �;
dance, SO Nipsy and E w,
he cut in on a Betty with I
eroding a hugi iking
gentleman with gold d
Someone infom ed
� � � ��
high-tailed to the ck� � N
Parts store where we av -
morning with headaches.
The jinx almost ri vi
but after three pax
warm Shaffer we rea �.����
alive.
Key West and the Bekhtngtourgotfi
Ernest Hemingway � i jc
who wrote about war, -�
frustrated impotent mei o
cool that he stole the urinal fron
Sloppv foe's bar and : tdowi
inthebackyardofhisKe) '� -home
According to tour gukk
Bernice: "Ernest (bulp) took thi an-
nal because he said so much at hs
monev had drained down it "
Ten dollar toll road becomes mudr
more expensive
Final note on the put! I c ��
face: Ac driving shift I
midnight. The Honda rurnpikesi
Straig ' rite road wit
no cops.
"Gee Nipsy,th is turbo Daihata
doesn't seem like it's going 85, doe
it?" slipped from the jinxed mouth
The highway patrolrr.in was
most courteous, but he didn't :
that we were being chased by the
Cuban Mafia or the story jbou
Tobin's menstrual cramps.
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Hemp illegality based on erroneous facts
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
You know how you're some-
times in the mood to be scared?
So you go down to the video
store, and you rent a movie from the
horror section, and you take it home
and watch it, and maybe you're scared.
Here's what to do next time you
want to be really scared. Don't go to
the video store. Co to a bookstore, and
buy The Emperor Wears No Clothes, by
Jack Herer.
You won't find Emperor in the
horror section. That's because it's a
nonfiction account of America's pro-
hibit ion of hem p �a proh ibi t ion "born
in hysteria and racism, continued in
self-righteousness and repression as
attorney Michael Rose notes in the
prologue.
And it is positively terrifying.
In 182 large-format pages, Herer pre-
sents a thoroughly documented case
� much of it with photocopies of
news stories, government documents,
and so forth � for abolishing the laws
against the sale and use of hemp. By
the time he's done, Herer has amply
proved his thesis that there exists no
conceivable moral, economic, social,
or medical justification for outlawing
hemp. None.
The most troubling portion of
Herer's book is its account of the at-
tempts to prohibit hemp anyway.
Herer traces the beginning of hemp
prohibition to an anti-marijuana cam-
paign carried out by the newspapers
of William Randolph Hearst, the rac-
ist and power-hungry newspaper
magnate satirized in the classic film
Citizen Kane.
As it happens, Hearst had a con-
siderable financial stake in timber log-
ging. But newly invented machinery
would have made it possible to pro-
duce paper from hemp, on a large
scale, more cheaply than from trees.
Hence, the logging industry's profits
� and, by extension, Hearst's own
profits � weie ft risk.
So Hearst and his allies �
among them the DuPont Corporation,
which had other reasons to oppose
hemp � began claiming that mari-
juana was responsible for ludicrously
large percentages of violent crime.
Hearst's newspapers specifically and
repeatedly claimed that marijuana
caused "Negroes" to rape white
women. (Never mind that, a few years
before, Hearst had been claiming co-
caine was the culprit in those crimes.)
Thanks in large measure to Hearst's
lurid newspaper stories � most of
which, later researchers showed, were
false � hemp was outlawed in 1937;
with minor exceptions in a few states,
it has remained illegal since.
Admittedly, this is a conspiracy
theory � and, like any conspiracy
theory, it should be carefully inspected
with Occam's Razor close at hand.
Nevertheless, Herer's allegations are
clearly argued, copiously docu-
mented, and, most important, thor-
oughly plausible. (Besides, I'm only
telling part of the story in this column;
it is a complex story, and I cannot do
it justice in this space.)
But whatever its origins, the
subsequent rationalizations for hemp
prohibition have been little improve-
ment over Hearst's yellow journal-
ism. Like me, you have probably heard
the claim that pot kills brain cells, a
claim responsible for much of the con-
tinuing opposition to marijuana smok-
ing. But � prepare yourself to be as
surprised as 1 was � the claim is
completely unsubstantiated.
The pot-kills-brain-cells claim
rests entirely on a study performed by
Dr. Gabriel Nahas. To make a long
column short (too late), the brain cells
were actually killed by carbon mon-
oxide �a gas given off by almost any
burning object, and force-fed to the
monkeys along with the marijuana
smoke � not by the pot smoke itself.
In effect, the monkeys in Nahas' study
were sitting in a closed garage with a
car motor running. No wonder some
of their brain cells died.
Damningly, Dr. Nahas' study
has been refuted, has been ridiculed
Ball of Wax
by his peers, and was eventually re-
nounced by the good doctor himself
Furthermore, its results have never
been replicated even after im cr-
able attempts � yet the Nahas
M BtjQ aeJ us fact in schools legal
decisions, and, seem ingly, everywhere
else.
Of course, if all this fun abodl
re-legahzmg hemp were only so that
people could smoke pot legallv, one
might ask, so what? (Not to mention
that if they want to get high in a waj
that actually does kill their brain ceB
they have but to drink alcohol 1
"So what?" is a good question,
a nd ought a! wavs to be answered For
reasons set forth in Herer's book, hemp
is an astonishingly useful plant.
One can use it to make every-
thing from clothes to rope to paper
(hemp paper was used for two drafts
of the Declaration of Independence,
the Gutenberg Bible, and much more)
to fuel to medicine to well, you
name it.
In fact, hemp has been used for
many of those purposes for thousands
of years, even here in America. Sim-
ply put, hemp is a versatile plant that
can solve many of our environmental
problems in one fell swoop; to keep tt
illegal simply because people can g�t
high from it is the height of irrespo
sibiltty.
If that argument �
unconvincing, there is the matter of
our national self-respect. If doing the
right thing matters to us, Herer's book
shows that we must re-legalize hemp-
If even that argument is
unconvincing well, then, buy
Herer'sbookand discover manymore
Hell, if you can prove them wrong
about anything, they'll pay y0
SI 0,000. You can pick up a copy of Tit
Emperor Ween No Clothes at Quicksff-
ver Record k CD Exchange, a geni-
ally nifty shop on Fifth Street, f
SI 4.95. Read the book, and learn tl
truth bchind the half-century of lidk
damn lies, and statistics which ha
convinced you to ban a dumb plant-
Scared yet?

-TSm
) �
v'V,
January 16th & 1
UP TO 75
Need to make rooi
SPRING ARRIVAI
Everything
marked down bi
Peach Bowl Itei
f2r
CAfZVC
7C4f er nrm vt
-pRiisrnMA�





s way to hi-jinx ggc�rne.
�inkers md the Cu-
� brief layover at
N I �'� i;car
��e could meet our
v rum
we wat hed as the
1 I � �ithehou-
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so we
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esthoHtt,
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rutting sur-
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Ball of Wax
By Steve Reid Kung Fu Master J
By Harris and Haselrig
-Tirtt Tq HAK
pip'
TiAUV CepLP,W
AtvwT vacation
THANK, A fTANKUH
HOB&UIMAM I'M
JAY VMLKEK YOU'KL
LPOXN'GAZAT FEEl,
GOOP CSYOUGH TO
QA4MC FIVB ?
sukc.uh itfu,mA
ffl�WP &JUJN& FU
HAiTt XHE WANTS
Tb KNOWWHO GAVL
YOU T�(. QUAMTZA
THATBt-CW VOCg.
HANP Off A FEW
PAYS' A60. CAN ,
-YOU HEM�M3C!
By Sean Parnell
b i tvtvt, fct �koTAvie� ve
T"MS
I SJ, Ttj "Joy KV-ch- f
b�,� us.
NOKI KNOW
KUNGFUWliTtB
vac
The Death Of Kemple Boy
Fred s Corner
Il
uMNT A T GaoWe.� MyT ?
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By Kemple
1 erroneous facts
1 vi ntualty W"
lor hittvsetf.
I we never
�� - ninumcr-
N'ahas tvidy
Igal
. � where
this fuss about
tvere -mlv n that
� � pot legally, or
. t to mention
� � � gh in a way
their brain ceils
fool.)
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nxl.For
Herei ,hxk,hemp
ful plant.
e It to make every-
to rope to paper
I for two drafts
� Independence
. and much more)
� M well, yoy
; has been used fof
I ir pi �� for thousand
� . n here in America. Sim-
t a versatile plant thtl
'� "i 1 ut environmental
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ART00NI5T MMM
TUESPAW JAN. i
BE THEREll!
Cam
Daily Special $3.61
(complete meal)
Present ad for free dessert with meal.
I
I
ii a
le e long
p i cells
m mon-
IM any
i) to Dm
karijuana
ritM-f
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wth a
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hdicukxl
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. � � .� people can gV
t is the height of irresport
lity
If that argument i
unconvincing, there is the matter Of
our national self respect. If doing the
right thing maitten to usllerer'sbook
� vvemust r-legalizehem.
It even that argument U
t mg well, then, bdy
I It-n-r ibook and dtacovc many molt-
Hell, it v(u can pnve them wrortg
�bout anything, they'll pay yot�
$10,000. You can pick up a copy of Tr
EmjtjrBf vVf.jrc ,v c'totkm at Quicksll
H Km ord ft111 i hange, a gen"
ally nifty "hop on Fifth Street, f0t
$14 u" Head the book, and learn tB�
truth behind the ha!fentury of HA
damn lies, and statistics which ha$
COttvincad vou to ban a dumb plant.
Son yet?
January 16th & 17th
UP TO 75 OFF
Need to make room for
SPRING ARRIVALS
Everything
marked down but
Peach Bowl Items
JiT
Corner of Dickinson and Raleigh Ave. 752-5339
Open Mon-lri 6:30am-7:30pm
ATTIC
752-7303 1209 E. 5th St
7o4 e6-r nrn t
CWWVtU-l HC- I'M
Thursday
Student
Budget Night
'� PIIM$ir8
$1.15 Tall Boys
$1.25 Imports
$2.10 High Balls
$2.85 Ice Teas
ladies Free All Night
"tot
CoMedY
230NE
. The
CoMedY
23WE
Thursday
WZMB Night
AS IS
99 Draft �99 Highballs �99 Memberships
Friday
MIKE EDWARDS & THE BAJVJVEI
Classic Rock & Roll
Saturday
Beach Music's 1 Show!





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RT00NI5TJfFriNij
Daily Special $3.6(1
(complete meal)
Present ad for free dessert with meal.
Corner of Dickinson and Raleigh Ave. 752-5339
Open Mon-1 ri 6:30am-7:30pm
ATTIC
led
� a � -ir.itts
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Wl II, yotl
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cntury of litS.
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in .i (.lumb plant.
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752-7303 I 209 E. 5th St.
January 16th & 17th
UP TO 75 OFF
Need to make room for
SPRING ARRIVALS
Everything
marked down but
Peach Bowl Items
.
2c- fcAT WtM
Thursday
Student
Budget Night
$1.15 Tall Boys
$1.25 Imports
$2.10 High Balls
$2.85 Ice Teas
'Ladies Free All Night
COMeiff
ZONE
The. .
CoMedY
ZONE
Thursday
WZMB Night
AS IS
99c Draft99 Highballs �99c Memberships!
Friday
MIKE EDWARDS & THE BANNEl
Classic Rock & Roll
Saturday
Beach Music's 1 Show!
d
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r.
n
-
n
a
r,
c
il
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n
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Classifieds
ullic SaHt (Earultnian
January 16, 1992
SERVICES OFF
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES:
We offer typing and photocopy-
ing services. We also sell software
and computer diskettes. 24 hours
in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages.
SDF Professional Computer Ser-
vices, 106 E. 5th St. (beside
Cubbie's), Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
CLEANING: Married, female
student working her way through
school. Eight years of experience
cleaning personal homes. Rea-
sonable rates and own supplies.
Please call Cindy Myer at 752-
2759.
FOK KtV
I crD
FOR KENT
bedroom apt. $150 rent, 1II utili-
ties, 5 blocks from campus. Call
757-1372.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: starting Feb. $225 per
month includes everything: rent,
phone and cable. Only 1 2 block
from campus. Call 758-6418 and
leave number.
TWIN OAKS: Three bedroom, 2
12 bath, fully-turnished
townhouse. Upperclassman pre-
ferred. Jason 830-5173.
EFFICIENCY: 3 blocks from cam-
pus. Utilities, kitchen, bath in-
cluded. Available Feb. 1 $150. Call
for NORD or 1221. Keep trying.
Close to laundry and market.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: lmmediately.To share
Wilson Acre Apt. Pay 1 4 of rent
and utilities. Will have own bed-
room. Call 757-0458.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: for February for apart-
ment within an apartment, 12
block from campus. Call 758-6418,
$225 per month includes rent,
utilities, phone and cable.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: Neat, clean, ECU stu-
dent $125 and 12 utilities and 1
2 phone. Call 321-2128. Leave
message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED NOW: to share two
A Beautiful Place to I ivc
�All New
�Ami ReaJy i'o Rersl'
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
28W E 5th Street
�IcatcJ Near ECU
�Ne u Major Shopping Centers
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
lamilcd Offer � S330 a month
Contact J.T. or Pommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open - Apt. S, 12-S:30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
Qm ii-J quiet i�ir htdriHim n-miihrj IfamVtt,
encrg ci�. free aTt-r nrfatwor, � rVirri,dryer�.
cabie IV Ciu;Jc� oi � (tin �.W. UW � rmmlh. 6
momhlci-r MOBBXHOMB RENTALS LrniilHOi
nrfclet. Antutrnenl�ikiin.thJchi�r�riJi AialcfitiarJrns
ncu BfDah Vafe) Cautn CUk
Contact J.T or Tommy Williams
756 7815 '
FOK SALE
GILBERT'S MUSIC offers 20
discount to ECU students and
faculty - 40 off non-stocked
items. Musical instrument repairs
i OK SAl t
of all types. 2711 E. 10th St. 757-
2667.
SEIZED CARS: trucks, boats, 4
wheelers, motorhomes, by FBI,
IRS, DEA. Available your area
now.Call805-682-7555ext.C-5999.
REPOSSESSED AND IRS
FORECLOSED HOMES: avail-
able at below market value. Fan-
tastic savings! You repair. Also
S&L bailout properties. Call 805-
682-7555 ext. H-6314.
GREAT BUY! 6days and 5 nights.
Bahama vacation. Fun in the sun.
$149.00or best of fer. 919-776-8511.
YOU'VE ONLY GOT ONE
WEEK TO LIVE! Do it right!
Spring Break in Jamaica from only
$429 Hotel, air, transfers, parties!
Sun SplashToursl -800-426-7710
A BAHAMAS PARTY CRUISE:
6 days $279! Panama Gty $99,
Padre $199, Cancun $499, Jamaica
$399! Jasa 758-5165, Wayne 757-
1369 or 1-800-638-6786.
FENDER SQUIRE
STRATOCASTER: Red with
white pick guard tremelo and one
double coil Gibson Humbucking
pickup$190neg. Also Kay Acous-
tic six string, black, $125. Please
call 752-7490. Ask for Greg.
FOR SALE: Dorm refrigerator.
Medium size. Asking $90. Come
by 116 Jarvis Hall or call 931 -8530
after 5 p.m.
.1'WAN. II
HFIPWANTTD
m DlSrtAYCIASSlFILD
Ringgold Towers
Now Taking Leases for
1 Bedroom, 2 Bedroom.
& Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library ol Information In U.S.
19.278 TOPICS ALL SUBJECTS
E3E 800-351-0222
0' Ri�n K M to B�I Intonrntlofl
�:y7 :ai- �v� me � io� Aog��CA 90OK
MAKE S500-S1000 WEEKLY:
stuffing envelopes at home. Start
now! Rush S.A.S.E. plus $1.00 to
Home Employers, 2301 Kent 8
Las CruceNM 88001.
ADDRESSERS WANTED IM-
MEDIATELY! No experience
necessary. Process FH A mortgage
refunds. Work at home. Call 1-
405-321-3064.
FREE TRAVEL Air couriers and
cruiseships. Students also needed
Christmas, spring and summer
foramusementparkemployment.
Call 805-682-7555 ext. F-3464.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE:
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call 805-682-7555 ext. P-3712.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT
PAY! Assembleproductsat home.
Call toll free. 1-800-467-8585 ext.
5920.
MUSICIANS NEEDED: Key-
board or percussion to accompany
ECU dancedasses. Good pay. Call
757-6390.
SPRING BREAK TO FLORIDA
BEACHES: Energetic promoter
needed. Earn FREE trips and
CASH.CallCMIat 1-800423-5264.
HELP WANTED: Part-time stock
clerk, dependable car. Apply in
person at Larry's Carpetland - 310
E. 10th St.
HELP WANTED: Part-time ac-
counting clerk, computer experi-
ence required. Apply in person at
UnysCarpetland-310E. lOthSt.
WELCOMEBACK STUDENTS!
Start the new year wi th an exciting
position in retail. Brody's and
Brody's for Men are accepting
applications for part-time posi-
tions. Earn extra money for those
PWAMED
college expenses and clothingdis-
counts for a new spring ward-
robe. Apply Brody's, The Plaza,
Mon. - Wed. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
ECU STUDENT NEEDED: to
help care for two children in my
home for two hours, three days a
week. Daily housekeeping and
transportation needed. Call 756-
7622 after 6 p.m.
500-1000 CAMP POSITIONS
AVAILABLE: Staff Referral Ser-
vices provides a network of camps,
now hiring, from the "Keys" to
Wise-Minn. One application
reaches all camps. Applications at
Career Services-Bloxton House.
MATURE STUDENT: to work
part-time as telephone reception-
ist for local law firm. Hours are
8:30 tol p.m. Monday thru Friday.
Send resume to: P.O. Box 5026,
Greenville, N.C 27835.
����

1�ii
PfKSONAlS
Entertainment
Pr.KSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS: to the
ECU Pirates for their Peach Bowl
victory from ECU's spring break
travel company - STS - Student
Travel Services.
CONGRATULATIONS: to the
ECU Football team for its win in
the Peach Bowl Love the AOPIs.
SPRING RUSH 1992: Rush a fra-
ternity with strong ideals of broth-
erhood and honor. Sigma Nu.
Rush a fraternity with excellence
that has become tradition. Rush
Sigma Nu.752-6681,752-9607. We
make the difference. Sigma Nu.
BETA Os: Thanks for the great
DISPLAY ClASSIf IFD
sister party. We all had fun. Love,
the AOP1 sisters.
HAPPY 19TH BIRTHDAY: J.D.
Sears! Love, Mary Beth; and "salu-
tations" from the 401 posse: Rob,
Jaffy, Bru, Mike, Steve and Neil.
CONGRADS ECU PIRATES!
Great job in Atlanta. Sweet victory
over State. We love our Pirates!
Alpha Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS: to the
Pirates for their superb victory
over the Wolfpack. Way to go!
Love, Delta Zeta.
SIGMA NU: Spring 1992. Learn
about Sigma Nu. We do not haze.
Sigma Nu was founded against
hazing. Instead we develop lead-
ers, men of honor who learn and
earn respect. Get Some
ALPHA PHI AND SIG TAU:
We're looking forward to making
the first party of '92 thebest. See ya
tomorrow nite for a great time.
Lefs go! The brothers of Sigma
Nu.
RUSH ECU'S: W fraternity Sigma
Phi Epsilon. For info, call 752-
7641,830-9324.
THE BROTHERS OF SIG EP:
would like to wish all fraternities
a successful rush.
NICKI: Now that Dave is in DC.
wecan PARTY! Let'sdo it upright
this weekend if we are here! Jean
JOHN: I hope your foot feels bet-
ter soon. Smile and be happy. It
could have been worse. Jean
Let the one you love know how much you care
about them by sending them a Love Lines mes-
sage for Valentine's Day on Feb. 13th in The East
Carolinian. Come by the office across from the
library for more details.
Deadline is Tuesday,
February 11,1992.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES
Line Ads:
For 1st 25 words:
Students$2.00
Non-students$3.00
Display Ads:
Open Rate per column inch$5.50
DEADLINE:
Friday, 4 p.m for Tuesday issue and
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday issue.
Announcements
FCIJ SCHOOL OF MUSIC
The ECU School of Music will
hold a symposium entitled 'The
21 st Century Cellist: Preparing for
theCareersof Tomorrow" Jan. 17-
19. Distinguished cellists from
across the country will present
diverse lectures and classes on
Baroque cello, electric cello and
jazz improvisation, twentieth
century cello literature and or-
chestral repertoire. Forregistration
information, contact the ECU
School of Music at 919-757-6851.
ThehighlightofSaturday'sevents,
January 18, will be a gala concert
featuring the artist faculty. The
concert begins at 8 p.m. in the
ECU School of Music's Fletcher
Redtal Halloncampusandisopen
to the public free of charge on a
first-come, first-seated basis.
TRAVEL�STUDY-LEARN
If s not too late to apply for the
National or International Student
Exehangeor for oneof many study
abroad opportunities! If you are
interested in paying ECU tuition
and attending one erf 107 other
universities around the United
States or if you are interested in
study in a foreign country, inves-
tigate the many opportunities
available to you through the ECU
exchange programs. Also avail-
able is information on numerous
summer opportunities. Visit Ms.
Stephanie Evancho in Brewster
A-117 or call 757-6769 for a bro-
chure and application form soon!
NATIONALINTERNA-
TIONAL EXCHANG
E SEMINAR
How would you like to visit beau-
tiful parts of the country or world
you've been dreaming of and get
college credit at the same time?
We'll tell you how to get started
on your journey when you come
to the first Study Abroad-Ex-
change Program Seminar of the
semester on Thursday, Jan. 16 at 4
p.m. in GCB 1005. Stephanie
Evancho from the Center for In-
ternational Programs will explain
the exchange procedures for the
NSE (National Student Exchange),
ISEP (International Student Ex-
change Program) as well as ex-
changes with the Acadia Univer-
sity (Canada), Ecole Superieure
du Commerce Exterieur (Paris),
and Leicester Polytechnic (En-
gland). This session will deal pri-
marily with semester and aca-
demic year programs. A panel
composed of exchange students
studying at ECU as well as ECU
students who have returned from
exchanges at other schools will be
present to share their first-hand
experiences with you. Comeshare
their experience and be a part of
theexcitement. We're looking for-
ward to meeting you and making
your dreams come true! If you
cannot attend, contact Ms.
Evancho at 757-6769 for informa-
tion or to set up an appointment.
These seminars will beheld twice
monthly throu ghou t the semester
so check your ECU calendar for
future dates!
MISS GREATER
GREENVILLE
The Miss Greater Greenville Pag-
eant, an official Miss America Pre-
liminary, is still accepting applica-
tions for the 1992 pageant to be
held Saturday, February 15 in
Wright Auditorium on ECU
campus. To receive an applica-
tion, or to get more information,
please call 746-3171.
S-ON-5 BASKETBALL
RFCTSTRATION
All those interested in playing 5-
on-5 basketball need to attend the
basketball information meeting
being held on Jan. 21, 5 pm in
Biology 103. Formoreinformation,
call 757-6387.
BASKETBALL IAMBOREE
All faculty, staff and students are
encouraged to sign up for the Fust
Annual Basketball Jamboree on
Jan. 21,5 p.m. in Biology 103. This
pre-season tournament hosts
men's, women's and faculty divi-
sions. For more information, call
757-6387.
AEROBIC FTmFSS CLASSES
Begin your New Year resolutions
early by registering for the first
session fitness classes offered by
Recreation Services beginning Jan
21 thru Jan. 24 from 9 a jn5 pjn.
in204Christenbury Gym. Over 20
plus classes are offered through
the fitness programs offered by
Recreational Services. For class
schedules or more information,
call 757-6387 or stop by 204
Christenbury Gym.
loonmirrANTEERi
Did you miss it? Some are still
available at die Buccaneer office
or the Media Board Office at any
time. Offices are located on the
2nd floor of Student Publications
Building (across from Joyner li-
brary).
ORIFNTTATIONTQ
CAKEEK SERVICES
The Career Services office invites
seniors and graduate students iO
attend a program designed to ac-
quaint them with the services
available to them as they prepare
to enter the work force. Atten-
dance is strongly recommended
for those interested in registering
with the office and participating
in the campus interviews. Regis-
tration and interview sign-up
procedures, how to establish a
credential file, and a tour of the
Career Services Center are irt-
duded. These sessions will be held
intheBloxtonHouseonTlxursday,
Jan. 16at4p.m. and Friday,Jan. 17
at 2 p.m.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student
Centerinvitesyou to worship with
them. Sunday Masses: 1130 ajn.
and 830pjnjnassat the Newman
Center. 953, E. 10th St two houses
from the Fletcher Music Building.
Forhirmer information pleasecall
Fr. Paul Vaeth, 757-1991.
COUNCIL OF STUDENT
nBC.ANTZATION LEADERS
The Council of Student Organiza-
tion Leaders first spring meeting
is Wednesday, Jan. 22 from 5p.m
630 p.m. in Mendenhall's Great
Room. Jeannie Tomkalski, Direc-
tor of ECU's Health Promotion
and Wellness is this month's
speaker. Theagenda for Tuesday's
meeting will also include a leader-
ship inventory and the organiza-
tion speakout. For more informa-
tion, please contact Lisa Shibley at
757-1881.
GROUP ADVISING FOR PRE-
OT STUDENTS
Advising will be every 3rd Tues-
day of each month from 12-2 pm
starting Jan. 21 in room 203 Belk
Building. Please see the video at
either Joyner or Brody Libraries
before you come for advising.
RESUME WORKSHOPS
Workshopsonresume writing will
be conducted by the Career Ser-
vicesstafftohelpsrudentsdevelop
or revise their resume. They will
be held in the Bloxton House on
Jan 21 at 3 pjn Jan 22 and 23 at 4
pm.
ECU BIOLOGY CLUB
The first meeting of spring semes-
ter will be held on Wednesday,
Jan 22 at 6 pjn. in room BN109 of
the Science Complex New mem-
bers are always welcome.
I
Shanice's
By Cortrinna Home
Staff Writer
Shanice Wilson has burst onto
the music charts once more with
her fresh, sparkling album, Inner
Child, from Motown records. The
musical talent of the young star has
been prevalent since she was a
youngster.
According to a Motown press
release, Shanice started out singing
on stage with her mother and aunt
who spent time coaching her vo-
cally.
Her first major performance
was at a local theater in Los Ange-
les in the musical "Get Happy"
which led to Shanice's first record-
ing contract with A&M Records
when she was 11.
Shanice said in the press re-
lease that "it was hard to find songs
for an 11-year-old because most
songs for someone with my voice
were too mature
Shanice has undergone much
positive and creative growth since
she began recording with producer
Bryan Loren.
Her first success was with her
debut album, Discovery, which won
critical acclaim for the two hit R&B
singlesCan You Dance?" and "No
12 Steppin Motown said, "A se-
ries of selected appearances con-
firmed Shanice's talent as a power-
house young vocalist and she hit
the charts in 1989 with'This Time
a duet with the Detroit group Kiara
Shanice's new 1990 album In-
ner Child is delightfully soulful and
has put her on center stage in the
music industry.
Shanice is hard-pressed to
single out any specific cuts on Inner
Child: "I re
erything
of songs
ducer anc
and I wrc
ally happ
we were
around iij
Take
lovely bail
one of n
Narada
tend likt
stage an
thing anc
with the A
for the soi
Shanl
coming u
ics for "Yl
One" in a
utes. She
friend Mo
ting aroi
about ho
ex-boyfr
treated hi
her momj
added th
the song i
Tht
"You Die
Come Bac
sets the a!
serious h
Shanice i
said she i
siasticat
"I'm I
got to dd
enthuses I
Shar
ing the
danced
so I wan
and shov
ISO and the B
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
ECU's 1991-92 Performing Arts
Series will open the new year with
9 performance by the modern dance
troupe, ISO and the BOBS on Jan.
17.
In 1986, ISO Dance Theater
evolved from the collaborative cho-
reography of Daniel Ezralo w, James
Hampton, Ashley Rolland and
Morliegh Steinberg. Forming the
hudeusofMOMIXfrom 1983-1987,
Ezralow, Hampton, Rolland and
Steinberg helped direct fashion-
dance spectacles in cities like Tokyo
and New York. Choreographing
and performing television commer-
daJs and Music Television Videos,
such as David Bowie's Gloss Spider
World Tour and Song's They Dance
Alone, they then went on to form
ISO and tour new shows through-
out the world.
In their inaugural dance tour in
the spring of 1987, the Italian press
from the La Republica greeted ISO
and the BOBS to rave reviews.
"Quick-change artists.
Undassifiable: they stand alone.
video, anir
ence fiction
Inthof
with the BOl
thatisnowt
and Euroj:
created Ti
work to tl
Einaudi.
Milan, II !
States in Fet
During thd
team of If
tinued to
United Stat
tended enJ
Chicago, T(
The ei
style is hare
its name frc
So Outrage
tonic" and'
bill themsel
defining its
classical, nc
not folk, n
'The
between i
ers states
The a
Greene, Gi
9
J3 HTRl
� America's Premier Cl
f Thursday, Jan. 30th
4t Wright Auditorii
f GrccnvilU, N.C.
H $6.00 In Advance, $8.00
jt Call 355-3500 For
F TT Sponsored by
��� I Christian Fell
. oH
J3.J3.J3J3





PERSONALS
We all had fun. love,
HAPP I9TH BIRTHDAY: J.D.
1 ove MaryBeth;and"saIu-
l p the 401 posse Rob
Steve and Neil.
c ONGR IDS I CU PIRATES!
tlanta. Sweet victory
e love our Pirates!
v
CONCRATl I IIOS: to the
pert) � tory
k. Vav to co!
.1 l 1992. I earn
u We do not haze,
founded against
kve develop lead-
earn and
P SIC TAU:
n aking
� st Seeya
� il time.
;hi; i
�,m,i
ROTH1 RS (�l SIG I P:
fraternities
we are I
I HN ' - �. �urfoot feels bet-
mile and be happy. It
.
vn worse lean
AD RATES
t$2.00
,$3.00
$5.50
Kdti issue and
hurd.n issue.
.enter are m-
� held
n Thursday,
LXLLK
iholic Student
orshipwith
fees 11 MI a m
� ewman
, two houses
tusic Building.
tnn,pi. .i - i all
1991
blUPLNT
In llaulks
lent Organiza-
pring muting
: 2 from 5 p.m
lenhall s Great
ikalski, Direc-
' ' � ; li alth Promotion
I � month's
� ki � � agenda for tuesday's
- ndudealeader-
� -v and theorganLah
it For more informa-
: - ' ' aShibleyat
C RULTAllYlbLNlURrKL-
QTSTUDENTS
Advising will be every 3rd Tues-
day of each month from 12 2p.m
starting an. 21 in room 203 IVI k
Building. Please see the video at
either (oyner or Brody Ubraries
� re you come for advising.
KLSLML WORKSHOPS
Workshops on resume writing will
be conducted by the Career Ser-
�tatitohelpstudentsdevelop
or revise their resume They will
be held in the Btoxton I louse on
Ian 21 at 3pm , Ian 22and 23at4
p.m.
EUJDIOIQGYCIUP
rhe Hrst meeting of spring semes-
ter will be held on Wednesday,
Ian 22 at 6 p.m. in room BN109 of
the SdtnGe Complex. New mem-
bers are Always welcome.
Entertainment
�he Saat (Eutalxman
January 16, 1992
Shanice's Inner Child sparkles
By Cortrinna Home
Staff Writer
Shanice Wilson has burst onto
the music charts once more with
her fresh, sparkling album, Inner
Child, from Motown records. The
musical talent of the young star has
been prevalent since she was a
youngster.
According to a Motown press
release, Shanice started out singing
on stage with her mother and aunt
who spent time coaching her vo-
cally.
Her first major performance
was at a local theater in Los Ange-
les in the musical "Get Happy"
which led to Shanice's first record-
ing contract with A&M Records
when she was 11.
Shanice said in the press re-
lease that "it was hard to find songs
for an 11-year-old because most
songs for someone with my voice
were too mature
Shanice has undergone much
positive and creative growth since
she began recording with producer
Bryan lxren.
I ler first success was with her
debut album, Discmrry, which won
critical acclaim for the two hit R&B
singles, "Can You Dance?" and "No
12 Steppin Motown said, "A se-
ries of selected appearances con-
firmed Shanice's talent as a power-
house young vocalist and she hit
the charts in 1W with "This Time
a duet wi th the Detmit group Kiara
Shanice's new TWO album In-
ner Child is delightfully soulful and
has put her on center stage in the
music industry.
Shanice is hard-pressed to
single out any specific cuts on Inner
Child: "I really love ev-
erything we did. A lot
of songs Narada (pro-
ducer and hit-maker)
and 1 wrote what re-
ally happened when
we were just messing
around in the studio.
Take 'I'm Cryin' (a
lovely ballad), whichis
one of my favorites.
Narada said, 'just pre-
tend like you're on
stage and sing any-
thing and I came up
with the whole chorus
for the song
Shanice recalls
comingup with thclyr-
ics for "You Were The
One" in about 15 min-
utes. She and her best
friend Moshie were sit-
ting around talking
about how one of her
ex-boyfriends had
tinted her bad ly when
her mom came in and
added the bridge and
the song wascomplete.
The streetwise
"You Didn't Think I'd
ComeRickThisHard"
sets the album off with
serious lyrics that say
Shanice is in effect. She
said she is very enthu-
siasticabout her career.
"I'm excited because I really
got to do it all on this record, "
enthuses Shanice.
Shanice turned 18 while mak-
ing the album. "1 don't think I
danced enough on my last record
so I want to get out there this time
and show everybody that I can do
Photo courtesy Motown Records
"Fresh, vibrant, hip and soulful, Shanice Wilson truly shines on Inner Child, her
sparkling and expressive debut album for Motown Records said Shanice's label.
that, too. Of course, I love to sing
balladsand we do have some pow-
erful slow songs on this album
Her producer Narada Michael
Walden recognizes Shanice's talent
and ability in the studio and the
future, "Shanice is one of the most
talented singers 1 have ever
worked with Walden said. "This
album is more dynamic than I had
ever dreamed. I'm really excited
about the project
Shanice covers all musical
bases and there is something for
everyone on this album. Shanice is
in total control.
Tritt moves out
of Country Club
By Pamela Oliver
Staff Writer
Who has one of the hottest
albumson the Country and West-
em charts? Who else but Travis
Trittand hisband,Country Club.
They are taking the country mu-
sic world by storm with the new
albumJt's All About to Change.
It's All About to Change is
Tritf s second album, which has
already produced three hits that
soared to the top of the Country
and Western chart: "The Whis-
key Ain't Wcrkin" (the latest re-
lease featuring Marty Stuart),
"Anymore" and the very popu-
lar, "Here's A Quarter (Call
Someone Who Cares)
Tritt continues that rough,
good-timing country boy image
that he started in his first album,
"Country Club which was
named after rowdy song in-
cluded on the record. On the new
albumHere's A Quarter"
and'Tf Hell Had A Jukebox" rep-
resent the macho, tough lyrics
similar to Hank Williams Jrs
tha t arecharacteristic of the whole
record. However, there is more
emphasis on the strong driving
beat behind Tritt's songs that
make his fans here in Greenville
want to two-step all the way to
Hard Times.
Travis Tritt wrote over half
of thesongson thisalbum, which
is impressive considering most
fans do not see or expect this
additional talent from their fa-
vorite singers. Usually perform-
ersget other people to write their
songs for them. Tri tt's lyrics are
original and entertaining and
prove that he is just as success-
ful a singer as a song writer.
Tritt's lyricsare just one reason
why Tritt's album is worth lis-
tening to and only one reason
why It's AU About To Change is a
success.
Another characteristic that
contributes to the album's suc-
cess several talented perform-
ers appear on it. Tanya Tucker,
who has been singing since she
was a child, makes a special
appearance. In thefieldofcoun-
try music, her reputation is out-
stand ing. Tucker provides har-
mony vocals on the ballad,
"Someone For Me found on
the second side. Since her voice
has a gruff, yet still clear sound
to it, the blend of her voice and
Tritt's does not change the
grinding sound of the rest of
the album but maintains it.
Another talented group of
performers who helps 'vith this
record is the well-known band
Little Feat. Little Feat has been
playing all types of audiences
for years. Members of the band
include: Bill Paynen (piano),
Paul Barrere(eIectricEuitarand
slide guitar), Fred Tackett (elec-
tricguitar),KennyGadney(bass
guitar), Richis Hayward
(drums), and Sam Clayton
(conga and tambourine). Tritt
asked them to be featured in a
song that he wrote titled "Bible
Belt a story about a preacher
who runs off with a question-
See Tritt, page 8
ISO and the BOBS create fashion-dance spectacles worldwide
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
ECU'S 191-2 Performing Arts
Series will open the new year with
a perfi rma nee by the minlem da nee
troupe, ISO and the BOBS on Jan.
37.
In 186, ISO Dance Theater
evolved from the collaborative cho-
reography of Daniel Eralow, James
Hampton, Ashley Holland and
Morliegh Steinberg. Forming the
nucleusof MOMIX from 198.3-1987,
Ezralow, Hampton, Rolland and
Steinberg helped direct fashion-
dance spectacles in cities like Tokyo
and New York. Choavgraphing
and performingtelevisioncommer-
cials and Music Television Videos,
such as David Bowie's Class Spider
World Tour and Sting's They Dance
Alone, they then went on to form
ISO and tour new shows through-
out the world.
In their inaugural dance tour in
the spring of 1987, the Italian press
from the La Republica greeted ISO
and the BOBS to rave reviews.
"Quick-change artists.
Unclassifiablo: they stand alone.
video, animated cartoon and at sci-
ence fiction films
Inthespringof 188, ISO joined
with the BOBS to produce the show
that isnow touring the United States
and Europe. In the fall of 1988, ISO
Created Time Out, a full evening
work to the music of Ludovico
Einaudi. Time Out premiered in
Milan, Italy and came to the United
States in February of 1990 at UCLA.
During the past two seasons, the
team of ISO and the BOBS has con-
tinued to perform throughout the
United States and Europe, with ex-
tended engagements in New York,
Chicago, Tel Aviv and long Kong.
The eight-member group's
style is hard to pin down. ISO gets
its name from statements like "I'm
So Ou t rageous" a nd words 1 ike "Iso-
tonic" and "Isothermic The BOBS
bill themselvcsasa "Bestof Breed
defining itself with negatives "not
classical, not punk, not new wave,
not folk, not rock, not roll
"The BOBS are sort of a cross
between Devo and the Mills Broth-
ers states The Los Angeles Times.
Thea cayivlla singers, Richard Bob
Greene, Gunnar Bob Madsen, Mat-
They wink at painting sculpture, thewBobStull,andJanieBobScott,
IN CONCERT J3
J3 "TRUTH"
fc America's Premier Christian Group F
F) Thursday, Jan. 30th At 7:30 P.M. �
41 Wright Auditorium - ECU m
f Greenville, N.C. JJ
j $6.00 In Advance, $8.00 At The Door Jfc
jt Call 355-3500 For Ticket Info jg
R T Sponsored by GRACE f
? I Christian Fellowship ea
of ECU S3
have played in Fairbanks, AK, l.os
Angeles Theater Center, Rome,
Italy, and Scotland. A prime ex-
ample of the BOBS's sense of hu-
mor is their "Grammatical I un
The BOBS is (and are) both a sin-
gularand plural noun.The BOBS is;
the BOBS are; bothare correct said
the band.
ISOand the BOBS perform vari-
ousdancepieccs, including "Psycho
Killerrhrough The Wall
"Helter Skelter and "Art for Art
Sake Somesongsmaybedianged
because ISO and the BOBS are al-
ways creating and adding new
songs 10 their repertory.
Stuart Sect tor, marketingdirec-
tor with University Unions, said
that "students will love this show.
It's a wonderful, contemporary
show that will please all
Tickets are available at the East
Caa)lina Central Ticket Office, ei-
ther stop by or phone 737-4788 or
toll-free 1-800- ECU -ARTS. Single
ticketscan be purchased in advance
for $20 for the general public, SI7
for ECU faculty and staff, and $15
for ECU students and youth. All
tickets bought at the door will cost
$20 each.
Photo court.sy Columbia Artist Management Incorporated
ISO and the BOBS display their unusual, nonetheless entertaining, theatrics while performing "Phycho
Killer" at The Smothers Brothers show.
3 MONTHS
FOR$69
Wtriai
LIMITED
TIME
OFFER!
TRIAL MEMBERSHIP
This Week's Entertainment
Thurs Ian 16
VINTAGE
50 Draft � $1 Longnecks
Fri. Ian 17
The USUALS
Sat. Ian 18
QUEEN SARAH SATURDAY
with Fountain of Youth
Hours
MonThurs. 11am-3pm
Fri.11am-2am
Sat. 9pm-2am
513Cotanche
(located across from UBE)
758-0080





PERSONALS
in ove
RTHDAY: I D
man S!
X
l
AD RATES
la issue and
jrsdav issue.
2B 'liL
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nthfroi
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omplex New mem-
bers are always welcome.
Entertainment
mitt lEaat (Enrulinian
January 16, 1992
7
Shanked Inner Child sparkles
By Cortrinna Homo
Suit Writei
Shank e Wilson has burst onto
the music charts once more with
her fresh, sparkling album. Inner
I from Motown records The
musical talent of the young star has
been prevalent since she was a
youngster.
According to a Motown press
release, Shanicc started out singing
on Stage w ith bet mother and aunt
who spvm tune coaching her vo-
cally.
Her first major performance
was at a local theater in l.os Ange-
les in the musical "Get Happy"
which led to Shaniee's first record-
ing contract with A&M Records
when she was 11,
Shanicc said in the press re-
lease that it was hard to find songs
tT an 11 year-old because most
songs to: someone with my voice
were too mature
Shanice has undergone much
positive and creative growth since
she began recording with producer
Bryan 1 oren.
1 lor first success was with her
debut album, Di . 7 which won
critical acclaim tor the two hit R&B
singlesCanYou I nco?"and"o
iteppia ' Motown snd, "A -
ris ol s lected appearances con-
firmed Shaniee's talent as a power-
house young vocalist and she hit
thechartsin 1989 with This Time
a duct with the I )etroitgroup Kiara
Shaniee's new H) album In
nerChUd is delightfully soulful and
has put her on center stage in the
music industry.
Shanice is hard-pressed to
single out any specific cuts on Inner
Child: "I really loveev-
erything we did. A lot
of songs Narada (pro-
ducer and hit-maker)
and I wrote what re-
ally happened when
we were just messing
around in the studio.
lake '1 m Cryin' (a
Knelv ballad), which is
one of my favorites.
Narada siiJ, 'just pre-
tend like you're on
stage and sing any-
thing and 1 came up
with the whole chorus
tor the song
Shanice recalls
comingup with the lyr-
ics tor ' You Were The
One" in about 15 min-
utes She and her best
friend Moshie were sit-
ting around talking
about how one ot her
ex-bo) friends had
treated her badly when
her mom came in and
added the bridge and
the song wascomplete.
The street ise
"You Didn't lhink I'd
ComeBac k rhisl lard"
sets the album off with
serious 1iks that say
Shard e is in effect. She
said she is very enthu-
siastic about her career.
I'm excited because I really
got to do it all on this record, "
enthuses Shanice.
Shanice turned IS while mak-
ing the album. '1 don't think I
danced enough on mv last reeord
so I want to get out there this time
and show everybody that 1 can Jo
Tritt moves out
of Country Club
Photo courtesy Motown Records
"Fresh, vibrant, hip and soulful, Shanice Wilson truly shines on Inner Child, her
sparkling and expressive debut album for Motown Records said Shaniee's label
that, too. 1 t course, I. love t sing
ballads and we do have some pow-
erful slow songs on this album "
1 ler producer Narada Mk hael
Walden recognizes Shanice s talent
and ability in the studio and the
future, "Shanu e is one ot tie most
talented sineers I have ever
worked with Walden said. "Iliis
album is morcdynamic than 1 had
ever dreamed. I'm really excited
about the project"
Shanice covers all musical
hasos and there is something for
everyone on this album, 'shanice is
in total control.
By Pamela Oliver
Staff Writer
Who has one of the hottest
albumson theCountry and West-
ern charts? Who else but Travis
Tri tt and hisband,Country Club.
1 "hey are taking the country mu-
sic world bv storm with the new
album,t's All Aknd to Oum$c.
It's All Ahnit to Change is
Tritt's second album, which has
already pnxjuced three hits that
soared to the top of the Country
and Western chart: "The Whis-
key Ain't Workin" (the latest re-
lease featuring Martv Stuart),
"Anymore" and the very popu-
lar, "Here's A Quarter (Call
Someone Who Cares)
Tritt continues that rough,
good-timing countrvbov image
that he started in his first album,
"Country Club which was
named after rowdv song in-
cluded on the record. Cn t he new
albumHere's A Quarter"
and"lf loll 1 lad A Jukebox" rep-
resent the macho, tough lyrics
similar to Hank Williams Jrs
tha t arecha racteristic of the whu le
record. I lowever, there is more
emphasis on the strong driving
beat behind Tritt's songs that
make his tans here in Greenville
want to two-Step all the wav to
Hard Times.
Travis Tntt wrote over half
ofthesongson this album, which
is impressive considering most
fans do not see or expect this
additional talent from their fa-
vorite singers. Usually perform-
ers get other people to write their
songs for them. Tritt's lyri sare
original and entertaining and
prove that he is just as success-
ful a singer as a song writer.
Tritt's lyricsare just one reason
why Tritt's album is worth lis-
tening to and only one reason
wbylt'sAllAl utTt I 'hangeisa
success.
Another characteristic that
contributes to the album's suc-
cess several talented perform-
ersappearon it. Tanya Tucker,
win 1 has been singing since she-
was a child, makes a special
appearance. In the Held of coun-
try music, her reputation is out-
standing. Tucker provides har-
mony vocals on the ballad,
"Someone For Me found on
the sect nd side. Since her voice
ha s a gru if, yet still cl a r sou nd
to it, the blend 1 �f her voice and
Tritt's does ; t change the
grinding sound of the rest of
the album but maintains it.
Another talented group of
performers who helps with this
record is the well-known Kind
Little Feat. Little Feat has been
playing all types of audiences
foryears. Members of the band
inch
icle: Bill Pavnen (piai
-10 .
Paul Barrere(el ec trie guitar an d
slide guitar), Fred Tackett (etec-
tricguitar), Kenny Gadney (bass
guitar), Richis Hayward
'drums), and Sam Clayton
(conga and tambourine). Tritt
asked them to be featured in a
song that he wrote titWL'Bible
Belt a story about a preacher
who runs off with a question-
See Tritt, page 8
ISO and the BOBS create fashion-dance spectacles worldwide
By Joe Hots!
Stjtt Writor
E L sl991-92PeifonrungArts
S I open the new year with
3perl : . themodemdance
b � 11 d the & BS on Ian.
17.
In 1986, ISO Dance rheater
evolved fromthecollaborativecho-
reographyol 1 anielEzralow, James
Hampton, Ashley Holland and
Morliegh Steinberg. Forming the
nudeusof MOM DC from 1983-1987,
Ezra low, Hampton, Holland and
Steinberg helped direct fashion-
dance spectacles in cities like Tokyo
and New "tork. Choreographing
and performingtelevisioncommer-
ciais and Music Television Videos,
such as 1 avid Bowie's Gloss Spider
World Tour and Sting's They Dance
Alt ne, they then went on to form
ISO and tour new shows through-
out the world.
In their inaugural dance tour in
the spring of 1987, the Italian press
from the La Repubika greeted ISO
and the BOBS to rave reviews.
Liu l.i sifiable
artists.
thev stand alone.
video, animated cartoon and at sci-
ence fiction films
Inthespringot 1988, ISO joined
with the BOBS to produce the show
that is now touring the United States
and Europe. In the fall of I988.ISO
created Time Out, a full evening,
work to the music oi Ludovico
Einaudi. Time Out premiered in
Milan, Italy and came to the United
States in February of l990atl)CLA.
During the past two seasons, the
team of ISO and the BOBS has con-
tinued to perform throughout the
United States and Europe, with ex-
tended engagements in New York,
Chicago, lei Aviv and 1 long Kong.
The eight-member group's
style is hard to pin down. ISO gets
its name from statements like "I'm
So Outrageous" and words like "Iso-
tonn. "and "Isothermic The BOBS
bill themselvesasa "Best of Breed
defining itself with negatives "not
classical, not punk, not new wave,
not folk, not rock, not roll
"The BOBS are sort of a cross
between Devo and the Mills Broth-
ers states The Los Angeles Times.
"he a cappella singers, Richard Ixb
Greene, Gunnar Bob Madsen.Mat-
lhev wink at painting, sculpture, thew Bob Stull, and Janie Bob Scott,
IN CONCERT J3
have played in Fairbanks, AK, 1 os
Angeles Theater Center, Home,
Italy, and Scotland. A prime ex-
ample oi the BOBS's sense ol hu-
mor is their "Grammatical Fun
I he B( )BS is (and are) both a sin-
gular and plural noun. FheBC )BSis;
theBOBSare;botharecorrei t! said
the band.
ISOand the BOBS perform vari-
ousdancepieces,irx luding i '� 1 ho
Killer " rhrough The Wall
"Helter Skelter and "Art for Art
Sake Somesongsmaybechanged
because ISO and the BOBS are al-
ways creating and adding new
songs to their repertory.
Stuart Sect tor, market ingdirec-
tor with University Unions, said
that "students will love this show.
It's a wonderful, contemporary
show that will please all
Tickets are available at the East
Carolina Central Ticket Office, ei-
ther stop by or phone 757-4788 or
toll-free 1-800-ECU-ARTS. Single
ticketscan be purchased in advance
for $20 for the general public, $17
for ECU faculty and staff, and 515
tor ECU students and youth. All
tickets bought at the door will cost
$20 each.
'�4j!k�L�ItaHra
�A��Lj' �'��-
1"Jjflmk.PpFPi, Wf
-J 1
1
1
ygP "�


Photo courtesy Columbia Artist Management Incorporated
ISO and the BOBS display their unusual, nonetheless entertaining, theatrics while performing "Phycho
Killer at The Smothers Brothers show.
J3

"TRUTH"
Americas Premier Christian Group

J3
ACH YOUR GOALS IN '92
3 MONTHS
FOR�69
TRIAL MEMBERSHIP
LIMITED
TIME
j) Thursday, Jan. 30th At 7:30 P.M. �
J � Wright Auditorium - ECU -
f GreenviUe. N.C. JJ
J2 $6.00 In Advance, $8.00 At The Door J
jt Call 355-3500 For Ticket Info fl
n
Sponsored by GRACE
Christian Fellowship
of ECU
This Week's Entertainment
Thurs. Ian 16
VINTAGE
50tf Draft � $1 Longnecks
Fri. Ian 17
The USUALS
Sat. Ian 18
QUEEN SARAH SATURDAY
with Fountain of Youth
Hours
MonThurs. 11am-3pm
Fri. 11am-2am
Sat. 9pm-2am
13 Cotanche
(located across from UBE)
758-0080





8 vEtje lEaot (Earulfntan January 16, 1992
Tritt
Continued from page 7
able woman.
Marty Stuart performs a hit
�ng with Tritt titled "The Whis-
kiv Ain't Workin written bv
Stuart and Kenny Scaife. Stuart
I sm'sm-s .) strong vocal sound that
matches Intt's. The two artists
come together to create a blond that
maintains the bad-boy image that
Nth they and their audiences on-
i, y
I'ntt successfully blends a
string quartet with his regular band
not commonly hoard in Country
and Western music.
rhe smooth ballads which ap-
pear on this album prove that Tritt
has c) setter side. 1 le cries over the
unrequited love and regrets about
his past in "Nothing Short Of Dy-
ing
The pleasant surprise on this
album is the last track,0 lomosick
As he suggested in his first album,
ho puts some "drive in his coun-
try I his sMi Combines country
to create a different sound that is ana v-i,lvjv. rocj beat to invent a
stylo that comes out kicking.
"Homesick" sounds like it
should be on a rock station rather
than a country station.
Tritt successfully tests the lim-
ltsof traditional country music with
this track.
This album has a little some-
thing for everyone, not just hardcore
country music fans. Yet the country
stylo is definitely in all the songs.
Unlike some artists who are simply
a flash in thopan,TravisTritt is hero
to stay.
S'J l JJ" j
tf
j fc
s16
occupancy (k 1fl
tax BeacMcanMr tmt Irntm (stand haw ttgRty
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Reduced
75 .
off catalog price
T.G.I.F. OUTLET
210 K. 5th St. (across from Bogies)
Store Hours: Mon - Sat 10-6
758-S612
East Carolina University9s
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking Applications for
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
for the 1992-1993 Term
Deadline: Thursday January 23
Interested students may piek up applications at
Mcndenhall Student Center's Information Desk and
Room 236 - Student Union.
Harris Teeter
HARRIS 1EE1ER MEANS
LOW PRICES!
U.S.D.A. Choice
London
Broil
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Broccoli
j
HT Liquid
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For
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17 0z.
2 Liter Bottle - Diet Coke Or
Coke
Classic
Prices Effective Through January 21, 1992
Prices In This Ad Effective Through Tuesday, January 21. 19?2 In Greenville Stores Only
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities None Sold To Dealers We o;adly Accept f-ederai Food Stamps
Sports
Logan na
By Michael Martin
Sporti t diti.r
It's been a roller
forSti '��
ball program in
weeks irv
and the I rat
Year -
the a i-
(11-1 ai :
Press rani
head coacl tnd
coach
, ftl � ' ral
Lewis m '
The �
coor linatoi
coach
1980.
Swimmers
drown
Davidson
Stev
Cha
rao
minganu : . -
wins froi � -
day at V � -
cruised I
worner �� 74

in every event meel
men upped their ret rdl
year, the women n . -1 I
� -
fast on ' head ach Rick � �
said. "At � � eseason I'm
� � �
p rl � � swimim i
gradu
real young: but we still contin .
impn
Kob os .
and Dawn Con so oth had out-
standing perl rn
Davidson rrk I
ThePirateswiiTttners .
o! practkef r. fevkistxvastheyspent
thec layinNorti 'aim
Beach, Fla It �� as the annual G rist
mas br r the teams, and
pulled - n two dual meets
Ashlar - � central
Ohio � rates.B ththe
rnen'sand worrier -von 11-0.
rortheastMisst uriStat ibol
mensvi in h "�
ladies squeal) � 4-82
Sports gambli
From Suit Reports
the natioi 1 feeds
love affair is sports gamb i u
ifsspreading lik
the plague, once it starts it shard to
control.
The number biers and
the mone) spent betting
reached all-timer ghs InNevada
when1 sports wagering is leg
billion annually is bet on basketball,
football and boxing. Around the
country,despitestateand local laws
banning sports wagering, Chns-
tcr's
INVITi
The Student Union Minor!
Alpha Phi Alpha FrJ
"A WALK WITH DR. MAR
CANDLELIG!
with Reverend
Monday, Janu
6:30 pm -
PLace: Christenbury Memori
Student Center -I
Came help us celebrate Dr. King's holi
the university campus. Following the
speak in commemoration of one of ou
Gospel Choir will also be feature�
For more information on any of these
please call the Student Union Hotline





8
L)c fcn�t (Earolintatl January 16, 1992
Tritt
Continued from page 7
' ' woman. ,u,t commonly heard in Country style that comes out kicking.
rt) Stuart performs a hit and Western music "Homesick" sounds like it
mth rritt titled TheWhis rhe smooth ballads which ap should be on a rock station rather
1 - n't Workin written by pear on this album prove that Tritt than a country station,
tuart and Ronny Scaife Stuart has a softer side. He cries over the Tritt successrully tests the lirn
" �strongvocal3oundthat unrequited lov and regretsaboul itsof traditional country music with
es rntt's rhe two artists his past in Nothing Short Of Dy- thistr.uk.
h i tocreatcablendthat ,� lhis tl�nim hils a llttlo
untains tin- bad boy image thai i ho pleasant surprise on this thmgforeveryor�,itojusthardcore
� ththe and their audiences en- album is the last track, Homesick country music fans. Yet thecountry
'sh i � I n his first album, style is definitely in all the songs.
;mlly blends a he I n I coun Unlikesomeartistswhoaresimply
kH with hisregular band try rhis � n bines country aflashinthepan,TravisTrirtishere
d " �t sound th.u is m.i �
lx.it t invent .1 to st.
i
pring
j J i J j J
f
�"�SP-1-
res"1 BC5"f�'Z&0 0fi
t
V.

O IVI
$mA fk " HMFi are per
� &M perxmi per ntqm
B WT based on quad
�i fcF MXupK plus 10
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wflh other dlsniunts or special often
Choose from three
Oceanfront Hotels: j - 81 )
v
8747420
.4
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XtANI
��v -
?000 N. Atlantic Ave.
Daytona Beach
J INN
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Daytona Beach Stores
mm im
202b S. Atlantic Ave.
Daytona Beacti Stwres
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking Applications for
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
for the 1992-1993 Term
Deadline: Thursday January 23
Interested students may piek up applications at
Mendenhall Student (enter's Information Desk and
Room 236 - Student Union.
Harris feefer
Sports
HARRIS mm MiAHS Lo�anna
10W PRICES!
Holly Farms - Tyson
Whole Fryers
� -
V. � .� S.
Lb.
Limit 4 With Addition.il Purchase
C

idiiion.il Purchase (�v . i
v- �� ��fty. r:JY ft Jtf Ktv. v & ' i -
U.S.D.A. Choice "
London
Broil
VK.
'1.70
Mill.

Lb.
Fresh, Crisp
ornia
Broccoli
HT Liquid
Bleach
HT Canned
Vegetables
410
Peas,Com Or
Green Beans
1
' �
2 Liter Bottle - Diet Coke Or
Coke
Classic
Prices Effective Through January 21, 1992
Prices In This Ad Effect - h Tuesday January 21 1902 in Greenville S'ores Only
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities None Sold To Dealers We uudly Accept Federal food Stamps
By M i M,

IV
Swimmers
drown
Davidson
Ch
m:
.
� a �




North
Sports gambl
1
1
� "
I
the -

when � billion annu . j
footh � j
�I
Kmnirii: J1
invitJ
The Student Union Mine-
Alpha Phi Alpha Frj "A WALK WITH DR. MAR CANDLELIG
with Reverend
Monday. Janu
6:30 pm -
PLace: Christenbury Memord Student Center 4
Connhelp u celebrate Dr. King's holu
theuniversity campus. FoUowingthe
spcak in commemoration of one of u
(Gospel ('hoir will also be ft atun d
For more intormation on any of these
please call the Student Union Hotline





Sports
�J?e lEaat (Harulinian
January 16, 1992
RMEANS I Logan named as new head coach
lCES
Commentary
I
esh, Crisp
fornia
ccoli
HT Canned
Vegetables
fmoo
Peas,Com Or
Green Beans
Oz.
ttle - Diet Coke Or
oke
assic
January21, 1992
??2 In Greenville Stores Only
rs We oicxfly Accept Federal Food Stomps
By Michael Martin
Sports Editor
It's been a roller coaster ride
tor Steve Logan and the ECU foot-
ball program in 1992. Just two
weeks into the new year, Logan
and the Pirates have won a New
ear's Day bowl game, finished
the season with the best record
(11-1) and highest Associated
Tress ranking (ninth) ever, lost a
head coach and gained a head
coach.
Logan was named head coach
v t the Pirates Jan. 11, replacing Bill
1 ewis who left for Georgia Tech.
The 38-year-old former offensive
coord ina tor becomes the 17th head
coach of ECU, the fourth since
19W.
Swimmers
drown
Davidson
Staff Reports
The men's and women's swim-
ming and diving teams took a pair of
wins from Davidson College Satur-
day at Minges Coliseum. The men
cruised toa 120-101 victory, while the
women won 98-74.
Both teams captured first place
in every event in the dual meet The
men upped their record to 6-1 on the
vear, the women moved to 5-2.
"We won the events with real
fast times head coach Rick Kobe
said. "At this point in the season, I'm
happy with the way the teams are
performing. We lost 14 swimmers to
graduation last year � this team is
real young: but we still continue to
improve
Kobe also said thatDcrekNelson
and Dawn Comiso both had out-
standing performances in the
Davidson meet.
The Pi rate swimmers had plenty
of practicefor Da vidson,as they spent
the New Year's holiday in North Palm
Beach, Fla. It was the annual Christ-
mas training for the teams, and both
pulled off victories in twodual meets
Ashland College, out of central
Ohio, forfeited to the Pirates. Both the
men's and women's teams won 11 -0.
Northeast Missouri State also fell.The
men swam to a 111-56 win, while the
ladies squeaked by 84-82.
Steve Logan
"It was a solid fit said Dr.
Henry VanSant, associate athlet-
icsdirector for administration. "He
(Logan) was the very best man for
the job
Logan was unavailable for
comment.
Finishing his 17th year in
coaching, the Lawton, Ok native
was hired from a highly touted
list of candidates.
Although unconfirmed, the
list included Mike Archer from
the University of Virginia,
Tennessee's Philip Fulmer and
former Arizona State Coach Larry
Marmie.
Continuity within the football
program was one of the reasons
Logan was named.
"They plan to keep the same
offensive and defensive schemes
next year said Sports Informa-
tion Director Charles Bloom.
Logan's experience in started
in 1975 when he was an assistant
at Union High School in Tulsa,
Ok. In 1980, he served as tight end
coach at Oklahoma State, and left
for Hutchinson Junior College the
next year. While at Hutchinson,
Logan was named Jayhawk Con-
ference Coach of the Year in 1982.
In 1983, Logan was named of-
fensive coordinator at Tulsa. He
left for Colorado in 1985 where he
coached running backs, and made
two post-season bowl appearances
while at the Big 10 school. Logan
packed his bags and moved East
in 1987, where he coached quar-
terbacks at Mississippi State.
Logan joined Lewis' staff in
1989 as the running backs' coach.
In 1990, he was named co-offen-
sive coordinator and quarterback
coach.
Although u neon firmed. The
News and Observer of Raleigh re-
ported that Dale Steele, wide re-
ceiver coach and recruiting coor-
dinator, had gone to Atlanta with
Bill Lewis, but will return to
Greenville this week.
It is also rumored that Bob
Slowik (outside linebacking coach)
and Jeff Jagodzinski (tight end
coach) stayed in Greenville to
work with Logan.
"There wasa lot of uncertainty
following the Peach Bowl
VanSant said. "But everyone is
certainly grateful to Bill Lewis and
his staff for the job they did during
1991
Chancellor's Cup
race heats up
By Margi Morirt
Assistant Sports Editor
The ECU Department of
Recreational Services is offering
a wide range of activities this
semester.
Last fall ECU fraternities
and sororities started their com-
petition for the Chancellor's
Cup. Organized by the Recre-
ational Services, the competition
consists of various sporting
events in which the fraternities
and sororities compete to
achieve the highest score. The
competition will continue this
spring to determine which or-
ganization will be awarded the
Chancellor's Cup.
The fraternities have com-
peted in flag football competi-
tion, 3-on-3 basketball, volley-
ball, soccer, bowling, turkey trot,
racquetball singles and team
tennis. Sigma Thi Epsilon leads
in the standings, followed by Pi
Kappa Phi.
The sororities have com-
pleted their competitions in flag
football, volleyball, soccer,
bowlingand team tennis. Alpha
Phi tops the list, and Zeta Tau
Alpha comes in second.
The fraternities must com-
pete in basketball, indoor soccer,
Softball, innertube water polo,
golf and frisbee golf this semes-
ter. The sororities still have to
complete basketball, indoor
soccer, softball, innertube water
polo and frisbee golf competi-
tions
The Recreational Services
has scheduled a co-rec bowling
registration sign-up for Jan. 21 at
5 p.m. and a water polo meeting
on Jan. 28 at 5 p.m.
For those interested in
aerobics, registration for the
spring semester will be between
9a.m.and5p.m.Jan.21-24at204
Christenbury Gym. The session
dates run from Jan. 27 to March
5. The cost for the session is $10
for students and $20 for 'acuity,
staff and their spouses Drop-in
costs are $5 for five sessions for
studentsand$10forfaculty,staff
and spouse participants
A roundball rama informa-
tion meeting is scheduled for Feb.
4, and a slam dunk information
meeting will be held Feb. 19. For
those crested in windsurfing,
a workshop isscheduled for Feb.
27at7:30p.m.atthe Christenbury
Gym pool.
Ben
ex
1KT
ZTL
TKJE
Top 8 standings as of 11692
Fraternities
1. Sigma Phi Epsilon
2. Pi Kappa Phi
3. Pi Kappa Alpha
4. Phi Kappa Tau
5. Lambda Chi Alpha
6. Theta Chi
7. Delta Chi
8. Sigma Pi
Sororities
1. Alpha Phi
2. Zeta Tau Alpha
3. Alpha Delta Pi
4. Alpha Omicron Pi
4. Sigma Sigma Sigma
6. Delta Zeta
7. Chi Omega
8. Alpha Xi Delta
Graphic by Mlch��l Martin � The East Carolinian
Sports gambling fever strikes the Emerald City
From Staff Reports
Sports mania has taken hold of
the nation. The fuel that feeds this
love affair is sports gambling, and
it's spreading like the plague. Like
the plague,once it starts, if s hard to
control.
The number of gamblers and
the money spent betting have
reached all-time highs. In Nevada,
where sports wagering is legal, $1
billion annually is bet on basketball,
football and boxing. Around the
counrry,despitestateand local laws
banning sports wagering, Chris-
tianCummings Associates re-
ported that Americans gambled
$253 billion in 1988 � $56 billion of
that number was bet on sporting
events.
"We will face in the next de-
cade or so, more problems with
youth gambling than we'll face with
drug use said Howard Shaffer,
director of theCenter for Addiction
Studies. Along with the many ad-
dictions of our society, thisbecomes
a very powerful statement.
Gambling is defined by
Webster's Dictionary as wagering
money or other stakes on an uncer-
tain outcome. For reasons such as
greed, challenge or need, people
feel compelled to try to defy the
odds.
One sports gambler said that
he bets through a bookie in
Greenville. In fact, he said he knows
of four that live in the region �
something not uncommon in col-
lege towns.
The gambler explained some
gambling rules;$25isthe minimum
bet on a game, and there is a 10
percent "bookie fee" that accompa-
nies each bet. One may bet more, as
long as the bets are in increments of
$5. So if one bets $100 and wins, the
payoff would be $100. If the wager
is lost, one would owe $110.
Four or five bets a week is aver-
age for this gambler, and he rarely
goes three days in a row without
making one. His average wager is
$50or$100,and without a part-time
job or any steady income, he has to
resort to some extreme measures to
pay his debts.
"I pay what I owe he said If
I don't have it (the money), I call my
parents and make up an excuse for
needing more. V ve sold some of my
CDs, my tennis racquet and even
my golf clubs
He said he knows of at least 15
other students who bet through a
bookie and have had similar
experiencesIfs fun, entertaining
and challenging he said.
Dr. William C Phillips, coordi-
nator of counseling services at
Bryant College in Rhode Island,
studied gambling among college
srudentsatninecollegesinsixstates.
He found that 87 percent of the
students had gambled, 26 percent
gamble weekly and 11 percent said
they have gambled more than $100
dollars a day.
Come on
Wolfpack,
play Bucs
By Michael Martin
Sports Editor
So, North Carolina State
doesn't want to play ECU.
That's fine.
Take your toys and go play
somewhere else.
Keep the Division II schools
on your schedule. It doesn't
matter. Nobody in the world
wants to see the match-up.
Neither school needs the
revenue the old intra-state
rivalry brings in each time the
teams play. Last time I checked,
$16 a ticket 58,000 people
somewhere in the neighborhood
of $1 million � not including
what the city makes on hotels,
restaurants, etc.
Oh, thaf s right You guys in
Raleigh don't want to come to
Greenville. Let me guess, us
rednecks might get ya � huh?
Go ahead, be greedy. Keep
on demanding all the games be
played in Carter-Finley. Thaf s
sure going to get you a long way
� especially when it comes to
in-state recruiting. It might even
get you labeled as "scared
Continue to add powder-
puff teams to pad your schedule.
It may get you into a bowl,
especially if the Atlantic Coast
Conference race goes down to
the wire and you find yourselves
tied with another school with a
more difficult schedule. Don't
worry, that Wolfpack reputation
will pull you through.
Why not play the best
possible team you can schedule?
The excuse of no money in
Greenville is really running thin.
Even if the games were to be
played home-and-home, the
television coverage would
certainly make up a large part,
or maybe all of the difference, if
the game was only in Raleigh.
Someone even suggested
playing at a neutral site. But
that, too, wasn't good enough.
Looking at the Wolfpack
schedule for 1993,1994 and
1995, there are still open dates in
each season. How about it? We
students at ECU may even
promise not to tear down the
goal post or storm the field.
We'll be good sports about
it. Really.
But nothing we say or do
will change your mind. Thaf s
obvious. We've supposedly been
working on this deal for over
three years now, and the fans are
the ones who suffer the most.
Thaf s OK, N.C. State. ECU
doesn't need you or the rivalry
anymore. It's time the Pirates
move on to bigger and better
programs.
Besides, now we have a
problem in Atlanta to take care
of.
4NVITATION
The Student Union Minority Arts Committee and
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity presents
"A WALK WITH DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR
CANDLELIGHT MARCH
with Reverend Sidney Locke
Monday, January 20,1992
6:30 pm - 8:0C pm
PLace: Christenbury Memorial Gymnasium to Mendenhall
Student Center -Hendrix Theatre
Come help us celebrate Dr. King's holiday with a candlelight march through
the university campus. Following the march, Reverend Sidney Locke will
speak in commemoration of one of our nation's greatest leaders. The ECU
Gospel Choir will also be featured, as well as other local musicians.
For more information on any of these events,
please call the Student Union Hotline at 757-6004.
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
JB

�Cf
is now accepting Applications
Volunteers must have:
2.2 GPA
Regular access to a car
2 free hours a week
Deadline: January 23rd
Call 757-6137 or come by Brewster A 409





10 vDljc East (Carolinian January 16, 1992
AP Athlete of the Year, Magic finishes
DEERF1ELD, 111. (AD
Michael Jordan joins an elite club
as 1 he Associated Press Male Ath-
lottMd the Yea fof 1W1: The Chi-
cago bulls player is only the sec-
ond NBA athlete to win the award.
"I'm very surprised since 1
thought all the awards had been
handed out Jordan said. "And I
don't take the award lightly.
"I've had lots of honors over
the vears, ,md every one is very
special to me he added.
Jordan also was named NBA
Player of the Week on Monday.
Jordan, 28, led the bulls to
their tirst title last season. 1 le ws
named league and playoff MVP.
I .irrv bird ot the Boston Celtics
was AP Male Athlete of the Year in
1986, the only other NBA player to
win the award in its 61-year his-
torv.
"There are a lot ot things that
make Michael very special said
bulls coach Phil Jackson.
AP-member sports writers
and broadcasters were asked to
Vote for three athletes, with a tirst-
pl.ue vote worth five points, sec-
ond three and third one. Jordan
compiled 348 points to 134 for long
jumper Mike Powell and 80 for six-
time Olympic gold medalist and
two time AP Male Athlete of the
Year Carl lewis.
i ow i II, who broke bob
Beamc; 'si 23-year old world long
jump record by leaf ing ?l) feet, -1
12 inches at the World Champ
onshJpS, got 22 first place votes.
I .ewis' 10-year, 65-meet streak
was broken by Powell, but at the
Championships at Tokyo in Au-
gust, he beat l.croy burreil and
broke his World record for the 100-
meter with a time of 1.H(S seconds.
Lewis got eight first-place votes.
Nolan RyanoftheTexas Rang-
ers, baseball's no-hitter and
strikeout king, finished fourth in
the voting after a second-place fin-
ish last year to San Francisco 49ers
quarterback Joe Montana. Ryan
threw hisseventh no-hitter last sea-
son. He let! 10 ballots and got 76
points.
Fifth with eight first-place
votesand 68 points wasCal Ripken
Jr. of the Baltimore Orioles. Magic
Johnson, who announced his re-
tirement from the l.os Angeles Lak-
ers because he had contracted the
virus that causes AIDS, also got
eight first-plate votes and finished
with 48 points.
Finishing seventh was tennis
comeback sensation Jimmy
Connors. Next were pole vaulter
Sergei Bubkaof Ukraine, Heisman
Trophy winner Desmond Howard
and boxer George 1 oreman.
AUDITIONS
SINGERS � DANCERS � INSTRUMENTALISTS
SPECIALTY ACTS � TECHNICIANS WARDROBE
Kings Productions the world
auditions (oi the 1992 ec
irodvcei o entertainment is holding
� KINGS DOMINION Pichmond
�y of positions '� � � � i '� Ond a travel fee will be paid
s to the park
UNITED COLORS
OF BENNETTON.
12 off
ALL WINTER MERCHANDISE
STARTS JAN. 18
Arlington Blvd. ARLINGTON VULAG1 VS.s-7474
. must travel mori " h �
GREENVILLE. NC � Tuesday
f Oil Carolina University
A J Fletcher Music Bldu '�� ital Hall
A S p in Singi
5-6 pm i tar i i
4-6i '
RICHMOND VA

2-6 p n
26
v
Basketball
Do you like to play for fun?
sign up for tlurfct spring basketball programs offered through
ECU Recreational Services. ompettUVe and recreational
leagues are Scheduled. Individuals and leans welcome!
5 ON 5 MEN'S AND WOMEN'S
Register: Tues. January i
Siiiopm in Bio 103
BASKETBALL JAMBOREE TOl IRNAMENT
Register: January 21 at 5:00pm in Bio 103
ROUNDBALL RAMA
Fret' Throw contest. 3 POINT and 5 SPOT shoot out
Register: Tues, February � at 5:00pm in Bio 103
SLAM DUNK COMI51
Register: Wed, February 19
5:00pm in Bio I -s.
FOR MORE 1MOR.VLVliON CALL 757-638



$30
afl u arv- M av
m e in berships
t
HARMS SUPERMARKET
COKES
99(t
Delmonte
Microwave
Vegetable Classics
2 liter
Ore Ida
French Fries
2-pound bag
49
Marcal Towels
3-roll pack
$129
Great Scoop
Ice Cream
5-quart bucket
�Tl
Natural
Light
12PK120Z
Call the Deli at Bells Fork Location to order
subs, party trays, fried chicken drummettes
to complete your Super Bowl Party
10th Street
u
Ficklen
Stadium
The

�s� I
Harris Supermarket
Harris Supermarket





,W ,i ' � vv.
13
c ia0t (Jlnrnlintau
L.
, m ��
Fa '
Sports
ECU falls in overtime to GMU
By Robert S. Todd
Staff Writer
ECU has not won at George
Mason since rJecembcr 30,1981, has
never won at the Patriot Center and
failed to win Jan. 20. Coach Eddie
Payne's Pirates, trying to snap the 14-
game, 11-year losing streak in Fairfax,
lost in over-time 81-78. The Pirates
now have a six-game losing streak
and are winless in the CAA.
ECU stormed to a 14-2 lead over
the Patriots. However, the Pirates
could not hold George Mason and
lost the lead, 29-28, on a 3-point shot
by Donald Ross with 352 left in the
first half. A 23 foot jumper by Craig
Hodges, the only seven foot player in
theCAA,cutECU'sleadtooneathalf
time, 35-34.
The Pirates built a 5844 lead
midway through the second half.
However, ECU only scored two
points in the next 7:20 and led by one
point with 3:06 remaining in thetec-
ond half. With a 66-65 lead, Lester
Lyons fouled Paul Arthur. Arthur hit
both of his free throws, his first two of
the season, to give George Mason a
one-point lead with :43 seconds in
regulation.
Lester Lyons, who led all scorers
with 19 points, made four consecu-
tive free throws to give ECU the lead
See Overtime, page 15
Ailing Pirates lose to Campbell, American
Fit photo by Dail R�d
Aggressiveness was the key for the Lady Pirates 78-60 victory over George Mason. Gaynor O'Donnell (in
background), Tonya Hargrove and Toina Coley (left) exemplify what playing hard really means.
Lady Pirates stump GMU, 78-60
Team wins fourth CAA game
From Staff and Wire Report
The road can be devastating
forailingbaskctball teams. Justask
Pirate head basketball coach Eddie
Payne.
ECU lost two games on the
road last week, one to Colonial
Athletic Association for American
University, the other to rival
Campbell.
Payne and the ailing Pirates
traveled to Washington, DC, Sat-
urday, where they suffered a 80-79
setback. American's Donald Grant
scored 16 points in the second half,
including the go-ahead free-throw
with 1:11 to play to seal the win for
the Eagles.
American had a 12-point lead
at intermission, led primarily by 21
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
The Lady Pirates won their
fourth CAA game Monday night,
defeating the visiting Lady Patri-
ots of George Mason, 78-60.
The victory gives ECU a 9-5
overall record and keeps them in
first place in the conference.
"I'm very pleased with our
overall team effort tonight said
Head coach Pat Pierson. "We had
good, balanced play with a lot of
players contributing
Gaynor O'Donnell continued
Jher consistent play, scoring a team
high 21 points and dishing out
seven assists.
ECU jumped out to a quick 14-
2 lead with 15:30 to play in the first
half. GMU called time-out and
with new adjustments forced 13
Ladv Pirate turnovers.
GMU's Marcell Harrison
nailed a three-pointer, tying the
game with just over 2:00 to play in
the half. On their next trip down,
Harrison again hit another three,
giving the Lady Patriots their first
and only lead of the game.
"We started off running our
break and really caught them off
guard Pierson said. "After Ma-
son called time-out they tightened
their defense and used our zone to
get them back in the game
The Lady Pirates aggressive
defense forced turnovers of their
own. Thev had 15 steals and 23
points off GMU's 22 turnovers.
Toina Coley led with four
steals. She shot a perfect five-for-
five from the floor and finished
with 11 points.
ECU had double figure per-
formances from Rhonda Smith
who had 18 points and seven re-
bounds and Tonya Hargrove had
16 points and grabbed 12 boards.
The Lady Pirates ran their lead
to as many asl8, with outstanding
play and 16 second half points by
ODonnell.
ECU will look to continue their
three-game winning streak at
Campbell Jan. 23. They return
home Jan. 29 to face the Lady
Wolfpack of N.C. State at 7 p.m. in
Mingcs Coliseum.
Copeland out for season
after tearing ligament
ECU center Ike Corind
will be out for the remainder of
the season after suffering a knee
injury in the Pirates' 80-72 loss to
Campbell Wednesday night in
Fayetteville.
Copeland, a junior from
Rocky Mount, underwent a MRI
test Thursday. Results showed a
tear of the anterior cruciate liga-
ment He will undergo surgery
to repair the ligament in several
weeks.
Copeland has started in all
12 of ECU'S games this season,
averaging 10.1 points and 8.8
rebounds per game. He scored
in double figures in five games
this season. Against Appalachian
State, he scored 23 points and
grabbed 14 rebou nd s. Copela nd
ranks as the 10th leading
rcboundcr in in ECU history
with 526 and is tied for ninth in
blocked shots with 31.
Ike Copeland
of Craig Sedmak's game-high 26
points. The Pirates ba ttled backand
took 67-66 lead with 5:01 left to
play on Ronnell Peterson's basket.
ECU tied the game 76-76 at the
1:25 mark, but could not hold on,
as Grant's free-throw sealed the
Eagles' first home CAA win.
Forward Curly Young paced
the Pirates with 20 points, while
teammate Anton Gill added 18.
Lester Lyons finished the night
with 15.
The loss compounded
Wednesday night's 80-72 loss to
Campbell.
Mark Mccnik score 19 points
to lead Campbell over the Pirates,
despite being out-rebounded 43-
27 Wednesday night. The Camels
broke a hree-game losing streak to
the Pirates, includinga 105-67 early
season loss in Minges Coliseum.
Mocnik led five double-digit
scorers and scored seven of his
points during a two-minute stretch
to start the second half, increasing
the six-point Campbell halftime
lead to 44-31.
The Camels, who went on a
13-2 run to start the second half,
took their biggest lead at 48-31 on a
Billy Ellison basket. Campbell's Joe
Spinks, who added 18.
Lyons had 14 for the Pirates in
the contest.
Recreational Services to sponsor basketball tournament
r3y Blake Payne
Recreational Services
Recreational Services has cre-
ated a new event. The Sneak-a-
Peak Poole Play, previously
known as the Basketball jambo-
ree, is being held in the
Christenbury Gym, Jan. 22-24.
This is a prc-season event for
teams interested in playing bas-
ketball during the regular intra-
mural season. Each team plays
three, 20- minute games during
the same night.
The teams are placed into a
poole, were they will play other
teams in their league. The differ-
ent leagues are fraternity Gold
and Purple, men's independent
Gold and Purple and the sorority
and women's independent
leagues.
There is also a new league
being introduced this season, the
men's independent Leisure
League. The league involves only
round-robin play, with no league
standings and no play-offs.
The pre-season is not only a
time for the players to practice,
but a time for the officials and
timekeepers to practice as well.
The new officials in the league
will get a chance to test their skills,
as well as to find out if they need
to make an appointment with the
optometrist. The veteran officials
get an opportunity to refresh
themselves on the rules before
the season begins.
Teams that are interested in
playing in the Sneak-a-Peak Poole
Play, need to send their team cap-
tain to the registration meeting
Jan. 21, at 5 p.m. in Biology 103.
Registration is on a first come,
first serve basis.
There are several other bas-
ketball events including the
Jones, Blake earn
MVP honors
By Michael Martin
Sports Editor
Seniors Robert Jones and Jeff
Blake were named the Most Valu-
able Players for the 1991 football
season Saturday night at the annual
Pirate Football Appreciation Gala in
Minges Coliseum.
Jones, an All-American line-
backer from Blackstone, Va won
the award for defense, while Blake,
from Sanford, Fla captured the
honor for his offensive shows dur-
ing the season.
Presented by the ECU coaching
staff, the awards ceremony capped
off the Pirates' best season ever. The
learn finished 11-1 on the season
with a New Year's Day victory over
N.C State in the Peach Bowl and a
ninth place finish in the final Associ-
ated Press college football poll.
Jones recorded 151 tackles on
the year and was the only consensus
All-American linebacker in the na-
tion. He had 16 stops in the Peach
Bowl.
Blake, who broke 32 passing
recordsat ECU, guided the Pirates to
key victories over Pittsburgh, Syra-
cuse and N.C State. His aerial at-
tacks and quick feet often amazed
opposing coaches and pleased the
fans.
Senior tight end Luke Fisher,
who caught the game-winning
touchdown against N.C State in the
Peach Bowl, was named Outstand-
uSeraw. The Medford,N.J,native
was a favorite target of Blake, and he
finished the season second in recep-
tions.
Qtartesl fowardarDfontohn-
sory were named the Outstanding
Special Teams' Players. Howard, a
senior from Sanford, N.C, won for
his defensive skills, while Johnson, a
senior kick returner from Newport
News, Va won the award for of-
fense.
Junior running back Cedric Van
Buren and senior comcrback Chris
Hall captured the Swindell Memo-
rial Award, also known as the BIG
TEAM, Little Meaward. Van Buren,
from Charleston,S.C, wasoneof the
Pirates leading rushers. Hall, a Fort
Dix, N native was a key tackier for
ECU in 1991.
Junior offensive tackle Tom
Scott, from Rose Hill, N.C, was
named the Most Valuable Blocker.
Keith Arnold, a senior center from
Kennesaw,Gaeamed theE.RRawl
Memorial Award for character,
scholarship and athletic achieve-
ment.
Derek Owens, a freshman
placekicker from Jacksonville, N.C,
won the Jerry T. Brooks Academic
Achievement Award. Senior line-
backer Ken Bumette,a Spruce Pines
N.C, native, won the James E. Jones
Scholarship Award.
See Awards, page 14
De La Sierra becomes ECU's first
female kickboxer in competition
Jeff Qlakc
By Margi Morin
Assistant Sports Editor
ECU is sending its first fe-
male kickboxer to competition.
Denise De La Sierra, a 22-
year-old senior from Puerto Rico
and a gTeenbelt karate student,
will compete in the East Coast
Middleweight Championship
Kickboxing Competi tion Jan. 25.
The competition will be held in
the Rocky Mount Sheraton Gate-
way Convention Center at 8
p.mandgcneraladmission tick-
ets are $10.
De La Sierra will represent
ECU in the competition which
will include women from Char-
lotte, Raleigh and Virginia
Beach.
Seventh-degree blackbelt
and ECU karate instructor, Bill
McDonald, said that De La Si-
erra first expressed interest in
kickboxing a year ago when she
saw the men practicing.
According to McDonald,
women compete in kickboxing
on the West Coast and in the
Orient. It is uncommon on the
East Coast. He said there has
been some competitions in South
Carolina and Georgia; however,
Saturday's competition marks
the first time a women's
kickboxing competi tion has been
held in North Carolina.
McDonald said that De La
Sierra's participation in the sport
has increased the interests of
other females even though none
have started competing yet.
De La Sierra is a member of
the ECU karate club and prac
Denise De La Siena
rices with the male kickboxers.
"You better not underesti-
mate her said Scott Harrison,
ECU kickboxer. "She is intimi-
dating Harrelson said he is in-
terested to see her compete with
other women on Saturday.
De La Sierra saysshe spends
two to three hours per day work-
ing out in order to keep in shape.
Her workout consists of run
ning, weight lifting, stair climb-
ing and kickboxing.
According to McDonald,
kickboxing is similar to boxing
in that the athletes compete
until one isdown; however, the
kicking takes more energy.
Therefore, instead of three-
minute rounds followed by
one-minute reshrtgperiodalike
See Kfckbaatf, page 16
Roundball Rama, which is a two-
day event that involves free
throw, three point, and Hot Shot
shootouts. There is also the Sfrm
Dunk contest. This year the NBA
slam dunk rules will be in effect.
For further information about
these or other Recreational
Service's events call 757-6387 or
stop by 204 Christenbury Gym.
O'Donnell
sets career
high mark
in 81-56 win
The ECU men's and women's
swim teams losta pair of dual meets
to Duke University Saturday in
Durham. The men lost 137-94, while
the women fell 127-104.
The Blue Devils, boasting alop-
heavy junior and seniorline-up, were
able to outdistance the Pirates. The
Duke win ended a five-meet win-
ning streak by ECU.
"We swam real well, but wegot
beat by a better team Head ceach
Rick Kobe said. "It's the first time
Duke has won in five years, buflhey
had a very experienced team1
The Duke men captured fint in
every swimming event except the
400-meter free relay. Diver Matt
Lawrence and Brian Soltz paced the
men. Lawrence captured theirte-
and three-diving events, whileoltz
had strong finishes in freesryieand
breast events. I
The toss dropped the rfen's
record to 6-2 on the year.
The Lady Pirates won sixif 11
events, buta lack of depth caused the
toss.
"WeoiilyhavelOwomenswim-
ming Kobe said. "We woa six
events, butouTnurrtber were juit too
small. You can't wmeveiytimivith
only 10 swimmers �
TkPardueandJacquelinepftKr
paced the Lady Pirates in the
Pardue won the 50-and
freestyle events, while
the2O0-free.
The loss moves die Ladyl
to W on the year.
nnonSatuidayfora2pjn.
am





13
51k East (Earolintan
January 21,1992
Sports
ECU falls in overtime to GMU
By Robert S. Todd
Staff Writer
ECU has not won at George
Mason since December 30,1981, has
never won at the Patnot Center and
failed to win Jan. 20. Coach Eddie
Payne's Pirates trying to snap the 14-
game, 11 -war losingstreakin Fairfax,
lost in over-time 81-78. The Pirates
now have a six-game ksing stmak
and art winteas in theCAA.
ECU stormed to a 14-2 lead over
the Patriots. However, the Pirates
could not hold George Mason and
lost the lead, 29-28, on a 3-point shot
by Donald Ross with 352 left in the
first half. A 23 fool jumper by Craig
Hodges, the only seven fcxt player in
theCAA,cut ECU'sleadtooneathaif
time, 35-34.
The Pi rates built a 58-44 lead
midwav through the second half.
However, ECU only scored two
points in the next 721) and led by one
point with 3:06 remaining in the sec-
ond half. With a 66-65 lead, Lester
Lyons fouled Paul Arthur. Arthur hit
both of his free throws, his first two of
the season, to give George Mason a
one-point lead with :43 seconds in
regulation.
Lester Lyons, who led all scorers
with 19 points, made four consecu-
tive free throws to give ECU the lead
See Overtime, page 15
Ailing Pirates lose to Campbell, American
Fil� photo by Dail Reed
Aggressiveness was the key tor the Lady Pirates 78-60 victory over George Mason. Gaynor ODonnell (in
background), Tonya Hargrove and Toma Coley (left) exemplify what playing hard really means.
Lady Pirates stump GMU, 78-60
Team wins fourth CAA game
From Staff and Wire Report
The road can be devastating
fbrailing basketball teams. Justask
Pirate head basketball coach Eddie
Payne
ECU lost two games on the
road last week, one to Colonial
Athletic Association for American
Campbell.
Payne and the ailing Pirates
traveled to Washington, D.C Sat-
urday, where they suffered a 80-79
setback. American's Donald Grant
scored 1h points in the second half,
including the go-ahead free-throw
with 1:11 to play to seal the win for
the Eagles.
American had a 12-point lead
University, the other to rival at intermission, led primarily by 21
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Stjtf Writer
The Lady Pirates won their
fourth CAA game Monday night,
defeating the visiting Lady Patri-
ots of George Mason, 78 611
The victory gives ECl a 9 i
overall record and keeps them in
first place in the conference.
"I'm verv pleased with cur
overall team effort tonight said
Head coach Pat Pierson "We had
good, balanced plav with a lot of
players contributing
Gaynor CDonnell continued
.her consistent plav, scoring a team
high 21 points and dishing out
- seven assists.
ECU jumped out to a quick 14-
2 lead with 1530 to plav in the first
half. GMU called time-out and
with new adjustments forced 13
Lady Pirate turnovers.
(All's Marcell Harrison
nailed a three-pointer, tying the
game with ust over 2:00 to play in
the halt. On their next trip down,
Harrison again hit another three,
giving the Lady Patriots their tirst
and only lead ot the game.
We started off running our
break and realty caught them off
guard Pierson said. "After Ma-
son called time-out thev tightened
their defense and used our one to
get them Kick in the game "
The Lady Pirates aggressive
defense forced turnovers of their
rn. Thev had 15 steals and 23
points ofl GMU's 22 turnovers.
Toina Coley led with tour
steals. She shot a perfect tive-tor-
five from the floor and finished
with 11 points.
ECU had double figure per-
formances from Rhonda Smith
who had is points and seven re-
bounds and Tonya 1 iargrove had
lf points and grabbed 12 boards.
The Lady Pirates ran their lead
to as rnanv aslS, with outstanding
plav and 16 second halt punts by
O'Monnell.
ECU will look tocontinue their
three-game winning streak at
ampbeH Ian. 23. They return
home Jan. 2 to face the Lady
Wolfpackof N.C. State at 7 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum.
Copeland out for season
after tearing ligament
ECU center Ike Coi�' I
will be out for the remainder oi
the st-as. n after suffering a knee
injury in the Pirates S(V72 loss to
Campbell Wednesday night in
Fayetteviue.
Copeland, a junior from
Rocky Mount, underwent a MR!
lest Thursday. Results showed a
tear of ihe anterior cruciate liga-
ment He will undergo surgery
to repair the ligament in several
weeks.
Copeland has started in all
12 of ECU'S games this season,
averaging 10.1 points and S.S
rebounds per game. 1 le scored
in double figures in five games
thissoason. Against Appalachian
State, he scored 23 points and
grabbed 14 rebounds. Copeland
ranks as the 10th leading
rebounder in in ECU history
with 2h and is tied for ninth in
blocked shots with 31.
Ike Copeland
of Craig Sedmak's game-high 26
points. The Pirates battled back and
took 67-66 lead with 5:01 left to
play on Ronnell Peterson's basket.
ECU tied the game 76-76 at the
1:25 mark, but could not hold on,
as Grant's free-throw sealed the
Eagles' first home CAA win.
Forward Curlv Young paced
the Pirates with 20 points, while
teammate Anton Gill added 18.
Lester Lyons finished the night
with 15.
The loss compounded
Wednesday night's 80-72 loss to
Campbell.
Mark Mcvnik score 19 points
to lead Campbell over the Pirates,
despite being out-rebounded 43-
27 Wednesday night. The Camels
broke a three-game losing streak to
the!irates,includinga 105-67 early
season loss in Minges Coliseum.
McKnik led five double-digit
scorers and scored seven of his
pointsdunnga two-minute stretch
to start the second half, increasing
the six-point Campbell halftime
lead to 44-31.
The Camels, who went on a
13-2 run to start the second half,
took their biggest lead at 48-31 on a
Billy Ellison basket. Campbell'sjoe
Spinks, who added 18.
Lyons had 14 for the Pirates in
the contest.
Recreational Services to sponsor basketball tournament
Bv Blake Payne
Reoreation.il Son, � n
Recreational Services hascre-
ated a new event The Sneak a
Peak Poole Play, previously
known as the Basketball Jambo-
ree, is being held in the
Christenbury Gym, Ian. 22 24
This is a pre-season event tor
teams interested in playing bas-
ketball during the regular intra-
mural season Each team plays
three, 20- minute games during
the same night.
The teams are placed into a
poole, were thev will plav other
teams in their league. I ho differ-
ent leagues are traternitv Gold
and Purple, men's independent
Gold and Purple and the sorority
and women's independent
leagues.
There is also a new league
being introduced this season, the
men's independent Leisure
1 eague. The league involves only
round-robin play, with no league
standings and no play-otts.
The pre-season is not only a
time for the players to practice,
but a tune tor the officials and
timekeepers to practice as well.
The new officials in the league
will get a chance to test their ski Us,
as well as to find out if they need
to make an appointment with the
optometrist. The veteran officials
get an opportunity to refresh
themselves on the rules before
the season begins.
Teams that are interested in
plaving in theSneak-a-Peak Poole
Plav, need to send their team cap-
tain to the registration meeting
Ian. 21, at 5 p.m. in Biology 103.
Registration is on a first come,
first serve basis.
There are several other bas-
ketball events including the
Jones, Blake earn
MVP honors
De La Sierra becomes ECU's first
female kickboxer in competition
By Michael Martin
Sports Fditnr
Seniors R(bert orxs and )ett
Blake were named the M�M Valu-
able Players for the IfM fixtball
season Saturday night at the annual
Pirate Football Appreciation Gala in
Minges Coliseum.
Jones, an All-American line-
backer from Blackstone, Va won
the award for defense, while Blake.
from Sanford, Fla captumd the
honor for his offensive shows d lr-
ing the season.
Presented by the ECU coaching
staff, the awards anvmony capped
off the Pirates' best season ever. The
team finished 11-1 on the season
with a New Year's Pay victory over
N.C State in the Peach Bowl and a
ninth place finish in the final Associ-
ated Press college football poll
Jones recorded 151 tackles on
theyearand wastheonlyconsonsus
All-American linebacker in the na-
tion. He had 16 stops in the Peach
Bowl.
Blake, who broke 32 passing
recordsat ECU.guided the Pirates to
key victories over Pittsburgh, Syra-
cuse and N.C. State His aerial at-
tacks and quick feet often amazed
opposing coaches and pleased the
fans.
Senior tight end Luke Fisher,
who caught the game-winning
j touchdown against N.C. State in the
j Peach Bowl, was named Oitstand-
mgSenior.TheMcdfonl N (native
I wasa favorite target of Blake.and he
I finished the season second in recep-
� bons.
� Charles Howard and Die n John-
son- were named the Outstanding
Special Teams' Players 1 toward, a
senior from Sanford, N.C won for
his defensive skills, while ohnson,a
senior kick rvturntT from Newport
News, Va won the awani for of-
fense
Junior runningbackCodnc Van
Buren ,md senior cornerhack Chris
Hall captured the Swindell Memo-
nil Award, also known as the BIG
IT AM. 1 Htle Meaward. Van Burvn,
fromCharleston.S G, wasoneof the
Pirates leading nishers. Hall, a Fort
I )ix, N 1, native was a key tickler for
ECU m 1991.
Junior offensive tackle Tom
Scott, from Rose Hill, N.C, was
named the Most Valuable Blocker.
Keith Arnold, a senior center from
Kennesaw,Gaearned theF.FR.iwl
Memorial Award for character,
scholarship and athletic achieve-
ment.
Derek Owens, a freshman
placekicker from Jacksonville, N.C,
won the Jerrv T. Bmoks Academic
Achievenx-nt Award. Senior line-
Kk kir Ken Bumerle, a Spruce Pines,
N.C, native, won the James E. Jones
Scholarship Award.
See Awards, page 14
Jeff Blake
I
By Margi Morin
Assistant Sports Fditor
ECU is sending its first fe-
male kickboxer to competition.
Denise De La Sierra, a 22-
year-old senior from Puerto Rico
and a grecnbolt karate student,
will compete in the Fast Coast
Middleweight Championship
Kickboxing Competition Jan. 25.
The competition will be held in
the Rocky Mount Sheraton Gate-
way Convention Center at 8
p.mandgeneraladmission tick-
ets are $10.
De La Sierra will represent
ECU in the competition which
will include women from Char-
lotte, Raleigh and Virginia
Beach.
Seventh-degree blackbelt
and ECU karate instructor, Bill
McDonald, said that De La Si-
erra first expressed interest in
kickboxing a year ago when she
saw the men practicing.
According to McDonald,
women compete in kickboxing
on the West Coast and in the
Orient. It is uncommon on the
East Coast. He said there has
been some com peti tions i n Sou th
Carolina and Georgia; however,
Saturday's competition marks
the first time a women's
kickboxing competi tion has been
held in North Carolina.
McDonald said that De La
Sierra's participation in the sport
has increased the interests of
other females even though none
have started competing yet.
De La Sierra is a member of
the ECU karate club and prac-
Denise De La Sierra
tices with the male kickboxers.
"You better not underesti-
mate her said Scott Harrelson,
ECU kickboxer. "She is intimi-
dating Harrelson said he is in-
terested to see her compete with
other women on Saturday.
De La Sierra says she spends
two to three hours per day work-
ing out in order to keep in shape.
Her workout consists of run-
ning, weight lifting, stair climb-
ing and kickboxing.
According to McDonald,
kickboxing is similar to boxing
in that the athletes compete
until one isdow n; however, the
kicking takes more energy.
Therefore, instead of three-
minute rounds followed by
one-minute resting periodslike
See Klckboxe page 16
Roundball Rama, which is a two-
dav event that involves free
throw, three point, and Hot Shot
shootouts. There is also the Slam
Dunk contest. This year the NBA
slam dunk rules will be in effect.
For further information about
these or other Recreational
Service's events call 757-6387 or
stop bv 204 Christenbury Gym.
O'Donnell
sets career
high mark
in 81-56 win
The ECU men's and women's
swim teams lost a pair of dual meets
to Duke University Saturday in
Durham. The men lost 137-94, while
the women fell 127-104.
The Blue Devils, boasting atop-
heavy juruorand senior line-up, were
able to outdistance the Pirates. The
Duke win ended a five-meet win-
rung streak by ECU.
"We swam real well, but wegot
beat by a better team Head coach
Rick Kobe said. "It's the first time
Duke has won in five years, butthey
had a very expenenced team
The Duke men captured fi5t in
every swimming event except the
400-meter free relay. Diver Matt
Lawrence and Brian Soltz paced the
men. Lawrence captured the one-
arid three-diving events, whileSoltz
had strong finishes in freestyle and
breast events.
The loss dropped the men's
record to 6-2 on the year.
The Lady Pirates won six of 11
events, but a lack of depth caused the
loss.
"Weoruy ha ve 10 women swim-
ming Kobe said. "We won six
events, but our number wrere jutt too
small. You can't win everytim�with
only 10 swimmers
Tia Pardueand Jacquelinefcber
paced the Lady Pirates in the WBA
Pardue won the 50- and the 100-
freestyle events, while Silberwon
the200-free.
The loss moves the Lady Pirates
to 5-3 on the year.
Both tnm travekto CM Do-
minion Saturday for a 2 p.m. meet





14
January 21, 1992 Efre EaHt (Enroll nian
Ruggers look to defend crown
By Jason Webb
Staff Writer
The ECU rugby team is gain-
ing national recognition as one
Of the hardest hitting, most ex-
plosive teams in this region. It
has won the state championships
for the past three years.
The team represented North
Carolina in the Eastern U.S.
Group Three Play-offs. The Pi-
rates were upset by Mary-Wash-
ington College, the defending
Virginia champion, by a score of
12-0. The game was a hard fought
battle in which both teams sus-
tained several injuries.
The rugby team will be in
the rebuilding stage early this
season. Two-time Winger of the
Year, Guy Travers, has gradu-
ated. The Pirates will also miss
the experience of winger Doug
Schrade and scrummer Dee
Thompson. Coach Mike
Leemhuis has handed over his
Whistle to faculty-adviser
Robbert Carroll and English-na-
tive Sam Elshafey.
The Pirates have a difficult
season ahead. They open their
season with a road trip to
Clemson on the Feb. 1. They will
host the first annual "The
Ground Ain't Frozen" Tourna-
ment Feb. 15. The team will also
attend the Mardi-Gras Rugby
Festival in Baton Rouge, La and
the 29th Annual Porter Cup
Tournament in Richmond.
"ECU'S rugby club has come
of age by making the national
play-offs for the third consecu-
tive year and is the team to beat
in this year's state tournament
Redskins to remember Utiey
HERNDON,Va.(AP)�The
Detroit Lions carried Mike
Utiey's "thumbs-up" attitude
into the NFC championship
game.The Washington Redskins
will make sure Utiey is remem-
bered at the Super Bowl.
Utiey, the Detroit guard
paralyzed from the mid-chest
down in a Nov. 17 game against
the Los Angeles Rams, became
an inspiration for the Lions. Even
though Detroit lost to Washing-
ton last Sunday, the Redskins
want to recognize Utiey in some
fashion.
Redskins coach Joe Gibbs
says defensive end Eric Williams,
a former Lion, will sound out the
Detroit players on what tribute
they would like to see.
"I thought we would have
Eric call and talk to some of the
players and see what they had in
mind, and carry on Gibbs said.
"We want to do whatever they
think is appropriate
The Lions had said that if
they made the Super Bowl, they
would do something special for
Utiey. Nearly all wore T-shirts
under their uniforms with
Utles name on them, and all
had his uniform number embla-
zoned on the backs of their hel-
File Photo
Rugby ism just for anyone. The guys just like pain. If your interesled in
playing, attend the organizational meeting Jan. 21 at 9 p.m. in GCB 2017.
mets.
Utiey was no stranger to the
Redskins,includingquarterback
Mark Rypien, who was the
former lineman's teammate at
Washington State.
-Sometimes ifs real hard to
talk about Rypien said before
the Detroit game.
"He'sa friend, someone you
know, and ifs a tough thing
Rypien added, his voice trailing
off.
Closer to home, many
Redskins were shocked this week
at the death of Glen Brenner, an
irrascibie, witty and fun-loving
sports anchor on a local televi-
sion station.
Brenner, who was 44, died
Tuesday of an inoperable brain
tumor. He had first fallen ill after
competing in a marathon during
November, but the deadly
growth was not diagnosed until
two days before the NFC cham-
pionship contest
"Glen's situation reminds us
all of how fragile human life is
Gibbs said in the locker room
after the Detroit victory. "You're
out here running around, in the
primeof your life he said, point-
ing to ward the playing field, "and
something like this happens. It
makes you stop and think
Just after midnight Monday,
Gibbs arrived at Brenner's hos-
pital bed with a game ball that
the team had dedicated to him
and stayed for more than an
hour talking with the
announcer's friends and family
as they maintained a round-the-
dock vigil, according to WUS A-
TV officials.
Brenner, whose innovative
style included persuading a Ro-
man Catholic nun to make NFL
predictions on his broadcasts,
enjoyed poking fun at himself
as well as others. That, more
than anything,is what made him
a welcome presence at Redskin
Park.
"He's up in the right place
right now, and 111 bet he's crack-
ing a joke wide receiver Gary
Clark said. "He always had a
smile
Gibbs said that the team will
rum up the intensity of their
workouts, but that they won't
see Buffalo's game plan until
next week.
Gibbs said his objective is to
give the Redskins as normal a
work week as possible once they
arrive in Minneapolis.
"The coaches do their work
early and giveitout late is how
the coach put it.
Awards
Continued from page 13
Dr. Rob Carroll said.
His sentiments are shared by
most people who keep up with
rugby on a national level.
Those interested in playing
this fast-paced, full-contact sport
should attend the rugby meet-
ing today at 9 p.m. in GCB 2017.
No experience is required, and
no pads are worn.
Three freshmen won the Rick
Bankston Memorial Award for out-
standing scout t-eamplay. DerekHaD,
a quarterback from Tallahassee, Fla
won for the offense, while David
Crumbie, a comerback also from
Tallahassee, wonfor defense. Carlos
Blake, a Macon, Ga running back,
won the special teams.
Hunterikttunore,a senior wide
receiver from Wilson, N.C, was
named the Most Improved Offen-
sive Flayer. Senior defensive tackle
Greg Gardill was the team's Most
Improved Defensive Flayer.
Finally, Greg Grandison, a jun-
ior safety from Pensacola, Fla was
named theOutstanding Newcomer.
RUSH SIGMA PI
WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE
Jan 21-24
8-11 pm
Tues
Sub Night
Meet the Brothers
Thurs
Deli Night
Wed
Pizza Night
with Chi O's
Eri
Bid Party
(Invite Only)
Kingston Place
For ride or info call
757-3421 or 752-0626
10th St.
Greenville Blvd.
I
Kingston Place
Krzyzewski sa
RALEIGH (AP) - The NCAA
Cut costs in the wrong places when it
decided to eliminate positions on
the men's basketball coaching staffs,
the coach of the No. 1-ranked team
in the country said.
'The two main ingredients are
players and coaches Duke coach
Mike Krzyzewski said Tuesday on
the weekly news conference of the
head basketball coaches in the At-
lantic Gast Conference. "If you're
going to cu t from a sport, you should
cut the fat, not the meat The things
that are cut are things for the kids
and roaches. Thaf s not right.
'Then? should be more innova-
tive ways to do that and not look at
it like we're against tl
that Coach K is beir
"The game has
everybody and we'
dose kok at what
seems that every
getting worse and
ball
He said men's I
duces80 percent of a
enue,a figure an N
confirmed.
Dean Smith of
and Gary WilliamM
voiced frustration
decisions.
"Even though
vides80 percent oil
QDonnell sets
in American wi
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
Gaynor O'Donnell scored a
career-high 23 points to lead the
Lady Pirates to an 81 -56 win over
the Lady Eagles of American, in
Minges Coliseum Friday night.
"I thought it was a real good
team effort, and I was proud of
the way they played said ECU
head coach Pat Pierson.
"American was obviously
jcoming of fan emotional win over
Old Dominion, and we were
looking to come back from our
loss to JMU, so there were a lot of
emotions involved she said.
O'Donnell scored the first 12
of 13 points for ECU, including
three, three-pointers. She was
seven-of-nine shooting and
dished out six assists.
"Gaynor's career high scor-
ing was an obvious boost, and it
took some pressure off our in-
side game Pierson said.
O'Donnell is leading the
CAA in assists with a 7.5 per
game average. She added her
name to the ECU record books
during the win over Richmond
by surpassing the old record of
413 to stand in first place with
430.
The Lady Pirates took a five-
point half-time lead and quickly
turned it into an 18 point margin
with over 13 minutes left to play
in the game.
AU could never get back into
the game. They
with no three-poij
nected for five,
most 50 percent
ECU had 18 st
21 points off of
overs. Toina Cole
for the game to pi
the CAA.
The Lady Pir
from every pla)
players scoring inl
Tonya Hargrove!
Rhonda Smith hal
Connie Small ha
The victory
CAA win. They
in the CAA with
They defeated Wi
80-75 and Richi
fell to James Mi
over time.
ECU took th
JMU with 1:27 tc
tion when Small
two free throws
high 18 points.
Small then
bound and put i
ECU a 59-56 Unk
guard Jackie FrJ
three-pointer wi
game and send
Freeman so
in overtime to
Dukes a big
point victory.
Smith had
points in the wi
at the Robins
mond, Va. Smal
Overtime
Continued from page 13
68-65 lead. George Mason's Donald
Ross, with: 14 remaining, hit his fourth
three-pointer to tie the game. The
Pirate'sfinal shot by Ronnell Peterson
fell short and sent the game into over-
time.
The first basket in over-time, by
Mitch Madden, gave George Mason
thelead for the remainder of thegame.
ECU was down by six points with fH
left and came within three at the final
buzzer on a three-pointer by Peterson,
who scored 17 points.
After the game, Payne said, "1
thought we played a hard, decent
game except we fouled in two key
situations, when we've got the lead
and kt them score with the dock
stopped
EKv a .
Ireland, Belgn
Hungary, Malll
Korea, or Honl
Sounds tan
expensive; or
foreign langua
The truth oi
ENGLISH. If J
then your choj
The cost'
INTERNATK
is, except for
in most ages.
It is a fact I
available at Ej
information an
national and
Dr. Robert
ISEPCq
Aum
PH. 757-6411
Tuesday
Dollar
WE DO IT
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
� Good Luck With
��.�-�-� � �





ZJJ?e �aat (Earolinian
January 21, 1992 15
ember Utley
riger to the
Quarterback
was the
Jammat? at
� hard to
Isaid betore
biTeone you
n;h thing
K-e trailing
, many
I this week
iFrenner an
run-loving
i jI televi-
ws 44, died
rabk brain
liien ill after
It: on during
h deadly
tosed until
iNFCcham-
rerrundsus
Iman life is
. OU re
:nd. in the
point-
hg r'ield. "and
I: appens. It
think
Just after midnight Monday,
Cibbs arrived at Brenner's hos-
pital bed with a game ball that
the team had dedicated to him
and staved for more than an
hour talking with the
announcer's friends and family
as thev maintained a round-the-
clock vigil, according to WUSA-
TV officials.
Brenner, whose innovative
style included persuading a Ro-
rrw.n Catholic nun to make NFL
predictions on his broadcasts,
enioved poking fun at himself
as well as others. That, more
than anything, is what made him
a welcome presence at Redskin
Park.
"He's up in the right place
right now, and I'll bet he'scrack-
mg a joke wide receiver Gary
Clark said. "He always had a
smile
Cibbs said that the team will
rum up the intensity of their
workouts, but that they won't
see Buffalo's game plan until
next week.
Gibbs said his objective is to
giv the Redskins as normal a
w ork week as possible once they
arrive in Minneapolis.
"The coaches do their work
early and giveit out late is how
the coach put it.
Continued from page 13
ense. Carlos aVe Player. Senior defensive tackle
inning back, Greg Gardill was the team's Most
Improved Defensive Player.
i a senior wide Finally, Greg Grandisoa a jun-
N.C, was jor safety from Pensacola, Fla was
-ved Of fen- named the Outstanding Newcomer.
E
Wed
Pizza Night
with Chi O's
Fri
Bid Party
(Invite Only)
I
:e
Krzyzewski says NCAA made cuts in wrong area
RALEIGH (AP) - The NCAA
cut costs in the wrong places when it
decided to eliminate positions on
the men'sbasketball coaching staffs,
the coach of the No. 1-ranked team
in the country said.
"The two main ingredients are
players and coaches Duke coach
Mike Krzyzewski said Tuesday on
the weekly news conference of the
head basketball coaches in the At-
lantic Coast Conference. "If you're
going to cut froma sport, you should
cut the fat, not the meat The things
that are cut are things for the kids
and coaches Thaf s not right
"There should be more innova-
tive ways to do that and not look at
it like we're against the presidentsor
that Coach K is being a jerk.
"The game has been great for
everybody and we'd better take a
close look at what we're doing. It
seems that every convention, if 5
getting worse and worse for basket-
ball
He said men's basketball pro-
duces 80 percent of the NCAA's rev-
enue, a figure an NCAA spokesman
confirmed.
Dean Smith of North Carolina
andGaryWilliamsof Maryland also
voiced frustration with the NCAA's
decisions.
"Even though basketball pro-
vides 80 percent of the money for the
NCAA and all these sports, they
don't seem to listen Smith said.
Basketball staffs now are al-
lowed to include a head coach, two
full-time assistants, a part-time as-
sistant and a graduate assistant.
The NCAA, in its 1991 conven-
tion, approved a reduction in the
basketball staff that will go into ef-
fect in August
A basketball staff for next sea-
son will include a head coach, two
full-rime assistants and a part-time
coach with tight restrictions on how
much he can earn from the school.
The measure is part of cost-cutting
measures that will reduce staffs in all
sports.
Men's basketball scholarships
also will be reduced.
An organization similar to the
College Football Association may be
necessary to give college basketball
coachesmoreclout, Krzyzewski said.
There's a closed ear concern-
ing men's basketball, and I don't
understand it he said. "We're try-
ingto work through the proper chan-
nels. It has not proven to be very
good at all.
"I'm not sure of the next step.
We want to be part of the team. But
if we're part of the fcaam, the other
members have to listen. We're for
reform. We want to look at the big
picture, but they have to focus on
O'Donnell sets mark
in American win
Follow ECU sports with
The East Carolinian
basketball sometimesand see what's
in our best interest They're not do-
ing that"
The Atlantic Coast Conference
proposed at last week's convention
in Anaheim, Calif mat the restric-
tions on earnings for the part-time
coach be lifted. That proposal was
defeated.
Thus, Krzyzewski said, the bas-
ketball staffs willbecutby 20 percent
(the graduateassistant),and another
20 percent (the part-time coach) will
be put on "minimum wage
Krzyzewski, Smith and Wil-
liams said that holding the conven-
tions in January didn't allow basket-
ball coaches to take part.
.�
The
East Carolinian
is now accepting
applications for
Sports Writers.
If you are
interested, stop
by the office for
more
information or
call 757-6366.
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
Gay nor O'Donnell scored a
career-high 23 points to lead the
Lady Pirates to an 81-56 win over
the Lady Eagles of American, in
Minges Coliseum Friday night.
"I thought it was a real good
team effort, and I was proud of
the way they played said ECU
head coach Pat Pierson.
"American was obviously
jcoming of fan emotional win over
Did Dominion, and we were
looking to come back from our
loss to J M U, so there were a lot of
emotions involved she said.
O'Donnell scored the first 12
of 13 points for ECU, including
three, three-pointers. She was
seven-of-nine shooting and
dished out six assists.
"Gaynor's career high scor-
ing was an obvious boost, and it
took some pressure off our in-
side game Pierson said.
O'Donnell is leading the
CAA in assists with a 7.5 per
game average. She added her
name to the ECU record books
during the win over Richmond
by surpassing the old record of
413 to stand in first place with
430.
The Lady Pirates took a five-
point half-time lead and quickly
turned it into an 18 point margin
with over 13 minutes left to play
in the game.
AU could never get back into
Overtime
Continued from page 13
68-65 lead. George Mason's Donald
Ross, with :14 remaining, hit his fourth
face pointer to tie the game. The
nrate'sfiivilsrKMbyRonnellPeterson
fell short and sent the game into over-
time.
The first basket in over-time, by
Mitch Madden, gave George Mason
thelead for therernainderof thegame.
ECU wasdown by six points with .04
left and came within three at the final
buzzeron a three-pointerby Peterson,
who scored 17 points
After the game, Payne said, "I
thought we played a hard, decent
game except we fouled in two key
situations, when we've got the lead
and let them score with the dock
stopped
the game. They shot 43 percent
with no three-pointers. ECU con-
nected for five, three's and al-
most 50 percent shooting.
ECU had 18 steals and scored
21 points off of AU's 24 turn-
overs. Toina Coley had six steals
for the game to put her second in
the CAA.
The Lady Pirates saw action
from every player, with four
players scoring in double figures.
Tonya Hargrove had 15 points,
Rhonda Smith had 13 points and
Connie Small had 10.
The victory was ECU'S third
CAA win. They share first place
in the CAA with Old Dominion.
They defeated William and Mary
80-75 and Richmond 67-65, but
fell to James Madison 71-69 in
over time.
ECU took their first lead over
JMU with 1:27 to play in regula-
tion when Small connected for
two free throws. She had a team
high 18 points.
Small then grabbed a re-
bound and put it back in giving
ECU a 59-56 lead. JMU freshman
guard Jackie Freemen nailed a
three-pointer with :21 to tie the
game and send it to overtime.
Freeman scored four points
in overtime to give the Lady
Dukes a big boost and a two-
point victory.
Smith had a team high 24
points in the win over Richmond
at the Robins Center in Rich-
mond, Va. Small had 18 points.
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Docs a year or semester of study in England, Scotfand, Wales,
Ireland, Belgium, France, The Netherlands, Finland, Sweden,
Hungary, Malta, Kenya, Mexico, Argentina, Costa Rica, Cyprus,
Korea, or Hong Kong sound interesting?
Sounds fantastic? But it's just not possible because: It's too
expensive; or it will delay graduation; or you aren't fluent in a
foreign language?
The truth of the matter is that many institutions offer programs in
ENGLISH. If, of course, you do have a fluency in another language,
then your choices of study sites will be even greater.
The cost? The cost of attending a participating institution in the
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAM (ISEP)
is, except for travel costs, exactly the same as attending ECU. And,
in most cases, credits earnrd abroad can be transferred back to ECU.
It is a fact that some of the finest universities in the world are
available at ECU prices to qualified ECU students. For more
information about ISEP and other programs of exchange, both
national and international, contact immmcdiaiely
Dr. Robert J. Hursey, Jr.
ISEP Coordinator
Austin 222
PH. 757-6418 or 756-0682
Stephany Evancho
Office of International Programs
Brewster A117
PH. 757-6769
'EpiscopaCStudent Jdlozvship
Invites foil to Join Us �acn Wanedag
S.30 pm CtUbration of Holy Gucnari
followed By supper and conversition
St. PauCs 'EpiscopaC Church
401 E.4tfiSt.
(cross SthSt. in front of garret MaO; xoaOdoxun MoUySt. to 4th St.)
you Anlhtrtl
J
Join us for our T.G.I.F. celebration every Friday from 5-8.
Featuring live music and our complimentary hors'd'oeuvres.
O'ROCK'Sis now serving lunch Monday thru Friday from 11:30 to
2:30.
Serving dinner Wednesday thru Friday from 5 to 9:30. Sample
delicious selections from our new expanded menu. Fresh
seafood, vegetarian selections, homemade soups and unique
sandwiches. Casual dining in a relaxing atmosphere. Large
import beer selection.
118 E. Fifth Street (entrance off Cotantche Street)
758-7373
,���-� ��





16
January 21, 1992 �fte EaBt (garolfnian
team's academic
CLEMSON, S.C. (AP) �
Clemson coach Cliff Ellis says he
doesn't have a "bunch of dumb"
basketball players and doesn't have
a problem with where they are aca-
demically.
At a time when Clemson presi-
dent Max Lennon said the school
was making overall academic
strides, the basketball team had
the lowest grade point ratio of the
16 programs in the athletic depart-
ment.
The basketball Tigers pulled a
team GPR of 1.86 during the first
grading period of the academic
year. That's less than a C average.
"I don't have a bunch of dumb
kids Ellis said. They're working
at it
Ellis explained the reason for
the low GPR was a number of his
players registered incompletesdur-
ing the semester and incompletes
are counted as Fs in the school
grading computer. Incompletes can
be made up during the second se-
mester.
Ellis didn't say how many
incompletes his players had, al-
though a source told the Anderson
Independent-Mail nearly every
player has one. Ellis also wouldn't
say how many players had less
than a 2.0 average.
The university has a policy of
not releasing the number of play-
ers who made less than 2.0 for any
team.
The highest individual GPR
on the team belonged to freshman
walk-on George Kelada, who made
the honor roll � the only men's
basketball player to do it � with a
3.42 in engineering.
The team's only senior, David
Young, was dismissed in Decem-
ber for failing to make satisfactory
progress toward his degree � a
Clemson rule. Young was eligible
by NCAA standards, and his GPR
actually helped the team total.
Despite the low overall GPR,
Ellis said he doesn't think anyone
is in a grade problem at this point.
Ellis also cited the number of
his players who had to adjust to
four-year college life. There are
seven new players in the program
this year�four freshmen and three
junior college transfers.
If last year is any indication,
Ellis has reason to be optimistic the
team's GPR will improve. The Ti-
gers had a 2.28 last spring after a
2.02 in the fall. But they had a 1.98
team GPR in the spring semester of
1990.
Ellis was quick to point out all
five of the seniors on last year's
team graduated, including Sean
Tyson, who came into the program
as a Proposition 48 non-qualifier.
That, Ellis said, is the ultimate prov-
ing ground.
If they don't graduate, I will
be concerned he said. "Last year's
senior class made us proud. This is
a new class coming in, they've got
some things to learn If s not that
our guys have not worked;
Clemson is a tough academic insti-
tution. If s a matter of adjusting.
They have to adjust to play-
ing basketball for the first time and
they have to adjust to the class-
room. Some are in a case where
they barely met the NCAA entrance
requirement and even in meeting
that states you have the capability
to get a degree.
"I havenoqualms of where we
are academically. I plan to see most
of these guys graduate. I hope we'll
have 100 percent with this fresh-
man class
Washington, Buffalo were clearly
Super Bowl favorites early in season
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) � You
heard the predictions in August.
People were saying it a bit more
emphatically in September. By Oc-
tober, they were virtually shouting
it
BeforeThanksgi ving, fansof the
Washington Redskins and Buffalo
Bills were making travel plans, des-
tination Minneapolis. By Christmas,
thev were arranging Super Bowl
parties.
Evervone who boldly stated last
summer thattheSkinsand Billswere
headed for a Super showdown hit
the mark likea Rypien-to-Clarkpass.
Or, for you folks from upstate New
York, a Kdly-to-Reed completion.
Here they are, the best teams in
the NFL ready to go at it for the
championship. Isn't that refreshing?
"It seemed like all season, you
were hearing that we were the best
in theNFCand they were the bestin
the AFC Redskins quarterback
Mark Rypien said. "It was destined
for us to play, I guess. You want the
best matchup for the Super Bowl,
and we got it"
Washington rampaged through
the NFC with a 14-2 record, then
easily whipped Atlanta and Detroit
in the play-offs. The Bills were 13-3
in taking their fourth straight AFC
East crown, then routed Kansas City
before struggling past Denver for
the conference title.
"We won't need a lot of motiva-
tion RedskinscoachJoeGibbssaid.
"Both teams kind of were pointing
toward this all year
Since the season opened on La-
bor Day weekend, there has been
little question that these teams were
as solid as any. The Redskins won
their first 11 games before Dallas
beat them, then took three more be-
fore losing a meaningless finale at
Philadelphia.
"We got on a roll and had every-
body contribu ting Gary Oar k said.
"We've had a very professional atti-
tude all season. We felt we were the
best team in the league and we
wanted to prove it every week
Which they did. The Redskins
scored morepoints than anyone(485)
and allowed less than everyone ex-
cept New Orleans (211-224). They
beat you with the run and the throw.
Or their defense stuffed you.
"This team is a heck of a team
from the standpoint of the talent of
the players and the chemistry and
the way they all fit together Gibbs
said. "What we did through Plan B
and the draft gave us an infusion of
new talentand enthusiasm. We were
solid. There were not a lot of holes
there
When you face the Bills�who,
incidentally, have lost three straight
games to the Redskins � you had
better not have any holes. Thurman
Thomas, the league's most valuable
player, surely will find them and flit
through them. Or Jim Kelly will ex-
pose them with his arm and his
mastery of the no-huddle attack.
Or the suddenly revitalized and
healthy defense will burst into them
and stop you dead.
"We've felt all year we were a
good defense, certainly not No. 27
like we'd been hearing said line-
backer Cornelius Bennett, a whirl-
wind in the play-offs. "We're really
putting it together now with Bruce
(Smith) and Jeff (Wright) back and
the rest of the guys playing up to
their level
That neither team leveled off
this season is remarkable. Even when
the Skins struggled, usually for a
quarter or a half, they made adjust-
ments, rallied and won.
Reqistration for aerobics workouts starts today and runs through Jan. 24, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The
classes will meet Jan. 27 through March 5, and cost $10 for students, $20 for faculty, staff and spouse
Kickboxer
Continued from page 13
boxing, kickboxing rounds last for
two minutes with one-minute
breaks.
The competitors wear boxing
gloves, shin guards, mouth pieces
and foot padding. Head gear is
optional. According to McDonald,
the head protection can block the
competitor's vision and creates a
false sense of security.
"It hurts just as bad when you
get hit with the head protection
on said kickboxing promoter
John Ormsby. "It only prevents
you from being cut
Ormsby explained that few
injuries occur in kickboxing.
"There are not a whole lot of solid
blows because of the distance fac-
tor. The competitors remain close
to each other
Do the men hit as hard with
De La Sierra as they do with each
other?
"I fight as hard as needed to
be competitive said Randy
Ballard, ECU karate club presi-
dent Ballard explained that he
never attacks his competitors.
De La Sierra is a physical edu-
cation major and hopes to open
her own gymand continue to com-
pete in kickboxing championships.
RUSH
PHI KAPPA TAU
r -
!?"�
WINNER OF 1991 CHANCELOR'S CUP
1990 -91 CHAPTER OF EXCELLENCE
TOP OVERALL GPA OF LAST 4 YEARS
����?
Taking Campus By Storm
Tonight: 8-11 Come Out & Participate in our Casino Night. Meet the
Brother of Phi Kappa Tau and be introduced to the ASA Sorority.
Hors d'ouerves will be served.
Wed: 8-11 Meet the SEI sorority plus enjoy Delicious Seafood.
Thurs: 8-11 Pizza with the AO sorority
Fri Invitational with the Brothers of Phi Kappa Tau
FOR RIDES CALL: 757-1319
If
Addams Famil
LOS ANGELES (AP) � The
creator of "The Addams Family"
TV series is suing the makers of
the "Addams Family" movie for
$50 million, accusing them of rip-
ping off his ideas.
David Levy, who holds rights
to the 1964-66 series, f i led the law-
suit Wednesday in state court.
Among the defendants: Para-
mount Studios and Orion Pro-
ductions, which sold Paramount
the uncompleted film for about
$22 million.
"They appropriates
and concepts said Lej
ney, Neil Papiano. "H
the characters, he put tl
together. He invented til
ters Thing' and 'It' cor
Levy also contenc
ated patriarch Gomez I
fencing expertise
Morticia's sizzling bed
gave Uncle Fester enr
age to light a bulb in
and conceived butler lj
gan playing.
Seattle produces
SEATTLE (AP)�Two decades
after blues-rock legend Jimi Hendrix
set his last guitar afire onstage, Se-
attle is back in the musical spotlight
with a sound so raw and gritty if s
called "grunge
The city's grunge practitioners
have attracted international airplay
and major-label contracts with their
mix of low, driving power chords
and surprisingly melodic lyrical
hooks.
The group Nirvana has seen its
Nevermind release go double plati-
num, selling more than 2 million
copies. Pearl Jam, Soundgarden and
Alice in Chains also are selling in the
hundreds of thousands.
"Right now it's really crazy. If
you go to a show every band is being
looked at by some label said Anna
Woorverton, a contributing writer at
The Rocket, Seattle's largest music
magazine.
"I don't think we've really seen
a regional scene explode to quite the
� extent thishas said BrucePavitt,co-
president of independent Seattle la-
bel Sub Pop, which can claim much
of the credit for developing grunge.
"What's interesting is that for
decades the music industry hasbeen
controDedbytheNewYork-LA.axis,
and what you're seeing here is a
regional scene outside that axis that
has developed somet
scratch and is acruall
worldwide impact Pa
Spin magazine's
cover featured Nirvana,j
members hail from thecc
ington town of Aberdeei
ington, D.G The group j
Sub Pop and is headc
Seattle.
"We've been focusj
native music lately, aru!
rea 1 ly been prod ucing tl
producing it well S;
Daniel Fidler said. "The
reallyprodigiousoutpi
Nirvana's vid �
their song "Smells Like
has been in heavy rota
a Music Television
said, and MTV has an
Soundgarden, Alice n
other Seattle acts.
Fidler said the ind
an eye on Seattle grui
He describes the soun
nation of '60s and
with '80s punk energy J
really accessible in its j
Pa vitt describes .t
and look and feel of fn
the sound of the unj
nally getting paid:
Sub Pop publics
r,
Don't
HELPB
-�
y �"
RU
FOR





emic record
mtit Cast Carolinian
January 21, 1992 17
Jnng after a
had a 1.91
semester of
nint out all
last year's
iding Sean
Ihc program
pn-qualifier
pmaleprov-
uate, I will
Last year's
n id rhisis
t xv we got
) not that
our guvs have not worked;
Clemson is a tough academic insti-
tution. It's a matter of adjusting.
'Thev have to adjust to play-
ing basketball for the first time and
thev have to adjust to the class-
room. Some are in a case where
thev harelv met the NCAA entrance
requirement and even in meeting
that states you have the capability
to get a degree.
"1 have noqualms of where we
are academically. 1 planto see most
ot these guvs graduate. 1 hope we'll
have 100 percent with this fresh-
man class
�' I
Flla Photo
through Jan 24. from 9 a m. to 5 p.m. The
r students. $20 for faculty, staff and spouse
Continued from page 13
protection De La Sierra as they do with each
p promoter other?
Iv prevents "I fight as hard as needed to
be competitive said Randy
d that few Ballard. ECU karate club presi-
dekboxing. dent. Pallard explained that he
le lot of solid never attacks his competitors,
stance tac- De La Sieira is a physical edu-
main close cation major and hopes to open
her own gym and continue to corn-
hard with peteinkickboxingchampionships.
LOR'S CUP
:ellence
IT 4 YEARS
torm"
et the
pity.
1319
'Addams Family creator sues
LOS ANGELES (AP) � The
creator of "The Addams Family"
TV series is suing the makers of
the "Addams Family" movie for
$50 mil lion, accusing them of rip-
ping off his ideas.
David Levy, who holdsrights
to the 1964-66 series, filed the law-
suit Wednesday in state court.
Among the defendants: Para-
mount Studios and Orion Pro-
ductions, which sold Paramount
the uncompleted film for about
$22 million.
"They appropriated his ideas
and concepts said Levy's attor-
ney, Neil Papiano. "He named
the characters, he put the concept
together. He invented the charac-
ters Thing' and 'It' completely
Levy also contends he cre-
ated patriarch Gomez Addams'
fencing expertise and wife
Morticia's sizzling bedroom talk,
gave Uncle Fester enough volt-
age to light a bulb in his mouth
and conceived butler Lurch's or-
gan playing.
Paramount spokesman Harry
Anderson said the studio had not
seen the lawsuit and had no com-
ment.
Orion officials could not be
reached by telephone after busi-
ness hours Wednesday.
The movie has grossed more
than $100 million since its release
last month.
Levy created the TV charac-
ters based on cartoons drawn by
Charles Addams for The New
Yorker magazine.
Seattle produces 'grunge' music
SEATTLE (AP)�Two decades
after blues-rock legend Jimi Hendrix
set his last guitar afire onstage, Se-
attle is back in the musical spotlight
with a sound so raw and gritty if s
called "grunge
The city's grunge practitioners
have attracted international airplay
and major-label contracts with their
mix of low, driving power chords
and surprisingly melodic lyrical
hooks.
The group Nirvana has seen its
Nevermind release go double plati-
num, selling more than 2 million
copies. Pearl Jam, Soundgarden and
Alice in Chains also are selling in the
hundreds of thousands.
"Right now ifs really crazy. If
you go to a show every band is being
looked at by some label said Anna
Woolverton, a contributing writer at
The Rocket, Seattle's largest music
magazine.
"1 don't think we've really seen
a regional scene explode to quite the
extent thishas said BrucePavitt,co-
president of independent Seattle la-
bel Sub Pop, which can claim much
of the credit for developing grunge.
"Whaf s interesting is that for
dccadesthemusicindustryhasbeen
controlledby theNewYork-LA.axis,
and what you're seeing here is a
regional scene outside that axis that
has developed something from
scratch and is actually having a
worldwide impact Pavitt said.
Spin magazine's December
cover featured Nirvana, whose three
members hail from thecoastal Wash-
ington town of Aberdeen and Wash-
ington, D.G The group started with
Sub Pop and is headquartered in
Seattle.
"We've been focusing on alter-
native music lately, and Seattle has
really been prod uci ng tha t genre and
producing it well Spin columnist
Daniel Fidler said. "They just have a
really prodigiousoutput of albums
Nirvana's video accompanying
their song "Smells Like Teen Spirit"
has been in heavy rotation on MTV,
a Music Television spokeswoman
said, and MTV has aired cuts from
Soundgarden, Alice in Chains and
other Seattle acts.
Fidler said the industry has kept
an eye on Seattle grunge for years.
He describes the sound as "a combi-
nation of '60s and 70s garage rock
with'80s punk energy and speed. It's
really accessible in its sounds
Pavitt describes it as "thesound
and look and feel of fresh money. It is
the sound of the underground fi-
nally getting paid
Sub Pop publicist Jenny Boddy
said Pavitt and his partner, Jonathan
Poneman, who helped establish Se-
attle as a musical hot spot by flying
Melody Maker magazine writer
Everett True from England in 1987 to
see the city's up and coming bands.
"He want back to England and
got the Euro-press going crazy about
Sub Pop and Seattle Boddy said.
"That made it easier to get into the
American press
Alice inChainslead singer Layne
Staley believes it's the quality of
Seattle's music scene and the atti-
tude of those involved that has
brought its music to a mass audi-
ence.
"It's, like, the most supportive
music scene in the country, because
every band's different and the atti-
tude is more to get up and jam and
have a good time than to outdo the
other band he said. "So the bands
are there to support you and there
all your friends and everyone gets
up and jams together and ifs an
incestuous scene. It's great
Staley proved the point in the
group's Dec. 21 show at the Para-
mount by bringing Heart lead singer
Ann Wilson onstage. Wilson, who
with her sister Nancy, has long
reigned as the royalty of Seattle rock,
will appear on Alice in Chains' up-
coming four-song acoustic release
ALPHA SIGMA PHI
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� Richest National Fraternity
� 10th Oldest National Fraternity
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Intramurals
� Socially Active (including Band Parties)
� Over 50 Chapters (5 Nearby Chapters)
� At or Near the Top of Fraternity GPA
� Dues To Fit the College Budget
� Services to the Community
� Tight Brotherhood
COMMITTED TO EXCELLENCE SINCE 1845
422 W. 5th St.
757-3516 or 757-066
CALL FOR RIDES
E5E�3
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RUSH DELTA CHI
FOR MORE INFORMATION: 8304)528





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COME TO THE PI KAPP HOUSE
803 HOOKER RD.
TUESDAY - WEDNESDAY - THURSDAY
8 PM TO 11 PM
FRIDAY - INVITATION ONLY
CALL FOR RIDES
756-2149
Pi Kappa Phi offers an excellent opportunity
to anyone who has the desire to make the
most of themselves.
RUSH
KAPPA PHI





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803 HOOKER RD.
TUESDAY - WEDNESDAY - THURSDAY
8 PM TO 11 PM
FRIDAY - INVITATION ONLY
CALL FOR RIDES
756-2149
Pi Kappa Phi offers an excellent opportunity
to anyone who has the desire to make the
most of themselves.
RUSH
KAPPA PHI





Title
The East Carolinian, January 16, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 16, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.850
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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