The East Carolinian, January 14, 1992






WE WIN! Pirates triumph over State, bring home Peach Bowl trophy
See stories page 16, photo essay page 10
� � -
imsmtefaimtm
uJJre lEaHt (Eattfltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
IAY, January 14. 1992
Ghh'nviue, North Carolina
Circulation 12.000
20 Pages
Hod parts tiispLucd

Students elect eav men
U.M.bi
layoffs
Iowa reinumbers victims
vedbv
ird
Professor charges discrimination
B lot I Becker
Sufi Writci
�i tho dcp.Ht
tion has filed
; w itli tho uni oi sit
: dis� rimination
n, md ho started laughing
he said I hon he said I made
more titan vou did
I le had tist finished his
Ma-act -� dogroo the somostoi
before I was very upset, to sav
to personnel records, both m
st rue tors arc p,ud more than
u kern; both arc men
W i( kern said alter she
learned the new instriK tors'
salaries, she aeain took action
the least K anse 1 net only had She said she brought the mattci
u kem
�i i it 11
('kevl
Kikil
� �' , �
mple ol years tea hing ex
enccbv then but 1 also have
professional experience that
i ounts in m qualifi ations
Wi kern said she went to
the a ting hairperson of thi
mmunications department to
' � ass the matter She slid the
pavi hoi a small
raise whi h led her to believe the
issue w as res 1 ed
I hen in August, the om
munieation department hit
two new instnu t �rs V i online
to I r I larrell Allen, the now
ctorof i nmmunii ation who
also took tttu c in August
K kern said Allen took the
Lie to the lean ol the i oll
ol rts and Sciences, Dr. W Keats
Sparrow but the dean made no
attempt to resoh e the matter.
U i( kern Mid she then wrote
a lettoi ' iien w Ilk h v,Ar ,1
step b step a count ol tier at
i. larifS the issue Allen
. hn wont to Sparrow whk h
between hersoll
and an assistant dean, she said
Wickem said the meeting
upset her even more
I ollowing thi' ,o H e ol a
1i1 worker, Wi kem took the is
sue to Mary Ann Rose, the
chancellor's assistant and direi
tor ot Equal Empl lymenlh
portunit (EE( �
Rose, who investigates
discrimination complaints I i
the university, is currently
kxikingintoWickem'sconcorns
When asked about
Wi( kern's (omplaint, Rose said
she could not comment on spe
tifi cases, but she listed the
tai tors that must be looked il
when investigating a discrimi
nation case
Rosesaid shotirsti ompares
the salaries of the complainant
to the salaries of the those in the
same Held w In. have the same
rank and wh have the same
conti
InWi Kem ase.shewould
ioku ,� al ks turers in the
ommunu ati m department
who are on .1 nine month con
1 '
A i1 irding to dot uments
obtained from the department
human resoun es, th new
1 tmunii ation instructors were
hired on a temporary basis,and
both instructors signed .1 tour
monthontr Id tor $13 �
Wu kern signed a nine-month
( ontra I f� it $
Rose said she ther h��ks al
See Wlckern page 7
Shooting
leads to
weapons
violation
By Julie Roscoe
�it ant t'V s I dito
Going the distance
Not 1 ' P rate football team travel to the Peach-
Bowl, but also a flock of: �� ashingfans Attendance
et 1 "� Bowl a: well as a tew records set
Photo by Dail R�ed ECU Photo Lab
bytheplayersthemselves ECUfansandtnends chanted
We Believe as the team snatched a fantastic victory from
the near jaws of defeat.
said
� s
Students suffei4n SS
. �
tr ious Us in
ients
V ith
the .ru ersit ol
wit totell
w !iallising
�seek
�more

. ,into
�i-if to
. - . �

piled by Beth Shimmel
InsideThursday
t �1
t ass'6
1 1
SpIf.
DePuy contradicts state auditor
Television interview reveals additional information
A student in Garrett Hall accidentally
shot another student in the shoulder with a
9mm semi -automatic pistol on Saturday, Jan.
11 at approximati 7p.i
Thestudent,Michael rhomasShaw,20,
ol J35 Garrett Hall, will be charged with
illegal possession I ,1 weapon on campus,
said Lt. Keith Knox, public information offi-
cer tor Public Safte
According tothe campus police, Shaw
was show ingother students in room 333 the
gun he had recent purchased when he
pointed the pistol at thevichm, Michael Lewis
lunx-r, 19, oi V48Garret i Jail.
I unxT pushed the barrel of the pistol
away from himself with his right Kind. The
pistol accidently fired a bullet which went
through I unier s right pinkie finger and
trfrough his right shoulder.
Shaw and another student took Turner
to the Pitt County Memorial Hospital's
emergency room, "urner was treated and
discharged on Sunday, Ian. 12.
After an ECl police investigation no
charges were tiled on hlviw tor the incident
because they found the shooting to be acci-
dental.
"It there had been serious injury charges
would have been fifed knox said. "It is not
in the intenM of the situation at this time to
press charges
Ilie charge ol illegal possession oi a
weapon on campus usually results in a six
nxnth jail sentence and ora$500fine.
By Matt ones
Managing 1 ditor
The 1 c "I wiretapping scan
dal took ,1 turn list week when
Director ol Public Safety lames
1 vi'w contradicted the state
auditor's report during a tele 1
sion interview
DePuy said thestateauditors
tookhis ommentsout of context
v hen the reported that he did
not realize that wiretapping was
illegal
1 lie report states that the
officials involved "have stated
that the were not aware that
taping employee's telephone
conversations without the
employee s knowledge was j-m
tentialK illegal
In a later interview, DePuy
said that the auditors ttxik his
statements out of context I le
then explained his involvement
in tin- ux ident I VI'uv said thai
learned ol the wiretappine
! tin- deed was done.
James DePuy
I le said that his hrst know 1
edge of the wiretapping was at
ter teddy Roberson, director of
telecommunications and James
Burris, captain of investigations,
made the first tape
According to DePuy, when
burns told him of the wiretap
ping, he was busy and did not
have time to listen to the tapes
He told him to transcribe the
I
tai-s into print form 90 that he
i ould look at them at a later date.
DePu remembered saying
the ta-s were bad" and that
they could nol be used in court,
but never focused on their
illegalliry
The intention of the wire-
tapping was to produce evidence
against an employee who was
suspected ot dealing drugs.
DePuy made his contradic-
tory statements en camera last
week while entering the federal
court in New Bern. He. along
with Richard Brown, vice-
chancellor tor business Affairs,
and Evan Midgette, assistant
director of HumanKolations
were subpoenaed to testify about
the incident.
The subpoenas were issued
after the I Bl concluded their
year-long investigation ot the
incident. 1 YPm said that he was
grateful that the investigation
wasoverand that he would have
a chance to give Ins side ot the
issue.
KKK storms Wilson
By Marjorie Pitts
Matt Writer
Approximately 30
membersof the ku klux Man
marched through downtown
Wilson to the courthouse
steps on Sunday. No physi-
cal violence broke out but
obscene chants like, "Fuck
vou "You can't touch this
"The hell with the clan and
"Go on back home were
shouted.
The reason tor the march
was to get more members.
Authorities from sur-
rounding counties, as well as
Wilson's Police Department,
took many precautions. Phe
police videotaped and per-
formed a minimal body
search on the spectators.
Weapons, including
rocks or anything that could
ho used as a weapon, were
not allowed in tho area Po-
licemen stood on top of roofs
with binoculars and semi
automatic nflos and police
walked on the sides ot the
roped-oft area
The police handed out
flyers to the citizens and
visitors of Wilson at tho
checkpoints
"This tetter tetsyou know
that the city of Wilson did not
solicit the Man to come to this
area, police said as they dis-
tnbutod fivers. "That we in
fact because of the First
Amendment, do not have the
nght to keep them away We
have to protect their nghts to
tree speech like we do ev-
erybod else's
Julie Peppers, an Fc L
student, was among the hun-
dreds ot spectators who un-
derwent the minimal Ks.iv
search. I didn't think tho
march was any big deal
Peppers said. "But when they
did the txviv search it made
me nervous
A crowd ot about 50 from
ECl met at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center to oppose tho
Klansmen Manygot together
the night before the rally to
make 1 shirts and signs op-
posing the Man. The signs
See KKK page 7
n-
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2 3H?t �a0t Carolinian January 14, 1992
t88W�M�t
CRIIi:SENE
Loud music, loud heating unit cause
disturbances across campus
Jan.1
2341�Chancellor's house: Responded to a call that the
Chancellor's daughter was locked out of the house. A locksmith was
called.
Jan. 9
0121�Fletcher Dorm: Request from the dorm staff to assist with
a grossly impaired female passed out in a bathroom. Rescue was
called and the subject was transported to Pitt Emergency.
1700�Jones Hall: Bled a report concerning larceny.
1442�Mendenhall Student Center: Checked out a report con-
cerning property damage. The subject was referred to the Greenville
Police Department.
1630�Scott Hall: Removed a lock for a resident.
Jan. 10
0033�Tyler Dorm: Responded to a request and assisted the
dorm staff with a malfunctioning lock. A locksmith was called.
0049�Jenkins Building: Checked out a suspicious male west of
the Jenkins Building. No action was taken.
0051�Vehicle stopped for erratic driving. A male non-student
was charged vith DW1 and alcohol violations.
0330�Marathon restaurant: Officers assisted Greenville offic-
ers with a report of a breaking and entering in progress. Suspects
apprehended by Public Safety and turned over to the Greenville
Police Department.
0456�Fletcher Dorm: Responded to the 1st floor in reference to
loud music. Unfounded.
Jan. 11
0111� Aycock Dorm: Responded to a reference about an intoxi-
cated student in a restroom. The subject left the area and went to his
room.
0158�Scott Dorm: Responded to a report of loud music on the
1st floor. Music was turned off.
0259�Officer with one student and one non-student, male and
female, having a disagreement. Argument was resolved.
1021�General Classroom Bldg: Checked on a clogged toilet in
room 3122.
1920�Garrett Hall: Checked out a scene on the 3rd floor in
reference to a shooting. The area was secured.
Jan. 12
0009� Checked on a report of loud music. Subjects were gone
upon arrival.
1008�Brewster: Checked the heating unit on the 1st floor that
was making loud noises. Maintenance was called.
1651�Fletcher Hall: Filed a larceny report.
2149�Greene Hall: Assisted a rescue. The student was trans-
ported to PCMH Emergency. Dr. Matthews was contacted concern-
ing the reference.
Crlm� Sc�w i� taken from otftaal Public Safety Log.
Jury awards five million
(AP) � A jury awarded $5 bil-
lion to a woman whose son was
sexually tortured and cut to pieces
by a serial killer�a verdict that will
ensure the murderer will never
profit from his crimes, the woman's
lawyer says.
The verdict Wednesday is be-
lieved to be the largest ever in a
said.
in
Police said Berdella, a flea-mar-
ket owner and antiques dealer, kept
allthevkirnsr�stage,injected them
with drugs and sexually assaulted
them. Their bodies were cut up and
placed in curbside trash, police said.
and killing her son, Todd Stoops, $55,000 he has in a trust fund arid BeUaeadedguiltvin
and five others between 1984 and lay claim to any money he might tos,akld
ella, 42, is serving a life & LJwJZ
sentence-HetoldauthoritiesStoops jury for at tot $1 billion. Instead r
died in 1986 after being tied to after less than two hours of dehb- .�� -TJT? "rm
Berdella'sbedfornearlytwoweeks, eration, it awarded $25 billion each ��
injected with powerful sedatives, for wrongful death and punitive return tor ruseooptrai
given electric shocks and repeat- damages.
wrongful-death case, said Martin edly sexually assaulted. "We made the argument that
Meyer, an attorney for Betty Ann Meyer said there is no hope of they ought to award a verdict in the
Haste. Haste collecting anything close to billion-dollar range so there was
Haste had sued Robert Berdella $5 billion from Berdella, but the absolutely no way there would be a
in 1989 after he admitted capturing verdict will enable her to go after profit fromanythinghedid Meyer
Cairt Believe It'j
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FEELING ALL COOPED UP?
Come In And Try Our Delicious
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Any Regular Or Large
Cup or Cone
Offer good only at participating full sized
I Can t Believe It's Yogurt stores Coupon not
valid with anv other offer
Soft serve on
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1414 Charles Blvd. ' 1414 Charles Blvd. 1414 Charles Blvd.
STUDENT UNION EVENTS
AN EVENING OF THE ARTS
Wednesday, January 15th
Opening Reception for Deaf Chinese Student Art
Exhibit in Mendenhall Gallery, followed by an
screening ofJU-DOU, a Chinese film (with English
subtitles) nominated for an Academy Award.
Reception: 6:30 - 8:00 pm
Film: 8:00 pm Hendrix Theatre
U$ED BOOKS
Do You Want Used Books?
The ECU Student Stores
Buys More Used Books From Students
For Students.
TRAVEL ADVENTURE FILM
& THEME DINNER
Iceland - Europe's Outback
Dinner: 6:30 pm (advance purchase required)
Film: 8pm, January 16, Hendrix Theatre
WEEKEND MOVIES
Hendrix Theatre
REVERSAL OF FORTUNE 00 pm, January 17-18
TRUTH OR DARE 8:0�Pm nuary 19th
Free with valid ECU student ID card or a spring semester Film Pass card.
HNVITATION
The Student Union Minority Arts Committee and
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity presents
"A WALK WITH DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR
CANDLELIGHT MARCH
with Reverend Sidney Locke
Monday, January 20,1992
6:30 pm - 8:00 pm
PLace: Christenbury Memorial Gymnasium to Mendenhall
Student Center -Hendrix Theatre
Come help us celebrate Dr. King's holiday with a candlelight march through
the university campus. Following the march, Reverend Sidney Locke will
speak in commemoration of one of our nation's greatest leaders. The ECU
Gospel Choir will also be featured, as well as other local musicians.
We paid over $170,000.00 to students
between November 1st
& December 16th
Just for Their Used Books!
tm'sMrnt
UtCD
TREATING
"n THE
CRIMINAL
OFFENDER
third rah-KJN
ECU Student Stores Has More of These &
Other Used Books!
MAKE $EN$E
For more information on any of these events,
please call the Student Union Hotline at 757-6004.
Clinic provi
By Christie Lawrence
SUM Writer
We have all had our share of
scratches and scrapes, but for those
of us who continue to suffer from
more serious physical injuries, hope
still exi sts thanks to the Department
of Physical Therapy which operates
the Back and Limb clinic in the
School of Allied Health.
The clinic provides its clients
with weekly therapeutic services
by professional physical therapists
and students in training who treat
muscle and joint problems associ-
ated with injury and dis
Student athletes, acj
tims and the elderly, wr
ject to muscle and joint
that are brought on byj
process, are offered aj
physical treatments.
"The clink is increa
ing the needs of ECU fa
students and the ger
said Duane Williams, cl
tor and ECU clinical
rector of physical theraj
The purpose of thej
provide patients with re
treatments to control
University aw;
By Matt Jones
Managing Editor
The University paid out a
group of seven settlements last
month equaling over $115,000 in
the largest of the wiretapping
scandal pay-offs.
The settlement occurred on
Dec. 17, just days after most stu-
dents were leaving the campus for
their Christmas vacations. At that
time, Chancellor Richard Eakin
issued a press release which gave
his reasons for the settlement.
"On the advice of the Uni-
versity Attorney and at the direc-
tion of the State Attorney General's
Office, I have authorized financial
settlements with seven claimants
Eakin stated.
"Upon review of all aspects of
these cases, I believe
these claims is the
responsible course of j
taken, a fact which
disturbs me greatly
The first of the
settlements arose frc
filed against two indij
University represent
viduals and settled
fore it reached a cour
time, University Aj
Irons said that the ri
University's out of
ment was "based on
of fundamental fail
Irons went on tt
the University's in
the wiretapping foi
employee of the Ui
with actual knowk
she was violating tl
Frequent tune-
Special to The East Carolinian
As the temperature begins to
drop and frost covers our wind-
shields every night, some of the
older cars out there won't start as
well as they did mis summer.
Most people will take their cars
to Precision Tune or a local auto
shop for a winter tune-up. A simple
tune- v at a Goodyear tire center
will generally cost between $50 and
$80, depending on the number of
cylinders in your engine.
The cost of a major tune-up
starts around $80 and can get much
higher depending on the parts and
labor the car needs.
But those car owners feeling
adventurous this time, or maybe
just low on money, can invest in a
few tools, a manual and a little time,
and tune up a car themselves and
save money.
An engine tune-up is an impor-
tant part of the maintenance of a car
and can increase performance and
gas mileage. Some symptoms that
indicate the need for a tune-up are
hard starting, reduced power and a
rough idle.
It's important to decide what
type of tune-up each car needs.
There are many other symptoms
that require a tune-up like poor gas
mileage, but these
engine analyzer tol
cause of the probk
The use of di
ment, such as an er
not usually include
a simple tune-up.
In new cars
computerized eng
ten is an engine an
communicate wit
puter.Itismorecol
simple tune-up ar
formed by a prof e
Simple tune-i
the replacement ol
plugs, spark pW
distributor cap.
shops offer both
tune-ups for thei
the difference in
easy for you to d�
which.
A simple tunJ
simple. It will
problems, and if.
at all it probably
better. If a car'
withperfor
the simple tune-t
effective.
The first st
is getting togett
tion needed for 1
will need to
Free
Checki
ECB offers free checking a
college students and faculty
Call us for details
The
EastCarolina
Arlington Boulevard & Red
(919) 355-8200
M(





Ll kod
urder trial
h nd and ,ki
l Berdella pleaded guiltv in ld
&1 six killings ami tokidnappfaw
,uul-Hioiniingaseventhman, wh
escaped from Bordella's home
w earing only a dog collar. Berdella
v.i- spared the death penalty
return tor his cooperation.
Poltcesaid Berdella, a flea-mar-
ketovs nerand antiques dealer, kept
theTCtinwrK�tage,injectedthenJ
with drugs and sexually assaulted!
hi' bodies were cut up and
i irbside trash, police said.
January 14.1992 She gagt Carolinian 3
!t ,li
I V
-
UP?
IICIOUS
4
wm
JM
)
� �
I
60 Off!
Any Pint Or Quart Of
Frozen Yogurt
I
fTi in't Believe It'sN
830-3933 lYogurtfj ,
1414 Charles Blvd. J
)OK$
Books?
o in Students
X) to students
member 1st
December loth
Just for Their Used Books!
AUEXANDtft ft. SMiTH Wi
UAft ItfglW
TREATING I
THE
CRIMINAL
OFFENDER
IHJKf) IIH I l
US�D
more of These &
voks!
,N$E
limb treatment
By Christie Lawrence
SUf f Writer
We have all had our share of
scratches and scrapes, but for those
of us who continue to suffer from
more serious physical injuries, hope
still exists thanks to the Department
of Physical Therapy which operates
the Back and Limb clinic in the
School of Allied Health.
The clinic provides its clients
with weekly therapeutic services
by professional physical therapists
and students in training who treat
muscle and joint problems associ
ated with injury and disease.
Student athletes, accident vic-
tims and the elderly, who are sub-
ject to muscle and joint problems
that are brought on by the aging
process, are offered a variety of
physical treatments.
"The clinic is increasingly serv-
ing the needs of ECU faculty, staff,
students and the general public
said Duane Williams, clinical direc-
tor and ECU clinical associate di-
rector of physical therapy.
The purpose of the clinic is to
provide patients with rehabilitative
treatments to control pain and re-
store optimal muscle and joint
movement to injured or diseased
limbs.
In order to control pain, non-
invasive means such as heat, cold,
ultrasound and therapeutic elec-
trotherapy are used.
The clinic realizes that direct
care of a patient by the physical
therapist is important but does not
neglect educating their clients as
well as treating them.
"We treat several knee and back
injuries, and find it important to
educate clients on how to avoid
repeat injury Williams said.
Since Americans are living
longer and becoming more physi-
cally active, the need for physical
therapy and physical awareness is
increasing.
"With this change in attitude
and behavior, physical therapists
must help people gain proper con-
trol of their bodies and teach them
how to maintain optimal physical
performance Williams said.
The clinic's emphasis on edu-
cating the patients is maintained by
teaching the importance of fitness,
prevention methods to avoid re-
peat injury, and self care techniques
to ensure normal function of the
limbs after therapy.
Services offered by the clinic
also help patients to become physi-
cally stronger and to regain use of a
limb.
Exercise is recommended for
patients who need to improve coor-
dination and endurance.
The clinic is "striving to further
develop a model clinic which al-
lows faculty to integrate education
and practice for physical therapy
students said Williams.
Therefore, the clinic is able to
provide quality physical therapy
services for a broad range physical
injury problems in the community.
Each patient receives an initial
evaluation, then a plan of treatment
requiring mem to become actively
involved. Every patient will also
receive a follow-up exam.
The clinic is open weekdays
from8ajn.to4-30pjn.andislocated
in the Belk Building on the comer of
Charles Street and Greenville Bou-
levard.
Patients are accepted by ap-
pointment or referral. For informa-
tion or appointment call 757-4135
or 757-4450.
University awards more wiretap payoffs
By Matt Jones
Managing Editor
The University paid out a
group of seven settlements last
month equaling over $115,(XX1 in
the largest of the wiretapping
scandal pay-offs.
The settlement occurred on
Dec. 17, just days after most stu-
dents were leaving thecampus for
thei � Christmas vacations. At that
time, Chancellor Richard Eaktn
issued a press release which gave
his reasons for the settlement.
"On the advice of the Uni-
versity Attorney and at the direc-
tion of the State Attorney General's
Office, I have authorized financial
settlements with seven claimants
Eakin stated.
"Upon review of all aspects of
these cases, 1 believe settlement of
these claims is the only legally
responsible course of action to be
taken, a fact which saddens and
disturbs me greatly
The first of the wiretapping
settlements arose from a lawsuit
filed against two individuals. The
University represented the indi-
viduals and settled the claim be-
fore it reached a courtroom. At the
time, University Attorney Ben
Irons said that the reason for the
University's out of curt settle-
ment was "based on consideration
of fundamental fairness
Irons went on to explain that
the University's investigation of
the wiretapping found that "no
employee of the University acted
with actual knowledge that he or
she was violating the law
Six of the seven settlements
involved individuals who found
themselves recorded on the tran-
scripts of the phone taps. The Uni-
versity paid over $10,500 to each
of the six recipients.
"In agreeing to pay this
amount, the University took into
consideration the fact that the
applicable federal statute requires
a minimum payment of $10,000 in
damages plus attorneys fees for
each violation Eakin stated.
Brooks and Jene Mills were
the recipients in the latest wire-
tapping settlements and were
a warded $62,411. The documents
associated with the settlement do
not clearly define the reasons for
the pavment, however, Brooks
Mills' phone was the originally
tapped line. He later resigned his
position in the Telecommunica-
tions department after University
officials notified him of the phone
tap.
According to the auditors' re-
port, the original intention of the
phone tap was to discover if Mills
was involved in drug dealings,
although it was never made clear
who first tapped the line.
The report states that the fol-
lowing individuals were involved
or had knowledge of the wiretap-
ping: Richard Brown, vice-chan-
cellor for Business Affairs; James
DePuy, director of Public Safety;
Johnny Burrus, captain of inves-
tigations for Public Safety; Evan
Midgette, assistant director of
Human Resources; and Teddy
Roberson, former director of
Public Safety.
Crime doesn't pay, but we do!
The East Carolinian is looking for a few
good people to fill the following staff
positions:
� Copy editors
� News writers
� Entertainment writers
Apply at our office in the Student Pubs
Building, 2nd float 9-5 daily.
Frequent tune-ups save money, help avoid breakdowns
. . � At this point,
Special to The East Carolinian
As the temperature begins to
drop and frost covers our wind-
shields every night, some of the
older cars out there won't start as
well as they did this summer.
Most people will take their cars
to Precision Tune or a local auto
shop for a winter tune-up. A simple
tune-up at a Goodyear tire center
will generally cost between $50 and
$80, depending on the number of
cylinders in your engine.
The cost of a major tune-up
starts around $80 and can get much
higher depending on the parts and
labor the car needs.
But those car owners feeling
adventurous this time, or maybe
just low on money, can invest in a
few tools, a manual and a little time,
and tune up a car themselves and
save money.
An engine tune-up isan impor-
tant part of the maintenance of a car
and can increase performance and
gas mileage. Some symptoms that
indicate the need foi a tune-up are
hard starting, reduced power and a
rough idle.
It's important to decide what
type of tune-up each car needs.
There are many other symptoms
that require a tune-up like poor gas
mileage, but these may require an
engine analyzer to find the exact
cause of the problem.
The use of diagnostic equip-
ment, such as an engine analyzer, is
not usually included in the price of
a simple tune-up.
In new cars equipped with
computerized engine control sys-
tems an engine analyzer is used to
communicate with the cars com-
puter. It is more complicated than a
simple tune-up and should be per-
formed by a professional technician.
Simple tune-ups require only
the replacement of parts like spark
plugs, spark plug wires, and the
distributor cap. Most auto repair
shops offer both simple and major
tune-ups for their customers. But
the difference in prices will make it
easy for you to determine which is
which.
A simple tune-up is just that �
simple. It will not cure any major
problems, and if a car isn't running
at all it probably won't make it any
better. If a car has minor problems
with performance or gas mileage,
the simple tune-up is easy and cost-
effective.
The first step in tuning up a car
is getting together all the informa-
tion needed for the auto parts store
will need to provide the correct
parts. They will ask for the make
and the model, the year the car was
made and the type of engine.
Don't assume anything, check
the owner's manual or look under
the hood for an identification sticker.
Themost frequent parts needed
for a simple tune-upare sparkplugs,
one for each cylinder in your car, a
distributor cap and the rotor button
that goes inside the cap.
If none of these parts sound
familiar, it would be a wise invest-
ment to purchase a repair manual
specific to the car. The manuals run
from$5-$25 and can be helpful in all
types of repair work, and i t only has
to be bought once.
Few tools are needed for the
tune-up. A spark plug socket and a
ratchet are a must for any tune-up.
A regular and a phillips head
screwdriver will be needed in most
cases.
For those without any tools, it
would be a good idea to purchase
an inexpensive set of socket
wrenches and screw drivers for this
and future projects.
After the car has cooled, if s
time to begin tuning the car. The
first step in a tune-up is to replace
the spark plugs, but the first step in
any auto work is to lock the parking
brake, cover the fenders of the car to
protect the paint and d isconnect the
negative battery cable to keep from
accidentally starting the car.
Remove and replace the plugs
one by one as not to get confused
and cross a spark plug wire. Gently
pull the plug wire off the spark plug
and lay it to the side. Place the socket
over the plug and turn it counter-
clockwise.
Once the plug is loose and re-
moved from the engine, take the
new plug, check the gap in between
the arc and the electrode to the
manufacturer's specification listed
in the owners manual. This can be
done with a tool known as a spark
pluggapper.
Take the gapper in one hand
and the spark plug in the other.
Locate thecorrect size on thegapper
and slipitinbetweenthearcandthe
electrode. Adjust the gap until this
"gap" is the correct size.
After this, it is time to carefully
thread the plug back into the hole
from which it came. When it is
snugly back in the hole, put the
socket back over the new plug and
tighten.
Do not over-tighten or cross-
thread a spark plug. It may damage
the engine block. Once the plug is
tight, replace the plug wire on the
plug it came from. It is important to
do only one at a time
Once all the spark plugs and all
the wires on them have been re-
placed, it is time to tackle the dis-
tributor cap and rotor button.
Take a spark plug wire and
follow it until it meets up with a cap
that looks like the one purchased
from the store. It may be attached
by dips, screws, or spring activated
clasps.
Underneath the cap is the rotor
button. Rotors attach in various
ways, most simply pull straight off
thedistributor shaft, orare attached
with small screws. Replace the ro-
tor and be sure that it is pointing in
the same position as the old rotor.
Now take the new cap and at-
tach it to the distributor over the
new rotor button. The spark plug
wires should still be in the old cap.
With the new rotor installed
and the new cap in place, begin
switching plug wires from the old
cap to the new cap, one at a time.
The goal is to get each wire in
the same position on the new cap as
it wasontheoldone. A mistake will
cause a misfire that sounds like
backfire through the engine when
the car is started. Hold the old cap
over the new one and replace the
wires one at a time, going around
the cap in one direction.
At this point, the simple tune-
up is complete and the work should
be checked. Trace all the work done
and make sure there are no parts
left
If the plug wires appear dry or
cracked it might be a wise decision
to replace them as well.
This can be done one at a time
while you switch them from cap to
cap.Otherrune-uppartscanindude
points and condenseronolder point
breaker ignition systems. This
usually requires some adjustment
thatwiUrequire further knowledge.
Ignition timing is another pro-
cedure that can be included in a
tune-up and can be the cause of
poor engine performance.
Adjustment is made by loos-
ening the distributor lock down,
and turning the distributor to ad-
vance or retard the timing. It is
necessary to use a timing light for
this adjustment and should be su-
pervised by a trained technician.
Most repair manuals will give di-
rections on how to adjust ignition
timing.
If everything has been done
correctly, reconnect the battery and
start the engine. Allow it to warm
upand listen for any rough ninning.
If a rough idle persists, you may
need to take the car to a shop with
an engine analyzer to diagnose the
problem.
Free
Checking
ECB offers free checking accounts to
college students and faculty members.
Call us for details
The
Fast Carolina Bank
Arlington Boulevard & Red Banks Road
(919)355-8200
Member FDIC
Crystal
Connection
422 Arlington Blvd.
355-8250
We've moved to a new location
& we've expanded so that we
have Greenville's largest selec-
tion of unusual gift items
25 OFF
Any Purchase
Excludes books, tapes & sale items j
� ;
J Crystal Connection
if
Clothing Incense
Jcwelry�Cards
Native American
Items
Minerals � Gems
Candles � Fossils
T.G.I.F
UTLET
Save 50 or more on your
favorite men's & women's
catalog and department
store clothing.
NEW YEAR SAVINGS
20 Discount (with coupon) on i
any purchase of $10 or more, j
SALE ITEMS EXCLUDED1,
Good through Saturday, January 25th
T.G.I.F.
210 �. 5th St. (across from Bogies)
1-F10-6
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at
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urder trial
A rdella pleaded guilty in 19i
v killings and to kidnapping
and sodorrtizingaaevcnlhaMaiwi
,j escaped from Bordella's hom.
iringonl) a dog collar. Berdell
was spared the death penaltv
his avperation.
said BeTdeUa,aflea-mari
i i i:iviHitiquesdealer,kept
. u tinis hstagiMn)ivted them
iigs and sexually assaulted
� !1ie�werecutupand
side trash, police said
January 14, 1992 She taut Carolinian 3
ml
5
I
UP?
Iicious
4
)
vsm
60 Off!
Any Pint Or Quart Of
Frozen Yogurt
,TM
830-3933
JfogurtiJ
1414 Charles Blvd.
OK$
Books?
o in Stud e n t s
to students
r 1st
Their I sed Books!
tm.rs iifBirs
TREATING
IMF
CRIMINAL
OFFENDER
rMIRf) nxiio
flore of These &
oks!
N$E
limb treatment
By Christie Lawrence
Sutf Writer
We have all had our share of
scratches and scrapes, but for those
of us who continue to suffer from
more serious physical injuries, hope
still exists thanks to the Department
of Physical Therapy which operates
the Back and Limb clinic in the
School of Allied Health.
The clinic provides its clients
with weekly therapeutic services
by professional physical therapists
and students in training who treat
muscle and joint problems associ-
ated with injury and disease.
Student athletes, accident vic-
tims and the elderly, who arc sub-
ject to muscle and joint problems
that are brought on by the aging
process, are offered a variety of
physical treatments.
"The clinic is increasingly serv-
ing the needs of ECU faculty, staff,
students and the general public
said Duane Williams, clinical direc-
tor and ECU clinical associate di-
rector of physical therapy.
The purpose of the clinic is to
provide patients with rehabilitative
treatments to control pain and re-
store optimal muscle and joint
movement to injured or diseased
limbs.
In order to control pain, non-
invasive means such as heat, cold,
ultrasound and therapeutic elec-
trotherapy are used.
The clinic realizes that direct
care of a patient by the physical
therapist is important but does not
neglect educating their clients as
well as treating them.
"Wetreatseveralkneeandback
injuries, and find it important to
educate clients on how to avoid
repeat injury Williams said.
Since Americans are living
longer and becoming more physi-
cally active, the need for physical
therapy and physical awareness is
increasing.
"With this change in attitude
and behavior, physical therapists
must help people gain proper con-
trol of their bodies and teach them
how to maintain optimal physical
performance Williams said.
The clinic's emphasis on edu-
cating the patients is maintained by
teaching the importance of fitness,
prevention methods to avoid re-
peat injury, and self care techniques
to ensure normal function of the
limbs after therapy.
Services offered by the clinic
also help patients to become physi-
cally stronger and to regain use of a
limb.
Exercise is recommended for
patients who need to improve coor-
dination and endurance.
The clinic is "striving to further
develop a model clinic which al-
lows faculty to integrate education
and practice for physical therapy
students said Williams.
Therefore, the clinic is able to
provide quality physical therapy
services for a broad range physical
injury problems in the community.
Each patient receives an initial
evaluation, then a plan of treatment
requiring them to become actively
involved. Every patient will also
receive a follow-up exam
The dinic is open weekdays
from8ajn.to4J0pjTtandislocated
in the Belk Building on the comer of
Charles Street and Greenville Bou-
levard.
Patients are accepted by ap-
pointment or referral. For informa-
tion or appointment call 757-4135
or 757-4450.
University awards more wiretap payoffs
By Matt Jones
Managing Editor
The University paid out a
group of seven settlements last
month equaling over $115,000 in
the largest of the wiretapping
scandal pay-offs.
The settlement occurred on
Dec. 17, just days after most stu-
dents were leaving the campus for
their Christmas vacations. At that
time, Chancellor Richard Eakin
issued a press release which gave
his reasons for the settlement.
"On the advice of the Uni-
versity Attorney and at the direc-
tion of the State Attorney General's
Office, I have authorized financial
settlements with seven claimants
Eakin stated.
"Upon review of all aspects of
these cases, 1 believe settlement of
these claims is the only legally
responsible course of action to be
taken, a fact which saddens and
disturbs me greatly
The first of the wiretapping
settlements arose from a lawsuit
filed against two individuals. The
University represented the indi-
viduals and settled the claim be-
fore it reached a courtroom. At the
time, University Attorney Ben
Irons said that the reason for the
University's out of court settle-
ment was "based on consideration
of fundamental fairness
Irons went on to explain that
the University's investigation of
the wiretapping found that "no
employee of the University acted
with actual knowledge that he or
she was violating the law
Six of the seven settlements
involved individuals who found
themselves recorded on the tran-
scripts of the phone taps. The Uni-
versity paid over $10,500 to each
of the six recipients.
"In agreeing to pay this
amount, the University took into
consideration the fact that the
applicable federal statute requires
a minimum payment of $10,000 in
damages plus attorneys fees for
each violation Eakin stated.
Brooks and Jene Mills were
the recipients in the latest wire-
tapping settlements and were
awarded $62,411. The documents
associated with the settlement do
not clearly define the reasons for
the payment, however, Brooks
Mills' phone was the originally
tapped line. He later resigned his
position in the Telecommunica-
tions department after University
officials notified him of the phone
tap.
According to the auditors' re-
port, the original intention of the
phone tap was to discover if Mills
was involved in drug dealings,
although it was never made clear
who first tapped the line.
The report states that the fol-
lowing individuals were involved
or had knowledge of the wiretap-
ping: Richard Brown, vice-chan-
cellor for Business Affairs; James
DePuy, director of Public Safety;
Johnny Burrus, captain of inves-
tigations for Public Safety; Evan
Midgette, assistant director of
Human Resources; and Teddy
Roberson, former director of
Public Safety.
Crime doesn't pay, but we do!
The East Carolinian is looking for a few
good people to fill the following staff
positions:
� Copy editors
� News writers
� Entertainment writers
Apply at our office in the Student Pubs
Building, 2nd floor; 9-5 daily.
Frequent tune-ups save money, help avoid breakdowns
At this noint.
Special to The East Carolinian
As the temperature begins to
drop and frost covers our wind-
bhields every night, some of the
older cars out there won't start as
well as they did this summer.
Most people will take their cars
to Precision Tune or a local auto
shop for a winter tune-up. A simple
tune-up at a Goodyear tire center
will generally cost between $30and
$80, depending on the number of
cylinders in your engine.
The cost oi a major tune-up
starts around $80 and can get much
higher depending on the parts and
labor the car needs.
But those car owners feeling
adventurous this rime, or maybe
just low on money, can invest in a
few tools a manual and a little time,
and rune up a car themselves and
save money.
An engine tune-up is an impor-
tant part of the maintenance of a car
and can increase performance and
gas mileage. Some symptoms that
indicate the need for a tune-up are
hard starting, reduced power and a
rough idle.
It's important to decide what
type of tune-up each car needs.
There are many other symptoms
that require a tune-up like poor gas
mileage, but these may require an
engine analyzer to find the exact
cause of the problem.
The use of diagnostic equip-
ment, such asan engine analyzer, is
not usually included in the price of
a simple tune-up.
In new cars equipped with
computerized engine control sys-
tems an engine analyzer is used to
communicate with the cars com-
puter. 11 is more complicated than a
simple tune-up and should be per-
formed by a professional technician.
Simple tune-ups require only
the replacement of parts like spark
plugs, spark plug wires, and the
distributor cap. Most auto repair
shops offer both simple and major
tune-ups for their customers. But
the difference in prices will make it
easy for you to determine which is
which.
A simple tune-up is just that �
simple. It will not cure any major
problems, and if a car isn't running
at all it probably won't make it any
better. If a car has minor problems
with performance or gas mileage,
the simple tune-up is easy and cost-
effective.
The first step in tuning up a car
is getting together all the informa-
tion needed for the auto parts store
will need to provide the correct
parts. They will ask for the make
and the model, the year the car was
made and the type of engine.
Don't assume anything, check
the owner's manual or look under
the hood for an identification sticker.
The most frequent parts needed
for a simple tune-up are spark plugs,
one for each cylinder in your car, a
distributor cap and the rotor button
that goes inside the cap.
If none of these parts sound
familiar, it would be a wise invest-
ment to purchase a repair manual
specific to the car. The manuals run
from$5-$25andcan be helpful inall
typesof repair work, and it only has
to be bought once.
Few tools are needed for the
tune-up. A spark plug socket and a
ratchet are a must for any tune-up.
A regular and a phillips head
screwdriver will be needed in most
cases.
For those without any tools, it
would be a good idea to purchase
an inexpensive set of socket
wrenches and screw drivers for this
and future projects.
After the car has cooled, ifs
time to begin tuning the car. The
first step in a tune-up is to replace
the spark plugs, but the first step in
any auto work is to lock the parking
brake, cover the fenders of the car to
Free
Checking
ECB offers free checking accounts to
college students and faculty members.
Call us for details
The
Fast Carolina Bank
Arlington Boulevard & Red Banks Road
(919)355-8200
We've moved to a new location
c� we've expanded so that we
have Greenville's largest selec-
tion of unusual gift items!
Member FDIC
protect the paint and d isconnect the
negative battery cable to keep from
accidentally starting the car.
Remove and replace the plugs
one by one as not to get confused
and cross a spark plug wire. Gently
pull the plug wire off the spark plug
and lay it to the side. Place the socket
over the plug and rum it counter-
clockwise.
Once the plug is loose and re-
moved from the engine, take the
new plug, check the gap in between
the arc and the electrode to the
manufacturer's specification listed
in the owners manual. This can be
done with a tool known as a spark
pluggapper.
Take the gapper in one hand
and the spark plug in the other.
Locate the correct size on the gapper
and slip it in between the arc and the
electrode. Adjust the gap until this
"gap" is the correct size.
After this, it is time to carefully
thread the plug back into the hole
from which it came. When it is
snugly back in the hole, put the
socket back over the new plug and
tighten.
Do not over-tighten or cross-
thread a spark plug. It may damage
the engine block. Once the plug is
tight, replace the plug wire on the
plug it came from. It is important to
tJ&
do only one at a time
Once all the spark plugs and all
the wires on them have been re-
placed, it is time to tackle the dis-
tributor cap and rotor button.
Take a spark plug wire and
follow it until it meets up with a cap
that looks like the one purchased
from the store. It may be attached
by clips, screws, or spring activated
clasps.
Underneath the cap is the rotor
button. Rotors attach in various
ways, most simply pull straight off
the distributor shaft, or are attached
with small screws. Replace the ro-
tor and be sure that it is pointing in
the same position as the old rotor.
Now take the new cap and at-
tach it to the distributor over the
new rotor button. The spark plug
wires should still be in the old cap.
With the new rotor installed
and the new cap in place, begin
switching plug wires from the old
cap to the new cap, one at a time.
The goal is to get each wire in
the same posi tion on the new ca p as
it was on the old one. A mistake will
cause a misfire that sounds like
backfire through the engine when
the car is started. Hold the old cap
over the new one and replace the
wires one at a time, going around
the cap in one direction.
Crystal
Connection
422 Arlington Blvd.
355-8250
a
25 OFF
Any Purchase
S
Excludes books, tapes & sale items �
Crystal Connection
I
r
Clothing Incense
Jewelry "Cards
Native American
Items
Minerals � Gems
Candles � Fossils
T.G.I.F
OUTLET
Save 50 or more on your
favorite men's & women's
catalog and department
store clothing.
NEW YEAR SAVINGS
20 Discount (with coupon) on
any purchase of $10 or more.
SALE ITEMS EXCLUDED!
Good through Saturday, January 25th
L.G.L.r.
210 E. 5th St. (across from Bogies)
Open M-F10-6
tv
�?
at
a-
n
I
?
ve
pe
n-
At this point, the simple tune-
up iscompleteand the work should
be checked. Trace all the work done
and make sure there are no parts
left
If the plug wires appear dry or
cracked it might be a wise decision
to replace them as well.
This can be done one at a time
while you switch them from cap to
cap.Othertune-uppartscan include
points and condenser on older point
breaker ignition systems. This
usually requires some adjustment
that will require further knowledge.
Ignition timing is another pro-
cedure that can be included in a
tune-up and can be the cause of
poor engine performance.
Adjustment is made by loos-
ening the distributor lock down,
and turning the distributor to ad-
vance or retard the timing. It is
necessary to use a timing light for
this adjustment and should be su-
pervised by a trained technician.
Most repair manuals will give di-
rections on how to adjust ignition
timing.
If everything has been done
correctly, reconnect the battery and
start the engine. Allow it to warm
upand listen for any rough running.
If a rough idle persists, you may
need to take the car to a shop with
an engine analyzer to diagnose the
problem.
r
e-

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or
jd
l
h
id
m
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to
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si-
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in
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ed
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as
in
int
i
911
I
-4





Wli WIN! Pirates triumph over State, bring home Peach Bowl trophy
See stories page 16, photo essay page 10
��.�
ttttumimmmimmmmimuiMiimmammiitanamtMaimn
QJlie lEast (Eawltntatt
the i ast Carolina campus i ommunity sine- I �. �

I4, 1992
Greenville. North Cahuhna
Circulation 12.000
20 Pages
XL
wuounrf o
Professor charges discrimination
;
ed
Stud en
;�i men
I A1
ffs
Iowa
nbers victims
Students suiter stress
,
-
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Inside Ihursddv
-
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cfi Beckei
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1 an assistant :� i
Wi kern aid tl - p
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� s assista
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I in. cast but ' � ted th
factors that l ; � �. ked a
�. �� . ,sui Mien ���' � n invest i disenn
I � � a whi h nahi n i a -
vnhersoll - ��� :
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� � � �
ntra
Wickern
Shooting
leads to
weapons
violation
H ulie Roscoc
Assistant New 1 I
II
'� � , ' �' � � :
� ;� ther
tt
� . :
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� . � iw,3
harj
rPul
� I . � �
Going the distance
Mot only did tl (ball team travel to the Pi
lowl. but a 11 kof sabei ishmg fans Attend
Is w ��� -v records set
Photo by Daii Reed ECU Photo LaD
bythej ayersthemselves ECUfansandtnends chanted
isthi ���am snatched a fantastic victory from
the i ��� of defeat
DePuy contradicts state auditor
Television interview reveals additional information
i �
gun he had recei . � n he
pointed the ' ' ewis
imei � ' -�-

i lentlv hred bullet which wenl
���� - r and
� �
-�ns and irv � lent took 1 timer
to the I � Mi . .tal s
- ited and
� . .
p � . sag � !i no
charges were hied on Shaw I r the incident
because thes found th � ' . � act
denta
"If there had been seri �us injury charges
.� tfikd Knoxsaid. "Itisnot
in the interest of the situation at this bme to
press charj
Fhe at � ssession of a
weap � � results m a six
month pil sentence and ora$500fine
KKK storms Wilson
1U Matt ones
1.i . : lot
iretappii . -
dal tool
Director of Public Safety lames
tradi ted the stati
ludit r s report during a teli
sion inti i
� 'i said�' ' ' htors
� � .��
� . � 'll. did
tap ing was
. �� tati tl at the
nvolved have stated
thai �� � aware that
employee's teli :
itions w ithout the
know ledge was po
� illy illegal
In a later inti r. � I lePuj
� thai tl litors took his
f I,
expla ed his involven
� DePu)
imed thi :
James Del'uv
1 lc said that histirst knowl
edge of the wiretapping was at
tiT reddv Roberson, director of
telet ommunk ahons and lames
Burris,captainof investigations
li the tirst tape
tording to I )ePuy, when
Burns told him of the wiretap
g tic was busy and did not
have tune to listen to the taps
Hue ti � transcribe the
I
tapes into print term, so that
cou! � katt matalatcrdate
1 vl'uv remembered saying
. - were bad' and that
thev ould not be used in court
but never focused on their
illegallm
The intention of the wire
tapping was to produce e idence
against an employee who was
suspe ted ol dealing drugs
I ePu made his contradic-
tory statements on camera last
week while entering the federal
court in ew Bern 1 le along
with Ku hard Brown, vi e
i ham ellor foi Busi ess Affairs
and I van Midgette, assistant
dire tor of HumanRelations
were subpoenaed to testih about
the in ident
1 he subpoenas were issued
atter the I IM concluded their
year-long investigation of the
inn ident 1 VI 'u said that he was
grateful thai the investigation
waso er and that he w i ukj have
,i i hance to gi e his side ol the
issue
Bv Marjorie Pitts
sutt Writer
Approximately
membersoftheKu KluxKlan
marched through downtown
Wilson to the courthouse
steps on Sunday No physi
cal violence broke oul but
obscene chants like Fuck
von "Youcan t toiu h this
Thehell with the Jan and
( .o on h.K k home were
shouted
rhe reason for the man h
was to cet more members
Authorities from slSr
rounding counties as well as
Wilson sPol k e 1 )epartmenl
took main precautions Ihe
police videotaped and per
termed a minimal bod)
search on the spe tators
Weapons, including
rocks or anything that could
be usl as a weapon were
not allowed in the area i ' �
lit emen suhvI on top of mots
with binoculars and semi
automatic ntli-s and police
walked on the sides of the
roped-ott area
ue handed out
rs ti � the citizei s and
visitors � '� - at the
eckp
"This " ' tsvouknow
thatthearvofWilst lid not
tttheklai too metothis
area, ih lice said as they dis-
tributed flyers Thai we in
fact because of the first
Amendment, do not have the
nht to keep themawav We
have to protec t their rights to
free speech like w do ev-
crti else s
luhe Peppers an 1I
student wasamongthe hun-
dreds of spectators who un-
derwent the minimal body
search. 1 didn t think the
march was am big deal
Peppers said But when they
did the bod search it made
m nervous
A crowd of about 50 from
: I met at Mendenhall Stu-
dent 'enter to oppose the
Klansmen Many got together
the nighl before the rallv to
make 1 shirts and siejis op.
posing the Klan I"he siiis
See KKK page 7
ore
hat
mi-
�'?!
es
ice
Hi
lie
t
ill
ny
ir
h-
he
jn
or
�d
id
Ss
It
�g
id
ik
t
al
�o
M
il
tt





2 (El?e �afit (daroitntar January 14, 1992
S!E
jury awards five million in murder trial I Clinic ptOV
I Wft him �wmlmlttiil -�- M ����� Trl QtrvuTt tcK f�Vl lu� Kjc in a tnist fund and Said. B A.
Loud mv?ic, loud he Sng unit cause
disturbai es across campus
Jan. 1
2341�Chancei. 's houa I �J mded to a call that the
Chancellor's daughter jd rkedotft the house. A locksmith was
called.
Jan. 9
0121 �Fletcher Dorm: Request from the dorm staff to assist with
a grossly impaired female passed out in a bathroom Rescue was
called and the subject was transported to Fitt Emergency.
17(X- lones Hall: Filed a report concerning larceny.
1442 Mendenhall Student Center: Checked out a report con-
cerning property damage. The subject wasreferred to theGreenviBe
Police Department
1630�-Scott Hall. Removed a lock for a resident.
Jan. 10
l133�Tvler Dorm: Responded to a request and assisted the
dorm staff with a malfunctioning lock. A loci smith was called
0049�Jenkins Building: Checked out a suspicious male w est ot
the lenkins Building. No action was taken.
0051�Vehicle stopped for erratic driving. A male non-Student
was charged with DW1 and alcohol violations.
0330�Marathon restaurant Officers assisted Greenville offic-
ers with a report of a breaking and entering in progress. Suspects
apprehended bv Public Safety and rumed over to the Greenville
Police Department.
0456� Fletcher Dorm: Responded to the 1 st tlwr in reference to
loud music. Unfounded.
Jan.11
0111 �Avcock Dorm: Responded to a reference about an intoxi-
cated student in a restroom. The subject left the area and went to his
room
0158�Scott Dorm. Responded to a report of loud music on the
1st floor. Music was fumed off.
0259�Officer with one student and one non-student, male tnJ
female, having a disagreement. Argument was resolved.
1021�General ClassnxMn Bldg: Checked on a dogged toilet in
room 3122.
1920�Garrett Hall: Checked out a scene on the 3rd Moor in
reference to a shooting. The area was secured.
Jan. 12
0009� Checked on a report of loud music. Subjects were gone
upon arrival.
1008�Brewster: Checked the heating unit on the 1st floor that
was making loud noises Maintenance was called.
1651�Fletcher Hall: Filed a larceny report
2149�Greene Hall: Assisted a rescue. The student was trans
ported to PCMH Emergency. Dr. Matthews was contacted concern-
ing the reference.
Crlm� Seen it taken from otllcal Public Safety Log
(AP) � A jury awarded $5 bil
lion to a woman whose son was
sexually tortured and cut to pieces
bya serial killer�a verdict that will
ensure the murderer will never
profit from his crimes, the woman's
lawyer says.
The verdict Wednesday is be-
lieved to be the largest ever in a
wrongful-death case, said Martin
Meyer, an attorney for Betty Ann
Haste.
Hastehad sued Robert BerdeOa
in 1989 after he admitted capturing
and killing her son, Todd Stoops, $55,000 he has in a trust fund and
. � u� rr.n7ht Berdella pleaded pulv in lHk
av c a m to anv monev he mignt r t r�u�
- . y tothesixkillingsandtokidnannino
someday nuke. rr
Haste's lawyers had asked the ardsodonmgaventn
jury for at least $1 bilhon. Instead, escaped from Berde la s ho,
LL , .u,� H-n hn.M of delib- wearing only a dog u.liar Berdelia
and five others between 1984 and
1987.
Berdclla, 42, is serving a life
sentence. He told authorities Stoops
died in 1986 after being tied to
Berdella'sbed for nearly two weeks,
injected with powerful sedatives,
given electric shocks and repeat-
edly sexually assaulted.
Meyer said there is no hope of
Haste collecting anything close to
$5 billion from Berdella, but the
verdict will enable her to go after
after less than two hours of delib-
eration, it awarded $25 billion each
for wrongful death and punitive
darrvges.
'We made the argument that
they ought to a ward a verdict in the
billion-dollar range so them was
absolutely no way them would be a
profit fromanylhinghedidMeyer
ruefial
was spared the death penalty m
return for his cooperation
Police said Berdella, a flea-mar-
ket owner and antiques dealer, kept I
all the victims hostage, injected them
with drugs and sexually assaulted
them. Their bodies were cut upand
placed incurbsidetrash, p li, esajd
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STUDENT UNION EVENTS
AN EVENING OF THE ARTS
Wednesday, January 15th
Opening Reception for Deaf Chinese Student Art
Exhibit in Mendenhall Gallery, followed by an
screening ofJU-DOU, a Chinese film (with English
subtitles) nominated for an Academy Award.
Reception: 6:30 - 8:00 pm
Film: 8:00 pm Hendrix Theatre
TRAVEL ADVENTURE FILM
& THEME DINNER
Iceland - Europe's Outback
Dinner: 6:30 pm (advance purchase required)
Film: 8pm, January 16, Hendrix Theatre
WEEKEND MOVIES
Hendrix Theatre
REVERSAL OF FORTUNE 8:00 pm, January 17-18
TRUTH OR DARE 8:00pm, January 19th
Free with valid ECU student ID card or a spring semester Film Pass card.
1
U$ED BOOKS
Do You Want Used Books?
The ECU Student Stores
Buys More Used Books From Students
F o r Students.
"
We paid over $170.000.00 to students
between November 1st
& December 16th
Just for Their Used Books!
INVITATION
The Student Union Minority Arts Committee and
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity presents
"A WALK WITH DR. MARTIN LUTHER KIG, JR
CANDLELIGHT MARCH
with Reverend Sidney Locke
Monday, January 20,1992
6:30 pm - 8:00 pm
PLace: Christenbury Memorial Gymnasium to Mendenhall
Student Center -Hendrix Theatre
Come help us celebrate Dr. King's holiday with a candlelight march through
the university campus. Following the march, Reverend Sidney Locke will
speak in commemoration of one of our nation's greatest leaders. The ECU
Gospel Choir will also be featured, as well as other local musicians.
�. in
THE
THKA1ER
EXPERIENCE
AlSXANDt . SMITH WXf D
u.�.ft arsnx
TREATING
THE
CRIMINAL
OFFENDER
THIKnt!)UK
xro
MrtlMOU-
ECU Student Stores Has More of These &
Other Used Books!
MAKE $EN$E
For more information on any of these events,
please call the Student Union Hotline at 757-6004.
By Christie Lawrence
Staff Writer
We have all had our share of
scratches and scrapes, but for those
of us who continue to suffer from
monvnous physical injuries, hope
Still exists thanks to the Department
of Physical rherapy which operates
the Back and Limb clinic in the
School of Allied Health.
The clinic provides its clients
with weekly therapeutic services
by professional physical therapists
and students in training who treat
muscle and joint problems associ-
ated with injury and
Student athletes,
tims and the elderly
ject to muscle and
that are brought on
process, are offered
physical treatments
"The clinic is men
ing the needs of ECL
students and the ge
said Duane Williams
tor and ECU din ; I
rector of physical the!
The purpose (i
provide patients with
treatments to contr
University aw;
By Matt Jones
Managing t ditor
The University paid out a
group oi seven settlements last
month equaling over $115,0011 in
the largest of the wiretapping
scandal pay-offs.
The settlement occurred n
Dec. 17, just days after most sni-
der ts were leaving the campus for
their Christmas vacations. At that
time, Chancellor Richard Eakin
issued a press release which gave
his reasons for the settlement.
"On the advice of the Uni-
versity Attorney and at the direc-
tion of the State Attorney Genera's
Office, 1 have authorized financial
settlements with sevenclaimants
Eakin stated.
"Upon review of all aspects of
these cases, I belie
these claims is th
responsible cours
taken, a fact whi h
disturbs me greath
The first of th
settlements ar
tiled against two in
University represe
yiduals and settle
tore it reached a co
time, University
Irons said that the
University's out c
ment was "based oi
of fundamental fai
Irons went on
the University's
the wiretapping
employee of the 1
with actual knowl
she was violating
Frequent tune
Special to The Est Carolinian
As the temperature begins to
drop and frost covers our wind-
shields every night, some of the
older cars out there won't start as
well as they did this summer
Most people will take their cars
to Precision Tune or a local auto
shop for a winter tune-up. A simple
tune-up at a Goodyear hre center
will generally cost bet ween $50and
$80, depending on the number of
cvlinders in your engine.
The cost of a major tune-up
starts around $80 and can get much
higher depending on the parts and
labor the car needs
But those car owners feeling
adventurous this time, or maybe
just low on money, can invest in a
few tools, a manual and a little time,
and tune up a car themselves and
save money.
An engine tune-upisanimpor-
tant part of the maintenance of a car
and can increase performance and
gas mileage. Some symptoms that
indicate the need for a tune-up arc
hard starting, reduced power and a
rough idle.
It's important to decide what
rvpe of runc-up each car needs.
There are many other symptoms
that require a tune-up like poor gas
mileage, but the-
engine analyzer
cause of the prob
The use
ment, such as an i
not usually incluC
a simple turn I
In new
computerized erj
terns an engine.
communicate wi
puter. It is more d
simple tune-up al
formed bya prott
Simple tunt
the replacement j
plugs, spark pl
distributor cap
shops otter hot hi
tune-ups for ti-
the difference m
easv for you to
which.
A simple ru
simple. It will
problems, and i
at all it probabl
better. If a car '
with pertormat
the simple rune-
effective.
The first st
is getting togetl
tion needed tor
will need to

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ECB offers free checking a
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Call us for details
The
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M(





January 14. 1992 gbe just (Earolfnfan 3
urder trial
�v�U.i.
Betdefta pleaded guilty in 1988
tho-iv killmgsami to kid napping
and vvmwnngasewnthman, who
I escaped from Berdella's home
only a dog collar. Berdella
was spared the death penalty in
his avperahon.
said Bordella,aflea-mar-
v net aixi antiquesdealer,kept
, vuiuihvsugimjtxtedthem
,v!h drop and sexually assaulted
heir bodies wore cut up and
d i nairbside trash, police said.
ita.
I
ICIOUS
4
)
vm
60 Off!
Any Pint Or Quart Of
Frozen Yogurt
JM
830-3933
r Can. Ft1 here It'sA
OTogurttJ
1414 Charles Blvd.
I
1
)OK$
(l Book s?
,
es
r r o in S t u d e n t s

57 0 to students
i mber 1st
� mbt f 16th
i i for Their I sed Books!
srtWM

TREATING !
l'HF
CRIMINAL
OFFENDER
ntiftn i raiK
USfO
s More of These &
Boi)ks!
EN$E
limb treatment
By Christie Lawrence
Staff Writer
We have all had our share of
scratches and scrapes, but for those
of us who continue to suffer from
more serious physical injuries, hope
still exists thanks to the Department
of Physical Therapy which operates
the Back and Limb clinic in the
School of Allied Health.
The clinic provides its clients
with weekly therapeutic services
by professional physical therapists
and students in training who treat
muscle and joint problems associ
ated with injury and disease.
Student athletes, accident vic-
tims and the elderly, who arc sub-
ject to muscle and joint problems
that are brought on by the aging
process, are offered a variety of
physical treatments.
"The clinic is increasingly serv-
ing the needs of ECU faculty, staff,
students and the general public
said Duane Williams, clinical direc-
tor and ECU clinical associate di-
rector of physical therapy.
The purpose of the clinic is to
provide patients with rehabilitative
treatments to control pain and re-
store optimal muscle and joint
movement to injured or diseased
limbs.
In order to control pain, non-
invasive means such as heat, cold,
ultrasound and therapeutic elec-
trotherapy are used.
The clinic realizes that direct
care of a patient by the physical
therapist is important but does not
neglect educating their clients as
well as treating them.
"We treat several knee and back
injuries, and find it important to
educate clients on how to avoid
repeat injury Williams said.
Since Americans are living
longer and becoming more physi-
cally active, the need for physical
therapy and physical awareness is
increasing.
"With this change in attitude
and behavior, physical therapists
must help people gain proper con-
trol of their bodies and teach them
how to maintain optimal physical
performance Williams said.
The clinic's emphasis on edu-
cating the patients is maintained by
teaching the importance of fitness,
prevention methods to avoid re-
peat injury, and self care techniques
to ensure normal function of the
limbs after therapy.
Services offered by the dink
also help patients to become physi-
cally stronger and to regain use of a
limb.
Exercise is recommended for
patients who need to improve coor-
dination and endurance.
The clinic is "striving to further
develop a model clinic which al-
lows faculty to integrate education
and practice for physical therapy
students said Williams.
Therefore, the clinic is able to
provide quality physical therapy
services for a broad range physical
injury problems in the community.
Each patient receives an initial
evaluation, then a plan of treatment
requiring them to become actively
involved. Every patient will also
receive a follow-up exam.
The dink is open weekdays
from8a m to430p m and is located
in the Belk Building on the comer of
Charles Street and Greenville Bou-
levard.
Patients are accepted by ap-
pointment or referral. For informa-
tion or appointment call 757-4135
or 757-4450.
University awards more wiretap payoffs
By Matt Jones
Managing Editor
The University paid out a
group of seven settlements last
month equaling over $115,000 in
the largest of the wiretapping
scandal pay-offs.
The settlement occurred on
Dec. 17, just days after most stu-
dents were leaving thecampus for
their Christmas vacations. At that
time. Chancellor Richard Eakm
issued a press release which gave
his reasons for the settlement.
"On the advice of the Uni-
versity Attorney and at the direc-
tion of the State Attorney General's
Office, 1 have authorized financial
settlement, with seven claimants
Eakin stated.
"Upon review of all aspects of
these cases, I believe settlement of
these claims is the only legally
responsible course of action to be
taken, a fact which saddens and
disturbs me greatly
The first of the wiretapping
settlements arose from a lawsuit
filed against two individuals. The
University represented the indi-
viduals and settled the claim be-
fore it reached a courtroom. At the
time, University Attorney Ben
Irons said that the reason for the
University's out of court settle-
ment was "based on consideration
of fundamental fairness
Irons went on to explain that
the University's investigation of
the wiretapping found that "no
employee of the University acted
with actual knowledge that he or
she was violating the law
Six of the seven settlements
involved individuals who found
themselves recorded on the tran-
scripts of the phone taps. The Uni-
versity paid over $10,500 to each
of the six recipients.
"In agreeing to pay this
amount, the University took into
consideration the fact that the
applicable federal statute requires
a minimum payment of $10,000 in
damages plus attorneys fees for
each violation Eakin stated.
Brooks and Jene Mills were
the recipients in the latest wire-
tapping settlements and were
awarded $62,411. The documents
assodated with the settlement do
not clearly define the reasons for
the payment, however. Brooks
Mills' phone was the originally
tapped line. He later resigned his
position in the Telecommunica-
tions department after University
offidals notified him of the phone
tap.
According to the auditors' re-
port, the original intention of the
phone tap was to discover if Mills
was involved in drug dealings,
although it was never made clear
who first tapped the line.
The report states that the fol-
lowingindividualswereinvolved
or had knowledge of the wiretap-
ping: Richard Brown, vice-chan-
cellor for Business Affairs; James
DePuy, director of Public Safety;
Johnny Burrus, captain of inves-
tigations for Public Safety; Evan
Midgette, assistant director of
Human Resources; and Teddy
Roberson, former director of
Public Safety.
Crime doesn't pay, but we do!
The East Carolinian is looking for a few
good people to fill the following staff
positions:
� Copy editors
� News writers
� Entertainment writers
Apply at our office in the Student Pubs
Building, 2nd flooi; 9-5 daily.
Frequent tune-ups save money, help avoid breakdowns
, , .� At this point, I
Special to The East Carolinian
As the temperature begins to
drop and frost covers our wind-
shields every night, some of the
older cars out there won't start as
well as they did this summer.
Most people will take their cars
to Precision Tune or a local auto
shop for a winter tune-up. A simple
tune-up at a Goodyear tire center
will generally cost between $50 and
$80, depending on the number of
cylinders in your engine.
The cost of a major tune-up
starts around $80 and can get much
higher depending on the parts and
labor the car needs
But those car owners feeling
adventurous this time, or maybe
just low on money, can invest in a
few tools, a manual and a little time,
and tune up a car themselves and
save money.
An engine tune-up is an impor-
tant part of the maintenance of a car
and can increase performance and
gas mileage. Some symptoms that
indicate the need for a tune-up are
hard starting, reduced power and a
rough idle.
It's important to decide what
type of tune-up each car needs.
There are many other symptoms
that req uire a tune-up like poor gas
mileage, but these may require an
engine analyzer to find the exact
cause of the problem.
The use of diagnostic equip-
ment, such as an engine analyzer, is
not usually included in the price of
a simple tune-up.
In new cars equipped with
computerized engine control sys-
tems an engine analyzer is used to
communicate with the cars com-
puter. It is more complicated than a
simple tune-up and should be per-
formed by a professional technician.
Simple tune-ups require only
the replacement of parts like spark
plugs, spark plug wires, and the
distributor cap. Most auto repair
shops offer both simple and major
tune-ups for their customers. But
the difference in prices will make it
easy for you to determine which is
which.
A simple tune-up is just that �
simple. It will not cure any major
problems, and if a car isn't running
at all it probably won't make it any
better. If a car has minor problems
with performance or gas mileage,
the simple tune-up is easy and cost-
effective.
The first step in tuning up a car
is getting together all the informa-
tion needed for the auto parts store
will need to provide the correct
parts. They will ask for the make
and the model, the year the car was
made and the type of engine.
Don't assume anything, check
the owner's manual or look under
the hood foran identification sticker.
The most frequent parts needed
for a simple tune-up are spark plugs,
one for each cylinder in your car, a
distributor cap and the rotor button
that goes inside the cap.
If none of these parts sound
familiar, it would be a wise invest-
ment to purchase a repair manual
specific to the car. The manuals run
from$5-$25 and can be helpful in all
types of repair work, and i t onl y has
to be bought once.
Few tools are needed for the
tune-up. A spark plug socket and a
ratchet are a must for any tune-up.
A regular and a phillips head
screwdriver will be needed in most
cases.
For those without any tools, it
would be a good idea to purchase
an inexpensive set of socket
wrenchesand screw drivers for this
and future projects.
After the car has cooled, if s
time to begin tuning the car. The
fir.jt step in a tune-up is to replace
the spark plugs, but the first step in
any auto work is to lock the parking
brake,cover the fenders of the car to
protect the patnt and disconnect the
negative battery cable to keep from
accidentally starting the car.
Remove and replace the plugs
one by one as not to get confused
and cross a spark plug wire. Gently
pull the plug wire off the spark plug
and lay it to the side. Place the socket
over the plug and turn it counter-
clockwise.
Once the plug is loose and re-
moved from the engine, take the
new plug, check the gap in between
the arc and the electrode to the
manufacturer's specification listed
in the owners manual. This can be
done with a tool known as a spark
pluggapper.
Take the gapper in one hand
and the spark plug in the other.
Locate thecorrect size on the gapper
and slip it in between the arc and the
electrode. Adjust the gap until this
"gap" is the correct size.
After this, it is time to carefully
thread the plug back into the hole
from which it came. When it is
snugly back in the hole, put the
socket back over the new plug and
tighten.
Do not over-tighten or cross-
thread a sparkplug. It may damage
the engine block. Once the plug is
tight, replace the plug wire on the
plug it came from. It is important to
do only one at a time.
Once all the spark plugs and all
the wires on them have been re-
placed, it is time to tackle the dis-
tributor cap and rotor button.
Take a spark plug wire and
follow it until it meets up with a cap
that looks like the one purchased
from the store. It may be attached
by dips, screws, or spring activated
clasps.
Underneath the cap is the rotor
button. Rotors attach in various
ways, most simply pull straight off
the distributor shaft, or are attached
with small screws. Replace the ro-
tor and be sure that it is pointing in
the same position as the old rotor.
Now take the new cap and at-
tach it to the distributor over the
new rotor button. The spark plug
wires should still be in the old cap.
With the new rotor installed
and the new cap in place, begin
switching plug wires from the old
cap to the new cap, one at a time.
The goal is to get each wire in
the same position on the new cap as
it wasontheokione. Amistake will
cause a misfire that sounds like
backfire through the engine when
the car is started. Hold the old cap
over the new one and replace the
wires one at a time, going around
the cap in one direction.
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Call us for details
The
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"Good through Saturday, January 2Sih
T.G.I.F.
210 �. 5th St (across from Bogies)
Open M-F10-6
r
s
It
I-
h
-
I
e
e
V
At this point, the simple tune-
up is complete and the work should
be checked. Trace all the work done
and make sure there are no parts
left
If the plug wires appear dry or
cracked it might be a wise decision
to replace them as well.
This can be done one at a time
while you switch them from cap to
cap.Othertune-uppartscan include
points and condenseronolder point
breaker ignition systems. This
usually requires some adjustment
thatwill require further knowledge.
Ignition timing is another pro-
cedure that can be included in a
tune-up and can be the cause of
poor engine performance.
Adjustment is made by loos-
ening the distributor lock down,
and turning the distributor to ad-
vance or retard the timing. It is
necessary to use a timing light for
this adjustment and should be su-
pervised by a trained technician.
Most repair manuals will give di-
rections on how to adjust ignition
timing.
If everything has been done
correctly, reconnect the battery and
start the engine. Allow it to warm
upand listen for any rough running.
If a rough idle persists, you may
need to take the car to a shop with
an engine analyzer to diagnose the
problem.





$tfe Safit (Earoltnlan January 14, 1992
�he iEaat (Earoltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Matthew D. Jones, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
Jennifer Wardrep, News Editor
Julie Roscoe, Asst. News Editor
Lewis Coble, Entertainment Editor
Dana Danielson, Asst. Entertainment Editor
Michael Martin, Sports Editor
Margaret Morin, Asst. Sports Editor
Bi air Skinner, Copy Editor
DEBORAH Daniel, Secretary
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Chantal Weedman, Layout Manager
Jean Caraway, Classified Advertising Technician
Stephen Schaubach, Systems Engineer
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Margie O'Shea, Advertising Technician
Ihe East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Wiretapping trail may lead to Eakin
After an enjoyable Christmas there is nothing
more an ECU studentor faculty member likes to hear
when thov return to campus than discovering that
the l diversity haspaid over$100,000 in settlements.
What? $100,000 in settlements!
Yes, more than $100,000.
$11 486, to be exact.
By now, we all know why. It seems that about
a year and half ago, certain officials of the ECU
campus (namely those in the Telecommunications,
1 luman Relations and Public Safety departments)
decided that they wanted to wiretap an employee in
hopes of discovering criminal actions. But going
through all that red tape of acquiring a court order
for the wiretap was much too troublesome for our
officials, so they decided to tap phones without one.
That's what we know as breaking the law.
And now we're paying for it.
With the addition of the two previous settle-
ments, the total payments add up to the tune of
$138,986.
Thisbringsupaninterestingquestion.Whyare
we (the taxpayers) paying for the mistakes of a few
ECU officials? Would it not be easier to fire the
individuals who broke the law and let them suffer
their own consequences?
Apparently the University and the state attor-
ney general do not think so. We find ourselves pay-
ing for a crime we did not commit.
Why?
Perhaps the University is trying to cover up
wrongdoing. Maybe they are settling these lawsuits
for the individuals who committed the crime be-
cause there is some bit of information they don't
want discovered.
But what could be so important that it's worth
$138,000 to keep secret? Well let's look at the facts.
Chancellor Richard Eakin told the state audi-
tors that he heard of the wiretapping months after it
happened. At that point he started an investigation
carried out by University Attorney Ben Irons, after
which certain individuals were reprimanded.
But what if the chancellor knew about the
wiretapping as it was happening? His vice-chancel-
lor for Business Affairs, Richard Brown, knew about
it. Why did Brown not brief him of the situation?
If thisis true, it would certainly explain why the
University has chosen to settle the lawsuits. If not,
the lawsuits would lead to investigations and if
Eakin was involved, it would be exposed.
The penalty for giving erroneous information
during a state audit is probably a little worse than a
few hours community service. Perhaps if s a penalty
that would surely be worth avoiding with the rela-
tively small sum of $138,000.
Of course, this speculation will not be specula-
tion for long.
Now that the FBI has concluded its investiga-
tion, a federal grand jury will decide who is involved
and who is not.
If the chancellor was involved, then the truth
will come out, unless the story told to the auditors is
the story told on the witness stand.
Only time will tell.
Another Column With a Trendy Title
Lambda Chi's followed official's lead
, U5TA BbltP
l(00o CW� ftyR
Good CAR T
l RAI�t A WH0l� A LOT Of W0W
tummj Lw j back
UOK AT Mfe. i
T H�
UrtePL-6YVENJT &L.UES
Keeping Up With the Jones Boys
Thieves, vandals should rot in hell i
By Greg and Matt Jones
Editorial Columnists
In this column, we aren't going
to attempt to debate the existence of
heaven or hell, but if there is indeed a
place called hell, we believe two cat-
egories of people can be found there.
In this hell, thieves and vandals will
be forced to eternally bum alongside
serial killers and )esse Helms.
The University's student body
seems to have its fair share of thieves.
The campus certainly has its share of
thievery victims (of which we have
been many times.)
There are two types of stealing
committed on this campus. First, there
is the case of some dumbass swiping
your car stereo while you are in night
class (or day class for that matter).
Secondly, the case when some bigger
dumbass steals your entire CD collec-
tion while attending your party and
drinking your beer.
In the first instance, we are
forced to wonder what thought pro-
cess possesses a thief as he breaks into
someone's car or house. Does he feel
he deserves to have what is inside?
Did he somehow earn the right to take
what is ours? Or is he simply thinking
of the wonderful bounty he is about to
inherit?
Regardless of his pea-brained
thought process, because it'sa stranger
committing the act against a random
victim seems to make the crime a little
easier to swallow than when an ac-
quaintance robs you blind.
We used to have a lot of parties.
Parties in general are great � you
generally invite a bunch of friends
and drink until sunrise.
Inevitably people show up
whom you don't know.
Thisis fine.The majority of those
people end up becoming friends who
are invited to the next party. How-
ever, there are also the ones who you
never see again � The Thieves
These sneaky bastards are the
scum of the earth. You accept them
into vour house, and they steal from
you. It's also a pretty safe bet that
they'll give you no money for the keg.
But you know, when we wake
up the next morning and discover all
the items missing from our house, we
somehow feel better knowing that
someone is receiving good use from
the stolen goods.
The same cannot be said for the
other of the two hell-burners. Yes,
vandals. What do these people think
when they carry out their immoral act
against unsuspecting victims? Dothey
receive a material gain for their ac-
tions? They receive nothing.
Hell, we had to toast the thieves
at our last keg party for at least being
smarter than vandals. At least a thief
has some justification for what he does.
But anyway, we hear you read-
ers grumbling out there. We know
that you agree that thieves and van-
dals are the lowest form of life. But
what you want to know is how we can
stop them.
Unfortunately, we haven't any
M
H
m.
S
54
y
good answers. Vandalism is certainly
an unstoppable crime, unless DuPont
invents a car paint which is impervi-
ous to the scraping of a key.
Thievery, however, can be con-
trolled to a certain extent. One night,
after one of our infamous keg parties,
during which thievery ran rampant,
we remembered something our Dad
said.
We had just gotten new bicycles
for Christmas, and with them, bicycle i
locks. He told us that if someone �;
wanted the bikes, the locks wouldn't I
do any good. �
"But he said, "it will keep 1
honest people honest
His point was a simple one, but jp
it should be followed by us all. If our p
Dad had been having a beer with us j
the night of a last keg party, he prob- -
ably would have told us to put our �
CDs away
(We wonder if he would have ;
anticipated our answering machine's ;
disappearance, but that is beside the -
point. However, we must admit, it
was nice of the thieves to reconnect
the phone after the act.)
So what's our point, you ask.
Mostly we are venting frustration. But
if there is anything to learn from the
ramblings of a couple of fun-loving,
beer-drinking, thief-and-vandal-hat-
ing college students, it's to remember
two things while you're holding a keg
party.
You should always put away
your valuables, and you should never
forget the advice from your Dad.
You'll Get Nothing and Like It
Problems with schools start at bottom
By Parker
Editorial Columnist
By Blair Skinner
Editorial Columnist
Imagine this scene. Four men
unlawfully enter an apartment after
midnight and wake one of the resi-
dents. They shout a bit. The resident
fires a 9mm pistol to scare the four
men off.
It sounds likea scene from a bad
rapper's lyrics, but it's not. Unlike the
vision, similar to those dancing in
Vanilla Ice's head, the four men pro-
ceed to beat the pistol-bearing apart-
ment dweller to a pulp.
This is what happened at jim
Segrave's apartment at 210 N. Ash St
No. 5, on Oct. 23, at about 2:40 a.m.
The four assailants were stu-
dents Todd Arnold, Macon Brock,
John VanCoutren and Ryan Casey.
The tatter's name did not appear in
earlier reports due to a police filing
mistake- All four are members of
Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity.
I would suppose that my name
is not held in high regard by Lambda
Chis, presumably because of the mis-
guided belief that I, like my co-work-
ers at The � CmroHnitm, was "out to
get them.
I was, indeed, "out to get the
four students. Although news reports
are supposed to be unbiased, report-
ers, like anybody else, are biased.
In fact, reporters are exposed to
many differing opinions and are hard
pressed to remain objective. Journal-
ism students receive little training in
objectivity.
Frequently, professors and edi-
tors alike tell reporters to rely upon
their instincts. My instincts told me
the aforementioned students are stu-
pid.
No reasonably intelligent per-
son would go to someone's house in
the early morning, enter it unlawfully,
and beat the resident senseless after
that resident fired a gun to scare them
off.
Even a person of moderate in-
telligence would have ran following
the firing of the gun. Only thick-
headed egoists would do oth�-
and the four assailants did otherwise.
Even worse, they presumed
themselves to be above the law. They
reportedly shouted, "We're Lambda
Chi's, we can do what we want when
they entered Segrave's bedroom.
Brock, Arnold, Casey and
VanCoutren are not alone in their dis-
regard for the law. There are others on
the ECU campus who have done the
same. And likewise they are targeted
for stupid mistakes.
The others are administrators
paid by the university. Chancellor
Richard Eakin, Vice Chancellor for
Business Affairs Richard Brown, Di-
rector of Public Safety James DePuy.
They, just like the four students, ig-
nored the law.
These thick-headed egoists au-
thorized the illegal tapping of a uni-
versity employee's office phone, a
violation of federal law. The lawstates
that anyone who unknowingly has
their voice taped has the right to sue.
The university is financially liable for
the administrator's actions.
Though no one was injured as a
result of the administrators' actions,
the university has paid a total of
$138,986 in n"flii�I
Both groups ignored the law.
One group has had to pay.
The students who beat Jim
Segrave must each pay $250, do 75
hours of community service and am
suspended from ECU for a year.
The administrators involved in
the
For many students approach-
ing the road's end of their educational
career, a popular conversation topic is
whether those graduates plan to teach
in their respective fields. An alarming
feature of these chats is the nearly
universal retreat reflex these prospec-
tive educators make when the possi-
bility of teaching at the high school level
is raised.
The tonal inflections and facial
expressions made when uttering high
school are almost too ghastly to de-
scribe. Many of the future teachers
then confess that despite their eager-
ness to teach, they plan to pursue a
master's degree so that they can work
at least in community colleges or small
four-year schools. This route is taken
toavoid toiling in what has come to be
referred to as the trenches, the riot
zone, the battlefields, the zoo and so
on.
What bothers me is that many
of these remarks are often made by
me and my fellow graduate students
who currently teach college freshman
courses, Ishigh school�and we might
as well include middle and elemen-
tary school�that chaotic an environ-
ment? After all, I was just a part of it
not that long ago. Unfortunately, the
answer as it pertains to most schools
and particularly those in North
Carolina is yes, and it's growing worse
every year.
To move a way from those green
recruits who haven't yet served in
"the fields I have abo talked to many
of my pears who do teach high school.
Almost invariably they look at ma as
punished and continue to work for tffroq)thotnTrtdofcaptl�My ptod-
glass and warn, no, often begging me
to not look toward the grade schools
for work.
Many of my own high school
teachers, seasoned veterans all, tell
me of how they are slowly taking
graduate classes so that they too can
teach at another level. Many of the
people I consider good teachers are
either avoiding "the riot zone" or join-
ing a mass exodus out of those schools.
By a "good" teacher I mean not just a
knowledgeable one, but a person who
is highly communicative and diverse,
able to appeal to many varying stu-
dents at once.
If you are unsure what all the
clamor is about, go sit in on a few
sophomore or junior level classes in a
typical state high school. You'll likely
see a good deal of teenagers discuss-
ing more important subjects than al-
gebra, English and history. You may
then see the teacher reprimand the
talkers with a verbal lashing that is
effective for all of three minutes, and
then repeat their empty threats. Often
a few bold students will show their
classmates how unafraid of tH� �cher
they are and chaH�gc authority, only
tofec��v ' caaed penalty of going to
the principal's office for another stem
warning, perhaps a few days in in-
school suspension where they can
completely ignore the teacher, and a
nice visit to the school counselor who
understands what they must be going
through.
Now follow that teacher
through the other duties of the day.
He or !�he stops by the office mail box
(cubby hole) to pickup a Hat of failing
students that really "eat" to be passed
� wouldn't want to bring down the
school performance levels, would we?
:

Somebody higher up might catch some
heat for that.
Then, on certain odd days the
school's foremost authorities on world
history, math, literature, physical and
natural science, language and more
gather for meetings of which, in many
cases, people with no formal experi-
ence as educators (and often having
less education than the faculty) criti-
cize their methods and create new
agendas to tell them how to teach.
And at the end of this fairly i;
average day our teacher heads rag- i
gedlytohishercarandonwardhome, I
to find a death-threat on the wind- !
shield.
Principals and superintendents
alike could easily criticize my hypo-
thetical painting of an average public
school were these examples not so
commonplace, and according to many
"soldiers very tame compared to ;
what occurs in many of the larger ;
public schools.
That our nation has a severe I
problem in its educational system is ,
not news, but the constant search for
people to lay blame upon shows no
signs of ceasing. We have been re- ;
ferred to as "a nation of finger-
pointers and that is very true for ;
now. Parents point to incompetent ;
teachers; teachers point to corrupt �
administrators; administrators point ;
to die cheapskate state governments �
who don't provide enough money, ;
and the government points back to �
the unstable family unit that fosters ;
die disrespectful and inattentive stu- ;
dent.
Our nation's eyes and arms are
poked and bruised constantly with
these pointing fingers, and afl elements
PQ05
Education
set up camp independently, destroy-
ing any semblance of a team effort to
teach these future leaders.
During Christmas break I had
an opportunity to see the concerned
elements of our state, maybe our na-
tion, in miniature. While half of my
gathered family argued vehemently
about football, the other half debated
on the state of education in North
Carolina. The teachers and parents of
students searched desperately for
some common ground upon which to
agree � after all, they were familv.
But while one aunt (a longtime art
teacher) related tales of students with
all the manners of a firm upbringing in
a barn, another aunt (and consistent
PTA fund-raiser) told of teachers who
couldn't manage a mere group of fifth
graders with any order or respect.
I remember only a few years ago
the heat of the matter was exactly what
was being taught, but that area has
been rendered moot by the question of
how to control the youth long enough
to teach them.
When asked how the students
of our state were performing by the
time they reached my realm of experi-
ence, I answered with the facts as 1
saw: kids from 'he Charlotte schools
and parts of Raleigh consistently out-
perform students from the other city
and county schools. Students from the
Continued from page 4
private schools generally do bets
than their public system counterpar
As for the subject of English in pJ
ticular, the majority of freshml
typically have trouble writing deal
and logically, and cannot fully coj
prehend the most basic of collt
reading material. (What that sa
about our university's requirement
I'll save tor another column.)
Ultimately these examples pi
the blame on school systems as
whole, but as to what causes tht
adequacy, we need to neither -
scapegoats to blame nor waste val
able time doing so. That only pusf
the various elements that make fo
strong education further apart al
allows more time for uneducaf
students to slip out of their chanci
learn forever. In North Carolinal
least, our educational system mu�-
adapted to meet the needs of the sj
dents of the Nineties, who may ha
disintegrated family struct
of respect for authority and an
willingness to learn.
What many on all sid
fence sadly agree upon is thai
change must begin at the very -turf
kindergarten and first grade, for ,
new plans, methods, or teache:
work to the best of ab:
In the meantime, wh
i irve in the battlefields?
Basketball
Do you like to play for fun?
Sign up lor these spring basketball programs offered through
ECU Recreational Services. Competitive and recreational
leagues are scheduled. Individuals and teams welcome'
5-ON-5 MEN'S AND WOMEN S
Register: Tues. January 21
S:00pm in Bio 103
BASKETBAIX JAMBOREE TOURNAMENT
Register. January 21 at 5:00pm in Bio 103
ROL NDBALI RAMA
Free Throw contest. 3 POINT and 5 SPOT shoot -out
Register: Tues. February t at V.OOpm ii, Bio 103
SLAM DUNK CONTEST
Register: &ed, February 1
S:00pm in Bio 103
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 757-63�
Peach Bowl Vic
Over 8 Designs
S
Al
�Zc SW
East Carolina Ui
Student Union Boan
is taking Applia
�TI TDFNT UNIO
for the 1992-1
Deadline: Thursda;
Interested students may picl
Mendenhall Student Center's Ii
Room 236 - Studei
J





I 7

HOii- A teT Of WOW��J
ALirr err no-nap? ux,
�, AAV JO BACK�

. m r il u
& Jones Boys
ould rot in hell
I
f thr
I
ilism is certainly
� .� unless PuPont
�� hi h i imprrvi-
1 i key
- f i iin be con-
rtain extern One night,
� imous Krg partie5,
ran rampant,
�v. our Dad
new bicycles
h them, bicycle
thai if "someone
ks wouldn't
t will keep

mpleoM, but
wed by US all If our
Dad had bewi hn ecf with tM
ift) he prut'
� 0 put our
� he would have
d our answering machine's
H th.it is beside the
� However we muM admit, it
�t the thieves to reconnect
T Id )
� Bttf point, vou ask.
in venting frustration But
thing to learn from the
ir'u' �� fun-loving,
� I md v.iml.il hat-
lents, it s to remember
. while vou 're holding a keg
r)
V'u should always put away
� valuables and vou should never
Ivtce trom vour Dad
-�
i


3 and Like It
Is start at bottom
c s he
I
V
I n � pin-
' Mt ,1
I person who
end divt
stu
whet all the
lir on a NrW
Jl i lillM tfl
(loulllikdv
It'r ill iim
JeUs than al
rv Vow m.iv
prtmend th�
ihing that is
unutev an.)
hnau Often
l �-how thru
Mrb� hor
�thorny, only
Itvof gointo
Another tem
�lavs m in-
tv they can
ai her, and a
�MMIH who
hust be going
at teacher
of the day
ne mail box
Ihst of tailing
tv be passed
down the
i, would we?
p mighti atchsome
� �� I � odd ilavs the
chool MtH'Min world
literature, physical and
ii , uagta end more
� I which, in many
people with no formal experi-
ducetofs (and often having
lest tlu. ation than the faculty) criti-
methodi end create now
das to teO them how to teach.
"l at the end of this fairly X
iverage day our teacher heads rag-
gedl v to hisher i ar and onward home,
to find a do.ith threat on the wind-
shield
Prim IpaUend superintendents i
alike could easily cnticie my hypo- i
thetn al painting of an average public 4
sth.Mil were thrso examples not SO 1
ioninionpla�e.andaccordingtomany '
soldiers verv tame lompared to
vshat QCtMrl m many of the larger
publu schools
That our nation has a severe 4
pnMem in its educational system i� �
not news. Kit the constant search for
people to lav blame upon shows no J
signs of ceasing We have been re- J
ferred to as "a nation of finger- j
pointers and that is very true for j
now Parents point to incompetent J
tea. hers, teachers point to corrupt J
administrators, administrators point J
to the cheapskate state government
who don't provide enough money, I
and the government points beck to
the unstable family unit that foster,
the disrespectful and inattentive stu- �
dent
Our nation's eyes and arms ere
poked and bruised constantly with
these pointing fingers, and all elements
See Education, page 5
Education
SUje �afit(Earo!lnfan January 14, 1992 5
Continued from page 4
set up cafllp independently, destroy-
ing any semblance of a team effort to
te� fl these future leaders.
"hiring Christmas break I had
an opportunity to see the concerned
elements of our state, maybe our na-
tion, m miniature. While half of my
withered family argued vehemently
about football, the other half debated
OH the state of education in North
C arollne. The teachers and parents of
students searched desperately for
M me common ground upon which to
agre � after all, they were family.
Rut while one aunt (a longtime art
teacher) related tales of students with
all the manners of a firm upbringingin
i bam, another aunt (and consistent
tund-raiser) told of teachers who
couldn't managea mere group of fifth
graders with any order or respect.
I remember only a few years ago
the heat of the matter was exactly what
was being taught, but that area has
been rendered moot by the question of
how tocontrol the youth long enough
to teach them.
When asked how the students
i ottf state were performing by the
time (hey reached my reaimofexperi-
ei ce, I answered with the facts as 1
saw: kids from the Charlotte schools
and parts of Raleigh consistently out-
perform students from the other city
and county schools Students from the
private schools generally do better
than their public system counterparts.
As for the subject of English in par-
ticular, she majority of freshmen
typically have trouble writing clearly
and logically, and cannot fully com-
prehend the most basic of college
reading material. (What that says
about our university's requirements,
I'll save for another column.)
Ultimately these examples place
the blame on school systems as a
whole, but as to what causes the in-
adequacy, we need to neither seek
scapegoats to blame nor waste valu-
able time doing so. That only pushes
the various elements that make for a
strong education further apart and
allows more time for uneducated
students to slip out of their chance to
learn forever. In North Carolina at
least, our educational system must be
adapted to meet the nerds of the stu-
dents of the Nineties, who may have a
disintegrated family structure, a lack
of resptxrt for authority and an un-
willingness to learn.
What many on all sides of the
fence sadly agree upon is that this
change must begin at the very start �
kindergarten and first grade, for any
new plans, methods, or teachers to
work to the best of ability.
In the meantime, who is going
to serve in the battlefields?
6COR.6IA JAN
Jiyei6�riii
Basketball
Do you like to play for fun?
sign Up for tlu-fti- spring basketball programs offered through
1(1' K r� .ition.il Services. Competitive and recreational
leagues arc scheduled. Individuals and teams welcome!
SON 5 MEN'S AND WOMEN'S
Register: lues. January 21
S:00pm in Mo 103
BASKETS ALL JAMBOREE TOURNAMENT
Register January 21 at 9f00poa in Mo 103
KOIINDHALL KAMA
Free ThTOSV contest. 4 POINT and S SPOT shoot out
Register: lues, February 1 at JiOOfJfll in Hlo 103
SI AM DUNK CONTEST
Keglster: Vied. February 19
S:00pni In Mo 103
l
FOR MOHF. INFORMATION CM1 757-3H7. .
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To Your
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Quli k Copies � Fax Srrvke
Desktop Publishing fill
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AUDITIONS
SINGERS � DANCERS � INSTRUMENTAUSTS
SPECIAITY ACTS � TKHNICIANSWARDROBE
Kings Productions the world's 1 producer of entertainment is holding
oudTtions for the 1992 season at KINGS DOMINION. Richmond,
Virginia A variety of positions are available and a travel fee will be paid
to employees who must travel more than 250 miles to the Dark
GREENVILLE, NC � Tuesday, January 21
East Carolina University
A J Fletcher Music Bldg , Recital Hall
4 5pm Singers
5 6 p m Dancers
4 6 p m Instrumentalists Technicians,
Speciorty Acts
RICHMOND, VA
Saturday January 25 & Sunday, January 26
Kings Dominion, MasonDixon Music Hall
2 4pm Singers
5 6pm Dancers
2 6pm Instrumentalists, Technicians,
Specialty Acts
f o addi�onol in(o"�Kjxi coli
Kingi Dwi'iitX Eileo�nm�nl D�f)� 804, 86 5141
K.ngl PtodixVxn BOO' 544 5464
KINGS ISLAND � KINGS DOMINION � CAROWINDS
Kingt Protutoro
GREAT AMERICA
Peach Bowl Victory Shirts
Over 8 Designs
LARGEST
SELECTION
ANYWHERE
Get Tan & Stay Tan
Special Student Rate Tan All Semester
Only $75.00
iAfp �new Wolff tanning beds
-� �unlimited visits
Oiien �open 7days a week
�Conveniently located in the Carolina
East Mall behind Baskets by Choice
Only 75 memberships will be offered
at this price. Phone for reservations.
321-0709
(f )")ft 00l
We
Deliver
Mon-Sat 10-9
Sunday 1-6

East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking Applications for
STUDENT UNTON PRESIDENT
for the 1992-1993 Term
Deadline: Thursday January 23
Interested students may pick up applications at
Mendenhall Student Center's Information Desk and
Room 236 - Student Union.
CONGRATULATIONS
PIRATES
ON YOUR
PEACH BOWL VICTORY
from Sharkev's m .
Splash I Sports Pad
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Classifieds
�1� iEaat (Carolinian
January14, 1992
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES:
We offer typing and photocopy-
ing services. We also sell software
and computer diskettes. 24 hours
in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to 20 hand written pages.
SDF Professional Computer Ser-
vices, 106 E. 5th St. (beside
Cubbie's), Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
TYPESETTING: Resumes and re-
ports. Brochures and newsletters.
Call 752-0833 or 830-9090. Ask for
Lisa.
CLEANING:Married,femalesru-
dent working her way through
school. 8 yearsof experience clean-
ing personal homes. Reasonable
rates and own supplies. Pleasecall
Cindy Myer at 752-2759.
VIDEOTAPE: a party, birthday,
weddingreception or any spe-
cial occasion for $49.95. Tape in-
cluded. Call Mike at 757-1525.
time 1C ir. week. Call 752-1932 for
details Available Jan. 8. Ask for
Courtney.
TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT: 3
bedroom, 2 12 baths, fireplace.
Small pets allowed with pet fee.
Security deposit required. Avail-
ablejan. 1,1991 .$590.00permonth.
355-5079.
FEMALE SEEKING: roommate
to share2bedroom apt. at Stratford
Arms beginning Jan. 1. $175 a
month 1 2 utilities. Call 355-
7640.
PRIVATE ROOM: with shared
bath,kitchen,livingroom. Located
next to campus. 504 E. 12th St
behind DominosPizzaonCharles.
$180 per month includes utilities.
Call Marsha Blair to see at 757-
2110 days, 355-2228 nights.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: Immediately. To share
Wilson Acre Apt. Pay 1 4 of rent
and utilities. Will have own bed-
room. Call 757-0458.
OK Kl l
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: Neat, clean, ECU stu-
dent $125 and 1 2 utilities and 1
2 phone. Call 321-2128. Leave
message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED ASAP: $115 and 13
utilities, non-smoker, 1 1 2 miles
from campus. Call 758-8652 any-
time.
WANTED: Female roommate to
share apartment at Wilson Acres.
1 4 of rent and utilities. Will have
own bedroom. Pleasecall for more
information. 757-0458.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: FREE rent, utilities,
cable in house, near campus in
exchange for care attendant ser-
vices. Will provide own room. NO
experience necessary. Avg. work
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
3
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
Hours:
F� 8:30-3:00
A Hcauuful Race io Liw
�All New
�And Ready To Rent
UNIVERSITY APARTMKNTS
2899 E. 5lh Street
�lxcaicii Near ECU
�Near Major Shoppng Centers
�Actosj Rom Highwty Patrol Station
Limited Offet $330 a month
Contact I.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open � Apt S, 12 5 30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS-
Hfin �rl qut Hi hr.fcxH�n furmdied ipWjrrntt.
c-vrgt MEtiM, brt ��r inJie�cr. ���Sen. Ayru.
able TV CouJei r� �j-1m �Uv240 � nxnuh. b
�Mfchaa MOMJ ikaif RENTA1 S .�jr�
unjkl. A(mronert�jidrTb.lch.mitf: Aftiea CiuJcn�
ntu Bro.i tiles Canftn CWb
Contact I.T or tommy Williams
756 7815
)S (
Largest library ol Information In ITS.
19.28 TOPICS- ALL SUBJECTS
0'0e' CatJ.09 ToOjy wi!ti VISA. MC or COO
E& 800-351-0222
Or KmA C 00 to ReMirth intorrrnipft
"3?2 �Jo Av 206-A tot jejejM CA 90C73
GILBERTS MUSIC: offers 20
discount to ECU students and fac-
ulty - 4(Fr off non-stocked items.
Musical instrument repairs of all
types. 2711 E. 10th St. 757-2667.
1982 YAMAHA MAXIM Excel-
lent running condition. Looks
sharp, too! A steal at $700. Call
Greg at 8304131.
SEIZED CARS: trucks, boats, 4
wheelers, motor homes, by FBI,
IRS, DEA. Available vouf area
now.Call 80S682-7555e'xt. C-5999.
REPOSSESSED AND IRS
FORECLOSED HOMES: avail-
able at below market value. Fan-
tastic savings! You repair. Also
S&L bailout properties. Call 805-
682-7555 ext. H-6314.
GREATBUY!6davsand5nights.
Bahama vacation. Fun in the sun.
$149.00orbest offer. 919-776-8511.
FOR SALE: Queen size waterbed.
Simple wood en frame, semi-wave,
asking SI 25 or best offer. Call 321 -
1179. Leave message.
YOU'VE ONLY GOT ONE
WEEK TO LIVE! Do it right'
Spring Break in Jamaica from only
S429Hotel, air, transfers, parties!
SunSpIashToursI �800426-7710
HOT NIGHTS: cool drinks,
reggaemusicsandy beaches .and
you Affordable spring break trips
to Jamaica, Cancun and Florida.
Gill Loren at 931-7940 for details
OK S-M
SPRING BREAK'92:Jamaicaand
Cancun. Seven nights and air as
low as $439. Call Heather at 757-
0537.
DON'T BE LEFT OUT! Limited
space still available to Jamaica,
Cancun and Florida for spring
break Call Loren at 931 -7940 im-
mediately to ensure a space.
A BAHAMAS PARTY CRUISE:
6 days $279! Panama City $99,
Padre $199, Cancun $499, jamai ca
$399! Jasa 758-5165, Wayne 757-
1369 or 1-800-638-6786.
'WWII I)
DlSPI.tr
ASM I II I)
The 9(giC Company
of Qwnvdk Ltd.
2408 S Charles St. Suite 5 355-4596
Specializing in:
Manicures � Pedicures � Acrylic Nails
� Waxing � Tanning
See our ad in the Pre-Registration Magazine
MAKE $500-$1000 WEEKLY:
stuffing envelopes at home. Start
now! Rush S.A.S.E. plus $1.00 to
Home Employers, 2301 Kent 8
Us Cruces,N.M. 88001.
ADDRESSERS WANTED IM-
MEDIATELY! Noexperience nec-
essary. Process FHA mortgage
refunds. Work at home. Call 1-
405-321-3064.
FREE TRAVEL: Air couriers and
cruiseships. Students also needed
Christmas, spring and summer
for amusementmrk employment.
Call 805-682-7555 ext. F-3464.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE:
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call 805-682-7555 ext. P-3712.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT
PAY! Assemble productsat home.
Call toll free. 1-800-467-8585 ext.
5920.
SPRING BREAK Bahamas Partv
Cruise $279! Panama Gty $99! S
Padre $199! Cancun $469jamaica
$399. asa 758-5165, Georgia 931-
9363, Jeff 830-5367, Wavne and
John 757-1369.
MUSICIANS NEEDED: Key-
board or percussion to accompany
ECU danceclasses Good pa v. Call
757-6390.
SPRING BREAK TO FLORIDA
BEACHES: Energetic promoter
needed. Earn FREE trips and
CASH. Call CMI at 1 -800423-5264.
HELP WANTED: Part-time stock
) S:1 v ss : 1
I.I'WASH I)
clerk, dependable car. Apply in
rrsonatLarrv'sCarpetland-310
10th St.
HELP WANTED: Part time ac-
counting clerk, computer experi-
ence required. Applv in person at
Larry's Carpetland -310E. 10th St.
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS!
Start the new year with an exciting
gosition in retail. Brady's and
Tody's for Men are accepting
applications for part-time posi-
tions. Eam extra money for those
college expenses and clothing dis-
counts for a new spring ward-
robe. Apply Brady's, The Plaza,
Mon. - Wed. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
B ABY-SnTERS NEEDED:Com-
munity Bible Study, a Womens'
Interdenominational Bible Study,
meeting at Oakmont Baptist
Church, Thursday mornings, 9
a.m. to 11:30 a.m! Need several
WWIID
Ringgold Towers
Now Taking Leases for
1 Bedroom, 2 Bedroom,
& Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
WESLEY COMMON APARTMENTS
BRAND NEW!
1 and 2 Bedroom Apt.
AVAILABLE NOW
LOCATED NEAR CAMPUS
CALL FOR MORE INFO.
3 5 5-3647
MEMORIAL COIN
&PAWN
� STEREOS
� GUNS
�CD'S
� DIAMONDS
� TELEVISIONS
� VCR'S
�CAMERA'S
H�

� MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
� COINS
� COIN SUPPLIES
INSTANT CASH LOANS
WE Bl Y GOLD & SILVER
All Transactions Strictly Confidential
752-7736
NEW LOCATION
2208 A MEMORIAL DR (WEST END CIRCLE)
Announcements
young women to work in our nurs-
ery area to provide patient, loving
care to our youngest participates.
Church nursery experience pre-
ferred, but not necessary. Must
provide own transportation and
be able to make commitment
through Apul 30th. Call Pat
Stansell, Class Coordinator, 756-
0842.
ECU STUDENT NEEDED: to
help care for two children in my
home for two hours, three days a
week. Daily housekeeping and
transportation needed Call 756-
7622 after 6 p.m
PfKSONAtS
CONGRATULATIONS: to the
ECU Pirates for their Peach Bowl
victory from ECL's spring break
trawl company - STS - Student
Travel Services.
DISPIAY CLASSIFIED
CLASSIFIED AD RATES
Line Ads:
For 1 st 25 words:
Students$2.00
Non-students$3.00
Display Ads:
Open Rate per
column inch
$5.50
DEADLINE:
Friday, 4 p.m for Tuesday issue and Tues-
day, 4 p.m. for Thursday issue.
Let the one you love know how
much you care about them by
sending them a Lo ve Lines mes-
sage for Valentine's Day 011 TeH
l3fanTheEastCarolinian. Come
by the office across from the li-
brary for more details.
Deadline is Tuesday,
February 11,1991
� FOI SCHOOL OF MUSIC
fThe ECU School of Music will
hold a symposium entitled 'The
21stCenruryCeJlist: Preparingfor
rheCareersof Tomorrow" Jan. 17-
19. Distinguished cellists from
across the country will present
diverse krtures and classes on
Baroque cello, electric cello and
jazz improvisation, twentieth cen-
tury cello literature and orchestral
repertoire. For registration infor-
mation, contact the ECU School of
Music at 919-757-6851. The high-
light of Saturday's events, Janu-
ary 18, will be a gala concert fea-
turing the artist faculty. The con-
cert begins at 8 p.m. in the ECU
School of Music's Fletcher Recital
Hall on campus and is open to the
public free of charge on a first-
come, first-seated basis.
pAVF-STUDY-LEARN
If s not too late to apply for the
National or International Student
Exdhangeorforoneofmanystudy
abroad opportunities! If you are
interested in paying ECU tuition
and attending one of 107 other
universities around the United
States or if you are interested in
study in a foreign country, inves-
tigate the many opportunities
available to you through the ECU
exchange programs. Also avail-
able is information on numerous
summer opportunities. Visit Ms.
Stephanie Evancho in Brewster
A-117 or call 757-6769 for a bro-
chure and application form soon!
L.VTIQNAL
INTERNATIONAL
FXCHANCE SEMINAR
How would you like to visit beau-
tiful parts of the country or world
you've been dreaming of and get
college credit at the same time?
We'll tell you how to get started
on your journey when you come
to the first Study Abroad-Ex-
change Program Seminar of the
semester onThursday, Jan. 16 at 4
p.m. in GCB 1005. Stephanie
Evancho from the Center for In-
ternational Programs will explain
the exchange procedures for the
NSE(National5tudentExchange),
ISEP (International Student Ex-
change Program) as well as ex-
changes with the Acadia Univer-
sity (Canada), Ecole Superieure
du Commerce Exterieur (Paris),
and Leicester Polytechnic (En-
gland). This session will deal pri-
marily with semester and aca-
demic year programs. A panel
composed of exchange students
studying at ECU as well as ECU
students who have returned from
exchanges at other schools will be
present to share their first-hand
experiences with you. Come share
their experience and be a part of
theexcitement. We're looking for-
ward to meeting you and making
your dreams come true! If you
cannot attend, contact Ms.
Evancho at 757-6769 for informa-
tion or to set up an appointment.
These seminars will be held twice
monthly throughout the semester
so check your tCU calendar for
future dates!
MISS GREATER
The Miss Greater Greenville Pag-
eant, an official Miss America Pre-
limmary, is still accepting applica-
tions for the 1992 pageant to be
held Saturday, February 15, in
Wright Auditorium on ECU cam-
pus. To receive an application, or
to get more information, please
calI746-317L
�UON-S BASKETBALL
REGISTRATION
All those interested in playing 5-
on-5 basketball need to attend the
basketball information meeting
being held on Jan. 21, 5 p.m. in
Biology 103. For more informa-
tion, call 757-6387.
BASKETBALL IAMBOREE
All faculty, staff and students are
encouraged to sign up for the First
Annual Basketball Jamboree on
Jan. 21,5 p.m. in Biology 103. This
pre-season tournament hosts
men's, women's and faculty divi-
sions. For more information, call
757-6387.
AFROBIC FITNESS CLASSES
Begin your New Year resolutions
early be registering for the first
session fitness classes offered by
Recreation Services beginning Jan
21 thru Jan. 24 from 9 a.m5 p.m.
in204ChristenburyGym.Over20
plus classes are ottered through
the fitness programs offered by
Recreational Services. For class
schedules or more information,
call 757-6387 or stop by 204
Christenbury Gym.
OUTDOOR SMORGASBORD
Recreational Services will be host-
ing an outdoor smorgasbord to
generate interest and promote the
programs available through the
ROC (Recreational Outdoor Cen-
ter). The Smorgasbord will include
demonstrations trip informa bon
and free giveaways! This event
will be held Jan. 15 at 5 p.m. in
Chnstenbury Gym 117. For more
i formation, call 757-6387
1 BUCCANEER!
Did you miss it? Some are still
available at the Buccaneer office
or the Media Board Office at any
time. Offices are located on the
2nd floor of Student Publications
Building (across from Joyner Li-
brary).
ORIENTATION TO
CAREER SERVICES
The Career Services office invites
seniors and graduate students to
attend a program designed to ac-
quaint tnem with the services
available to them as theyprepare
to enter the work force. Registra-
tion and interview sign-up proce-
dures, how to establish a creden-
tial tile, and a tour of the Career
Services Center are included.
These sessions will be held in the
Bloxton House on Thursday, Jan
16 at 4 pm and Friday, Jan. 17 at
2 p.m.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
rhe Newman Catholic Student
Center invites you to worship with
them. Sunday Masses: 11:30 a.m.
and8:30p.m.massattheNewman
Center. 953, E. 10th St two houses
from the Fletcher Music Building.
For further information, pleasecall
Ft. Paul Vaeth, 757-1991.
GAMMA BETA PHJ
Gamma Beta Phi will hold ifs first
meeting on Wednesday,Jan. 15 at
5 p.m. in Great Room I
Mendenhall. Officers meet at 4:30
p.m. See you there!
COUNCIL QF STUDENT
ORGANIZATION LEADERS
The Council of Student Organiza-
tion Leaders first spring meeting
is Wednesday, Jan. 22 from5p.m-
6:30 p.m. in Mendenhall's Great
Room. Jeannie Tomkalski, Direc-
tor of ECU'S Health Promotion
and Wellness is the speaker. The
agenda for Tuesdasrneeting will
also include a leadership inven-
tory and the organization
speakout For more mformation,
please contact Lisa Shibtey at 757-
4881.
Ex-hostage Al
Former hostage Alarm
� Fad plenty of catching up to
do preparing to teach Monday for
the first time since he was taken
captive in Lebanon.
taught the courses before.
But it has been six vears since I've
taught any one of them. A lot of the
� ks are obsolete Steen said in
an interview before his return to the
dassroom He was "up to my el-
b'vs �� mg ready for his stu-
dents at Albion College
i day long-awaited,
as a hostage, cut off from
the world, the educator never
d hankering for the lectern.
i spnt a great deal of time as
i hostage thinking about teaching
and ho - 'my techniques
-iid
ir-old journalism
ill handle three courses:
pository wnj
the student
sumes his pr
of the day fij
was taken pr
Steen's'
art history at!
oflTOOstudj
Lansing. V
while teachu
near Albior
Steen was f r
Shnte Muslu
"I do U
pablenghti
I feel saicj
brain damaj
kicked him u
escape atter
tion to cont
outs.
Mvh
adaptr
(journalism, advanced ex- he said.
CDC proclai
1 ederaJ health officials
have confirmed what the nation's
beleaguered hospitals already
knew The flu has become an epi-
demic.
ed to the flu
reached epidemic levels in the last
mber and first week of
January in the United States, ac-
cording to the U.S. Centers for Dis-
-
The epidemic, the nation's first
flu epidemic since 1989, could get
worse February traditionally is the
peak month ot the flu season, which
runs through March.
"It has tilled our hospital to
11 erft i wing, said Orbenia Stewart,
. admissions clerk at suburban
Atlanta s DefCalb Medical Center,
one of doze
wide reporti
cause of milt
"Thiswi
the hardeM
years then
The flu �
of the deat!
monitored i
Dr. Larry
director ol tlj
pr 'gram,
An epic
the death ra
than the pr
6l2 percent
Flu nor
Amencans I
has not pro!
die this wi
KKK
Continued from page 1
said, "K.KK sucks the wet farts out
of dead pigeons and "Segregation
is for sissies"
The speeches given by the
KJansmen were only clearly heard
by the Klan gathered by the court-
house steps The protesters'chants
drowned out the Klan's speakers.
Spectators could catch a few
words when the crowd was calm.
"We're gonna march to victory be-
fore the end of the decade Luke
Barrack, historian of the KKK, said.
The Imperial Wizard of the KKK,
Virgil Gnftin, hollered that there is
a need to end abortion.
Members of the KKK were
dressed many different ways. Some
members wore silk robes of many
colors, while other members were
dressed in jeans, T-shirts and boots.
Two Klansmen wearing cowboy-
hats held a banner saving "David
Duke for President
The loudness of the crowd pre-
vented the spectators from heanng
everything the Klan preached. The
rallv lasted about an hour and no
violence was reported.
TiS
dol
IN CONCER1
J3J3J3J3J3


it
f! -A
J3

J3 "TRl
ft America's Premier Chrisl
R Thursday, Jan. 30th Ai
J Wright Auditorium
� G��vUte, N.C.
fl M h Mm ?S.OO
jt Call 355-3500 For
J3.J9.J9J9
Pa I � il � in
Cnranan
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HELP WANTED
work inournurs
de patient, loving
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rtation and
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� all Pat
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lentine'sDayoiiIc
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r�e is Tuesday,
uary 11,1992.
I
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the Career
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hold in the
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� 1:30 a m
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houses
� � � Music Building.
therinj irmationeasecsuj
. , � � � -
GAMMA BETA PHI
� - ta Phi will hold if s first
� tnesdayjan 15 at
p m in (in at Room 1
denhaJJ Officers meet at 430
ei . . there!
LULACimi SI LULNI
()K(.AN1ZA 11()N LEADERS
- ounciloi Student Organiza
tion Leaders first pnng meeting
is Wednesday Ian 22 from 5p.m
p m in MendenhaU's Great
Room leannie Tomkalski, Direc-
tor oi ECU'S Health Promotion
and Wellness is the speaker The
agenda for luesday's meeting will
also include a leadership inven-
tory and the organization
spetkout lor more information,
pu ase contact Lisa Shiblev at 757-
4881.
January 14. 1992 �fc flarolfnian 7
Alarm Steen returns
Wickern
Continued from psge 1
IAP) Former hostage Alarm
Steen had plenty of catching up to
do preparing to teach Monday for
the first time since he was taken
captive in l-ebanon.
! re taught thecoursesbefore.
Hut it has been six vears since I've
taught anv one of them. A lot of the
b�Hks ,m obsolete Steen said in
an interview before his return to the
daaaroom He was "up to my el-
bows getting ready for his stu-
dents at Albion College
Us a day long-awaited.
Even as a hostage, cut off from
the world, the educator never
stopped hankering tor the lectern
I spent ,i great deal of time as
i hostage thinking about teaching
and how to better my techniques
he said
I he 52-year-old journalism
heT will handle three courses:
photojournalism, advanced ex
pository writing and producing
the student newspaper. He re-
sumes his profession 11 days shy
of the day five years ago that he
was taken prisoner.
Steen's wife, Virginia, teaches
art history at the liberal arts school
of 1,700 students 40 miles south of
Lansing. The couple, who met
while teaching in Beirut, have lived
near Albion in Clark Lake since
Steen was treed Dec. 3,1991, by his
Shiite Muslim captors.
"I do feel I'm more than ca-
pablenghtnow,at least that'show
I feel said Steen, who suffered
brain damage when his captors
kicked him in the head after a failed
escape1 attempt. He takes medica-
tion to control seizures and black-
outs
"My biggest problem will be
adapting to a Michigan winter
he said.
Steenisonlycommitted to teach
one semester. A brother in Florida
and histwo daughters in California
want him near them when his ob-
ligation at Albion ends.
'Talk about being torn' Steen
said. "1 think that I'll be satisfied to
stay here for the winter and per
haps a good part of the summer.
When it's over I will have to start
looking for another position some-
where
He's been offered at least a
temporary slot at American Uni-
versity in Washington, DC, he said.
But he's wary of the high cost of
living there. "These things 1 have to
keep in mind he said.
California is a strong lure. He
taught sporadically at Humboldt
State University in Arcata, Calif
between 1970 and 1981 and at Cali-
fornia State University inChico from
1981 to 1983.
Lebanon drewSteen in that year
with a job as copy editor at the
English-language Beirut Daily Star.
He had been teaching public rela-
tions at Beirut University College
since 1984 when he was kidnapped
Jan.24,1987.
Steen is unbothered by the
prospect that some Albion students
enrolled in his classes just to hear
hostage stories. "There will prob-
ably be more people wanting to
find out what life was like in the real
world he said.
Albion is lucky to get Steen,
said acting Provost Patricia Fnck.
"He brings considerable teach-
ing expenence in journalism, pho-
tojournalism and writing to Albion
College she said.
And, Frick said, "He has the
mature perspective of a person who
has been through an ordeal that we
can only guess at
CDC proclaims flu to be epidemic
ederal health officials
have confirmed what the nation's
beleaguered hospitals already
knew The flu has become an epi-
demic
�� buted to the flu
reached epidemic levels in the last
ikot I Jecember and first week of
January in the I rated Mates, ac-
cording to the VS. (enters for Dis-

I hecpidemic, the nation's first
flu epidemk since 1yg. could get
. February traditionally is the
peak month of the flu season, which
runs through March.
It has tilled cur hospital to
overflow ing, saidOrbeniaStewart,
admissions clerk at suburban
Atlanta's DeKalb Medical Center.
one of dozens of hospitals nation-
wide reporting bed shortages be-
cause Of influenza.
"This week's been horrendous,
the hardest week I've had in 23
vears there she said Saturday.
The flu was linked to 7.2 percent
of the deaths in 121 cities the CDC
monitored in the two-week period,
Dr. Larry Schonberger, assistant
director of theCDCs viral diseases
program, said Friday.
An epidemic is declared when
the death rate isapprociably higher
than the projected rate, which was
o.2 percent
Flu normally kills about 24,000
Americans each winter. The CDC
has not projected how many amid
die this winter.
Bv Friday, the CDC had re-
corded flu outbreaks in 31 states,
with the worst in the Northeast and
other statesalong the Atlantic coast.
Most are of the worst flu strain, a
subtypeof the'Type A" viruscalled
the Beijing flu.
The strain, historically hard on
theelderly,bringshighfever,aches,
pains and extreme fatigue. It's
usuallv transmitted through the air
or by shaking hands
Cooper Medical Center in
Camden, N.J is advising ambu-
lances to take all but the most seri-
ously ill patients elsewhere. Its
emergency nxm is treating 50 pa-
tients more than the daily average
of 110, Dr. Michael Chansky said.
In Connecticut, the 200-bed
New Britain General Hospital had
been sending overflow patients to
the University of Connecticut
Health Center, but now that center
is nearly full.
"We don't know what is going
to happen next New Britain
spokesman Joseph Crawley said.
The flu also hit nursing homes.
The Friends Home at VVoodstown,
N last week began restricting
visitation to try to keep the virus
from spreading, said nursing di-
rector Mane Allcorn.
The New York lanes reported
Saturdav that the Parkview Nurs-
ing Home in suburban Massapequa
closed its d(xrs to visitors and vol-
unteers Jan. 2 after 63 percent of its
residents came down with the flu.
performance evaluations done by
the complainant's students and
peers.
According to her, the univer-
sity gives more money to those who
have a higher performance rating.
Evaluations are confidential and
cannot be released to the com-
plainant or the public.
If a salary gap does not seem
warranted by these factors, Rose
said she then has to look at any
"impermissible reasons" that may
account for the difference in pay.
These reasons include race, gender,
age, handicap status, national origin
and religion.
After an investigation. Rose said
she meets with the dean or chair-
person to discuss the results.
"I go back and I say look, as
EEO officer I have a concern about
this she said "If together we say
it does not appear nght, then the
university would go back and cor-
rect it
Rose said although a dean or
chairperson is not required to take
her advice, she has never had any-
one go against her suggestions.
"Generally, 1 have found that
our people do not want to discrimi-
nate she said.
"Once we have found an in-
equality, it is not usually a tight. We
try to fix inequalities
According to the 1990-91 ECU
Fact Book, an annual publication
distributed by The Office of Plan-
ning and Institutional Research,
men averaged $6,787 more than
women in 1990.
At the level of lecturer, such as
the case concerning Wickern, men
averaged $2,106 more than their fe-
KKK
Continued from page 1
said, KKK sik ks the wet farts out
ofck and "Segregation
� i sissies
! he speeches given by the
Klansmen were only dearly heard
by the Klan garnered by the court-
house steps ITieprotesters' chants
iwned out the Klan's speakers.
Spectators could catch a few
words when the crowd was calm
inna march to ictory be-
fon the end of the de ade Luke
Barrac k, histi irianof the KKK, said.
In. Imperial Wizard of the KKK,
Virgil.riMm, hollered tnat then- is
,i need toend abortion
Members of the KKK were
dressed manv different ways.Some
members wore silk robes of many
colors, while other members were
dn'ssod in jeans, T-shirts and boots.
Two Klansmen wearing cowboy
hats held a bannersaying "David
I hike for President
I he loudness of me crowd pre-
vented the spe tators from heanng
everything the Klan preached. The
rallv lasted about an hour and no
violence was reported.
Forking out bucks for books
Photo by Dail R��d � ECU Photo Lb
Tis once again that dreaded time of year when poor college students spend their hard-earned
dollars to purchase the instruments of higher learning.
ft ft ft J3 ft J3 J3
IN CONCERTft
ft

ft
ft
ft
FAMOUS FROZEN YOGURT
"TRUTH"
� Premier Christian Group
IWELCOME BACK STUDENTS
ft
ft
ft
Congratulations to the ECU Football Team
on their Peach Bowl Victory
Buy any size cup of yogurt and get one small
I cup FREE
iexdudingjdddie cup)I
r Thursday, Jan. 30th At 7:30 P.M.
J J Wright Auditorium - ECU n
J GmrvtDc. N.C. Jj
rt M h AaVaact, 8.00 At The Door
Call 355-3500 For Ticket Info fl
H T Sponsored by GRACE S
WZ' A Christian Fellowship pa
K ofECU J
ftfftfftfftfftfftfEf
i
1 7580327
iTar Landing Seafood
Rntioriat
ALL - II - CAN - EAT
FRIED SHRIMP
$6.95
(DAILY SPECIAL)
l l AM 9 PM MOM SAT
10 AM 8 PM SUNDAY
male counterparts.
Rose said she had no clear an-
swer as to why men made more
than women at ECU.
"I am quite hesitant to say that
it is just across the board discnmi-
nabon she said 'That hasn't been
mv expenence when I have inves-
tigated individual cases
Several other factors may have
plaveda njleinthe salary difference
between Wickern and the new in-
structors.
Contract negohationat the time
of hinng may have played a part.
"Some people can just negoti-
ate better' Rose said. "Not many
salanes are absolutely fixed
Also, the communication de-
pa rtment needed i nstructors for the
Fall semester. Any urgency on the
part of the school's administration
may have resulted in higher pay for
the new instructors.
Wickern said Rose has looked
at everything and has not found
any justification for her to makeleis
money.
The saddest part is if I hadn't
found out, I would have wentalong
happily thinking I was being paid
equally when I wasn't Wickern
said.
"Isigno ranee bliss? I don't think
so. The statement on every piece of
ECU stationary tnat says equal
opportunity employer' is supposed
to mean something
Wickern said she is bound to
her current contract and will not
know the results of her efforts until
she re-negotiates her contract next
year.
ROTC commissions officers
Special to The East Carolinian
Four ECU Army ROTC ca-
dets recently made the transition
from cadet to officer during a
commissioning ceremony held by
the Army ROTC department in
the Rawl Building on Dec. 7.
Major David Santa Ana, de-
partment chairman, hosted the
ceremonv which followed the ECU
Commencement Ceremony held
earlier that day. The commis-
sioning ceremony marked the end
of college life and the beginning of
a career as an Army officer for
four cadets.
During the ceremony, each
cadet took the oath of office. Fol-
lowing the oath, the new officers
had their gold lieutenant bars
pinned on by friends or family.
An audience of approximately 60
people witnessed the proceedings.
Second Lieutenant Jason
Johnson received an active duty
commission and was branched
into the Medical Services Corps
Second Lieutenant Luis Tavera
received a reserve duty cornmis
sion and was branched into the
Military Tolice. Second Lieuten
ants Bryan Bailey and Wolfgang
Biggerstaff were also commis
stoned, but must wait until later in
January to be assigned active or
reserve duty and be branched.
Second Lieutenants Bailey,
Johnson, and Biggerstaff received
their degrees during the com
mencement ceremony earlier that
day. Bailey and Johnson were
awarded undergraduate degrees
in criminal justice and psychology
respectively. Biggerstaff was
awarded a graduate degree:in
psychology. Second Lieutenant
Taveras will graduate in Mayof
1992 with a degree in busing
accounting. These officers vflll
now begin their military cares
by attending the Officer Bafic
Course offered by their assigmd
branches. �
If you don't think you belong anywhere, you belong with us.
OUR PURPOSE
We seek lo provide a chiistian environment thai not only accepts, but
challenges its members to act and react in their struggle with God and lo
become bold in response to Jesus, the Christ.
We understand that it is not our purpose to mold people into a particular
type of Christian but lo promote the authority of Christ to call each person
individually into a relationship with Him.
WHERE:
Methodist Student Center
501 East Fifth Street
Corner of 5th & Holly
WHEN: Wednesday Nights
at 5:00 ptn
WHO: Dan Earnhardt
758-2030
Dinner
In The
Neighborhood
$5.
AtAp08beeNBqhtatnod(l�Bg,youart
defcaous tod a! an urteatatw pnoa Thai men meats. mundxeE and onris.
loo Not to menion he lun. nabxnQ ttmotftvn Appiebeat c tamout to
ApptabwY The bast ptoe to go tor a great Mat And its pracicalV ngfrt r you
own backyard.
&P
U
202 SW GrMnvllte Blvd.





Oh my God, its EUIL RE-RUN WEEK
That's right, you're not experiencing Deja-Vu, you probably have seen thes
cartoons Before. Our vacationing, working, and studying cartoonists promise
to have spankin' brand new ones in next week (yeah, right!). In the
meantime, re-examine these and don't worry- they aren't getting paid tor
them! Hahahahahahahahahahahaaaaa
Adventures of Kemple Boy
By Kemplf
Hazardous Waste
By Manning
4&
cdajsttutom ro Aim fwee
iti semis H voo'tt wme
I
Buddy-Ro's
S� IBEAUVPOMJ
(K thimk77115isrmei6Hr
��� n ��.
SAIMT MAURICE
CATWOlIC SCHC
By Ian
re
HOLO
HA HA HA
rish Sandwich
Bie Adam Crack Babies
Bie Adam
55�r� � v( A�S N0 � MONTHS Of CONT.N.OUS ,�?�" '
VOUIHT
WtNNf.Bf.GO NC
STr �N0 WltMA "RAVEI I COu
BEC.tsi mf� l�i ro rww
0RGCT �"t Rf "f ' ��
u - � SS �"�I
Survey shows
(AP)
tor who sm Ice
whose bell) .
dulgenc. atthed -
the n, si parl
doctors f !i
ad via'
Editor-
Letter, an �� � � �
asktxi doctoi � �
habits H
found, fore?
less rt1 nm I
more fiber I
they're h
The d � �
questionnaii
nansatth
Experts say as
(AP
down r i pr
scientist bokinj
father, gav tl
presci I �'�
achw a littli
nn.
Now that & �
has become
decades oi tv
It re
aches or d �
thntis
It is n ��� �
venting heart itta
strokes
�It seen
against carif r
�It counti r
hyper i
GOLD registration begi
l
Recreational Service
Presbyterian V Methodist Cad
SPRING f$
BREAK 92
DAYTONA INNS 1
2 Oceanfront Motels 3
�BROADWAY: bloc.
to Bandshell Boardwalk
�SEABREEZE i block to
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POOLDECK PARTIES a I OUNGBS
DRINK DANCE AND MAKE NEW FRIENDS
1-800-874-1822
Does a year or semester of study in England, Scodand, Wales,
Ireland, Belgium, France, The Netherlands, Finland, Sweden,
Hungary, Malta, Kenya, Mexico, Argentina, Costa Rica, Cyprus,
Korea, or Hong Kong sound interesting?
Sounds fantastic? But it's just not possible because: It's too
expensive; or it will delay graduation; or you aren't fluent in a
foreign language?
The truth of the matter is that many institutions offer programs in
ENGLISH. If, of course, you do have a fluency in another language,
then your choices of study sites will be even greater.
The cost? The cost of attending a participating institution in the
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAM (ISEP)
is, except for travel costs, exactly the same as attending ECU. And,
in most cases, credits earnrd abroad can be transferred back to ECU.
It is a fact that some of the finest universities in the world are
available at ECU prices to qualified ECU students. For more
information about ISEP and other programs of exchange, both
national and international, contact immmediately
Dr. Robert J. Hursey, Jr.
ISEP Coordinator
Austin 222
PH. 757-6418 or 756-0682
Stephany Evancho
Office of International Programs
Brewster A117
PH. 757-6769
January 16th & 17th
UP TO 75 OFF
Need to make room for
SPRING ARRIVALS
Everything
marked down but
Peach Bowl Items
h"
C07TCW
y
ft
�204 SS6T WTV VT
Wednesday
Progressive
Dance Night
10 0 Draft
$1.15 Tall Boys
$2.50 Pitchers
$1.00 Kamikazes
�Ladies Free til 10:30
THE METHODIST STUDEN
501 EAST5THSTRI
(across from Garrett Dorr
Wednesday Evening Supper j
Thursday Evening Evening Bible
Dan Earnhardt. Director -75J
Office (9am to 3 pm
Paul Lang. Resident Managei
Episcopal Student Fel
Wednesdays 5:30 pm-1
St. Paul's Episcopal Cl
401 E. 4th St.
Service at 5:30 in chui
Supper provided after sei
Parish Hall.
Program Discussion follow!
Marty Gartman, Campus
752-3482
Charlie Dupree, Student Repl
757-1743 !





January 14, 1992 Clitic Cant (Earalfnfan 9
&K
p
IL RERUN WEEK
; Deja-Vu you probably have seen these
i rking, and studying cartoonists promise
es in next week (yeah, right!). In the
n't worr the) aren't getting paid for
laaaa
By Kemple
m&i�m
1
l (
� A ' "Mt
ednesday
Progressive
Dance Night
10 0 Draft
$1.15 Tall Boys
$2.50 Pitchers
S1.00 Kamikazes
Ladies Free til 10:30
Survey shows doctors follow their own dietary advice
IAP) � You might know a doc-
tor who smokes cigarettes or one
whose belly is evidence ot overin-
dulgenceat thedessert table,but tor
the most part, a survey shows,
doctors follow their own dietary
advice.
Editors of the Harvard Health
otter, a newsletter tor consumers.
asked doctors about their health
habits in 1982 and last year. They
found, for example, that doctors eat
less red meat and fewer eggs and
more fiber these davs � just as
they re telling patients to do.
The doctors w ho returned the
uestionnaires, all teaching phvsi-
are not perfect, however. Seventy-
two percent of the 672 respondents
said they eat ice cream or other rich
desserts at least once a week, 24
percent said they eat them four to
seven times a week, and 5 percent
said more than seven times. (The
question wasn't asked in the first
survey.)
"There's no doubt that doctors
are also human and make private
decisions much the same as anyone
else does Patricia Thomas, the
newsletter editor, said by telephone
from Boston. "No amount of edu-
cation makes us perfect. We all do
things we ought not
Doctorsand other experts have
suggested Americans reduce their
consumption of saturated fats,
found in most red meat. And the
doctors at Harvard appear to be
heeding that advice.
While 56 percent of the re-
spondentsin 1982 ate red meat more
than three times a week, just 10
percent said so in the later survey.
Egg consumption, possibly be-
cause of the high-cholesterol con-
tent of egg yolks, also was down,
from the 79 percent of respondents
who lOyears ago said theyate three
or fewer eggs a week, to 95 percent
the second time around.
Bu t despite these changes, only
14 percent said they ate fish more
than three times a week. (Doctors
were not asked about fish in 1982.)
Fiber was important to 41 per-
cent of the doctors a decade ago,
and to 59 percent last year.
"On the whole these findings
indicate that respondents are trying
to abide by the prevailing dietary
wisdom Dr. William Ira Bennett
wrote about the later study in the
January 1992 issueof the newsletter.
That's not to say they feel con-
tent with their weight.
Twenty-nine percent of the re-
spondents in 1982 said they weighed
more than 10 pounds above what
they'd like. Today, 39 percent were
worried about the same thing, and
74 percent said they are working to
control their weight, mostly through
both diet and exercise.
In 1982,49 percent of the doc-
tors said they did aerobic exercise
for 20 minutes at least three times a
week, compared with 53 percent in
the second survey.
Among other responses:
� Aspirin. The proportion of
respondents who take aspirin daily
to protect their hearts has nearly
quadrupled, from 7 percent to 25
percent. Bennett noted that in the
time between the two surveys, evi-
dence mounted of aspirin's role in
preventing heart attacks.
Vitamins. Fourteen percent
msat the Harvard Medical !xhool, Doctorsand other experts have 14 percent said they ate fish more worried about the same thing, and � Vitamins. Fourteen percent the first time, 65
Experts say aspirin cures more than just headaches
(in. A.�� wn,v .4�� ,LJ h,Hvh�ah�TTvn�nlPn used drug in the world In Reye's syndrome, some "I!?1
took a daily multivitamin in 1982,
the same percentage who said they
used vitamin C to protect against
colds. In the later survey, 23 percent
said they took vitamin or mineral
supplements, with 13 percent rely-
ing on vitamin C to protect against
colds.
�Smoking. Respondents who
said they smoked decreased from 8
percent in 1982 to 3 percent today.
The 1982 survey drew 595
responses, 10 percent of them from
women. Last year, nearly a quarter
of the responses came from women.
Twenty-five questions were asked
the first time, 65 the second.
AP)� As the 1800s dwindled
down to a precious few, a German
ncnhst, looking to helphisarthntic
father, gave the 20th ccnturv a
present to cure 100 years of head-
i hes, a little white pill called aspi-
rin.
Now that same little white pill
las become a wonder of the latter
decades of the century.
It no longer just relieves head-
aches or the swollen joints of ar-
thritis.
�It is now credited with pre-
venting heart attacks and probably
strokes.
�It seems to act in some way
against cancer of the colon.
�It counters a sometimes fatal
hypertension during pregnancy.
It seems to slow the develop-
ment of cataracts in the elderly.
�And it may enhance the
ability of the immune svstem to
tight off viruses and bacteria.
Yet, in spite of its century-long
ubiquity, aspirin remains one of the
greatest medical mysteries. No one
had an inkling how it worked, what
it did inside the body, until 1970
and even now scientists wonder if
they know it all.
Today Americans take more
than 29 billion aspinn or aspirin-
containing tablets a year � 80 mil-
lion a day some 40 percent of
them tor headaches
Thev work. They work so well,
in fact, that the little white pill has a
strong psychological effect. One
study shows that some people sense
relief when they only think they are
taking aspirin and really aren't.
All through the annals of mod-
ern medicine scientists and doctors
extol the little white pill.
Says Dr. Charles Hennekensof
Harvard Medical School and
Boston's Bngham and Women's
Hospital:
"In a sense aspirin is as old as
medici ne because Hippocratesused
the leaves and bark of the white
willow tree, the extracts from them,
to relieve the aches and pains of his
patients, which included women in
labor.
So we've jumped from500 B.C.
to 1900 and in the next 100 years
aspirin became the most widely
used drug in the world
In 1948, when modem aspirin
was only 50 years old, a search of
the medical literature came up with
4,000 published reports on aspirin.
In just the lOyears from 1975 to 1986
there were 4,000 more.
In short, science is still probing
and finding more effects of the little
white pill.
Not all the effects are virtuous.
Scientists knew early on that aspi-
rin irritated the stomach and found
ways to coat it or buffer it so it
would pass tnrough to the intes-
tines without causing harm.
Then in 1963, an Australian
pathologist named R.D.K. Reye
implicated aspirin in a strange dis-
order which was given his name.
I
In Reye's syndrome, some
children recovering from influenza
or chickenpox who took aspirin
began to vomit and later showed
signs of brain involvement ranging
from sleepiness to aggressive be-
havior.
Though aspirin was not shown
to be causative, the evidence was
strong enough in 1986 for the Brit-
ish Committeeon Safety of Medicine
to recommend that aspirin not be
given to children under the age of
12 except on a physician's advice.
But in any case, the occurrence
of Reye's syndrome is rare.
Aspirin is a non-prescription
drug proving itself useful against
ailments that require prescribable
remedies.
"The more we leam about the
science, how it interacts in the body,
there may be even more uses says
Dr. Thomas Bryant, president of the
Washington-based Aspirin Foun-
dation.
"But one must hasten to add
it's not a panacea, not a magic pill.
People shouldn't rush out and start
taking a lot of aspirin. You don't
take it without some consequences.
You can't take a lot of it and people
should beawareofthat. You should
consult with your physician and
see if you are one of those who can
benefit from it
Insights into aspirin's marvels
pile one upon the other. Twice it
won researchers Nobel Prizes.



$30J.
anuary-May
memberships

Presbyterian & Methodist Campus Ministry
toz foi
THE METHODIST STUDENT CENTER
501 EAST 5TH STREET
(across from Garrett Dormitory)
Campus Christian Fellowship Intervarsity Christian Fellowship
Our fellowship strives to
strengthen the believer, reach the
unbeliever, and celebrate the risen
Lord!
Wednesday Evening Supper Program 5:00 pm
Thursday Evening Evening Bible Study 7:30 pm
Dan Earnhardt, Director -758-2030 -
Office (9am to 3 pm)
Paul Lang, Resident Manager - 830-9527
ccf J
Meetings held Wednesday at 7:00 pm
and Sundays at 6:00 pm at 200 E 8th
Ttlw m�
Street
Experience Intervarsity
GOOD NEWS SPREADS FAST!
Everyone Welcome
Large Group Meeting
7:00 pm Wednesdays
1032 General Classroom Bldg.
Tim Turner, Campus Minister - 752-7199
Anne Horton, Student President -
931-9476
Episcopal Student Fellowship
Wednesdays 5:30 pm- 7:30 pm
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
401E. 4th St.
New Life Christian Fellowship
InterVarsit
.
: ���� ����
Todd Jones, Staff - 752-2054
Gordon Duncan, President - 931-7095
Baptist Student Union
Service at 5:30 in church.
Supper provided after service in
Parish Hall.
ProgramDiscussion follows supper.
Marty Gartman, Campus Minister -
752-3482
Charlie Dupree, Student Representative
757-1743
A Non-denominational campus
ministry with an emphasis on Bible
study and sharing of our faith.
The Baptist
Student Union
provides a good
hang-out place
for Christian
community and
growth.
r
East Carolina University
7:00 pm Thursday
2024 General Classroom Bldg
1
Eddie Hilliard - 830-6814
Jim Wyatt, President - 931-8694
Monday 5:30 Fellowship Dinner
Thursdat 7:00 Informal Worship
Baptist Student Union
511 E. 10th St.
(next to Wendy's)
Bob Clyde, Campus Minister - 752-4646
Pam Lowry, Campus ministry Intern
752-4646
Joellen Best, President 355-6114





Congratulations ECU Pirates
1992 Peach Bowl Champions
James Browning � ECU Pboto Lab
Pirates 37 � Wolfpack 34





Entertainment
(Eire iEast QIaruItntan
January 14,1992
Author explains meaning of life
By Matt Jones
Managing I ditoi
Anyorwwhodocsn'trecognize
Robert I ulghum's name has prob-
ably heard ol hismostfamouswork
I verything ! need to know 1 leamel
�� kindergarten.
In that book, Fulghum ex
plained that life is too often confused
by irreievent details and may be
broken down intoa few simple rules;
rules which we all learned in km
dergarten.
The following arc a few ol
Fulghum's basics ol life: play tair;
put things back where you found
them; when you hurt someone, 'viv
you re sorry; w hen vou go out into
the world, hold hands and Muk
together and take a nap even af-
ternoon.
In sh,rt. I ulghum's first book
makes a lot ol sense Apparently,
the world aerees. Everyti �� Need
toKnowisi urrcntlyontheNeiyYorJ!
imes' top ten best selling book list
a position it has held for four
years.
It has become the Jonathon
I ivingston Seagull t the 90s; a
roadmap tor In ing life.
Since that book, Fulghum has
written two others It WasonFire
WhenlLayDownonltandUh Ofc,his
most recent.
With Was on ire, Fulghum
showed that hestill had theflarefor
life, although it somehow didn't
equal up to his original effort. I lis
latest book, continues the apparent
trend is even more
dissapointing than his hrst.
But even disappointing is not
bad for Fulghum.
1 hosevs ho have read hisbooks
know that theauthorwritesinessay
form about certain events in his life
which, when reviewed, produce
some all-encompassing aspect on
existence. It seems with this book,
however, Fulghum hasdecided that
all the events in his life "mean"
something and we end up having
to believe that there is .1 cosmic
parallel between blowing you nose
and the meaning of life.
What saves the book is the
truths that Fulghum does produce.
Although they are fewer and more
far between, compared to hisearlier
works, they can be found. And that
makes all the difference.
In 17i Oh, which is subtitled
Somel Observations from Both Sides ot
the Refrigerator Door, Fulghum ex-
plores the significance of eating
meatloaf in the middle of the night,
tclK ! the modem day equivalent
ot the fairy godmother, ponders
whether or not fireflies' lights burn
out. asks what makes a hiccup and
explains how to know when you're
in love.
Al though the book is filled with
some ramblmgs which don't seem
to mean much, it is worth reading
for the light it sheds on the previ-
ously mentioned subjects.
It is important to note that the
book should not be read in on !
sitting. Fulghum expounds upon
th.it notion in one section.
"It may help to emphasize that
it w.is written one part at a time' he
writes, "and the odds are that it will
make more sense if it's read the
same way
It's true.
There is too much information
to be digested in one reading. This
reviewer considers the bathroom
the best place for the book, where
everyone has time read one essay at
least once a day.
The answer, by the way, to the
question ot love is a good one. I'm I
won'truinitfor the readers. Getting
to it is half the fun.
Illustration by Rich Haselng � The East Carolinian
Comic book artist
breaks racial barriers
By lewis Coble
ntertainmen! Editor
lohn Romita, ir. made his plai c
in thecomicbook industry by creat-
ing the artwork on the titles
��: �; ' and .
Now he is breaking ground
again. Romita is creating the new-
est frican American comu book
character in the industry.
African American characters
have been in and out of the omi
industry for neol the more
prominein the past
was 1 uke( age (a tver Man 1
� �. � even managed to be-
comea monthly title, and lasted for
125 issues Yet few if am black
characters ever receive their own
titles
In recent years, the role ot the
African-American character has
bevn as a sidekick, a temporary re
placement or as a villain. In past
issues 1 t iron Man. the lead charac -
ter who was the real Iron Man was
replaced temporarily by a black
character. In recent issues ot
Amazing Spider Aan Spider-man
faced a black villain named Car-
diac.
The most recent African
American character to come close
to his own title is Night llirasher in
� New Wan � Night rhrasheris
I several herosinagroupcalled
Tie New Warriors The New Wat
�� aKo mi hides the appearance
ot a young bla k heroine.
Yet Romita plans to carry his
charat ter farther than anv African-
American character has gone be-
fore. Romita's character tirst made
hisappcaranceinDamfm273. I "ho
charac tcr'scodenameor nickname
is Shotgun. Romita got the idea tor
the character's name from a old
Mo- r 'W n song called "Shot (iun"
by unkr Walker and the All Mars.
I he character's "real" name is IK.
Walker.
hi an interview inV et street's
� Pri If late, Romitasaid
that he felt it was time to create a
character like ShotGun. Romita felt
that he should capitalize on the
popularity ot the current black ac-
tors .nd directors
' My capitalizing is not such a
materialistk capitalizingin that I've
had this cit) thing in me Romita
slid in the interview I'm from New
York City, a huge racial and cul-
tural melting pot.
Romita feels that thisisamulti-
racial world and thatcomics should
reflect that world. Romita comes
from anltalianbackgroundand says
that there is only one Italian comic
book character, Ihe Blemishcr. Me
tools th.it every culture should lv
represented in comics-
Over the past years, Romita has
done his part to make comics more
diverse and equal.
"I'vealways tried to put black
characters m my books, in back-
grounds, villains, heros he said in
the interview. "It you Kvk in my
books over the last 15 years, I have
more black people in themes than
anybody else "
1 lelpmg Romita with the book
will he African-American writer.
Pwavne McPuttv.
"1 le is a great writer who hap-
pens to be an African-American
man. nist like I Happen to be .n
artist who'sa whiteguy with Italian
background he said. "He is a grea t
writer and we'll do this character
better than anybody
Romita expects some contro-
versy over the fact that he is a white
man doing a black comic character.
According to Romita, that will
begreat Also, McDuffyisthereto
help him out. Between those two
Photo courtssy ot Ovarstreet Comic Book Prica Updata
things, Romita expats tehreaka lot John Romita Jr Slts at nis desk and p0nders the life, loves and dreams
t ground and to even reach a new
plateau.
of his character. JR Walker (a.k.a. Shotgun)
Mainstream listeners
open their eyes to R.E.M.
NEW YORK (AP) The 1992
(irammv nominations showed Paul
Simon is still creative after all these
years, Natalie Cole is back and the
mainstream has finally discovered
R.F.M the earlv h'V's darling of
the underground.
Simon, who won (Irammys for
best album in the 1960s, '70s and
'80s, was nominated in that cat-
egory agam Wednesday, tor
"Rhythmof the Saints
It he wins, he will be the only
artist to capture the honor in four
different decades.
The Southern rock group
R.E.M which has produced Id al-
bums and critical praise in .1 career
dating to lyso, also was nominated
for album of the vear tor "Out oi
Time as well as in six other cat-
egories, including record of the vear
for 'Losing My Religion
The seven nominations � the
most any act got this year were
the first R.E.M. ever received.
Rocker Bryan Adams, who has
been nominated twice but never
won, had six nominations, includ-
ing single of the vear for "(i;very-
thing 1 Do) 1 Do It for You
Miss Cole, who won three
Grammys in the 1970s, was nomi-
nated in four categories, including
album of the year for "Unforget-
table a sentimental tribute to her
father, Nat "King" Cole.
Amy Grant, who has won five
Grammys forChristian music,made
an easy conversion to pop, picking
up four nominations, including al-
bum of the year consideration for
"Heart in Motion
Ronnie Raitt, the comeback fa-
vorite ol 1990 when she won tour
Grammys, was nominated five
times, including album ol the year
tor "Luck ot the Draw
Boyz II Men.C C Music Fac-
tory, Marc Conn, Color Me Badd
and Seal were nominated in the best
new artist category.
Winners will be announced in
New York on bob. 23 at the 34th
annual awards ceremony of the
National Academy of Recording
Arts and Sciences.
Wednesday's nominations
werea vindication of sorts for R.M.
and Miss Cole.
Formed in 1980 by four Uni-
versity of Georgia students, R.E.M.
was proclaimed the best new group
oi 1983 by Rolling Stone magazine.
The group has enjoyed critical
and commercial success over the
wars with such albums as "Mur-
mur "Green" and "Document
but until now, no Gramme nomi-
nations.
The title cut from Miss Cole's
album isanacross-the dec ad esduct
with her father, who died 25 years
ago, that was achieved through stu-
dio dubbing.
She said last vear that Flektra
Entertainment released the record
after another company had turned
it down.
Simon won Grammys in in 1969
and 1970 for the Simon and
Garfunkel albums "Mrs. Robinson"
and "BridgeCH er Troubled Water
and in 1976 and 1987 for the solo
albums "Still Crazy After All These
Years" and "Graceland
���. �'�� ����
PRINT SHOP
STUDENT
PUBS
i
Photo by K�vin Amos � ECU PHoto Lab
Pubs?
Here at the ECU Print Shop we publish The East Carolinian, the Rebel, and Expressions. In addition
we also serve a wide variety of domestics and imports We can accredit past mistakes to this fact.
Tried Green Tomatoes' served nationwide
By Lewis Coble
Fntertainment Editor
Oscar winners Jessica Tandv
and Kathy Bates will be starring in
a new film titled "Fried Green To-
matoes The film deals with the
theme of mid-life crisis from the
woman's point oi view.
The film centers around one
woman � Evelyn Couch. Evelyn
has reached the point in her life
where she must face the inevitable
� middle age. Burdened with a
few extra pounds, an indifferent
husband and the longing for some-
thing better, Evelyn begins to re-
evaluate her life.
The catalvst for this re-evalua-
tion is Evelyn's onlv friend. Ninny
Threadgoode. innv is an affable,
eighty-some year-old woman who
loves to tell stories about the Old
South. It is these stories in which
Evelyn finds the means to change
her life.
The stories center around The
Whistle Stop Cafe, a southern
roadside eatery run by the spunky
young ldgie Threadgoode and her
, best friend Ruth. The cafe serves all
the traditional Southern foods, in-
cluding ldgie's favorite � fried
green tomatoes.
Yet the stones turn dark when
ldgie isaccused of murdering Ruth's
abusive husband, leaving her fate
to be decided by her enemies.
Through Ninny's storytelling,
Evelyn discovers herself and a life-
long friend.
The film is based on the best
selling novel, Fried Gam Tomatoes
at the Whistle Stop Cafe, by Fannie
Flagg.
The film opens on Jan. 24.
JFK
raises
viewer's
suspicions
By Pamela Oliver
Staff Writer
There ha ve a 1 wa vs been ru mors
about underhanded deals behind
John F. Kennedy's assassination.
With the release of Oliver Stone's
recent movie, "JFK America'ssus-
ncions have resurfaced.
Someone who shiesaway from
politics might be intimidated bv the
movie's subject matter However,
anyone can enjoy this superbly-
made film starring such big names
as Kevin Costner, Sissv Spacek, and
Kevin Bacon.
Grabbed from the beginning,
theaudience is hurled back to 13.
John F. Kennedv is assassinated in
Dallas, Texas, in a parade. The film-
ing technique and the sounds of
shots ringing out from everywhere
effective! y provide tor the and ience
the feeling of fear and confusion.
The reactions oi the United
States citizens are mixed. For the
most part, they are devastated,
feeling confused and lost. Someare
outraged. Yet others cheer, even
praise the death of Kennedv. Con-
flicting emotions run rampant
throughout the entire world.
This shocking introduction to
the movie leads the audience to
formtheirownquestions. Thevare
overpowered by a strong desire to
know more about the murder of
their president.
For three yea rs the U ni ted S ta tes
government accepted the fact that
Lee Harvey Oswald killed John F.
Kennedy out oi cold blood, but not
District Attorney Jim Garrison,
played by Kevin Costner. Just the
suggestion that there might have
been a cover-up drove him to find
out the truth. He began asking
questionsthat noone had ever dared
toask. If Oswald didn't assassinate
Kennedy, the who did? And wh ?
Was there a larger group involved?
He was determined to find the an-
swers to thesedangerousquestions.
The audience easily becomes
caught up in Garrison's quest for
the truth and his willingness to
sacrifice his credibility and his
familv. Even his wife, played by
Sissy Spacek, doubts his findings in
his investigation of Kennedy's as-
sassination. Garrison risks every-
thing important to him in the pro-
cess of his investigation.
As the film rolls on. Garrison
realizes that the operation is much
bigger than anyone could conceive.
Tliere seem to be too many people
involved, almost too many to keep
up with. New names, important
names, keep popping up which lead
to whole new avenues to investi-
gate. The conspiracy to assassinate
John F. Kennedy apparently runs
amuck throughout most of the fed-
eral government, trickling down to
local police departments.
See JFK page 11





�1C �aBt (Carolinian January 14, 1992
Campus
proudly
parades
Pirates
By Lewis Coble
I ntertainment Fditor
A football appreciation parade
will be held in C.nvnvillo Ian. IS at
2 p.m. The parade and attendant
activities are planned to celebrate
the Ian. 1 Teach Bowl victory over
North Carolina State University by
the Fast Carolina Tirates.
The parade is scheduled to be-
gin in the area ot Rose 1 ligh School
c�n Elm Street. All members of the
football team, except those playing
in other games, will be featured in
the parade.
The ECU cheerleaders and the
marching Kind will alsoattend. Ihe
ECU football coaches, except Hill
Lewis, will be appearing in the pa
rade. Abo placing a guest appear-
ance will be Pee I the Pirate
mascot.
"Die response to the parade
has been incredible said Tnpp
Roakes, field representative of the
Pirate Club. "We are expecting be-
tween 15,000 to 20,000 people to
attend
"The Peach Bowl trophy will
be displayed during the parade
said Roakes "Still, the parade is to
celebrate the team s victory and the
team itself. Thev are the ones that
got us here
Die ECU Pirate Club is the
Pakistan
Jackson's
ISl.AMABAD,PakistanAP) -
Pop superstar Michael fackson has
accepted a government invitation
to perform in Islamic Pakistan, an
official said todav, but opposition
by religious leaders could cancel
the concert
Sheikh Rashid Ahmed, minis
ter of culture and sports, said the
concert had been tentatively set for
April Uintheeastemcityot Lahore,
the country's cultural center.
But he said threats bv religious
leaders to close airports and orga-
nie street protests could force Prime
Minister Nawaz Sharif to rescind
the offer.
Hie final decision is the prune
minister's Ahmed said. "But
re j ects Michael
sexual advances!
don't know what thev arc so atraid
of.
-II (xr!ehan.afamousl aki-
stani classical singer, can go to the
United States why can't Michael
jackson come here?"
Ahmed extended invitations
last year to jackson and Madonna,
hoping their appMran.es would
help portray this predominantly
Muslim country of 120 million asa
modem state tol.rantot other cul-
tures, customs and ideas
Butjamaat-e felamuorPartyol
Islam, a small but powerful reK-
gious party that is a crucial compt -
nent inthegoverning Islamic Demo-
cratic Alliance, says there's nothing
wrong with Pakistan's image.
"We u ill do w I '
andifthatmeansdosu �
then we will do if, sa j
Rehman, a party spoki
"Michael a ksondoe
resent our ulture. Out
dear We will org �- � .
protest"
Some lesser know �
artists have be a
past to entertain at prival
matic functions, but rw
the general public.
Islamic traditionesi
lie displays of any!
suggestive, such as I
I.k kson normallj
There was i
Madonna's reply.
Pee Dee will be making a guest appear;
Photo courtesy J D Whitmire
il � Dara l nJan 18
major sponsor ot the parade Co include the meal, rhemealisopen
sponsors ot the parade .ire the only to football players, their family
Greenville Chamber ofommerce and upper level Pirate Club mem-
and the City of Greenville bers.Lee - in ESPN football
After the parade, the annual analyst v lib th ?icst speaker at
ECl ' nil banquet will be held the :
.it 8 p m
1 ickets are available to the gen
era) publi for $20,but that does not ihe best in the university's history
ihe Ninth-ranked Pirates fin-
ished the season with a 11-1 record
Bush hoax catches Headline News
ATLANTA (AP) I W
Headline News came within sp-
ends of reporting that President
Bush had died before an editor re
ahed it was a hoax
A caller identifying himself as
Bush'sdoctor had telephoned CW
on Wednesday and said the presi-
dent was dead.
CNN 1 leadline News anchor-
man I Vn 1 larrison started to read
the report on the air at 9:45 a m. 1LSI
during coverage of Bush's collapse
at a dinner m lapan, when he was
alerted by another staffer,said CNN
spokesman Steve 1 laworth
1 leadline News is a sister sta-
tion of CNN and features con-
densed versions of C NN reports.
"This just in to CNN ! leadline
News Harrison said. "And we
say right ott the bat. we have not
confirmed this through any other
si lurce
AtthatpointavoH coff camera
said, No Stop
tion I larrison said
inc a ci ?rrcc-
will not
give vou that story. It was regard-
ing some rather tra ' ' � AsmvoK
� . resident Bush. But updating
that Story, President Push is re
ported resting comfortably
Hush tell ill at a state dinner in
fbkyoon Wednesday and wasdi
agnosed as having stomach flu.
( NN staffers decided "through
the editorial process" that the tip
was a hoax within moments of re
ceiving it, I laworth said.
(laworth said the Secret Ser
vue has been notified.
Public Enemy clashes fantasy with philosophy
PO THAT AGAJtyANP KCCi
NEW YORK (AP) Public
Enemy has released a rap video in
whK'h make-believe public officials
responsible for thwarting creation
of an Arizona state holiday in honor
of Martin Luther King lr. are assas-
sinated.
"lt'sa trip into the fantasy world
of Public Fnemv. You know, the big
payback Chuck D, the group's
lead rapper, said Tuesday.
The video, "Bv the Time 1 C.et
10 Arizona begins with "a David
Duke-type character as governor of
Arizona" denying heisracist, Chuck
Dsaid.
Throughout are re-enactments
of civil rights struggles from the
l0s
By the end of the video asena-
tor falls to his office floor alter eat-
ing poisoned candy and the
governor'scar is blown Up after he
steps into it.
The killings .ire interspersed
with re-enactmentsol King'sassas
smation.
Douglas C ole. spokesman tor
Arizonaiov.FifeSymington.calkd
the video "extremely unfortunate
He said Symington, who be
came governor in March, cam
paigned on a promise to work to
make Martin Luther King Day a
state holiday.
Cole said the assassination fan
tasv clashed with the understand
ing "that our society works bv the
ballot box, not through violem e
t his news conference,huck
D was asked it the group s violent
fantasy clashed with the philoso-
phy ot non-violence that King
preached.
1 tenoted that king was shot to
death and said, "We've got to be
able to siv . It I e.et hit vou're
going to get hit ba k
Jewish groups criticized Public
Fnemv two years ago, claiming its
record "Welcome to the
lerrordome" was ,niti-Semitic.
M I V spokeswoman Carol
Robmson said thecabie musk chan-
nel would show the video, but each
time 'in a context where it is dtv
cussed prior to airing
Illustration By Rich Haseing
a Eds' - - '
Auth m explains strange and bizarre
NEW YORK AP) - It A.M.
1 lomesevcr writes her autobiogra-
phy, she might have a hard time
getting anyone to read it. As the
author herself points out, there's
little drama in the Story of a nice girl
in a nice fa mi h -growing up in a nice
town.
For now, 1 tomes is sticking to
fiction. Her storiesare about people
who rebel, publulv and privately,
in ways she never dared trv herself.
Drawing on the lives of others,
1 iomes raises questions about love
and s and the nuclear family, ap-
proaching her work as it she were
an actress and her characters were
roles to slip into.
"My stories are explorations,
Homes explained during a recent
interview.
"It's so much a part ot my na-
ture tiist to stand back and kxk at
thir.gs. 1 action is more interesting
and more tun to rite when vou're
writing about someone other than
yourself.
"What I like to do is take some-
thing past it's logical conclusion, to
take to kind of a heightened reality.
so when vou read it it caiw syoal
question everything in ' �
life.
Homes, 29, has wr
books the novel lack a Jaa
lection ot stones, IK Safety!
Objects
"(ack'isa story aboul �
buy who discovers that hts ' ithfli
gay.
She doesn't hoid ba
Safety of Objects There an a
smokers, a mother cuttinc off I
son's respirator, a man killed in
shopping mall.
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"1
UNIVERSITY
Frame Shop
�nd
Art Gallery
Adversity, b
mountain a

� � �
���
-� - �

� � -
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tain
nurtun
S
Ui - � Collectii
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forl f New mb i - -
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stick
int-stoi
. �� k in
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-
-
think il
-
-
'Grand Canyo
Spend
r
�� 'tor and
you r I to pick up a few

ing a perfoi
thebt lint befor
night.
Anothinh
will h � in
Shakt� an an work :n which ho
performed while at Indiana
versi ty, a dra rrvi he pined - I
�i was supposed to be takii
sica4 piano.
'Thev wore auditioning tho
Scottish play ho whispered dur-
�trtga recent interview, raising hi
eyebrows and kxking arxund his
- aw me and sa
- �


, 1 rt-c
-�
was '

� (- as '
Soundgarden o
PHILADELPHIA (AP)
. enigmatic singer Chris
Cornell of the not-so-quiet but
equally enigmatic quartet
Soundgarden wrote a song tor the
Band's new alburn after spending
lOdaysinaroom without talking to
anyone
1 fe said he doses himseU away
like that "when I have the chance.
1 gotreaHyusedtobeingalone,
even at a very young age, out ot
choice'CorneD said ma telephone
interview. "Not seeing my friends,
not answering the phone and iu-t
living in my own world
I think I'm a little bit too
sensitive to, or too vulnerable to,
what someone else might be feel-
ing when they're around, and so it
tends to be work, subconsciously,
to be around other people ' he said
"Sometimes that can worry
vou. too. because you don't want
to break down where vou can't
-
peop



and's
� rThai
the musk
lidified ts -
That debut
drenched

droned their i
sometimes a
roaring, vo
- drew
ruresof thel .
tnl, revolution
destr �
The b.
Badmol rfinger
ertul and ofta
an altogethef n
vni track
'





(Btlt Ca0t (HuraiMm January 14, 1992 13
ts Michael
al advances'
We will do whatever wecj
,iul it that nxwnsilosingtheair
then we will do it s,iid Kha
m a party spokesman.
Michael lacksondoesnotrJ
t our culture. Chir position!
We will organize people
, me lesser-known WVstel
. have been allowed in
entertain at private dip!
� m tions, but never Wu
neral public.
imi tradition eschews pd
. �( anything sexual
tive such as much oi wl
��� 1) v does on stage.
. n �.as n(i comment
� .i - reply.
Adversity, beauty inspires
mountain artists to create art
w
ISONVILLE, Ky. (AP) -
Nestled among the Appalachian
foothills in lonely Eldridge Hollow
lies burgeoning group of artists
whose work is inspired as much by
adversity as beauty.
With thearea'sunemployment
running at about 24 percent, a mix-
tureof economic hardshipand bore-
dom has driven these mountain
people 10 develop their own brand
of folk art. And it haseamed several
of them national reputations.
"They're people who have fed
Of) each other and have helped to
MMure each other said Adrian
Swain, curator of Morehead State
University's Folk Art Collection.
The rugged country along the
right fork of Newcombe Creek in
Eltiott County has provided much
of the artists' raw material.
In a twisted root from the back
yan 1, Ti m Lewi s en vi si( ns a bri ghtly
cokrod tiger whose lurching bodv
becomes the kindle of a walking
stick.
A set of $8 discount-store chis-
els transformsa discarded chimney
stone into a bust reminiscent of an-
cient Africa artistry.
Lewis, whose last job was driv-
ing a coal truck in an area where
coal production has all but ceased,
said he began carving because he'd
"run out of anything to do But I
think it'sbecomea little morc tome
now. I call it art now
His cousin, Erma "junior"
Lewis, uses his tools to release fenv
cious American Indian-style totems
from ordinary logs. But those same
hands also have given expression
10 beautiful biblical scenes.
Despite the artists' diverse
styles, they share a common muse
� Minnie Adkins.
Adkins, a sturdy woman with
a spritely face, began peddling her
carvings about eight years ago to
supplement her husband's income.
The 57-year-old Adkinsencour-
aged her neighbors to start crea ti ng,
and her financial success was the
impetus they needed.
"Setting a piece of wood for a
lot of money? Everyone else was
into it, and 1 said, 'I could do that"
Tim Lewis said.
Adkins had toyed withcarving
and quilting all her life. But a visit to
Swain's own Morehead gallery in
1984 made her rcali zc her artistic �
and economic � potential.
Her first pieces were simple �
little songbirds and roosters
whittled from forked sticks.
With the encouragement of
those first sales, she began to blos-
som, Swain said.
"1 watched her evolve from a
fairly modest beginning into what
became, really very quickly, in a
couple of years, quite bold Swain
said.
Adkins and her 63-year-old
husband,Garland, now share in the
design,carving and painting of cre-
ations that run from simple animal
figures to complicated biblical
scenes.
The couple's works are dis-
played in galleries, museums and
houses across the country. Some
pieces sell for as much as $1,500.
Junior Lewis, 43, took Adkins'
advice and started carving alliga-
tors, dogs, squirrels and other ani-
mals to supplement his tobacco
farming income.
Now, works such as his three-
dimensional "Garden of Eden"
fetch up to $600 apiece.
Adkins has used her fame to
help her neighbors market their
pieces.
When dealers come to Eld ridge
Hollow to buy the couple's work,
she sends them to other artists'
homes.
Linville Barker, 63, who
moved to Isonville after retiring as
a steel mill technician, was "climb-
ing the walls" from boredom.
Minnie Adkins urged Barker
to "make a little something so he
started carving what have become
his trademark: faceless pigs, cats
and other animals.
"Minnichad somebody lookat
them, and he bought everything I
had Barker said.
Video Top 10 List
The following are the most popular videos as they
appear in next week's issue of Billboard magazine. Copy-
right 1992, Billboard Publications, Inc. Reprinted with
permission.
29
�f-fcr
VIDEO SALES
1Fantasia" (Disney)
Z"Robin Hood: Prince
of Thieves" (Warner)
3Home Alone" (Fox)
4Ghost" (Paramount)
5. "The Rescuers Down
Under" (Disney)
6The Jungle Book"
(Disney)
7The Terminator"
(Hemdale)
8lfs a Wonderful Life:
48th Anniversary Edition"
(Republic)
9HowtheGrinch Stole
Christmas" (MGM-UA)
10. "1992 Playboy Video
Playmate Calendar" (Play-
boy Home Video)
VIDEO RENTALS
lCity Slickers" (Co-
lumbia)
2Terminator 2: Judg-
ment Da' (Live)
3Backdraft" (MCA-
Universal)
4. "The Silence of the
Lambs" (Orion)
5. "What About Bobr
(Touchstone)
6Soapdish' (Para-
mount)
7FXZ- The Deadly Art
of Illusion" (Orion)
8Robin Hood: Prince
of Thieves" (Warner)
9TheNakedGun21
2: The Smell of Fear" (Para-
mount)
10. "Out for Justice"
(Warner)
'Grand Canyon' returns Kline to a softer style of work
't
tl a
NEW YORK (AP) � Spend
enough time in the theater and
you're bound to pick up a few su-
perstitions, like not whistling dur-
ing a perfornvmce or never saving
the last line of a play before openi ng
night.
Another little rule, Kevin Kline
will tell you, involves a certain
Shakespearean work in which he
performed while at Indiana Uni-
� versify a drama he joined at a time
he was supposed to be taking clas-
. sical piano.
"Thev were auditioning the
Scottish play he whispered dur
�toga recent interview, raising his
�eyebrows and looking around his
publicist's office to see if anyone
else was listening. "You're not al-
lowed to siy it aloud � bad luck �
but since we're not in a theater I'll
say it out loud, 'Macbeth
"I went to watch and the direc-
tor saw me and said, 'You haven't
auditioned' and that I hadn't filled
out the cards. The whole drama
school was there, like2(X)kidsin the
classroom and I got up and read
some part in the deepest voice I
could muster; I had no clue to what
I was saying. I read the part and I
got a little part in 'Macbeth' and it
was fun
His voice lifts up sweetly as he
finishes, as if this were a tlwrming,
casual experience, like having a
drink with an old friend, and not
the beginning of a long-term obses-
sion.
Kline, 44, is unashamedly in
love with acting, with expression
and storytelling, with the sheer joy
of pouring himself into his charac-
ter.
Even in this casual setting, that
shows: his inflections, his concen-
tration, the shifts in mexxi between
playful and thoughtful, the sweep-
ing hand movements, the way he
curls and spreads his long fingers.
"I was never shy although a lot
of people told me 1 was shy said
Kline. "1 think what they meant
was I was emotionally repressed
and not forthcoming.
"One of the things 1 didn't like
a bou t bci ng a musician was the lone-
liness of it, and 1 liked being in this
play. It's very social, you're always
working with people. It's likea team
spor whereas practicing piano is a
solitary sort of thing. I think I was
emotionally guarded and drama
demanded that I dropped it
It was a lesson he had to
learn again in films. Three years
ago, Kline was in a rut. A dynamic,
award-winning actor on stage �
twoTonysand twoObics�he had
cut himself down to size for the big
screen. With "The Big Chill "Vio-
lets are Blue" and others, he had
settled into a pattern of low-key
performances that focused on his
characters' inner lives.
He was eager to break out, and
John Cleese, his co-star in the film
"Silverado was eager to let him
do it. The former Monty Python
performer chose him to play a
bumbling, demonic jewel thief in a
"A Fish Called Wanda
For the first time since "Sophie's
Choice"and 'TiratesofPenzance
his first two features, Kline was
holding nothing back. His charac-
ter was loud, mean and out of con-
trol , a villain who jammed a pear in
a man's mouth and french fries up
nvy-1' � "t
arzi
orr:

"
Soundgarden opens new doors 'JFK'
his nose.
"It was great to break all the
rules I had made for myself in the
films before said Kline, who won
the Academy Award for best sup-
porting actor.
"I had been much more 'natu-
ralistic' I used to think I'll never be
able to let go on the scale that I can
on stage
'Xirand Canyon his new film,
is a return to the softer style of his
earlier work.Kline plays an affluent
lawyer who has a midlife crisis after
he's nearly mugged.
The film also stars Steve Mar-
tin, Danny Glover, Mary McDonnell
and Alfre Woodard.
Continued from page 9
j Th� t��t C�rolmt(
range and bizarre
so when you read it it Piuses you
stion everything in your oi
lifi
i lomes, 29, das written tw
� ks the novel lack" and act
tion ol stories, The Safety
I Ibjei ts
- is a story about ft yoi
� who discovers that his fathet
She doesn t hold back in "T
Safer) of Objects Iherearecra
- ne smokers, .i mother cutting off I
- n s respirator, a man killed if
h iliry, shopping mall.
!
STUDENTS
Is your humble
abode a bit too
humble?
PHILADELPHIA (AP) �
Quiet, enigmatic singer Chris
Cornell of the not-so-quiet but
equally enigmatic quartet
Soundgarden wrote a song for the
Kind's new album after spending
10days in a room without talking to
anyone.
He said he closes himself away
like that "when I have the chance
"1 got really used tobcingalone,
even at a very young age, out of
choice Cornell said in a telephone
interview. "Not seeing my friends,
not answering the phone, and just
living in my own world
"I think I'm a little bit too
sensitive to, or too vulnerable to,
what someone else might be feel-
ing when they're around, and so it
tends to be work, subconsciously,
to be around other people he said.
"Sometimes that can worry
you, too, because you don't want
to break down where you can't
really function with other
people"
Soundgarden's music really is
suited for those times when you're
alone. It'sbnxxiing, introspective.
Thcband'sl989dcbutonA&M,
"Louder Than Love helped bring
the music world's attention to the
Seattle scene and defined and so-
lidified its sound.
That debut was a record
drenched in guitarist Kim Thayil's
minor chords that snarled and
droned their way around Cornell's
sometimes crooning, sometimes
roaring, vocals.
Its lyrics drew dispiriting pic-
tures of the lust for power and con-
trol,revolution,and environmental
destruction.
The band's new album,
"Badmotorfinger is no less pow-
erful and often no less dismal, but is
an altogether more mature effort.
One track, "Jesus Christ Pose
which Cornell said addresses "an
individual'spersecution complex
has prompted fans to write to the
band's fan club, saying their par-
ents were upset with the song's ac-
companying video. The clip fea-
tures crucified women and skel-
etons.
"I think people are afraid of it
just because of the title he said. "I
don't think most people who take
offense to most things in art or mu-
sic tend to look past the surface.
"It wasn't so much religious as
being annoyed with the exploita-
tion of symbols tha t are held sacred,
especially that one (the cross).
"It's not really my responsibil-
ity to understand someone else's
feelings or ideas or attitudes when
it comes to being an artist or a
writer.
"It's more their responsibility
to understand what I'm doing if it
bothers them he said.
2
After you buy your
books at U.B.E
Come upstairs to
see us!
rs & prints
mounting
"ames
m framing
five matting
try
Inal art
A-� 9-6 Sat 10-5
UNIVERSITY
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ic Jim
I
FREE GUIDE TO SPRING RREAK '92
ou're Invited to the
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Tension in the theater rises; the
ideas presented would scare any-
one. The realization that "JFK" is
not just another movie makes most
people squirm.
For a 11 who see "JFK the mo vie
inspires thoughts they have never
thought before. It raises questions
about every aspect of the govern-
ment system that has been trusted
for so long. These thoughts should
make all Americans feel uncom-
fortable and curious to find out how
much the government can be
trusted.
Younger audience members
will be amazed as they watch the
past come alive. Twenty-five years
have passed since Jim Garrison's
investigation started, yet they will
see and understand all the fear and
rage of the people as the past is
brought back to life before their
eyes. JFK is an outstanding history
lesson for those who are too young
to have experienced the assassina-
tion first hand.
For the members of the audi-
ence who were alive when John F.
Kennedy was assassinated, JFK is a
reminder of what they experienced
back then. Most will relive their
own emotions they felt when they
first heard of the shooting and the
hate thev felt for Oswald when he
was arrested for the murder of the
President of the United States. They
will remember their fear when they
heard the rumors of the conspiracy
that might have taken place in the
higher levels of the country's gov-
ernment.
Costner makes this movie come
alive. Not once is the reality of his
character questioned. The personal
and professional drive to discover
what truly happened to the presi-
dent is apparent in everything he
does and says. The audience can
easily pick up on his every emotion.
Costner is familiar with the type
of role he plays in JFK, a strong-
willed man who marches to a dif-
ferent drum. He is driven to live his
life against the grain of popular
thought.
Just as in "Dances with Wolves"
and "Field of Dreams society casts
stones and calls him insane, because
they don't understand or don't want
to believe what he stands for. But
there is no stopping this man with a
quest for truth.
Costner has proven once again
that he can handle an intense, dra-
matic role and mezmerize his au-
dience with his character's passion.
In this particular film, he has proven
that he can give a powerful enough
performance to cause the audience
to question one of the most influen-
tial organizations in the world, the
United States government.
Sissy Spacek gave a believable
performance asGarrison's wife. She
plays the role of the dutiful wife
who does her best to support her
husband, despite the personal con-
flicts she has with his work. Spacek
gives an especially touching per-
formance when she finally believes
in her husband. This role fits her
like a glove.
Kevin Bacon has an interesting
role in "JFK He is a convicted
criminal who solves some unan-
swered questions of Garrison's.
This role is quite different from
what Bacon has played in the past.
Speaking with a heavy Southern
drawl, he tells of his mostly homo-
sexual involvement with the group
that Garrison suspects killed
Kennedy.
If a film is determined suc-
cessful by the extent of the emotions
stirred in the hearts of those watch-
ing, orby the intensity of the drama,
then "JFK" should be the most
successful movie of this season.
Viewers are kept on the edge of
their seats, because they know that
the characters and the events are
real. They are a part of our nation's
history.
M
� II
1
LASAGNA DINNER
Wednesday Night,
January 15th,
5:00 pm
Methodist Student Center
Downstairs
501 East 5th St
across from Garrett Dorm
4
Sponsored by Methodist A Prssbytsrlsn
Campus Ministries
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
RATES PER COLUMN INCH
Local Open Rate $5.00
Student $2.50
Bulk & Frequency Contract
Discounts Available
Advertisinf Representatives:
L'sa Betting Beau Canton
I'm Knotty �Richard UtOm
AndySutorim
Business Hours
Monday - Friday
9:00 - 5:00
757-6366
V I





14 glfrg gagtCHarolinian January 14, 1992
Theatre helps teach medical interns
Chapel Hill � The young
woman dons a white lab coat and
prepares to rruvt her patients. She
hasn't graduated from medical
school vet � but she is no im-
ister.
She's an actress. The "patients"
are performers, too. But all are
working toward health-carecarccrs
or already practicing them. And
their stints with the UNC Staged
Readings Company at the Univer-
sity of North Carolina at Chapel
1 fill just might make them move
effective practitioners.
The company is a component
ol the ground breaking N.C. Medi-
cine and Society Readers' Repertory
! 1 teater, started in 1908 at the UNC-
111 School of Medicine. The Na-
tional Endowment for the Humani-
ties awarded the N.C. Humanities
(Council a $75,000 grant to support
the project the first of its kind in the
nation. Medical schoolsat Dukeand
the East Carolina universities also
participate.
A project like this really does
providemedical students the chance
to explore their role in society and
gi ves people who come to perfor-
mances the opportunity to have an
impart on that education said
Nancy M.P. King, theater founder
and assistant professor of stxrial
medicine at UNC-CH.
Literary works, usually
adapted short stones, provide the
vehicles through which students,
faculty and staff from the UNC-Ch
School of Medicine, other campus
departments and UNC Hospitals
leant by performing and bv in-
teracting with audience members
afterward.
The theater groups travel to li-
braries, county medical societies,
retirement communities and com-
munity centers around the state to
perform and discuss the stories, all
of which address doctor-patient is-
sues.
Audiences generally welcome
the chance to share their views on
the issues raised by the presenta-
tions, "all of the stories we do cause
people to make connections with
medical experiences they've had
Mid King.
Director Richard Robeson said,
"The succcssof anevent is measured
by the extent to which the audience
becomes involved in thediscussion
afterward
One of the original consultants
for the medical theater project,
Robeson finds his directing duties
rewarding. "1 like being involved
with any sort of art form that asso-
ciates itself with ideas and the
thought process he said. "Theater
helps people consider the world
outside themselves
Performers sometimes are sur-
prised by audience perspectives,
said King. For example, audience
members might feel sympathetic
toward a doctor character for who
the medical students feel no sym-
pathy, or vice versa.
The actors are also interested in
hearing the expectations patients
have, said King. Most of the stu-
dentsarein their first or second year
of medical school and haven't
worked in the hospital, she said.
"Thevliketheopportunitytotalkto
real people and to be taken seri-
ously
Informal conversations follow
post-performance group discus-
sions.
Each school performs four
times per semester under grant.
Popular demand usually elicits one
or two additional shows in each
community. The UNC Staged Read-
ings Company favors adapted
works bv physician-writer William
Carlos Williams, whose story "A
Face of Stone" was performed dur-
ing the fall.
Another Williams short story
will be performed in the spring.
"Old Doc Rivers" is about an alco-
holic, drug-addicted man who is
his community's only doctor. The
story raises questions concerning
who gets to be doctor and what
makes a good doctor, King said.
Short stories evoke thoughtful
commentary, said King. "I like the
richness with which you can have a
discussion about ethics when it's
coming out of literature she said.
Robeson recalled an earlier
production adapted from a work
by Katherine Anne Porter and per-
formed for the Moore County
Medical Society. In the story, parents
whosechild maybe retarded follow
doctors' recommendations to insti-
tutionalize him.
The production raised ques-
tions on which doctors in the audi-
ence were polarized, said Robeson.
"Is the whole family the patient, or
just the child? Is there a lack of
compassion? Is the child being
martyred? It made for a lively de-
bate he said.
Robeson, a writer, poet, music
teacher and composer, enjoys di-
recting "original work by people
with their own ideas to express
He said the medical group dif-
fers from others he's directed in
several ways.
'The performersare usual ly not
very experienced Robeson said.
"And there are operational differ-
encesof having peoplelcamhow to
do a reading
He said there is a positive dif-
ference. "Everyone I've worked
with is involved because the sub-
jectsor issuesare important to them.
Their enthusiasm is commensurate
with that involvement. They're
easier to work with in the sense that
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
" o
ECf
is now accepting Applications
Volunteers must have:
2.2 GPA
Regular access to a car
2 free hours a week
Deadline: January 23rd
Call 757-6137 or come by Brewster A 409
& T�n
HUNGRY PIRATE
521 Cotanche Street
757-1666
The Biggest Burrito
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11
5, Weekdays
5, Weekends

The East
Carolinian
Possibly
the only
organization
on campus
that's not
tapping your
phones
they're committed to the ideals of
the project
Everyone who wants to par-
ticipate is included, King said.
The medical schools take vari-
ousapproachestotheater,Kingsaid.
East Carolina's performances are
akin to traditional readers' theater;
Duke's have ranged from the read-
ers' theater style to full fledged dra-
matic productions; and UNC-
Chapel Hill's performances fall
somewhere in between.
"We ki nd of li ke the in-bet ween
because you do a little bit of what's
in the story and it gets people's
imaginationsgoing King said. The
UNC-CH performers move around
the stage some bu t read from scri pts.
Forcing them to memorize their lines
would take so much more time that
it would detract from focusing on
ideas, she said.
The N C. Medicine and Society
Readers' Repertory Theaters' inno-
vative approach to ideas has
spawned similar projects. The con-
cept entered thecurriculumat UNC-
CH, that trend is reflected in the
movement toward more ambula-
tory care, she said. Curriculum
planners also are considering re-
quiring medical students to do
community service projects.
Meanwhile, alumni of the
medical theater groups are spread-
ing that concept wherever they go.
King said the former East Carolina
director is now studying at the Uni-
versity of Kentucky at Louisville
and isconsideringstarringa similar
program there.
Robeson praised King. "Thede-
partment of social medicine de-
servesa lot of credit for its visionary
approach to education he said.
pjraucSattempts
to salvage 'Rosie'
LOS ANGELES (AP) - In
an industry where few speak
their mind with anything ap-
proaching candor, television
producer Barney Rosenzweig is
an anomaly.
Not only does he speak his
mind, but most recently he spent
$50,000 to vent it through ads in
The New York Times, USA To-
day and the Los Angeles Times.
What he wants is to save his
CBS series, "The Trials of Rosie
O'Neill What he has gotten isa
temporary reprieve.
"Had we done nothing, we
would have been canceled he
its 1990 fall schedule.
Rosenzweig and "Rosie
which were supposed to be
ready fora spring debut, walked
onstageaboutfourmonthsearlv
Things went more or less
downhill from there.
Critics liked the series'
senptsad acting performances
Audiences watched in small,but
loyal, numbers.
Bothcritksand viewers had
a hard time liking the character
of RosieONeill, who faced some
of the most contemporary is-
sues of our time (such as sexism
and racism) but was often not
says, resolutely. 'This is a small very nice about it.
victory and 1 take them as I get
them
Rosenzweig's diminutive
triumph came in the form of a
November purchase by CBS for
three additional episodes of
"Rosie O'Neill That number,
though, is far from the usual
"back nine" that networks give
series to complete a full season
order of 22 installments.
CBS refused comment on
Rosenzweig.
That the producer was able
to finagle any pickup order at all
fora beleaguered series that even
he calls "good, but not great" is
more a testament to his will than
to the quality of his show.
It has been an uphill battle
for "Rosie" since its rushed de-
but two seasons ago. When
Connie Chung abruptly an
The show starsShan m (.less
asa hard-edged public defender
from a rich family.
In the second season,
Rosenzweig softened Qess'
character (Gless also is his real-
life wife), brought in Ed Asner
in guest roles and hired Robert
Wagner to play Rosie's love in-
terest for three episodes.
The three episodes featur-
ing Wagner have yet to air. The
program also has been yanked
for the entire month oi January
(because of a feared clobbering
from the highly popular
"Columbo" TV movies specially
broadcast during that period by
ABC).
It most likely will not return
at least until March, after
February's Winter Olympics.
So for right now
nounced she was dumping her Rosenzweig does know not
upcoming prime-time series to when his series will return or it
"aggressively pursue" concei v- the network will broadcast all of
inga child, CBS was left with an the remaining six episodes from
hourlong programming hole in the 1991-92 season.
SAVE TIME!
Save
Stamps
Too
Pay Your
utility
bill at
the
NEW
EAST
BANK at
Mendenhall.
Monday - Friday
10 am-2 pm
Call Greenville Utilities at
551-1539 for further information
L
d
NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
Would tike to
Welcome New and Returning Students
dnd Invite You to Join Us
in Newman9s Version of "Mass at Camelot"
Campus Mass Schedule for Soring Session:
Sunday 11:30 am & 8:30 pm Newman Center
Wednesday 5:30 pm Newman Center
Followed by a Meat
953 East 10th Street
(At tile foot of College Hill Drive)
Greenville, NC 27836-2405
757-3760
L.
tton abort these and mer propaw sponsored by the
,caU or vi the OnterdiSy between 8-30 am and Upm.
Fr. Pin! Vaeth, Chaphhi ft Campus Minister (757-1991)
iiiMb
Gibson aba
NEW YORK (AP) - Singer
ijbieGibson, who first auditioned
r a Broadway show at age 6, fi-
By landed a role 15 years later.
debuted Jan. 7 as Eporune in
gs Miserables
But in those 15 years, besides
ting a lot of auditioning, she has
ip sold millions of records.
Gibson's 1987 debut album,
Xit of the Blue sold 3 million
pies and made her famous as a
iger. Her 1989 follow-up, "Elec-
C Youth sold 2 million. "Any-
ng Is Possible m 1990, bold 1
Jlion.
But diminishing record sales
yen't the reason she auditioned
�"LesMiz
Through the years, she has au-
ioned for Broadway parts, suit-
le or not, with an enthusiastic a�-
jde she calls "realistic and opti-
stic
Whileshe doesn't eva
bvr all her auditions, shj
member trying out for
'The first time, 1 wa
for one of the orphans,
sing Happy Birthday
callback y u could sing r
1 auditioned several timti
"When 1 was 11 I w.
the last 10 girls for Annu
tall at the time. I wore b3
and bent mv knees. But tfl
on and threw me right
kind of depressing. 1 nd
play Annie
Gibson, who gra
Merrick, Long Island,
when she was 3 she said
be on Broadway somedai
�vn an vthing.lt just alwj
it was the highest place j
be.
"The first time I wasj
wastoaudibon,nottc i
2ueen Elizabetl
(AP)�"There is the business-
m or businesswoman who may
il fly in one direction but comes
oard either to prepare for an im-
rtant meeting or is using the ship
unwind afterwards. You see lots
attache cases in the library and
blic rooms.
"Next are families rekcating.
ey have an automobile on board,
S of luggage in the hold. They
rfer having their possessions with
nn, rather than flying and having
an shipped.
"Then there is the tourist going
er to Europe or the United States,
io regards shipboard life as part
Ihe total experience
With auto rental costs nsing
oughout Europe "having your
�onboard isconvenient and more
momical says Frederick Pills-
ry of Key West, Ha whose 1990
nge Rover was in the hold, ready-
roll when his luggage cleared
customs.
In a reprise of the
ties again are going u
plank. Recent pas- i .
Julie Andrews, Andi
Weber, Cispar Weii -I
Savalas, Michael Cravst
land Amory and Dec
Terence Stamp and
Fairbanks jr.are deeme
by the crew
'Trans-Atlantic pas
marginally younger tha
cruises in the opinid
Applebv, librarian of
5,000-volume library.
"Thev're more hyp
come aboard, more n
where they are going.
of research into routes i
tions. About 1 jOOObookJ
crossing, mostly biograj
ries, anything about th
lly
"Cruise1 passengej
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
PIRATES
1992 PEACH BOWL CHAMPIONS I
"Peach
IS92
111
I
AS AT
Believe it!
PK A II
i!lMWI.
IANTA.GA.
NUARY1,1W2
ECU NCSU i
37 34
jfu Student Stores
im
t 0j rampni
in the hear
Own: �Mcn-Tkur. &�
J fri. 6-500
Sat. W5-00
-&-00
mr





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from a rich family.
� c second season,
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pisodes.
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tor further information.
AN
lent Center
Ike to
eturning Students
to Join Us
"Mass at Camelot"
leforSpring Spssinn
0 pm Newman Center
i Newman Center
y a Meal
:h Street
lege Hill Drive)
27836-2605
m
otlier programs sponsored by the
daily between 8:30 am and 11 pm.
:ampus Minister (757-1991)
Jk
MMfC IgjMM VUtUtUHUlt UANUAHY l, I tfU IO
Gibson abandons singing for Broadway
NEW YORK (AP) - Singer
bbioC.ibson, who first auditioned
r a Broadway show at age 6, fi-
lly landed a role 15 years later,
c dAotad Jan. 7 as Eponine in
es Miserables
But in those 15 years, besides
�ing a lot of auditioning, she has
o sold millions of records.
Gibson's 1987 debut album,
Xit Of the Blue sold 3 million
pies and made her famous as a
ger Her 1989 follow-up, "Elec-
C Youth sold 2 million. "Any-
ng Is Possible in 1990, sold 1
llion.
But diminishing record sales
Ten t die reason she auditioned
� "Los Miz
Through the years, she his on-
ioned tor Broadway parts, suit-
le or not, with an enthusiastic at-
idc she calls "realistic and opti-
stic
While she doesn'tcven remem-
ber all her auditions, she docs re-
member trying out for "Annie
"The first time, I was 6. It was
for one of the orphans. You had to
sing ' hippy Birthday If you got a
callback you could sing Tomorrow
I auditioned several times.
"When 1 was 11 I was down to
the last 10 girls for Annie. I was too
tall at the time. I wore baggy pants
and bent my knees. But they caught
on and threw me right out. It was
kind of depressing. I never got to
play Annie
Gibson, who grew up in
Merrick, Long Island, recalls that
when she was5 she said, I want to
be on Broadway someday I hadn't
seenanything. It justalwaysseemcd
it was the highest place you could
be.
"The first time 1 was in a theater
was toaudition, not to sceanything.
The first show I saw was 'Annie I
was 7 or 8.1 kept thinking, 'Am I
dreaming? I can't believe I'm here
seeing a Broadway show
Over the years, she kept on au-
ditioning.
'Tor Tvita' you were supposed
to have dark hair she recalls. "I
went anyway. I auditioned for Star-
light Express That looked like a
scene from 'Funny Girl I was on
roller skates. I couldn't skate to save
my life. I never even got to sing my
16 bars on that one.
"There was a show that closed
in previews, Surf Gty where I was
called back 11 times. It was Beach
Boys music. It seemed like a good
idea
Gibson auditioned for Eponine
before "Les Miz" opened in 1987.
Now that she's 21, Gibson thinks
she was too young to play Eponine
then. "I'm ready now.
'She'sin love with Manus (the
young male lead, a revolutionary)
but he's in love with Cosette (Jean
Valjcan's adopted daughter).
Eponine dies in his arms on the
barracade. She sings 'On My Own'
and 'A Little Fall of Rain' with
Manus as she is dying.
"In the beginning you see her
as a little girl. I'm not Eponine until
a third of the way into the show.
Before thatl playchorus roles which
arereallyfun �a factory worker,a
farm worker, a prostitute where
they sing 1ovely Ladies
Last summer Gibson was on
the road, giving concerts.
"I was performing 'On My
Own she says. 'It was a bit of a
risky thing to do, for a pop audi-
ence. The response was amazing.
Young kids knew where it came
from. I spoke a little about 'Les Miz'
and how I wanted to do this role
someday. They applauded at the
mention of 'Les Miz
"I wanted to introduce this song
to people and they knew it already
Gibson will be in "Les Miz" at
the Imperial Theater for three
months, replacing NatalieToro who
is taking a vacation. Then she'll work
on a fourth album.
The singer is also popular in
Japan, where there are DebbieGibson
clothing stores.
"The Japanese designer came to
my house and went through my
closet she says. 'The store is a big
version of my closet
About her third album selling
"only" a million copies, she says, "I
guess that's not that important to
me. I don't think it was because I
wasn't a teen anymore. In people's
minds there's a bump in the road
there. In reality there is not.
"I think if s because that album
was half pop rock and half ballads
�musical music. If you listen to the
radio, there is very little musical
music. It frustrates me no end that
ballads these days are based on a
groove instead of a melody.
"I don't smoke, drink or do
drugs. Some people lump that to-
gether with I'm a wimp and don't
have a mind.
And some people have a hard
time watching me grow up.
Some say, Wear something
sexy The other half says. Stay 16
E very one else i s goi ng to ha ve to do
the adjusting. I'm going to grow up
however I grow up
The day she turned 21, on Aug.
31, Gibson had flu and a fever. She
stayed in bed all day but sang that
night at an AIDS benefit in Los An-
geles. "I see performing on my
birthday as a treat as opposed to
work
Jueen Elizabeth offers alternate route
(AP)�"There is the business-
m or businesswoman who may
41 fly in one direction but comes
oard either to prepare for an im-
rtant meeting or is using the ship
unwind afterwards. You see lots
attache castes in the library and
blic nx�ms.
ext are families relcxating.
ey have an automobile Ml board,
s of luggage in the hold. They
Her havingtheir possessions with
m, rather than flvingand having
�m shipped.
"Then there is the tourist going
er to Europe or the United States,
� regards shipboard life as part
the total experience
With auto rental costs rising
oughout Europe "having your
on board isconvenient and more
momical says Frederick Pills-
ry of Key West, Fla whose 1990
nge Rover was in the hold, ready
roll when his luggage cleared
customs.
In a aprise of the '20s, celebri-
ties again are going up the gang-
plank. Recent passengers included
Julie Andrews, Andrew Lloyd
Weber, Caspar Weinberger, Telly
Savalas, Michael Crawford, Cleve-
land Amory and Dean Martin.
Terence Stamp and Douglas
FairNinksIr.aadeemed "regulars"
bv the crew.
' Trans-Atlantic passengers are
marginally younger than those on
cruises in the opinion of une
Appleby, librarian of the QE2's
0,(XK)-vohime library.
'They're nxm? hyper when they
come aboard, move intense about
where they are going. They do a lot
of ICJeUCh into routes and destina-
tions. About 1 ,(XX) bwks go out on a
creasing, mostly biographies, histo-
ries, anything about the royal fam-
ily.
"Cruise passengers take out
fewer books, mostly best sellers and
romantic novels. During evening
hours on a crossing, there is a rush
for reference works to settle argu-
ments that came up at dinner
Captains work harder on an
Atlantic crossing. Fog off theGrand
Banks and the world's most unpre-
dictable sea and weatherconditions
require long hours on the bridge.
"A North Atlantic storm can
be mon1 ferocious than a hurricane
and come up with less warning
says WoodaH over the melancholy
moan of the fog horn, on automatic,
every two minutes, off
Newfoundland's Cape Race. Near
here two decades ago, the QE2
Kittled the worst storm in his ex-
perience. "Waves 100 feet high put
us twodayslateinlo Southampton
Social life on the Atlantic also
makes greater demands. "You're
concentrating a lot into four and a
half days the captain sighs.
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
PIRATES
f��� PWACH BOWt CHAMPIOMS I
jjjUM Ufy
IPeach iBowfictorvj
CU37 h
1892
NCSI 34
111
I
AS AT
THE
PEACH
illOWL
1ANTA,GA.
NUARY 1,1992
Believe it!
ECU NCSU
37 34
fMf PSACM aOWt CMAMMONS
mcu 37" 34"��
EAST CAROLINA j
PIRATES '
itk a Own
or
Sweatshirt
Ttu Student Stores
"Wright feiiimi na
!n tke heart of iamyus
3W
Open IMon-Tkur. &�
7 Tri.6-5 00
Sat- 10- - 5:00
"Three,formal nights in a row
and all those receptions
Crossing people tend to spend
less time in the casino, the physical
fitness rooms, the "computer learn-
ing center" and similar innovations
borrowed from the cruise ships.
They are more apt to be at shuffle-
board when the noon whistle bel-
lows or tossing deck quoits as, di-
rectly overhead, theConcordeemits
its double sonic boom on a flight
path subtly coordinated with the
shi p. They get as excited as Colum-
bus' crewat sighting the first seagull
and shiver at the rail by dawn's
early light to catch Bishop's Rock
Light, England's earliest landfall,
blinking over the horizon.
The fate of the Titanic is their
constant fascination. The entire
crew is pestered with queries as to
when the ship will approach lati-
tude 41.46 north, longitude 50.14
west, where that murderousiceberg
lurked on an April night in 1912.
"We'll be right over her in a
tick deck stewards oblige.
Woodall's final word is, "The
only ice I feel comfortable with is in
my glass
B&Jlose support
BEND, Ore. (AP) � Frank
a nd Ed, the lovable hayseed huck-
sters for Bartles & Jayies wine
coolers, are out of work.
"It was a hell f a ride while
it lasted said rancher David
Rufkahr, who portrayed Frank
Bartles, the one who did all the
talking in thepopularseven-year
ad campaign.
The end came without fan-
fare. Rufkahr, who lives just out-
side Bend, didn'teven get to keep
the straw fedora and
suspenders.
'That's all theirs he said.
"It's down there in creative ser-
vices
Officials of Emest and Julio
Gallo, which produces the wine
coolers, wouldn't comment on
the end of the campaign.
"They're going in a different
di rection, I guess, so they released
us said Rufkahr, whose last con-
tract expired about Nov. 1.
"They always informed us
in writing before then that they
were going to use us.
But thev didn't send us anv
J J
notification this time, so 1 kind of
got the feeling it was fading
away he said.
Rufkahr, who got the call
shortly before Christmas, saw it
coming.
"That's what they told us
when we first started he said.
You make a national
commercial, it's usually good
for six months It just kept go-
�- - tr
ing.
The campaign helped make
Bartles & James the nation's top
selling wine cooler.
Frank's deadpan trademark
comment, "And thank you for
your support became part of
the American lexicon.
Rufkahr and Santa Rosa,
Calif building contractor Dick
Maugg, who played the reticent
Ed Jaymes, shot their last com-
mercial in April.
In that spot, Frank has laryn-
gitis, which forces Ed to talk.
Rufkahr's face may be well
known across America, but the
commercials didn' t make him all
that rich, he said.
"We wasdoin' all right he
said. "I made good money, but 1
didn't make fabulous money
H
H
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s9





ottiz lEaBt (Earoltntan
January 14,1992
Spoils
Lewis leaves
for post at
Georgia Tech
By Jeff Becker
Staff Writer
Five days after winning the
Peach Bowl in Atlanta, ECU'S head
football coach, Bill Lewis, resigned
his position to become the head
football coach at Georgia Tech.
Lewis ended his three-year ca-
reer at ECU with the best season in
the school's history. The team fin-
ished ninth in the country with a 11-
1 record and a win in the Peach
Bowl. Lewis, the 1991 Kodak and
UPI national coach of the year, com-
piled a 21-12-1 record in his three
years as the school's head coach.
Several factors played a part in
his decision to join Georgia Tech,
Lewis said.
"In the things 1 want to accom-
plish in my coaching career, in the
goals that I wanted to achievecoach-
ing, the Georgia Tech situation ex-
cited me Lewis said. "I feel all of
the things nationally I wanted to do
with a programare there right no w
Lewis also said Georgia Tech's
outstanding academic record was
important in his decision.
" really feel strongly � and
this is not negative toward East
Carolina and I'm not making com-
parisons here � but 1 think that the
decade of the 90s in intercollegiate
athletics there is going to be tremen-
dous emphasis toward academics
.id academic reforms Lewis said
'nn the case of Georgia Tech,
they have been a long-time leader
in that area and I think they are
going to be one of a handful of
programs in the country that will
have an opportunity to serve as a
role model for everyone else
Membership in the Atlantic
Coast Conference was another im-
portant factor in deciding to join
Georgia Tech, Lewis said.
"1 am just not sure of what the
future of independents in thiscoun-
try will be Lewis said. '1 think
Notre Dame stands on very solid
ground, but I'm not sure where ev-
erybody else stands. That is a con-
cern of mine, and at decision mak-
ing time that was one of the consid-
erations because I think the Atlantic
Coast Conference, athletically, is
very sound, very solid.
'Their future relationships with
the bowl games appears to be very
sound and very solid. In the case of
the football aspect of the Atlantic
Coast Conference, they are enjoy-
ing right now their highest viability
ever in the history of that confer-
ence
Lewis signed a five-year roll-
over contract � a contract that re-
news every year � with Georgia
Tech for an undisclosed amount of
money.
Lewis replaces Bobby Ross who
left Georgia Tech to take over as
head coach for the NFL's San Diego
Chargers. Ross had a base salary of
$150,000 but eared more than
$350,000 annually from benefits
such as radio and television.
The contract Lewis signed to
become ECU'S head football coach
was a four-year roll-over that in-
cluded a buyout clause.
In order for Lewis to leave ECU,
the university would have to be
reimbursed for the remaining three
years of the contract.
Lewis, who had a base salary of
$95,000, said he took out a loan to
pay off the debt.
Lewis coached at several uni-
versities including eight seasons as
an assistant coach at Georgia (1980-
88) and one year as an assistant
coach at Georgia Tech (1971 -72).
A parade honoring the team
will take place on Jan. 18, at 2 p.m.
Lewis, who said he regrets he did
not have a chance to bid farewell to
theteamasawhole,saidhewill not
attend the parade.
Photo by Dai) Rd � ECU Photo Lab
TOUCHDOWN!
Senior tight end Luke Fisher dives into the end zone for the game- score marked a 20-point come-from-behind victory for the Pirates,
winning touchdown against N.C.State in the 1992 Peach Bowl. The which moved the team to No. 9mthefmal Associated Press football poll
Pirates rally for 37-34 Peach Bowl victory
By Tim Hampton
Staff Writer
ATLANTA � It is to be en-
graved into the halls of Pirate lore.
A near tragedy turn jubilant
comedy.
The valiant, purple-donned
Buccaneers arising from the peril-
ous murky depths to capture the
prized booty: the 1982 Peach Bowl
trophy. In the aftermath of the in-
spiring comeback against N.C.
State in the New Yearns Day Bowl
before a record 59,322 crowd, ECU
completed a magical 11-1 season
and became the ninth-ranked team
in the nation.
Achieving these accolades
placed the Pirate faithful into a
frenzied state to which no quanti-
ties of lithium or other sedatives
could relieve. In the wanning sec-
onds of the game, as a field goal
attempt by N.C State sailed wide
right, some remained speechless,
while others screamed until their
gizzards tickled.
A post-game reveler, who
blazed onto the Fulton County sta-
dium field, summed up the sweetly
torrid event quite succinctly be-
fore grabbing a piece of purple-
painted turf: "It was a deeply mov-
ing religious experience
By now, the final score 37-34
should be permanently etched into
the collective Pirate brain. And let
it be remembered that with a com-
fortable 17-point lead, many over-
confident Packers pushed through
the turnstiles and headed to the
parking lot with more than eight
minutes remaining.
But narv a one of the Pirate
faithful left. The previous come-
back heroics displayed by ECU in
gamesagainstSouthem Miss,Syra-
cuse, Pittsburgh and Cincinnati
were enough proof that it could be
done again.
ECU had been a fourth-quar-
ter team all season. The sole blem-
ish of the 11-1 season � a 38-31
opening-game loss to the Fighting
lllini � could just as easily been
another Pirate comeback if not for
a hanky-happy headlinesmen.
With rifleman )eff Blake lead-
ing the ECU aerial assault, any-
thing was possible. Even when
faced with a 17-point deficit with
8:41 to go in the biggest game of the
season.
"Everyone knew what they
had to do, deep down Blake, the
Peach Bowl co-MVP, said. "N.C.
State didn't put that much pres-
sure on me, and 1 had time to
throw
Blake and his primary receiv-
ers of Luke Fisher, Hunter
Gallimore and Dion Johnson ex-
ecuted the final three drives which
decided the contest with precision
passingand glue-like hands. Blake
and company made a believer out
of Wolfpack head coach Dick
Shendan.
"We knew what they were ca-
pable of doing. We missed some
catches on third down and weren't
able to complete them. Our de-
See Bowl, page 18
Blake captures Peach Bowl records with a late aerial assault
By Tim Hampton
Staff Writer
ATLANTA � The miraculous 17-
point Pirate comeback in the 1992 Peach
Bowl came after hi-tech was scrapped for
a cowboy-style strategy.
ECU quarterback Jeff Blake orches-
trated the come-from-behind victory en
route to his biggest passing day of his
career, compiling 378 yards and four
touchdown passes. The scoring tosses
stand as a Peach Bowl record.
Almost 200 of Blake's passing yards
came in the second half, the majority of
which were gained in the fourth quarter.
In the final eight minutes Blake proved
why he is "too legit to quit
And the confidence became instilled
in the defensive corps as well.
"Even when we were 17 points down,
there was not a worried look on my face,
I never looked down Pirate defensive
end Jerry Dillon said.
With ECU'S back to the wall in the
fourth quarter of the New Year's bowl
game against N.C. State, Blake first at-
tempted to hop back into the saddle with
a long strike. Proving successful in the
second quarter with a 55-yard launch to
HunterCallimorefora Pirate touchdown,
Blake went back to the missile silo for a
bomb to receiver Clayton Driver near the
left side of the end zone three minutes
into the fourth quarter.
But State safety Mike Reid, who was
burned in the Gallimore score, saw the
play develop and intercepted at the State
3. The Wolfpack had possession of the
football and owned a 17-point lead with
12:16 remaining.
The circumstances did not look too
hopeful for the Pirates, in fact it was look-
ing grim.
But a strong defensive effort forced
State to punt seven plays later; once again
Blake would have a chance to marshall
his team down field. With 8:41 remain-
ing, ECU went to a shotgun formation
with eagle-eyed, rifle-armed Blake as its
commander.
The long-range artillery was put on
hold in preference to the target shoot.
Starting from the State 32, Blake went
to the short game, hitting Dion Johnson
for nine, Cedric Van Buren for eight and
Luke Fisher for 13 which placed the ball at
the two. After two incompletions, Blake
went behind left tackle Tom Scott for the
touchdown. Backed by the mighty shot-
gun, ECU then trailed by 10, 34-24 with
7:19 to go.
Blake's drop in the shotgun was un-
usually deep, a good seven-yards behind
See Blake, page 20
Cagers lose key CAA
battle to JMU, 81-77
fey (Mil
I �ECU MMtoUb
Junior guard RonneN Peterson shoots for another bucket in
ECU'S 65-62 loss to Rtehrnond Saturday night. The Pirates fell 81-
77 to James Madison in overtime Monday night.
By Lisa Spiridopoulos
Staff Writer
ECU had a 77-75 lead with 254
remaining in overtime but couldn't
convert another field goal and fell to
CAA rival James Madison 81-77.
'It really hurts said first year
head coach Eddie Payne. "We work
so hard for the whole game and then
in the end everything falls apart for
us fundamentally.
"We'll get to where we want to
go if we can pull together in crucial
points,butrightnowit's?eallyhard
he said.
JMU point guard, freshman
Kent Culuko, had a career high 25
points to lead the team. He hit for six
three-pointers and hit the tying bas-
ket to send the game into overtime.
ECU, who lead by as many as
nine points in the second half, al-
lowed JMU to comeback on the long
range shooting of Culuko.
Pirate guard Ronnell Peterson
(12 points) hit a three pointer to put
ECU up 71-68 with 1:36 left in regu-
lation. On the Dukes next trip,
Culuko answered with a three of his
own to tie the game.
Lester Lyons (11 points) made
a driving lay-up with :12 left giving
ECU the lead. With K)l left on the
clock, Culuko nailed a short jumper
to send the game into overtime.
ECU'S Anton Gill (14 points)
and Curky Young (13 points) hit
early buckets, but mat's all the Pi-
ratescould score. Peterson got called
for an intentional foul and William
Da vis sank both his free throws with
.�07 left giving them a three point
advantage. Culuko was then fouled
and madeone shot to seal the victory
for the Dukes.
Thetossforth Pirates is their
second in the CAA. On Saturday,
the Richmond Spiders defeated ECU
in another close game, 65-62.
Approximately 5300 fans were
on hand to see strong perform? .ices
by Lyons (17 points) and Gill '14
points).
Lyons is ninth in scoring in the
CAA, first in steals and third in as-
sists.
ECU,now5-6overafl,wfll travel
to Buies Creek to face Campbell on
Wednesday. They return home on
Jan. 25 to host Old Dominion for a
(to be televised on ESPN.
Johnson miscue sparks
need for redemption �
touchdown evens mistake
By Tim Hampton
Staff Writer
J
ATLANTA � Dion Johnson
prayed for a way to redeem him-
self after a fourth quarter miscue
on a punt return lead to a ECU
turnover.
With 13: 50 remaining in the
24th annual Peach Bowl on New
Year's Day, Johnson attempted to
grasp a high punt off the foot of
Wolfpack kicker Tim Kilpatrick,
but the wiry, all-purpose speed-
ster fumbled the ball at mid-field.
After retaining possession,
N.C. State quickly capitalized on a
48-yard flea-flicker as quarterback
Terry Jordan lateralled to running
back Ledel George who unloaded
the surprising touchdown pass to
Charles Davenport.
The trick play put the Wolfpack
firmly in control of the game as
State led 34-17, its largest margin,
with 1301 in the game.
But Johnson sought atonement
for the fumble. After ECU closed
the gap to 34-24 and the Pirate
defense held on four straight
downs, the heralded ECU return
man and receiver would have a
chance for a make-good.
On second and 10 at the State
27, Johnson lined up on the inside
of the triple formation left. He took
the middle route, turned to catch
the Blake strike and evaded a tack-
ier at the five before leaping into
the end zone.
Johnson's touchdown brought
the Pirates to within 34-30 with
4:18 remaining.
Again the entrenched Pirate
defenders held State on four con-
secutive downs and Johnson had a
crack at returning another
Kilpatrick punt.
Johnson fielded the 40-yard
kick at the ECU 42, drifted to the
left before stopping on a dime
which forced three would-be tack-
lers to run past him. Seeing a hole,
Johnson turned on the jets and
evaded many other white jerseys
as he returned the punt 27 yards to
the State 41 with 237.
On offense, Blake threw to
Johnson over the middle for aft
eight-yard pick-up which started
the game- winning drive.
Johnson's prayers came true.
-

artfe
W
Pho�o by Qarrvn KMIIan
Members ot ECU'S men's intramural flag football cr
traveled lo New Orleans, La , to participate in the I3ti
Flag Football Championship dunng the New Year s j
Flag football officials,
Ho's' garnish Louisi;
By Kendra Curtis
RecTcafional Services
Two ECU flag football officials
inked their names into the record
books at the 13th Annual National
Invitational Rag Football Champi-
onships in New Orleans.
Max Carter entered the record
books when he was named All-
American for being one of the top
12 officials .it the tournev. Christy
Kee was the only female of the 80
officials.
Carter is the second All-Ameri-
can official in ECU history, follow-
ing Craig Nestor who was named
fast year. He officiated one of the
exhibition gamesin the Superdome,
while tel!w ECU official Willie
George exchanged some coaching
advice with Fighting Irish Coach
Lou Holtz prior to Notre Dame's
39-28 victory over Florida in the
Sugar Bowl game.
The tournament is held every
year dunng Sugar Bowl week on
thecampusof the University of New
Orleans.
This vear, a total of 150 teams
from the Unstedi
from Mexico cor
women's and col
Conducted
period, the tour
with exhibition;
two top teams ir
ECU's men
pions, the Suj
journey to New
in the toumamd
both of their p
Louisiana State5
30-13 and the
Texas 13-6, failinl
off mund
Members ofl
elude: Brandon
Mike Sellers, Da
Howard, Dei
Talbert and Ste
Winners oi
were Southea
versify in the
University of
women's and N
lnco-rec.
Other flag fc
resenting ECLJ
Dillahunt and Bl
All-C
COLLEGE BO'
January
Pick up a teamindividui
at the Mendenhall Stui
Desk, or call 757-471
Each member on the winning team
selected from the participants to ret
BOWL tournament to be held at
AllexpensesforthetripwHIbepaidb)





�lie gastfllaroHnian
January 14. 1992 17
,1
�Jl
m'WW &l .a.m.ippr
Photo by D�M R��d � ECU Photo Lab
jomt come-trom-behmd victory tor the Pirates,
i -etmal Associated Press football poll
Bowl victory
know what they
�p down Blake, the
.i co-MVP, said. "N.C
a didn t put that much pres-
re on me, and 1 had time to
kke and his pnmary recciv-
t Luke Fisher, Hunter
kllimore and Dion Johnson e-
;1V ecul final three (frhreswWdh
lei ided the contest with precision
i�htir.� passing and glue-like hands. Blake
and company made a believer out
of Wolfpack head coach Dick
Sheridan.
e knew what they were ca-
pable of doing. We missed some
catcheson third down and weren't
able to complete them. Our de-
See Bowl page 18
v been
- it not tor
i Ke leaO"
issault, any-
n when
� with
aerial assault
I -
hold in preference to the target shoot.
Starting from the State 32, Blake went
to the short game, hitting Dion Johnson
for nine, Cednc Van Buren for eight and
Luke Fisher for 13 which placed the ball at
the two After two incompletions, Blake
went behind left tackle Tom Scott for the
touchdown Backed by the mighty shot-
gun, ECU then trailed by 10, 34-24 with
7:19 to go
Blake's drop in the shotgun was un-
usually deep, a gcnd seven-yards behind
See Blake page 20
in miscue sparks
or redemption �
own evens mistake
orceo
again
arshall
remain-
rma hon
ke as its
Is put on
ampton
friter
Dion Johnson
to redeem hinv
quarter miscue
lead to a ECU
remaining in the
:h Bowl on New
son attempted to
it off the foot of
Tim Kilpatnck,
l-purpose speed-
ban at mid-held,
king, possession.
(y capitalized on a
ler as quarterback
palled to running
�e who unloaded
fruchdown pass to
rt.
r put the Wolfpack
kl of the game as
ts largest margin,
game.
sought atonement
ifter ECU closed
A and the Pirate
n four straight
ilded ECU return
rruin and receiver would have a
chance for a make-good.
On second and 10 at the State
27, Johnson lined up on the inside
of the triple formation left. He took
the middle route, turned to catch
the Blake strike and evaded a tack-
ier at the five before leaping into
the end zone.
Johnson's touchdown brought
the Pirates to within 34-30 with
4:18 remaining.
Again the entrenched Pirate
defenders held State on four con-
secutive downs and Johnson had a
crack at returning another
Kilpatnck punt.
Johnson fielded the 40-yard
kick at the ECU 42, drifted to the
left before stopping on a dime
which forced three would-be tack-
lers to run past him. Seeing a hole,
Johnson turned on the jets and
evaded many other white jerseys
as he returned the punt 27 yards to
the State 41 with 237.
On offense, Blake threw to
Johnson over the middle for an
eight-yard pick-up which started
the game-winning drive.
Johnson's prayers came true.
ECU faithful to cherish that special moment
Photo by Oarrwtt KIIHan - Rocroattonal Sorvtcoa
Members of ECU'S men's intramural flag football championship team
traveled to New Orleans, La to participate in the 13th annual National
Flag Football Championship during the New Year's holiday.
Rag football officials, Super
Ho's' garnish Louisiana trip
By Kendra Curtis
Recreational Services
Two ECU flag football officials
inked their names into the record
books at the 13th Annual National
Invitational Flag Fwtball Champi-
onships in New Orleans.
Max Carter entered the record
books when he was named All-
American for being one of the top
12 officials at the tourney. Christy
Kee was the only female of the 80
officials.
Carter is the second All-Ameri-
can official in ECU history, follow-
ing Craig Nestor who was named
last year. He officiated one of the
exhibition gamesin theSuperdome,
while fellow ECU official Willie
George exchanged some coaching
advice with Fighting Irish Coach
Lou Holtz pnor to Notre Dame's
39-28 victory over Florida in the
Sugar Bowl game.
The tournament is held every
year during Sugar Bowl week on
thecampusof the University of New
Orleans.
This year, a total of 150 teams
from the U ni ted Sta tes and one team
from Mexico competed in the men's,
women's and co-rec divisions.
Conducted over a four-day
period, the tournament concluded
with exhibition games between the
two top teams in each division.
ECU'smen'sflagfootballcham-
pions, the Super Ho's, made the
journey to New Orleans to compete
in the tournament. The team lost
both of their pool play games to
Louisiana State University-Medical,
30-13 and the University of North
Texas 13-6, failing to make the play-
off round.
Members of the Super Ho's in-
clude: Brandon Taylor, Trent Britt,
Mike Sellers, David Campbell, Cecil
Howard, Derrick Perry, Doug
Talbert and Steve Marshbum.
Winners of the tournament
were Southeastern Louisiana Uni-
versity in the men's division, the
University of New Orleans in the
women's and North Carolina State
in co-rec.
Other flag football officialsrep-
resenting ECU were Haywood
Dillahunt and Brian Weingartz.
By Michael Martin
Sports Editor
We Believed.
So did thousands of other
Pirate supporters.
There are some things in
life that stick in your mind
forever. Going to baseball
games with grandpa, mom's
homemade apple pie, getting
your driver's license �
they're all special. But to me,
none can compare to New
Year's Day 1992 and the 24th
annual Peach Bowl in Atlanta,
Ga.
ECU versus N.C. State.
My dad and me.
There are loyal Pirate
supporters all over the state
� clearly evident by the mass
of purple and gold clad fans
in Fulton County Stadium.
Well over 20,000. Maybe even
30,000. No one will ever
know. But there was defi-
nitely one fan there that, in
my mind, deserved to see the
Pirates win the biggest game
in school history.
You see, there's a differ-
ence between being a sup-
porter and being a FAN.
A supporter goes to a
sporting event and pulls for
his team to win. Whether on
the road or at home, the
supporter will be a short-term
follower. Eventually, the
supporter will move on and
pull for another team, be-
cause of an extended losing
streak or just a lack of inter-
est.
Supporters are good,
don't get me wrong. They're
real good when it comes time
for the big game. They're
good for a donation here and
there � sometimes a sizeable
one to make up for years past
and for years to come. Maybe
even wearing the team colors
at homecoming or some other
pertinent sporting event. But
a supporter differs from a
FAN.
A FAN eats, sleeps,
drinks, wears, talks about,
writes everything is for the
team. A FAN sends donations
when he can. It's not how
much he sends, it's the fact
that he sent something , as
the old cliche has it described.
He is at every game the
team plays, or he listens to it
on the radio when it's not
feasible to attend � such as
far-away road games. He sits
in the rain, the snow, the very
cold. A FAN is there through
thick and thin.
A FAN even takes the
harsh ribbing his buddies and
co-workers dish out during
the losing times (So your team
is going to the Toilet Bowl
again this year? heh heh). He
suffers, just like the players
and coaches. But a FAN never
stops cheering for the team.
They're called "the
faithful diehard and loyal.
In short, FAN means fanatic.
Sure, there were a lot of
supporters in Atlanta to watch
the Pirates and Woifpack
renew an old rivalrv. But the
FANS, along with the team,
are what made this season
such a success.
Many times, that "12th
man" helped ECU pull out a
close game. They picked the
team up when it seemed
almost impossible to make
that next first down, complete
the pass or gain that extra
yard. South Carolina, Syracuse
and Pittsburgh, they all know
about ECU'S "12th man
But that aforementioned
FAN almost didn't get to go to
Atlanta and the Peach Bowl
because of "closet" Pirate
supporters. Yeah, the ones
that prior to the Syracuse
game haven't been seen in
years. The same ones that
gave money to the Pirate Club
five years ago and haven't
been heard from since. The
same ones that seemed to get
tickets to the Peach Bowl from
nowhere.
I'm glad I went to the
Peach Bowl with my dad. It's
something we'll never forget.
Going to Atlanta was just
like old times when we went
fishing together; he also went
to every football and basket-
ball game I played. It was
quality time between father
and son that somehow slipped
away.
This season and the Peach
Bowl win wasn't only for the
players and coaches. It was for
FANS like my dad.
So here's to you, dad.
WE BELIEVE.
Rocks
CU
Except Us.
From early in the morning until late nite. East Coast Music & Video
rocks with your favorite flicks and great tunes on compact disc and cassette.
And (xi Friday, January 17 at 7:00 pm come join us as we rock live with
Jon Byrd&Aoanckm Reason
1109 Claries Blvd. 584251
Open Nightly until 11:00
WELCOME BACK & nnNr,RATHLATQNS PEACH BOWL CHAMPIONS
R NOW!
COLLEGE
WANTS
TO PICK
YOUR
BRAIN.
All-Campus
COLLEGE BOWL Tournament
January 25-27,1992
Pick up a teamindividual player registration form
at the Mendenhali Student Center information
Desk, or call 757-4766 fpr more information.
Each member on the winning team will win $25. An All-Star Team will be
selected from the participants to represent ECU at the ReglonalCOLLEGE
BOWL tournament to be held at VlrglnlaTech February 29- March 1.
lAllexpen8esforthetrlpwillbepaidbyth�ECUStudentUnionProductlon�Commltt9�
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We delay your billing
but not your ring!
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Iivim in m At a
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Deposit required:
$20.00
L
1991 Jowent Inc LUboUSA 92-437(CP-6





18 3Uie Sast (Earoltntan
January 14, 1992
Book recaptures Tarheel glory from 1982
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Former
Tar Heels team manager David
Daly wanted to celebrate the 10th
anniversary of North Carolina's
1982 national basketball champi-
onship with a big reunion.
His task was formidable �
bring together a cast that included
Michael Jordan, Dean Smith, James
Worthy and Sam Perkins.
"The guys were spread out
from Australia to Mount Olive,
N.C so 1 created my own reunion
in a book said Daly, the author of
One To Remember�The 1982 North
Carolina Tar Heels NCAA Champi-
onship Team, Then and Now , pub-
lished by Down Home Press of
Asheboro.
The 120-page book, which in-
cludes dozens of action photo-
graphs by Hugh Morton, brings
the reader along North Carolina's
emotional run through the NCAA
tournament that vaulted the '82
Tar Heels to legendary status.
"Anyone who follows college
basketball remembers Michael's
jump shot that beat Georgetown
Daly said.
Jordan, then a freshman guard
out of Wilmington, sank the game-
winning basket from the left cor-
ner with 17 seconds on the clock to
lift North Carolina to a 63-62 vic-
tory over Patrick Ewing and the
Hoyas.
"Ever since I made that shot
everything has just fallen into place
for me Jordan says in the book.
"Everything has been perfect. It
was destiny. If that shot hadn't
gone in, 1 don't think I'd be where
I am today
Daly said Jordan broke into
his trademark grin when he pre-
sented him with a copy of the book
when the NBA champion Chicago
Bulls came to Charlotte to play the
Hornets.
"He said he was glad to see it
because maybe it would negate
some of the other stuff written
about him Daly said. He was re-
ferring to Jordan Rules , a new book
by a former Bulls beat writer that
took some shotsat the former North
Carolina star.
Daly, a 31-year-old photogra-
pher for WBTV in Charlotte, said
One To Remember is not a kiss-and-
tell expose like Jordan Rules or
Personal Fouls by Peter Golenbock,
which made serious allegations of
wrongdoing at North Carolina
State University's basketball pro-
gram under former Wolf pack
coach Jim Valvano.
'These guys knew me, and
they trusted me Daly said.
Instead, One To Remember fo-
cuses on the success of the champi-
onship team, from the exploits of
NBA stars like Jordan and Worthy
to lesser-known players like Buzz
Peterson and Cecil Exum.
Readers learn from Daly's
book that Exum is playing profes-
sional basketball in Australia.
"In fact, Cecil is to Australian
basketball what Michael Jordan is
to American basketball, in terms of
popularity Daly writes. "He
doesn't have high flying dunks, or
score 30 points a game, but he does
have the charisma and charm that
have made him a success off the
court
Daly also follows the careers
Bowl
of former North Carolina assistant
coaches Eddie Folger and Roy Wil-
liams. Both learned enough from
Dean Smith to achieve greatness
on their own�Folger at Vanderbilt
and Williams at Kansas.
Last year, Williams' Kansas
Jayhawks met Smith'sTar Heels in
the Final Four of the NCAA tour-
nament. Smith's student came
away on top but lost to Duke in the
championship game.
While Jordan, Worthy and
Perkins are making millions play-
ing pro ball, the other two starters
from the 1982 Tar Heels also are
involved in the game.
Jimmy Black, the Tar Heels
point guard and acknowledged
team leader, isan assistant at Notre
Dame, which played North Caro-
lina in New York this year. Matt
Doherty isan assistant at Davidson.
"What's striking about that
team is that even though if s be-
come almost a legend, the players
and coaches are not dead and bur-
ied Daly said. 'They are still at
the top of their game
Continued from page 16
Goodwill Games
to name host in fall
fense played well in the early part
of the game. We were playing a
normaldefenselin thefourthquar-
ter not prevent it was just good
execution by Jeff Blake said the
head Packer.
After finishing two seasons of
5-5-1 and 5-6, the Peach Bowl vic-
tory capped a tremendous year for
Pirate head coach Bill Lewis and
his staff.
"I'm so proud of every single
player on our team Lewis said.
'This was the biggest game any of
us ever had the opportunity to be a
part of, for players or coaches, and
I mean that. If s the most fun I've
ever had. It was a tremendously
outstanding season
Individual Highlights:
� Blake finished with a Peach
Bowl record 378 yards passing on
31 completions including four
touchdown throws. Blake had scor-
ing-strikes to Cedric Van Buren,
Johnson, Fisher and a 55-yard
touchdown bomb to Gallimore.
The senior signal caller, who also
played in the post-season Japan
Bowl, shared the victor's MVP
award will All-America linebacker
Robert Jones.
�Jones, whocarried the Peach
Bowl trophy off the field, compiled
16 tackles, a pass interception and
a blocked extra point. Both the INT
and the blocked kick occurred in
the third period.
� Tight end Fisher, who with
Blake and Jones should go high in
the upcoming NFL draft, caught a
Peach Bowl record 12 receptions
for 144 yards, including the game
winning touchdown with 1:32 re-
maining.
�Mr. All Purpose, Dion John-
son, had 156 yards on the day.
Atoning for a fourth quarter
fumble, Dion's fleet of foot and
withal to evade tacklers produced
a 27-yard punt return which set up
the winning score. Johnson also
scored on a 17-ya rd pass from Blake
with 4:28 togo, tightening the score
34-30.
� Defensive end Jerry Dillon,
who will be the cornerstone of the
1992 Pirate defense, intensified the
line play with seven tackles includ-
ing a rap-up of a reversing Charles
Davenport for a nine-yard loss in
the fourth period.
� Zaim Cunmulai and Derek
Taylor had a key sack on State
quarterback Terry Jordan for a 18-
yard loss with :26 remaining.
� Receiver Hunter Gallimore
caught five passes for 113 yards.
Gallimore snagged a perfectly
thrown 55-yard pass from Blake in
full stride at the five-yard line be-
fore breezing into the end zone.
The scoring catch gave ECU a 17-
14 half time lead.
� Runningback Van Buren,
one of the few returning offensive
stars, rushed for 65 yards and
caught five passes, including the
first ECU touchdown of the game.
ST.LOUIS(AP)�St. Louis,
Dallas, Indianapolis, New York
and Miami were named final-
ists Tuesday for the 1998 Good-
will Games. The finalists were
chosen from a field of nine that
submitted formal bids in No-
vember.
A final selection isexpected
Octl.
"We're delighted we've
made the first cut in this compe-
tition said Ned Taddeucci,
president of the St. Louis Re-
gional Commerce and Growth
Association. "This speaks very
well of our position as an out-
standing sports city both for pro-
fessional and amateur athlet-
ics
The Triangle area of Ra-
leigh, Durham and Chapel Hill
in North Carolina was not in-
ternational enough, officials
said Tuesday.
"Of course, we're disap-
pointed said Raleigh sports
consultant Hill Carrow, who
spearheaded the Triangle's bid.
"This is image over sub-
stance. Indianapolis is the only
one that's done a major
multisportsevent. Also, we have
a bigger population in a 150-
mile radius than three of them.
"That makes it tougher to
take
Lastyear,St. Louis wascho-
sen to host the 1994 U.S. Olym-
pic Festival. Mike Dyer, execu-
tive director of the St. Louis
Sports Committee, said the
Goodwill Games would repre-
sent a natural progression to in-
ternational competition for the
city.
"I think St. Louis has an
awful lot to offer Dyer said. "I
think we need to get some ven-
ues developed, but we have a
great corporate base here
The Goodwill Games are
held every four years in even-
numbered non-Olympic years
and have been hosted alter-
nately by the United States and
the former USSR.
The first games were held
in Moscow in 1986 and the 1990
event was in Seattle. The 1994
Games will be held in St. Peters-
burg, Russia.
�lj� last (tollman
now has two positions open for sports
writers. If you are interested in covering
one of the nation's up-and-coming
athletic programs, stop by the office
today and pick up an application. These
positions will close on January 20,1992.
(Across from Joyner Library In the ECU Pubs Building)
Welcome Back to Fitness
�Steam & Sauna
�Hot Tub
�Juice Bar
�Cardiovascular
Center
�Racquetball
'Nautilus
1 Gymnasium
'Indoor Track
�Free Weights
�Year-Round
Swimming Pool
�Pro Shop
�Aerobic Exercise
�Nursery
Call or visit us today!
We've got a membership plan just for you!
Individual
'Student
'Family
Senior Citizen
Corporate
Guest Rate
Regular Hours
Mon-Fri 6am-10pm
Sat & Sun 8am-7pm
Open 7 Days A Week
SPECIAL
STUDENT
FATE
$120
SBMES7EF7
Student Hours
Mon-Fri 6am-4:30pm
Sat & Sun 8am-2:30pm
eenvifle AthleticlClub
140 OAKMONT DRIVE � GREENVILLE, NC TEL 91975&0175
"The Place For Heart And Soul"
lemson's Hatfiel
AP) � Clemson coach Ken
ield has had enough of his
i's bad behavior So he's
edit.
nd to make sure the Tigers
understand what isexpected
hem on and off the field,
ield has put it in writing
He's also asked his plavers to
this code of conduct But the
rs do have a choice: sign or
e.
"If anybody doesn't want to
art of it, that's their decision
field said in a telephone ;nter-
v Thursday. "If they don't
it to, then that's fine Thev can
heir own way
The rules haven't changed,
they're just in writing
second-year coach said tl
doubt" the Tigers undej
havior that doesn't hel
won't be tolerated
"I didn't lea.
misinterpretation ot
Hatfieldsdid'Weallkif
we're trying to go. 1 dj
that we'll have any p
all
The move to put thel
in writing was "promj
whole season said
whose team finished
losing to California 3
( itrus Bowl.
"1 think definitely
manv things to hurt ou
The East Carolinian
All the news that's fit to pi
And even some that isn't
PINEBROOKAPT
1 NDER NEVA r KMIIP
l River
Renovations I rulerwa ' j
IBedroom Apis & 1 Bedioom los.nhoJ
?Water,Sewer and Basic Calle included
�Pool"ECU Bus
?Pets Allowed (conditional 1' Laundrv
Nov accepting :nations foi
Septembers
21 Riverbluff Rd7 3 q
r
�St'

t
IHB I' HHMi I
'
��I�M � �
, -�� -� � v- - �





dwill Games
e host in fall
t P St. Louis,
Bpolis, New York
Are named final-
tr the 1998 Good-
ie finalists were
field Of nine that
mal bids in No-
c -toon is expected
ghted we've
Iv nthiscompe-
Nt.1 raddeucci
jhe St. Louis Re-
leree and Growth
'his speaks very
Mtion as an out-
� tv Knh tor pn
amateur athlct-
kilo area o( Ra-
and Chapel Hill
na was not in-
;h, officials
we re disap
sports
irrow who
bid
. r sub-
P only
one that's done a major
mulhsportsevent. Also, we have
a bigger population in a 150-
mile radius than three of them.
'That makes it tougher to
take
Last year, St. Louis wascho-
sen to host the 1W4 U.S. Olym-
pic Festival. Mike Over, execu-
tive director of the St Louis
Sports Committee, said the
Goodwill Games would repre-
sent a natural progression to in-
ternational competition for the
ntv
1 think St. Louis has an
awful lot to offer Dversaid. "I
think we need to get some ven-
ues developed, but we have a
great corporate base here
The Goodwill Games are
held every four vears in even-
numbered non-Olvmpic years
and have been hosted alter-
nately bv the United States and
the former USSR.
The first games were held
m Moscow in 1986and the 19Q0
event was in Seattle. The 1994
Games will be held in St. Peters-
burg, Russia.
3tye �a0tEaralfnfan
January 14, 1992 19
tafit Carolinian
two positions open for sports
you are interested in covering
the nation's up-and-coming
programs, stop by the office
pick up an application. These
will close on January 20, 1992.
Joyner Library in the ECU Pubs Building)
Lmind
piing Pool
lop
c I xercise
'OH
Student Hours
Mon-Fri 6am-4:30pm
?at & Sun 8am-2:30pm
fab
our
lemson's Hatfield inks new behavior policy for football players
AP) � Clemson coach Ken
leld has had enough of his
's bad behavior. So he's
ied it.
nd to make sure the Tigers
understand what isexpeeted
rtem on and off the field,
icld has put it in writing.
He's also asked his players to
this code of conduct. But the
rs do have a choice: sign or
e.
If anybody doesn't want to
art of it, that's their decision
leld said in a telephone inter-
v Thursday- "If they don't
t to, then that's fine. They can
leir own way
Fhe rules haven't changed,
they're just in writing now. The
second-yearcoach said there's "no
doubt" the Tigers understand be-
havior that doesn't help the team
won't be tolerated.
"I didn't leave room for any
misinterpretation of anything
Hatfield said. "We all know where
we're trying to go. I don't think
that we'll have any problem at
all
The move to put the team rules
in writing was "prompted by the
whole season said Hatfield,
whose team finished 9-2-1 after
losing to California 37-13 in the
Citrus Bowl.
"I think definitely we did too
many things to hurt ourselves be-
fore the ball was ever snapped
he said. "We talked way too much
before the Georgia game. That cer-
tainly fired them up, and when
you look back thaf s our only loss
during the season.
"I hoped we had learned
something before we went to the
bowl game. Some people did,
some people didn't
Among those who didn't was
defensive lineman Brentson
Buckner, who was thrown out of
the Citrus Bowl for punching the
California quarterback while he
was on the ground after a tackle.
Buckner wasone of two Tiger play-
ers ejected in the game.
Then there was an incident
involving senior linebacker Ed
McDaniel, who used profanity at
a public pep rally the night before
the game in Orlando, Fla.
Hatfield said McDaniel'scom-
ments fired up California and
"alienated some good Clemson
people who had gone down
there
"It was (a) sad incident that
really upset me immensely he
said. "The night before the game
and I've got to worry about that.
"Ain't anybody that played
harder than Ed did all the years he
was here, and he had one negative
incident his whole career. That's
the only one I've ever had with
Ed.
"If s a 20-second deal. I think
if Ed were to apologize, he'd be a
lot better off
McDaniel, a personable player
who says what he thinks, did just
that Thursday.
"I've been thinking about it.
At the time at the pep rally, I was
out there just having fun he said
in a telephone interview. "Some
people got upset If I offended
anybody, I'm sorry.
"I was wrong. I know that
he said. "I shouldn't have even
said that. I should have kept my
mouth shut
He hopes his mistake will keep
players on the 1992 team from
making the same error. "From my
mistake, they should leam he
said. "It should help the team for
the upcoming year
Just in case it doesn't, how-
ever, there are the written rules.
Hatfield wouldn't give out a copy
of the guidelines, but he said the
Tigers have been told not to make
derogatory comments about op-
ponents and to not do anything
that would embarrass the pro-
gram.
"I just wanted them to know if
they are committed (to the pro-
gram), here's the way you show
you're committed by doing these
things, and also in your conduct
and the way you represent
See Hatfield, page 20
The East Carolinian
All the news that's fit to print
And even some that isn't
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20 ube tastdlnroltnfnn
January 14, 1992
Blake
Continued from page 16
the center But with Blake'sarm.a
tew vards more to throw became
irrelevant, and besides the longer
drop meant rushers had to chase
the quick quarterback even fur
ther
Another defensive stand bv
the obstinate Pirates yielded a State
punt which hopped into the end
zone tor a touchhack
Starting from their own 20,
IIs passing attack picked apart
the cushioned WoWpack defense.
Blockbuster
Bowl officials
huddle with
Big East, ACC
WAHHM.Calif (AH Howl
and cDnfefence officials huddled in
impromptu meetingsdiscussing the
proposed bowl alliance and the
tAock&USter Bowlsenticing otter to
the Big FastandAtlanticCoast Con-
ference Ian. 7.
In the meantime. repnsenta
tives of the ACC told reporters the
alliance had offered to guarantee its
champion would play in the ()t
angc. Cotton or Sugaf Bowl each
year
If the Big Fast and ACC accept
the Blockbuster's offer of about J4J
million pet team, it would remove
Big Fast member Miami and possi-
blv sink the alliance, which is de
signed to pfoduce the equivalent of
a national championship match bv
pairing the two highest-rated teams
within the alliance in a New ear 9
bowl game
Offteialsofboth conferences saj
a decision won't be made this eek
"Wedidn't ask tor one Steve
Hatchell. executive director of the
Orange Bowl, said after meeting
with ACC officials We just slid
lev. here 9 whore we are and what
we re trvme, to do That was about
it
Hatchell s.nd bowl officials
planned to mtvt later with Big East
officials.
1 vefybod) has told us thev
weren't giing to doan thing here
Hatchell s�ud It lv9 good to just
sit with the whole group It wasfust
a tot ci questions about payouts,
television, title Sponsors There
weren'tanv votes taken (t'sallbeen
very impromptu
Quickly, it was Blake toGallimon?
and Van Buren fof shof! gains and
then a2l yard strike to Priver up
the middle Two passes to Van
Buren and a keeper gave FCU a
first down five minutes remain
ing
Cool hand Luke Fisher had
two consecutive eight-yafd
completions, the latter of which
was on the right sideline allowing
the tight end to run out of bounds
and stop the clock.
Two plavs later lohnson
caught a Blake pass down the
middle and danced in tor the
touchdown
Following a timeout, the Pi-
rates opted tor the two point con-
version which would narrow the
State lead to one point. NCSU's
Mike Keid spoiled Blake's at-
tempted conversion pass by land
mg a finger on the half-cocked
ball.
I own 34-30 with 4:13 remain-
ing, the FCU defense was called
upon to hold the Pack once again
I Dillon discnbed the situation:
"We were asked to go in there
and allow only three downs and
out Dillon said 'The coaches
said it we could accomplish this
task three times, then the offen-
sive would definitely have their
turn
On State s next offensive play,
Dillon read a reverse by the Pack's
Kevin Davenport and drove the
ball carrier backwards for a nine-
yard loss.
All-America linebacker Rob-
ert lonesthen tackled tailback Gary
Downs. On third and 11, quarter-
backTerrylordan'squick pass was
dropped by Shad Santee as the
slot end heard the footsteps of
Greg Floyd, forcing State to punt
Johnson's 27-yard return to
the NCSU 41 gave Blake and com-
pany gcxxi field position with 2:37
left. Breaths abruptly stopped af-
ter Fisher fumbled a shon pass at
the 33, but Cednc Van Buren had
the presence of mind to drop on
the loose ball.
Faced with third down and
two, Blake found Fisher on a curl
pattern with a short pass which
the prolific tight end grabbed,
eluded one would-be-tackler and
dove for the magical score � a
score which will immortalize
Blake and Fisher in the Pirate foot-
ball history.
Hatfield
Continued from page 19
Clemson on and Off the field he
said
In light Of things that hap-
pened this year it's important to
get all that spelled out in writing
for everybody, and tO make sure
thev knew and understood what 'l
going to happen if thev don't go
bv those rtlies. I think thev need to
know that on the front end '
While the written rules are
important. 1 lattioUl sud it hisplav
ers will always put the team first
in their thoughts and actions"
there will be no problems
The overriding thing is
what's best for the team, he said
That wasn't always the case
this season for Clemson. which
still won the Atlantic Coast Con
terence championship tor the first
time since 188 The tigers led the
nation in rushing defense for the
first time ever and had the mx
ond best offensive performance in
school history
"There wen' some little things
that kept us from being as com
plete as I team as we could have
bun Hatfield Mid. But we're
going to Ih .ill right "
Tlie
East Carolinian
Ls now accepting
applicatioas for
news and
entartainnvnt
writers. For more
irtfonriation, call the
News Editor or
Entertainment Editor
at 757-6366.
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 14, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 14, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.849
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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