The East Carolinian, July 31, 1991






I

The few, the bad, the unwanted
Unruly Marines are not wanted in Greenville.
4
What's a Lollapalooza?
The alternative music festival comes to Raleigh.
S
�lic Saat (Earnlmtan
Voc.65 No.39
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Wednesday, July 31,1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5,000
6 Pages
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
reveals misconduct at Creative Living Center
stolen state and donated
equipment assigned to the
CLC
Researcher anticipates support
A UNC-Chapel Hill Sociology professor, Ronald Rind fuss,
coordinator of the American Teenage Study, is hopeful that
his study will be continued.
The survey gained attention from federal legislators last
week because of controversy concerning the contents of the
study. Some congressmen had problems with distributing
federal funds for a study which asked teenagers questions
about oral and anal sex. The legislators decided to cancel
funding for such projects.
Recently, the U.S. House accepted a plan to limit research
projects dealing with sexual behavior to those approved by
expert panels.
'It's not clear (the vote) has any implications for my
study said Rindfuss. "But it has broad implications for the
scientific community. It sendsa message that when necessarv
for public health reasons, some (survey) questions are ap-
propriate
Rindfuss said that the bill offers hope that similar studies
will not meet the same fate.
Universities misuse funding
Administrators at both North and South Carolina's uni-
versities haveacknowledged that some exp-rises from cock tail
parties and hotels should not have been included as costs for
their research projects.
They contend however that the $238,000 of questionable
expensesareprobablyoffsetbyundocumentedn-searchcosts
that were not included under the fund.
The University of South Carolina included expenses for
actor Jimmy Stewart toattcnd their commencement ceremony
into their research fund. The cost of the private flight and a
cocktail party was $15,900.
Both universities used research money to pay for hotel
and travel expenses associated with the Gator Bowl.
Under federal rules, the private flight. Gator Bowl bills
and cocktail reception should not have been included in
overhead cost calculations.
Federal Officials acknowledge that the rules are vague
and the enforcement has been lax, so the universities have
been free to claim numerous expenses.
ISU approves tuition raise
Indiana State University approved a 8 percent raise in
tuitionforin-statesrudentsanda9 percent raiseforoutof state
students, as part of a $92.1 million operating budget
Richard G. Landini, ISU president, said that the budget
was the weakest in 16 years due to overall cuts made by the
General Assembly. This year, Indiana Legislators have cut
funds for university projects in half.
Landini said that he has contacted the Legislature to ask
for supplemental funding. Although the president said that
the university's strive for excellence will not be impeded by
the lack of funds, certain programs will have to be curtailed.
Tuition raised at colleges
The North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges,
acting upon instructions of the General Assembly, voted to
raise tuition at 58 community colleges.
Starting this fall, students will pay an average of 53
percent more for tuition. In-state students will pay $161 per
quarter, up from $105. Out of state fees have gone up to$l ,505
from $981.
"With a billion-dollar state revenue shortfall, a mandate
from the General Assembly to raise tuition was inevitable,
State Board Chairman William Simpson said. "I am just
grateful that we were able to keep the increase as low as we
did
System President Bob Scott said that the tuition increases
do not seem to be affecting overall system enrollments,
however he expressed fears that the rise in tuition could
endanger the colleges' accessibility. The community college
system was originally created to offer an affordable alterna-
tive to the more expensive universities.
Seminar to be held at WCU
Nearly 40 faculty members from 12 institutions of the
University of North Carolina system will. nd a seminar on
proper teaching methods at Western Ca la University.
Faculty with less than three years experience will attend
the "New Faculty Seminar on Exemplary Teaching The
program is designed to promote effective teaching practices
among new faculty and demonstrate that teaching excellence
is valued in the UNC system.
Participants will read literature from scholarly journals
on effective college teaching. They will then discuss principles
and applications derived from the readings, discuss course
design strategies and develop new course material.
Inside Wednesday
Crime Scene72
Classifieds3
Editorial4
Features5
Sports76
The State Auditor's office The investigation was for writing the "dummylet-
issued a "management letter" competed by interviewing ter was to discover if any of
last month to ECU concerning employees, examining
theinvestigationofallegations timesheets and CLC pur-
of misused funds, abuse of chases and taking inventorv
of reportedly stolen equip-
surgery administrator, sent a partment was found to allow vides supervised day care for
letter to Kuenzi containing at least four employees access theelderly,expected to receive
falseinformation.Thepurpose to use funds, thus increasing funds from the government
payroll and theft of property.
The allegations, received
over the auditor's hotline cre-
ated for dealing with such
matters, concerned the Cre-
ative Living Center, a subsid-
iary of the Department of
Surgery. The center has since
reported a decision to close its
doors due to lack of stable
funds.
Connie Kuenzi, the direc-
tor of the CLC, said that the
closing has "no connection
whatsoever" to the auditor's
report.
The rep t stated that the
complaints maue to the office
concerned "employees mis-
using CLC funds by purchas-
ing personal items with the
funds
Other allegations con-
cerned employees "abusing
state time by leaving work
wi thou t taking vaca tion or sick
leave
The office was also in-
formed that employees "have
ment.
The outcome of the in-
vestiga tion found no evidence
that substantiated any misuse
of state funds or state time.
However, a television and a
VCR assigned to the CLC
could not be located.
Due to conflicting accu-
sations made by CLC em-
ployees, the person involved
with the missing equipment
could not be ascertained. The
report stated that a weakness
in controls exists in the CLC's
storage facility because three
people have a key to access
the equipment.
The report recommended
that the university keep the
inventory of the CLC depart-
ment with more accuracy and
also limit the number of em-
ployees with the storage
facility's keys.
During the interviews, it
was determined that Alva
Morris, the department of
the CLC's employees were
opening confidential mail.
The report stated that the
"practice of a university ad-
ministrator directing an em-
ployee to write a fictitious
letter raises serious concerns
The auditors recom-
mended that the "university
insure that administrators re-
frain from using unprofes-
sional tactics when add ressing
personal conduct issues
Although the State
Auditor's office found no
proof concerning the misuse
of funds, thev did find the
the chances for misuse.
The report recommended
that CLC purchases be con-
trolled by one person to inhibit
the chance of misuse.
Chancellor Eakin re-
sponded on behalf of the uni-
versity and agreed to change
the questionable policies
within the department.
No comments were pre-
sented involving the false let-
ter associated with Morrisand
Kuenzi. He stated that because
they deal with "personnel
matters" he would not "dis-
cuss them in this response
An ECU news release
stated that the reason for
CLC's situation concerning CLC's closing deals with a
state funds provided the op- "lack of a stable source of in-
portunity for such. The de- come The CLC, which pro-
shortly after forming in 1985.
The money was never ap-
proved for their endeavor.
While the government
sources werebeingsought, the
School of Medicine and sev-
eral organizations supported
the department.
Ben Irons, the university
attorney stated that the deci-
sion to close the CLC had no
rela tion to the aud i tor's report.
He also stated that he had no
knowledge of the report af-
fecting theother organizations
responsible for funding the
department.
Morns offered similar
comments, while adding that
the closure was determined a
long time before the auditor's
report was released.
Chamber
Commerce plans
cultural center
By LeClair Harper
News Editor
Plans for a cultural center
in Greenville are being dis-
cussed by a study group of
academic, cultural, business
community, civic organiza-
tions' representatives along
with the Chamber of Com-
merce.
Dr. Mohammed Ahad,
professor of nursing, proposed
a permanent cultural center in
Greenville after successfully
organizing cultural round
table discussions.
With the help of a grant
from the North Carolina Hu-
manities Council, Ahad orga-
nized round table discussions
on Indian culture, Chinese
culture, Hispanic culture and
Middle Eastern culture. The
positive response to these
round table discussions
prompted Ahad to propose a
cultural center in Greenville,
he said.
This is something
people want to know (and)
will enjoy he said.
They hope to have rooms
in the center with artifacts, lit-
erature, pictures and art from
different cultures, Ahad said.
The objectives of the cul-
tural center are to develop re-
sources, such as films, videos,
charts, maps and books for
students, teachers, scholars
and interested people; to con-
duct exhibits on particular
cultures; to help with research
on health care beliefs and
health care utilization strate-
gies of different cultures; to
conduct seminars and work-
shops for target groups such
as teachers and nurses; and to
maintaina library and reading
room of reference material on
immigrant cultures.
According to a press re-
lease, the center will target
grade and high school stu-
dents, college students,
graduate students and pro-
fessors.
"It will benefit the stu-
dents (of ECU) (because)
they can visit the exhibits and
enjoy the information from
different cultures Ahad said.
Students may be able to
See Culture, page 2
Dail Rm4� ECU Photo Lab
The Creative Living Center offers daytime care and activities for the elderly, but the center
will soon close its doors because of lack of funds.
Ralph Nader to speak at
environmental festival
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
Ralph Nader will be the
keynote speaker of a day long
environmental festival to be
held in Butner, Saturday,
August 3. The purpose of the
event, Lakefest '91, is to in-
crease environmental aware-
ness. Everyone is urged to at-
tend and the admission is free.
Nader gained fame in the
'60s for his consumer advo-
cacy. He was part of the
spearhead to forceautomobile
manufacturers to produce
safer cars, including the drive
for safety bel ts. He was widely
popularized for his "Nader's
Raiders who exposed irre-
sponsible industries.
Other speakers to be
featured will be Lois Gibbs,
leader of the fight against the
infamous LoveCanal incident
and Brian Hunt, a Greenpeace
representative.
Gibbs was at the front of
the movement to close a school
in Love Canal built on 21,000
tonsof buried chemical waste.
She later organized the
Citizen's Clearinghouse for
Hazardous Waste, an organi-
zation dedicated to educating
and helping communities in
the presence of poisonous
chemicals.
Hunt offers Greenpeace
assistance across the Southeast
by presenting speeches, edu-
cational forums and materials
and workshops concerning
citizen lobbying techniques.
The day will also feature
special demonstrations per-
formed by EustenceConway,
a Native Americanculturalist.
Conway will present a dis-
play of Native American skills.
People are urged to bring
friends, family, lawn chairs
and blankets. Food, music,
environmental exhibits and
booths, T-shirts and buttons
will be available at the event
Lakefest '91 will be held
at Lake Holt near Burner. It
will start at 11 a.m. and last
until 7 p.m.
Directions: 1-85 to Butner
Exit (191). Follow signs for
Hwy.50intoCreadmoor. Left
at Southern States onto 56 W.
Follow signs. For more infor-
mation, call 575-4093 or 575-
4064.
ECU divers explore Civil War shipwreck
By George Threewitts
ECU Newi Bureau
The cargo-laden hold of a
long buried and nearly forgot-
ten Civil War Shipwreck has
become a time capsule for a
group of Florida divers and
underwater archaeologists
from ECU.
"It may be the most excit-
ing shipwreck site in the
United States said Dr. Wil-
liam N. Still, a maritime histo-
rian and co-director of the ECU
program in Maritime History
and Underwater Research.
ECU underwater archae-
ologists have agreed to assist
with the excavation of the
Maple Leaf, a 173-foot steam-
ship that was registered in
Canada and leased to the
Union navy to support the
blockade of Southern ports.
The vessel sank after striking
a Confederate mine in the St.
John'sRiver near Jacksonville,
Fla. in 1864. It was carrying
the personal possessions of
about 2,400 soldiers.
400 tons of supplies and
personal items were on board
when the vessel went down.
Still said. The manifest in-
cluded medical equipment,
carved mementoes and nu-
merous other personal items
and the musical instruments
from a regimental band. Only
afractionofuSecargohasbeen
recovered. Hundreds of
thousands of items are buried
beneath the black ooze of the
riverbottomthathasprotected
the ship and its contents for
127 years.
The Maple Leaf is a
sealed time capsule said
Bradley Rodgers, an ECU ar-
chaeologist who is conserva-
tor for the project.
Rodgers said the decks of
the ship are intact, and mud
fills the insides of the vessel.
The mud has helped preserve
the wood and metal artifacts.
'The artifacts that I have
seen coming out of the Maple
Leaf are probably in the best
shape of any Civil War arti-
facts that I've seen come from
a watery environment
Rodgers said.
Three musical instru-
ments recovered at the site �
a clarinet, a fife and a flute �
are of antique shop condition.
The fife still carries a tone. A
boxed kit of surgical instru-
ments includes the surgeon's
bone saws, knives, probes,
tweezers and a pair of old
shoes in need of new soles.
The Maple Leaf sank with
the contents for two or three
sutlers' stores, tents, supplies
and the personal belongings
of Union infantry�estimated
to be about 800,000 pounds of
goods. No effort was made to
salvage the cargo after it sank.
A group of divers discov-
ered the wreck five years ago.
The wreck was hidden on the
river bottom covered by seven
feet of mud and silt. Diving
conditions at the site are de-
scribed asdivingm "biack Jell-
O Still said.
The Florida divers, led by
Dr. Keith Holland, a Jackson-
ville dentist, obtained a court
order claiming rights to re-
cover cargo. They also formed
a group, the St. John's Ar-
chaeological Society, to begin
excavation of the wreck.
About 3,000 artifacts repre-
senting only two percent of
the ship's contents have been
recovered.
ECU'S inclusion in the
project is a result of $200,000
in historic preservation grants
by the stateof Florida totheSt.
John's Archaeological Society
to fund the excavation and
preservation of artifacts at the
site. Contracts were signed
with ECU for professional help
in planning and conducting
future excavations and for
conservation work with re-
covered artifacts.
Some of the items from
the wreck are undergoing
treatment in ECU'S preserva-
tion laboratory on campus.
ECU will also conduct a field
school for underwater ar-
chaeology students and
maritime historians at the site
next summer.
See Drver, page 2





2 (Phe gagt (Earnlfnfan July 31, 1991
CRIMF SENE
Subjects apprehended for strong-
armed robbery in Willis Building
July 23
1220�Garrett Residence Hall (east):investiga ted alarceny report
1415�James Street vehicle stopped for stop sign violation; driver
found to be driving while license revoked.
2249� Cotton Residence Hall: assisted residence advisor in try-
ing to locate subject for emergency call.
July 24
1257� Biology Building: checked out report of elevator mal-
function Same was cleared.
1310�Ninth Street(southofMendenhallSrudentCenter): vehicle
stopped for overcrowded car. Same given verbal warning.
1457� Joyner Library (north): vehicle stopped for stop sign
violation and speeding; driver given verbal warning.
1528� Wright Circle (west): vehicle stopped for careless and
reckless driving. Non-student given verbal warning.
1552� Maintenance warehouse: investigated domestic dispute.
Same was solved.
2139� Jones Residence Hall (east): investigated report of break-
ing and entering of state vehicle.
2237� Greene Residence Hall: investigated disturbance. Subject
banned from campus.
2343� Memorial Gym (sou th west): vehicle stopped for speed ing.
Same was issued campus citation.
July 25
0208�College Hill Drive and 10th Street investigated suspicious
male subject. Same was identified as non-student waiting for a bus.
0239� Clement Residence Hall investigated visitation violations.
Subjects advised to leave.
0750� Fletcher Music building: took larceny report.
1115� North Campus: investigated report of two suspicious
males the area. Same were unfounded.
July 26
0017�Jarvis Residence Hall: responded to fire alarm. Turned out
false.
0819� Jarvis Residence Hall: took a breaking and entering and
larceny report.
July 27
0216� Jenkins Art Building: Investigated report of attempted
breaking and entering. Apprehended one subject.
2331� Fifth and Reade streets: checked out subjects for ABC
violation. The non-students were given verbal warning for violation
and littering.
Jury 28
0115� Fifth and Reade streets: checked out a group of subjects
loitering in parking lot. Same were advised to leave.
0246� Willis Building: took report and apprehended three sub-
jects concerning strong-armed robbery.
Cri�� Scrn to Ukca from Official Public Safety Log
Area youth participate in leadership program
By Anne Joyner
Staff Writer
Jenni South sat on the hard,
cold floor of Greene Dorm staring
angrily at her meager supper of
plain rice, beans and hot water. A
participant in ECU'S Legislator's
School for Youth Leadership and
Development, South thought she
was sitting down to a global dinner.
The 17-year-old rising high
school senior from Jacksonville said
that she loves Chinese food and
was initially delighted at the pros-
pect of possible oriental cuisine.
Khary Smith of Beau fort, also a
rising senior and participant in the
Legislator's School, said that he
wasn't sure what to expect from the
global dinner, but had a feeling he
wouldn't be eating a gourmet meal
when he and the other students had
to line up and draw tickets to de-
termine their supper.
Only one student drew a ticket
for a first-world-country meal, while
most drew lots for a third world
supper of rice and beans. South's
first reaction to the global dinner
was anger.
"But once we started talking
abou t (the d inner) as a group it was
emotional. Some people were even
crying South said. "Now I know
what it's like and can even imagine
being homeless. (The dinner) was
very effective she said.
"I went through (the dinner)
gracefully Smith said. "1 was glad
to experience the dinner. That was a
great experience for me. It gave me
a new outlook on whaf s going on
in third-world countries
Making students aware of
world hunger through the global
dinner is only one example of the
lessons the Legislator's School for
Youth Leadership and Develop-
ment (LSFYLD) attempt to teach,
said Katee Tully, program coordi-
nator.
"The program is designed to
target rural youth, and the idea is to
cultivate leadership potential so that
those youth can be recycled back
into their community, having par-
ticipated in the program Tully
said. "Ifs intended to provide a
basis for taking community action
� getting involved in local issues
The Legislator's School began
in 1985 as a collaborative effort be-
tween Beaufort County House
Representative Howard Chapin,
Pitt County House Representative
Ed Warren and some of the person-
nel at ECU's Rural Education In-
stitute. The program vvasoriginallv
designed for 300 eighth through
twelfth graders to develop leader-
ship, thinking and communication
skills. The participants attend on
scholarship funded through the
N.C. General Assembly
The students are divided into
two groups: eighth and ninth grad-
ers, and tenth through twelfth
graders, who attend LSFYLD for
three weeks each in the summer
Unfortunately, due to budget cuts,
the program had to be reduced to
Diver
two weeks this year, Tully said.
"We found we were still able to
achieve the same kind of intensity
and commitment on the part of the
students to cause many changes,
which will come following their
participation in the program Tully
said.
"We've designed the program
to teach students how to use infor-
mation to solve problems Ann
Harrison, LSFYLD director, said.
Today's youth and tomorrow's
leaders must be both problem find-
ers and problem solvers � people
who can communicate and solve
conflicts, Tully said.
"Those are the types we'll need
in the 21st century she said.
Both Harrison and Tully are
quick to praise the men and women
who staff the Legislator's School.
Eight faculty members instruct the
students in their particular area of
expertise, whilea separatecounselor
works with each of the eight groups
of twelve students. Additionally,
the program is enhanced by eight
junior counselors who participated
in the program as students in pre-
vious vears.
As evening coordinator,
Stinson plans many of the recre-
ational and nighttime learning ac-
tivities for the LSFYLD participants.
Both he and Mansfield play an im-
portant role in planning Challenge
Days, a weekend of physical ac-
tivities at River Park North.
Fourteen-year-old Wendy
Scott, a rising ninth grader from
Durham, said that her favorite part
of the Legislator's School was Chal-
lenge Days. The Challenge Days
focused on a lot of trust and com-
munication activities, she said
"Legislator's School has
changed my whole outlook on life
I was very hesitant about making
friends Scott said.
LikeScott,Smithalsodescnbed
LSFYLD as giving him a new out-
look on life. "Ifs given me exate-
ment for a new year, and new skills
to help me in and out of class he
said.
Tulls main goal is to make
sure the program continues and to
ensure that it is a quality program
geared to offer something to both
North Carolina and its people
"We have to havea holistic view
of North Carolinandifsimportant
that leaders emerge and take an
active role in those rural areas of
North Carolina is to develop in a
way that is representative of all the
persons residing in the state and
out of the state Tully said.
"We're real responsive to v hat
weseeasNorthCarolina needsand
student needs, and we stronU
combine those two things she sa id
As a means of following up on
the program's success, the '
LSFYLD participants will reuni'
for a weekend, probably in Novem-
ber. At that time, the students m i
network with one antther and find
out what strategies they learned th i s
summer work and which ones thev
can improve, Tully said
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Continued from page 1
Gordon P. Watts, an underwa-
ter archaeologist and co-director of
the ECU program, said the value of
the wreck is in the thousands of
small, personal items it carried.
He said the ship is not impor-
tant because of the arms, ammuni-
tion, cannon and carriages on board.
"We have a tremendous amount of
this material that survived the Civil
War said Watts.
"The things that make this
wreck important are the small to-
kens of people's daily lives like
toothbrushes and pencils and the
objects they carved themselves
that give us a lot of insight on the
Culture
personal effects of the Civil War
he said.
The personal possessions be-
longed to the men of three infantry
regiments � the 13th Indiana and
the 112th and 169th New York
volunteers. The soldiers werebei ng
moved from Folly Island, S.C, to
northern Florida where Confeder-
ate forces were believed to be
massing.
The Maple Leaf reached Jack-
sonville and put ashore the troops
on the evening of March 30 but
before the cargo could be unloaded
the vessel's captain got an urgent
order to deliver reinforcements -
87 cavalrvmen and their horses �
up river to Palatka. At Palatka the
ship picked up 45 fleeing Union
sympathizers. When darkness fell
the ship steamed back towards
lacksonville.
It was "a right clear night" with
no sign of danger, the ship's pilot
Romeo Murry later told an Army
board of inquiry. As the shipneared
Jacksonvilleon the Momingof April
1, the 70 people on board were
awakened by what the Maple Leaf's
captain, Henry W. Dale of Chelsea,
Mass described as "a tremendous
crash The rotten eggs stench of
burnt gunpowder filled the air.
The Maple Leaf had struck a
Confederate "torpedo a type of
mine made with a wooden keg oi
powder. A forward cargoarea filled
with water and within minutes the
ship sank in the main channel .Four
people died.
Later Confederates burned the
decks that protruded above the
water. Army engineers attempted
to demolish the remainsof the wreck
in 1880 but by then much of the
vessel's hull wasbuneddeepin tht
mud.
"No other shipwreck in the
United States � including the USS
Monitor � is so rich in artifacts
Nothing even comes close said
Still,one of thecounoVsauthonties
on naval history.
Continued from page 1
integrate information available at
the center into class papers, Ahad
said. One particular area of research
in which the cultural center might
help is in different cultural attitudes
toward health care, Ahad said.
People from different cultures
havedifferentattitudesaboutwhen
a sickness is one that requires a trip
to the doctor. The information at the
cultural center may help with re-
search into how people from dif-
ferent cultures adjust to different
ideas about health care, Ahad said.
The group had considered try
ing to develop the center within the
University, but because of budget
constraints, the building will most
likely have to be established under
a nonprofit organization.
Chancellor Richard Eakin and
Dr. Prabhaker Khazanie of the
School of Medicine were part of the
study group.
The group will look into find-
ing a rent-free building from a local
philanthropic individual or institu-
tion.
The group is considering
buildings in the downtown area
that have been vacant for years,
such as the Blount Harvey Building
on Fourth Street in the Evans Street
Mall.
The grou p hopes to have found
a corporate sponsor and a building
for the center within the next three
to six months-
Ed Walker, president of the'
Chamber of Commerce, presided
over the meeting. "Although the
Chamber seems to be promoting
the project, it needs to be a commu-
nity project he said. Everyone at-
tending the meeting agreed that the
project needs to be pursued.
Students interested in helpinc
with the cultural center can volun-
teer services. Anyone in terested ra n
contact Ahad or the Chamber I
Commerce for more information
Bogies Welcomes Ml Orientation Students
f ftCC Admission Nightly for all
orientation students
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v:
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Specilixing in Custom Screen
Printed Sportswear Since 1
T-SHIRTS, SWEAT SHIRTS. GOLF SHIRTS, CAPS, ETC.
IN HOUSE ART DEPARTMENT�EXCELLENT SERVICE
COMPETITIVE PRICES'LOW MINIMUMS
WE UNDERSTAND BUDGETS & DEADLINES
OFFICIALLY LISCENCED TO PRINT ECU LOGOS
1016 MYRTLE AVE. GREENVILLE
(919)758-4176
7
W 31 1001
WANTED TO BUY
BASfcBALL CARDS WANTED: SCHOLAR!
N1 ist be in good condition. Call 758- from privat
73 yr) Call 2
detail s.213-41
or income
FOR SALE
WANTED Musical instruments for
em I sales: guitars be
mandolins - violins - cellos bass -
s - amps - keyboards - drums
erfs Music, 2711 E. 10th St 757
2OT commission cost Jim and
I lebbie
MUSIC STUDENTS 4
to you if you order non
V i order direct from ware!
I npie $800 horn - i �
p. ts$6 shipping plus 5241
J510. Gilbert's musk, Z
Greenville 7S7 7
FENDER AMP4
excellent tone, great n
quality price. $300.00. Ca � I
757-2597.
MOVING SA1I
si eBassett mattress an 1
S65 for set. Student 3drawer � � �
r,$65 Rocker with cushioi �
Call 3554764
PIRATE FOOTBALL '91
ScheduleT-shirtsare here! The season
of the PURPLE HAZE! Call (Ja
BOWL BOUND GRAPHICS (757-
2980) We Deliver'
CO PIRATES!
11
THE WAY
R1CH1
Y'i u can ea rn
intern f �
Plus you
able busmes
junior sen
Sandior 1.
HI LP V
ivarel
I
PART-T1M1
ACCEPT!
NIGHT
BOriKkH.il
WANTED
Thun
Call
WAREH0US1
riDCJLLJ
rN S
August 1
I incjerte
Slcepuarc Y
Uniforms
9:00 a.m. -
Look
lx iut da
Welcome Ba
Hitting Stands
Football Prei
Coming Out Au





V
i
ykMJMi
;hip program
SH?e lEaat (Earoiinutn
id
lableto
t� nsitv
vt the
anges
thetr
ullv
ngram
nror-
�nn
�vJld
vople
solve
an'
rtselor
It
I
TV-
i rod
Durham, said that hei favorite part
cA the Uisator'sS. od was Chal-
lenge Days The challenge Days
focused on a lot ot trust and com-
munication activities, she said.
"Legislator's School has
chanced m w hole outlook on lire.
I was ver) hesitant about making
friends, Scott said
LikeScoti mithalsodescribed
i SH 1 D as giving him a new out-
n k on life !t 5 given me excite-
men! tor a new year and new skills
to help me in and out of class he
said
Tullv's mam goal is to make
sure the program continues and to
re that it is a quality program
seared to offei something to both
Nlorth Carolina and its people.
Wehavt '�� ba ea holistic view
ofNorthCarolina,andit important
that loader emerge and take an
e in tJhose rural areas of
ISJortl �is to develop in a
v ay that sentative of all the
persons residing in the state and
the state "ully saki.
si veto what
naneedsand
lent needs, and we strongly
things shesaid,
s arm I '� lowingupon
the program s success the 1991
LD participants vmII reunite
veeki ibabl) mN'ovem-
� - the students will
irk writh one another and find
hat strategies they learned this
.unv- rl md which ones they
thy s.iid
-line th a wooden keg of
-d cargo area filled
with water and within minutes the
in the main channel. Four
peopk �
federates burned the
protruded above the
gineers attempted
�the wreck
by then much of the
vasburied deep in the
v reck in the
including the
) rich in � � -
unrn. luthontn
t president
ati area
ars
line
und

ik the
Chan ber I 0 nwnerce, presided
over the meeting. "Although the
Chamber seems to be promoting
her- � � I needs t� be a commu-
nity pn �ject he said. Everyone at-
tend ing the meeting agreed that the
projet t needs to be pursued.
Students interested in helping
with the cultural center can volun-
tei r services. Anyone in terested can
contact Ahad or the Chamber of
Commerce for more information.
fall - August 21
hinian is still hiring. Honest.
I pting applications for the
ions: Assistant News Editor,
fter, Editorial Columnist
fend Typesetter.
by our offices in the
Building anytime between
in Mondays through Fridays
It? pen when classes are out,
In't have to wait for school
start in the fall.
Sportswear
Specilizing in Custom Screen
Printed Sportswear Since 1!
SHIRTS, GOLF SHIRTS, CAPS, ETC.
DEPARTMENT-EXCELLENT SERVICE
IVE PRICES'LOW MINIMUMS
JTAND BUDGETS & DEADLINES
iSCENCED TO PRINT ECU LOGOS
lYRTLEAVE. GREENVILLE
19)758-4176
WANTED TO BUY
BASEBALL CARDS WANTED:
Must be in good condition. Call 758-
7853.
FOR SALE
WANTED- Musical Instruments for
consignment sales: guitars - banjos -
mandolins - violins - cellos - bass -
horns - amps - kevboards - drums.
Gilbert's Music, 2711 E. 10th St. 757-
chr.7. 20 commission cost im and
Debbie.
MUSIC STUDENTS: 40H discount
to you if you order non-stocked items.
We order direct from warehouse.
Example $800 horn - You pay $480
plus S6 shipping plus $24 tax - Total
$510. Gilbert's music, 2711 E 10th St,
Greenville. 757-2667.
FENDER AMP:40wattsper channel,
excellent tone, great reverb, all at a
quality price $300.00 Call Seth at
757-2597.
MOVING SAI E: Extra dean twin
si e Bassett mattress and box springs,
$65 for set. Student 3drawer desk and
chair, $65. Rocker with cushion, 560
Call 355-4764.
PIRATE FOOTBALL '91: Home
Schedule T-shirrsare here! The season
of the PURPLE HAZE! ail (Joel) of
BOWL BOUND GRAPHICS (757-
2980). We Deliver'
E
GO PIRATES
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE:
from private sector (up to $20,000
yr.). Call 24 - hr. message for more
details:213-964-4l66,ext.95 Nograde
or income restrictions. All majors.
THE WAY TO MAKE MONEY IS
RIGHT UNDER THIS HEADLINE
You can earn good money as a college
intern for Northwestern Mutual Life.
Plus you get flexible hours and valu
able business experience. If you're a
junior, senior, or grad student, call:
Sandi or Ijnda for an interview, 35
7700.
HELP WANTED. Part time driver
and warehouse worker. Mornings
preferred. Must have driver's license
and dependable car. Apply in person:
larry's Carpetland, 3010 E 10th St,
Greenville, NIC.
PART-T1MEEARTH-SAFE Signup
residents for curb-side recycling' Earn
$15 an hour. Help save trie Earth and
earn extra money Call 758-9411, 752-
1179.
ACCEPTING APPIICATIONS FOR
NIGHT AUDITOR AND
BOOKKEEPER. Holiday Inn Green
ville.Cal!919-286-5013betore5:00pm
919-934-5809 after 5:00 pm.
WANTED : Mature, dependable
babysitter for 2 yr old & 6 mos old.
Tues - Thurs, 8 am - 5 pm. Housework
as rime allows. Long term commit
ment required. Must have own car
Gail 758-3600 (Sarah).
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Profes-
sional graduate, or mature tmdei
graduate. $200 per month plus 1
utilities. Very nice townhouse
Washerdryer included. Non
smoker. Call 757-0467.
RMAI E ROOMMATE W a rry
ASAP: Call Wendy (919)728 i 14
Close to campus. Own room spa
cious. VillageGreen, great neighboi:
i'mi
ROOMMATE WANTlil
non-smoker to share furnished
apartment Private bedroom and h fh
$180permonthplus13utilic. Ca I
collect. (704)733-5444
ROOM FOR RENT: in poung
ople'shome. Female only $225 per
month, indudesutilities.Nosrnol. ing.
private bathnxim. Kitchen privilegt &
Gall 355-5078
FEMAIE ROOMMATE: Prefer up
peniaaanian to share a two bedrot n
house. Prefer non-smoker Maturity
is required. Call Amy at 8 JO 1624.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
to share a one bedroom apartment.
Excellent location, convenient to
campus and downtown Must be
outgoing! $150 per month plus halt
utilities. Call830-19foforde!aiaftir
FURNISHED HOUSE $75 each lor
serious quiet male students Rural,
secluded, rustic! Deposit required
Call (919)584-4848.
i iOUSE FOR RENT: Female only. 2
bedroom furnished home for rent in
nice residential area. $350 per month.
Call 752-5358.
FURNISHED ROOM FOR RENT:
In nice home. Phone jack. Own bath.
Kitchen privileges. No pets. Prefer
graduate student or responsible un-
dergraduate 90 per month indudes
hiut, utilities. Serious inquiries only
please. 756-6615.
VM1 SON ACRES APARTMENTS:
752-75 H, 2 BR, 1 1 2 bath, part fum,
$115 per month plus utilities, deposit
negotiable, prefer male nonsmoker
indcrgrad, 2 blocks from campus.
Ix'stliH-ation-besideswimmingpool,
basketball court, tennis and
launderette Available 1 August.
FEE INCREASE FOR
MILLER ANALOGIES TF.ST
Effective September 1, 1991, the fee
for the Miller Analogies Test (MAT)
will increase from the current fee of
$30 to $35. This amount reflects an
increase to the Testing Center from
the Psychological Corporation.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
PERSONALS
PURPLE HAZE FOOTBALL '91!
COMING THIS FALL. MEMPHIS
STATE SEPT 14.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Ringgold Towers
Now Taking Leases for August
1991-1 Bedroom, 2 Bcdnxim.
& Efficiency Apartments
CALL 752-2865
A UeautifuJ Place to Ijve
�All New
�And Ready To Rent-
iMVKRSITY APARTMENTS
28W K. 5lh Street
�I AKiiril Near ECU
Near Major Shopping Centers
� V ri� From Highway Patrol Sution
I imitcd Offer $300 a month
i ��niact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Qfficeapn Apt 8, 12 5 30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
l jji and ijuel tme tsdniom fumuted apannzms.
f'�"KefT� w,b�e water and aewcr. ajSen. Aoi
caMsTM Ccairiaa or toiglea cnly J2A0 � munch b
mrmlmm MrMlf.HONff.RENTAl.Scoupla'or
M�jlm Apanmenl nd maKle home ir AxaJea Gv
�k a x � � . Valley Cnaran Oub
t'oniatt J T or Tommy Williams
756 7815
"The 9aiC Company
of LJTicmtiU Ltd.
�GREENVILLE S FIRST FULL SERVICE NAIL CARE SALON'
Pedicures � Acrylic Nails � Wraps � Gel � Nail Art
Manicures � Eacials � Paraffin � Waxing � Gift Certificate
Planning 'Package
Wl'isits $25.00
5"Visits Si5.00
$4.00 per ins it
aO ��
JranfQe 'Ruth
VaC 'Kacqud
&Specia
"JuffSet - S35.00
'free paraffin treatment untfi first I ill-in
Pedicure $4.00 Off
Offer good (imited time only
2408 S. Charles, Suite r
(919)355-4596
A WAREHOliSE SALES
1 53Q SOTH KVAINS 5nr
August I. 23
I inqerie Slippers
SIcepware Piece Goods
Uniforms Lace
9;00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
OLD
FASHIONED
Homemade
Ice Cream.
Yofurt
& Sorbri
Opfii I)m! i
11am -11pm j
SlriEHIthSt.
FREE
PREGNANQ
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Services & Cmin! elin
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 F. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NO
Mon-Fri 8:30 5:0(i
(7
ITG Tours USAir
July 26-28 � August 23-25 � November 1-3, 1991
Ms s
Saigon
snd�
Your Miss Saigon N�w York Tour Includes:
Q Roundtrip air via USAir
J Two nights hotel accommodations
LI Orchestra seat for Mis Saigon
? launch or late dinner at the Stage Dell
Q Ixnver New York or Upper New York
sight-seeing tour
Q Admission to the South St. Seaport
Museum
CJ Air and hotel taxes
Qj New York City information packet
MILFORD PLA2
$459
ppdbl occ. single
supp: '108
OMNI PARK
CENTRaAL
$489
ppdbl occ. single
supp: '131
(�) ITG Travel Centers

RALEIGH 782-2662 CHaAPEL HILL 967-1438 WILMINGTON 392-2315
DURHAM-RTP 941-5014 OR 1-800-833-1151
GREENVILLE 355-5075 OR 1-800-5628178
AMERICA'S
FAVORITE
OIL CHANGE
At Jirfy Luho. your car receives the finest, most
romptetf; prpvmtfve maintenance possible,
per1oifld by hiqhly- trained team of specialist
Dove irto irfy Lube and drive out in minutes
knowing youi car is ready tor that long road trip
1 We change your oil with a mapr brand'
2 We nstaN a rv�w oi fitor"
3 We lubricate the whole rhassat1
4 We Check and ?�iransmKKrntiud'
5 We Check and fi WliuiI lk�d'
6 We Check and fi brat? tlmd'
7 We Check and fl power steering Hind'
8 We Check and fi window washer fluid1
9 We Chock and f � battery
10 t Check the ar liter!
11 Wo Check the wiper blades'
IP W inflate the tires to proper pressure'
13 Wc vacuum the interior'
14 �� ��en wash your windows'
VUe'B Hav� You Ready in Minutes
lifSflL M A mm m ImsssmmsmmssS
it mi up ftppoinniwiiis
NC OFFICIAL SAFETY INSPECTION STATION
126 S.E. Greenville Blvd. 756-2579 M-F 8-6 Sat 8-5
Not good wNh any other coupon offer Cash value of 120lh or or cent
Limit one coupon per person per visit 'Vwnly m Greenville or Jacksonville
Expires 83191
1
I
PULL 14pt
SIRV1CI
I
I
I txpires oj i�i �
PINEBROOK AFTS.
UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP
formerly Riverbluff
Renovations Underway
1 Bedroom Apts & 2 BedroomTownhouse
Water Sewer and Basic Cable included in rent
Pool Low Deposit
Pets Allowed (conditional) liundry Room
Now accepting applications for
August 1st & August 15th
121 Riverbluff Rd. 758-4015
ECU SPECIAL
THURSDAY
?5 fa 0ff fl 6. brWrWQ$
1tnifdoN(ghtwiff Coupon
mf mm �)��� ,mw. jtj�a�ieii .it m






I
hip program
ZUfe lEaut CUnrdlltltatl
i -
i.it her favorite part
ss, hfd wasChal-
ohaHer5 Days
truSI and com-
es -ho vitd.
School has
�hokonlifo
�int about making
ilsodescriftfed
a tevv ont-
rr� oxcitp-
-� w Nkills
� , iass he
- to rnako
S and to
. nram
g to both
-nc view
.mportant
tarKfc an
riMs of
pma
ffl the
� �' and
ti i svhat
� FSaTtd
-Ti-nglv
.�. i p on
� �� : �
mint to
" . verrv
- will
i firid
� I thi
5 !hov
�illod
-
- �
� I the
tht
ptfxl
��rock
ii the
vpm the

tfhofifieS
� the
' vidpd
. h the
� �� : r rfrtoflri
� (�mmu-
Hd.i �� -vone at-
!thatfhe
�- f d.
helping
� � n vnlim-
�vtfdran
I �
' iformation.
F4LL - August 21
in is still hiring. Hornet.
. ; itiofls foi -l '
'lumniM
� hi the
lime betWfl
i

h l ri I a
ifi if,
� ill
19f tor IMi'tfit
Sppf illtlnif in Cut lorn Screen
Printed Spnr1wpar 9inrp fW5
h SHiMfr,if SHIRTS, CAPS. ITC
ii fAfUMf NT-EXCELLENT SERVICE
j puk.f s-i ow minimums
. I Afjf I Hi IDGETS & DEADLINES
CfN I f) TO PRINT ECU LOGOS
'HTIEAVE GREENVILLE
19)758-4176
WANTED TO BUY
BASEBALL CARDS WANTED:
Must he in good condition. C all 738-
7hSi
FOR SALE
W-WTED- VfiiMr,il IrxtninvnN tor
0 nsignmert Safes guHsarS hanu-s
mardohs violins cellos fea�S
rvrns .imps - keyboards drums,
(.lllxrt's Music, 27! i F. 10th St 757-
2�S7. -W commission onst im and
bbie
Mi S( SFl DENTS: k , .hsunrnt
.uiit vouorJernon sfocktffifaWS
W, order direct � warehouse
1 -NX) Krn . y,M1 n. JgQ
Sfi -hipping plus $24 tax Total
5 ihert's him i.ith St,
(.ronviilo 757-2i667
I in RMr.JOw.etsp
PXO � ;rv.v r. � at a
'itv prKe $300.00. �a - - at
VMVI(, sf A n
M PWS9 'essandbtv
R rSPl Student "drawtTwrskand
CTva r. Sr R,v kvr with cushion. $66
is4
PIP Aff LOO, BAI . '91 ft,
Schedule T shirts a re here' fhesoason
of the PURPLE HAZE!Call Ooel) of
B( WL BOUND GRAPHICS tf�?
pgffi We Deliver'
GOPIKMfV
HELP WANTED
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE:
from private sector (up to $20,000
vr). Call 24 hr message for more
details: 213 -Mlhh.ext. Nograde
or income restrictions All majors.
THE WAY TO MAKE MONEY IS
RIGHT lA'DER TH!S HFADI ir
Yt 'U can earn gixvi money as a college
.ntern for Northwestern Mutual 1 lie
Plus you get flexible hours and valu
able business experience If you're a
Hinior, senior, or grad student, call
Sandi or Linda for an interview,
7700.
HUP WANTED: Part li.n.e driv. r
.r warehouse worker Mornings
preh rrcxi Ivrusf have driver's licen.
jv.d Jopc-ndable car Apply in person
Lirrv's CafpefltffKl, mti F lOffi 5l
(reenv.lle. C
PAKT-rivUdARLH-SAFF signup
residents tor oirb sidenonc. Fan
�s1" fan hour Help save the Farthai
earn extra money' Call "s 941 "
117Q.
ACCLFTINCAPn K A DONSFOK
K;HT AIDITOR AND
BOOKkFFPFR Mbiklay Ir.nCreen
tfHt&9t9 &fc-5fl md -rX)pr.
' I fM r ' ' .
WANTED : Mature, dependa:
babysitter for 2 yr old & h mos old
Tues- Thurs,8 am - 5 pm Housework
(i me a 1 low I or. g ferSt t. ,r, u r, i t
ncnt requirrd Must have own �s
Call 758W10 fSarah)
FOP PF NT
FEMALE ROOMMATE I
sional graiiiate, or mahi.c ai o�
graduate $200 per month pi & f.
utilities. Very nice townhouse
Washerdryer included N-on
smoker. Call 757-0467.
F MAIE RiiOMMATEW
ASAP: Call Wendy (�b
(lose to campus. Own rnin, pj
cious.VillageC.reen,great.urig h6i
ROOMMATE WANTED
nn smoker to share fun.
apartment Privatebe�Jro(n'
$l$0permonthplus1"hi .
co.lKx-t (704)754-14
ROOM FOR RENT: :
couple's home Female only $22 I
month,includesutilirie f . , �
privatebathnnmi Kitihe
( all r55 51 78
FtMAIF ROOMMAii I'� .
perclassman to share a fa �
house Prefer non-smoker 'A .mritv
l-r(ji;iroi Ca'lAmyatS' : t
ttMMM ROOM.MAft v-n i)t).
to share a one beir(Km Ar-
Fcelient lo�.ati(in. conveiint to
campus and downtown M I
� fc! $156 pT moi.l r
utilities.CaI836 l-fVoor,1. �. (Aff, t
FURNISHED HOUSE: $7S (
:ri!e ud- , ;� Ki
eluded rus? Depos . ,
Oil tlWftMM
F OR RF NT
IK t Sfi FOR RENT: Female only 2
' iroom furnished home for rent in
nice r.sidential area. $350 per month.
Ca72-535S.
FLRNISHED ROOM FOR RENT:
In nue home. Phone jack. Own bath.
rt privileges. No pets. Prefer
In rte student or responsible un-
wvoi�iuate.$190 per month includes
utilities. Serious inquiries only
� 75fHS615.
� il; ON ACRES APARTMENTS:
�4,2BR, 1 12 bath, part fum,
$1 �5 j i r month plus utilities, deposit
.�;� �.able, prefer male nonsmoker
i ' ii, 2 blocks from campus.
: � viHon-besideswimmingpool,
; a ketball court, tennis and
a.nd' rette. Available 1 August.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
FEE INCREASE FOR
MILLER ANALOGIES TBSTT
Effective September 1, 1991, the fee
for the Miller Analogies Test (MAT)
will increase from the current fee of
68f to $35. This amount reflects an
increase to the Testing Center from
the Psychological Corporation
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
PERSONALS
PURPLE HAZE FOOTBALL '9V
COMING THIS FALL MEMPHIS
STATE SFPT 14
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Ringgold Towers
Now Taking Leases for August
1991 - 1 Bedroom 2 Bedroom
A Fflkiencv Apartment
CALL 752 :xco

Kcatitifut Place to 1 jve
�All Now
�And Rcjiiv To Rom-
i-MVKRSITY APARTMENTS
2� K 9tk Stm-i
�lncaicd W'ar f-Cl
n Major Shi'ipping(rurr-
� . r f-rom Hi(hjv P�llol Suii.fl
Hf.1 Offer Stflfla m.nlh
i mi J f or fommv Williamv
'S6 'Sis erfffjQ : '
'�� tapm p �,ii uipm
�i:(;ARinsS'
in nirf ui ont hcAvKjm fumiArrf nw.nrr'r
�-�� r-TrrW free wrtrrmdwwer �r�shrr� vcri
- - l' fr�i4c� or �mgle� only J2rt t mnnrh 6
��� MOnilf flTA4F RF.VTAI S croplci �
:�imnm trw4 mnie hrtm ir A 7ala f-�r
. Vrtlrv rnntrw Huh
1 i .Kl J P or 1 .�nmv Willunn
, ; 'ZTt7 0ai( (nnpanif
i � ������ . t
�GREENVILLE SF.PSTFULL SERVICE NAiL CAR: 4 �

Pedicures � Acrylic Nails � Wraps � Gel � Nail Art
Manicures � Facials � Paraffin � Wamg � Gift Certificate
�-('Tanning &tkty0t
fifat$i�A
$4 00 per rvir
�T�
V.
Special
'fullSet - x5.()()
free paraffin treatment uHtftftM fit,
' 'Pedicure S-1.00 Oft
Offer good limited time onli
' rankie 'Ruth
Vai 'Kacquei

- MAREHOUSE SALES
B 1510 SOliHI pVAPiS ST,
AncpiM I 2 �ir S
irifieric
Slecpwarc
liniforms
:00 a.m.
MppefG
Piece Cioorls
Lace
7:00 p.m.
i
rAMlKLNH)!
Ice (ream. I
Yoeurt
I ofbi��?
�' tr n I) ii
I l:4m ItjMM
ftf nrtfiN

?0 05
FREE
PREGNAM Y
TESTINC,
1 TVi' AtOnflJo
Carolina Pregnancy (enter
757-0003
I'M d ;tr(.
I he Li Bull
Crornvjllr v T
I lour
Mon in y- �"
Saigon
wT,
ITG Tours USAir
July 26-28 � August 23-25 � November 1-3, 1991
Your Mist Saigon New York Tour Includes:
Cl Koundtrip air via USAir
fj Two nights hotel accommodation
Ll Orchestra �e�t for Mis Saigon
ij ' unch or late dinner at the Stage Dell
Q lower New York or Upper New York
sigh) seeing tour
Q Admission to the South St. Seaport
Museum
J Air and hotel taxes
LI New York City information packet
MILFORD PIAZA
$459
ppdbl occ. single
supp: '108
OMNI PARK
CENTRAL
$489
ppdbi occ. single
supp: '131
V
y ITG Travel Centers
KALEJGll 782-2662 CHAPtL IfflX 967-1438 WILMINGTON 392-2315
DURllAM-RTP 941-5014 OR 1-800-833-1151
GRLENVILLE 355-5075 OR 1-800-5628178
Look f or
Sl( Ixft (Earolinian
Welcome Back Issue
Hitting Stands August 21st
AMERICA'S
FAVORITE
OIL CHANGE
At Mfy I if1" fiw M receives the finest most
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Stye �aat Ulnroiintan
SenHng the fast Carolina campus community since 1925
TlM C. Hampton, General Manager
Maitmf.w B. Skinner, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Adtvrtising
I lO air Harpfr, News Editor jm pARKKR Staff Illustrator
Mari Kino, Eeatuw 1,1,tor Margie 0Sm,AClassified Ads Technician
Mar Momma, Sports rditor Michael At.huqufrqub, Mm Manager
Stkvb Run, yvw, Manager i ARRY Huc.gins, Cl l IIIII 11 MnaJP
Uwis Com v, dry Editor Stuart Rosnfr, fjatapj Eninw
KfRRY NliSTKR, C7'V UMPF DfBORAH DanIFI , Secretary
lh hiu,an.���, , ttudaaj run. ami rmphifw information (hat �rfc-ia KCll intents. The masthead editorial in each
�dMon . .ho OfMce or the Bdlteftal Board Ihr Eum C�rol,n,�n welcomes s.gne.1 leilers. limited to IV) worda. For purpoaea
.�I ,icr,HV �m1 brevity, the F,ut Carolimita reserve ihe right to win or reject letters for publication. Uttera should he
Mrr�r,l To fhe Editor, The EaM (MMm, hihhraimnii Rldg ECU, Oreenville. N.C 27858. For more, call 757-6166
That Jones Boy
"Just say no" to drug legislation
Opinion
Page 4, Wednesday, July 31, 1991
Troublesome Marines not welcome
By Matt Jones
Editorial Columnist
Wo don't want dangerous Marines in
Greenville.
It's not that we don't like Marines. We
think thev serve a purpose and perform
their duties well. Thev could possibly be
our nation's best soldiers, if not the world's.
But we don't want their tew troublemakers
in our town.
On the weekend or July 13-14, Marines
on leave from Gamp I ejeune were involved
in a brawl in a parking lot outside the Attic
nightclub, as well as a drunken, 85 miles per
hour automobile chase with police down
Fifth Street. Both were separate incidents,
and Marines in both instances were arrested
A small number of Marines stationed
in Jacksonville, mostly young enlisted men
tresh from the intense basic training of Tarris
Island, regularly migrate to Greenville to
blow off steam.
Not all of them cause trouble, but the.
Marines that do are not welcome in
Greenville or on campus.
Most of the trouble is not exactly the
Marines' fault. It comes from their training.
As stated above, most of the soldiers that
COfne to town on weekends are voung Ma-
rines. They have just spent several harsh
weeks being taught that they are indestruc-
tible.
And the recruits believe that, until they
drunkenlv plow their car through a cem-
etery fence at almost l0 mph, hit a tree and
continue moving 15 feet, all while running
from police officers.
This is not what Greenville needs, nor
what the University needs. Also, the Marine
Corps din's not need such poor examples of
behavior and judgement by what are sup-
posed to be some of our nation's best sol-
diers.
The Marine Corps either needs to raise
their recruiting standards, or they need to
teach their recruits the true meanings of
judgement, discipline and pride.
Soldiers are given a great deal of re-
sponsibility bv our nation: we give them the
right ro kill in wartime.
But in peacetime, they should behave
as each citizen is expected to behave. Noth-
ing else is acceptable.
If Marines are taught that they are the
best, then thev should all behave in an ap-
propriate manner and set a proper example.
Maxwells Silver Hamrrier
We should know where justices stand
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columniat
Of coura, Clarence Thomas
wasn' t nomi na ted to the Su promo
Court solely because he's black.
As with David Souter before him,
the meagerness of Thomas's "pa-
per trail" helped.
And that's funny. It's been
the avowed intent of the Republi-
can Tarty (as stated in its platform
at least as long ago as 1984 and
maybe as far back as 1980) to ap-
point only conservative justices
to the Supreme Court. Former At-
torney General Ed Meese has re-
ferred to this process as entrench-
ing the "Reagan Revolution" so
firmly that it could not be re-
versed, at least for 40 or 50 years.
Undemocratic of him. Anyway.
If a president nominates jus-
tices based in whole or in part on
their ideology, then he should
openly delineate and coura-
geously support that ideology. He
should also expect the nominee to
aggressively state and defend his
views in the nomination hearings.
If the judge's ideology was good
enough to get him nominated,
then surely if s worth defending
in public.
This 'Stealth Justice' busi-
ia ludicrous and dishonor-
able. That we should be forced to
guess at the legal opinions of
unelected officials with the power
to define what the Constitution
will mean in practice, and scolded
for openly inquiring, is intoler-
able.
Even worse is the underly-
ing assumption that we should
pick judges based on their ideol-
ogy � that some ideologies are
okay in a judge and some are not.
When one speaks of "conserva-
tive" judges and "liberal" ones,
'law 'n' order" judges and judges
who are "soft on crime one im-
plicitly acknowledges that the
judge under discussion is not im-
partial � which should be un-
thinkable to anyone, conservative
or liberal.
If s been a perverse pleasure
to see liberals begin to embrace
this thinking and conservatives
reject it. Curiously, the trend of
converts to this line of reasoning
seems to have something to do
with the current makeup of the
Supreme Court itself. Can't figure
that one out.
No one should be so strongly
opposed to liberal judicial activ-
ism as to reject its positive effects
� among them various restraints
on the powers of the police and the
state, a corresponding attentive-
ness to the rights of the accused
(those may be your rights some
day), school desegregation, and
legal abortion. An expansive view
of Constitutional rights is ulti-
mately the only defensible view,
even for a strict obstructionist.
On the other hand, turnabout
is fair play. All those issues are at
least arguably Constitutional is-
sues, and Constitutional interpre-
tation is the raison d'etre of the
Supreme Court. Now that the Su-
preme Court's ideological bias is
accelerating rightward, ifs per-
fectly fair for the present Court to
reverse previous Court rulings. Ifs
not right, perhaps, but ifs fair.
Still, there's hope for the fu-
ture. Maybe the conservatives on
the Supreme Court will all be hon-
est conservatives, meaning that
they'll recognize that the Consti-
tution is meant to explicitly limit
the powersof the government, not
the rights of the people.
Maybe they'll realize that
there are lots of things the govern-
ment has no business regulating,
like which chemical substances
individuals may ingest and what
moral choices women can make
about their own bodies.
And maybe hdl will freeze
over next Thursday.
In the last three months, four
murders have occurred in
Greenville. Perhaps this would not
be so revolting if we lived in a
large metropolitan area, where
shootings and gun play are nor-
mal, but this is a relatively small
community where it is hard to
accept such happenings.
The latest victim, Jefferson
Leon Bunn, was shot and killed at
theCamelot Inn earlier this month.
The police said that he was noth-
ing more than an innocent by-
stander. Apparently two men had
a confrontation near Bunn and at
some point guns were drawn and
shots were fired. Bunn was sim-
ply in the wrong place at the wrong
time.
The police reported that this
incident, as well as the three other
murders, all shared one common
denominator. The killings were
all drug related. Three of the tour
involved a dispute over drugs or
drug money.
The problem thus lies. When-
everdrugdcalcrsgct intodisputes
over their occupations, they have
no other solution than to turn to
violence. Drug dealers can't go to
court if they feel they have gotten
ripped off. The only thing they
can do is turn to violence. Guns
ha vebecomethedrugdealers' jus-
tice.
The solution is simple, yet
to many, quite implausible.
Legalize drugs
Take the illegality out of
drugs and with it goes the vio-
lence, as well as many other detri-
mentscaused by illicit substances.
Before pursuing this discus-
sion further, let me present a quote:
"For thirteen years federal la w en-
forcement officials fought the ille-
gal traffic. State and local rein-
forcements were called up to help.
The fight was always frustrating
and too often futile.
The enemy was pursued re-
lentlessly on land and sea and in
the air.
There were an alarming
number of casualtieson both sides,
and, as in all wars, innocent by-
standers fell in the crossfire
The preceding quote is not
describing the drug war, although
it easily could fit into that scheme,
it is about the prohibition of alco-
hol during the 1920s.
Many problems evolved
from the enactment of prohibition,
such as organized crime, corrup-
tion of public officials, widespread
disobedience of the law and a rise
in overall crime rates.
After 13 years, Congress re-
pealed the amendment which for-
bade alcohol. There law didn't
work, so they simply did away
with it.
The laws against alcohol
were the cause of the problems of
the 1920s. The same can be said for
drugs today.
In short, there are two prob-
lems whichdnigs pose � the prob-
lems drugs cause and those drug
lawscause. It isapparent that little
can be done about the problems of
drugs, but much can bedoneabout
laws. Take the criminal element
outofdrugsand the criminals will
disappear.
The drug laws of today have
many detrimental effects. The
worst is crime. In addition to dis-
putes in the drug field, there is
also economics. The drug laws
decrease the supply of drugs
which forces prices to rise Thus,
the people who use drugs must
pay large amounts of money.
Many addicts turn to crime to pay
for drugs, which would be afford-
able if they were legal.
Another effect is corruption.
It is not hard to believe that there
are police and other officials on
the take from drug dealers.
Law enforcement officials
are arresting dealers who drive
cars worth three times more than
their yearly salary. It would be
impossible to raise officials' sala-
ries to a level out of reach for a
drug dealer.
The creation of stronger
drugs is also a problem caused by
today's laws.
In a society where drugs are
legal, crack cocaine would prob-
ably not exist. It too, is a story of
economics. Which would a drug
dealer more 1 ikely transport,a kilo
of oxraine or the same amount of
crack?
With crack generating ten
times more money, the answer is
simple. If a dealer is going to do
something illegal, he will want to
make the most money.
If drugs were not illegal, then
the need for more potent, compact
drugs would never have arisen.
Another problem with laws, not
drugs.
This was paralleled in the
1920s when an increase in mari-
juana use occurred because it was
easier to buy than alcohol.
The more strict the laws are
made, the more potent drugs will
be.
The final problem with the
drug war is futility. It just isn't
working. This country has an esti-
mated 23 million drug users, 5
of the total population. No matter
how much we spend, we are not
going to end the drug problem.
So what can be done with a
war you are not winning? One of
two things, escalation or retreat.
Alas, we have already tried
escalation, and now it is time to
retreat.
Decriminalization
Many people oppose this
idea. Some say that drug use will
increase, others say it won't.
Advocates say that with le-
galization, drug use could be cur-
tailed. With the drugs legal, the
surgeon general would issue
warnings to be placed on their
products, just like alcohol and to-
bacco. Those warnings are work
ing. Indicators show that there
are fewer demands for tobacco
products and that existing ciga-
rette salesare shifting toward low-
tar brands. Alcohol consumption
has shifted from hard liquor to
beer and wine, and from wine to
wine coolers.
If drugs were legal, then
eventually their warning labels
would have the same effect. Manv
people, especially youngsters,
probably believe that current
warnings against drug usage are
just part of a scare tactic.
Opponents believe the It
galizahon oi drugs would most
likely result in a rise in usage
However, if that were the case, it
would seem more logical (and less
dangerous) to have a nationwide
medical epidemic, rather than a
nationwide criminal epidemic
Even with drug usage increasing,
the effect could never be as bad as
the current situation. We wouldn't
find addicts going out in thestreet
robbingor killing innocent people
for their habit.
The drugs would be afford-
able, not to mention safer and
cleaner. Drug dealers would no
longer settle their disputes with
guns, in fact drug dealers would
no longer exist. They would have
no market.
It is not even perfectly clear
that an increase in some drug us-
age would be as detrimental as
already legal drugs on the mar-
ket.
Medical evidence is almost
overwhelming that switching
from alcohol or tobacco to mari-
juana or other drugs would pro-
duce a longer, happier life.
It is generally estimated that
100,000 deaths a year are caused
in the United States bv alcohol,
300,000 by tobacco, bu t only 3,500
deaths from illegal drugs. And of
3,500, 80 are due to
criminalization, not from the
drugs themselves.
Take the risk
In the end, it seems ex-
tremely hypocritical and down-
right foolish that this country al-
lows the legality of alcohol and
tobacco, clearly the two largest
killer drugs, while placing other
less deadly drugs in illegality. The
government is supposedly doing
this for our protection, but it can't
seem to show us the reason for
that protection.
While looking at the entire
situation, the answer appears
simple.
This country needs no pro-
tection from drugs, it needs pro-
tection from drug prohibition.
Letters To The Editor
Student upset
with nightclub
advertisement
To The Editor.
I am writing concerning the
Stiver Bullet Adult Entertainment
advertisement on page 3 of the
Jury 24 issue of The East Cmrdkn-
ian. I could bring up the obvious
moral objections to the ad, but I
fed that moral background
should not have to be mentioned.
I will concentrate my objec-
tions tat two areas: the exploit-
ative aspect and the image of the
ad.
I think that the ad b exploit-
ative to the women of East Caro-
lina University. The ad contains
these requests for female dancers:
"Wednesdays: Amateur Night
(Female Dancers)Cash Prize and
"Help Wanted: Female Exotic
Dancers Needed This type of ad-
vertisement preys upon women
whose circumstances leave them
with little choice other (man) mis
alternative to earn a living, or just
to get by in a time of crisis.
The second point I would
like to make is the negative image
that the ad puts forth to anyone
that picks up the paper. ECU has
tried to shake its "party school"
image during recent years.
Ada like the one for the Sil-
ver Bullet only reverts the
progress that the University has
made toward cleaning up its
image.
This ad has run through-
out all the orientation sessions.
Parents of the incoming fresh-
men must come away thinking
ECU is a wild place where tneir
children will not be safe.
A college newspaper is no
place for this type of advertise-
ment In the near future, I would
hope TV East Carolinian would
reconsider allowing this type of
advertisement.
Paul Shaw
Industrial Technology
Junior
Jane's Addi
v r
�Photo CourtM? ot WARNER BROTHER
Jane's Addiction spearheads the live show of the season. Loiii
WZMB discovers n
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
WZMB, ECL"s college radio sta-
tion, has steadiiv increased its popu-
larity over the last few years. This
growth can he attributed to manv
factions, such as its change in format
the new studio, and the appointment
of Tim Johnson as general manager
With all of these attributes, occa-
sionally the most important fao
the station is forgotten - the people
WZMB has arguably one of the best
staffs on campus, and it shows.
All of the employees have con-
tributed to the growth of the station.
New protects are constant! v added to
the agenda at WZMB to keep it feel-
ing fresh. One such activity which
has recently picked up speed are
WZMB promotions.
"The Attic" is the spot for one oi
WZMB's popular promotions where
the station sponsors local Licks"
everv Thursday night The evening is
comprised of an exhibition of three
local bards complemented by dnnk
specials and item giveaways.
Discjockev jason Holt described
the success of another of the promo-
tions.
He works on Wednesday Bights
at Bogie's dunng their WZMB spon-
sored progressive dance night. He
said that response was "going prettv
well although dunng the summer
there are smaller turnouts due to the
reduced number of students. He pre-
dicted that when fall semester begins,
the evening will pick up larger
crowds
Dan Maehold and Marc Petruska
are WZMB's promotion managers
whose jobs involve organization of
the majority of events to be spon-
sored bv WZMB. However, Holt
noted that everyone �
ensure their success, empf
fidelity found at their stat
Patty Zegar, the j
ager, also adds much I
the college radio. Her )ob
dominantlv around w I
the air such as scheduling
for new shows.
She mentioned
changes were anticipate
lowing semester, but sal
could only talk a: f
them.Zegar said that I 1
would soon be on the aiif
and Folk music will be tht
nons to the alternate�. i
slots on WZMB
Also reported were 1
a talk show to premiere I
ing with community �
nothing yet has bees
When a-kid about
she could not mention
that her hands were tied
sav that it would be anndl
end of a "4,S-hour Dl
which will start on Fndaj
The marathon will
DJ's that will broadcast i
nil h PM. the foBowin
that time, in the word's
The New' New Ro
present a special annoi
mentioned that the
"surpnse" will have to j
until then
Other important tai
tion involve the wide
dalized music to be !
weekend, shows are d
cific types of music
rap, reggae and blues
One oi the most:
ments is the 4-hour
Friday and Saturdav slj
night. Brad Strom is tr
is a Si
Hot Dog
In �wakaot�wsludant store's expansion, its






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ones Boy
irug legislation
b 't the problt rr - ;
�amecanbesaid for
It tere ,�re tvs ti prob
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�that little
e problems of
bedoneabout
.Timin.il element
the criminals will
iwsof today have
Ital effects The
n addition to J'
Ig field there is
fs l"he drug laws
ipply o( drugs
I H' ! h u s
I e drugs must
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irn to crime to pay
If � ild beafford-
legal
Iffecl is corruption
believe that there
other offk ials en
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nt officials
who dne
h times more than
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iise officials sala
I reach tor i
tion of stronger
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where drugs �re
taine would prob-
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transport.
generating ten
f . the answer is
r is going to do
hi, he will want to
(money
(re not illegal, then
'potent, compact
lever have arisen
fin with laws, not
paralleled in the
increase in man
i because it w is
Ian alcohol
�strict the laws ,ire
I potent drugs will
Kobtern with the
tility It just isn't
bun try hasanesti-
n drug iivts, 5
�ation. No matter
Jpend, we arp not
drug problem.
in be done with a
winning? One of
ll.ihon or retreat.
lave already tried
jnow it is time to
linalization
pie oppose this
at drug use will
ly it won't.
-Vko. ,ites s,iv that with le-
galization, drug use could be cur-
tailed With the drugs legal, the
surgeon general would issue
warnings to be placed on their
products jusl like alcohol and to-
� rhose warnings are work
ing Indicators show that there
.ire fewer demands for tobacco
products and that existing ciga-
rette sales are shit ting to ward low-
tar brands Alcohol consumption
has shitted from hard liquor to
beer and wine, and from w me to
wine coolers
If drugs were legal, then
eventually their warning labels
would have the same effect. Many
people, especially youngsters,
probably believe that current
warnings against drug usage .ire
just part of a scare tactic
Opponents believe the k
galizabort of drug vould most
likely result in a rise in usage
However, if that were the case, it
would soem more logical (and less
dangerous) to have a nationwide
medical epidemic, rather than a
nationwide criminal epidemic.
Even with drug usage increasing,
the effect could never boas bad as
thecurrent situation. We wouldn't
find addicts going out in the street
robbing or killing innocent people
for their habit
The drugs would be afford-
able, not to mention sater and
cleaner. Drug dealers would no
longer settle their disputes with
guns, m fact drug dealers would
no onger exist They would have
no market.
It is not even perfectly clear
that an increase in some drug us-
Ige would be as detrimental as
air: id) legal drugs on the mar-
ket
Medical evidence is almost
overwhelming that switching
from alcohol or tobacco to mari-
juana or other drugs would pro-
duce a longer, happier life.
It is generally estimated that
100,(XX) deaths a year are caused
in the United States by alcohol,
300,000by tobacco, but only 3,300
deaths from illegal drugs And of
J,300, H0 are due to
criminaliation, not from the
drugs themselves.
Take the risk
In the end, it seems ex-
tremely hypocritical and down-
right foolish that this country al-
lows the legality of alcohol and
tobacco, clearly the two largest
killer drugs, while placing other
less deadly drugs in illegality. The
government is supposedly doing
this for our protection, but it can't
seem to show us the reason for
that protection.
While looking at the entire
situation, the answer appears
simple.
This country needs no pro-
tection from drugs, it needs pro-
tection from drug prohibition.
The Editor
hen of East Caro-
Tbe ad contains
female dancers:
lAmateur Night
Cash Prize and
Female Exotic
L" This type of ad-
s upon women
knees leave them
other (than) this
i a living, or )ust
I of crisis.
point I would
� negative image
forth to anyone
paper. ECU has
"party school"
it years.
one for the Sil-
ver Bullet only reverts th!
progress that the University has
made toward cleaning up its
image.
This ad has run through-
out all the orientation sessions.
Parents of the incoming fresh-
men must come away thinking
ECU is a wild place where their
children will not be safe.
A college newspaper is no
place for this type of advertise-
ment. In the near future, I would
hope The East Carolinian would
reconsider allowing this type of
advertisement.
Paul Shaw
Industrial Technology
Junior
Hhe gaot (Haroljnfan
July 17.1991
ane's Addiction headlines '90s Woodstock
By Matt King
Features Editor
-Photo CourtMy of WARNER BROTHER RECORDS
Jane's Addiction spearheads the live show of the season, Lollapalooza.
Spanish speaking people have
a word for something that is "huge
and great The Three Stooges
used that Spanish word in many
of their movies as a synonym for
"holy cow
And I always thought it wasa
"bigred lollipop But this summer
"Lollapalooza means none of
those things.
The Lollapalooza is the
brainchild of Perry Farreil and is
hailed as an all day artsenter-
tainmentinformation festival.
Rolling Stone magazine bills it
as the travelling Woodstock of the
19Ws; the concert of the summer.
This 21-stop rolling well of rock,
talent is not just seven of the eras
most influential and popular
bands,but, also a trading place for
ideas of our time.
Marc Gieger, spokesperson
for Lollapalooza claims that the
bands in the show felt that they
had no forum to present their
music so they created one that
custom-fit their needs.
"Plus, if they didn't offer an
alternative to todasconcert scene
we run the real risk of kids today
growing up thinking that New
Kids on the Block, Vanilla Ice, and
Warrant are what music is all
about said Geiger.
WZMB discovers new enthusiasm
By Matt Jones
Slaff Writer
WZMB, ECU'S college radio sta-
tion, has steadily increased its popu-
lanty over the last few years. This
growth can be attributed to many
factions, such as its change in format,
the new studio, and the appointment
of Tim Johnson as general manager.
With all of these attributes, occa-
sionally the most important facet of
the station is forgotten - the people.
WZMB has arguably one of the best
staffs on campus, and it shows.
All of the employees have con-
tributed to the growth of the station.
Newprojectsareconstantlyaddcd to
the agenda at WZMB to keep it feel
ing fresh. One such activity which
has recently picked up speed are
WZMB promotions.
'The Attic" is the spot for one of
WZMB's popular promotions where
the station sponsors "local I.icks"
every Thursday night. The evening is
comprised of an exhibition of three
local bands complemented by drink
specials and item giveaways.
Discjockey Jason Holt described
me success of another of the promo-
tions.
He works on Wednesday nights
at Bogie's during their WZMB spon-
sored progressive dance night. He
said that response was "going pretty
well although during the summer
there are smaller turnouts due to the
reduced number of students. He pre-
dicted that when fall semester begins,
the evening will pick up larger
crowds.
Dan Machold and Marc Perruska
are WZMB's promotion managers
whose jobs involve organization of
the majority of events to be spon-
sored by WZMB. However, Holt
noted that everyone lends a hand to
ensure their success,emphasizing the
fidelity found at their station.
Pattv Zegar, the program man-
ager, also adds much to the quality of
the college radio. Her job centers pre-
dominantly around what is heard on
the air such as scheduling and ideas
for new shows.
She mentioned that several
changes were anticipated for the fol-
lowing semester, but said that she
could only talk about some of
them.Zegar said that two new shows
would soon be on the air. New Age
and Folk music will be the latest addi-
tions to the alternative to alternative
slots on WZMB.
Also reported were the plans for
a talk show to premiere this fall deal-
ing with community interests, but
nothing yet has been finalized.
When asked about the subject
she could not mention, Zegar said
that her hands were tied. But she did
say that it would be announced at the
end of a "48-hour DJ marathon"
which will start on Friday, August 23.
The marathon will feature two
DJ's that will broadcast continuously
till 6 P.M. the following Sunday. At
that time, in the words of Johnson,
"The New' New Rock 91" will
present a special announcement. He
mentioned that the nature of the
"surprise" will have to remain secret
until then.
Other important facets of the sta-
tion involve the wide variety of spe-
cialized music to be heard. On the
weekend, shows are devoted to spe-
cific types of music including jazz,
rap, reggae and blues.
One of the most popular seg-
ments is the 4-hour metal show on
Friday and Saturday starting at mid-
night. Brad Strom is the metal direc-
tor for WZMB whose duties include
dedding what music will be played
during his time slots and organizing
ticket giveaways.
Strom works closely with the
record companies by indicating the
listener response concerning the
bands heard. He also organizes
WZMB's showcases for band con-
certs which usually involve ticket
giveaways. He set up the WZMB's
promotions for "Operation Rock &
Roll a multi-band concert includ-
ing Judas Priest and Alice Cooper.
All of the staff agreed that part of
the success tc be fou nd there is due to
the new location of the station. Ad-
mittedly it is an improvement
The old station was located in a
cramped portion of the library on the
second floor. Its broadcasting studio
was about the size of a telephone
booth and there was virtually no room
for their music collectioa The entire
effect gave a negative blow to the
station, furthering the idea that it was
little more than a small college station
that didn't really matter.
"People used to think this sta-
tion was a joke said Strom, "but
they're taking it moreseriously now
'If s easier to work in a nice
place said Holt. 'Its more comfort-
able to work in a studio thaf s not
cramped. I'm positive that it presents
a generally more professional look
Zegar finished the notion,
"People take us more seriously in a
place where we don't have records
on the ceiling. Even if the listeners
can't see it, the staff shows the differ-
ence on the air
But don't take their word for it,
tune into 913 for yourself. And don't
forget to stay tuned after the DJ mara-
thon, it should be an announcement
with long-lasting impact.
The musical entities that will yond the cobwebs of college
be presenting their wares at the debauchment, attend the
Lollapalooza festival are Jane's Lollapalooza.
Addiction, Siouxsie and the Ban-
shees, Living Colour, Nir Inch
Nails, Ice-T, Butthole Surfers and
Rollins Band.
Along with the bands, tents
will be set up for artifacts of our
age to be sold and traded. Tents
will also be set up for the enlight-
enment of the public coiKerning
en vironmental, governmental and
human rights issues.
"We want to create an envi-
ronment- a community, if you will-
of communication, creativity and
environment, where kids can
come, spread their blanket s out
and spend the day says Geiger.
Just by looking at the attend-
ing talent it will be easy to predict
that a ticket to this roving rock
show is something to be attained
at any cost.
As a veteran of bearing wit-
ness to Jane's Addiction on stage I
can testify that they are worth the
$23 ticket price (give or take a
dollar) by their own right. Couple
Jane's Addictu . th another no-
toriously dominant stage pres-
ence, that of Living Colour, and
the ticket price is already a
bonafide steal.
Considering the rest of the tal-
ent on the agenda the cost of ad-
mission to this show is so low that
it might as well be called a benefit
To ensure that the memory of
the summer of 1991 will last be-
The experience is sure to re-
visited many times in the recess's
of memory for man y years tocome.
�Mfc 'AMtaayof OEFFEN RECORDS
Siouxsie along with her Banshees, join the Lollapalooza bandwagon.
William Hurt plays "Doctor" in
the summer of sensitive men
NEW YORK, NY (AP)�This
seems to be the season of the sensi-
tive male�a man made caring and
considerate through horrible trag-
edy, a man who leams humility
through serendipity's sometimes
terrible paw.
In "Regarding Henry
Harrison Ford's nasty, self-centered
lawyer becomes a kinder, gentler
soul after a gunshot in the head
leaves him brain-damaged. Billy
Crystal leams what really counts in
life when he becomes a cowboy in
"City Slickers
Now comes William Hurt in
"Doctor who journeys from
arrogrant self-assuredness to vul-
nerable terror as a sjurgeon who
becomes a patient
As Dr. Jack MacKee, he treats
patients like auto parts. Yes, he is a
veritable genius in the O.R a doc-
tor who leads his crew in jokes and
song while holding someone's heart
in his hand.
An M.D. who requests that a
tapeof the standard "closing music"
be played while he sews up his
patient. The song? Jimmy Buffer's
"Why Don't We Get Drunk and
Screw
MacKee's philosophy is that
medicine is a craft and a business.
Forget beside manner. When one
patient asks him about the nasty
post-operative scar covering most
of her chest, he says to just tell her
husband that she's as pretty as a
Playboy centerfold and has the
staples to prove it.
He is equally smart-mouthed
with his long-suffering wife, Anne
(Christine Lahti), and is but a mere
apparition to his son.
But when he goes to an equally
cold and distant throat specialist
complaining of a lingering cough,
he gets a taste of his own medicine,
which is the title of a non-fiction
book by Dr. Ed Rosenbaum upon
which "The Doctor" is based.
MacKee's lesions prove ma-
lignant and he enters the hospital
mill as a patient. Here, the movie
departs from reality. "The Doctor"
would have us believe that top sur-
geons are treated just like the masses
at hospitals.
Equally questionable is
MacKee's 360 degree rum from
callous mechanic to self-righteous
savior. He turns his back on hisbest
friend and colleague of 15 years,
Murray (Mandy Patinkin), because
he wants MacKee to lie in a mal-
practice case. Ifs understandable
that MacKee should refuse to lie.
But would he completely sever the
friendship?
No matter, "The Doctor"
transcends minor flaws and excels
as a warm drama, one given hu-
manity by the sensitive direction of
Randa Haines ("Children of a Lesser
God") and a brilliant performance
by Elizabeth Perkins as June, a ter-
minally ill cancer patient
June is MacKee's link to his
soul, and he clings to her rapture
long after they part.
Hurt, who teamed with Haines
in "Children of a Lesser God is
ideal as MacKee, demonstrating his
creative range as an actor Lahti
adds dignity, and Patinkin is good
support.
Produced by Laura Ziskin and
written by Robert Caswell, the
Buena Vista Pictures release is rated
PG-13.
National Park service guru speaks
out on the trials of Yellowstone
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL
PARK, Wyo. CAP) � Dan Sholly's
story is about a man in the wilderness
�a 12 million-acre wilderness called
Yellowstone National Park thaf s
underfunded by the government,
misunderstood by many of its visi tors
and caught in a cross-fire of political
and ecological battles.
In "Guardians of Yellowstone'
Sholly, the park's chief ranger, pre-
cariously balances his official and
personal views of how the world's
first national park is run.
Throughout the 317-page book,
Sholly succeeds in portraying the
many pressures � natural and
manmade � exerted upon
Yellowstone as well as the joys of
living in the park.
But the promise from publisher
William Morrow k Co. that Sholly
"writes vividly about the wrangles
between self-serving poUtidam, ri-
val environrnentattstiand thesquab-
bling gateway communities, who all
fed they have a right to determine
how the park is run it never met
The chief ranger never attacks
politicians for their brash statements,
and the "squabbling gateway com-
munities" of Gardiner, Mont; Silver
Gate, Mont West Yellowstone,
Mont; Cody, Wyo; and Jackson,
Wyo are barely mentioned.
"My personal feelings, which
are probably true, and the Park Ser-
vice probably feels mem too I'm
not really able to come out and say
those type of things because thaf s
the way our government, our society
works Sholly said during an inter-
view on the shores of Yellowstone
Lake
"And I like my job. And I like
living here and I think as a respon-
sible employee it would not have
been wise of me to Hart" naming
namesJkdlt around the cataclysmic
fires of 1968 that swept Yellowstone,
the book looks bade on Sholly's six
years in Yellowstone
He recounts the debate over re-
turning wolves to Yellowstone and
enora to weep aneasea monoutot
Mwuam, me growing pressures Of
tourism on Yellowstone; and the line
between observing wildlife and in-
truding upon it
Sholly was specific in recount-
ing recent tragedies in Yellowstone,
such as the tragicdeathsof two young
boys who rumbled into the Grand
Canyon and the agonizing death of
park employee John Williams, who
fell into a boiling hot spring late one
winter night in the Shoshone Geyser
Basin
While Sholly was deeply
touched by Williams' tragic death, he
has no sympathy for Bill Tesinsky, a
38-year-old photographer fromGreat
Falls, Mont, who was mauled by
"Bear 59" in October 1986.
Bear 59 was a wild animal,
and that meant she was unpredict-
able' Sholly writes. "And Tesinsky
had approached way toodoaeiy while
�he was feeding in an area where she
was not used to swing a human.
The would-be wildlife pho-





I
!
t

(She �aat (ffarolinian
July 17,1991
ones Boy
Jrug legislation
�� � iat with le-
�� ouldbecur
al the
� �uld issue
! I !h, if
I �� i to
ii � � r k
(hen
' Mi i 0
I
irdlow
� ption
� . ll then
. labels
� Many
ing �ters,
urrenl
� �
� i a ir. ta in
!
a rise in usa
f thai � ase, it
� ide
i
Ini ' � : ' I!
-
� with a
pnalization
if - ;
Id no
. iti
rs would
� uld have
Irug us-
� � - detrimental as
n th( mai
.lilin isf
thai vitching
� mari-
� If igs a i uld pro
! that
OOdeatlran
- 1001 i.hut. i
Ihs from
�f to
� nminalization, m t from thi

Take the risk
In tit' i nil it seems e
i �� riti al and down
lish that this country al
. i'iIv of all ohol and
irly the two largest
killer drugs, while placing other
leadl) drugs in illegality. The
rnment is lupposedly doing
' ' U! n !� i hon,but it ant
a us the reason tor
that protei hen
Whilr looking at the entire
situation, the anst r appear
in pie
I his country needs no pro
Irus, it neids pr(v
� fritii drug pnihibition
The Editor
en of I astar
1 t'l � ntains
Ir female dan ers
I iteur Night
( ashf'ne, and
tale i -otic
rhis type of ad
9 upon women
frees leave them
�ther (than) this
rna living, or iist
e of crisis
point I would
negative image
forth to anyone
paper. ECU has
party school"
pnt years.
one for the Sil-
ver Bullet only reverts the
progress that the University has
made toward cleaning up its
image
I his ad has run through-
out all the orientation sessions.
Parents of the incoming fresh
men must come away thinking
M I is a wild place where their
children will not be safe
A college newspaper is no
place for this type of advertise
ment In the near future, I would
hope The Fatt Carolinian would
reconsider allowing this type of
advertisement.
Paul Shaw
Industrial Technology
lunior
Jane's Addiction headlines '90s Woodstock
By Matt King
Features Editor
-Phcrfo CourUsy of WARNER BROTHER RECORDS
Wid n spearheads the live show of the season I ollapalooza
Spanish speaking people have
a word forsomethingthatis"huge
and great The Three Stooges
used that Spanish word in many
of their movies as a synonym for
"holy cow
And I always thought it wasa
"big red lollipop But this summer
"LoUapalooza means mine of
those things.
The LoUapalooza is the
brainchild of Perry Farrell and is
hailed as an all clay artsenter-
tainmentinformation festival.
Rolling Stone magazine bills it
as the travelling Woodstock of the
1OW s; the concert of the summer
This 21-stop rolling well of nck,
talent is not just seven of the eras
most influential and popular
Kinds,but, also a trading place for
ideas of our time.
Marc Cieger, spokesperson
for LoUapalooza claims that the
Kinds in the show felt that they
had no forum to present their
music so they created one that
custom-fit their needs.
This, if they didn't offer an
alternative to tixiay'sconcoTt scene
we run the real nsk of kids todav
growing up thinking that New
Kids on the Block, Vanilla Ice, and
Warrant are what music is all
about said Gciger.
WZMB discovers new enthusiasm
The musical entities that will
be presenting their wares at the
LoUapalooza festival are Jane's
Addiction, Siouxsie and the Ban-
shees, Living Colour, Nine Inch
Nails, Ice-T, Butthole Surfers and
Rollins Band.
Along with the bands, tents
will be set up for artifacts of our
age to be sold and traded. Tents
will also be set up for the enlight-
enment of the public concerning
environmental, governmental and
human rights issues.
"We want to create an envi-
mnment-acommunity,if youwill-
of communicahon,crearivity and
environment, where kids can
come, spread their blanket's out
and spend the day saysGeiger.
lust bv Uxiking at the attend-
ing talent it will bo easy to predict
that a ticket to this roving rock
show is something to be attained
at any cost.
As a veteran of bearing wit-
ness to Jane's Addiction on stage I
can testify that thev are worth the
$23 ticket price (give or take a
dollar) by their own nght. Couple
Jane's Addictit .th another no-
toriously dominant stage pres-
ence, that of Living Colour, and
the ticket price is already a
Knafide steal.
Considering the rest of the tal-
ent on the agenda the cost of ad-
mission to this show is so low that
it might as well be called a benefit.
To ensure that the memory of
the summer of 1991 will last be-
yond the cobwt
debauchment,
LoUapalooza.
of college The experience is sure to re-
attend the visited many times in the recess's
of memory for many years to come.
By Malt Jones
Staff Writer
a ZJ IB EC sta
has sti ' ncreascd its popu
r the last few years rhis
th un be attributed to n
a' studio,
With all of
tatior
. -
peopli
the
ZMB has arj
. us, and it shews
All (�f the employees have con-
ted to the growth of the stark u
Ii . . rojectsareconstantlyadded to
genda at WZMB to kei
fresh. One such activity which
is recently picked up speed are
rVZMB promotions
'The Afti
i-ot for one ot
.MB's popular promotions where
the station sponsors "local I i -
Hiursdaynight I'heeverv
prised of an exhibition of three
local bands complemented by dnnk
specials and item giveaways.
Discjockey Jason I lolt described
' e success of another of the promo
He works on Wednesday nights
at Hogie's during their WZMB spon
lored progressive dance night He
-nd that response was "going prettv
well although during the summer
there are smaller turnouts due to the
reduced number of students. He pre-
dicted that when fall semester begins,
the evening will pick up larger
crowds
Dan Machold and Marc Petiuska
are WMB's promotion managers
whose jobs involve organization of
the majority of events to be spon
sored bv WZMB. However, Holt
lends a hand to
.uretheir i mphasizingthe
d at their station.
Patty Zegar, the program man
i . much to the quality of
I ler job centers pre-
d iminantly around what is hi ard on
puch as scheduling and ideas
vs
She mentioned that several
re anticipated for the fol-
lowing semester, but said that she
ild only talk about some of
them.ei;ar snd that two new shows
would soon he on the air Niew Age
dFi 'r nu. ,i wi 11 be the latest addi-
tions U the alternative to alternative
slots on WZMB
Alsi' rep rted were the plans for
,) talk shew to premiere this fall deal-
ing with community interests, but
nothing vet has been finalized.
When asked about the subject
she could not mention, Zegar said
thai In r hands were tied But she did
say that ii would be announced at the
end of a "48-houf DJ marathon"
whuh will start on Friday, August 23.
fhe marathon will feature two
i �'sthat will broadcast continuously
till fS P.M. the following Sunday. At
that time, in the words of ohnson,
New New Rock 91" will
present a spedal announcement. He
mentioned that the nature of the
"surprise" will have to remain secret
until then
(t her important facets of the sta-
tion involve the wide variety of spe-
ciatized music to be heard. On the
weekend, shows are devoted to spe-
cific types of music including jazz,
rap, reggae and blues.
( ne of the most popular seg-
ments is the 4 hour metal show on
I rlday and Saturday starring at mid-
night Brad Strom is the metal direc-
tor for WZMB whose duties include
deciding what music will be played
dunng his time slots and organizing
ticket giveaways.
Strom works closely with the
record companies by indicating the
listener response concerning the
bands heard. He also organizes
WZMB's showcases for band con-
certs which usually involve ticket
giveaways. He set up the WZMB's
promotions for "Operation Rock &
Roll a multi-band concert includ-
ing Judas Pnest and Alice Cooper.
All of the staff agreed that part of
the Success to be fou nd there is due to
the new location of the stahon. Ad-
mittedly it is an improvement.
The old station was located in a
cramped portion of the library on the
second fhxir. Its broadcasting studio
was about the size of a telephone
Ixxithand there was virtually no room
for their music collection. The entire
effect gave a negative blow to the
stahon, furthering the idea that it was
little more than a small college station
that didn't really matter.
'Teople used to think this sta-
tion was a joke said Strom, "but
they7 re takingit more seriously now
"It's easier to work in a nice
place said Holt. 'Its more comfort-
able to work in a studio thafs not
cramped. t m positive that it presents
a generally more professional look"
Zegar finished the notion,
Teople take us more seriously in a
place where we don't have records
on the ceiling. Even if the listeners
can't see it, the staff shows the differ-
ence on the air
But don't take their word for it,
rune into 91.3 for yourself. And don't
forget to stay tuned after the DJ mara-
thon, it should be an announcement
with long-lasting impact.
-f�ho�o Coor1��y o� GEFFEN RECORDS
Siouxsie along with her Banshees, join the LoUapalooza bandwagon
William Hurt plays "Doctor" in
the summer of sensitive men
NEW YORK, NY (A P�This
seems to be the season of the sensi-
tive male � a man made caringand
considerate through horrible trag-
edy, a man who learns humility
through serendipity's sometimes
terrible paw.
In "Regarding Henry
Harrison Ford'snasty,self-centered
lawyer becomes a kinder, gentler
soul after a gunshot in the head
leaves him brain-damaged. Billy
Crystal learns what really counts in
life when he becomes a cowboy in
"City Slickers
Now comes William Hurt in
"Doctor who journeys from
arrogrant self-assuredness to vul-
nerable terror as a sjurgeon who
becomes a patient.
As Dr. Jack MacKee, he treats
patients like auto parts. Yes, he is a
veritable genius in the OR a doc-
tor who leads his crew in jokes and
song while holding someone's heart
in his hand.
An M.D. who requests that a
tape of the standard "closing music"
be played while he sews up his
patient. The song? Jimmy Buffef s
"Why Don't We Get Drunk and
Screw
MacKee's philosophy is that
medicine is a craft and a business.
Forget beside manner. When one
patient asks him about the nasty
post-operative scar covenng most
of her chest, he says to just tell her
husband that she's as pretty as a
Playboy centerfold and has the
staples to prove it.
He is equally smart-mouthed
with his king-suffering wife, Anne
(Christine Lahti), and is but a mere
apparition to his son.
But when he goes to an equally
cold and distant throat specialist
uimplaining of a lingering cough,
he gets a taste of his own medicine,
which is the title of a non-fiction
book by Dr. Ed Rosenbaum upon
which "The Doctor" is based.
MacKee's lesions prove ma-
lignant and he enters the hospital
mill as a patient. Here, the movie
departs from reality. 'The Doctor"
would have us believe that top sur-
geons a re trea ted ju st 1 ike the ma sses
at hospitals.
Equally questionable is
MacKee's 360 degree turn from
callous mechanic to self-nghteous
suv mr. He turns his hackt n highest
friend and colleague of 15 years,
Murray (Mandy Patinkin), because
he wants MacKee to lie in a mal-
practice case. Ifs understandable
that MacKee should refuse to lie.
But would he completely sever the
friendship?
No matter, "The Doctor"
transcends minor flaws and excels
as a warm drama, one given hu-
manity by the sensitive direction of
Rarxla Haines ("Ohildn-n of a Dosser
God") and a bnlliant performance
by Elizabeth Perkins as June, a ter-
minally ill cancer patient.
June is MacKee's link to his
soul, and he clings to her raphire
long after they part.
Hurt, who teamed with Haines
in "Children of a l,csser Cod is
ideal as MacKee, demonstrating his
creative range as an actor lxihti
adds dignity, and Patinkin is good
support.
Produced bv I .aura Ziskin and
written by Robert Caswell. the
Buena Vista Pictures release is rated
PG-13.
National Park service guru speaks
out on the trials of Yellowstone
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL
PARK, Wyo. (AP) � Dan ShoUs
story is about a man in the wilderness
�a 2.2 million-acre wilderness called
Yellowstone National Park thafs
underfunded by the government,
misunderstood by many of its visitors
and caught in a cross-fire of political
and ecological battles.
In "Guardians of Yellowstone
Sholly, the park's chief ranger, pre-
cariously balances his official and
personal views of how the world's
first national park is run.
Throughout the 317-page book,
Sholly succeeds in portraying the
many pressures � natural and
manmade � exerted upon
Yellowstone as well as the joys of
living in the park.
But the promise from publisher
William Morrow k Co. that Sholly
"writes vividly about the wrangles
between self-serving politicians, ri-
val environmentalists and the squab-
bling gateway communities, who all
feel they have a right to determine
how the park is run" is never met
The chief ranger never attacks
politicians for their brash statements,
and the "squabbling gateway com-
munities" of Gardiner, Mont Silver
Gate, Mont West Yellowstone,
Mont Cody, Wyo and Jackson,
Wyo, are barely mentioned.
"My personal feelings, which
are probably true, and the Park Ser-
vice probably feels them too I'm
not really able to come out and say
those type of things because thafs
the way our government, our society
works Sholly said during an inter-
view on the shores of Yellowstone
Lake.
"And I like my job. And I like
living here and I think as a respon-
sible employee it would not have
been wise of me to starf naming
names.Built around the cataclysmic
fires of 1988 that swept Yellowstone,
the book looks back on Sholly's six
years in Yellowstone.
He recounts the debate over re-
turning wolves to Yellowstone and
efforts to keep diseased bison out of
Montana; the growing pressures of
tounsm on Yellowstone; and the line
between observing wildlife and in-
truding upon it.
Sholly was spedfic in recount-
ing recent tragedies in Yellowstone,
such as the tragicdeathsof two young
boys who tumbled into Hie Grand
Canyon and the agonizing death of
park employee John Williams, who
fell into a boiling hot spnng late one
winter night in the Shoshone Geyser
Basin.
While Sholly was deeply
touched by Williams' tragicdeath,he
has no sympathy for Bill 1 esinsky, a
38-year-old photographer from Great
Falls, Mont who was mauled by
"Bear 59" in October 1986.
Bear 59 was a wild animal,
and that meant she was unpredict-
able Sholly writes. "And Tesinsky
had approached way toodosely while
she was feeding in an area where she
was not used to seeing a human.
"The would-be wildlife pho-
tographer had crossed over that fine
line between being just another pesky
photographer





f
1
IS
Cghe gqgt (Karoltrtian
SPORTS
July 31,1991
Long suspended for steroid use
By Mike Casaubon
Sports Wrilrr
Ex-ECU football player, Terry
lx�ng, who started on the Pitts-
burgh Steelers offensive line,
tested positive on the use of
steroids earlier this month.
I le faced a four game suspen-
sion and the loss Of his starting
position to Carlton Haselrig as a
result of the test according to
Knight-Ridder.
Sources said that Umg, in a tit
of desperation, tried to commit
suicide twice last week. He
apparently was found bv his
girlfriend sitting in his running
car in the garage.
When she called for help,
Long went into his house and
infested a quantity of rat poison in
another attempt to end his life.
Long was later taken to Allegheny
General Hospital where he was
able to walk to and from the
ambulance without assistance.
The events of last Wednesday
were a shock to those who knew
Long to be an upstanding citien
and a man who loved children.
Put those who know what steroid
usage can do find it to be rela-
tively Common that personality
changes are I side affect of that
performance-enhancing drug.
If one finds it a shock that
Long was using steroids, it was
stated that the 5-foot-1l offensive
lineman could touch a 14-foot
ceiling. When he was a senior at
ECU, he was selected to six All-
American teams. He won the N.C.
Powerlifting Championships by
bench pressing 501 pounds and
dead lifting 865 pounds.
lin 1963, he was drafted in the
fourth round by the Steelers
where he started as a guard.
If lxng had been using
steroids since 1983 how is it that
he was just discovered in 1991
and could he not have taken
certain measures to protect
himself?
Long's friends found it
surprising that he was using
steroids because he constantly
denied using them, according to
Knight-Riddcr. He did not drink
or smoke and he was extremely
careful about what he ate.
After getting caught using
steroids, it seems that Long lost
sight of what he was trying to
accomplish, keeping his starting
position and maintaining a
healthy body. Drug abuse will
bring mental anguish to those
involved, as well as physical
dehabilitation; just ask Lyle
Alzado.
ECU looks for a winning football season
By Matt Mumma
Spoils Writer
I"he weekend of August 31 isa
long awaited one for football fans
across the country. Professional
hxithill begins that glorious week
end to the delight of hundreds of
armchair quarterbacks throughout
the country.
An added delight forthose who
anticipate the coming of football
with I cold beer and a fistful! of
friends in the Greenville area is the
Saturday afternoon matchup of Il-
linois and ECU on ESPN.
Yes. An extra dav ot lixMhall
(albeit college) with the hometown
Pirates on the tube as if thev were I
national power Moro to the print.
thev .in1 playing I nation.il power
Rut that isrolative; BCD will be
tin television for the eves of the the
nation to analyze and thus draw
conclusions to the integrity of our
sicrod institution
In point (if fact, the toughest
game that ECU will plav this year
will be on national television at II
linois. Granted the Pirates plav
Syracuse and South Carolina, but
the first game ot the season is al-
wavs the hardest to win.
I ast vear the Pirates had an
easy first game at home against
LouWtM Tech. whuh thev won
27-17, but this vear is a different
story. Against a national power like
Illinois, in fix1 first gamed the season
and on national television, thegame
should be considerably harder for
ECU to win than last year's first
game.
But the rest of the year's
schedule favors a winning season
for the Pirates. With the exception
tit Illinois and Syracuse, the away
schedule is not what it once was
when the Pirates played the likes of
Auburn, Miami and Pcnn State.
Central Honda, Southern Mis-
sissippi, Virginia Tech and Cincin-
nati aroECU'saway opponents this
yearand they are ail games that can
be won. At home, the Pirates tough-
est game is against South Carolina.
This will be the ninth meeting
between the schools and USC has
won them all. However, South
Carolina has only come to Rcklen
Stadium oncebeforeand that could
be a turning point in a series that
USC has dominated over the
years.
Memphis State, Akron Pitts-
burgh and Tulane are the other
home games that ECU faces in the
upcoming season and again, they
are all games that should be won.
With the exceptions of Illinois,
Syracuse and South Carolina, the
Pirates should be able to win the
rest of their games and have a
winning season.
A liberal estimate of the Pirate
foothill schedule for the 1991 season
would be 8-3 a not too unattainable
Ewing destined to play in
NYC four more years
national power More 10the print, lllinois.mthehrstgameottheseason won them all. However, South goal.
Football Hall of Fame inducts five members
CANTON, Onto (AP) With
11 kids to raise, Ann Campbell
didn't think she'd ever have tinx1 to
see the world But she got to mv her
son Earl inducted into the Pro
Football 1 fall of Fame Saturday
Farl Campbell was joined bv
offensive guard lohn Hannah,
lineman Stan lonos, placekicker Ian
Stenerud and former Pallas Cow-
bovsgvnor.il nianagorToxSchramm
at induction eeronxinioson the front
steps of the 1 lall of Fame.
Earlier this week mv mother
was telling mo about one time when
she was getting us dossed to go to
church. Slx turned to mv daddy
and snd. I won't ever get a chaixv
to go anywhere. I won't ever get a
chance to six1 anything
' Shestid my dad Mid, Darlin
vou need to w.nt because vou never
know what God has in store for
vou
"This week she livkod around
and sud. Who'd have thought I'd
bo in Canton, Ohio? Well. Mam,
Mrho'd have thought I'd ho hen1
either r
Campbell, who plavod eight
seasons with the Houston Otters
and Mow (.Vleans Saints, racked up
9,407 yards and 74 touchdowns
England Patriots. The first Patriot in
the hall, he was named the best
Offensive lineman in the NFL four
times.
' 'What hxlay means is that I've
made the cut, I'm on the team
1 lannah slid. "Now I have the honor
of playing alongside the greatest
heroes to ever play the game
tones, selected by a seniors
committee, spent 12 years with the
Chicago Boars and one with the
rushing In his first year out of the Washington Redskins. He spent
most of his career as an offensive
guard, but also played defense late
in his CSfStr.
Stenerud, a ski jumper at Mon-
tana State, went on to become the
second highest scorer in NFL history
behind George Blanda. His373 field
goals are an all-time high. Seven
University ot levas, ho led the NM.
m rushing and was named All-Pro,
rookfc of the war and the NFL's
most valuable plavcr He led the
H. in rushing in each ot his first
three seasons
Hannah was Ml ali pro guard
from 17n to 185 with the New
times he scored 100 or more points
in a season. He kicked throe field
goals to lead the Kansas City Chiefs
toan upset of thcMinncsota Vikings
in the 1970 Super Bowl.
Schramm took over as general
manager of the fledgling Cowbovs
in 1960 and created one of the
dominant franchises of the next
three decades.
"I wasn't one of the great ath-
letes, like the men here behind mo
he said. 'To recognize the depth of
this honor tome, I was in the league
for 44 years and there are a lot of
people in the hall who are people I
saw and met. I never dreamed that
someone from the administrative
side would ever be here. It's stag-
gering. There is no greater honor
NEW YORK (AD An arbi-
trator ruled in favor of the New
York Knicks today and denied
Patrick Fwing's bid tor free agency
this season.
lite ruling by arbitrator Daniel
G. Collins moans that the All Star
center is hound to the Kmcks tor the
remaining four vearsofhiscontract,
worth $14.2 million.
Ewinghasa provision in his 10-
year contract, signed in 1965, that
would allow him to become an ro
strietod tree agent this vear if he
were not among the NBA's four
highest paid players on June 1
Agent David Falk claimed that
Ewing was not among the top tour,
theNBAand the Knicks maintained
he was fourth behind Cleveland s
lohn Williams, 1 fouston's I l.ikoem
Olajuwon and Chicago's Michael
Jordan.
Ewing is slated to make $3.19
million in the 199143 season. Wil-
liams will earn $4 million,Ottjuwon
$3.5 million and Ionian $3.25 mil-
lion.
The Knicks offered Ewing an
extension after last Season that
would have paid him more than S5
million mis season, but he turned it
down, raying he wanted to pursue
the chance to become a free agent
Collins chd not issue a written
opinion, del hiring only that he was
deciding in favor of the Knicks.
'We are pleased with the
arbitrator s nihng upholding ours
and the NB As position that Patrick
Ewing has a four-year, binding
agreement with the New York
Knicks club president Dave
Checkoffs said. "We believe this
should resolveanvcjuostionson the
matter of Patrick's contract. Now
WC an roadv to got on with our goal
ot bufldmga very competitive tcarr
that the tans can be proud of
However, today's decision
might not be the etui of the dispute
Falk has indicated he'll seek to
prove the Knicks and other teams
arc guiltv of collusion in an attempt
to keep Ewmg's salary out of the
top tour in the NBA. Similarly, the
Knicks amid counter bv claiming
that Ewmg's side attempted to in-
duce the Golden State Warriors to
upgrade Chris Mullin's wages,
driving Ewmg's salary from the top
four.
Vicario wins Federation Cup
NOTTINGHAM. England
tAP) � After leading Spain to its
tirst Federation Cup title bv alnxst
single-handedly defeating the
United States team. Arantxa
Sanchez Wano finally wasaxilod
down by the winner's trophy.
Sanchez Vicano first defeated
Mary lev Fernandas in singles, then
luted her rnewperkneed doubles
partner Conchita Martinez to vie
ton as Spain detested the Ameri-
cans 2-1 in Sunday's final of the
international team competition.
Equal parts showman and
tennis superstar, Sanchez Vicario
dominated the doubles match
against the experienced American
duo of Gigi Fernandez and Zina
Garrison�and even led the crowd
in cheers of'Oeiaer
The only thing that cooled off
Sanchez Vicario was the trophy,
which was loaded with water and
yellow roses. It tipped over as she
accepted it.dnuxTung the exhausted
player.
"I told them thanks for the
shower she said.
Sanchez Vicario was all over
the court in doubles, smashing
winners and exhorting Martinez�
ranked only 105th in the world in
doubles�asSpain rallied to win 3-
6,6-1,6-1 in the rubber match of the
best-of-3 series.
"After I won my singles, we
knew we had a chance, bu t it would
be difficult Sanchez Vicario said.
"We decided to just go for it. We
haven't played many times to-
gether, but we work well together
Gigi Fernandez, ranked No. 1
in the world in doubles, said the
reason for the loss was simple.
"I think basically we choked.
Thafsthebiggestchokeof my career
by far she said. "1 think I was way
under par today. It happens when
you'rein the final and you're playing
for your country
The Americans jumped out toa
4-0 lead in the first set of thedoubles,
but then won only four games the
rest of the way.
The two teams had split the
singles matches, with Jennifer
Capriati defeating Martinez 4-6,7-
6, 6-1 and Sanchez Vicario men
overpowering Mary Joe Fernandez
6-3,64.
Ml
ECU
Richard Simmons would be proud
Classes for beginners arid advanced aerobic enthusiasts are offered at Memorial Gymnasium
Spaniard wins Tour de France
PARIS (AP) � Miguel
Indurain, the newestTourde France
champion, will start the defense his
title next year in his home territory
as the 1992 Tour starts at San
Sebastien in the Basque region of
Spain.
Wherever it starts, three-time
champion Greg LeMond will also
be mere and likely will be among
the favorites. This year he tost his
title and for the first time in his
career didn't even earn a berth on
the podium as a top-three finisher.
"Next year I'll skip the classics.
My objective is always to win the
Tour de Prance LeMond said. "As
long as I'm racing, I'm going to
come every time to the Tour with
the intention of winning it"
Indurain won the Hi on Sun-
day by three minutes over Gianni
Bugno of Italy, with LeMond 13
minutes behind.
Flushed by victory, Indurain
also promised to be back next year.
Now Indurain can be taken seri-
ously instead of being seen as just a
teammate of Pedro Delgado, the
Spaniard who won the Tour de
France in 1988.
Indurain improved froma 10th-
place finish last year.
"Last year I was there to fight
for a place. But if s not the same
thing when you fight to keep the
10th position than when you've won
the race Indurain said.
LeMond began pushing him-
self in front in this Tour right at the
beginning and took a lead of two
minutesover Indurainafter the first
time trial.
The American held his advan-
tage through the first week until the
transfer from Nantes in Brittany to
Pau just outside of the Pyrenees
to the Pyrenees, Indurain came
in second in the stage to Val Louron.
LeMond was slowed by a viral in-
fection that put LeMond seven
minutes behind Indurain.
From that time, LeMond lived
the most drama be hoursonhis bike.
After recuperating from two bad
days in the Pyrenees he was down
again physically and psychologi-
cally in the Alps.
Once he recuperated, LeMond
said it was easier to ride, and his
results showed it with victories in
the 16th, 19th and 22ndi





Title
The East Carolinian, July 31, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
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newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.820
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
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