The East Carolinian, July 17, 1991






Right Site? 4
The recreation center site was poorly chosen.
Boyz N the Hood
L.A. violence depicted realistically
6
�he Saat (ftaraliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.65 No.37
Wednesday, July 17,1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5,000
8 Pages
Drunk driver crashes into cemetery
������������� Anmrlinn tr tk� rnnnrt - tf
Student kidnaps secretary
An ex-convict kidnapped a Lee College secretary at
gunpoint in order to have the grades from classes that he
had taken while in prison raised.
Arthur Lee Dunbar, 20, was charged with aggra-
vated kidnapping and sexual assault for the abduction of
the 52-year-old secretary.
Du nbar entered the office Monday afternoon saying
that he had locked his keys in the trunk of his car.
Witnesses told police that the secretary went down the
hall and did not return.
The secretary called about 30 minutes later and told
her co-workers that her husband had picked her up from
work Since she was not married, her co-workers called
the police.
She called again an hour later and told her co-
workers to look up Punbar's transcript and to raise his
grades. Then she told them to send the transcripts to
Southern Methodist University.
Indiana State begins recycling
The Indiana State University physical plant has re-
duced the amount of materials that ISU sends to the
dump by 25 percent through a new recycling plan.
Custodians have placed boxes around the ISU cam-
pus for collection and sorting of recvclable materials.
Those materials an in rum, taken as needed to the
physical plant where thev can be sold to a recycler.
Items that can not be sold are used around campus.
Barbara Lawrence, lSU's superintendent of Custodial
Services and Waste Management said that plastics are
being used for carpeting and playground equipment
while florists are using the shredded green-bar paper to
insulate flower bulbs.
UNC builds Recreation Center
UNC-svstem Board of Governors approved a bond
issuance to pav for a $4.9 million Student Recreation
Center.
The Bond will be payed off through a$13 increase in
UNC students' fees.
Students voted in 1990 to increase their fees in order
to pav for the Recreation Center.
The Recreation Center will include a Wellness Cen-
ter, exercise equipment, weights and aerobics and dance
facilities.
Businesses end late-night hours
ChapelHiirsHardee'sandCat'sCradlehavechanged
their operating hours in response to a shooting that
occurred early on the morning of June 25.
Hardee's, formal Iv open 24 hours, has started closing
at midnight. According to published reports, the restau-
rant managers decided to beginclosingearlybecauselate
night activity on West Franklin Street had made the late
hours dangerous.
Cat's tradle has cancelled their Club Vogue night, a
late night dance party. The Cradle was the site of the
drive-by shooting.
Chapel Hill police Capt. Ralf Pendergraph said that
there are no leads on who fired the shots.
Laettner named top male athlete
Christian Laettner was awarded the Anthony J.
McKevlin award as the ACC's top male athlete of the
year.
Laettner garnered 31 of the 65 votes for the award
compared to University of Virginia's wide receiver
Herman Moore with 12 and Georgia Tech quarterback
Shawn Jones with nine.
The a ward comes two monthsafter Laettner finished
second place to N.C State's Rodney Monroe in the ballot-
ing for the ACC's top men's basketball player of the year.
Laettner is Duke's fourth straight recipient of the
McKevlin award, following Danny Ferry, who won in
1988 and 1989, and Clarkston Hines in 1990.
UNC Congress shuts down
UNC Student Supreme Court Chief Justice Mark
Bibbs postponed until mid-July the trial challenging the
appointment of 11 Student Congress members.
Bibbs has placed a restraining order on the Student
Congress preventing it from meeting until after the trial.
The trial was postponed since there must be at least
three supreme court justices toad judicate the trial. Of the
five justices, two graduated and one has left the country.
Justices need the approval of congress to take office
so the two vacant positionscan not be filled until congress
is again allowed to meet.
Inside Wednesday
Crime Scene72
Editorial74
Classifieds� 5
Features7
Sports78
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
Adrunkdriverranhiscar
into a cemetery early Sunday
morning. The driver, John
Paul Abcrcrombie, a Marine
from Camp lx?jeune, was be-
ing pursued bv both the City
of Greenville and ECU Police.
Aborcrombie was travel-
ling from the direction of
downtown Greenville head-
ing east on Fifth Street. Ac-
cording to police reports, he
was travelling at an estimated
85 miles per hour.
While attempting to
round the curve at the end of
Fifth street, he lost control of
the vehicle and impacted the
iron fencework of the Fifth
S tree t cemetery. The esri ma ted
speed of the impact was 70
mph.
According to the report
filed by arresting officer Greg
Savage, the car travelled 90
feet away from the road after
hitting the fence. It then hit a
tree, and continued moving
an additional 15 feet.
Abcrcrombie, was ar-
rested and charged with
driving while impaired, care-
less and reckless driving and
failure to stop for blue lights
and siren.
There was no report of
AbercTombie's physical con-
dition after the accident,
however Pitt County Memo-
rial Hospital has no record of
his admission.
Estimated damage to the
cemetery was $20,0OC. Esti-
mated damage to the driver's
car was $9,000.
Neither the arresting of-
ficer nor a witnessing officer
were available for comment.
Dail Rm-ECU Ptoto
A drunk driver fleeing from police did a estimated $20,000 damage to the cemetery on F
Street and an estimated $9,000 damage to his car.
Lab
Ifth
Environmental Health Professor receives award
ECU News Bureau
Dr. Trenton Davis, a pro-
fessor at ECU, is the recipient
oi a national award recogniz-
ing contributions to heal thand
the environment
Davis, a professor oi en-
vironmental health in the
School of Allied Health Sci-
ences, was awarded the 1991
Walter F. Snyder A ward from
the National Environmental
Health Association and the
National Sanitation Founda-
tion International.
Theaward waspresented
at the National Environmen-
tal Health Association Con-
ference in Portland, Ore.
Named for a former ex-
ecutive director of the NSF
International, the award rec-
ognizes contributions to pub-
lic health and leadership in
solving environmental prob-
lems.
Previousaward recipients
have included the assistant
surgeon general for the U.S.
Public Health Service, Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency
administrators and an envi-
ronmentalist with the Pan
Amencan Health Orgaruza
tion.
In being selected for the
award, Davis wascited for his
research and for numerous
articles and public presenta-
tionsoncnvironmental issues.
He has served as technical
editor for the Journal of Envi-
ronmental Health since 1984.
Davis is a former presi-
dent of the National Environ-
mental Health Association
and is serving with the North
Carolina Public Health Asso-
ciation and the National Ac-
creditation Council for Envi-
ronmental Health Curricula.
For the past two vears he
served as a member of the
N.C. Hazardous Waste Man-
agement Commission. Davis
was one of the first scientists
selected from outside the So-
viet Union to visit the
Chernobyl nuclear reactor
plant following the accident
in 1986.
"Dr. Davis's great hu-
manity, intellect, integrity and
commitment toimproving the
quality of life through his work
in environmental health has
make a better world for all of
Citizens march against drugs
By Matt Jones
Staff Wrife:
A silent march against
drugs will be held on Satur-
day, July 20 in the West Gre-
enville Area. The march will
start at the Pitt County office
building at 2 p.m. and end at
St. Gabrielle's Catholic
Church.
The West Greenville
Neighborhood and Citizen
Clean-Up and Chug Preven-
tion Task Forceis theorganizer
of the march. Their organiza-
tion was formed in June 1990
to express the idea that the
community was becoming
tired of the drug problem in
their area.
The march will be part of
an effort by the organization
to make themselves more vis-
ible to the public. They also
declared July 15-20 as West
Greenville Beautification
Week.
D.D. Garret, the
organization's president, said
that the march and other ac-
tivities are not solely for West
Greenville Citizens. He re-
ported that the Town Council,
Board of Education and Uni-
versity officials have been in-
vited to participate.
'The drug problem did
not start in West Greenville
and will not end in West
Greenville Garret said. "It is
not a black problem or a white
problem, it is everyone's
problem
He said that only when
all the people in the commu-
nity come together to fight the
problem will it be defeated.
Garrett said that he be-
lieved the organization has
had positive effects on the
community. He said that in
J
the last year the group has
concentrated on cooperation
with the police, which includes
reporting any crimes or suspi-
cious activity which may be
witnessed.
Theorganizationurgesall
those interested to come to the
march and bring with them
banners against drugs, hand-
guns, crime or poverty.
The march will start at
1717 West Fifth street (the Pitt
County Office building).
Those attending should arrive
around 1 p.m. so thatthe group
may be organized.
For more information,
contact Rev. Michael Dixon at
830-5321.
us the citation
said.
Davis
joined ECU in
1972 as chair-
man of the De-
partment of En-
vironmental
Health, a posi-
tion he held un-
til 1904.
He became
the special as-
sistant to the
ViceChancellor
for Academic
Affairs in 1984,
the Associate
ViceChancellor
for Academic
Support in 1986,
and Acting
Dean of the
School oi In-
dustry and Technology in
1987
Hewastheassoaatedean
Martanna Bamaa � ECU Nawa Bureau
Dr. Trenton Davis
of the ECU School of Allied
Health Sciences in 1990-91.
Recreation Center
to be erected next
to Mendenhall
Top tobacco
Thomas Griscom (right) of Reynolds Tobacco Co. presented NCSU with a $190,050
tobacco research grant. Also pictured ant Kim Camped and Or. Durward Bateman.
By LeClair Harper
News Editor
The Board of Trustees
decided Thursday that the
Recreation Center wi 11 be bui 11
on the Cotanche Street side of
Mendenhall Student Center.
Dr. Al Matthews, vice
chancellor for student life, said
the decision was based pri-
marily on student wishes.
"The primary reason that was
given was the desire of stu-
dents he said.
TheStudentGov-emment
Association provided the in-
formation that Mendenhall
was the location students
wanted for the recreation
center, Matthews said.
The SGA conducted a
survey of students to deter-
mine where students would
like the recreation center to be.
According to Alex Martin,
SGA president, about 500
students responded, and
about 95 to 99 percent wanted
the center located by Men-
denhall Student Center.
Matthews also said the
site was chosen for greater
access and use for students.
"I'm glad to see it at a
location where students can
make the most of it Martin
said.
The building, an $18 mil-
lion project, will take up ap-
proximately two acresof land.
Matthews said. Construction
is hoped to begin in late sum-
mer 1992, he said.
Once construction on the
building begins, it should be
finished in two years, Martin
said.
According to Martin,
about 250 parking spaces will
be taken out for the building.
The building will occupy the
space bv Mendenhall Student
Center from Ninth Street to
Seventh Street, and from
Mendenhall to Ringgold
Towers.
While parking spaces will
be eliminated, The parking
will be evened out with new
spaces, Martin said.
Student fees will pay for
the building. A fee of $26 was
added to the Recreational
Services fee last year. The
Board of Trustees is recom-
mending that $40 be added to
the fees next year. The Board
of Governors must approve
the fee increase; their decision
should be known today.
The process for getting a
recreation center on campus
began about four or five years
ago, Martin said. When Scott
Thomas was SGA president, a
proposal on the center was
passed through the legislature.
I'm glad it was initiated
by the students, and I think
once it gets to the campus, it
will be exciting for the stu-
dents Martin said.






2 Eh� Cast (Harolinfan July 17,1991
Regional Development Institute to host conference I Criminals recei
Campus citation issued to student
urinating near Greene Residence Hall
July 9
2208- Oneral Classroom Building: stopped suspect for one way
stnvt violation. Same was given a verbal warning.
aiOl � 11 th and Charles Streets: assisted Greenville Police with an
intoxicated subject.
July 10
0019- Brewster Building: checked on two suspicious subjects. A
knife was confiscated from one of the subjects and both were banned
from campus.
July 11
1141 � Location unknown: investigated a Report of a stolen purse.
Same was located and returned to owner.
0235�Greene Residence Hall: observed a male student urinating
in public Same was issued a campus citation
0241�Garrett Residence Hall: foot patrol observed male student
damaging the north side door. Same was issued a campus citation.
July 12
1421� foynef Residence Hall: responded to report of burning
smell Same was identified as coming from the light ballast and
repaired.
014� Austin Building: Verbal warning given to student for
driving on the sidewalk.
020ft- -larvis Residence Hall: assisted a Greenville officer in an
tttempt to locate a male subject eluding the officer on foot. Unabk to
N ate.
0420 Wright Circle: verbal warning given to male student for
wading in the fountain and alcohol violations.
July 13
2019 Nursing Building: investigated suspicious person outside
the building Same was a student preparing to Study.
2237 Mendenhall Student Center: stopped a suspect for speed-
ing, improper equipment and expired registration plate. Same was
given a verbal warning.
0102�5thand Holly Strivts: observed carclessandrecklessdriver.
suspect used excessive Speed and no headlights to elude arrest.
Subject later located in the cemetery on 5th Street involved in a one car
.undent Same charged with 85 m.p.h. in a 35 m.p.h. zone to elude
arrest
July 14
1240�Cotton Residence Hall: responded to fire alarm. Same was
i aused bv unknown person burning chicken.
July 15
1707- Biologv Build ing: stopped staff member forexcessi vespeed
md Stop sign violation. Same was issued statecitation for no operators
license.
0125 Slav Residence Hall: investigated report of larceny of clothes
in the wash room. Report filed.
( not SrrnritUkrn from OHicijI Public Safety logS
ECU News Bureau
ECU's Regional Development
Institute will host a regional con-
ference July 25 on economic fore-
casting as part of strategic planning
for business and government in
eastern North Carolina.
Invited arecorporate presidents
and chief executive officers, execu-
tive planners and developers, divi-
sion heads, financial and marketing
managers, research and economic
analysts.
Co-hosts for the conference will
be Carolina Telephone and Tele-
graph Co. and Problem-Solving
Research Inc a business and eco-
nomic consulting firm based in
Greenville.
A quantitative forecast to sug-
gest the most probable path of
economic heal th in the nation. North
Carolina and eastern North Caro- casting process, Neil Sipe, consult
hna will be presented by Problem- ant, on planning and forecasting by
Solving's president. Dr. James local government, and Michael
Kleckley of Greenville. Kleckley's Smith, manager of access-toll ��
firm specializes in analysis of re- viceoostsand forecasting forCT&T,
gional development problems and
related regional economic issues
Other speakers will be Dr. Rob-
ert Schellenberger, professor and
chair of the Department of Decision
Sciences, ECU School of Business,
on strategic planning and the fore-
on planning and forecasting by busi-
ness.
For more information on regis-
tration and the conference sched-
ule, write RDi. Willis Building, ECL,
Greenville, NC 27858.
Night downtown ends with
brawl, damaged windows
By Keith Abluton
Suff Writer
A weekend night in downtown
Greenville ended in a brawl among
a group of students and marines.
The fight occurred late Saturday
night July 6in the parking lot behind
the Attic. According to a Greenville
Police report, a group of marines
waited in the alley behind the Attic
to continuea dispu te that had started
in the nightclub.
At least one ECU student was
treated for bruises and lacerations
IS FOR
i :
Now Taking Applications
SGA Transit Manager
�Must have 2.0 CGPA
�Applications Available in
Transit Office (Mendenhall)
r
� �
Deadline for Applications July 19th
to the face and head. Officer Tho-
mas Forrest, a spokesman for the
Greenville Police, said two Marines
were arrested and charged with
assault inflicting serious injury.
Joe Orander, an employee of
Sub Station II and witness to the
disturbance, said, "It was crazy.
There were about 40 people in-
volved, and one guy was hit in the
head with a tire iron
Orander was working inside
when the owner of Sub Station II
ran in and instructed him to call the
police.
In a separate incident later the
same night substa ntial damage was
done to the windows of Sub Station
11. Several chairs from the pa tio were
thrown through one of the front
windows, two side windows and a
door.
Jim Sullivan, owner of Sub Sta-
tion II, said the damage was over
$800. Damaged windows were re-
placed early the next day It is not
known whether the two incidents
are related. At the current time no
one has been arrested for the dam-
age.
The East
Carolinian
is now accepting
applications for the
positions of
News Editor
and
Features Editor
So get off your
butt and apply.
For information,
details and such.
call
757-6366
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By Jim Rogers
Senior News Writer
Prison inmates arc receiving
Federal and state aid to attend col-
legeclassesoffered by several North
Carolina universities and commu-
nity col leges.
According to the Sews and Ob-
server Shaw University and Uni-
versity of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill offer classes to inmates in
Central Prison m Raleigh.
Prisoners are awarded federal
Pell Grants to pay for the classes
they attend behind bars.
Two of North Carolina's law-
makers are not pleased with this
program because the pnsoners re-
ceive money that could he spent
aiding less fortunate students who
are not in prison.
Pell Grants are taken from a
Congressional fund to help students
who seek financial aid avoid huge
loan deficits. Over 3
dents will receive Pell
year.
Lt.Gov James C
State Sen Daniel R. Sir
spokenout against the u
and state funds for pn;
In a letter to Sen Jesd
Gardner wrote, "1 find it j
that our government is
what amounts to a
education for criminal-
Simpson, in an mu
The News and OfatfW
upset about tuition mo
pnsoners when I donl
ervone in this state
pnson and wants and
can get it
Many N.C stude
ceive financial aid are tc
out loans while pnso
ceive grants, accord mj
andObsener
Archaeologist
By Keith Abluton
Suit Writer
Archaeologists from ECU have
been involved in the excavation of
an American Indian fort this sum-
mer.
The Tuscarora Indians, who
were at war with American colonists
from 1711 to 171?, built the fort,
which is at the comer of a field
along the Contentnea Creek near
Snow Hill. On March 20, 1713, a
force consisting of 80 colonists and
an allied force of 500 Cherokee,
Yamasee, and Siouan Indians
launched an assault on the fort,
which was held by 850 Tuscarora
warriors. The Tuscaroras were no
match for the colonists' artillery,
which blasted holes through their
blockhouse, gateways, and subter-
ranean bunkers.
This summer, archaeologists
are trying to piece together the
events which unfolded during the
battle. The first excavation of the
: site began last vear by ECU on land
j that had been used for agriculture
tor more than 150 years. In the 1950s
the land was registered as an
American Indian site and was
identified as the Nee
1971. Since then, it
popular site tor artitacl
According to an E
lease. Dr. David S. P
chaeologist from East (
"Last year and again
we'vebeen trying todej
is here
The site, despite
artifact hunters, is
archaeologKallv intac
antKipateahout five v
Phelps said The ei
funded by ECU and isl
course in archaeolo
students.
Excavation includ
several inches of tor
stains in the soil whi
tions of human habiW
discolorahons reveal
houses, palisade wal is
trash piles and bunal
The protect begad
and trenches but is noj
the center part of the I
workers have onoal
oval-shaped strucnii
be bunkers They wei
"caves" in an early
taming a descriptor
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QIhe gaHt (Earolfnfan July17. 1991 3
host conference Criminals receive aid for education
�orth Caro
K Problem
Dt unes
MtvkUx s
lalvsis ot rv
It Nem ami
pmu' issues
(l beDr Rob
fessor and
i I viumi
t Business
.s id tho tonv
ith
notify process, Noil Sine, consult-
ant, on planning and forecasting by
local government, and Michael
smith manager of aavss-toll ser-
v icecostsand IbwcastingforCTifcT,
on pfamningand ton astingbybush
!X-ss
Rw more information on regis-
tration and the conference sched-
ule.writeRDI WillisHuildin&ECU,
Greenville V 27858
The East
Carolinian
i now accepting
applications for the
positions of
News Editor
and
Features Kditor.
So get off your
butt and apply.
For information,
details and such,
call
757-6366.
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99
With I his Ad
All ABC
permits
By Jim Rogers
Senior Newt Writer
Prison inmates are receiving
Federal and state aid to attend col-
lege classes of fered by several North
Carolina universities and commu-
nity colleges.
According to the News and Ob-
server Shaw University and Uni-
versity of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill offer classes to inmates in
Central Prison in Raleigh.
Prisoners are awarded federal
Tell Grants to pay for the classes
they attend behind bars.
Two of North Carolina's law-
makers are not pleased with this
program because the prisoners re-
ceive money that could be spent
aiding less fortunate students who
are not in prison.
Pell Grants are taken from a
Congressional fund to help students
who seek financial aid avoid huge
loan deficits. Over 3 million stu-
dents will receive Pell Grants this
year.
Lt. Gov. James C. Gardner and
State Sen. Daniel R. Simpson have
spoken out against the use of federal
and state funds for prisoners.
In a letter to Sen. Jesse A. Helms,
Gardner wrote1 find itoutrageous
that our government is paying for
what amounts to a free college
education for criminals
Simpson, in an interview with
The News and Observer, said, '1 am
upset about tuition money going to
prisoners when I don't think ev-
eryone in this state who isn't in
prison and wants and needs help
can get it
Many N.C. students who re-
ceive financial aid are forced to take
out loans while prisoners just re-
ceive grants, according to The News
and Observer.
Shaw University is the main
correctional education program in
thesute,spending$806,963on their
program last year.
University of NorthCarolina at
Chapel Hill is the main public uni-
versity in the state with a correc-
tional educational program. UNC-
CH offers eight in-prison classes
and many more correspondence
courses.
UNC's program differs from
Shaw University'sprogrambecause
it offers courses for prisoners who
will be re-entering society.
Shaw's program does not hold
such stipulations. One prisoner,
who is taking classes in City Prison,
is not eligible for parole until 2020.
He will be 94.
"That is a waste of time
Simpson said. "If we are going to
allow prisoners to get a degree, it
ought to be for prisoners who are
going to get out into the commu-
nity.
Most of theclassesare taught in
the prison by staff members paid by
the universities.
ECU does not have any correc-
tional educational programs in
conjunction with the prison system,
according to ECU's Registrar's Of-
fice.
In this area, many community
colleges offer correspondence
courses inside prisons. Carteret,
Martin and Ablemarle Community
Colleges are active inside the prison
system.
"Wherever our prisoners are,
we have access to community col-
leges Gwynn Gordon, program
director for the Department of Cor-
rections, said.
Communi ty College classes for
prisoners are paid for by the voca-
tional rehabilitation fund inthe state
budget, according to Gordon.
Archaeologists excavate Indian
By Keith Abluton
Staff Writer
Archaeologists from ECU have
been involved in the excavation of
an American Indian fort this sum-
mer.
The Tusearora Indians, who
wereat war with American colonists
:from 1711 to 1713, built the fort,
which is at the comer of a field
along the Contentnea Creek near
Snow Hill. On March 20, 1713, a
force consisting of 80 colonists and
an allied force of 500 Cherokee,
Yamasee, and Siouan Indians
launched an assault on the fort,
which was held by 850 Tusearora
warriors. The Tuscaroras were no
match for the colonists' artillery,
which blasted holes through their
blockhouse, gateways, and subter-
ranean bunkers.
This summer, archaeologists
are trying to piece together the
events which unfolded during the
Kittle. The first excavation of the
site began last vear by ECU on land
; that had been used for agriculture
tor more than 150 years. In the 1950s
the land was registered as an
American Indian site and was
identified as the Neoheroka fort in
1971. Since then, it has become a
popular site for artifact collectors.
According to an ECU press re-
lease, Dr. David S. Phelps, an ar-
chaeologist from East Carolina, said,
"Last vear and again this summer
we' ve been trying to determine wha t
is here
Thesite.despitcintrusion from
artifact hunters, is believed to be
archaeologically intact. "We now
anticipateabout five yearsof work
Phelps said. The excavation is
funded by ECU and is part of a field
course in archaeology for ECU
students.
Excavation includes shaving off
several inches of topsoil to show
stains in the soil which are indica-
tions of human habitation. The soil
discolorations reveal outlines of
houses, palisade walIs, cooking pits,
trash piles and burial grounds.
The project began with test pits
and trenches but is now confined to
the center part of the fort. So far the
workers have uncovered several
oval-shaped structures believed to
be bunkers. They were described as
"caves" in an early document con-
taining a description of the battle
given by Colonel James Moore.
Moore wasa Georgia Indian fighter
who led the attack against the fort.
Among the artifacts that have
been recovered are musket balls,
metal farming tools, wine and rum
bottles, beads, dried but burned
fruitsand vegetables, pottery, pipes,
a few glass arrowheads and shrap-
nel from cannon balls. After the
battle, the Neoheroka fort was
burned and thedead were buried in
a nearby mass grave. At the present
time, ECU has no plans to excavate
the burial site.
After the defeat, the remaining
Tusearora Indians from eastern
NorthCarolina moved north. Many
descendants can be found in New
York. The site is important because
it is one of the last chapters in
Tusearora history.
The fort is strikingly European,
which reaffirms the sophistication
of the Tusearora people. The fort
was about 100 by 200 feet in size,
with blockhouses on the comers of
the walls and a protected passage-
way between the fort and the wa ters
of the creek.
The battle began with an ex-
plosion at the entrance to the fort. It
is believed that the weaponry of the
colonists extracted the heaviest toll
on the Tuscaroras. On the third day
of the battle, the last defensive po-
sition, a passageway between the
fort and the creek, was destroyed.
Little is written about the aftermath
of the battle or the Tusearora sur-
vivors. The colonists and their In-
d ian allies removed most of the val-
ued items from the battle site.
lt is believed that hundreds of
people died in this battle in which
little is known about. In an Ed I
press release, John Byrd, a gradua te
assistant from Boone, said, "1 imag-
ine that by our standards it was a
pretty gruesome
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�lie iEafit (Earaltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
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The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students. During summer sessions. The East Carolinian publishes once a week with a circulation of 5,000. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board The East Caroltnuin welcomes letters expressing all points of
view. letters should he limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, The East Carolinian reserves the
right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg
ECU. Greenville. N.C 27814 For more, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Wednesday, July 17, 1991
Proposed center site chosen poorly
The Board of Trustees voted re- Administrators and student lead-
cently to build the proposed $18 mil- ers only know that the center will take
lion recreation center in the Mendenhall up at least two acres of parking space,
Student Center area, but did the board from Seventh Street to Ninth Street,
members consider what students re- Perhaps we are being too cynical,
ally want? too sour about the proposed building.
The Student Government Associa- Perhaps it could do the university
tion surveyed students to gather opin- some good. It could be a nice selling
ions on where the proposed center point for recruiting students,
could be built. The idea for the survey This is contradictory to our opin-
was well-intended, and SGA members ion of June 27, which was wrought in
were wise to have done it, but their the pursuit of cynicism,
timing � in thesummertime, when the Nevertheless, with the fees for park-
entire student body cannot be polled, ing stickers increasing, a planned de-
only 500 students responded to their crease in the number of spaces does not
questionnaire � was off.
And as the primary medium for
university-related issues, we wish to
air our opinion, as clearly as possible,
seem logical.
ECU is locked in the middle of
Greenville and has no place to grow.
We need to decide what we think is
on the location and necessity of the more important and ignore all alterna-
proposed recreation center: We don't tives.
need it, and if we are stuck with this
athletic albatross, then don't put it near
Mendenhall.
Perhaps we were unclear in our
June 27 editorial. There is not enough
room in the Mendenhall area for an-
other building without sacrificing 250
parking spaces. It's a nice-looking area.
Recent, obviously non-state-
funded beautification projects will soon
make the Student Center a sight to
Granted, there is a need for central-
ized recreational facilities, but is the
recreation center necessary at this time?
With the University confronted
with so many other crises � state bud-
get cuts, tuition increases and the Pub-
lic Safety wiretapping lawsuit, to name
a few � do we need to worry, and pay,
for a building that will hobble us as
much as it helps us?
Do we need something more to
behold � until ground is broken on the argue about, or another distraction?
recreation center. Ifs like arguing over who was the
Construction is projected to begin best navigator on the Titanic while the
at the earliest in the summer of 1992. water is rising.
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
The Constitution protects us all, not a few
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
Every time there's a battle
over the rights of the accused,
police are among the more
prominent voices arguing to limit
those rights.
So here's a modest proposal.
If cops are so sure the rest of us can
get along fine without the
Constitution's safeguards on the
judicial process, let the cops refuse
those protections when they're ar-
rested.
Let's consider how that
might look. A policeman is ac-
cused of breaking the law; nobody
knows whether he's guilty (no-
body other than the accused, that
is). Other cops break into his home
without announcing themselves
as police officers, then conduct a
warrantless search of the accused
officer's home.
For the sake of discussion,
let's assume the investigating of-
ficers find nothing incriminating,
try as they might. They then arrest
the accused officer anyway,
merely on the strength of the as
yet unsubstantiated accusation.
They do not read him his rights
Without informing the ac-
cused of the charges against him,
they toss the poor cop into jail.
Leaving him there incommuni-
cado, they search as long as they
want, and as sporadically as they
want, for any incriminating evi-
dence � whether it's related to
the alleged crime or to some other
crime. (If he'sbeen accused, there's
gotta be dirt on him somewhere,
right?) In the meantime, they seize
the accused officer's assets and
sell them to finance the inquiries
� after all, honest taxpayers
shouldn't have to pay for investi-
gating these lawless scum.
Eventually, evidence turns
up. Maybe the investigators
manufacture that evidence, maybe
not. Or maybe they coerce a con-
fession.
Years later, there's a trial.
The accused officer is dragged
from his overcrowded jail cell into
a courtroom, where there is no
lawyer to greet him. Nor is there a
jury of his peers. Neither the
officer's accuser nor any other
witness is present.
The accused is instructed to
prove he is innocent; of course he
cannot. "Justice" is swift, given
the incontrovertible evidence so
graciously provided by the up-
standing prosecution.
Our protagonist is handed a
sentence outrageously di spropor-
bonate to his crime The defendant
cop � by now an ex-cop � ap-
peals all the way to the State Su-
preme Court, but at every step the
courts find him guilty. (They're
bound to: the evidence hasn't
changed.)
Though he tries to appeal for
federal review of his case on the
grounds that he received a cruel
and unusual punishment, no court
hears the cop's appeal. In our sce-
nario, all that's required to dem-
onstrate that the punishment was
neither cruel nor unusual, is that
all defendants in the state are
treated pretty much the same way
(thaf s "fairness"), and that there
were no major procedural errors.
(Incidentally, if Bush's crime bill
passes, that will be the law.)
Now the cop is in jail, his
guilt never established beyond
reasonable doubt. His family may
not know where he is. His lawyer
may not know, either. Even if they
did, there's nowhere and no way
to appeal the case. Perhaps the
cop's sentence was death, in which
event a human being is murdered
for a crime he may not have com-
mitted.
Since Constitutional protec-
tions did not apply, the entire
process was perfectly legal. End
of story.
I'll be convinced that police
officers really think Constitutional
protection of the accused is ex-
cessive, when they themselves
regularly waive that protection.
That Jones Boy
Abortion laws ruled by emotions
By Matt Jones
Fditori.il Columnist
Let's talk about abortion.
Oh, I know abortion isa tired old
subnet th.it is argued day in and
day out. So let's discuss smaller
details within the issue.
What i want to discuss starts
with the legality of abortion. Well
that'seasy,except Louisiana, abor-
tion is legal. In Louisiana, abor-
tion is allowed in cases of rape or
incest. Cut and dry.
lets discuss what legal"
means According to my dictio-
nary, the definition of legal is: "In
conformity with or permitted by
law
What things are legal?
It is legal to wash dishes and
mismatch your socks. It is legal to
speak your mind. Itisevenlegalto
eat green eggs and ham.
So what's my point?
Hypothetical situation: One
day the President signs an execu-
tive order which prevents feder-
ally supported agencies from
mentioning the words "green eggs
and ham
How silly, you say Our
president would never do a thing
like that, it wouldn't make sense.
I mean, it would be different per-
haps it green eggs and ham were
an illicit substance or maybe
caused some detrimental effect
when ingested. But as long as
eating green eggs and ham is le-
gal, there should be no reason for
the president to forbid their being
mentioned. Right? Right
This evample seems to cor-
relate with a real policy.
There is a policy that is simi-
lar to my green eggs and ham
scenario. It's the "gag rule and
here's how it works.
It is illegal for employees of
federally supported clinics to men-
tion "abortion" as an alternative
to pregnancy. That means that
workers can tell pregnant women
everything concerning post-natal
care (adoption, welfare, etc) but
cannot mention abortion. But why
can't they mention abortion?
Simple, abortion must be il-
legal. Yes, that would be the onlv
thing that makes sense. But,
abortion isn't illegal. That's al-
ready proven. It's quite a para-
dox.
O.K I hear some of you out
there, saying, "Well, abortion is a
different thing all together
WRONG. Until the day that
Roc v. Wade is overturned, that is
not a viable argument Because
abortion is legal, there is no argu-
ment which can refute that it is in
any way different. Think about it
Isn't it funny how with a little
help from Dr. Seuss, federal poll
cies can be transparently errone-
ous.
Now let's further thisdouble
standard which envelopes abor-
tion.
If abortion is just as legal as
any other legal acts, let's propose
another scenario.
1 break my arm. I go to the
hospital and I have no money. So
I expect the government to pick
up the tab.
However, at the hospital, 1
discover that the government will
pay for all medical procedures
except broken arms. If only I'd
had the foresight to break my leg.
But there's nothing 1 can do. that -
just the way it is.
Why w( u Id t he gc vem i
treat broken armsditferentl
any other lllncssor in)ur
something illegal about bn iu
arms? Perhaps breaking arms
some communist plot setaNuth
heathensof the underworld I hen
is no reason for a bn ken arm to be
handled differently than am
medical treatment
Once again, there i- i
parallel Many states rel �
for abortions for tho � � I
not afford it. What sens
There is no difference -
abortion or anv other rrn-du
eration. Why then is it treat
there is a difference?
There you go a ran
there is a difference ei
mean, look we're talking about
abcirtion here
If there is adit tinm it run n
is emotional, not legal.
We must learn to (.ho k i ur
emotional bags at the door when
entering the realm ot law
If we take the s n in. I
logical end, it would even be
considered a crude form ot dis
crimination it abortions an
funded. The government would
in a sense be saving, "O K If you
are rich, you can get an ahonior
but if you're poor, no v j
The purpose ot this columi
is not to say that abortion is ngh:
or wrong.
What this is about is thaiI
ten the policies of our government
are hypocritical and saturated with
personal beliefs.
We need to judge on t he tacts
not emorions.
Letters To The Editor
Grad student
angry about
payment changes
To The Editor:
In response to the article
written about the graduate assis-
tantships, one question to the of-
fice of graduate studies may be
appropriate: Is there anyone at
home?
It is unfortunate that Dr.
Tchetter's views were the only
ones presented. Everything looks
great through rose-colored
glasses. Why were other voices
not heard in the article?
Tchetter stated that a need
to create consistency with a 20-
hour limit and equal pay scale
would help students move along
in their studies efficiently. These
are justifiable goals, yet shortsight-
edness seems to be dominant. Has
any administrator in the graduate
studies office considered how the
change will affect the students, or
how the university as a whole
might be affected?
Tchetter mentioned in the
article that assistantships were not
meant as support. The definition
of "assist" is, "to help, to lend
help, to contribute assistance or
aid Aid is a form of help. Help is
to make things easier or better for
a person or to give assistance that
is useful or beneficial. Finally, one
must define "support This word
relates, because it means "to help,
to provide help with money or
subsistence With these defini-
tions in mind, one can conclude
that an assistantship would pro-
vide help and beneficial aid.
A proper kind of subsistence
that would meets needs would be
inclusive in an assistantship.
Tchetter is wrong about
what an assistantship is. His views
will not assist grad students to
complete a degree because the
help offered would not be suffi-
cient.
Dr. Tchetter, why do you
think grad students stay in school
up to seven years? The type of
assistance never changes, but costs
such as tuition, books, housing
and parking do. Each cost has
grown, yet "assistance" did not.
Using the theory that an as-
sistantship is not meant to be lived
off is contradictory to what the
university and graduate depart-
ments expect of their students.
Weare told that the work done for
the university must take prece-
dence over any other work that
one might do outside graduate
work.
If graduate students cannot
pay for tuition and books, a home
and meals, then the assistance
doesn't measureup to needs. Con-
sequently, it will not allow one to
finish the program quicker either,
because other work must be
sought to cover what an assistant-
ship cannot.
If the office of graduate stud-
ies would do research, most likely
they would find that ECU is not
being competitive with colleges
within its own system. Even com-
paring last year's stipends and
work loads to other universities
will show that ECU offered less
assistance or more work for the
same amount of pay.
The figure of $2,600 is quite
a mystery. Again, it is not com-
petitive in comparison to other
colleges.
If the example in the article
is explored, it would show the
harshnessof the change the gradu-
ate studies office wants. For ex-
ample, English grads for 1990-91
received $800 a month ($3,203 a
semester). The new pla n is to work
students less-a mere three hours
� and give them $-50 a month
($2,600a semester). After state and
federal taxes, theearningsdwindle
to $550 a month.
Other department's grads
will suffer even more pay cuts
One has to ask, where is the logic
to this idea? What kind of assis-
tance is this?
The plan not only under-
mines the student, it hurts the
departments' Master's programs
as well. How will thev recruit
when they cannot offer a viable,
competitive assistantship? These
programs willdetenorateduetoa
lack of enrollment because stu-
dents cannot live off the wages
offered.
ECU's goal to obtain PhD
programs will also die a slow
death. Why? The foundation
Master's programs will have fallen
behind, and a Ph.D. could not be
awarded since student will have
nothing to build upon.
Many grad students would
like to stay, yet the depleted as-
sistance cannot allow the work
that is being asked of students to
take precedence over the basic
necessities of life. Many grads
want to teach, do research or edit
for professors, but the sacrifice
asked is too great.
Obviously, the skills that
graduates have are not valued
with regard to a worthwhile wage
to be earned.
How about it Drs. Tchetter
and Jacobs, could you allow some
form of respect for your graduate
students and provide the "real"
kind of assistance a student is
worthy of?
Name withheld by request

July 17. 1991
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A -
!
N
IT
V
tiat Jones Boy
ruled bv emotions
-
mg I can do, that's
i ;n
�uM the government
k narrnsdifferentlythan
i ssoi injuryIs then?
mg illegal about broken
ips breaking arms i
mumst plot set about bv
� . underworld. Then
reason tor a broken arm toot
n ntl) thananyother
i nl
igain there is another
i tes refuse to pan
e whoa
What viim' is this
difference bet�ve
; other medical op
. n is it treated as tl
i : again Well
rena . ei uh
� � re talking about
sadifference.thenM
t legal
le im to check our
- .it the door when
r aim of law
ike the scenario to a
uld even be
ide form or dis
ibortions are not
rnment would
Ok. If you
tan abortion.
n � m a�
of this column
ibortjon is right
about is that of-
t out government
ind saturated with
-
� ijudgeontheCacts,
s To The Editor
i
-
I not
� � - � al
ind
cpect ol th,
ki that the n . �or
arsity �� take pn
rk that
noonan ibo ks
ps. then the assistance
paaureupto needs. Con-
. it will not allow one to
program quicker either.
lother work must be
pover what an assistant-
it
fofficeoJgradua te stud-
it research, most likely
find that ECU is not
hpetitive with colleges
Swn system Even corn-
It year's stipends and
Is to other universities
jthat ECU offered less
or more work for the
iint of pay.
Igure of $2,600 is quite
Again, it is not com-
companson to other
kxamplein the article
it would show the
f t he change the grad u -
I office wants. For ex-
Mvgrads for 1990-91
month ($3,200 a
� plan is to work
a mere three hours
1650 a month
Vfterstateand
I he ea m i ngs d wi nd le
month.
department's grads
! suffer even more pav cuts
hast jsk where is the logic
�� hat kind of assis-
is?
� m not only under-
the student, it hurts the
b Ma r s programs
' I�� How vmII thev reerutt
Ihej cannot offer a viable,
xwripetitive assistantship? These
II deteriotaled ueloa
k I � '� roHment because stu-
ot live off the wages
"� red
to obtain Ph.D.
.rams will also die a slow
death Why? The foundation
MdMlT programs will have fallen
behind, and a PhD could not be
awarded since student will have
nothing to build upon.
Many grad students would
lke to st��y. yet the depleted as-
sistance cannot allow the work
that is being asked of students to
take precedence over the basic
necessities of life. Many grads
want to teach, do research or edit
for professors, but the sacrifice
asked is too great
Obviously, the skills that
graduates have are not valued
with regard to a worthwhile wage
to be earned.
How about it Drs. Tchetter
and Jacobs, could you allow some
form of respect for your graduate
students and provide the "real
kind of assistance a student is
worthy of?
Name withheld by request
I
July 171901
Bhe gaat (Unrolinian
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August 28, 1991, the MAT will no
longer he offered even Wednesday
but only on the published dates.
Dates are as follows: Julv 17, 1991;
July 24,1991; Jury 31t 1991; August 28,
1991; September 4, 1991; September
18,1991; October 2 1991; October 1 b,
1991; November 6, 199: November
20, 1991; December 4,1991; January
15, 19Q2; Februarv 5. 199?; February
19, 19Q2, March 4. 1992; March 18,
1992; April 1, 1992; April 15, 1992;
May 6, 1992; May 20, 1992; June 3.
1992; June 17,1992; Julv 1,1992; Julv
8,1992; August 26,1992
SERVICES OFFERED
NEED TYPING WORD PRO-
CESSINC?Call 355-3611 after 5:30or
leave message. 15 years experience
includes spelling and grammatical
corrections Work guaranteed!
FOR SALE
WANTET. Musical Instruments for
consignment sales: guitars - banjos -
mandolins - violins - cellos - bass -
horns - amps - keyboards - drums.
Gilbert's Music, 2711 E 10th St. 757-
2o67. 20 commission cost. Jim and
Debbie.
MUSIC STUDENTS: 40 discount
to you if you order non-stocked items
We order direct from warehouse.
Example $$00 hom - You pav $480
plus $6 shipping plus $24 tax - Total
$510. Gilberts music. 2711 E 10th St,
Greenville. 757-2r7.
FENDER AMP: 40 watts per chan-
nel, excellent tone, great reverb.
$300.00. Call Seth at 757-2597.
HELP WANTED
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE:
from private sector (up to $20,000
yr.). Call 24 - hr. message for more
details: 213-9M-4166,ext. 95. Nograde
or income restrictions All majors.
THE WAY TO MAKE MONEY IS
RIGHT UNDER THIS HEADLINE
You can earn good money as a college
intern for Northwestern Mutual Life.
Plus you get flexible hours and valu
able business expenence. If you're a
junior, senior, or grad student, call.
Sandi or Linda for an interview, 355-
7700.
WANTED: Football Managers for
ECU. Grants are available. Contact
Fred Sponholtzat the SportsMedidne
Building, Room 129, or call 757-4602,
(Monday - Thursday, 9:00 am - 5:00
pm).
EXCELLENT COMMISSIONS
Work you r own hours marketi ng -
namic skincare products. Career op-
portunity. Call 756-5679.
FOR RENT
WANTED: Mature responsible stu-
dent to share a two bedroom apt. at
1312 E 14th SKnear Elm St). Smoking
or non-smoking. $137 50 per month.
Call Sam at 551-2730 (days) or 758-
1741 (nights).
FEMALE ROOMMATE. Profes
sional graduate, or mature under-
graduate $200 per month plus 12
utilities. Very nice townhouse
Washerdrver included Non-
smoker. Calf757-047
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
ASAP: Call Wendy (919)728-1447.
Qose to campus Own room, spa
cious. VillageGrten,great neighbors.
ROOMMATE VVANTED: Male or
female. Room available in 3 bedroom
home Fully furnished with washer
FOR RENT
and dryer, $105 per month plus 13
utilitiesand $100 deposit. 3milesfrom
campus. August 1st. Please call 355-
1282, leave message.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Respon
sible male or female non-smoker to
share 2 bedroom townhouse dose to
campus. $180 per month plus 12
utilities. Call Kevin an vtime355-8372
Pick one up on Aug. 28 at any East Carolinian stand.
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asjscnieanscfcDnvraimcarion SUMMER DEADLINE: . D.V
Am pm.
Ringgold Towers
ucu t
1991 - 1 bedroom. 2 hedroom, &
htficcncN Apartmcnis.
CALL 752-2865
Br�tihd Plan h Ljwc
�Al! V�-
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rMM'RSlTVAPAKiMKMS
199 E -in Si
�1 ocwprf Ncm EC1
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� t.�, i nn High I'jlr SlMwn
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CoMadj I hi l.�nmy WiUsn
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ificn f 12-3 MpH
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' �����i n�wx.fc

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�ut J 1 r romm �.
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Manor
Apartments
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and
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Available
Now
1 & 2 bedroom
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apartments with
washer and dryer
hook-ups.
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The
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ZONE
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j � �� �
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would like to
Invite You to Join Us In Worship
Campus Mass Schedule: Summer Sessions May 19 - July 28
Sunday: 11:30am and 8:30pm at the Newman Center
Weekdays: 8:00am at the Newman Center
Wednesdays: 8:00am and 5:30pm
For more information call or visit the Center daily between 8:30am and 11pm
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953 East 10th St(At the Foot of College Hill) Phone: 757-3760 757-1991
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US!
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n
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Pad
Downtown Greenville 757-3658
i





6
tShg iEaat (garnlintan
July 17,1991
r
home in
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
Martin Luther King once said
t hat the old adage an eye for an eye'
will leave everybody blind. The
point of the film "Boyz N The Hood "
could not be better emphasized.
Manv are probably familiar
with the film somewhat because of
the violence associated with it. The-
.i ters acrossthe na tion ha ve repor ted
riots and Other forms of violence
during its presentation. Even the
Greenville theater where it is play-
ing had an Police officer posted at
the door to discourage any upnv
ings
The film is the story of thav
vouthsgrowing up in South Central
Los Angeles, a community engulfed
in anger, violence and drugs. The
central characters Tre, Doughboy
and Ricky live m a world where
worries are not concerned with
gradesormoney,bui how not to get
shot. The leads are played bv Cuba
Gooding, Jr Ice Cube, and Morns
Chestnut, respectively.
Tre is the only character with a
father. This seems to be a main as-
pect of the movie, pointing out that
much oi the problem stems from
the absence of father figures for the
you ths. The other characters' home
lives are shown with little or no
discipline exhibited by the mothers
who find it hard to control their
children.
'The film has a lot of messages
in it said the director, John
Singleton in a press release, "but
my main message is that African-
American men have to take more
responsibility for raising their chil-
dren, especially their boys Fathers
have to teach their boys to be men.
The audience will be able to see the
directions that the characters take
when there is an absence or a pres-
ence of fathers in their lives
Tre's father, Furious Styles, is a
man of hard character and integrity
who takes pride in giving his son a
high standard of moral responsibil-
ity, larry Fishbone plays the part of
Furious with intensity.
The film begins with the three
youths at around the age of 10. It
portrays the life in which they live,
giving an idea of the difference be-
tween their world and perhaps a
life in the suburbs.
Singleton gives an ironic twist
in one scene in which the youths are
walking along a railroad track. One
of the youths asks if the others
' Wanna see a dead body i "Thescene
isoerily reminiscent oi RobReiner s
"Stand Be Me and furthers
Singleton 's separation of the two
worlds.
When tl�e characters reach the
bodv. we tind them arguing over a
football instead of a reaction one
would expect from the sight of a
dead person This further empha-
sizes how their lives are lived, vio-
lence and murder incite no more
reaction than any other common-
place event.
We next see the youths around
the age of 17. Doughboy has had
infractions with the law and served
time in pnson, Tre has gaiwn up to
be an intelligent young man, and
Ricky is a promising football player
with hopes of going to college.
The rest of the story is mainlv
character study dealing with their
struggle of through day to day life
which involves women, alcohol,
drugs, and violence.
The finished product is im-
pressive. Singleton has produced
an emotionally stirring rendition of
a life which most of us know little
about. At the end of the movie,
before the credits rolled, three words
appeared on the blackened screen:
"Inca-ase the Peace
It is sad to say, however that
some may not have fully understood
thepurposeof the film. At one point.
Doughboy revenges the murder of
a friend by shooting his assailants.
Singleton undoubtedly meant to
show the futility of this action, not
its glory. However, much of the
audience cheered at this point,
missing the underlying message
which itsdirector was trying to por-
tray
fne film is multi-faceted con
taining more than just a simple
message. Singleton also points out
many of the pniblems within the
community of South Central Los
Angeles (problems which sta'tch
across the nation). The film may
also be seen as a coming of age
movie dealing with boys turning
into men.
The only problem evolves at
certain times when Singleton, who
also wrote the script, seems to step
into the dialogue of his characters.
In several instances. Furious gives
soap box speeches about the pmb-
lems within the black community
Singleton should have let the mes-
sages of the film speak tor them-
selves, instead of having the char-
acters speak down to audience "I"he
stunt came off looking fcxhsh and
Doughboy (Ice Cube) lives by the laws of the street in South Central LA
amateurish, but did not destroy any
artistic caiibility.
The acting in the film was fairly
good, including the actors selected
for the younger characters. In many
films, the younger actors do not
carry their roles as well as the oth-
ers, however, Singleton did an ex-
cellent job in casting the younger
roles.
The role of Doughboy was
portrayed by Ice Cube, a L.A. rap-
per. Bovz N the Hood was hisdebut
into acting, and he did a fine job.
The rapper grew u p the commu nity
portraved in the film which must
have enhanced the believability of
his character.
� � � �
"Bovz N The Hxi" is plaving
at the Plaza Gnema. Call the Theater
for show times at 7VH)88.
PSo�o� courtwrr al CotombU Pkrtur��
Star Trek hits
anniversary
By Michael Harrison
Staff Writer
Richly defined characters,
imaginativestorviinesand the most
loval fans in the world are but a few
of the elements of one of entertain-
ment industry's most successful
series.
This year marks the 25th anni-
versary of "Star Trek which is
fvrhaps more successful than ever.
The Next Generation" series will
enter its fifth season this Fall, and
the sixth Trek movie theonginal TV
series cast is in production at this
time, to be aMeased this December.
Until then, Trek fans will have to
continue to re-watch the previous
five films, which are all affordably-
priced on videocassette.
In Star Trek-The Motion Pic-
ture, a highlydestructivealiencloud
of unknown origin destroys three
Klingoncruisersand a space station
on its way to Earth. Captain Kirk
(William Shatner) returns to the
newly refurbished U S.S. Enterprise
to take command of the shipand its
reunited crew from TV' to discover
a way to prevent the cloud from
reaching Earth.
Released in 1979ST-TMP' is
a visual treat of special effects but
virtually nothing more. The script
did nothing but showcase the spe-
cial effects. Director Robert Wise
was said to have prepared the first
finished version of the film, which
placed the main emphasis on char-
acter development and storylines.
Paramount objected, however, in-
sisting to see more of those special
effects that had brought the total
budget to $40 million.
"Star Trek 11-Thc Wrath of
Khan"(1982) is the best of the Star
Trek movie series. In it, those on the
Enterprise have to abandon its
training mission to investigate a
peculiar disturbance at Space Sta-
tion Regula One.
Thesourceof thedisturbance is
Khan (Ricardo Montalban), who has
stolen from Regula One the Project
Genesis missile, a highly-advanced
mechanism with awesome de-
structive capabilities.
With his newfound strength,
Khan vows vengeance on Kirk for
exiling himand his followers fifteen
years earlier on a planet that experi-
enced catastrophic environmental
changes soon after Kirk left.
Battle is waged, and the immi-
nent detonation of a Genesis missile
is the result. Spock (Leonard N imoy)
saenhces his life by making neces-
sary repairs in a contaminated en-
gine room, enabling the Enterprise
to warp out of the danger zone of
the detonation.
"ST II" is tern fie Sci-Fi.The spe-
cial effects, as in the first movie, are
wellonsrru(1txJ,butcharactersand
storylines rightfully dominated the
picture. The atmosphere of the
original series is recaptured with
humor and senous dramatic ele-
ments combined for utmost effec-
tiveness.
"Star Trek III- The Search for
Spock"(1984) convincingly brings
Spock back from the dead and fur-
ther revealed the depth of loyalty
and love among the series' charac-
ters. Klingons hit the scene, how-
ever, killing Kirk's son (Mernt
Butnck) and nearly killing Spock
(again)and Saavik (played by Robin
Curtis who replaced "Cheers"
Kirstie Allen from the previous
film.)
In a last-chance effort to create
a "fighting chance to live Kirk is
forced to program the Enterprise to
self destruct. Later, Kirk, Dr. McCoy,
Chekhov, Sulu and Scotty capture
the hostile Klmgon ship,carry Spock
to planet Vulcan where a high
priestess (Dame Judith Anderson)
performs a ceremony that restores
Spock's mind to his body.
"Star Trek lV-Voyage Home"
(1986) was the most successful Trek
movie thus far. In it, a probe from
deep space approaches Earth and
emits a signal that begins to evapo-
rate the planefs oceans and destroy
the atmosphere. Kirk and crew dis-
cover the probe and Earth's peril-
ous situation while on their way
back from Vulcan.
SpKk learns that the probe is
trying to contact Earth's humpback
whales, which are now extinct, and
will continue to wreck Earth's en-
vironment until a whale a'sponds
to the probe.
Tlie onlv solution is to take off
into a time warp to 1986 San Fran-
cisco, where they begin their search
for a whale to bring back to the 23rd
Century.
Leonard Nimoy did a fine job
directing this film. His knowledge
of the cast and crew had to enable
him to bring a Trek story to the
screen in a fashion that most direc-
tors wouldn' t be able to accomplish.
"Star-Trek V-The Final Fron-
tier" (1989) was the most expensive
Trek movie since the first and was
William Shatner's directing debut
of a Star Trek story.
Spock's very emotional half-
brother Sybok (Laurence Luckinbill)
captures the Enterprise to take it
past The Great Bamcr an avoided
section of deep space, where he
believes the god of the universe
waits.
Critics were unjustly harsh on
this film, although the writers did
push comedy a little too far for the
movie's good. Nevertheless, the film
is a very enjoyable space romp.
Tre (Cuba Gooding. Jr despairs over the seemingly endless violence
that is depicted in Boyz N the Hood
New Van Halen is
sure to please fans
By Greg Jones
Staff Writer
Van Halens latest effort, For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge, returns to their rock n' roll roots and should appeal to every Van Halen fare
If you have been wondenng
what has happened to real rock n'
roll, given the onslaught of bands
suchas Warrant, Poisonand Nelson,
then relax because Van Halen is
back from a three year hiatus and
they have a lesson or two for those
MTV posers.
For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge
is Van Halen's ninth album and
third post-David Lee Roth effort.
Although a large split exists in the
band'saudience,thosewhoareloyal
to Roth and those whom have ac-
cepted Van Hagar, the latest album
should be pleasing to both groups
alike.
Even if the band were fronted
by Barry Manilow, the musical
abilities of Michael Anthony, Alex
Van Halen and the axe wizardry of
Edward Van Halen could not be
discounted. (Although that maybe
an extreme example.)
In typical Van Halen style, the
first release from the album,
"Poundcake is true party rock n'
roll. Sammy sings praises to beauti-
ful women who love to do what he
does best (check the album title for
an acronym) and Edward's searing
guitar riff drives that point home.
The album also contains a few
surprises. For instance, "316" is a
melodic guitar instrumental dedi-
cated to Edward's newborn son,
Wolfgang. Rumor has it that Ed-
ward played guitar to his son while
still in his mother's womb. Some
may speculate that the number
'316" may refer to a famous Bible
verse whichaffirms faithina father's
son.
Edward also demonstrates his
keyboard prowess on a track called
"Right Now a song that when
played in a car stCICO triggers an
uncontnilable urge to drive until
there is no more nvid.
The album also obtains Van
Halen's usual selection of hard
nosed party tunes. "Runaround"
features some down and dirty gui-
tar work backed by the band's dis-
tinct harmonization. "Pleasure
Dome" is a straight ahead Rock n'
Roll song cranked out at breakneck
speed.
For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge
is not filled with the most poetic of
lynes, the songs do not proclaim a
solution to world peace, and it is
doubtful that a keynote speaker
would ever choose to quote a
Sammy Hagar original line. How-
ever, the album as well as the band
is full of pure talent.
Michael Anthony on bass,
coupled with Alex Van Halen on
drums, are the solid backbone of
the band. Anthony also lends his
voice on backgrounds and har-
mony.
Edward Van Halen's awe in-
spiring guitar playing is the finesse
that forms thecomerstoneon which
the band was founded. He contin-
ues to be one of rock n' roll's pre-
mier guitar soloists, utilizing the
finger tapping style he invented over
ten years ago; a style that is widely
duplicated but seldom perfected.
Sammy Hagar's voice has a
much wider range man did David
Lee Roth's, and Hagar's lyrics fit in
with the band's image. When all the
individual pieces are put together,
the combined result is total Van
Halen
Since Van Halen is one of the
few bands this fall who will tour
solo, they will prove once again
their expertise in the rock field.
Science Com
for former C
ECU News Bureau
Greenville-Fast Carolina Uni-
versity has named its sprawling,
mid-campus Science Complex in
honor of Urmer chanceJk �r John M
Howeil and his wife, C ,ladys D
Ho well.
Howell was chancellor of the
university from 182 until his re-
tirement in 1987 and held faculty
and academic administrative posts
at East Carolina f r 30 years He and
Mrs. Howell. a retired member of
the sociology faculty, continue to
live in Greenville
Howell was dean i �f theCottege
of Arts and Sciences at the time that
the Science Complex was con-
Structed 22 years ago at a ast of $3 3
million It was built at a time when
Fast Carolina, then a liberal arts
college seeking unist
was strengthening its j
grams and cumculun j
With eight distincj
connecting bridge, tj
houses laboratories
lecture rooms, audirf
room, an animal
gn-enhouse The
footScienceComplex i;
between the umvers
classroom buildingsar
Biology and Physics Q
Other science de
the College i f Arts anJ
innearbv older)
try and Scien
Flanagan and C-
Other -
located administrate
of the universir.
schools indudl! I
Widespread P
defines south
By ARS
Information Services
What is the sound of the ever-
changing, urbanizing New South7
It's not Southern rock in the tradi-
tional sense of the word. And it has
something � but not very much �
to do with angry guitars and three-
chord pop songs.
If there is one band that defines
the musical sound of the dynamic
New South, it is Widespread Panic,
an Athens, Georgia, quintet that
shares the freshness, wit, and en-
ergy t their Southern musical con-
temporaries, but churns out a dis-
tinctive, straight-up sound that is
firmly rooted in the guitar-based
rock n' roll of the late '60s and early
r)S.
The first act to be signed by the
newly reincarnated Capricorn
Records, Widespread Panic takes a
cue from the r&b, blues and coun-
try sounds that inspired earlier
Capricorn artists like The Allman
Brothers Band, Wet Willie,and Elvm
Bishop, then spikes this mixed bag
of influences with dashes of psy-
chedelic guitar, melodic bass lines,
and percolating percussive
backbeats.
The result is one of the finest
original sounds now being served
up on the airional ton nng circuit �
a circuit Widespread Panic has got-
ten to know quite well since the
group sincept i i
band member �
the University of Get
over 200 dates a
ranging from the 'or.r
forma, the band has
following across the naj
on the reputatior
gebc live performance!
Quasi-fanatica!
Heads" have been kno
literallv hundred I
nence Widespread
nonsense, hard-r � � g
which features the road!
sical interplay oi sing!
John Bell and guitar wi
Houser, set against
rhvthmic backdrop d
bassist David School:
Todd Nance, and
Domingo S. Ortiz.
With the release
self-titled Capricorn d
1991, Widespread Panfl
up for a national tour
new album, which shov
of wide-ranging ongi
features conrnbunon
rock and r&b veterans
Widepread Pan;
duced by Johnnv Sandl
worked with The Allm
Wet Willie, and DeibeH
over the coueot his pr
Former Dixie Dreg T1
the disc's swirling easej
STUDENT UNION.
'OuTfJooR Movie
STEVE
MARTIN
ThejERK
TkuRsdAy, July 18iri
9:00 pM CentraI Campus MaIIJ
CONCESSIONS Will tE AVAJUbU
Rain Site: HENdftix TIieatre
r
roiunu
MoNcUy, July 22nd
9:00 p.M. HENcfoix TIieatre
BotIi Events Sponsor id by EC I
STudENT UNJON FilMS COMMJTTEI
'UDENT UNION





6
iBUt iEaHt (Earnltnian
July 17,1991
home in
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
Martin Luther King once said
that the old adage 'an eye tor an eye'
will leave everybody blind. The
point of the film "Boyz N The lood"
could not be better emphasized.
Many are probably familiar
with the film somewhat because of
the violence associated with it. The-
a ters acn KSthena rion ha ve repor ted
riots and other forms of violence
during its presentation Even the
Greenville theater where it is play-
ing had an Police officer posted at
the door to discourage any upris-
ings.
The film is the story of three
youths growing up in SouthCentral
I .os Angeles, a community engulfed
in anger, violence and drugs. The
central characters Tre, Doughboy.
and Ricky live in a world where
worries are not concerned with
gradesor money, but how not to get
shot. The leads are played by Cuba
Gooding, Jr Ice Cube, and Morris
Chestnut, respectively.
Tre is the only character with a
lather This seems to be a main as-
pect ot the movie, pointing out that
much of the problem stems from
the absence of father figures for the
youths The other characters' home
lives are shown with little or no
discipline exhibited by the mothers
who find it hard to control their
children
The film has a lot of messages
in it said the director, John
Singleton in a press release, "but
my main message is that African-
American men have to take more
responsibility for raising their chil-
dren, especially their boys. Fathers
have to teach their boys to be men.
The audience will be able to see the
directions that the characters take
when there is an absence or a pres-
ence of fathers in their lives
Tie's father, Furious Styles, is a
man of hard character and integrity
who takes pride in giving his son a
high standard of moral responsibil-
ity. Larry Fishbone plays the part of
Furious with intensity
The film begins with the three
youths at around the age of 10. It
portrays the life in which they live,
giving an idea of the difference be-
tween their world and perhaps a
life in the suburbs.
Singleton gives an ironic twist
in one scene in which the youths are
walking along a railroad track. One
of the youths asks if the others
" wa nna see a dead body V The scene
iseerilyremiruscentot Rob Reiner s
"Stand Be Me and furthers
Singleton's separation ot the two
worlds
When the characters reach the
body, we find them arguing over a
football instead of a reaction one
would expect from the sight of a
dead person This further empha-
sizes how their lives are lived, vio-
lence and murder incite no more
reaction than any other common-
place event.
We next see the youths around
the age of 17. Doughboy has had
infractions with the law arid served
time in prison, Tre has grown up to
be an intelligent young man, and
Ricky is a promising football player
with hopes of going to college.
The rest of the story is mainly
character study dealing with their
struggle of through day to day life
which involves women, alcohol,
drugs, and violence.
The finished product is im-
pressive. Singleton has produced
an emotionally stirring rendition of
a life which most of us know little
about. At the end of the movie,
before theCTvditsrolled, three words
appeared on the blackened screen;
"Increase the Peace
It is sad to say, however that
some maynot have fully understood
the1 purpose of the film. At one point.
Doughboy revenges the murder of
a friend by shooting his assailants.
Singleton undoubtedly meant to
show the futility of this action, not
its glorv. However, much of the
audience cheered at this point,
missing the underlying message
which its director was trying to por-
tray
he film is multi-faceted con
taming more than just a simple
message. Singleton also points out
manv of the problems within the
community of South Central Los
Angeles (problems which stretch
aooss the nation). The him may
also be seen as a coming of age
movie dealing with boys turning
into men
The only problem evolves at
certain times when Singleton, who
also wrote the script, seems to step
into the dialogue of his characters
In several instances, Furious gives
soap box speeches about the pmb-
lems within the black community.
Singleton should have let the mes-
sages of the film speak for them-
selves, instead of having the char-
acters speak down to audience. The
stunt came off Uxiking foolish and
Doughboy (Ice Cube) lives by the laws of the street in South Central L.A
Photos counaay ol CoKtmbta PicturM
amateurish, butdid not destroy any
artistic credibility.
The acting in the film wasfairry
good, including the actors selected
for the younger characters. In many
films, the vounger actors do not
carry their roles as well as the oth-
ers, however, Singleton did an ex-
cellent job in casting the younger
roles.
The role of Doughboy was
portrayed by Ice Cube, a L.A. rap-
per. Bovz N the Hood was hisdebut
into acting, and he did a fine job.
The rapper grew up the community
portrayed in the film which must
have enhanced the behevability of
his character.
� � � �
"Boyz N The Hcxxi" is playing
at the Plaa Cinema.Call the Theater
for show times at 7txvX')88.
Star Trek hits their silver anniversary
By Michael Harrison
Staff Writer
Richly defined characters,
unaginativestorvlincsand the most
loyal fans in the world are but a few
of the elements of one ot entertain-
ment industry s most successful
series.
This vear marks the 25th anni-
versary of "Star Trek which is
perhaps more successful than ever.
The Next Generation' series will
enter its tilth season this Fall, and
the six th Trek movie theonginal TV
senes cast is in production at this
time, to be released this December.
I ntil then, Trek fans will have to
continue to re-watch the previous
five films, which are all affordably-
priced on videocassctte.
In Star Trek-The Motion Pic-
ture, a highly destructive alien cloud
of unknown origin destroys three
Klingoncruisersanda spacestation
on its way to Earth. Captain Kirk
(William Shatner) returns to the
newly rvt urbished U S. S. Enterprise
to take command of the ship and its
reunited crew from TV' to discover
a way to prevent the cloud from
reaching Earth.
Released in 1979ST-TMF' is
a visual treat of special effects but
virtually nothing more. The script
did nothing but showcase the spe-
cial effects. Director Robert Wise
was said to have prepared the first
finished version of the film, which
placed the main emphasis on char-
acter development and storylines.
Paramount objected, however, in-
sisting to see more of those special
effects that had bnnight the total
budget to $40 million.
"Star Trek 11-The Wrath of
Khan"(1982) is the best of the Star
Trek movie series. In it, those on the
Enterpnse have to abandon its
training mission to investigate a
peculiar disturbance at Space Sta-
tion Regula One.
The sourceof the disturbance is
Khan (Ricardo Montalhan), who has
stolen from Regula One the Project
Genesis missile, a highly-advanced
mechanism with awesome de-
structive capabilities.
With his newfound strength,
Khan vows vengeance on Kirk for
exiling himandhisfollowers fifteen
years earlier on a planet that experi-
enced catastrophic environmental
changes soon after Kirk left.
Battle is waged, and the immi-
nent detonation of a Genesis missile
lStheresult.Spock(LeonardNimoy)
saenfices his life by making neces-
sary repairs in a contaminated en-
gine room, enabling the Enterprise
to warp out of the danger zone of
the detonation.
"STII" is tern fie Sd-Fi.The spe-
cial effects, as in the first movie, are
well-constructed, bu tcha ractersa nd
storylines rightfully dominated the
picture. The atmosphere of the
original senes is recaptured with
humor and serious dramatic ele-
ments combined tor utmost effec-
tiveness.
"Star JtvV. 111- Ihe Search tor
Spock"(1984) convincingly bnngs
Spock back from the dead and fur-
ther revealed the depth of loyalty
and love among the senes' charac-
ters. Klingons hit the scene, how-
ever, killing Kirk's son (Mernt
Butnck) and nearly killing Spock
(again)andSaavik(played by Robin
Curtis who replaced "Cheers"
Kirshe Allen from the previous
film.)
In a last-chance effort to create
a "fighting chance to live Kirk is
forced to program the Enterprise to
self destruct. l-ater, Kirk, Dr. McCoy,
Chekhov, Sulu and Scotty capture
the hostile Klingonship,carry Spock
to planet Vulcan where a high
priestess (Dame Judith Anderson)
performs a ceremony that restores
Spock's mind to his body.
"Star Trek lV-Voyage Home"
(1986) was the most successful Trek
movie thus far. In it, a probe from
deep space approaches Earth and
emits a signal that begins to evapo-
rate the planet'soceansand destroy
the atmosphere. Kirk and crew dis-
cover the probe and Earth's peril-
ous situation while on thou way
back from Vulcan.
Spock learns that the probe is
trying to contact Earth's humpback
whales, which are now extinct, and
will continue to wreck Earth's en-
vironment until a whale responds
to the probe.
Tlie onlv solution is to take off
into a time warp to lgHf San Fran-
cisco, where they begin their search
for a whale to bring back to the 23rd
Century,
Leonard Nimov did a fine job
directing this film. His knowledge
of the cast and crew had to enable
him to bnng a Trek story to the
sawn in a fashion that most direc-
tors, wouldn't he able to accomplish.
"Star-Trek V-The Final Fron-
tier" (198) was the most expensive
Trek movie since the first and was
William Shatner's directing debut
of a Star Trek story.
Spock's very emotional half-
brother Sybok (Laurence Luckinbill)
captures the Enterpnse to take it
past The Great Barrier an avoided
section of deep space, where he
believes the god of the universe
waits.
Critics were unjustly harsh on
this film, although the writers did
push comedy a little too far for the
movie's good. Nevertheless, the film
is a very enjoyable space romp.
Tre (Cuba Gooding, Jr.) despairs over the seemingly endless violence
that is depicted in Boyz N the Hood
New Van Halen is
sure to please fans
By Greg Jones
Staff Writer
Van Haleris latest effort, For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge, returns to their rock n' roll roots and should appeal to every Van Halen fan
If you have been wondering
what has happened to real rock n'
roll, given the onslaught of bands
suchas Warrant, Poison and Nelson,
then relax because Van Halen is
back from a three year hiatus and
they have a lesson or two for those
MTV posers.
For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge
is Van Halen's ninth album and
third post-David Lee Roth effort
Although a large split exists in the
band'saudience, those whoare loyal
to Roth and those whom have ac-
cepted Van Hagar, the latest album
should be pleasing to both groups
alike.
Even if the band were fronted
by Barry Manilow, the musical
abilities of Michael Anthony, Alex
Van Halen and the axe wizardry of
Edward Van Halen could not be
discounted. (Although that may be
an extreme example.)
In typical Van Halen style, the
first release from the album,
"Poundcake is true party rock n'
roll. Sammy sings praises to beauti-
ful women who love to do what he
does best (check the album title for
an acronym) and Edward's searing
guitar riff drives that point home.
The album also contains a few
surprises. For instance, "316" is a
melodic guitar instrumental dedi-
cated to Edward's newborn son,
Wolfgang. Rumor has it that Ed-
ward played guitar to his son while
still in his mother's womb. Some
may speculate that the number
"316" may refer to a famous Bible
verse whichaffirmsfaithina father's
son.
Edward also demonstrates his
keyboard prowess on a track called
"Right Now a song that when
played in a car steroo tnggers an
uneontrolable urge to drive until
there is no more rtvid.
The album also contains Van
Halen's usual selection of hard
nosed party runes. "Runaround"
features some down and dirty gui-
tar work backed by the band's dis-
tinct harmonization. "Pleasure
Dime" is a straight ahead Rock n'
Roll song cranked out at bnvikneck
speed
For Unlauiul Carnal Knowledge
is not filled with the most poetic of
lyncs, the songs do not proclaim a
solution to world peace, and it is
doubtful that a keynote speaker
would ever choose to quote a
Sammy Hagar onginal line. How-
ever, the album as well as the band
is full of pure talent.
Michael Anthony on bass,
coupled with Alex Van Halen on
drums, are the solid backbone of
the band. Anthony also lends his
voice on backgrounds and har-
mony.
Edward Van Halen's awe in-
spiring guitar playing is the finesse
tha t forms he cornerstone on which
the band was founded. He contin-
ues to be one of rock n' roll's pre-
mier guitar soloists, utilizing the
finger tappingstyle he invented over
ten years ago; a style that is widely
duplicated but seldom perfected.
Sammy Hagar's voice has a
much wider range than did David
Lee Roth's, and Hagar's lyrics fit in
with the band's image. Whenall the
individual pieces are put together,
the combined result is total Van
Halen
Since Van Halen is one of the
few bands this fall who will tour
solo, they will prove once again
their expertise in the rock field.
Science Com
for former C
ECU News Bureau
Greenville-East Carolina Uni-
versity has named its sprawling,
rrud-campus Science Complex in
honor of fi-rmer i hanceUorJohnM.
Howell and his wife, Gladys D
Ho well
Howell was chancellor of the
university from 1V82 until his re-
tirement in 1987 and held faculty
and academic administrative �
at East Carolina for30 years 11e and
Mrs. Howell, a retired member of
the sociology faculty, continue to
live in Greenville
Howell wasdeanoftheC ollege
of Artsand Sciences at the time that
the Science Complex was con-
stmctii 22 yearsagoat a a �st i A 3
million It was built at a time when
Fast Carolina, then a liberal arts
college seeking univj
was strengthening ir
grams and curneuluni
With eight distini
connecting bridge I
houses laboratories
lecture rooms, audit
room, an animal sr
greenhouse
frot Science Complex i
between the universi
classroom buildings a r
Biology and Physics Lj
Other science a
the College t Arts and
in nearb.
try and Scien
Flanagan an : Ge
Other si 1
located admins-
of the uraver l
schools includir . I
Widespread P
defines south
By ARS
Information Services
What is the sound of the ever-
changing urbanizing New South7
It's not Southern rock in the tradi-
ti. inal sense I t the word And it has
something � but not very much -
to do with (angry guitars and three-
chord pop songs.
If there is one band that defines
the musical sound of the dynamic
New South, it is Widespread Panic,
an Athens Georgia, quintet that
shares the freshness, wit, and en-
ergy I t their Southern musical con-
temporaries, but chums out a dis-
tinctive, straight-up sound that is
firmly rooted in the guitar-based
rock n' roll ot the late '60s and early
76b.
The first act to be signed by the
newly reincarnated Capricorn
Records, W idespread Panic takes a
cue trom the r&b, blues and coun-
try -rounds that inspired earlier
Capncom artists like The Allman
Brothers Band, Wet Willie, and Elvin
Bishop, then spikes this mixed bag
of influences with dasher of psy-
chedelic guitar, melodic bass lines,
and percolating percussive
hackbeats.
The1 result is one of the finest
onginal sounds now being served
upon thenationaltounngcircuit �
a circuit Widespread Panic has got-
ten to know quite well since the
band member -
the . - � � G
over 200 dates a yi 1
ranging trom the'
fbrrua, the band has bj
following across the naj
on the reputation of its
getjc live perrorrr
Quasi-fanatica
Heads" have been kn
literally hundred-
rience Widespread
nonsense, hard-r � � j
which features tht r � 'j
sical interpla- j
John Bel 1 and guitai
Houser, set against
rhythmic backdrop
bassist David S
Todd Nance, and
Eomingo S. Ortiz.
W ith the rv
self-titled Capncom
1991, Widespread Pan!
up for a national I
new album, which sho
ot wide-ranging
features contributions
rock and r&b veterans
Widepread Pan?
duced bv lohnnv Sand
worked with Tht
Wet Willie, and Defoe
over the courseot I �
Former Di xie Dree I
the disc s swirlingensei
STUDENT UNION
-OutcJoor MoviE
STEVE
MARTIN
ThejEKK
ThuRsdAy, July 18lrl
9:00 pM CentraI Campus MaII
Concessions will de AVAiUbU
Rajn SIte: HENdkix Theatre
r
R
i
MoNdAy, July 22d
9:00 p.M. HENdRix TIieatre
BoTri Events Sponsor Ed by EC I
SmdENT Union FUms Committei
STUDENT UNION





July 17,1991
ne
Hood
A Pa� courlMy Co�umbi� Picluf
irs over the seemingly endless violence
Hood
Halen is
please fans
i si ng that when
a stereo triggers an
drive until
id
"he album also contains Van
- usual selection oi hard
tunes Runaround"
ressom lowfl and dirty gui-
tar ked by the band's dis-
tinct harmonization "Pleasure
Dome is a straight ahead RiKk n'
- � g cranked out at breakneck
� -
�, Carnal kmnvleJge
i the most pwtic of
the 9 mgs do not proclaim a
solution to world peace, and it is
doubtful that a keynote speaker
would ever ehxse to quote a
Simniv Hagar original line How-
r, the album as well as the band
1 of pure talent.
Michael Anthonv on bass,
coupled with Alen Van Halen on
drums, are the solid backbone of
the band Anthony also lends his
voice en backgrounds and har-
mony
Fdward Van H lien's awe in-
spiring guitar plavmg is the finesse
that forms the comerstoneon which
the band was founded. He contin-
ues to be one of rock n' roll's pre-
mier guitar soloists, utilizing the
finger tapping style he invented over
ten years ago; a style that is widely
duplicated but seldom perfected.
Sammy Hagar's voice has a
much wider range than did David
Lee Roth's, and Hagar's lyncs fit in
with theband'simage. Whenall the
individual pieces are put together,
the combined result is total Van
Halen
Since Van Halen is one of the
few bands this fall who will tour
solo, they will prove once again
their expertise in the rock field.
- -
I
!
� e ae-
I :m
?ups
fr mted
.mi al
Alex
In 4
ot be
nay be
le, the
Ibum,
r ck n'
Ibeauti-
.�hat he
liitlefor
�seanng
�home
Its a few
�" is a
dedi-
n son,
wt Ed-
ln while
Some
lumber
js Bible
lather's
iteshis
; called
I
glht gaat (Carolinian July 17.1991 7
Science Complex named
for former Chancellor
ECU News Bureau
Greenville-East Carolina Uni-
versity has named its sprawling,
mid -campus Science Complex in
honor of former chancellor John M.
Howell and his wife, Gladys D.
Ho well.
Howell was chancellor of the
university from 1982 until his re-
tirement in 1987 and held faculty
and academic administrative posts
at Fast Carolina for 30 years. He and
Mrs. Howell, a retired member of
the sociology faculty, continue to
live in Greenville.
Howell wasdeanof theCollege
ot Arts and Sciences at the time that
the Science Complex was con-
stnicted 22 years ago at a cost of $33
million. It was built at a time when
Hast Carolina, then a liberal arts
college seeking university status,
was strengthening its science pro-
grams and curriculum.
With eight distinct areas and a
connecting bridge, the building
houses laboratories, classrooms,
lecture rooms, auditorium, cold
room, an animal shelter and a
greenhouse. The 129,416-square
footScienceComplex issand wiched
between the university's largest
classroombuildingsand houses the
Biology and Physics Departments.
Other science departments in
the College of Arts and Sciences are
in nearby, older buildings-Chemis-
trv and Science Education in
J
Flanagan and Geology in Graham.
Other science disciplines are
located administratively in several
of the university's 10 professional
schools including Medicine and
Allied Health Sciences.
Howell, who was a professor
of political science, served as dean
of theGraduateSchool, provost and
vice chancellor for academic affairs
before being appointed interim
chancellor in 1981 following the
resignation of Dr. Thomas B.
Brewer.
Howell recalled that the con-
tracts for the Science Complex were
awarded in 1967, the year that an
act of the legislature made ECU a
regional university. Five years later
the university became a constituen t
campus of the University of North
Carolina.
ECU'S board of trustees voted
Thursday to name the Science
Complex in honor of the Howells
and their years of dedicated and
distinguished service to the univer-
sity.
Widespread Panic's sound
defines southern music
By ARS
Information Services
What is the sound of the ever-
, hanging, urbanizing New South?
I) s not Southern rock in the tradi-
tional sense oi the word. And it has
something � but not very much �
to do with )angly guitarsand three-
chord pop songs.
If there is one band that defines
the musical sound of the dynamic
New South, it is Widespread Panic,
an Athens, Georgia, quintet that
shares the fashness, wit, and en-
ergy of their Southern musical con-
temporaries, but churns out a dis-
tinctive, straight-up sound that is
tinmlv rooted in the guitar-based
rock n' roll of the late '60s and early
70s.
The first act to be signed by the
newly reincarnated Capricorn
Records, Widespread Panic takes a
(ue from the r&b, blues and coun-
try sounds that inspired earlier
Capricorn artists like The Allman
Hmthers Band, Wet Willie,and Elvin
Bishop, then spikes this mixed bag
of influences with dashes of psy-
chedelic guitar, melodic bass lines,
and percolating percussive
backbeats.
The result is one of the finest
original sounds now being served
up i n the national touring circuit �
a circuit Widespread Panic has got-
ten to know quite well since the
group's inception in 1985, when the
band members met while attending
the University of Georgia. Playing
over 200 dates a year in venues
ranging from the Northeast to Cali-
fornia, the band has built a loyal
following across the nation, largely
on the reputation of its tight, ener-
getic live performances.
Quasi-fanatical "Spread-
Heads" have been known to travel
literally hundreds of miles to expe-
rience Widespread Panic's no-
nonsense, hard-rocking live show,
which features the road-honed mu-
sical interplay of singerguitanst
John Bell and guitar wizard Michael
Houser, set against the nimble
rhythmic backdrop provided by
bassist David Schools, drummer
Todd Nance, and percussionist
Domingo S. Ortiz.
With the release of the band's
self-titled Capricorn debut in July
1991, Widespread Panic is gearing
up for a national tour behind the
new album, which showcasesa slew
of wide-ranging original tunes and
features contributions from several
rock and r&b veterans.
Widepread Panic was pro-
duced by Johnny Sandlin, who has
worked with The Allman Brothers,
Wet Willie, and Delbert McClinton
over the course of his prol i fie career.
Former Dixie DregT Lavitz fillsout
the disc's swirling ensemble sound
nil
STUDENT UNION
OuTdooR Movie'
STEVE
MARTIN.
"UiejERK-sB
TrlURsdAY, July 18Trl
9:00 pM CentraI Campus MaII
CONCESSIONS will bE AVAJUbU
Rain Site: HENdnix Theatre
with some tasty keyboards, while
The Memphis Horns of Wayne
Jackson and Andrew Love add a
touch of soul to the funky song,
"Weight of the World
It's basically straight rock 'n'
roll, as we see it says guitarist John
Bell on the new release. "The disc
really captures our live sound,
which has become tighter and
tighter over the years of playing
together on the road
Like the band's 1987 release,
Space Wrangler, on Atlanta-based
Landslide Records, Widespread
Panic displays the band's
songwriting gifts on such cuts as
"Walkin" and "Mercy while also
leaving room for a tasteful, inno-
vative reworking of anobscu re early
Van Morrison tune, "Send Your
Mind
Any attempt to pigeon-hole
Widespread Panic's all-encom-
passing, forward-looking approach
to straight ahead, honest rock n'
roll would do a disservice to this
stunning debut for Capricorn
Records. Suffice to say that it pre-
sents the label with the perfect
launch vehicle for its return. Wide-
spread Panic's distinctive New
South sound will draw you in for
repeated listenings and may find
you unexpectedly showing up in
the frontrowof the next Widespread
Panic concert in your neighborhood
�E
Crime
doesn't pay,
but we do.
TheEast Carolinian
is now accepting
applications for the
positions of
News Editor,
Features Editor,
Layout Manager,
Assistant News
Editor and
Staff Writer.
For an application,
stop by our office in
the Publications
Building across
from Joyner
Library.
OLD
FASHIONED
Homemade
Ice Cream.
Yogurt
& Sorbet
Open Daily
11am -11pm
316 E 10th St.
758-0000
I VI I I I
Vintage Clothing,
Jewelry, Collectibles,
Antiques, Furniture
1

FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NTC
Hours:
Mon - Fri 8:30-3:00 J

All Vintage Clothing
50 otT
417 Kvjiis st Mill
Dmvnttmn
752-175(1
Kl SAl I IHADC
Mon Sat M fjg
M$!imsaK
of Eastern North Carolina
- zsc sags
Wednesday
Prxxesswe Danes Mght
10 Draft
$ 1.15 Toll Boys1.00 Kamikazes
�Ladies Free til 10:30
TT
P
-4994
SEASON"
Thursday
Bucket Light Night
ruiunu
�;�'
MoNcUy, July 22nJ
9:00 p.m. HencIrix Theatre
BotIi Events SpoNSOREd by ECU
STudtNT UwioN Films Committee
5 bottles for $4.00!
$ 1.15 Tall Boys 1.25 Imports
$2.75 Ice Teas
�Ladies Free
TT
2EZ
7�T
Bogies Welcomes Ml Orientation Students
f RCC Admission Nightly for all
orientation students
$5.00 4-year Memberships
1 T-Shirt Specials
T&T
A Midsummer
Might's Dream
Co-Sponsor HOMsL�RAL
JULY 17-27
Matinees: July 20 & 24
'Shakespeare's most fanciful, endearingly
capricious comedy about love1
ECU STUDENT RUSH!
Want to see a show for half price??
Pick a night, grab your ECU ID and money,
and arrive at the McGinnis Box Office
Between 8-8:15 p.m.
12 PRICE TICKETS ONLY
FOR ECU STUDENTS
$7.50 rather than $15j00





July 17,1991
He
Hood
�"(f
airs over the seemingly endless violence
Hood
n Halen is
lease fans
w, ' a song that when
i ma cast stereo triggers an
�niahle urge to drive until
. rrw re n ad
bum also contains Van
Halen's usual selection of hard
ed partv runes. "Runaround"
features some down and dirty gui-
tar w( rk backed by the band's dis-
tinct harmonization "Pleasure
- mc is a straight ahead Rock n'
Roil songr ranked out at hnakneck
speed
For Unlawful Carnal Knmvledge
is not filled with the most poetic of
lyncs, the songs do not proclaim a
solution to world peace, and it is
doubtful that a keynote speaker
would ever choose to quote a
Sammy Hagar original line How-
ever, the album as well as the band
is full of pure talent
Michael Anthony on bass,
coupled with Alex Van Halen on
dnims, are the solid backbone of
the band Anthony also lends his
voice on backgrounds and har-
mony
Edward Van Halen's awe in-
spiring guitar playing is the finesse
that forms thecomerstoneon which
the band was founded. He contin-
ues to be one of rock n' roll's pre-
mier guitar soloists, utilizing the
finger tapping style he in vented over
ten years ago; a style that is widely
duplicated but seldom perfected.
Sammy Hagar's voice has a
much wider range than did David
Lee Roth's, and Hagar's lyrics fit in
with the band's image. Whenall the
individual pieces are put together,
the combined result is total Van
Halen
Since Van Halen is one of the
few bands this fall who will tour
solo, they will prove once again
their expertise in the rock field.
Ibands
�Ison.
lien is
nd
in the
loyal
album
oups
ronted
isical
Alex
rdryof
not be
rvavbe
le, the
lbum,
Irock n'
Ibeauti-
hathe
In tie for
earing
Ihome.
Ls a few
16" is a
il dedi-
son,
Mat Ed-
n while
Some
number
js Bible
father's
ires his
: called
t
i
(ghe �agt (flarolfnfan July 17.1991 7
Science Complex named
for former Chancellor
ECU News Bureau
Greenville-East Carolina Uni-
versity has named its sprawling,
mid-campus Science Complex in
honor of former chancellor John M.
Howell and his wife, Gladys D.
Howell.
Howell was chancellor of the
university from 1982 until his re-
tirement in 1987 and held faculty
and academic administrative posts
at East Carolina for 30 years. He and
Mrs. Howell, a retired member of
the sociology faculty, continue to
live in Greenville.
Howell wasdeanof theCollege
of Arts and Sciences at the time that
the Science Complex was con-
stnicted 22 years ago at a cost of $33
million. It was built at a time when
Fast Carolina, then a liberal arts
college seeking university status,
was strengthening its science pro-
grams and curriculum.
With eight distinct areas and a
connecting bridge, the building
houses laboratories, classrooms,
lecture rooms, auditorium, cold
room, an animal shelter and a
greenhouse. The 129,416-square
fbotSdenceComplex issand wiched
between the university's largest
classroom buildingsand houses the
Biology and Physics Departments.
Other science departments in
the College of Arts and Sciences are
in nearby, older buildings-Chemis-
try and Science Education in
Flanagan and Geology in Graham.
Other science disciplines are
located administratively in several
of the university's 10 professional
schools including Medicine and
Allied Health Sciences.
Howell, who was a professor
of political science, served as dean
oftheGraduateSchoolprovostand
vice chancellor for academic affairs
before being appointed interim
chancellor in 1981 following the
resignation of Dr. Thomas B.
Brewer.
Howell recalled that the con-
tracts for the Science Complex were
awarded in 1967, the year that an
act of the legislature made ECU a
regional university. Five years later
the university became a eonstituen t
campus of the University of North
Carolina.
ECU'S board of trustees voted
Thursday to name the Science
Complex in honor of the Howells
and their years of dedicated and
distinguished service to the univer-
sity.
Widespread Panic's sound
defines southern music
By ARS
Information Services
What is the sound of the ever-
changing, urbanizing New South?
It's not Southern rock in the tradi-
tional sense of the word. And it has
something � but not very much �
to do with jangly guitars and three-
chord pop songs.
If there is one band that defines
the musical sound of the dynamic
ew South, it is Widespread Panic,
an Athens, Georgia, quintet that
shares the freshness, wit, and en-
ergy of their Southern musical con-
temporaries, but chums out a dis-
tinctive, straight-up sound that is
firmly rooted in the guitar-based
rock n' roll of the late '60s and early
?9b.
The first act to be signed by the
newly reincarnated Capricorn
Records, Widespread Panic takes a
cue from the r&b, blues and coun-
try sounds that inspired earlier
Capricorn artists like The Allman
Brothers Band, Wet Willie, and Elvin
Bishop, then spikes this mixed bag
of influences with dashes of psy-
chedelic guitar, melodic bass lines,
and percolating percussive
backbeats.
The result is one of the finest
original sounds now being served
up on the national touring circuit�
a circuit Widespread Panic has got-
ten to know quite well since the
group's inception in 1985, when the
band members met whileattending
the University of Georgia. Playing
over 200 dates a year in venues
ranging from the Northeast to Cali-
fornia, the band has built a loyal
following across the nation, largely
on the reputation of its tight, ener-
getic live performances.
Quasi-fanatical "Spread-
Heads" have been known to travel
literally hundreds of miles to expe-
rience Widespread Panic's no-
nonsense, hard-rocking live show,
which features the road-honed mu-
sical interplay of singer guitarist
John Bell and guitar wizard Michael
Houser, set against the nimble
rhythmic backdrop provided by
bassist David Schools, drummer
Todd Nance, and percussionist
Domingo S. Ortiz.
With the release of the band's
self-titled Capricorn debut in July
1991, Widespread Panic is gearing
up for a national tour behind the
new album, which showcases a slew
of wide-ranging original tunesand
features contributions from several
rock and r&b veterans.
Widepread Panic was pro-
duced by Johnny Sandlin, who has
worked with The Allman Brothers,
Wet Willie, and Delbert McClinton
over the courseof his prolific career.
Former Dixie DregT Lavitz fillsout
the disc's swirling ensemble sound
STUDENT UNION
-OutcIoor MOVIE'
STEVE
MARTIN.
IhejERK -m
TriuRsdAy, July 18tIi
9:00 pt CentraI Campus MaII
Concessions will de AVAiUbU
Rain Site: HfNditix Theatre
with some tasty keyboards, while
The Memphis Horns of Wayne
Jackson and Andrew Love add a
touch of soul to the funky song,
"Weight of the World
It's basically straight rock 'n'
roll, as we see it says gui tarist John
Bell on the new release. "The disc
really captures our live sound,
which has become tighter and
tighter over the years of playing
together on the road
Like the band's 1987 release,
Space Wrangler, on Atlanta-based
Landslide Records, Widespread
Panic displays the band's
songwriting gifts on such cuts as
"Walkin" and "Mercy while also
leaving room for a tasteful, inno-
vative reworking of an obscure early
Van Morrison tune, "Send Your
Mind
Any attempt to pigeon-hole
Widespread Panic's all-encom-
passing, forward-lookingapproach
to straight ahead, honest rock n'
roll would do a disservice to this
stunning debut for Capricorn
Records. Suffice to say that it pre-
sents the label with the perfect
launch vehicle for its return. Wide-
spread Panic's distinctive New
South sound will draw you in for
repeated listenings and may find
you unexpectedly showing up in
thefrontrowof the next Widespread
Panic concert in your neighborhood
3EE
Crime
doesn't pay,
but we do.
TheEast Carolinian
is now accepting
applications for the
positions of
News Editor,
Features Editor,
Layout Manager,
Assistant News
Editor and
Staff Writer.
For an application,
stop by our office in
the Publications
Building across
from Joyner
Library.
HAm
M
!���
5�
OLD
FASHIONED
Homemade
Ice Cream,
Yogurt
& Sorbet
Open Daily
11am-11pm
316 E 10th St
758-0000
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
Hours.
Mon - Fri 8:30-3:00
r i i ii
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Thursday
Bucket Light Night
MowcUy, July 22nI
9:00 p.M. HENditix Theatre
BotIi Events Spowsoaed by ECU
STudENT UNJON Fill COMMITTEE
6EASOI
5 bottles for $4,001
$ 1.15 Tall Boys 1.25 Imports
$2-75 Ice Teas
-u.
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Bogies Welcomes fill Orientation Stud
.JMi Admission Nightly for oil
orientation students
$5.00 4-year Memberships
T-Shirt Specials
A Midsummer
Might's Dream
Co-Sponsor Ho5BAL
JULY 17-27
Matinees: July 20 & 24
"Shakespeare's most fanciful, endearingly
capricious comedy about love
ECU STUDENT RUSH!
Want to see a show for half price??
Pick a night, grab your ECU ID and money,
and arrive at the McGinnis Box Office
Between 8-8:15 p.m.
12 PRICE TICKETS ONLY
FOR ECU STUDENTS
$7.50 rather than $1540





a
Xhc jjagt (Carolinian
SPOOTS
July 17,1991
Basketball team set for 1991-92
By Matt Mumma
Sports I ditor
ITv Pirate basketball team will
show a rnnv fact in the coaching
departmerH tor the upcoming sea-
son but, on the floor there are only a
trw i. hanges
Nine lettermen are returning
as well as three starters from last
vear which should add some con-
sistency to a program that is in the
midst of change
Eddie Payne, the new head
coach, was hired in March and he
has brought in two new assistant
coaches as well. Payne's record as a
head coach is 103-51 over five sea-
sons which wmII, perhaps, rub oH on
ECl
Mike Hopkins. ex-Western
Carolina I niversity assistant, and
joeDooky,forrnerassiStant at South
' arolina. are the two new faces in
thecoaching staff with whomPayne
has elected to share the 1991-92
season
The players with whom Payne
has to work arc. tor the most part.
experienced and talented. Last
Year's Colonial Athletic
Association's Rxkie of the Year,
Lester Lvons, returns as the teams
floor capt.un and scoring leader.
Lvons' first vear of college play-
was bevond �ho h ptl - for ex pecta -
tions of ECU fans as he led the
Pirates in sconng (17h ppg), assists
(3.1 apg), steals (25 spg), Mocked
shots (1.0 bpg) and in free throw
percentage (7.h). In onlv one
game did L vonstail to roach double
figures and against NCAA cham-
pion luke he hit a season high 23
points.
junior center Ike Copeland also
returns to the squad this vear as
ECU's rebounding master
CopeUmd led the Pirates in re-
bounding in his first two seasons
averaging 8.1 rebounds per game
last season.
Copeland had seven double-
doubles last season and his experi-
ence and dependability on thecourt
is unquestionable as he has only
missed a mere two games in two
seasons.
If junior guard Steve
Richardson has no problems with
the new coach, then the Pirates may
have a chance at a winning season.
Richardson holds most of ECU's
three-point field goal records and is
a constant outside threat when on
thecourt.
But, last season, he was sus-
pended after breaking team rules.
Pavne has given Richardson a
chance to start anew and, provided
them a a n) itk ire problems between
him and the coaching staff, his po-
tential contributions on the offen-
sive end of the court are numerous.
Richardson has scored 30 or
more points twice in his career and
in just lgamoslast season he scored
a combined total of 54 three-point
shots, that's 162 points.
Sophomore Kevin Armstrong,
who started eight times last season
after he was supposed to be
redshirting the vear on the bench,
was a much needed boost to the
Pirate roster. The 6-5 forward shot
51.4 percent from the floor and
grabbed 1.9 rebounds per game.
Senior guard Jeff Whitaker
missed most of last season with a
broken foot and should be ready to
play this season alsongside Lyons.
Two years ago Whitaker averaged
5.1 points per game and 2.6 assists
per game.
The four new Pirates are all
transfers from junior colleges ex-
cept Curley Young who transfered
from the University of Maryland.
Young has three years of eligibility
left and could make a quick name
for himself in the guard or forward
position.
One new player who could give
ECU some strength in the paint is
James Lewis. He transfered from
Spartansburg Methodist College
where he averaged 14 points per
game.
The Pirates play two exhibition
games against St. Petersburg and
the Repubhcof Ukraine. After those
two games, the seaon officially
opens at Cameron Indoor Stadium
against NCAA champion Duke.
How the hell did they beat UNLV
anvwav?
HM fhoto
Skyball
A few ECU students participate in a friendly game of volleyball.
���-� ��
Dykstra returns to lineup
PHILADELPHIA (AP)� from John kruk's bachelor party. hismendin collarbone will react

Hto Photo
Fishing for dollars
A local dsherman attempts to catch something other than an infection in the Tar River
Dravecky recovers from surgery
Lennv Dvkstra returned to the
Philadelphia Phillies' lineup on
Monday night and apparently not
everyone was so glad to see him.
Dykstra, in his first appearance
since his car crash on May 6, was
met bv a mix of boos and cheers
from the home crowd when he
Kitted in the first inning against Los
Angeles. He lined out and them
was barelv a murmur from the fans
as he returned to tho dugout.
Dvkstra, who faces arraign-
ment July 25 on drunken dnving
charges, was one of the more
popular players on the Phillies be-
fore the accident. The crash occurred
when he was driving home, along
with teammate Darren Daulton,
Dykstra missed hi games since
runnirtg his sports car into two trees
in suburban Radnor Township,
breaking his collarbono, cheekbone
and three nbs.The collarbone is Still
healing.
Daulton sustained a fractured
bone noarhisevein the accident. He
returned before the All-Star break
as tho Phillies' starting catcher.
Entering Monday night sgame.
Dykstra still led tho team in on-base
percentage, was tied for the team
load in stolen bases with seven and
was fifth in walks. The club was 11-
14 before ho wasinjured, 24- since.
Dykstra insisted ho had not
given much thought to fan reaction.
He savs he's concerned about how
to tho ngors of everyday play.
"V. verybody is acting like this
is the day, " he said. "But I haven't
faced live pitching in over two
months. This will he i ne game out
of a lot of games in the season. You
have to Unik at the bn; picture
Dr. Phillip Marono. the
Phillies' team physician, makes it
clear that Dvkstra's early return is
a gamble He estimated the col-
larbone is almost mended.
"It'sa calculated nsk Marono
said. "No doubt if 1 had someone
else, not a professional athlete, I
would sav you can't play. But I
have an obligation to him and tho
club. In tho purest sense, tho longer
ho delays the bettor off ho is.
Fracture kept Seles from finals
ORLANDO,Fla(AP)� Former
San Francisco (Jiants pitcher l ave
Draveckv's new career is public
speaking, at least during his recov-
ery from the amputation of his
throwing arm and shoulder in a
struggle against cancer.
Looking fit and rested,
Dravecky said Monday he views
last month's surgery as only a tem-
porary setback.
"There's adjustments that 1
have to make, but there's nothing
out there that I don't want to do
Dravecky, 35, said at his first news
conference since his release from
Sloan-Kettenng Cancer Center in
Now York on Juno 24.
Although his future won't in-
clude baseball, Dravecky said he
would swim, plav golf and tennis.
and engage in other sports he was
unable to enjoy in the past because
ot his baseball contract.
He also has a full schedule of
speaking engagements.
Appeanng vith his wife, laniee,
at the Christian Bxksellors Asso-
ciation convention in Orlando,
Dravecky credited his religiousfaith
for helping him overcome the
problems that began in 1988.
"1 see thisasGod giving me the
opportunity to sharethegospel with
a lot ot people he said.
Cancer was diagnosed in Sep-
tember 1988, and Dravecky under-
went surgery to remove a tumor
and nearly half of the deltoid muscle
in his left arm. He made a dramatic
comeback to the major leagues on
Aug. 10,1989, at Candlestick Park.
But five davs later, ho broke his arm
while pitching in Montreal.
I ie hmke the arm again in Oc-
tober 189 and retired from base-
Kill the next month. After further
surgerv, doctorsamputatedhisarm
and shoulder last month.
"There's no struggle about
feel ing sorry for myself an upbeat
Dravecky said "The question is not,
Whv me, God?' The question is
What is your plan for me?'
Without Jesus Christ, 1 would not
have tho strength to endure this
His wife and two children have
been supportive through hisordeal,
Dravecky said. After his young son
looked him over following the am-
putation, he ran out and invited his
friends to come and look.
MAHWAH, N.J. (AP) �
Monica Seles, the Greta Garbo of
tennis, ended her self-imposed si-
lence and seclusion on Monday.
In a statement issued by her
Cleveland-based agent, Interna-
tional Management Group, Seles
revealed that the celebrated injury
that led to her withdrawal from
Wimbledon last month was "shin
splints and a slight stress fracture in
my left leg
Seles, whose whereabouts and
health have been a mystery, is
scheduled to re-emerge this week
for an exhibition event in northern
New Jersey.
Her brother and manager,
Zoltan,confirmed Monday that the
world's top-ranked player will play
in the Pathmark Tennis Classic at
Ramapo College. Although Seles
was scheduled to play in the
hardcourt event, tournament di-
rector John Korff wasn't absolutely
certain she was aiming until he got
the word form Zoltan in a phono
call from Soles home in Sarasota,
Ha.
"He said Monica is fine, that
she's practicing and plavnng great,
Korff said. "He said she's looking
forward to playing here"
Seles, vet to speak publicly
about her withdrawal from
Wimbledon, will hold a news con-
ference at Ramapo on Wednesday,
the day beforesheplays her opening
match in the tournament.
In the statement issued Mon-
day bv IMG, Seles said she might
have gone public earlier, "but 1 did
not want to make a statement with
contradicting facts in it because I
might have misled my fans and tho
public
"Now that 1 have a clear idea of
what my injury is and how to pro-
vont it form happenmc in the fu-
ture, I feel comfortable speaking
about it the statement said. "I do
not know the exact medical terms,
but the doctor who has worked
with me diagnosed shin splints and
a slight stress fracture in my left log
The injury first occurred in March
1991, and at the French Open dur-
ing practice, 1 hit my left leg with
mv racket on the same spot and re-
injured the leg
Seles, 17, hasn't played a match
since beating Arantxa Sanchez
Vicario in the French Open final on
June 8. Citing an unspecified injury
caused bv a "minor accident she
withdrew from Wimbledon three
davs before the tournament started
on June 24 and then dropped out of
sight.
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 17, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 17, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.818
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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