The East Carolinian, July 3, 1991






-V
Vacation time
Get away in Bath, N.Cs oldest township.
5
Great balls of fire 6
Michael Jordan golfs for Ronald McDonald houses.

�lj� lEaat (ftamitman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vot.W No.35
Wednesday, July 3,1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5,000
6 Pages
Students put heat on legislators
In an attempt to pressure the N.C. General Assembly to
reconsider proposed education budget cuts, student leaders
at UNC-Chapel Hill are conducting a statewide telephone
campaign urgingother UNC students to call their legislators.
The Senate has coasidered raising tuition by over 40
percent for in-state students and by about 21 percent for out-
of-state students by 1999.
The house has been considering similar measures with
lncreasesof 20 percent for in-state students and 25 percent for
out of state students.
August trial set for ISU student
Mark Nicholson, a 21-vear-old student at Indiana State,
will face an August 2b trial date after his request for an
extension was accepted by a Virgo County judge.
Nicholson is accused of the murder of 23-year-old Brian
Hogue outside BallvHoo Pizza King and Tavern. Hoguc, a
bartender at the tavern, was shot and killed in the tavern's
parking lot outside on Feb. 3.
Nicholson requested the new trial date so his attorneys,
Geoffrey G. Creason and John R. Himes, would have suffi-
cient time to prepare a defense.
Funds used correctly at USC
The Department of Energy has found no wrongdoings
or mismanagement of federal funds in connection with the
construction of the Sweanngen Engineering Center at the
University of South Carolina.
The investigation wasconducted by fouragentsand was
prompted bv an article in The Chicago Tribune which raised
questions about the federally funded project.
Budget compromise on hold
RALEIGH (AD � House budget conferees plan to turn
the tables on Senate counterparts they say have been unre-
sponsive in attempts to negotiate a compromise on a tax and
budget package.
There are dozens of differences between the House and
Senate proposals to cover a $1.2 billion revenue shortfall.
Both sides have signed off on at least $638 million in new
taxes. But the House supports about $30 million more in tax
increases, with a greater burden on the business community
than the Senate proposes.
Other differences between the two sides have revolved
around how they would spend available money for educa-
tion.
The Senate hopes to spend most of its education dollars
on greater school flexibility and accountability. The House
plan would emphasize teacher salary increases and basic
education improvements.
Twenty-four inmates graduate
Although they recently received degrees from Shaw
University, at least 24 graduates won't spend the next few
weeks partying and celebrating at the beach. Instead, these
students will spend their time in much the same way they do
everyday �in prison.
Inmates of the Harriett Correctional Institution in
Lillington and the N.C. Correction institute for Women in
Raleigh recently completed their studies from Shaw Uni-
versitv through a program the college has sponsored since
1985
Eleven men received their Bachelor of Science degrees in
Business Management, 10 women received their Associate of
Arts degrees and 3 women received their Bachelor of Arts
degrees in Behavioral Science in ceremonies held on June 18
and 20.
Documentary broadcast cancelled
CHAPEL HILL (AP) � The public television station at
the University of North Carolina has received complaints
protesting its decision not to broadcast an award-winning
documentary on gay black men next month.
The station has stuck by its decision not to air "Tongues
Untied officials said Monday.
Most of the phone calls have questioned whether the
action was an "anti-gay" decision, said Chancy Kapp, asso-
ciate director for programming at North Carolina Public
Television. Ms. Kapp said oncecallers were reassured that the
decision was not a result of anti-gay sentiment, they seemed
Inside Wednesday
Crime Scene2
Classifieds�&
EditorialM
Features�$
Sports��
ECU plans $24 million expansion to library
By Malana Harris
Staff Writer
Changing technology,
safety precautions and a
growing student body are
demand s that ECU must meet
in their plan to add a $24 mil-
lion expansion to Joyner Li-
brary.
While the library plan-
ning committee, headed by
Library Director Kenneth
Marks, is waiting for approval
of funds by legislation, archi-
tectural detailing is in the
works. The architects are
completing construction
documentssuchasblueprints,
which are required in order to
bid on the project later in the
vear.
J
Accord ing to Marks, such
a vast sum of money isunlikely
to be approved, but a bonding
for the construction project is
hopeful. In the bonding pro-
cess, the project has to be
presented in front of the state
and a referendum be passed
along with the approved vote
of North Carolina citizens.
This process could possibly
be passed late this fall.
The newlv-renovated li-
brary will be twice as big as
the present building and will
take approximately thirty
months to build. Although
the new building will take up
an estimated seventy-five
parking spaces, the new li-
brary will "accommodate
changes in technology and
respond to the change in the
way faculty teaches Marks
said.
The library will also be
fashioned for more group
study. The current facilities
cannot accommodate group
study well. Plans for at least
two dozen group study areas
will enable networking be-
tween students and faculty.
The renovations will be-
gin with the destruction of the
east wing stacks These steel
structural stacks, unlike the
ones in the west wing, are im-
movable, therefore causing a
potential fire hazard. If a fire
were to start in the library,
these steel stacks would be-
come a chimney endangering
people within the building.
A 70-foot wide corridor
cut into the center of the older
portion of Joyner Library will
become a courtyard with trees,
artwork and quiet places in
which students can sit and
study. The courtyard will
serve as a bridge between the
internal part of campus and
10th Street.
Ideas for artwork and
See Library, page 2
If
r
ffTT
J
V
�I
t
Larceny prevalent
during summer
� � 2 3
By Robin Duffy
Staff Writer
According to some ex-
perts, hot weather causes ag-
gression in people. Conse-
quently, the crime rate in-
creases during the summer
months.
But our campus has not
been a hot bed of cnminal ac-
tivity this summer. Lt. Keith
Knox of the Department of
Public Safety says that there
has been a slight increase in
larceny, but this is usual not
only for ECU campus, but all
over.
Bike thefts are prevalent
year round, but according to
Knox, after exams are over,
students leave their bikes be-
hind expecting them to be
there when they return from
summer vacation. And, he
said, some students don't
know how to lock up their
bikes. What is left behind, asa
result, is one front tire, a lock,
but most likely, no bike.
Public Safety cannot be
held responsible for
unregistered bikes. According
to Knox, 311 bicycles were sto-
len in 1 990 alone, mostly from
LCU students.
Bikes aren't the only
things being stolen during the
summer. Outdoor equipment,
lawnmowers, patio furniture
� anything of value left lying
about � are stolen during the
summer because people seem
Jiimi Browning� ECU Photo Ub
Plans for Joyner Library expansion include a courtyard with trees and artwork.
MMbta" Alny Impact of Graduate School policy to
weaken reputation, research capacity
people leave their windows
open during the hot months
and forget to shut them when
they leave. Thisisan invitation
for crime, Knox said.
What can students do to
prevent crimeon our campus?
Keep their eyes open, Knox
said, and be aware of whaf s
going on around them. Stu-
dents can organize a campus
watch program and should
report any kind of suspicious
activity or people, especially
around the residence halls. It
is the student's job to actively
participate in campus crime
prevention by anticipating
what puts people and their
property at risk and taking
measures to protect both,
Knox said.
"Crime preventionbegins
with the individual, and by
working together, we can cre-
atea safer campus Knox said.
Students may have seen
the ECU Crime Van on cam-
From Staif Reports
By limiting assistantships,
the Graduate School's new
policy may hinder the Uni-
versity from reaching its goal
of becoming a reputable re-
search institution and haven
for respected Master's pro-
grams.
In April, Graduate School
Dean Diane Jacobs instituted
an uniformed policy which
places an annual $5,200 cap
on the amount of money
graduate assistants may eam
from various teaching and re-
search jobs on campus.
Also, The Policies Gov-
erning Graduate Assistants
invited a comparison of ECU'S
assistantships to thoseof other
universities of similar size.
According to findings by
the English Graduate Students
Organization (EGSO), assis-
semester and 3 hours for
spring � less than half the
comparable workload at ECU
which based on a limit of 20
hours per week for both se-
mesters.
Other schools offer simi-
lar plans to that of UNC-C:
William & Mary, $6,000 for 10
hours; George Mason, $6,500
for 10-20 hours; and James
Madison, $6,076 for 10-20
hours.
While ECU'S policies do
allow for graduate assistants
to work more than 20 hours
and receive additional com-
pensation, Jacobs reserves the
right to amend the amount of
monies to both assistants and
their respective department.
In a April 29 memoran-
dum to department chairs,
Jacobs states:
"In those cases where
students are working more
not encourage graduate stu-
dents to finish programs faster.
In contrast, by limiting the
funds, students may be forced
to hold part-time jobs of f cam-
pus which would prolong the
time spent on their Master's
degree.
"We are not on the attack;
we want to work with Dean
Jacobs to embody a more eq-
uitable policy that is in keep-
ing with the University's mis-
sion to strive for academic
exceUence in graduate pro-
grams Herring said.
News Analysis
In addition, the policy
may cause a decrease in
grad uate enrollment which in
turn will limit the number of
courses taught and weaken
the programs in the future.
Graduate students, the major-
pus recently. The van is tan'LhiDS at ECu fall short of rTr �5 � � VTT
L;�kn� LroA a�H k� tantships at tcu tail snort or week � whom j financially
brightly colored and has pr0grarns offered at other
McGruff the crime dog hods. vVhile both UNC-
painted on the side. Knox
wants the van to be noticed
and to raise awareness on
campus, he said.
Charlotte and ECU have caps
of $5,200, UNC-C pay isbased
on 16 hours a week for fall
have stipends greater than
$5,200, work will be limited to
20 hours per student and the
stipends will be reduced to
the $5,200 rate and the unit
budget reduced accordingly
The Graduate School's
rationale behind the measure
was bom to bring consistency
to the graduate programs and
also to encourage the comple-
tion of degrees in a timely
fashion.
"We have students who
have been in the graduate
school for seven years Dr.
Paul D. Tschetter, assistant
dean of the graduate school,
independent, may opt to at-
tend competing universities
as an only alternative.
"I fear this policy may
perpetuate a bad reputation
for ECU among potential
graduate students recruits, or
may discourage the highly
qualified students from at-
tending this institution Her-
ringsaid. "Also, I'm afraid that
the morale among the present
graduate assistants could di-
minish, both in the courses
they are teaching and in the
ones they are taking
This will have a ripple
effect on faculty research a
said June 18The purpose of faculty will be forced to carry
the graduate assistantship is aheavierteachingloadinhght
to aid graduate students, not of the decreased number of
support them graduate students. Herring
While David Herring, said. Of approximately 120
president of EGSO, agrees sections of English cornposi-
with the policy's stipulation tion offered in the spring se-
of a three-year limit for indt- mester of 1991, 70 sections
vidual assistantships, he be- were taught by graduate stu-
lieves that a $5,200 cap wifl





2
(She Cuatdlaralintan
July 3, 1991
5
rSENE
Unconscious orientation student in
amphitheater escorted to room
June 25
2342 SW of Mendenhall: non-studenl slopped and given a
verbal warning for under .ige drinking aixl littering.
0144 College Hill Drive provided escort for one female mm
College 1 lill Driveto Universit) c ondonuniums. Same was turned over
to Greenville Police ("ifficer.
iW Greenville Police Depl aided GreenvMk P.D. in the
breathalyzer nxm.
June 2b
084 Harrington Held: investigated breaking, entering and
larcern from the storage building
June 27
1314 9rhandCbtarheSm?et:stoppedstudentforcarelessand
reckless driving Same was given state citation
P14 Tyler Residence Hall: arrived to assist subject who
dropped ke s In the elevator Unable to locate.
June 28
1110 Minges Coliseum: responded to medical emergency,
subject transported to ltt County lospital.
1228 Brewster Building: responded to report oi larcenv in
room 336 Same was unfounded as property was located by victim in
his office.
2215 iOthand College till Drive subject stopped and charged
with 1 VI Same was handled b; v 1 lighway Patrol.
0010- N'nrsing Building checked on suspicious subject Same
was identified a: a student and advised to leave the aaM.
June 29
221t 10th aixi Brow rtk e Stn ir. Student given a verbal warn-
ing tor speeding and stop sign iolation
2316 WWteRcsidenceHall non studentgivena verbal warning
for speeding standing in a mo ing ehk !e and loud music
2331 M.v mms rheater responded to a report of suspicious
activity Same as identified as subjects waiting tor their ride.
(214 Fletcher Residence 1 lal! two male non students given a
verbal warning for urinating in public miJ alcohol violations.
une30
0711 I mstead Residence Hall n i h contact with intoxicated
male subjei t Same was identified as anon student and was advised to
leave campus
(1227 ' .pie Strei ts verbal warning given to non-
studenl tor speeding and driving after drinking
04O7 Musk Building checked cm intoxicated male subject
the sidewalk Same was transported to Magistrate's office tor
proti- tivecustod) kxk '
lulvl
0139 Fleti her Amphith ater. intoxi ated person passed out in
amphitheater identified as an orientation St ident and returned to his
room.
0315 Fletcher Residence 1 lall rientation student passed out
�. nmr s��wr is 14 �� in � tn . val i'ublk: iU-t lou . .
Library
Continued from page 1
beautification of the courtyard are
being decided upon. It is state law
that 1II of one percent of the entire
construction fund has to be set aside
for artwork.
With this in mind, applications
were sent throughout the United
States for artists with innovative
ideas for the courtyard. From all
replies, the field of applicants was
narrowed down to five. These five
artists were flown to ECU, and each
gave their proposed ideas to the
Library Planning Committee.
This committee consists of
Marks, lead architect Larry Robbs,
Physical Plant director Rob Webb
and various people working within
the library and other campus offi-
cials. After hearing the proposals,
one artist was selected and his ideas
were sent to the North Carolina
Arts Council.
While legislature is deliberat-
ing the bonding issue, the present
library will continue to grow. For
example, the col lection of hooksand
other media materials will expand
and also the number of students
will become larger. Thclibrarvhas
madeacommitment tothesrudents
not to remove anv studv space due
to this expected continued growth.
When ample monev is ap-
proved for theexpansion, the "new"
library will provide more efficient
studyareasand will facilitate newer
technologies, keeping ECU in the
forefront of growing demands.
OLD
FASHIONED
Homemade
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&
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Open Daily
Ham-11pm
316 E 10th St
758-0000
A
Tar Landing Seafood
DAILl MM 1 l S
Mon � hi ken Breast StrtdwH h Hh
French Frici K W
Fried Oysters Diniui Sf 93
1 tit v n Steak & Shrimp $6 95
� v- Crab 1 egs -
All l fan E�l W W
Wi-d Country Fried Steak S3 5
� Snow I iK 1 egs
. I I ��� I at S9 99
3 iir 11me ffei i
I k�n v afood Plata - SS I
l- r i r v 1 loundei
i in h$4 23 Dirmei S I �
, , u , NEW SUMMER HOURS
105 ��PMIU AM 9PMMon gat
tO Am 8 PM Sunday
.���.v.vavngggggi jsisnHffisnsxnsn:
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville XC
Hours:
Mon-Fri 8:30-3:00
AMERICA'S FAVORITE OIL CHANGE
(Now Offers NC Safety Inspections and AC Recharging)
COMPLETE 14 POINT SERVICE
JSaVe $4.00 (ith this ad
(expires July 31, 1991)
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In just 10 minutes with no
appointment here's what the
J-team can do for you:
�Change "tour Oil
�Replace Your Oil filler
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Differential, Brake, PowerSaxmg.
Washer, uxl Battery RukIs
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�Inflate I ires to Proper Pn
sure
� acuum Interior
�Wash the w. indows
�Check Air 1-ilter System
126 S.E. Greenville Blvd. 756-2579 Mon - Fri Sam-6pm Sat til 5pm
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
- if ��
MoNdAy, July 8
9:00 p.M. HEsdRIX TrIEATRE
Free AdrviissioN Wjth VAlid ECU SitdENT ID
SpONSOREd by ECU STljdENT UiON FilMS CoMMJTTEE
-In Concert-
TritRsdAy, July 11
9:00 pw CentraI Campus MaII
Rajn Site: HtNdRix TIieatre MtridENruU Stiitest Center
SpoNsoREd by tIie ECU Silent Unjon SpeciaI Concerts Committee
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
�y
I . �
I f
MEN S. LADIES I CHILDREN S SHOES
Look lor our
special group ol
shoes marked with
YELLOW
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Savings
up to 50!
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Greenville Buyers Market
Memorial Drive
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the A.
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peers
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healt
Klie-
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to pt
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INC StR VICES: Ten Paper
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NEED TYPING WORD PRO-
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Visit our concession stai
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7
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Open Mon-Sat 9:30-9:00pm
Sun 1:00-6:00pm
Tel:756-6200
$2.00 OFF ALL SE VICES WI





Ulie fciHtiLamlinimi
July 3, 1991
Library
Unconscious orientation student in
amphitheater escorted to room
I one 25
i.1 SV i Mendonhall rw topped and given a
verbal w arning foi undei agp drinking and littering
0144 olki-111111 'n e prcn idtl tvit t�r one female from
College Hill Drive to I niversity ondominiums Same was turned over
Ireem ille PoIh �itu ei
0300 Greenville P ept aided GreenviUe P.D in the
Nvathah zi room
)u in- 26
� � 1 1 larnngton I ield in II iking, ntering and
rom the borage building
I u i
114 hand( otancheStreel stopped student for carelessand
as �.p m state . ttation
14 i assist subject w ho
the ele'ahi
un�
1 li iges Colis I to medk al i mergen v,
orted tal
I to report ol Ian eny in
timin

dharged
i DW1 Sam itrol
une 29
indl
.
231� ' � .
lii
Me
i vas identil i hjects
ill non stud� !��
rinatini , hoi vi ilahons
une 30
tact with int�
� � I i student and was advised to

Maj n to non
stud after dri
I male subject
office foi
uh i
iti I npassed out in
hitheah l returned to his
tudent i assed out
i rim "�� � � �� � IkmU ibUt i � Loaa
Continued from page 1
beautification of the courtyard an1
being decided upon. It is state law
that 12ol one percent of the entire
construction hind has to beset aside
for artwork.
With this in mind, applications
were sent throughout the United
States for artists with innovative
ideas for the courtyard. Fnim all
replies, the field of applicants was
narrowed down to five. These five
artists were flown to EC U,and each
gave their proposed ideas to the
Library Planning Committee
This committee consists ot
Marks, lead architect Larry Robbs,
Physical Plant director Rob Webb
and various people working within
the library and other campus offi-
cials After hearing the proposals,
one artist was selected and his ideas
were sent to the North Carolina
Arts Council.
While legislature is deliberal
me the bonding issue, the present
library will continue to grow For
example, the col lection of booksand
other media materials will expand
and also the- number ot students
will become larger. Thelibrary has
made a ommitmenttothestudents
m 4 to remove anv study spacedue
ti this expected o ntinued gn m th
When ample money is ap
proved tor theexpansion, the "nevs
irv will provide more effi ient
. ireasand will facilitate newer
technologies keeping EC U in the
forefront ol growing demands
AMERICA'S FAVORITE OIL CHANGE
(Now Offers NC Safety Inspections and AC Recharging)
COMPLETE 14 POINT SERVIC1
Jsave $4.00 (with this ad
(expires Jul
jiffy lube
In just 10 minutes with no
appointment here's what the
J-team can do for you:
�Change Your il
�Repl
� I ul nassis
�Che. ��
Diflcreniial, I
Washci
�Chi � �-� � ' I
� , nor
.("I k Air Fill
126 SJE. Greenville Blvd. 756-2579 Mon - Fri 8am-6pm Sat til 5pm
OLD
FASHIONED
Homemade
Yogurt
ft
Sorbet
Open Hail)
11am -11pm
316 E 10th St I
758-0000
,c.
sc
I) Ml "1 M't (ls
iX-
I Ul-
�!
Ul ' ' '�
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confident tl
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd St root
The Lee Building
(Jreenville T
I lours:
Mon - Fri 8:30-3:00
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
MoNcUy, Jtly 8
9:00 p.M. HENdRix THEATRE
Free Admission Wiih VAlid ECU SitdEM ID
SpoNsoREd by ECU SitdEM Union Fjims Commjttee
'In Conc ert-
ThtRsdAy; Jtly 1 1
9:00 pM CentraL CAMpts MaII
Rajn Site: HENdRix TriE4TRE MEsdEsbll SudiNT Center
SpoNsoREd by TriE ECU SndiisT Unjon SpEcJAi Concerts Committee
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION

i . �
. '�
,v
MEN'S. LADIES I CHILDREN S SHOES
YELLOW
Look for our
special opoud ol
shoes marked Kith � DOTS �
Savings
up to 50!
RACK ROOM SHOES
Greenville Buyers Market
Memorial Drive
Ll I �
Vo
i;
i � I w
If'
Lo
f- he
v h s
v � L
� tht
Iti
v. ed
t h
1 � kfc
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I ting!
R
and p
t � irti
I :n
Pa
he
A
( : . n
r tr a
he! u
m
( li
m
B
C
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the A
S
s� vet
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rveis
sates
depai
ire a!
:� -ai
r a vie
r lit
lie
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fty
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erad
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tv
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P
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SERVICES OFFERED
LNGSERVICE
' RIGrfl

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I- i
HELP WANTED
HIPS A

EflMB
Party
n
July 4th Specia
-FULLSEVI
-EUROPEA
-WOLFF TA
-LATEST IN
-SKIN & NA1
-PROFESSK
TOE PLAZA
Open Mon-Sat 9:30-9:00pm
Sun l:00-6:00pm
Tel:756-6200
$2.00 OFF ALL SEVICES WI





�� h E � ! iiiltnian
Jln.v j, ;99
Unconscious orientation student in
amphitheatei escorted L room
� � .1! inu; for I
; t
Hill Drive to University C I Same was turned ovci
I
i ille i' I m ilif
Library
i i
Jill
111 iu� 28
irelessand
: who
n c nirti
hargi .i
.

Continued from page 1
beautificabon o the courtyard an1
being decided upon. It is st.itv law
that 1 2 of one percent of the entire
construction fund has to be set aside
tor artwork.
With thism mind,applk ations
'Mtv sent throughout the United
States tor .irtits with innovative
ideas tor the courtyard From all
replies, the field of applicants was
narrowed down to five These five
artists were flown to E( I .andeach
gave thvir propose1 ideas to the
1 ibrar) Planningommittee
I his committee consists ol
Marks lead architect Larry Robbs,
Physical Plant director Rob Webb
.mil various people working within
the library and other campus offi
I tals After hearing the proposals
one artist wassele ted and his ideas
were sent to the North t anMina
Arts( ouncil
While legislature is dolib� i il
ing the bonding issue, the present
library will continue to grow 1 or
�he i ollectionofbooksand
other media materials will pand
and also thv number of studi I
will become larger rhelibi in 1 as
i immitment tothestudents
�remove an shidv space due
to thisex - - ' � I � ' ' �
When ampli - i i)
i vi fortheexp ����
iibr.irv will provide men
studvareasand will facilitate newer
�1�gies, keeping E I in the
forefront of growing demands
AMERICA'S FAVORITE OIL CHANGE
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l
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757-0003
111 ! rd Stn - �
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JufcA 1991
glhe gagt Qjarolfntan
3
OIL CHANGE
; C Recharging)
4 POINT SERVICE
uniteswith no
1 hen1s hat the
toryou:
� Pres
Sam-dpm Vit til 5pm
CLASSIFIEDS
STUDENT UNION
SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING SERVICES: Term Papers,
Reports, Resumes, Letters. Fast turn-
around! Laser Printer. Call 756-1783.
NEFD TYPING WORD PRO-
CESSING? 355-3611 after 5.30or
leave message. 15 years experience
includes spelling and grammatical
corrections. Work guaranteed!
JUST SAY NO TO FLEAS: Guaran-
teed for seven months. Professional
service. Call Debby at 830-0757 or 1-
HOO 347-8243.
HELP WANTED
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE:
from private sector (up to $20,000
vr) Call 24 - hr. message for more
deLiils:213-4-4166,ext.95.Nograde
or income restrictions. All majors.
Wi NEED SELF-MOTIVATED
STUDENTS: Eam up to SlOhr.
Market credit cards on campus.
Flexible hours. Only 10 positions
available. Call now 1-800-950-8472,
Ext 20.
SPECIAL OPPORTUNITY Need 5
serious individuals to launch new
Network Marketing Co. Serious S$$
Nl )V, not in 1 year. Family-oriented
product. Cosmetic dentistry. 355-
3789.
HELP WANTED
THE WAY TO MAKE MONEY IS
RIGHT UNDER THIS HEADLINE
You can eam good money as a college
intern for Norm western Mutual Life.
Plus you get flexible hours and valu-
able business experience. If you're a
junior, senior, or grad student, call:
Sandi or Linda for an interview, 355-
7700.
FOR SALE
WANTED: Musical Instruments for
consignment sales: guitars - banjos -
mandolins - violins - cellos - bass -
horns - amps - keyboards - drums.
Gilbert's Music, 2711 E. 10th St. 757-
2667. 20 commission cost. Jim and
Debbie.
MUSIC STUDENTS: 40 discount
to you if youorder non-stocked items.
We order direct from warehouse.
Example: $800 horn - You pay $480
plus $6 shipping plus $24 tax - Total
$510. Gilberts music, 2711 E 10th St,
Greenville. 757-2667.
FOR SALE Pet kingsnake, very
gentle, $40.00. With 20 gallon tank
and heat rock, $80.00. 757-2597.
FENDER AMP: 40 watts per chan-
nel, excellent tone, great reverb, all at
a quality price. $300.00. Call the
Sethster at 757-2597.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 20 gallon tank with all
accessories,plus fish,$50.00. JVC tape
deck, $30.00. End table, TV stand and
10 gallon tank, $1000 each. Call 830-
3904 after 6:00 pm.
COMPUTER: Tandy 1400 LT Laptop.
640 K-RAM, Dual 3.5" 720K floppy
drives. Plug-in or battery operated. 1
serial and 1 parallel parts, part for
external drive. Many other extras.
$500. 756-7572.
FREE- Lori's Intimate Apparel FINAL
CLEARANCE OFSWIMWEAR1991.
Buy one, get 2nd one free
FOR SALE- Six foot slate pool table.
$100 or best offer. Call Paul 758-5300.
BACK YARD SALE Saturday, July
6,8 am. 306 S Summit St. Many items
including nice regulation loft, electric
typewriter, 35mm cameras, nice
clothes, and many more. IN BACK
YARD.
NICE COUCH RECLINER: 40 W
Kenwood revr, ALTEC 5 Spkrs. Sharp
El-5500 II pocket science and finance
computer, 4.2 K RAM. Raleigh super
course bike with training stand. 501b.
recurve bow wi�h sight and quiver.
758-6925.
FOR RENT
EASY-GOING FEMALEs (1st yr
grad) wanting to move in with 1 or 2
other female students, preferably
duplex in August. Please call Sarah
collect at (919) 933-0073.
TWO BEDROOM FURNISHED
APT: $195 per month (or less for im-
provement work). Rustic, secluded,
private (4 miks out). Want 2 or 3
serious upperdassman or grad stu-
dent (no drugs, etc) next to church.
(919)584-4848.
WANTED: Two female non-smok-
ing roommates needed to share large
master bed room in a roomyTar River
Apartment. Call 752-0895. Ask for
Allison or Nichole.
ATTRACTIVE: 3 bedroom, 2 12
bath Twin Oaks Townhouse. Fire-
place, patk),pool, appliances. No par-
rying. $540 per month plus deposit. 2
miles from campus. 752-2851.
FOR RENT
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Ringgoid Towers
Now Taking Leases for August
1991-1 Bedroom, 2 Bedroom,
& Efficiency Apartments
CALL 752-2865
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
TO SHARE: Apartment at Eastbrook
starting August 1. Rent $170 a month
plus 12 utiliHes. Call Amy at 758-
9230.
WANTED: Responsible student to
share a two bedroom apt. at 1312 E
14th SHnear Elm St). Smoking or non-
smoking. $13750 per month. Call Sam
at551-2730(days)or 758-1441 (nights).
BEACH VOLLEYBALL
REGISTRATION
Register your men's, women's or co-
ed beach volleyball team together July
8 at 4:pm in Biology N-102. Recre-
ational Services is hosting the second
session tournament for all faculty,
staff and students. Individuals are
encouraged to sign up. For details,
call 757-6387.
CHANGES IN MAT TESTING
HATES FOR 1991-92
The MAT will be given at 2.30 pm on
the following dates during the 1991-
92 Academic Year. Starring with the
August 28, 1991, the MAT will no
longer be offered every Wednesday,
but only on the published dates.
Dates are as follows: Julv3,1991; July
10,1991; July 17,1991; July 24,1991;
July 31, 1991; August 28, 1991; Sep-
tember 4,1991; September 18,1991;
October 2, 1991; October 16, 1991;
November 6, 1991; November 20,
1991; December 4, 1991; January 15,
1992; February 5,1992; February 19,
1992; March 4,1992; March 18,1992;
April 1, 1992; April 15, 1992; May 6,
1992; May 20,1992; June 3,1992; June
17, 1992; July 1, 1992; July 8, 1992;
August 26,1992.
iiiiiiiminHiiiniiiiiininiiiiiiniii
A Beautiful Place to Ijvc
�AU New
�And Ready To Rent"
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899 E. 5ih Street
�Locaied Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Center
�Across From Highway Patrol Station
1 jmited Offer - S300 a month
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open Apt 8. 12 5:30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS-
Clean and quct one OEdrooR! furoiahed aparontnu
energy efTcKl, frte waarr andae�er. uflc,i lw:i
cabse TV Couples or smglcs only. 12A0 a month. 6
mosfausasc MOHDHOMEREMTAJ-caipka �
�mglna AyiuiaJM and motnk homes m Azalea Car
dens near Brook Valley Country Gub
Contact J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815
rVIRt
I St id i nt ID
Fils Comm.ttee
is MaII
II SudfST CfSTER
i Concerts Committee
STUDENT UNION
Party At
Before and After the Fireworks!
July 4th Specials
'� I
Lime Margaritas $2.50
Mexican Imports $1.25
Sample Platter $4.95
Visit our concession stand on the
Town Commons during the day
X
b
mmm
of Lutem North CsvoUru
499i
SEASON-
YHE
JULY 3-13
Matinees: July 6 & 10
"Larry- (THE FOREIGNER) Shue's
riotous comic farce
ECU STUDENT RUSH!
Want to see a show for half price??
Pick a night, grab your ECU ID and money,
and arrive at the McGinnis Box Office
Between 8-8:15 p.m.
12 PRICE TICKETS ONLY
FOR ECU STUDENTS
$7.50 rather than $15.00
�i
,vyp�
n JWS JiMM .J
ft �' ��
Wednesday
i �
ProcfessNG Dance Night
10 Draft
$ 1.15 Toll Boys1.00 Kamikazes
�Ladies Free til 10:30
i i -1.
��T"r �
:(
TT
Thursday
Bucket Light Night
;�
5 bottles for $4.00!
$ 1.15 Tall Boys 1.25 Imports
$2.75 Ice Teas
�Ladies free9
i
� � Sli
1 . v
rj
Bogies Welcomes All Orientation Students
Fft�� Admission Nightly for all
orientation students
$5.00 4-year Memberships
T-Shirt Specials
�BE
VM;V
rs SHOES
Savings
up to 50!
georges
hair designs
-FULL SEVICE UNISEX SALON
-EUROPEAN TRAINED STYLISTS
-WOLFF TANNING BEDS
-LATEST IN FACIAL & BODY WAX
-SKIN & NAIL CARE
-PROFESSIONAL HAIR PRODUCTS
��1
'TWW�
THE PLAZA
Open Mon-Sat 9:30-9:00pm
Sun l:00-6:00pm
Tei:756-6200
STANTON SQUARE
Open Mon - Fri 10:00-8:00pm
Sat 9:00-6:00pm
Tel: 7574HJ76
NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
Would like to
WelcomeMkeSummer Students
and
UsIn Worship
:hedule
19-
tan Center
center
visit
$2.00 OFF ALL SEVICES WITH THIS AD OFFER EXPIRES 8-6-91
SK�





-Inly3. 1991
jgfcc gggj (Jlaruliman
3
HLCHANGE
trging)
HM SERVICE
nits with no
w hal the
fi
i
mi (il 5pm
CLASSIFIEDS
SERVICES OFFERED1HELP WANTED1FOR SALE1FOR RENT1FOR RENT1ANNOUNCEMENTS
1DENT UNION
Ix. PING SERVICES: Term Papers.
Kqxrts, Resumes, Letters. Fast turn-
around! ljser Printer Call 756-1783.
NEED TYPING WORD PRO-
I iING?Cll 355-3611 after 5-JOor
leave message. 15 years experience
les spelling and grammatical
ctions Work guaranteed!
SAY NO TO FLEAS Guaran-
teed tor seven months Professional
e Call Debby at830-0757 or 1-
r 8243
HELP WANTED
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE:
private sector (up to $20,000
.ill ?4 hr message tor more
i 213 9644166,ext95.Noerade
i . . ome restrictions. All majors
NEED SELF-MOTIVATED
STI i)ENTS: Earn up to SlOhr
et credit cards on campus.
ile hours Only HI positions
.We CaB now 1-800-950-8472,
Ixt i
SPE IAI OPPORTUNITY ,vd 5
is individuals to launch now
ork Marketing Co Serious $$$
not in i year Family-oriented
. rod at Cosmetic dentistry. 355-
THE WAY TO MAKE MONEY IS
RIGHT UNDER THIS HEADLINE
You can earn good money as a college
intern for Northwestern Mutual Life.
Plus you get flexible hours and valu-
able business experience If you're a
junior, senior, or grad student, call:
Sandi or Unda for an interview, 355-
77a).
FOR SALE
WANTED: Musical Instruments for
consignment sales: guitars - banjos -
mandolins - violins - cellos - bass -
homs - amps - keyboards - drums
Gilbert's Music, 2711 E. 10th St. 757-
2667 20 commission cost Jim and
Debbie
MUSIC STUDENTS: 40 discount
tovou if vou order non-stocked items
We order direct from warehouse
Example; $800 horn - You pay $480
plus $6 shipping plus $24 tax - Total
$510. Gilbert's music, 2711 E 10th St,
Greenville. 757-2667.
FOR SALE: Pet kingsnake, very
gentle, $40.00. With 20 gallon tank
and heat rock, $80.00. 757-2597.
FENDER AMP: 40 watts per chan-
nel, excellent tone, great reverb, all at
a quality price $300.00. Call the
Sethster at 757-2597
FOR SALE 20 gallon tank with all
accessories, plus fish, $50.00. JVC tape
deck, $30.00. End table, TV stand and
10 gallon tank, $1000 each. Call 830-
3sX)4 after 6:00 pm.
COMPUTER: Tand v 1400 LT Laptop.
640 K RAM, Dual 3.5" 720K floppy
drives. Plug-in or battery operated. 1
serial and 1 parallel parts, part for
external drive Many other extras.
$500. 756-7572.
FREE-lori's Intimate Apparel FINAL
CLEARANCE OFSWIMWEAR1991
Buy one, get 2nd one free
FOR SALE Six foot slate pool table.
$100 or best offer. Call Paul 758-5300.
BACK YARD SALE Saturday, July
6,8am. 306S Summit St. Manv items
including nice regulation loft, electric
typewriter, 35mm cameras, nice
clothes, and manv more. IN BACK
YARD.
NICE COUCH RECLINER. 40 W
Ken w(xxj revr, A1 TEC 5 Spkrs. Sharp
E1-5W II pocket science and finance
computer, 4.2 K RAM . Raleigh super
course bike with training stand 50 lb.
recurve bow wijh sight and quiver.
758-6925
EASY-GOING FEMALE (1st yr
gradwanting to move in with 1 or 2
other female students, preferably
duplex in August. Please call Sarah
collect at (919) 933-0073.
TWO BEDROOM FURNISHED
APT: $195 per month (or less for im-
provement work). Rustic, secluded,
private (4 miles out). Want 2 or 3
serious upperdassman or grad stu-
dent (no drugs, etc) next to church.
(919)584-4848.
WANTED: Two female non-smok-
ing roommates needed to share large
master bed room in a roomyTar River
Apartment. Call 752-0895. Ask for
Allison or Nichole.
ATTRACTIVE: 3 bedroom, 2 12
bath Twin Oaks Townhouse. Fire-
place, patio,pool, appliances. No par-
rying. $540 per month plus deposit. 2
miles from campus. 752-2851.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
TO SHARE Apartment at Eastbrook
starting August 1. Rent $170 a month
plus 12 utilities. Call Amv at 758-
9230.
WANTED: Responsible student to
share a two bedroom apt. at 1312 E
14th SHnear Elm St). Smoking or non-
smoking. $137.50 per month. Call Sam
at551-2730(days)or 758-1441 (nights).
Ringgold Towers
Now Taking Leases for August
1991-1 Bedroom, 2 Bedmom,
&. Efficiency Apartments
CALL 752-2865
A Hcaulitul I'latc u I jvc
�All New
� And Ktad To Reap
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2KW E. 5lh Srrrcr.
� licaled Near ECU
�Near Major Shopping Cewen
�Across From Highwav I'airol Situci
Ijmited Offer $MX) a month
Conuci J 1 or Tommv William
756-7815 or 830-1937
Office open Apt 8.12-5 "p�n
�AZALEA GARDENS
(Van and 4UC. trtc hedrorax fum.ifd �nanmcru
enet effa Krt. frtsr �aKT andarwer aahcn Aycrt
cjhie TV Oaipiei � im�e� ras 2A" a rntm' ft
mMjileM MOBHi- ItOMl- KhVTM s caafftn .
imaiea Apartment and rmnk hiwnr � Aa.ra (-ar
drm near Rrrx Valley rmntry Cluh
Contact JT or Tommy Williams
m "hi
I3�ACilYQLLEYBALl
Register your men's, women's or co-
ed beach volleyball team together July
8 at 4:pm in Biology VI02. Recre-
ational Services is hosting the second
session tournament for all faculty,
staff and students. Individuals are
encouraged to sign up. For details,
call 757-6387.
OiANGESJNMAT -TESTING
DAHSiQRmi-92
The MAT will be given at 2:30 pm i n
the following dates during the 1991-
92 Academic Year. Starting with the
August 28, 1991, the MAT will no
longer be offered every Wednesday,
but only on the published dates.
Datesareasfollows: July3,1991;July
10, 1991; July 17, 1991; Julv 24, 1991
Julv 31,1991; August 28,1991; Sep-
tember 4, 1991; September 18, 1991;
October 2, 1991; October 16, 1991;
November 6, 1991; November 20,
1991; December 4, 1991; January 15,
1992; February 5, 1992; February 19,
1992; March 4, 1992; March 18, 1992;
April 1, 1992; April 15, 1992; May 6,
1992;May 20,1992; June r 1992; lune
17, 1992; Julv 1, 1992, ! - m
August 26,1992
iilllllll
id
T t f
'MMfTTfcE
DENT UNION

W:M
The
mmm
7AILC
of Listem North Cajolirw
4991
6EASON-
THE
MJX 3-13
Matinees: July 6 & 10
'Larry (THE FOREIGNER) Shues
riotous comic farce
T7TT
UhflUKat�tataMab�

iAr USES
iiledpesdog
ECU STUDENT RUSH!
Want to sec a show tor half price??
Pick a night, grab your ECU ID and money.
and arrive at the McGinnis Box Office
Between 8-8:15 p.m.
12 PRICE TICKETS ONLY
EOR ECU STUDENTS
$7.50 rather than $15.00
Progress Dcroe Night
10 Draft
$1.15 Tall Boys $1.00 Kamikazes
�Ladies Free til 10:30�
�JTmV �

J?
a.W
" M
1
Thursday
Bucket Light Night
5 bottles for $4.00! W
$ 1.15 Tall Boys 1.25 Imports f.
$2.75 Ice Teas
�ladies Free
a�
w
Bogies UJelcomes All Orientation Students
FRC� Admission Nightly for all
orientation students
$5.00 4-year Memberships
T-Shirt Specials

I ��� aW '
�&'
fKHr

Savings
up to 50!
georges
hair designs
-FULL SEVICE UNISEX SALON
-EUROPEAN TRAINED STYLISTS
WOLFF TANNING BEDS
-LATEST IN FACIAL & BODY WAX
-SKIN & NAIL CARE
-PROFESSIONAL HAIR PRODUCTS

THE PLAZA
Open Mon-Sat 9:30-9:00pm
Sun 1:00-6:00pm
Tel:756-6200
STANTON SQUARE
Open Mon - Fri 10:00-8:00pm
Sat 9:00-6:00pm
Tel: 757-0076
$2.00 OFF ALL SEVICES WITH THIS AD OFFER EXPIRES 8-6-91
NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
Would like to
Welcome The Summer Students
and
Invite You to Join Us In Worship
Campus Mass Schedule
Summer Sessions May 19-July 28
Sunday: 11:30am and 8:30pm at the Newman Center
Weekdays: 8:00am at the Newman center
Wednesdays: 8:00am and 5:30pm
For More information about these and other programs, call or visit
the Center daily between 8:30am and 11:00pm
953 East 10thiSt (At the Foot of College HD1)
757-0376757-1991 v
FnPaul Vaetn, Chaplain & Campus Minister





GUtc Saat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Ttm C. HAMrroN, General Manager
Matthew B. Skinner, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
LeCla� H arper, News Editor Jeff Parker, Staff Illustrator
Matt King, Features Editor Margie O'Shea, Classified Ads Technician
Matt Mumma, Sports Editor Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Steve Reid, Layout Manager Larry HuGGlNS, Circulation Manager
Amy Edwards, Copy Editor Stuart Rosner, Systems Engineer
Kerry Nester, Copy Editor Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students. Dunng summer sessions. The East Carolina publishes once a week with a circulation of 5,000. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of
view Utters should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the
right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg
ECU. Greenville. N.C 27834. For more, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Wednesday, July 3, 1991
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Appointee Thomas a mixed blessing mammoth beating
Bv appointing Clarence Thomas to re- Thomas has just 14 months experience llgllH laiVCO a lliaiinx p
By appointing Clarence Thomas to re- Thomas has just 14 months experience
place Supreme Court Justice Thurgood as a federal appeals judge. He chaired the
Marshall, President George Bush has made Equal Employment Opportunity Commis-
a wise political move. He has clouded his sion under President Ronald Reagan. Tho-
appointment of a conservative judge bv mas is a conservative. His written opinions
appointing an African-American to replace are few; we know little of his idea of mter-
another. The issue should not be an preting law.
appointee's race; his or her legal opinions
views are. justice. There is already a 6-3 conservative
Thomas' race is not a major issue in his majority on the court,
appointment to the Supreme Court. Justices Thomas' appointment to the court
should not be appointed for their political would place the balance of conservative
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
Language is one of the rea-
sons you didn't have to chase a
woollv mammoth off a cliff this
morning so that you would have a
Marshall was the court's prime liberal dinner to eat tonight. Opposable
thumbs are an equally important
reason.
People are relatively profi-
cient with their thumbs, but some
of us ape-men are concerned abou t
The Word "Nuclear
Tlease don't pronounce it "noo-
kyuh-ler It's "new-clear' almost
as though it were the brand name
of a fabulous new pimple cream.
� "Incident" (or "Inci-
dents") Versus "Incidence It has
another meaning, but the word
"incident" is usually confused
with "incidence when the speaker
refers to an occurrence or event. A
fight between two people is an
example of an inodent.
Bv contrast, "incidence" is
bplipfs Its not a conservative or liberal is- power far to the right. Future generations the general mishandling of lan-
Peliets. us not a const r drive ur uuti��i k r -o jar euaee, particularly the English mostcommonlv used in lay speech
sue. The issue is the appointees'view of the will be strongly affected by the decisions MolMhofus, to refer to the degree or extent to
made bv this court. One area that will draw
the court's attention is abortion.
Although women's abortion rights are
not an immediate issue, in their 1991-92 ses-
sion the justices will hear a case involving a
lawsuit filed by an abortion clinic against
law.
Nevertheless, as a justice, Thomas can
be a svmbol of accomplishment for African-
American vouths of what can be accom-
plished in spite of bigotry and poverty.
The main issue is not Thomas' race � it
is his qualifications and how his opinions anti-abortion protestors,
will influence court decisions. When they are confronted with an anti-
The Senate must know from the abortion case, and with such a conservative
candidate's experience and case opinions slant, the court could easily vote to end
their idea of interpreting the law in order to legalized abortion,
approve their appointment. How wonderful that would be: a court
Much has been said lately about with eight men and only one woman decid-
Marshall � how he was the last well-chosen ing what the women of our nation can do
justice. Marshall argued Brawn v. The Board with their bodies.
of Education, the case that led to the desegre- Thomas' appointment to the Supreme
gation of public schools, before the Supreme Court could accomplish a great deal so-
Court. Through his opinions and actions, dally. However, it will also lead to contin-
people know what he stands for. ued federal restrictions of citizen's rights
language. On behalf erf both of us,
I wish to counsel some oTfKe more
egregious offenders out there on
how to improve their control over
rhis-banslc skill:
� Direct Address. In a writ-
ten message addressed to an indi-
vidual or group, the name of the
individual or group ought to be
set off by commas when addressed
directly. This is too rarely done.
I'll give you a couple of examples
demonstrating how stupid it
sounds when it isn't done prop-
erly.
When the Special Olympics
was here recently, a sign hanging
on Cotten Dorm read "Welcome
Special Olympians As written,
this sign gave an order to the reader
to welcome the Special Olympi
The Other Side
ans. That's all well and good, and is actually the possessive. Also,
a nice message besides, but what I since they sound alike, there's no
think the sign-maker meant to ex- need to keep them straight when
press would be properly written speaking; this contributes to the
Financial aid solution hard to find
By John Carter
Editorial Columnist
North Carolina has a prob-
lem: Financially, the state has gone
under. Educationally, it went un-
der several years ago.
College tuition is increasing
this coming school year and fi-
nancial aid to students is de-
creasing. What's wrong with this
picture?
Academically, the two top
schools in this state are the Uni-
versity of North Carolina and
Duke University. Both have a
reputation for excellence in edu-
cation and they have two of the
nation's top medical schools.
Generally, the enrollment at Duke
consists of moderately wealthy
students. The enrollment at UNC
consists largely of the not so
wealthy students, most of whom
need the government's financial
assistance.
Hereiswhatl foroaae; collage
tuitions that continue to rise until
eventually only the wealthy can
afford college educations. Of
course, if all the students receiving
financia. aid can no longer afford
to attend college, tuition will in-
crease that much more for the
wealthy few. Possibly, costs will
go so high that even some of the
wealthy cannot afford an educa-
tion.
This prediction may sound
far-fetched, but this is the cycle we
are approaching. Someone has to
do something about it before uni-
versities begin closing and this
nation falls shorter on education.
Our politicians haven't figured it
out yet; they keep making things
worse. Mavbe if s time for the stu-
J
dents to step in and straighten out
this mess.
I'm not really sure what to
do or how to do it. I do see a tew
things that are wrong.
To begin with. North Caro-
lina ran out of money early in
1991. Public schools lost money.
The UNC system suffered cut-
backs and some state employees
lost their jobs. How can a state
whose constitution requires a
balanced budget be in financial
trouble?
One thing wrong is progress.
We have roads, roads and more
tors and faculty would have to be
paid less. As a result, some of the
"Welcome, Special Ol vmpians
thereby expressing salutations di-
rectly to the athletes.
That's quite a difference, but
at least that sign made some sense
as written, even though its mes-
best professors will be underpaid sage was not what was probably dog guarded its bone
and will quit. Why should thev intended. Many other signs fare If in doubt about which one
stay when they can be paid better less well. to use, expand the contraction �
elsewhere? For instance, we're annually in other words, see if "itis" makes
We like to think that some inundated with hotel marquees sense instead. If it does, it's "it's
would be so dedicated they would and other signs reading "Con- otherwise, it's "its "The dog
keep their jobs anyway. Perhaps gratulationsGraduates"�which, guarded it is bone"
?hat is true, but the dollar is the as written, is all but devoid of
driving force in this nation. Pro- semantic content. "Congratula-
tions, Graduates' is the correct
way to write it. The first form
makes no sense; the second ex-
presses congratulations to gradu-
ates. Alert your local hotel
fessors should be paid what they
are worth, but if salaries are cut,
only those who are not worth
much will continue teaching, with
few exceptions
The government is not the
roads We have highways running only body at fault in this matter,
anywhere anyone is willing to go. Spending needs to be thought out
Why do we keep building new more carefully by university offi-
ones that we don't need. We spend rials. For instance, the planned
millions of dollars each year just recreation center will sport rac-
on highwayecmstructaon. It would quetball courts, indoor and out-
be so much cheaper to simply door swimming pools and a
maintain the roads we already lounge. We can have all this for
have than build new ones. True, the low, low price of $18 million,
the federal government JaMJgeta. With the pxrfp ttBm niiMoot�
money to states for highways. If poll, don't we already have all
those things?
We have two indoor pools
and can survive without an out-
door one. Of course, student fees
will be increased to pay for all this.
We spend money on things we do
not need.
prohibits my going into the de-
tailsof objective versusnonu native
pronouns, so I'll just try to correct
one common mistake. As a rule of
thumb, when employing the firs!
person following some form of
the verb "to be use "I" rather
than "me" For example, say "It is
I" rather than "It is me (Simi-
larly, you should say "This is he"
rather than "This is him)
1 know it doesn't sound right
but that's only because everybody
around vou hasdoneit incorrectly
dunng your entire life. Just be-
cause they've done it wron,
though, that doesn't mean you
should. (If they all jumped off j
cliff, etc.) Speak properly. Be the
first on your block.
Those are a few of my favor
ite peeves, but only a few; they aTi.
but the tipof the iceberg. Far worse
language-mangling takes place all
the time, much of it in a deliberate
attempt to obscure communica-
tion rather than enhance it. English
also gets knocked around rather
badlvbvofficialsw'ho like to sound
officious.
Even some rules of English
occasionally detract from clarity it
followed too rigidly � there are
times when you ought to split in-
finitives, for instance, and times
when your meaning is clearest it
you end a sentence with a prepo-
sition. Still, one ought to know the
rules before one breaks them, and
even then they should be broken
only for deliberate effect. Like this
Just remember language is
a tool, like a hammer is a tool, but
the function of language is to fa-
cilitate communication. It's not
good enough merely to make
yourself understood to your audi-
ence, however vaguely they mav
understand you, and however
much you may have waved your
hands around in the process. In
order for language to continue to
hence, you know you should use be the tool � and weapon � that
"its" ratherthan "if s" Simple, eh? it can be, we all should follow the
� "Earth" Versus "earth rules (when they're sensible) and
The Earth is a planet, like Venus; express ourselves as clearly as we
earth is dirt. There's a lot of earth can manage,
on Earth. As for me, me go now. Push
� "Me" Versus "1 Space big mammoth over cliff. Eat good
to refer to the degree or extent to
which something occurs. For ex
ample, one may speak of the inci-
dence of skin cancer in young
males, meaning the frequency
with which the disease affects the
given population.
If an individual young male
discovers that he has skin cancer,
that is an unhappy incident. If ex-
actly half of the young males who
discover they have skin cancer kill
themselves as a consequence, that
is a collection of unfortunate inci-
dents; the incidence of suicides in
that group is fifty percent.
� "Ifs" Versus "Its The
confusion here is understandable:
things ending in s" usually indi-
cate ownership (as in "the dog's
bone"); but of the two forms, "its'
misunderstanding.
Still, there's an important
distinction between them. "Ifs" is
a contraction, short (though not
very short) for "it is "Its" is a
possessive pronoun, as in ' The
each state could save a couple
million each year on highways,
think of the amount of money the
federal government could provide
for education.
What do we need more: a
new highway or increased finan-
cial aid?
When the state reduces
money allotted to universities, differences and work together to
they are faced with two altema- find a solution to this problem. I
We all need to put aside our
rives: increase tuition or decrease
expenditures.
If universities are forced to
reduce their budgets, adequate
supplies may not be available
when they are needed. As cuts in
the budget continue, administra-
do not pretend to have the answer
to mis problem, just suggestions.
Write your representatives with
any suggestions you have. They
need to be reminded that we are
registered voters and a force to be
acknowledged.
Bath Guest
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
You've said it a million times
"1 just wish I could get away
fora while"
Ifs time to quit wishing
Located about an hour's drive
Ifrom here is a little piece of sanity
I which still exists in this hn;h
I world. Just travel down to Bath and
j visit the Bath Guest Housi
It is like anything you .
I wished for in a get -awayresi ri
guest house otters a typical I -
I Breakfast' motif as well as i . , -
of other essentials to pro
jlaxingstay.
Bath Guest ! bust -
I and operated by an amia r
to-earth couple wbj i moved S
from New York about nine
ago. Paul and Irene Komai
run the place year round i
A trip to Bath is truK
one. The town its. foffei
intncasiesthelikeotr hma
I be found in our aro.i
Bath is theories- �
j Carolina, incorporated in
has a wide range of histr
� tors Most of the
chitectureofthetov
and some is open to
Guided tours are ala i
the tour �
The gui-st �
side what B �
reel � oksa
rei k, but in that
than a ditch, bu'
� - �
A pier extend j
and a bench placed ur.
I
the
avauabk

small ��
j
ib
ho

an
College stud
By Michael Harrison
Suff Writer
College students have the ; -
tential to become a pnme target 4
the AIDS epidemic.
Students tend not to see them-
selvesasbeingatnsk Sughtlyolder
adults have been thetypical vk
of AIDS, so there are few o
peers with AIDS tod: ii ge un-
safe sex. A workeratthek -
department said QoUegi
are also still young en. tugl
denial to jusnfv unsate - ual be-
havior Students are strong and
healthy nght now. she said sothey
believe nothing can hurt them
A ls87 survey in Daytona sa d
28 percent oi students did ru I
to protect themselves m m 6
Fifty percent used condoms and
three percent had sex less I ften
Homosexual and bisexual men.
along with intravenous drug us rs
who shared needles, were the mi-
hal victims of AIDS. But time is
gradually changing these statistics
1
� 1
Air
- rs and tl

time- is �
fected
nn-H is �
cans less thai
6
Rese ' �'

the ga mn -
196
black and I
in the 19903 e
AIDS cases - - j
rated from hi
nurr-
Unpr � �
srnoi
the disease as
nal intercourst
Man. A
Riedmann.auth
��
I; cf y
1 Iw
" 53338 �

1 ���.� � -x �-�- �
V Mmm.SiiESl 1
rs3kw
UM'i
�3f -�
Tricky Mickey
Mickey and M.nn.e are joined here by some ECU
These students partogajenjhe
"The Nerd" b
By Matt Jones
Surf Writtt
For anyone who has ever had
an unwanted house guest the cur-
rent Summer Theatre production is
for you. Tonight, at McCinrus The-
atre, "The Nerd" will begin its 10
day run.
The play is an outrageous
comedy coroerrung the arrival of a
j house guest who proves to outlive
his welcomeness. The plot then
turns to the wild anbes which occur
Us the host tries to alleviate his
Problem.
The play, wntten by Larry
Shue, is known to be notoriously
funny. It will surely be an evening
I of outrageous entertainment.
i Students are urged to attend
the performances Although there
is no advance ticket discounts
granted to students, there will bean
iportunity to see the production
rareduced price. If a student goes
lolhebOKolficebtH
on the night ot thJ
which they wish to a
receive a ticket for
pnee. That's $750.
rabk? to the cost of a
The play will
Kenneth Albers, wl
has been seen at tl
Repertory Theatrej
Shakespeare FesOv?
acclaimed Abbey
occasionally acts ar
this production, tak
of Wamock Waldg
Also performd
are several other
professionals Jar
be taking on th
SteadmaaHehasj
Milwaukee Repertj
the last eighteen yj
forming m Milwai
bcipated in many
of Shue's other
Steadman is one!





Hhc iEaat (Harultman
July 3,1991
noth beating
ts my j I thr k
� objectivt �� i rsusnomina
5, S v orrix t
mon i stak� s.� rule of
s hen employing the 11 r -1
S I1 form t
ust- I" rath :
pie, say
than It is me tSimi
i -viv i his i
San I his is him
idoesn tsound right
v because everybody
u has done it incorrecth
dunnj - entire life, lust he
� they've done it wrong
ch that doesn't mean i.
i- ,i!i uimpui off i
� � .vrlv (V thr
- ! I ir .)
It
k tnn �
' makes
! he :
absurd.
khould IN'
limple. rh1
s 'earth
!(�? of earth
p " Space
heiceberg Far w
� ; . � place all
i i debt
bscure i ommun
- ther thani nharx eil
� � � nd rath
fficials who like to sound
me rules of Eng
detractfri mclarit) it
ved � rigid!) there ar
� mes when you ought to split n
tai and rime!
e is clearest if
� I ientence with a prep
neought to know tl �
rules befon � breaks them, an i
even then th . ild be bn �
only for deliberate) ffei t I ikethi!
fust remember: language
a tool, like a hammer is a tool
�he function ol language is t� 11
ite communication it's no!
! enough merely to maki
yourself understood to youraudi
ence, however vaguely they rruiv
understand you, and him.
h you mav have watil your
hands around in the process. In
order for language to continue to
he the tool - and weapon that
it can be, we all should follow the
rules 'when they're sensible) and
express i mrselves ts learlv as we
can manage
As tor me, me go now. Push
big mammoth over, liff. Fat good
Bath Guest House brings N.C. history to life
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
V
e said it a million times.
just wish 1 could get away
r.i fh
�nx' to quit wishing.
Lot �ted about an hour's drive
�. )s a little piece of sanitv
huh still exists in this high-speed
odd lusf travel down to Bath and
Bath Guest Hoow.
It is like anything vou've ever
L ishei I for ma get a way assort. The
uest house otters a typical Bed &
- . tst'motif as weft asa variety
essentials to provide a rc-
,�h t. uest House is owned
i by an amiable, down-
upte who moved South
- i N � rk about nine years
iul and Irene KomatOW have
� i ear round ever since.
trip ti i Hath is truly a relaxing
. itself offers pleasant
- t-s the!ike of which mav not
�sir area.
is the oldest town in North
rporated in 1705. It
has a wide range of history to offer
its visitors. Most of the original ar-
chitecture of the town still survives,
and some is open to the public.
Guided tours are also available via
the tourist center.
The guest house itself sits
alongside what is known as Bath
Creek. It looks a little bigger than a
creek, but in that area, if its bigger
than a ditch, but smaller than a
nver, then its a creek.
A pier extends over the creek,
and a bench placed upon it, allow-
ing for a great place to sit and enjoy
the scenery. There are fishing poles
available if you care to do more
than just sit.
If you want to get out on the
water, then you mav use one of the
small boats which is part of the
package. If you would rather ex-
plore the town, just grab one of the
bicycles and take off. Don't worry
ahoutoverexerhng yourself though,
Bath isn't that big.
The highlight oi vour stay
however, will most certainly be the
morning breakfast which will
arouse your sensesbnght and early.
For a Northerner, Paul fixes one of
the most superb southern breakfasts
you'll ever have the pleasure to eat.
After breakfast, you might care
to sit out on the back porch in one
the rockers and breathe in the fine
morning air. You and Paul can sit
and talk about simple things, and
intermittently he'll point out this or
that and tell you about it.
Irene won't be sitting around
much in the morning. That's when
she does the straightening up
around the house.
1 asked Paul once why he let
Irenedoall thecleaningwhilehesat
on the back porch.
He answered that because he
cooked the breakfast in the morning,
it was an even trade. Irene didn't
even bother with a response to his
statement, although she did let out
a small grunt of displeasure.
I noticed the next day that Paul
helped out a little more with the
household work. Color me nutty,
but I think there might have been a
correlation.
Perhaps the best part oi the
Bath Guest House though, is some-
Photo Coutasy of Bath Quaat Houm
The Bath Guest House is a fortress of hospitality and serenity hidden in N.C s oldest township
thing that isn't quite tangible. It has
nothing todo with the town of Bath,
or the things to do there, or any of
the special accommodations.
The best part of the guest house
stems from a unique sort oi feeling
you'll get from first entenng the
place. It's the feeling that you can
settledown hereandquit worrying
about day to day troubles. It's the
feeling that you will always be wel-
come and everyone is glad you
could make it.
In short, it feels like home.
So what are you waiting for?
IVk up your bags and head to Bath
It's best to call ahead and make
reservations, especially during the
summer. Their number is923-68l 1.
Go ahead, give them a call.
They'd love to hear from you.
By Michael Harrison
Staff Writer
students have the rnv
tential I become a prime target of
6 epidemic.
Students tend not to see them-
isbeingat risk. Slightly older
been the typical victims
iS, so there are few college
peers th 1DS to discourage un-
afi V a orkerat theUxil health
� it said college students
so still young enough to use
justify unsafe sexual be-
� Students are strong and
ghl now. she said, so they
nothing can hurt them.
57survey in Daytona said
tof students did nothing
� themselves from AIDS.
� ent used condoms and
� ercenl had sex less often.
m sexual and bisexual men,
with intravenous drug users
red needles, were the iru-
titms of AIDS. But time is
p 11 .ally changing these statistics.
Gay men are practicing safer
sex, and as medical treatment im-
proves, serious symptoms and even
death are being delayed.
AIDS isstill flourishing in some
areas, namely with inner-city drug
users and their sex partners. For
unknown reasons, blacks are three
times as likely as whites to be in-
fected, Hispanics, two and a half
times as likely, and Asian-Ameri-
cans are less than half as likely to get
AIDS.
Researcher Daniel Q. Haney
wrote that while AIDS devastated
the gav community during the
1 9905, the disease is moving to poor
black and Hispanic heterosexuals
in the I990S. Five percent of U.S.
AIDS cases are said to have origi-
nated from heterosexual contact.but
numbers are likely to nse.
Unprotected anal intercourse
is 10 times more likely to transfer
the disease as is unprotected vagi-
nal intercourse.
Mary Ann La manna and Agnes
Riedmann, authors of the textbook
prune target for AIDS infection
"Marriages and Families wrote,
"A single act with a low-nsk part-
ner has a one in five billion chance
of resulting in AIDS, but the risk
rises to one in 500 with an infected
partner and no condom The
chances oi contracting AIDS from
an infected sex partner might seem
remote, but consider the following
information:
�AIDS has spread rapidly in
the U.S. In 1981, 261 cases were
d lagnosed. In 1982, cases more than
tripled to 994. By, 1987,49,743 cases
were diagnosed and 1989 saw
117.781 cases.
� Nearly 60,000 people have
now died from it, and one million
Americans are estimated to carry
the HIV (or human immunodefi-
ciencv) virus, which virtually al-
wavs develops into full-blown
AIDS.
� Estimates indicate 365,000 will
have developed AIDS by 1993,and
263,000 will have died.
�Women now make up nine
percent of AIDS patients and 10
percent of all new cases. Over half
these women are black, 28 percent cancer as the number one national
white, 19 percent Hispanic and one health concern. Some people say an
Asear1vasl986,AIDSreplaced dient particularly effective in de-
stroying the AID'S virus.
percent Asian. Needle sharing ac-
counted for 50 percent of female
AIDS cases, 30 percent from sex
with infected men and the remain-
der from blood transfusion.
� Women can contract AIDS
from men easier than men can con-
tract it from women. Some statistics
sav women run one chance in a
thousand for getting AIDS from a
single encounter with an infected
man. About One-third of the female
unnecessary panic has swept
through the publ ic, but others point
out that the disease is increasing
geometrically, making the grave
concern of the public very war-
ranted.
The drug AZThas shown some
success in alleviating some AIDS
symptoms and even preventing
their development on some HIV
positive cases. Other drugs are bo-
ng developed, and some scientists
sex partners of infected men be- areopenly expressing real hope for
come infected through repeated a possible vaccine that might be
contacts
�Teens are being infected at
least 40 percent faster now than
they did four years ago. Ignorance
is a huge contributing factor. Eight
percent of adolescents know that
AIDS can be transmitted by needle
sharing and heterosexual inter
tested soon.
Condoms have been the most
effective preventive measure
against AIDS for those who choose
to continue sexual activity.
Women now account for 40
percent of condom sales. Women
areencouraged to practice safer sex.
course.Multiplesexpartners(which but many point out the reluctance
is any more than one partner) and many men have to wearing
"street kids" remain the highest- condoms, believing condoms re-
risk group, duce sensation. Other men are very
Denial plays a large part in these responsible,
cases. Researcher Judith "1 always wear condoms one
Sendcrowitz wrote in 1989 Ado- student said, "because I'm not will-
lescents are a prime example of a
group that does not look 10 years
ahead Denial is especially more
prominent among teenagers be-
cause, as with college students,
AIDS cases are still relatively fewer
among their age group. The danger
is much easier to ignore since there
mg to risk the rest of my life to
satisfy mv sexual needs for a few
hours. I don't care how small the
risk might or might not be to get
AIDS, it's still there
Here are some worthwhile
points to remember:
1. Use condoms, preferably
aren't many examplesof teenswho those with a spermicidal lubneant
have the disease. containing Nonoxynol-9, an lngre-
2. Trv monogamy. The Surgeon
General reported that couples who
are monogamous for at least five
years are not a t nsk. This is true for
both heterosexual and homosexual
couples he said in his report.
3. Don't use intravenous drugs
and especially don't share needles.
4. Ask about your sex partner's
health and sexual history before
having sex, but beware of dishon-
esty In a case study, 20 percent of
the questioned men said they would
lie when asked such questions.
5. The local health department
offers free anonymous or confiden-
tial testing for the HIV virus by
appointment. Remember, however,
the antibodies to AIDS could take
as long as six months to develop
(sometimes even longer, although
such cases are rare) before they will
show up in a test.
6. One night stands are not a
good idea; neither is sex with mul-
tiple partners or with those of high-
risk groups.
7. A responsible sexually active
person will volunteer to be tested. If
the test is positive, the person is
required by law to tell all sex part-
ners who rrugh t be endangered. The
person should also refrain from sex
or at least use condoms.
8. Women who are planning to
have children should be tested and
perhaps retested after six months.
9. Keep yourself informed and
support sex education meant to
prevent the spread of AIDS.
"The Nerd" begins tonight
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
For anyone who has ever had
an unwanted house guest, the cur-
rent Summer Theatre production is
for you. Tonight, at McGinnis The-
atre, The Nerd" will begin its 10
day run.
The play is an outrageous
comedy concerning the arrival of a
house guest who proves to outlive
his welcomeness. The plot then
rums to the wild antics which occur
as the host tries to alleviate his
problem.
The play, written by Larry
to the box office between and 8:15 characters,
on the night of the performance Catherine Lynn Davis is an-
which they wish to attend, they will other of the talents to be seen m the
receive a ticket for half the regular play. She too has performed at the
price Thaf s $750, easily compa- Milwaukee Theatre, as well as the
Cleveland Playhouse. Her past roles
have included Emily in Our Town,
Viola in Twelfth Night, and title rotes
in Educating Rita and The Diary of
Anne Frank.
Other performers in the play
include: William McNulty, Rose
rable to the cost of a movie.
The play will be directed by
Kenneth Albers, whose direction
has been seen at the Milwaukee
Repertory Theatre, Great Lakes
Shakespeare Festival and Dublin's
acclaimed Abbey Theatre. Albers
occasionally acts and will do so in Pickering, Scott Ray and PansPeet.
this production, taking on the rote Scott Ray is a 14- year old
of Warnoek Waldgrave. resident of Greenville. He has per-
Also performing in The Nerd formed in several of Greenville's
are several other seasoned theater Childien'sTheatreproductionsand
I play, wntten by Larry f James Pickering will iscurrentlyastudentatE.B. Aycock.
Shue. ,s known to be notoriously "VST role of Rick PansPeet is currently a faculty
funny It will surely be an evening J performed at the member of the Theater Arts De-
Milwaukee Repertory Theater for partment. He will soon be leaving
rtv last eighteen years. White per- to continue his acting studies,
fonning in Milwaukee he has par- The Artistic Director fortWsas
ticipated in many world premieres well as the other Summer Theatre
of Shue's other plays, although eventsiskhnShearm.theClvurman
SheaLalzNew otA
D&ecdex (Weekend
ITG Tours USAir
July 26-28 � August 23-25 � November 1-3, 1991
Your Mis Saigon New York Tour Includes: GILFORD PLAZA
MQs s
Saigon
Q Roundtrip air via USAir
QTwo nights hotel accommodations
Q Orchestra seat for Ml� Saigon
Q Lunch or late dinner at the Stage Dell
Q Lower New York or Upper New York
sight-seeing tour
? Admission to the South St. Seaport
Museum
Q Air and hotel taxes
? New York City Information packet
$459
ppdbl occ. single
ftupp: '108
OMNI PARK
CENTRAL
$489
ppdbl occ. single
supp:
'131
of outrageous entertainment.
Students are urged to attend
the performances. Although there
is no advance ticket discounts
granted to students, there will be an
opportunity to see the production
B ITG Travel Centers
RALHGH 7822662 CHAPEL HILL 9671438 WILMINGTON 392-2315
opportunity to see the production � J r Ws favorite Df the Theater Department,
forareducedprice.lfastudentgoes Steadman is one oi n�





!
16
alhe iEaat ffarg.lint.an.
July 3,1991
SPORTS
Record crowd turns out for golf tournament
By Malt Mumma
Sports Fditor
For the third time in three years
the Michael Jordan Celebrity Golf
Classic came to the Brook Valley
Country Club in Greenville over
the weekend and entertained over
9,000 fans.
The turnout was three times
that of last year's crowd probably
owing to the Chicago Bulls much-
belated NBA championship season
capped off with a virtual stomp
over the LA. Lakers in the- finals.
Jordan was, of course, instru-
mental in the Bulls win and he has
even risen, (in special occasions, to
lead his team to victory. He fell
short, though, of winning the golf
tournament that bears his name bv
the narrowest of margins
Jm�� Browning-ECU Photo Lab
Michael Jordan reacts to his tee shot on the 1 Qth hole Sunday
Edberg eliminates
McEnroe from games
WlMBl EDON, England (AP)
Defending champion and top
seed Stetan Edberg used a a mi pie t
short streaks to bounce lohn
McEnroe out ol Wimbledon tvvi.iv
Edberg beat M I nroe a three-
time champion. 7-6(7-41,6-1 64,
and moved into the quarterfinals
Top women's seed SteffiIraf
and titth seed Mary oe Fernandez
rolled to eas) victories and ad
vartced to a semifinal meetii
Graf defeated seventh seed Zina
Garrison 6-1, 6-3, gaining revenge
for her loss to (iarrison in the 1990
semifinals. Fernandez won -2 7 5
over fourth seed Aranrxa Sanchez
Vicario
Edberg ran off 15 straight points
midway through the second set and
then won 1 of 20 points in a third-
set spurt.
The Sweden won the tie-
breaker to end a hr-t set thai went
entirely en serve The lth seeded
McEnroe seemed to sa after the
tie-breaker
"He outplayed me. When it
really came do wntoit, he just played
a little better than 1 did said
McEnroe, whocomplained about a
tew line i alls but a voided an v major
verbal explosions
" lisgameissuited to grass, it's
a natural Anyone that volleys that
well is going to be giod on grass 1
would have preferred to play a lot
� therguys
Edberg thought the match
would have been tougher
1 still believe he can play some
ven good tennis put there, but he's
not as consistent as he was before,
Edberg said of McEnroe. "He has
lost a httle bit of his speed, but there's
still a lot of greatness out there
Unseeded David Wheaton
reached thequarterfinalswitha64,
6-3, 6-1 defeat of an Gunnarsson.
i n Monday, Wheatonousted third
seed Kan 1 endl in Uuir sets.
Also advancing to the
quarterfinals was French Open
champion im Courier, who de-
feated 14th seed KarelNovacek6-3,
64,6 2
1 lis next opponent will he sixth
seed Michael Stich, who rallied to
win the final three games for a 4-6,
3, 7-5, 1-6, 7-5 victory over
Alexander Volkov. Courier de-
feated stuh in the semifinals of the
! rench (pen.
The fourth-seeded Courier,
whose best previous Wimbledon
performance as reaching the third
round last year, now has lost onlv
1 " games in his last two victories.
'It's kind of unexpected tome,
because I'm not a natural grass-
court player Courier said. "I'm
pleasantly surprised to be in the
quarterfinals
This Week's Entertainment
Friday July 5th
Modern Pirate
Saturday luly 6th
Hi Way
Hours
MonThurs. 11am-3pm
Fri. 11am-2am
Sat. 9pm-2am
513Cotanche
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758-0080
7
In Jordan's fivesome was Ted
Smith, ulian Vainnght r. and lohn
Burgess. At the end of 18 holes
Jordan's group tinished with a H
early in the afternoon but the last
fivesome on thecourse finished with
a 5H to tie Jordan's group
Actor Mitchell Laurence along
with Simon Ong, Kick Harden,
George Wait and Fred Keamscom-
prised the group that tied Jordan
and doused his hopes of victory.
A win on the lth green was
possible, but none ol Laurence's
group could make a birdie putt and
die tournament went intoextra holes
reminiscent of the'91 US. Open.
Theovertimestartedon the 17th
hole which both teams readily
eaglod. ordan hit a 25-foot eagle
putt and (ng hit the eagle putt tor
his group
On the 18th both teams pared
the hole and each team birdied the
next. The deciding hole was the
second where lurence dropped
an eagle putt for the win.
Third place went to Michael
O'Learv, Randy Smith, Terry
Hogan, Richard 7apf and Jeff IXwiy
who finished in similar fashion to
the first place team. A playoff with
the team of F.mmet Walsh, Gary
Houser, Charlie Pnce, Ron Hinson
and Jerry Tedder began on the 14th
hole after thev finished at 59af ter 18
holesand tied wnthOLearVsgroup
66, eight stokes off the lead and
New York Krucks forward Charles
Oakley finished in a tie with two
other teams at 60 only two strokes
off the lead.
An estimated $120,000 was
earned on Sunday, which will
mostly go to the Ronald McDonald
House of Greenville
The tournament helps out the
surrounding community as well as
an estimated $500,01X) was spent in
Greenvnlleover trie weekend by the
visiting golfers and fans
An extra $6,500 was made on
Ihe playoff for third went on the side Burgess paid the amount
for six holes after five consecutive
tied holes. At the first holeOLeary
sunk a putt tor a birdie and clinched
the third spot at the tournament.
Minnesota Viking Chris
Overrun finished with his team at
at an auction for the privilege h
plavalongside Jordan on thecourse
Burgess is the president of South-
eastern Products and considered it
a worthwhile chanty and a tun
opportunity
FSU becomes newest member of ACC
I AI LAHASSEE, Ha. (AP)
It's official: Honda State is the
newest member of the Atlantic
Coast Conference.
It's kind ol like buying shvk
in c leneral Motors said Florida
State President hVnwd Sligerafter
handing AC C officials an entry- fee
check of $500,OOOon Monday.
Honda State isexpected tolend
its hxitball powerhouse reputation
to the basketball-wealthy ACC,
which will in turn boost the hixps
prestige of the Seminoles
"We've got thebest football and
basketball combination in the
country said Tom Mickle, assis-
tant ACC commissioner.
Ten new television markets
have already committed tothesyn
dicated A( C football package
handled by efferson-Pilot, eight of
them in Florida
"Honda St.ite has obviously
helped us said Ken Neal, a pro-
ducer at fefferson-Pilot "In terms
of overall impact, it's made the
league more competitive, which
makes our schedule more competi-
tive
l"he Seminole football inde-
pendents I r the past 40years, will
not be eligible for the AC Ctitleuntil
the 1992 season because of s hedul-
ing conflicts Bui the team s entry
into the league has helped a pro-
posed bowl deal that could net all
the schools millions of dollars.
Ihe ACC is involved in an alli-
ance between the1 Big Fast, the ma-
jor New Year's Dtty bowl games
and Notre Dame that amid thrust
ACC schtHils into bigger bowl
games in the 1990s.
' In Mav (it 1990, we were where
the Citrus Bowl wasn't even sure it
wanted to renew (its ACC con-
tract) Mickle said. "Now in July of
'91 we're where about every maor
howl in the country is wanting to
sign some agreement with the
ACC
The added visibility Honda
State gives the league through toot-
baO beastly matched by the league's
basketball prowess, which has al-
ready helped Coach Pat Kennedy
land so me top nrru its. Florida State
also will earn $1.55 million from a
basketball svndicahon package
Basketball, in fact, was one of
the maor deciding factors when
Honda State chose the ACC over
the Southeastern Conference last
year. The school has already
adopted a new ticket priority systexfi
asdemandincreasesforll games
against teams like North Carolina,
Duke and Georgia Tech.
Honda State Athletic Director
Bob Goin said the match is shaping
up well.
"It's proven nght out of the
starting blocks that the ACC as
good for us and we were good tor
the ACC Goinsaid.
�Tc
3
USC searches for
basketball coach
�?
v- ��v
.
. jam Brownmo-ECU Photo Lab
Fore!
A participant eyes the 14th fairway at Brook Valley Sunday
PINEBROOK APTS.
UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP
formerly Rivcrbluff
?Renovations Underway
1 Bedroom Apts & 2 Bedroom Townhouse
?Water, Sewer and Basic Cable included in rent
?Pool Low Deposit
?Pets Allowed (conditional) "Laundry Room
?Now accepting applications for
August 1st & August 15th
121RiverbIuffRd. 758-4015
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) -
Rutgers coach Bob Wenzel flew to
Charlotte, N'Cand met with South
Carolina officials to discuss the
school's basketball job.
Wenzel arrived in Charlotte at
4 p.m. Monday and flew back to
Newark, N.J at 8:15 p.m.
Wenzel said when he arrived
Kick in Newark that he had met
with King Dixon and other South
Carolina search committee officials
while in Charlotte.
It was mostly a meeting to get
acquainted, Wenzel said.
They didn't offer me the job,
and I didn't ask them to offer it he
said.
Wenzel said South Carolina had
contacted him several days ago.
As far as the job's appeal,
Wenzel said he didn't want to talk
about that.
"1 think if s a good job, but
everyone has to deade personally
their own family situation and
consider the jobs they an? presently
in
Wenzel, 41, is married and has
three children.
Rutgers athletic director Fred
Gruninger would neither confirm
nor deny that Wenzel was meeting
with South Carolina officials. But
he has given South Carolina per-
mission to talk with Wenzel.
Wenzel said Friday that South
Carolina had asked to interview him
and that he'd spoken with assistant
a thletic d irectors Sterl i n g B ro wn a nd
Art Baker "a number of tames
South Carolina has been look-
ing for a coach since finng George
Felton on May 14. The seven-mem-
ber search committee has inter-
viewed at least six candidates tor
the job.
"I think they need to do some-
thing as quickly as possible. It is late
and they are entering the SEC,
Wenzel said. Their idea is to take
their time and be sure and certain
they hire the nght person
Wenzel served as an assistant
under Bill Foster at South Carolina
during the 1980-81 season. After
that, he was head coach at Jackson-
ville, where he was 88-86.
After one year as an assistant
with the NBA's New Jersey Nets,
Wenzel became head coach at
Rutgers, where he is 55-40 in three
seasons. He has led the Scarlet
Knights to the NCAA tournament
twice and the National Invitation
Tournament once.
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 3, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 03, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.816
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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