The East Carolinian, June 27, 1991






More fees 4
Students shouldn't pay tor recreation center.
MiMMMiMMiwiMmmMM
'Jungle Fever'
Spike Lee's newest film raises many issues.
6
Stye iEaat Carolinian
Vot.65 No.34
Thursday, June 27, 1991
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5,000
8 Pages
kroundOther Cam,
Hie$l
South Carolina may raise tuition
rhe University ol S uth( arolina is facing the possi-
bilip, ol ition increase due to ruts in the 11 92
i "�
�I li ih
n Palms said thai major budget
outs hav ilrea been passed rhe cuts have been
i,i! nistration, he said
We'vi ' ' ur cuts in someof the support
� rativi ireas he said. "They don t
directl) the academic programs, but they .ire
there to sen
In nistrative positions might
keep all undergraduate teaching
progra
Employee arrested for theft
Dcpa
a I
equii
Ht�J worth oi equipment from the
. ision and Motion Pictures at
� lina it i hapel Hill led to the
� that department
� � harged in connection with
� �� � ft of equipment through-
ported that Law enfbrce-
�� ii 5200,000 worth of
i �� luding .i shipment oi 10
Budget may include fee increase
; � . � ma State I niversity
has bei ioard of 1 rustees.
� i - ire included in the budget It
� h, ;� ; ; : 1 resident graduate and
ini � � � pa about B percent
morel rl I I fees, and non-residents will have to
pa ab ' � . � re
i � . ma �� ide in the proposed budget by
thcGcnera � detailed budget willbepresented
totheBoardl fim n at its July meeting
Students given seat on board
A studi nl representative from the UNC system will
havethechanci I ' iheBoardofGovemorsasanon-
votingmi mb A-ingavTitebytheGeneralAssembly.
The bill passed b) the Assembly stated th.it the
president oi the I V Association ol 'student c lovem-
ments or a person des ited by him may serve as
representative ird
VSG Pn l Mart Bibbs, a senior at UNC-CH,
. � � . � ause he is considered a state
employee � �� �� � for Speaker oi the House Han
Blue rhe Board does not allow state employees to serve
Bibbs is looking into the possibility of being able to
take the position
Former president gets probation
The! niversitvofSouthC arolina's former president
received a five year probation sentence when he pleaded
guilty to receiving extra compensation and no contest to
a state tax evasi in charge
1 ioJderman will have to perform WO hours of com-
munity service and pay hick taxes of just under $4,000,
according toircuitjudge John Waller. The $4,000 is part
of $25,000 I fokk rman received through the law firm of
former Gov Robert McNair.
According to thearolina Research and Develop-
ment Foundation, me money was donated totheuniver-
sitvbva Puerto Rican businessman after Holdermanand
associates helped eliminate drug charges on him.
Student aqaiitted of manslaughter
A former UNC11 student was acquited of volun-
tary manslaughter charges in a Robeson County court.
Morehead Scholaredric Woods was charged with
second-degree murder in the shooting death of Gene
Clark. Clark had entered the home of Wood's girlfriend
when thev were both there.
Wood's attorney asked lhal the charges be reduced
to voluntary manslaughter at the beginning of the trail.
When Clark enter the house through a window,
Woods and his girlfriend locked themselves in a bath-
room, (lark kicked in the door of the bathroom, and
Woods shot him eight times.
Woods isexpected to return toUNCasa senior in the
fall, according to The Dmhf Tarheel.
Inside Thursday
Crime Scene2
Editorial4
ClassifiedsCom(s 5
Features�&
Sports�&
Lawsuit filed in campus wiretapping case
By Matt Jones
suit Writer
A lawsmt was tiKl Tues-
day against one current E 11
employee and one former
emplo e i on crning the
wiretapping of phone lines on
campus
1 he lavs siit, hied b
former Public Safety (. hid oi
Police ohnny Rose, seeks
damagesol 00 for the il
legal taping oi his conversa
tion with Brooks Mills, a
formei U l iuni( ati ns
empl �yee
� nl rliis
claim i tl t 1 � vi �ii e was
taped and I b) fhe
defei � ' iwsuil
rhetwi defendants in the
( Linn are I v an Midgette and
reddy Koberson. Midgetteis
currently the assistant director
oi human resources tor em-
ployee relations. Koberson
was the In1or of telecom
munications until March 8 oi
this year when he resigned
shortly after the disclosure of
a State Auditor's report con
cerningthe wiretapping
both North Carolina and
nited States law prohibits the
unauthorized tapping oi
phone lines. According to
North Carolina law. "It shall
be unlawful for any person to
lap or make any connection
with any wire or apparatus ol
any telephone e opt sin h
onnection as may be autho-
rized by the person operat-
ingsuch wire or apparatus
A I ederal law reads that
"anv person whose com-
munication is intercepted,
disclosed or intentionally used
in violation to this daw) may
in a civil action recover from
the person or entity such
relief as may be appropriate
Rose's lawyer, Herman
(laskins, viid his lien! i -
seeking more than damages
in an interview on Wednes
(w The lawsuit is hoped to
bring new interest to the
w in'taps which were most re-
centiymade public by thcState
Auditor's Report in March oi
1991.
t Raskins said that the suit
will lead to depositions from
the defendants whu h in turn
may tie the scandal to other
I niversity employees.
Gaskins said that the in
ten tion of fhe lawsuit is to find
who originally ordered the
wiretap In the report,
Koberson said thai he,
Midgette and John Burrus, a
Public Safety captain, had a
meeting concerning the tap-
ping.
A�ording to the report,
Koberson stated that In- was
asked by the captain, an
you tap theemployee's line?"
Both Midgette and Burrus
later told state auditors that
thev did to A remember the
conversabon Burrus resigned
on the same day as Roberson.
In the r port '� bcrsoi
�iid he tapped ai II . � Icon
versabons on Mills's phone
line bt iuse he su .pei ted
Millshad dealings with illegal
drugs
According to theaudttor's
report, after initial tape's were
made taectorofPublicSafety
lames Depuy was contacted
I puv said that he informed
Midgette that the tapes could
not he used in court, but did
not expressly inform of the
illegality of wiretapping
! unng the course of the
investigation, the auditors re
q tested notes from some of
mi etings between the
Robert in and MidgetteasweJI
as the wiretapping tapes, fiu
cording tothe report, Midgette
placed the notes in Mills's m-
i. uli nt fik When me notes
were requested he told the
auditors that they were no
nger in the tile
According to the report,
See Lawsuit, page 3
Graduate students
angered by new
assitantship policy
The cost of campus
parking increc
By Keith Abiuton
sun Writer
As the fall semester ap
proaches nd the campus
population swells to over
15,000, the annual parking
problem arises once again.
Parking and Traffic Ser-
ices has made somechanges
in parking regulations this
year
The biggest change is m
the price of a student parking
sticker
Iho pnee is now $70, up
from $50 last vear Night de-
cals tm be obtained for $30.
To alleviate long lines at
the start of the fall semester,
traffic services is ottering a
vehicle preregistraoon pro-
gram for 1991-92.
This svstem will allow
students enrolled tor tall se-
mester to register their chicle
by mail.
The application was sen!
out toall FCC studentsalreadv
enrolled and should he com-
pleted and sent in by July 31.
If the application is not
completed by this date, the
student must go in person to
the office of Traffic Services or
Mendenhal) Student Center.
Tickets will be issued to
vehicles which are parked in
areas not authorized by their
parking sticker.
In more severe cases, or in
cases of multiple unpaid tick-
ets, tars will be towed.
Another change this vear
will be1 in theconversionot the
parking meters.
"ho meters willallow 30
minutes tor 2s cents. Imple-
mentation of this change has
been in stages.
rhaseone.whichiH aired
in October TWO. converted
operation of nickel and dime
meters to quarter meters
T"he sea nd phase was the
change in the time limit from
one hour to 30 minutes.
Parking meters will not
allow accumulation of time
for using two quarters; only
30 minutes will be allowed.
By im Rogers
Scnkx News Mi riter
( iraduati studi nts from
manv departi I -bowed
disgust with the 1 niversity s
nevs ;� nit Mind to
its dunng a
meeting Wednesday after
noon
The meeting, headed K
David Hern: g t oi
h Graduate Studi n,s
Association was held toshare
ideasamonggradua to student
representatives ol other uni-
versity departmentsand I - I
Up a strateg) to tight the new
polic)
The nev� policj cuts
graduate assistant's pay by
placing a ceiling on the num-
ber ol hours ot work to 20 a
week. Graduate assistants
were formerl) paid for up to
" hours a week
1 lernng prop sed that
graduate assistants write let-
ters to I riane lacobs, Dean of
the (Graduate n hool, as vvell
as Marlene Springer, vice
chancellor for academic af-
fairs, tii pn 'test the new policy.
f Iraduateassistants from
the math, biology and English
Departments said the new
policy makes it evident how-
little graduate assistants are
appreciated
According to Herring,
graduate assistants in the En-
glish Department teach ap-
proximated 1,700 students in
lections of freshman En-
glish i lasses, a workload that
11 uld not easily tilled in their
absence
Tt would COS the uni-
versitx nvo,thnvor four times-
a mm h to bring ir full time
faculty to teach those sec-
tions Hemng aid
1 lernng also found fault
with the Graduate School's
statement that S5,2(X) per
lenrtii vear for graduate
assistantships is competitive
with other area universities.
According to Herring,
further investigation into the
niatter showed other univer
siti.s paying an average ot
$7 00 per academic year to
graduate assistants
'Those(uruversities)who
gave Ws i trvin $7.0iX) offered
tuition wavers to their gradu-
ate students, so it really was a
lot mom Herring said.
Herring said he is not
calling tor a mass walkout or
strikesand picket lines, but he
wants the administration to
lv aware of the staggering ef-
fort il would have on theuni-
vorsitv if 75 to 90 percent of
the graduate assistants de-
clined work.
A student from the biol-
ogy department said that al-
though graduate assistants in
that department are not af-
fected nearly as much as some
of the others, they still feel that
their confidence has been un-
dermined bv the new policy
New students to be oriented to
campus lifestyles and activities
Fll� Photo
Parking meters will now allow 30 minutes for 25 cents.
By Jim Rogers
Senior News Writer
The ECU campus is pn
paring for an invasion.
Appmvimately 4,350 new
studentsand 3,1 XXI pa rente will
attend orientation sessions
from June 30 to July 30.
The New Student Onen-
tation Program is designed to
introduce incoming freshmen,
transfer students and special
studies students to ECU for
the first time.
The seven 212 day long
programs are, "a cross be-
tween student activities, stu-
dentlifeandacadernicaffairs
Don Joyner, director of the
program, said.
Approximately 2,500
freshmen will attend five ori-
entation sessions beginning
Sunday June 30.
Joyner said new student
orientation is "real important
for the image of the univer
sitv" because it is the first real
taste of college life the new
students get
Approximately 700
transfer shidents will attend
an orientation session on July
2 and 30, and 150 special
studies students will attend a
special orientation session
from July 14 to July lb.
Orientation students will
take placement tests in math,
foreign language and chem-
istry, recei ve student 1D cards,
meet faculty and staff repre-
sentanvesand have thechanee
to visit areas on campus they
are interested in.
The new students will be
welcomed by a staff ot 20 ori-
entation assistants who are
upperclassmen volunteers
and student leaders selected
on a basis of good academic
Four of the orientation
assistants work strictly with
parents.
Elizabeth Freeman, an
onentahon assistant for the
second time, said it is re-
warding to work with parents
and shidents to help them
adjust to their new situation.
"You have to put yourself
in their shoes and think Kick
to � ' ' vou were a fresh-
man, Freeman said.
rhe male orientation stu-
dents will stay in Garrett
Residence Hall, the female
students will stay in dement
Residence Hall, and parents
will stay in Belk Hall.
Jovner said he wants ori-
entation to portray "a real
friendly and largeuniversiry
Joyner has worked wim
the orientation pmgram since
1983 but is directing the on
standing and knowledge of entation program for the first
the university. time this year.





I
2 glie taut (Carolinian June 27. 1991
crjmeS;ene
Unconscious female students in
Cotten Hall turned over to roommates
June 18
1234 �College r lill Dnve: investigated areport of suspkriousactivity.
Subjects in question were gone on arrival.
1302 Fiainoal Aid Offio: investigated a report of damage tostate
property.
June 19
0856 lonesCafeteria: responded to alarm. Same was found set off
by construction workers.
2211 S. of Homing Residence Hall: student stopped for speeding.
Same was given a verbal warning.
MM Garret! Residence Hall: investigated report of suspicious
male subject in the area. Same was found to be a resident of Garrett Hall.
June 20
2111 Mcndenhafl Student Center: verbal warning given to stu-
dent tor driving on median and under age drinking.
0? 14 rhird and Reade Street: issued state citation to male student
For alcohol violation in the parking lot.
(U00 Fourteenth and Elm Street, stopped non-student for erratic
driving Same was given a verbal warning.
tVl 8 Fifth and Reade Street, checked on suspicious person lying
on the ground in parking lot Same Identified as homeless and escorted
to Grcem ille Police Department for assistance.
June 21
2314 (reene Residence Hall: issued statecitation for non-student
driving on sidewalk.
0307 Mendenhafl Student Center: escorted intoxicated female
itudent to Eastern Street
June 22
212 Minges Coliseum: investigated report of subject plaving
with blue ligN phone on the upper level. Same was unfounded.
(VM4 Cotten Residence 1 (all: investigated aport of female subject
passed out on the second floor of dorm. Same located and turned over
to roommate
June 23
1324 G.( Moore practice field: investigated report of trespasser.
Same was a goiter and left the area when asked.
June 24
2341 Gotten Residence Hall: responded to report of female sub-
let t passed out on the second floor. Same was intoxicated and turned
over to her roommate
June 25
Time unknown Publications Building: East Carolinian staff
illustrator's bicvele tires slashed.
Mcw� oj Crime Scenr is ukrn from official Public Safety log.
French teachers will travel abroad this summer
ECU News Bureau
Eighteen French teachers from
public schools across the state have
been selected to participate in a
Governor's Language Institute
French Abroad program conducted
by ECU during July.
State Public Instruction super-
intendent Bob Ethridge said he was
pleased that funding for the lan-
guage institutes had been contin-
ued for 1991, the fourth year of the
program.
"Second language teachers gain
invaluable experience in their tar-
get languageduring these institutes,
and have an opportunity to hone
their teaching skills he said. "I am
particularly pleased about the
OLD
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Open Daily
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316 E 10th St
758-0000
FREE
PREGNANCY
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Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville N'C
1 lours:
Mon - Fri 8:30-3:00
Student Stores
more, tkaniaetioo�e
Come Explore Your
College Store!
�Art Supplies
�("heck Cashing
� VisaMastercard
�Gift Wrapping
�Room Accessories
�Film Developing
�Special Ordering of
Books nor in srock
�Greering Cards
�Pirate Imprinted Items
�Class Rings
� IBM & Apple Computers
�Typewriter Rental
�Caps & Gowns
�Graduation Announcements
�Gifts Tradehooks Department
Owe dfapfrktfoimrtdemf.
We can meet all your book needs,
both USED and New.
for all classes-both
Undergraduate and Graduate!
ECU Student St
More tf
( IxmiIvS V()U iJullitt s M('())t s
Wri'Jit InnL
Summer Hours: Nl��nJ.i - Iliurv
French Abroad Institute this year.
By living and working among na-
tive French people, ou r teachers will
improve their own expertise and
tuition, fees, lodging and meab �
are covered by a $79,145 grant from
the N. C. State Department of Pub-
lic Instruction. Each teacher will also
our teachers will improve their own
expertise and their teaching abilities
Bob Ethridge
their teaching abilities
The French Abroad partici-
pants, all of whom have partici-
pated in previous Governor's Lan-
guage Institute summer programs,
include both elementary and sec-
ondary school teachers. Leading the
group will be Dr. Martin Schwarz
of the ECU Department of Foreign
Languages and Literatures.
All their expenses � travel.
receive six hours of college credit.
During their month in France,
the teachers will take intensive
courses in conversational French
and French phonetics and method-
ology taught by a French professor
and a course in French culture and
civilization taught by Dr. Schwarz.
They will visit museums and
view films and operatic and theatri-
cal performances. Highlights will
be an excursion to Versailles, a boat
trip on the Seine and joining Pan
sians in Bastille Day activities on
July 14. While the program is hay-d
in Paris, the group will visit castles
in the Loire Valley and the cathe-
drals in Rheims and Chartres Abo
included is a trip to Brussels and
Amsterdam.
The French Abroad program is
one of three Governor's Language
Institutes scheduled for this summer
and is the only one to be held in a
foreign nation.
Other 1991 programs are a
Spanish institute at Greensboro
College and a French institute at
Western Carolina University All
institutes are full-immersion pn
gramswithonly the target lam-
spoken.
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
Watermelon Feast
ThuRsdAy, June 27
7:00 pi CentraI Campus MaU
SpoNsoREd by tUe ECU Snj(kT Uwiow PRoducrioN Committee
When Hurry
Mil Sally
MoNcUy, July 1
9:00 p.M. HcNdnix TIieatre
Free AdivtissioN WiTri VAlid ECU STudENT ID
SpoNsoREd by ECU STudENT Unjon FUms Committee
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
" o , .
MEN S. LADIES I CHILDREN S SHOES
Look fop our YFLt OW
special group ol WCa
shoes marked with � DOTS � UP to 50!
Savings
RACK ROOM SHOES
Groom ilk1 lUivt'rs Market
Memorial Drive
Outbursts o
CHAPEL HILL (AP) � Recent "Itwasi
violence, including gunfire dunng police Cap
a melee outside a downtown There wei
nightclub, won't be tolerated in this Two ri
ttllegecommuniry,Town Manager shot at ar
Calvin Horton says. saulted ai
"It's outragious behavior and bruises at
we've got to find a wav to stop it Carolina H�
Horton said Tuesday "A nurj
Chapel Hill pohcesaid as many v lived mfy
�is BOO people were involved in a "It got so on
brawl on Franklin Street around 3 the busines
a.m. Tuesday after many of the forced todH
people had attended "Dj Dance Justb.
Night" at Cat's Cradle. said he wa
NE
Catholic
Woi
Welcome Th
Invite You to
Campii!
Summer Set
Sunday: 11:30am and!
Weekdays: 8j
Wednesday
For More information aboul
the Center daily b4
953 East 10th St.
757-(
Fr. Paul Vaeth,
Hot & Hui
Beat the
10CM5 Cotton Sundn
T-shirts. Skirts'
Mo
WRedbanks
FOS
3003 S.
loth
Guess the number piece!
in our Treasure Chest ani
Grand prize valued
No purchase necessary
i Shrimp, Shrimp, i
Shrimp
Small Shrimp �
at lunch $2.99 !
I MghtThne Shrimp Ptatteril
I Small $399 1
I Regular - $499 �
� Large-$5.99 J
! Beverage not Included .
� Expires: 7-1-91 m






I
2 iBbt Caat (Carolinian June27,199i
(S;ene
French teachers will travel abroad this summer
Unconscious female students in
Cotton Hall turned over to roommates
June 1M
11U College!lilllYiw: investigated arerxxtofsuspickyusacrjvity.
Subjects in question were gone on arrival.
1 ?02 Financial AidOfrtce: investigated a report of damage tostate
�ropert)
June
0856 ones atetena responded to alarm. Same was found set off
i i mxstriK ti i orkers
2211 S ol Fleming Residence Hall: student stopped for speeding.
un( ,vas pivena verbal warning.
" s irrctl Residence Hall: investigated report of suspicious
e subject in the area Samewasfoundtobearesidentof( Barrett Hall.
June 20
i nhall Student i. enter verbal warning given to stu-
lent toi -n median and under age drinking.
1214 � 1 indReade Street issued state citation to male student
lation in the parking kt.
I k � Fourteenth and Elm Streel stopped non-student for erratic
Same was given a verbal warning
and Reade stn vt checked on suspicious person king
�ntl I i parking lot. Same Identified as homelessand escorted
lice Department for assistance
I nno 21
i iii eReskiencel lall: issuii statecitation rornon-stuctent
- ilk
ii
Iriv
-tu. astern Street
uiit' LL
ECU News Bureau
Eighteen French teachers from
public schools across the state have
been selected to participate in a
Governor's Language Institute
French Abnwd program conducted
by ECU dunng July.
State Public Instruction super-
intendent Bob Fthndge said he was
pleased that funding for the lan-
guage institutes had been contin-
ued tor 1W1, the fourth year of the
program.
"Second languageteachersgam
invaluable experience in their tar-
get languagedunngtheseinshtutes.
and have an opportunity to hone
their teaching skills he said. "1 am
particularly pleased about the
French Abnwd Institute this year
By living and working among na-
tive Fmnch people, our teachers will
improve their own expertise and
tuition, fees, lodging and meals �
are covered by a $79,145 grant from
the N C. State Department of Pub-
lic Instruction. Each teacher will also
our teachers will improve their own
expertise and their teaching abilities
Bob Ethridge
their teaching abilities
The French Abroad partici-
pants, all of whom have partici-
pated in previous Governor's lan-
guage Institute summer programs,
include both elementary and sec-
ondary school teachers. leading the
group will be I )r. Martin Schwarz
of the ECU f)epartrnont of Forvign
Languages and I iteratures.
All their expenses - travel,
receive six hours of college credit.
Dunng their month in France,
the teachers will take intensive
courses in conversational French
and French phonehes and methuxi-
ologv taught bv a French professor
and a course in French culture and
civilization taught by Dr. Schwarz.
Thev will visit museums and
view filmsand operatic and theatn
cal performances. Highlights will
be an excursion to Versa ill- �
tnp on the Seine and joining Pan
sians in Bastille Dav activities n
hrfy 14. While the program is ba .
in Pans, the group will visit
in the li�n- Vallev and the ath
dralsin Khtnmsand C hartn-
imluded is a trip to Bruss. !
Amsterdam
TheFnTxh Abroad -
oneot three knwrnor's Lanj
Institiessdseduledforthissur . �
and is the onlv one to be hi I
foreign nation
Other 11 programs
Spanish institute at .r i
College and a French instil
Westernamlirwi Univei
institutes an- hill irnmet
grams with (nlv the target Lai ,
Spoken.
OLD
FASHIONED
Homemade
Yogurt
&
Sorbet
Open Daily
11am -11pm
316 E 10th SL
758-0000
n �ommati'
inges oliseum investigated report tt subject plaving
ne on the upper level. Same was unfounded.
tten Residence I fall investigated n-port ot female subject
' � second floor of dorm Same located and turned over
' ! ore pr.u ti� e held: investigated reportol trespasser.
' i and left the area when asked.
� tten Residence Hall responded to report of female sub-
I i the second floor Same was intoxicated and turned
mat
mkn wn Publications Building East Carolinian statt
it ir's bu vi lc tires lashed
Mn-1 ,i(rime Si'iif s ukn (mm ottmjl I'ubllt Sjtrt liyv
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & c 'onfidential
Services & C !ounseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
737-0003
1 1 1 P. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
( reen lllr C '
1 lours.
Men - I ri 8:30-3:00
ThunsdAy, June 27
5:00 pM CentraI Campus MaII
SpoNsoREd by TriE ECU Silent Umon PRodtcrioN Committee
I
Student Stores
more- tkaxjat loo�f
When Hum
Mil SilllV
MoNdAy, July 1
9:00 p.M. HEsdRIX TrIEATRE
Free AdMissios WiTri VAlid ECU SitdENT ID
SpoNsoREd by ECU STtdENT UnIon FUms Commjttee
STUDENT UNION

I

Come Explore Your
College Store!
�Art Supplies
�( 'heck ("ashing
� VisaMastercard
�( iirr Wrapping
wr (Xm AC Cesx ifk's
�Film I )eveloping
�Special Ordering oi
B oks nor in srock
� Greeting C 'ards
�Pirate Imprinted Items
�( Hass Rings
�IBM & Apple Computers
� Typewriter Rental
�( ips 6k Gowns
�( iraduation Announcements
�Gifts Iradebooks Department
One SltftittkaKtfoitartd
We c i meet rill your hook needs,
both I JSHDtindNcw.
U )t iill classes-hoth
Undergraduate and Graduate!
ECU Student Stum: Wore then just books your dollars support .student u holms
VVriyht HuilJiny Tcliphoiu 7S7-( I
Summer Hours: Monj.iv - I luirsj.i, 7: iO.i.in 5p.m. I riJa, 7: iO.i.ml I: ki.m.
Outbursts o
CH
infire during p
d m.

" i -

-
a
NE
Catholic
Wo
Welcome Th
Invite You to
Campusj
Summer S
Sunday: 11:30am andl
Weekdays: S
Wednesday
For More information a5- :
the Center dail) bj
953 East 10th St.
757
Fr. Paul Va
Hot & Hui
Beat ihi
i
FOS
189
3003 S.
10th
Guess Ute number pieces!
in our Treasure Chest anj
Grand prize valued
No purchase necessary xi
r Shrimp, Shrimp
� Shrimp
� Small Shrimp �
� at lunch $z.99 2 H
Wght Time Shrimp PUttersI f
I Small $399 �
Regular - $4.99 �
! Large $599
� Beverage not included . Bev�
� Expires: 7-1-9 jI





2 EIk �aHt(faroltntan June 27, 1991
2Sene
French teachers will travel abroad this summer
Unconscious female students in
Cotten Hall turned over to roommates
urtc 18
1234 olkge Hill Drive: investigated a report of suspiciousactiviry,
kibJLx Is in question v ere gone on arrival.
1 02 Financial u1t Office investigated a report of damage testate
�ropei i
une
� oms Cafeteria responded to alarm. Same was found set off
. i w orkers
. i! leming Residencef I.ill student stoppil tor sptwlmg
iii � ,i verhal warning
n ft Resilience Hall investigated n'port of suspicious
' � area Same wasfound to bea resident of iarrettHall.
M1
ih.ill Student v inter verbal warning given to stu
ng on median and under age drinking,
bird ind Reade Street issued state citation to male student
� ion ni the parking lot
I V ttvnth and Flm Street stoppixj non-student for erratic
was given a verbal warning
md Reade Street che� Wtvi on suspicious (.vrson lying
i larking lot Same Identified a homelessand escorted
r "iMrtment tor assistance
Residence Hall: issued statecitation for non student
- ilk
l enter es i irted intoi 11� rl female
i i liscum investigated rtjTt ol subject plaving
pperlevcl Same was unfounded
enResK.ii nee Hall investigated report ol femalesubject
h econd floor ol dorm SamekKated and turned over
Moore pra I � field investigated report of trespasser
I . and left the area uht-n asked
tten Resident e I lall responded to rep rt ol female sub
nd floor Same was intoxicated and turned
iate
�n Publications Building East Carolinian staff
!�� tires slashed
� I nm Sent is ukn trt.m official I'uMi. sjtt lots
ECU News Bureau
Eighteen French teachers from
public schools across the state have
been selected to participate in a
Governor's language Institute
French Abroad programeonducted
by ECU during July
State Iiblic Instruction super
intendentBobEthridgesaidhewas
pleased that funding tor the Ian
guage institutes had been contin-
ued tor 1991, the fourth year Of tho
program.
Second language teachers gain
invaluable experience in thoir tar
getlanguageduringtheseinstjtutes,
and have an opportunity to hone
their teaching skills he said. "I am
particularly pleased about the
French Abnwd Institute this year tuition, fees, lodging and meals
Hv living and working among na- are covered by a $79, Migrant from
live French people,ourteachers will the N. C State Department of Pub-
improve their own expertise and lie Instruction. Each teacher will also
our teachers will improve their own
expertise and their teaching abilities
Bob Ethridge
their teaching abilities
The French Abroad partici-
pants .ill ot whom have partici-
pated in previous Governor's Lan-
guage Institute summer programs,
include hth elementary and sec-
(indary vh� l teachers 1 eading the
group will be IV Martin Schwarz
(t the I � I' Department ol Foreign
Languages and I iteratures.
All thoir expenses travel.
receive six hours ot college credit
I hinng thoir month in France,
the teachers will take intensive
courses in conversational French
and French phonetics and method-
i fogy taught bv a French professor
and a course in French culture and
civilization taught bv Dr. Schwarz.
They will visit museums and
view BImsand operatic and theatri-
cal performances. Highlights will
be an excursion to Versa lilt
tnp on the Seine and joii
sians in Bastille I �av activibt
uly 14. While the program i has I
in Pans, thegroup will visit
in the liire Valley and thi
dials in Rheims and Chartres ' .
included is a tnp to Brus -
Amsterdam
l"he I rern h Abroad progi
one of three ' iovernor s �� ,
Institutes scheduled for thi;
and is theonly one tobi
foreign nation
Other 1991 pi
Spanish institute .itirei i
( ollege and a f rent h u I
Western arolina I ruv i
institutes ,ir- full immei
gramswithonh tht tai .� �
spoken
OLD
FASHIONED
Homemade
Yopirt
&
Sorbet
Open Daily
Ham -11pm
316 E 10th St
758-0000
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
i roe &onfidential
Sen u es v (Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 3rd Street
I ho I tv Building
(Ireenville i
I lours
Mon - Fri 8 JO :00
TriuRsdAy, June 27
5:00 pM CentraI Campus MaII
SpoNSOREd by tUe ECU SnjdENT Union PRodtciioN Commitihe
When Hiirrv
j
Student Stores
more tkanjart Soo�e
Mil Silllv
Monday, July 1
9.00 p.M. HfNdRIX TrIEATRE
Free AdiviissioN Wiih VAlid ECU StucJeist ID
SpoNsoREd by ECU SiudENT Unjon FUms CommIttee
STUDENT UNION
Come Explore Your
College Store!
�An Supplies
� ix V c ! ishing
� is i Mastercard
�( iitt Wrapping
� '� ik ti, Ac cesst i it n
�Film I )eveloping
�Spec ia! ()rdering of
B ks nor in stock
�( ireeting I 'ards
�Pii ate Imprinted Items
� !lass Rings
�IBM & Apple (Computers
� I ypewrtter Rental
�( 'aps 6i Cn wns
�( iraduation Announcements
�( nt' fradebooks Department
urn Swppiintkheocmpus,
We i meet ;ill your hook needs,
! ,r ! 'SEP and New.
for all classes'both
Undergraduate and Graduate!
ECU Student Stores: More then just books your dollars support student .scholars
Wrijjht Building Tclophonc:757-ti7il
Summer Hours: Monday - Thursday, 7: iOa.m 5p.m. Friday, 7: Ki.m11: iOa.m.
Outbursts o
� �
tftCNBS
NE
Catholic
WO!
Welcome Th
Invite You to
Campus
Summer S '
Sunday: 11:30am and
Weekdays I
Wednesday
ihe Center dau b1
757
Fr. Paul Va I
Hot & Hui
litat th
m �.
FOS
3003 s.
10th
Guess the number pieces!
in our Treasure Chest anj
Grand prize valued
No purchase necsarjrtj
r Shrimp, Shrimp
� Shrimp 5
� Small Shrimp �
I at lunch $2.99 J H
I Night Time Shrimp PUttersI ��
I Small $3.99 �
� Regular - $4.99 J
! Large $5.99
J Beverage not included � Bev�
Expires: 7-1-1 . 1





his summer
als
int from
I of Pub-
l will also
dge
redit
ranoe
ensive
I retvh
n eth
tnd
be an excursion to Versailles, a boat
rnp on the Seine and mining Pari-
sians in Rastille Pav activities on
luh 14 While the program is based
in Tans the group wl11 V1S1 castles
in the Loire Valley and the cathe-
drals m Rheims and QiSflKS, Also
included is a tnp to Brussels and
Amsterdam
The French Abroad pngram is
one of three t lovemor s language
Mes scheduled forttussuHvner
and is the only one lo be held in a
foreign nation
Other 1991 programs are a
spanssh institute at Greensboro
md a French institute at
stem Carolina University. All
�S are full immersion pro-
a the target language
(Bhe taut Carolinian June 27.1991 3
Outbursts of violence occur in downtown Chapel Hill
STUDENT UNION
Feast
CHAPEL HILL (AP) � Recent
violence, including gunfire during
a melee outside a downtown
nightclub, won't be tolerated in this
collegecommunity,Town Manager
Calvin Horton says.
"It's outrageous behavior and
we've got to find a way to stop it
Horton said Tuesday.
Chapel Hill police said asmany
as 800 people were involved in a
brawl on Franklin Street around 3
a.m. Tuesday after many of the
people had attended "DJ Dance
Night" at Cat's Cradle.
'It was an absolute mess said
police Capt. Ralph Pendergraph.
There were fights everywhere
Two people reported they were
shot at and two others were as-
saulted and treated for cuts and
bruises at University of North
Carolina Hospitals.
"A number of them were in-
volved in fights Pendergraphsaid.
"It got so out of control that one of
the businesses � Hardee's � was
forced to close
Just before 3 a.m Willis Alston
said he was attacked in a parking
lot. Police found a puddle of blood
in an alley near the Caf s Cradle,
then found Alston lyingnearby. He
had been beaten and kicked in the
head. He was taken to UNC Hos-
pitals, where he was treated and
released.
About the same time, police
were called to the same emergency
room, where a Raleigh man was
receiving stitches in the head after
beingattacked near theCat'sCradle
by five men. Robert Bynum Jr 21,
had been walking to his car when
the men pushed him down some
stairs and began to hit and kick him.
About 3 a.m Clare Pennix, 19,
of Chapel Hill, said she was driving
from the parking lot at Tarheel
Textbooks when a Honda with four
or five men inside blocked her way.
A passenger in the Honda pulled a
shotgun and fired at her car at close
range. No one was injured, but
damage to the car was estimated at
$1,200.
Craig D. Jones, 17, of Pittsboro,
reported that someone had shot at
him with a shotgun as he sat in a car
in the Hardee's parking lot. He was
11
ivtpis MaII
PRodlCTioN CoMMJTTEE
r
Electric Youth
Teraza Walston, an area
youth from Farmville, will
represent Pitt and Greene
Electric Membership
Corporation in Washington,
D.C with North Carolina"s
Rural Electric Tour.
Walston joins 43 other North
Carolina students and over
1,200 young people from
around the country.
Activities include
educational sessions, visits
with members of North
Carolina's congressional
delegation and various sight-
seeing tours.
not injured. The car received $700
damage, and another parked car
also was hit.
"There was no indication that
anyone knew the people doing the
shooting Pendergraph said. Police
have not made any arrests, but
Pendergraphsaid he wasconhdent
there would be some made.
Authorities said they weren't
sure what spurred the free-for-all.
"There seems to be no dis-
cernible reason for either the
shootings or the assaults
Pendergraph said. "There was a
high level of emohoninthecrowd
Gatherings oi y. g people in
the area have caused problems in
the past. On April 8, Veronica
Lashonne Foushee was shot and
killed by her boyfriend. Derrick
Chrome Noell, in the parking lot of
University Spare. Noell then shot
and killed himself.
After Apple Chill Street Fair in
April, police were called in to
monitor a large gathenng of young
people in the downtown area. Sev-
eral assaults were reported. One
man was taken to UNC Hospitals
for treatment of severe head injuries.
Lawsuit
when the tapes were requested,
Bumissaid thathe had thrown some
tapesaway and that requested tapes
were probably among them. In ad-
dition, he said that his copy of the
transcriptions of those tapes were
also missing.
During the auditors' inter-
views, they were told that DePuy,
Burrus, Midget teand Robersonheld
a meeting during the first week of
November I'WO. According to the
report, DePuy said that the reason
for the meeting was for them to get
their "ducks in a row
According to the report,
Roberson said that as a result of the
meeting, he felt that he would not
be used as a scapegoat. However,
he was the only employee involved
Continued from page 1
in the wiretapping formally disci-
plined for his actions.
Depuy also said that Richard
Brown, the Vice Chancellor for
Business Affairs, wasalsoinformed
of the taping, and approved further
investigation of Mills.
The auditor's report also men-
tioned that the Director of Human
Resources, Richard Ferns was also
involved or had knowledge con-
cerning the wiretapping.
Gaskins said that after deposi-
tions from Roberson and Midgette
aRnaken,additurul defendants will
be added to the lawsuit.
� � �
1
THEATRE
CU STldtNT ID
IION FilMS COMMJTTEE
STUDENT UNION
NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
Would like to
Welcome The Summer Students
and
Invite You to Join Us In Worship
Campus Massr Schedule
Summer Sessions May 19-JuIy 28
Sundav: 11:30am and 8:30pm at the Newman Center
Weekdays: 8:00am at the Newman center
Wednesdays: 8:00am and 5:30pm
For More information about these and other programs, call or visit
the Center daily between 8:30am and 11:00pm
953 East 10th St. (At the Foot of College Hill)
757-0376757-1991
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain & Campus Minister
Moo.
I lies
Wed.
Thm I
Kri
.Tar Landing Seafood
Ractaszaat
DAILY SPECIALS
Chicken Breast Sandwich v.ah .r .
French Fries S2 w
Fried Oysters Dinner Sf) lJ5
Sirloin Steak & Shrimp Sf u5
Snow Crab Legs
All U Can Eat$9.99
Counlr Fried Sleak S3.75
Snow Crab Logs
All-U-Can-Eat $9.99
Seafood Platter S8 4"
Shrimp & Rounder
Loach S4 25 ! Diana Sf 44
I VI I I I
I 1N"S
Vintage Clothing,
Jewelry, Collectibles,
Antiques, Furniture
)
United Way
FEELING LOW?
UNCERTAIN?
NEED HELP?
Why not com. by th� REAL Crlela Intervention Center: 312 E.
10th St; or call 758-HELP, For Free Confidential Counseling or As-
sistance.
Our Volunteers and Stalf are on duty 24 hrs. a day. year around,
�n order to assist you In virtually any problem area you might have.
Our longstanding goal has always been to preserve and enhance
the quality of life for you and our community.
Ue.ns.d And Accredited B, The Stele ot North Cerollne
All Vintage Clothing
50 otr
417 ft am V Mall
Dow ntow 11
752-1750
Bl Y SALE TRADE
Moil Sal 10 ?
� .�
REN S SHOES
W Savings
� up to 50!
Hot & Humid Blues?
Beat the Heat with
100 Cotton Sundresses, Shorts, Tanks,
T-shirts, Skins, ANightgowns.
Party j
�a
ricate
JVC
IMPORT SEVICE
Mexican Restaurant
Mon-Sat 10-6 Thurs 10-8
919 Redbanks Rd. Arlington Village
756-1058
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
3003 S. Evens 7S6-2Q11
Guess the number pieces of treasure
in our Treasure Chest and win prizes
Grand prize valued at 500,00
Before and After the Fireworks!
July 4th Specials
Lime Margaritas $2.50
Mexican Imports $1.25
Sample Platter $4.95
Visit our concession stand on the
Town Commons during the day
We service all foreign cars: BMW, Mercedes,
Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Saab, VW, Porshe, Volvo,
Subaru, Alfa Romero, Jaguar,
and all others
756-9434
McKtwCod
2204 Dickinson Ave.
SM0�$
larket
No purchase
to register
r Shrimp Shrimp, 1
Shrimp
Small Shrimp �
j at lunch $2.99 �
I Night Time Shrimp Platters!
I Small $3.99 �
I Regular - $4.99 J
� Large - $5.99 B
I Beverage not included .
� Expires: 7-1-01 �
1
Buy one �,
Regular Shrimp
Platter at I
$6.50 1
Get the 2nd �
Regular Shrimp
Platter i
FREE �
C
�.
Beverage not included .
�7-i-ox ;
757-1666
USED FURNITURE
LARGE SHOWROOM
GOOD SELECTION
BARGAIN PRICES
FREE DELIVERY
USED, NEW, LIKE NEW
The Estate Shop
416 Evans (Downtown)
Mon-Sat 9:30-1:002:00-5:00 752-3866





�he ?E�0t Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Matthew B. Skinner, Managing Editor
Gregory E. Jones, Director of Advertising
LeClair Harper, News Editor Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Matt King, Features Editor Larry Huggins, Circubtion Manager
Matt Mumma, Sports Editor Stuart Rosner, Systems Engineer
Steve Rod, Layout Manager JefF Parker, Staff Illustrator
Amy Edwards, Copy Editor Margie O'Shea, Classified Ads Technician
Kerry Nester, Copy Editor Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects ECU
students. During summer sessions. The East Carolinian publishes once a week with a circulation of 5,000. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of
view. Letters should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the
right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The EaslCarolinian, Publications Bldg
ECU, Greenville, N.C 27834. For more, call (919) 757-6366.
Recreation center a waste of money
In the summer or fall of 1992, construc-
tion will begin on a new student recreation
center. It will cost $18 million. When com-
pleted, the center will boast racquetball
courts, basketball courts, indoor and out-
door swimming pools, locker rooms and a
lounge.
Planners, which include Vice Chancel-
lor of Student Life Dr. Alfred Matthews and
Student Government Association President
Alex Martin, have not decided upon a loca-
tion for the building. Two locations are con-
sidered: near Minges Coliseum and near
Mendenhall Student Center.
The idea of the center, although seem-
ingly well-intended, is fallacious. The cost
will be covered in part by a $20 increase in
student fees. Students who will never see
the building's construction will pay for it.
Students who will never see the completed
building will pay for it's construction. Stu-
dents who will never use the building's
facilities will pay as well.
Forty dollars � two semesters of the
charge � is not much to some people. But
for students, $40 can buy a month's worth of
groceries, a share of a power bill or part of a
semester's book fees.
That $40 can even pay for more than half
of a $70 parking sticker for 1991-92.
That the most likely sites for the center
are either Mendenhall or Minges is ridicu-
lous.
There is no room for another building
in the Mendenhall area, unless administra-
tors plan to build the center on top of park-
ing lots � which would worsen the already
sour situation of parking on campus. The
building won't fit near Mendenhall.
The other most likely site�near Minges
� would only improve the "country club"
the University has built for athletes in the
Minges area.
Of course, building the center at Minges
would be a nice selling point in recruiting
athletes.
"After practice is over recruiters could
say, "you can take a dip in the outdoor pool.
If it's raining, you can swim inside, or lounge
in the lounge
Most of the facilities planned for the
new center are already in Minges and the
Sports Medicine Building. If administrators
feel there is not enough recreational space
available for students in Minges, perhaps
they should open the weight room in the
Sports Medicine Building to all students.
Granted, there is a need for more rac-
quetball courts on campus, but for $18 mil-
lion, are they worth it? We think not.
To $e� wHat
Letters To The Editor
Abortion column
loses point
in argument
On June 19 The East Carolin-
ian printed an editorial written by
editorial columnist John Carter.
Throughout the column Carter
argued that abortion is an act of
murder.
However, in the second to
last paragraph Carter weakened
his argument by stating that
abortion is not murderous if a
woman has been a victim of rape
or incest. If abortion is murder, (as
Carter insists) isn't any abortion
considered murder?
Murder is murder; so what
is the difference if a rape has been
committed or a birth control de-
vise fails? An innocent child is still
being killed.
Although I disagree with
most arguments made by anti-
abortionists, the argument that an
abortion is murder in some cases,
but not in others is the ultimate
paradox.
Leslie Liedel
Graduate Student
History
Writer should
notice the
other side
There was an article in the
June 19 issue of The East Carolinian
that I thought was written in a
very poor judgement. It concerned
promoting abstinence instead of
abortion written by John Carter.
Mr. Carter's opinions were
very narrow-minded. Tell him to
wake up � this is the '90s!
I do have my own personal
reasons to disagree with this ar-
ticle. I had an abortion almost a
year ago and I will tell Mr. Carter
that I paid for my own abortion,
his tax dollars DID NOT! I will
also tell him that until then I too
didn't approve of abortion but I
had to change my mind and con-
sider all my options since I was
still in school. It wan a very painful
decision and to this day I wonder
how my life would be had I car-
ried my baby to term. I'll never
know but I will always wonder.
Mr. Carter, you cannot say
that you do not approve of abor-
tion wholeheartedly. You won't
know what you believe until you
are caught in that situation!
Name withheld by request
No change in
pay rate for
grad students
On Wednesday, 19 June
1991, The East Carolinian reported
that "Graduate assistants in the
department sic of English will
receive a cut in pay while the
work load will remain the same
While there are some problems
with the new payroll policies for
graduate assistants, let me assure
you that the English Department
is paying students virtually the
same amount per duty for the 1991 -
1992 year as we paid for the 1990-
1991 year.
Dr. C. W. Sullivan
Director
Graduate Studies in English
The Other Side
Rapists deserve death penalty
By John Carter
Editorial Columnist
Did you ever stop to think
about rape? It could happen to
you. It could happen to your best
friend, your sister, or your girl-
friend. Once it happens, it is too
late to prevent it. The victim can-
not erase the dreadful memories
and suffers for the rest of their life
while the culprit is sentenced to
only a few years, if any at all. One
out of four women will be raped.
Look around. Who will it be?
In 1989, ECU had four re-
ported rapes or attempted rapes.
According to the 1989 North Caro-
lina Uniform Crime Report, North
Carolina-run u ni versi ties reported
nine rapes. These statistics are the
most recent and do not distinguish
between rapes occurring more here
or if they are reported more here. I
hope the latter is true. There is
absolutely nothing that law en-
forcement officials can do about a
rape that is not reported. If it hap-
pens to you, call someone. If you
feel that voucannotdiscussit with
J
Public Safety or the police depart-
ment, call the Real Crisis Center.
They know what you are going
through and they have the ability
to help. That is why they are vol-
unteers.
In the past, it has been diffi-
cult to convict accuse rapists. Our
legal system has finally come to its
senses. Juries are realizing the se-
riousness of this violent crime and
are returning more and more
guilty verdicts. This cannot hap-
pen if it is not reported.
Ladies, I wish I could say
that if you are raped, it is your
own fault. Then I could tell you
what vou did wrong. Eventually,
women would quit doing these
things and rape disappear. It is
not your fault. It is the fault of a
sick mind that desires to commit
violent acts towards females. Pro-
voca rive dress isn't the cause. Eld-
erly women are raped in nursing
homes frequently. Beauty is not a
reason for rape.
Walking alone at night in a
poorly lit area does cause it. The
rapist is there and wants a victim
� someone in the wrong place at
the wrong time. The rapist sees a
victim and he can do whatever he
wants.
According to ECU public
safety official Ron Avery, the best
thing you can do to prevent be-
coming a victim is to take precau-
tions. He said not to walk alone in
the darkand to use common sense.
If you do not believe in
tal punishment, then you rru)
agree with what I am about to sav
Rape is a worse crime than mur-
der, yet, wesentence murderer
death and release rapists. Theoniv
way to stop crimes is to make the
punishment severe enough to re-
move the person's desire to com-
mit that enme. Most states allow
the death penalty for people con-
victed of first degree murder
North Carolina has a tendem �� �
not execute the people it has -
death row, and North Carolina
has a high murder rate Florida
executes people quite often
Florida has a low murder rate
Punishment works when it is ac-
tually applied.
Rape affects the victim for
the rest of her life. Psycholcj
cally, it is devastating. She ma
never again trust or feel relaxed
around men. The memories ne er
go awav. For a murder victim, it is
over. There is no more mental tor
ment for the actual victim. So, it
rape is so much worse on the vic-
tim, why not make rapists suh)i:t
to the death penalty? Death is the
ultimate deterrent.
At least if you execute a rap-
ist, he will never rape another per
son.
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Federal government policies blow smoke
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
I know, I know: it's a waste
of time to criticize government
policies on the grounds that they
don't make sense. This is because
so few of them are ever instituted
in the first place on the grounds
that they make sense; most are a
result of a confluence of various
political expediencies and inter-
ests, as opposed to being intended
for anything as silly as the general
welfare.
Though I know this, one
thing or another still gets under
my skin once in a while. This week,
it was the Bush administration's
reaction to a recently released fed-
eral study.
The study showed that
smokers' kids were more likely to
be in poorer health than children
of former smokers and children
whose parents had never smoked.
Surgeon General Dr. Lewis
Sullivan pounced on the results at
once, imploringsmokers with chil-
dren to stop smoking because the
study proved that the parents'
smoking made their kids un-
healthy.
He must have been kidding,
though he sure didn't seem to be.
Even assuming the government-
financed study is accurate � no
small leap of faith, sad to say �
the study hardly shows what
Sullivan seems to think it does.
Like Dr. Sullivan himself, the
study neglects the far more plau-
sible explanation that smokers
tend to be less healthy people than
non-smokers anyway, even leav-
ing aside the effects of their smok-
ing habits. In short people who
are concerned for their health
probably don't smoke. (Here's a
simple exercise: consider a three-
mi le-a-day jogger who assessesthe
nutritional value of everything he
eats, carefully tracks his choles-
terol level, and also smokes. Now
select the one characteristic that
does not fit in with the others.)
Ifs reasonable to suppose
further that children living with
their parents are likely to have
health habits similar to their par-
ents' �if the parents eat Twinkies
between meals, so do the kids �
regardless of whether the kids ac-
tually smoke. Hence, common
sense alone finds a correlation be-
tween smoking parents and un-
healthy kids, but nothing estab-
lishes a causation.
Now, in my opinion, it's a
good idea for parents not to smoke
around their children � such
smoking seems plenty irrespon-
sible, in fact, in light of the well-
known health effects of second-
hand smoke. But this study shows
nothing of the kind � that is, it
demonstrates no potential smok-
ing-related health problems for the
children of smokers, no causal link
between smoking and health.
However irresponsible those
smoking parents might be,
Sullivan is still more irresponsible,
for even the lowest moron among
the smokers is capable of discern-
ing the gaping holes in whatever
Sullivan uses in place of reason-
ing, and the most rudimentary un-
derstanding of human psychol-
ogy would inform the good doc-
tor that saying such transparently
stupid things undermines any re-
spect his audience might have for
him.
Sullivan's sally against
smokers is but the latest in a siege
begun by Sullivan's predecessor.
Dr. C. Everett Koop, who had the
saving grace of comparative intel-
lectual honesty. The federal line is
now, and has long been, that smok-
ing is a Bad Thing which ought to
be stopped. This is all well and
good, as long as the government
doesn't attempt prohibition of
smoking; and they have not yet
attempted this.
But the government7 s relent-
less yowling is beginning to grate.
Evidently, they're trying to create
a social climate in which anti-
smoking legislation may safely be
passed. That's unpleasant, but it
too is just tolerable, under the guise
of leadership � provided that in
the process they stick to the facts,
since, presumably, given open and
honest discussion, the best policy
will win.
What cannot be allowed is
the government's bending facts to
fit its rhetoric, plugging the square
facts into its propaganda's round
holes. Sullivan's publiccomment
on this study are the first evidence
I've seen that the government has
gone to this extreme on this issue
� although they're always doing
it with other matters � and if ever
there were a time to put a stop to it,
that time is surely now.
The best way to stop it is to
be more tolerant than your gov-
ernment is trying to convince you
you should be. If other people want
to smoke, let them smoke; if, like
me, you do not smoke and are
allergic to it, politely ask nearby
smokers to stop. (And stick to non-
smoking sections when possible,
naturally�surely these are Ralph
Nader's greatest gift to human-
ity.) I've found that very few smok-
ers fit the stereotype of rude folks
who'll tell you to buzz off when
you ask them to stop smoking,
when I have been polite and con-
siderate in my request, they have
generally been polite and consid-
erate in their response.
The government's apparent
desire to end smoking altogether
would be forgivable, indeed al-
most laudable, if it were based on
a genuine concern for the health
effects of second-hand smoke on
non-smokers. But it isn't. They of-
ten clothe their talk in the infuriat-
ingly paternalistic terms of saving
smokers from themselves, but no
such altruistic motive guides their
hand.
No, the real objection is that
smoking creates unpleasant odors
of which society wishes to rid it-
self, and this particular air pollu-
tion is attacked with a verve that
the government ought more rea-
sonably to apply to its presently
lackluster efforts to stem the far
moreoffensiveand hazardous pol-
lutions given off by factories and
automobiles. But again I forget
myself: that would make sense.
Junl27. 1991
ADVERTISING RATESSERVICES OF
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( HOI ARSHH'S j 1 1
1st 2 words Forsruderts � Non-students - i Each additional v v. Please notify 'hi . � ately if your ad will not be res rect ads after tl lication All classified be pre-paid W peser � �� torejectanyadf � andor bad taste 1 rate -sororities MUSI �� - �� Greek letters You vourname, addn-s-ber, and ID number. SUM Ml K DEADUN&MQNDAYtOOm
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J


I
A
Mr. Editor's note: We know
those this summer, have all beenj
time: our staff illustrator skipped!
us high and dry. Honest.
By the way. one of these comi
nationally-syndicated strip. There!
don't call us to complain. Were
how to make life hard for people
"Highlander" anyway. So there.
Just read and remember how
laugh this time. Pirate Comics w;
199K�
Outlander





eath penalty
do not believe in capi-
hment, then you may not
� vMth hat lam about tosav
- s a worse crime than mur-
� v( st n tence murderers to
ase rapists. Theonly
top rimes is to make the
ent severe enough to re-
p rson s desire to com-
that crime Mosl states allow
h penalty tor people con-
' degree murder.
ina has a tendency to
the people it has on
ind North Carolina
murder rate. Florida
pie quite often.
is .1 low murder rate
works when it is ac-
� iffects the victim for
rest of her lite. Psychologi-
vastating. She mav
rust or fed relaxed
eti rhe memories never
� r a murder victim, it is
- no more mental tor-
tctual victim. So, if
much worse on the vie-
to) not make rapists subject
leath penalty? Death is the
renl
east if you execute a rap-
rrapeanotherper-
er Hammer
olicies blow smoke

thai
" ten rial - .
loblemsf �
� � . link
i health
I portable those
might be,
irresponsible,
toron among
leof discern-
in whatever
Jce of reason-
limentaryun-
"ian psychol-
he good doc-
pansparentlv
nines anv re
Jghthave for
jlly against
jtest in a siege
1 predecessor,
who had the
irativeintel-
federallineis
n,thatsmok-
Juch ought to
�all well and
I government
)hibition of
ave not yet
?nfs relent-
ing to grate.
ng to create
'hich anti-
�y safely be
isant, but it
ier the guise
Hded that in
to the facts.
I resumably,givenopenand
' : - ission, the best policv
�hrit cannot be allowed is
'iment'sbending facts to
"u. plugging thesquare
"� Isinti its propaganda's round
v SullivanSpubliccomments
hisstu i v a re the first evidence
it the government has
this extreme on this issue
although they're always doing
th t her matters� andifever
� a time to put a stop to it,
me is surely now.
best way to stop it is to
i re tolerant than vour gov-
ernment is trying toconvince you
should be If other people want
' smoke, let them smoke; if, like
me, you do not smoke and are
allergic to it, politely ask nearby
smokers to stop (And stick to non-
smoking sections when possible,
naturally - surely theseare Ralph
Nader's greatest gift to human-
ity I've found that very few smok-
ers fit the stereotype of rude folks
who'll tell you to buzz off when
you ask them to stop smoking;
when 1 have been polite and con-
siderate in my request, they have
generally been polite and consid-
erate in their response.
The government's apparent
desire to end smoking altogether
would be forgivable, indeed al-
most laudable, if it were based on
a genuine concern for the health
effects of second-hand smoke on
non-smokers But it isn't. They of-
ten clothe their talk in the infuriat-
mgly paternalistic terms of saving
smokers from themselves, but no
such altruistic mob ve guides their
hand.
No, the real objection is that
smoking creates unpleasant odors
of which society wishes to rid it-
self, and this particular air pollu-
tion is attacked with a verve that
the government ought more rea-
sonably to apply to its presently
lackluster efforts to stem the far
moreoffensiveand hazardous pol-
lutions given off by factories and
automobiles. But again I forget
myself: that would make sense.
SH?g iEaflt (Earalfman
5
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AD RATES
1st 25 words:
For students$2.00
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Each additional word$.05
Please notify the paper immedi-
ately it vour ad is incorrect. We
will not be responsible for incor-
rect ads after the first dav of pub-
lication. All classified ads MUST
i pre paid.We reserve the right
� ect any ad for libel, obscenity,
and or bad taste.Fratemitiesand
sororities MUST write out all
( reek letters. You must fill out
�ur name, address, phone num-
tx r and ID number. SUMMER
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SERVICES OFFERED
TYPING SERVICES: Term Papers,
Reports, Resumes, Letters. Fast turn-
around! Laser Printer. Call 756-1783.
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SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE:
from private sector (up to $20,000
yr.). Call 24 - hr. message for more
details: 213-964-4166, ext. 95. No grade
or income restrictions. All majors.
FOR SALE
WANTED: Musical Instruments for
consignment sales: guitars - banjos -
mandolins - violins - cellos - bass -
horns- amps - keyboards - drums.
Cilbe rfs Music, 2711 E. 10th St. 757-
2667. 20 commission cost. Jim and
Debbie.
MUSIC STUDENTS: 40 discount
to you if you order non-stocked items.
We order diavt from warehouse. Ex-
FOR SALE
ample: $800 horn - You pay $480 plus
$6 shipping plus $24 tax - Total $510.
Gilberts Music, 2711 E 10th St, Green-
ville. 757-2667.
FOR SALE: Kitchen table and chairs.
$25.00. Call 830-6997.
FOR SALE: Pet kingsnake, very
gentle, $40.00. With 20 gallon tank
and heat rock, $80.00.
FENDER AMP: 40 watts per chan-
nel, excellent tone, great reverb, all at
a quality price. $300.00. Call the
Sethster at 757-2597.
FOR SALE: 20 gallon tank with all
accessories, plusfish,S50.00. JVC tape
FOR SALE
deck, $30.00. End table, TV stand and
10 gallon tank, $10.00 each. Call 830-
3904 after 6:00 pm.
COMPUTER: Tandy 1400LTLaptop.
640 K-RAM, Dual 3.5" 720K floppy
drives. Plug-in or battery operated. 1
serial and 1 parallel parts, part for
external dnve. Many other extras.
$500.00. 756-7572.
PERSONAL
THE ACTORS MEDIUM PRE-
SENTS: "A Prayer For My Daugh ter"
at The New Deli, Sunday June 30,
Monday July 1 at 8:00 pm. FREE
ADMISSION.
FOR RENT
EASY-GOING FEMALE: (1st yr
grad) wanting to move in with 1 or 2
other female students, preferably
duplex in August. Please call Sarah
collect at (919) 933-0073.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom apartment.
River Bluff, $250 montn, half rice
deal for July, low utilities, call David
at 757-2597.
TWO BEDROOM FURNISHED
APT: $195 per month (or less for im-
provement work). Rustic, secluded,
private (4 miles out). Want 2 or 3
serious upperclassman or grad stu-
dent (no drugs, etc.) next to church.
(919)584-4848.
FOR RENT
Sell it in the
Classifieds.
RECYCLE THIS
NEWSPAPER
Ringgold Towers
Now Taking leases for August
1991 - i Bedroom, 2 Bedroom,
& Efficiency Apartments
CALL 752-2865
� Beautiful Place la Live
�Ml New
�And Koid R ��
IMVERSITYAFARTMKMS
2899 I. Sh Si re. 1
�1 pealed New l-i I
�Near Major Shopping i men
��Vriftv From Ihhvtas I'alrol S
I imiird Offer 53O0 n ml
( xtnucl J ! f I immj V, Mi.li'
F56 '815 oc830 I 13
Office open pi 8,12-5 JOpro
�AZALEA GARDENS
(lean an�l uuwt QDC t s ��.
Cnerg) c f! K EM fac -�:r I W w -r- - -
��Me TV OOffel � � ,(-� � a
���III� M tBI 1 r 'Ml kr N I
NMjM Apartmrni and mohiic hiajWl � �
.irnxncajRr Vi.c ' .
(vnutiJ I urTamtn) William!
'56 '815
Hmv:m:4m:


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jnkatkm SUMMER DEADLINE MONDAY, 4:00 PM.
NEWMAN CLUB
The Newman Catholic Student Cen-
ter invites you to join us for worship.
Summer Session Sunday Mass
Schedule: ll:30amand8:30pmatthe
Newman Center, 953 E 10th St (757-
3760757-1991).
BEACH VOLLEYBALL
REGISTRATION
Register your men's, women's or co-
ed beach vollevball team together July
8 at 4:00 pm in Biology N-102. Recre-
ational Services is hosting the second
session tournament for all faculty,
staff and students. Individuals are
encouraged to sign up. For details,
call 757-6387.
CKJj2Q BASKETBAIL
REGISTRATION
Get ail in the pool iiis summer and
sign up for Co-rec water basketball.
Registration for intramural H-iO
basketball will be held July 2,4:30 pot
For details call 757-6387 or stop by 204
Chnstenburv Gvmnasium.
2ND SUMMER SOFTBALL
REGISTR TION
Sign up your team or register as a
individual July 2 at 4:00 pm in Biol
ogy N-102 for intramural Softball
For details call 757-6387 or stop by the
Rec Servi ces of f i cc i n 2( V4 Ch nste nbu w
Gvm.
Good luck to the brave souls attempting 2nd summer session
By Koss and Reid
&
Mr. Editor's note: We know, we know. These cartoons, like all
those this summer, have all been printed before. Our excuse this
time: our staff illustrator skipped town for the sunny tropics and left
us high and dry. Honest.
By the way, one of these comics is an obvious rip off of a
nationally-syndicated strip. There is no copyright infringement, so
don't call us to complain. We're much too busy trying to think up
how to make life hard for people we don't like. And we liked
"Highlander" anyway. So there.
Just read and remember how much you laughed last time; try to
laugh this time. Pirate Comics will return, hopefully in the fall of
1991
Outlander
By Reid 2
Af s-rmp coNTiHutf Mf Bat. lCAR
ftitfv
�35ri
�ffi
�$&7
Trlt $VOCeNHtr CC�tTiM0e
Chums
T





I
fflhg gout fltnrnltnfan
June 27,1991 U
Waldo-Mani
Microscopic
By Matt King
Features Editor
Carbondioxideistheoneofthe
main culprits that is leading to an
overall warning oi the earth's sur-
face. Carbon dioxide is the gas that
humans and most other animals on
theplanetexhalcduring respiration.
Like animals use oxygen to
fortify theirbkxxi. plants use carbon
d loxide to enrich their visceral fluid.
So, when a rain forest is cut down to
clear a spot of land, that much less
vegetation is taken out of the battle population is nearly nonexistent
Believe it or not the answer to
slowing down the gradual warming
of the planet could lie in one of its
most barren places.
The waters off the Antarctic
coast harbor extremely large
amounts of phytoplankton; tiny
plants that are the first step in the
marine food chain.
Because these phytoplankton
are plants they do absorb carbon
dioxideachvely in their lifeprocess.
Several miles of the coast of
Antarctica the phytoplankton
Theoffshore waters are mainly aimed at the enhancement of phy-
nutrient rich waters, except for the toplankton production may turn.out
presence of iron. Scientists noticed to be the most feasible method.of
The correlation and created con- stimulatingachveremovalofcarbon
trolledconditions(Uboratory)totest dioxide from the atmosphere, if the
phytoplankton growth at various need arises says Martin,
ron levels Coastal waters of all continents
The phytoplankton did repro- contain a high levels of nitrates and
duce much quicker in the iron and phosphates and a good amount of
nutrient rich waters than in the iron. The nutrients get into the wa-

IE '
Hi,

By ARS
Information Services
Beat it Bart, move over Mario
Brothers, "lx-nay in)a Turtles
It's Waldo, the bespectacled traveler
who's got everyone from nursery
schools to nursing homes in hot
pursuit.
With four books on the New
York Times best seller list, Waldo,
who has a tendency for getting lost
in his surrounding, has become
the object of an international hunt
against global warming.
Scientists at Moss Landing
Laboratories in Monterey, Calif,
think that they may have found a
way to accelerate carbon dioxide
consumption and fight the green
There is something else that
variesabout thecoastal and off shore
waters of the Antarctic continent.
The coastal waters contain high
waters were iron poor. As more
phytoplankton appeared in the test
situations, more carbon dioxide was
aspirated.
What does all this have to do
with global warming?
Dr. John H. Martin of the Moss
Laboratories suggest that we should
ter off the land.
But, the open waters of other
land massesdo not have high nutri-
ent levels, nor do they hold marked
levels of iron.
Because of a process called up-
welling the offshore waters of Ant-
arctica contain atypically high lev-
els of nutrients, compared with
fertilize the offshore waters of Ant
ZZZZZ pun, growing Uca to sH.uUte e grow of Mj�-
SSL 'r0n' 5�?2X�-�- ��� "
ho�o Coort��y o� Mom Landing Mvtn. 111 I ' �
This barren backdrop may be the heated battlefield of gobal warm.ng
consumption and fight the green- nutrients i.Ke .run, �.�� � -��� rir0n fertilization growth is iron. iwmwmmmumm � 1 J
Smke Lee continues sublime shot at reality
By Kendal Vance
Staff Writer
buvcr for Bloomingdales.
They live with their daughter
Ming (Veronica Timbers) in an up-
per middle class neighborhood
Adulterv, racism, drugs, vio-
lence and sex are but just a few of populated by mostly African-
the demons that fly forth from Amencans.
Photo eeutMy o Unhr��l Ptetur
Pandora's Box in Spike Lee's latest,
"Jungle Fever
In order to focus on the real
issues in "Jungle Fever his charac-
ters are sometimes portrayed in
over-simplified, stereo typical
products of their class genres.
However, the actors portray
their personalities through the
problems presented, with such
sincerity that these generalizations
do not matter.
Flipper Punfy (Wesley Snipes)
is conveyed as a happily married
black man from Harlem trying to
work his way up in an accounting
firm in "WhiteCorporate America
His wife Drew (Lonerte McKee) is a
There is not one, but several
One of the partners statesWe
hire on the basis of qualification
and competency alone, anything
else would be reverse discrimina-
tion
Which is a valid argument but
there is still a shadow of doubt and
antagonists in this movie. Hip is Hip asks accusingly, 'Whyamlthe
struecling to attain the respect and only person of color in this office?
appreciation for his hard work and The question ,s left hanging in the
dedication to the firm which is run air.
by two white yuppies.
He is about to request a part-
nership and it is clear that he is a
force in the upward mobility of this
company.
Then he meets Angie, a white
Italian Roman Catholic girl from
Bensonhurst, who has just been as-
signed to Hip as a temporary. At
first Hip is irritated at having been
Spike Lee opens sensitive is-
sues designated to inspire debate
and leaves theconclusionsdangling
in the wind perhaps to mate some
self investigative thought for every
viewer black or white.
Theircunosity feeds upon the
fact that people always want what
they think they cannot have or are
not supposed to have. Eventually,
assigned a white secretarv when he after a few nights of working late at
had specifically requested an Afri- theofficeandafewtakeoutdinners
can-American curiosity leads Flip and Angie to
give in to temptat
Both Flip and Angie make
mistake of confiding their secret -
their fnends. Hip to Cyrus (Spike
Lee) who sums the whole thing up
aslustor "Jungle Fever Eventually
someone lets the cat out of the bag
and lovalfies are divided when the
issue of adulterv merges with race.
The tension snowballs and esca-
lates into an explosion of prerudiv -
racism, bigotry and hatred
The fact that Hip has commit-
ted adultery �temporarily thrown
aside when Drew learns that
woman is white.
Drew's mother was black and
father was white and ever since
childhood was subjected to foul
mouthed derogatorv descriptions
about her skintone She, therefore is
somewhat and rightfully hyper-
sensitive. This is a particular blow
see Spike, page 7
Wnter-ditector-actor, Spike Lee spreads "Jungle Fever this summer.
threatens motion picture content
By Michael Harrison
Staff Writer
Censorship is a word that af-
fects everyone in every comer of
this country.
The problems surfacing about
suggestive and sometimes graphic
1vt.cs that depict sexual relations
andor violence are considered by
many people to be excessive.
Popular music, 900-telephone
numbers, artworks, live perfor-
mances and even comic books,
along with other forms of expres-
sion, have been targeted for attacks.
People in the motion picture
industry have been fighting a battle
with censorship for decades. In the Over the years, many movies
192as threatsof federal censorship, challenged Code provisions, espe-
a strengthening of local and state dally those dealing with sex, adul-
censor boardsand the further threat tery and profanity, but these moy-
of a nationwide Catholic boycott
frightened the movie capital.
To deal with this problem,
company presidents formed the
Production Code Administration,
ies appeared to have no far-reach-
ing effects.
When David O. Selznick was
acter Leslie Crosbv, cheating on not be depicted as being acceptable
herhusband. Heremotional turmoil or common. Passionate love scenes
by the end of the picture wasn't could not be used unless they were
enough to appease censors. The essential to the plot. Lustful and
ending had to be added where excessive kissing and embraces
Crosby was murdered by the wife couldn't be shown, nor suggestive
of the man with whom she had
filming "Gone With the Wind the shared the adulterous relationship
Production Code forbade Clark
whichaiiicklvbecameasimportant Gable to say "damn Selznick
tomovie-makingasthesoundstage, pushed the issue with the censors
scenery, props and actors
Dr. James Holte is a professor
of a film history course at ECU.
"After 1930, good always defeated
evil in movies he said. "Sex and
drugs were forbidden by the Hays
Code, as well asprofane language
Gable was finally allowed to say
"damn but Selznick was fined
$5,000. Nevertheless, it was
Sclznick's victory for he had man-
aged to by-pass the censors.
The 1940 film version of "The
Letter" showed Bette Davis' char-
FormurderingCrosby, the wife and
her accomplice were found by a
policeman at the end of the filmand
taken away. Punishment for all the
crimes was sufficient, the censors
said, and the picture was then
wrapped.
When it came to sex, the Code
upheld the "institution of marriage
and the home Casual sex could
gestures and postures.
White-slavery, interracial
sexual relations, talk of sex hygiene
and venereal disease were forbid-
den. Scenes of childbirth, even in
silhouette, were never allowed, ei-
ther. Nevertheless, changes would
eventually be made.
Producer Otto Preminger re-
leased the romantic comedy 'The
Moon Is Blue" m 1953. Censors an-
nounced the picture would be re-
Wednesday
Ptocpes5Ne Dance Mgt
10 Draft
$ 1.15 Tall Boys1.00 Kamikazes
�Ladies Free til 10:30
��&
Thursday
Bucket Light Night
5 bottles for $4.00!
$ 1.15 Tall Boys 1.25 Imports
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Ladi�sfr2�i
2ZZE
every Tuesday Night get o FR6�
Comedy Zone Pass, to the flttic.
and BUY ONE-
GET ONE FREE!
-a complete professional eye exam for $29
AND
-Buy ane pair of glasses at regular price
and get a second pair free
Call our office to schedule your $29 eye exam, or Just stop
by to check out our wide selection of frames.
Offer valid through August 30.1991.
Somerstricttwapply. (tactknsaamardcortaBcsrrttrriudcdatteprtet.
OnOMCTWC
�Y�CAR�C�Hl�R
PA
YOU'LL UKE THE WAT WE CAM FOR YOUR ETES
� 703 B. Greenville Blvd. Dr.uwUL.
�S�? 756-4204
Optician
Casey
Optometrist
Open Monday & Wednesday 9 to 7
Tuesday. Thursday Be Friday 9 to 6
Closed Saturday
Dressed in a red anl
striped t-shirt, blue jeanj
Mocking cap, the wiry
travels a book's pages entd
one worlds populated by hi
of cartoon creatures. Fir
and finding him fast
cmwded scene is the kej
craze compared by some ti
a needle in a haystack.
From the moment h
from the pen of Bnhsh 11
Martin Handford and M
store shelves m 1987, W
captivated fans whoa tsfl
Spjke
Continued from page 6
to her self-esteem and her (i mstanl
upward battle to attain a teeli:
belonging
The incident opens up a 'war
council" in Drew's livingroom Not
only is this a man-hashing sessa m
put it also addresses the fad
there is prejudice within the I
race of darker and lighter skin
ors. But, bv the end of the session,
tired of venting her frustration,
Drew says, "It doesn't matter
color she is, I don't hae my man '
jected unless six lines were changed
The words "virgin "seduce" and
"pregnant" were found to be ob-
jectionable, as well as the phrase
"You are shallow, cynical, selfish
and immoral, and I like you No
one could be immoral and likeable
at the same time, according to the
Production Code.
Preminger refused to change
the script, insisting the Code was
"antiquated" and saying he telt
other pictures that should be seen
as more objectionable were ap-
proved.
Preminger later commented: 1
am not a crusader or anything like
see Content, page 7
Suddenly everyone
thrown into turmoil, fit
home to find his under!
bought wife thro win
iongjns out ot the third !
dow to the bums and vaj
k �w
Angie is beater I i
bv her violet t, 1
until this point �
toservebkeadurifuh i
her out and disowns he
is she not the virgin her Cj
harshly enforces
Content
Continued from page 6
that, but it gives me great ptea
to fight for my rights '� n t
fight for vour rights, vou lose them
We have not only the right, but trie
duty to defend this right of tree
expression, because ii this nht
detenorates, that is the hrst step I
dictatorship, to totalitarian gov-
ernment
Ceraorsof 'The1 Moon is Blue"
faced an enormous defeat, despite
tireless efforts to suppress the tilm
the movie was screened in BjOO
theaters and gmssed more than $b
million. Cntics liked it, calling it "as
pure as Goldilocks" and Never
once m bad taste
Next came the screen adapta-
tion of Edward Albee s "Who s
Afraid of Virginia Woo?" an lr�.
seriously ehallerv
irtiry pro �
I"hose involved ir t
lion of "V irpp.ia Woo
the film could not
Production ode Thepa
biasphemv were ' � I
nallv it was decided thJ
be shown to "mature h)
Midnight Cowl
later, in 1970. It was j
rating bv United Artis
panv that distributed
bityest picture to be
rating
Censors gave
Cowboy an "R" ratinl
arttr its premiere, and
now hailed bv critics
classic and a main
moving the mencal
Saturday
O
��The Home o
Universal
14th &
757





I
16
nifte gaBt (EarflHman
June 27,1991 L
Waldo-Mani
Microscopic
By Matt King
Features Fdilor
Theoffshore watersarema.nly aimed at the enhancement of Phy-
as-n aap'ss kssekeses
v ait�nd�xkleisrheoneofthe
main culprits that is leading to an
overall warming o( the earth's sur-
face. Carbon dioxide is the gas that
humans and most other animals on
theplanetexhaleduring respiration.
I ike animals use oxygen to
fortifytheirblood plantsusecarbon
dioxide toenrkh their visceral fluid.
s i w hen a ram forest iscutdown to
clear a spot of land, that much less
vegetation is taken out of the Kittle
against global warming
Scientists at Moss I anding
Laboratories in Monterey, Calif
think that they may have found a
way to accelerate carbon dioxide
consumption and tight the green-
house effect.
of the planet could lie in one of its
most barren places.
The waters off the Antarctic
coast harbor extremely large
amounts of phytoplankton; tiny
plants that are the first step in the
marine hxxl chain.
Because these phvtoplankton
are plants they do absorb carbon
diovideactivcly in their lifeprocess.
Several miles of the coast of
Antarctica the phytoplankton
population is nearly nonexistent.
rhere is something else that
vanesaboutthecoastalandotfshin'
waters of the Antarctic continent.
The coastal waters contain high
concentrations of plant growing
nutrients like iron, nitrates and
phosphates
presence of iron. Scientists noticed
the correlation and created con-
trolled conditions(laboratory) to test
phytoplankton growth at various
iron levels.
The phytoplankton did repro-
to be the most feasible methcxi of
stimulating active n-moval of carbon
dioxide from the atmosphere, if the
need arises says Martin.
Coastal waters of all continents
contain a high levels of nitrates and


By ARS
Informatiun Services
Beat it Bart, mow .� � Mane
Brothers, "U run" Ninja ! u
fsWakk,thebespe
who's got everyone from n
Is '
pursuit

I.
duce much quicker in the iron and phosphates and a good amount of
nutnent nch waters than in the
waters were iron poor. As more
phytoplankton appeared in the test
situations, morecarbondioxide was
aspirated.
What does all this have to do
with global warming?
Dr. John H. Martin of the Moss
La bora tones suggest that we should
fertilize the offshore waters of Ant-
arctica to stimulate the growth of
these microscopic plants
"Oceanic iron fertilization
iron. The nutrients get into the wa-
ter off the land.
But, the open waters of other
land massesdonot have high nutri-
ent levels, nor do they hold marked
levels of iron.
Because of a process called up-
welling the offshore waters of Ant-
arctica contain atypically high lev-
els of nutrients, compared with
other open waters. All these waters
need to induce phvtoplankton
growth is iron.
VV1H 3 f v ' ' '
schools to nursing home
pursuit
With four books oi
Y ork Times best seller li� I A
who has a tendency f rrgetunj
in his surround
the object of an international hunt
Spike
Pho�o CourtMY of Mom L.nd.r M.rln. laboratory
Thts barren backdrop may be the heated battlefield of gobal warrr
onsumpbon and hgmtne green- j "Oceanic iron fertilization growthisiron ' � � � 1 �.
Spike Lee continues sublime shot at reality
YS M.MJ-0 -�� CW of the Partners states. We give in to temptation
�k - . � BB Bv Kenda. Vance Eat �fZ��S FHpandA, �
Photo coul��y of Untv�r��l Pctur��
By Kendal Vance
Staff Writer
Adultery, racism, drugs, vio-
lence and sex are but just a few of
the demons that fly forth from
Pandora's Box in Spike Lee's latest,
"Jungle Fever
In order to focus on the real
issues in "lungle Fever hischarac-
ters are sometimes portrayed in
over-simplified, stereo typical
products of their class genres.
However, the actors portray
their personalities through the
problems presented, with such
sincerity that these generalizations
do not niatter.
Flipper runfy (Wesley Snipes
is conveyed as a happilv married
black man from Harlem trying to
work his way up in an accounting
firm in "WhiteCorporate America
His wife Drew (Lonette McKee) is a
ITiev live with their daughter
Ming (Veronica Timbers) in an up-
per middle class neighborhood
populated bv mostly African-
Americans.
There is not one, but several
antagonists in this movie. Rip is
struggling to attain the respect and
appreciation for his hard work and
dedication to the tirm which is run
bv two white vuppies.
I le is about to request a part-
nership and it is clear that he is a
force in the upward mobility of this
company.
I Tien he meets Angle, a white
Italian Roman Catholic girl from
Bensonhurst, who has just been as-
signed to Rip as a temporary. At
first Hip is irritated at having been
assigned a white secretary when he
had specifically requested an Afri-
can-American.
hire- on the basis of qualification
and competency alone, anything
else would be reverse discrimina-
tion
Which is a valid argument but
there is still a shadow of doubt and
Hip asks accusingly, "Why am 1 the
only person of color in this office?"
I"he question is left hanging in the
air.
Spike Lee opens sensitive is-
sues designated to inspire debate
and leaves theconclusionsdangling
in the wind perhaps to incite some
self investigative thought for even,
viewer black or white.
Theircuriosity feeds upon the
fact that people always want what
they think they cannot have or .m'
not supposed to have. Eventually,
after a tew nights of working late at
the office and a few takeout dinners
curiosity leads Hip and Angie to
Both Hip and Angie n
mistake of confiding their so
their friends Hip to C vni ; �
Lee) who sums the whole tl
asrustor"JungleFever '1 vt ntual .
someone lets thei.it out oft!
and loyalties are divided ���
issue of adultery merj
The tension snowballs and i - �
latesintoanexplosi i
racism, bigotrv and I ati
The tact that Rip has o i
ted adultery istemporanly thn
aside when Drew learns that I
woman is white.
Drew's mother was H- �
father was white and ever -
childhood was subjected to I
mouthed derogatory descript
about her skintone She,theref n -
somewhat and rightfully hj
sensitive This is a particular bl �
see Spike page 7
Writer-director-actor. Spike Lee spreads 'Jungle Fever this summer.
threatens motion picture content
By Michael Harrison
Staff Writer
Censorship is a word that af-
fects everyone in every comer of
this country.
The problems surfacing about
suggestive and sometimes graphic
Ivncs that depict sexual relations
andor violence are considered by
manv people to be excessive.
Popular music, 900-telephone
numbers, artworks, live perfor-
mances and even comic hooks,
along with other forms of expres-
sion, ha vebeen targeted for attacks.
People in the motion picture
industry have been fighting a battle
with censorship for decades. In the
192(Ts, threats of federal censorship,
a strengthening of local and state
censor boards and the further threat
oi a nationwide Catholic boycott
frightened the movie capital.
To deal with this problem,
company presidents formed the
Production Code Administration,
which quickly becameas important
to movie-making as the sound stage,
scenerv, props and actors.
Dr. James Holte is a professor
of a film historv course at ECU.
"After 1930, good always defeated
evil in movies he said. "Sex and
drugs were forbidden by the Hays
Code, as wellasprofane language
Over the years, many movies
challenged Code provisions, espe-
cially those dealing with sex, adul-
terv and profanity, but these mov-
ies appeared to have no far-reach-
ing effects.
When David O. Selznick was
filming "Gone With the Wind the
Production Code forbade Clark
Gable to say "damn Selznick
pushed the issue with the censors.
Gable was finally allowed to say
"damn but Selznick was fined
$5,000. Nevertheless, it was
Selznick's victory for he had man-
aged to by-pass the censors.
The 1940 film version of "The
Letter" showed Bette Davis' char-
acter, Leslie Crosby, cheating on
her husband. Her emotional turmoil
bv the end of the picture wasn't
enough to appease censors. The
ending had to be added where
Crosby was murdered by the wife
of the man with whom she had
shared the adulterous relationship.
For murdenngCrosby, the wife and
her accomplice were found by a
policeman at the end of the him and
taken awav. Punishment for all the
crimes was sufficient the censors
said, and the picture was then
wrapped.
When it came to sex, the Code
upheld the "institution of marriage
and the home Casual sex could
not be depicted as being acceptable
or common. Passionate love scenes
could not be used unless they were
essential to the plot. Lustful and
excessive kissing and embraces
couldn't be shown, nor suggestive
gestures and postures.
White-slavery, interracial
sexual relations, talk of sex hygiene
and venereal disease were forbid-
den. Scenes of childbirth, even in
silhouette, were never allowed, ei-
ther. Nevertheless, changes would
eventually be made.
Producer Otto Preminger re-
teased the romantic comedy The
Moon Is Blue in 1953. Censors an-
nounced the picture would oe re-
jected unless si x 1 i nes were changed
The words "virgin, "seduce" and
"pregnant' were found to be
jechonable, as well as the phrase:
"You are shallow, cynical a
and immoral, and 1 like you!
one could be immoral and likeable
at the same time, according to the
Production Code.
Preminger refused to chance
the script, insisting the Cod
"antiquated" and saying he felt
other pictures that should be se n
as more objectionable were ap-
proved.
Premingerlatercomrnented: i
am not a crusader or anything �
see Content, page 7
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Some restrictions apply. Contact tens exam and contact tenses not included at this price.
SUMMER
SALES BLITZ
Tnek.The
Off-Road Warrior:
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CHECK OUT OUR GREAT PRICES
BICYCLE
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r"
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iuttu 703 E. Greenville Blvd. Dr. Lewi
uLi 756-4204
Optician
Casey
Optometrist
Open Monday & Wednesday 9 to 7
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Closed Saturday
Dowitowi
530 Cotonchc St.
7S7-3616
Store Hours 10-6
Lay away Available
215 Arlington Btvd
756-3301
TREK
USA
Dressed in a red ani
stnp'd t-shirt. blue K-anj
� - king cap. flic win.
. - . I
v, A rldi populatedb) til
f cartoon creatures I if
and finding him I
i rowded scene i



I and
- �
-
Continued from page 6Idenh
to her self-esteem and her i tani
upward battifei�
belongingi
The incident pei
council" in Drew'slivii room.Not
only 1 this a mar ba
but it also addre �
there is prejudice witl in
raced darker ind
ors But, bv the end of tho si-
tired of venting hei�
Drew says, li 1 -
color she is, I don't 1
Content
Continued from page 6
that, but it v
to fight for m i
fight for your rights �
We have not nlytl -
duty- to defend this - gi I
expression, v-
deteriorates, that is the first
dictatorship, to totalitarian
eminent
Censors of "The Moor IsBlue"
faced an enormous defeat, despite
tireless ettorts tosuppi
the movie was screened in 8,00
theaters and grossed moa than
million. Cnhcsl
pure as Goldilocks �
once in bad taste
Next came the screen ad
rion of Edward Alba s
Afraid of Virginia V oil inl
roducl

t was
rating ted Arhs
picture! '�
� rs
hailed I
-nain
mo I
Saturday
O
��The Home o!
Universal
l4th&
757





I
June 27,1991
(Phe �agt (EaroHnfan June 27.1991 7
use effect
V
V &


�.
k
sfc3C
ay
-Ptwto Courtly ot Mo�� Landing M�rln� L�bomtofi��
e ihe heated battlefield ot gobal warming.
at reality
S A i give in to temptation
ficat on Both Hip and Angie make the
; anything mistake of confiding their secret to
. rimina- their friends Hip to Cyrus (Spike
I tv who sums the whole thing up
kgument but aslustor"JungleFever Eventually
v doubt and s'rmvnt' lets the cat out ot the bag
lA'hvam I the and lovalties are divided when the
�his office?' issue ot adultery merges with rave
Inginginthe Tho tension snowballs and esca-
latesintoanexpiosionof prejudices,
sensitive - racism, bigotry and hatred,
fepire debate 'I"he fact th�H Flip has commit-
I tangling ted adultery is temporarily thrown
incite some aside when Drew teams that the
pnt foreverv woman is white.
Drew's mother was black and
ds upon the tather was white and ever since
Is want what childhood was subjected to foul
It have or are mouthed derogatory descriptions
Eventually aboutherskintorie.She,thereforeis
rkinglateat somewhat and rightfully hyper-
jeoutdinners sensitive This is a particular blow
Ind Angie to see Spike page 7
e content
: g acceptable locted unless six lines were changed
Re love scenes The words "virgin "seduce and
Mthey were pregnant" were found to be ob-
Lustful and lectionable, as well as the phrase:
1 embraces "You aw shallow, cynical, selfish
suggestive and immoral, and 1 like you No
one could be immoral and likeable
.nterracial at the same time, according to the
f sex hygiene Production Code.
were forbid- Prerrunger refused to change
jirth, even in the script, insisting the Code was
allowed,ei- antiquated" and saying he felt
ianees would other pictures that should be seen
as more objectionable were ap-
reminger re- proved,
Bomedy The PremingerbtercDminented: 1
Censors an- am not a crusader or anything like
Iwouid be re- see Content, page 7
UMMER
IS BLITZ
Tiek.The
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UT OUR GREAT PRICES
BICYCLE
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eke St.
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Store Hours 10-6
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TREK
Waldo-Mania sweeps over country
ByARS
Information Services
Beat it Bart, move over Mario
Brothers, "Ix-nay Ninja Turtles.
It s Waldo, the bespectacled traveller
who's got everyone from nursery
xhoob to nursing homes in hot
pursuit.
With four books on the New
ork Times best-seller list, Waldo,
v ho has a tendency for getting lost
in his surroundings, has become
the object of an international hunt.
Dressed in a red and white tective work has pushed book sales
striped t-shirt, blue jeans and a to over six million copies in the U.S.
stocking cap, the wiry wanderer alone.
travels a book's pages entering ex- Handford, who was inspired
otic worlds populated by hundreds by the military illustrations of H.
of cartoon creatures. Finding him Charles McBarron, decided he
and finding him fast in each needed a character to pull together
crowded scene is the key to the his own mob-like drawings. Clev-
craze compared by some to finding erry, he decided to "lose" the char-
a needle in a haystack. acter in each scene, turning the pro-
From the moment he sprang cessoflocatingWaldointoanexcit-
from the pen of British illustrator
Martin Handford and onto book-
store shelves in 1987, Waldo has
captivated fans whose taste for do-
ing game of eye and brain power.
Fueled by spots on 'Today"
and "Good Morning America ar-
ticles in Time and Newsweek and
endorsements by First Lady Bar-
bara Bush, Waldo-mania continues.
And, for Waldo fans hungering for
more, the wiry wanderer expands
his itinerary to the American
breakfast table thanks to Quaker
Oat LIFE cereal.
The same brand that gave
America Mikey, the kid who hated
everything until he tasted LIFE ce-
real, has lassoed the latest folk hero
for mebackofitscereal box. Waldo's
leap from book shelf to grocer's
shelf has transformed back panels
of LIFE cereal into a deep blue sea
swimming with aquatic creatures,
a bustling train station, a festive
country fair and a crowded beach
�each scene harboring the elusive
Waldo.
Accordingto LIFE cereal Brand
Manager Cathy Solomon, the pair-
ing has proven a successful part-
nership. "We've produced 10 mil-
lion boxes with the Waldo game
and they're being snapped up as
fast as we get them on the shelves.
People are saving the boxes, trying
to get all four different scenes toadd
to their Waldo collection.
So, whafs next for Waldo? Who
knows where he'll pop up? One
thing's for sure, the world will be
watching.
Spike
Continued from page 6
to her self-esteem and her constant
upwaid battle to attain a feeling of
belonging.
I"he incident opens up a "war
council" in Drew's living room. Not
only is this a man-bashing session
but it also addresses the fact that
there is prejudice within the black
race oi darker and lighter skin col-
ors But, bv the end of the session,
tired of venting her frustration,
I )rew says "It doesn't matter what
color she is, I don't have my man
Suddenly everyone's world is
thrown into turmoil. Flip returns
home to find his understandably
distraught wife throwing his be-
longings out of the third story win-
dow to the bums and vagrants be-
low.
Angie is beaten black and blue
by her violent, bigot father whom
until this point she had continued
to serve like a dutiful slave. He kicks
her out and disowns her. Not only
is she not the virgin her Catholicism
harshly enforces � but she's a
"nigger-lover" too.
Everyone is a victim here. Drew
a victim who has had her man sto-
len, her confidence shaken, and salt
poured on open wounds She man-
ages to hold her head high and to
place herself above the situation.
Aneie. a victim who has tried
unsucccssu. U ep ot the
boundariesof her white bread world
now faces rejection from her friends
and family. She reaches for Flipper.
She defends him against the
police, who try to haul him a way on
Content
Continued from page 6
that, but it gives me great pleasure
to tii;ht tor my rights. If you don't
fight for your rights, you lose them.
S e have not only the right, but the
dutv to defend this right of free
expression, because if this right
deteriorates, that is the first step to
dictatorship, to totalitarian gov-
ernment
Censors of The Moon Is Blue"
raced an enormous defeat, despite
tireless efforts to suppress the film
the movie was screened in 8,000
theaters and grossed more than $6
million. Critics liked it, callingit "as
pure as Goldilocks" and "Never
once in bad taste
Next came the screen adapta-
tion of Edward Albee's "Who's
Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" in 1966,
seriously challenging the Code's
profanity provisions.
Those involved in the produc-
tion of "Virginia Woolf" realized
the film could not comply with the
Prod uctionCode. The profanityand
blasphemy were too constant. Fi-
nally it was decided the film could
be shown to "mature filmgoers
"Midnight Cowboy" came
later, in 1970. It was given an "X"
rating by United Artists the com-
pany that distributed it. It was the
biggest picture to be given such a
rating.
Censors gave "Midnight
Cowboy" an "R" rating six months
after its premiere, and the film is
now hailed by critics as a modern
classic and a main influence in
moving the American movie in-
dustry to a confrontation with film
depictions of some of life's more
seedy and ugly realities
Sexually-oriented material in-
creased in movies by this time, and
soon, explicit sex found its way to
the box office. 'Triple-X" pictures
showed genitals, oral and anal pen-
etration, heterosexual and homo-
sexual sex, and audiences were
flocking to the theaters. "Deep
Throat" and 'The Devil In Miss
Jones" were among the 12 top-
grossing movies of 1973.
The Production Code finally
collapsed. New grounds, subjects
that could never be touched before,
were now open to exploration.
Finally, free expression and
motion pictures could co-exist in
peace. At least sort of.
suspicion of rape, "This man is my
boyfnend,heismy lover shequips
Angie shouts and Flip rums
his back in horror and shrinks un-
der the touch of her outstretched
hand.
She never gives in to the her
prie�f baiting even when he calls
her a "whore monger She never
strikes out in anger and frustration.
Sheasksquestionslike, "Where
are we going? What of our chil-
dren?" Flip cuts her off bitterly, in-
forming her tha t he'll bring no mixed
up, half this-and-that, children into
this evil world.
When the inevitable morning
comes Flip is surprised to find that
she too, has left him.
Flip also has to deal with yet
another problem. His crack smok-
ingoldcr brother.ThisisSpike Lee's
first time openly addressing the is-
sue of drug addiction in a movie.
He does this by pointing out that
the problem is not contained to just
whites and blacks butotall people.
Drug addiction affects every
member of society, i t is blind of race,
creed, religion or social status. The
brother, Gator, stands, arms askew,
eyesbugging from withdrawal and
dances for money to feed his habit.
Hegives personality and charm
to a figure that is viewed empty
headed and invisible, a wandering
nomad of society that has been
tossed aside like used trash.
The language is harsh, just as
the issues presented, especially in
the scene where the Good Rever-
end Dr. Purity explains through
biblical parables his interpretation
of what is wrong with the world.
Once again Lee has set forth
some provocative issues for debate,
unlike a lot of films where every
problem has a candy coated solu-
tion, Lee tells it like it is. There is no
ultimate omniscient solution. No
moralistic fable designed to set the
audience at comfortable ease.
Jungle Fever is a perfect ex-
ample of how thi ngs are not simply
a clear cut division of black and
white, and whereas "Do the Right
Thing was Lee'sbest film, "Jungle
Fever is his best statement, one
well worth seeing.
(M$
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July 26-28 � August 23-25 � November 1-3, 1991
Your Mfs� Saigon New York Tour Includes:
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? Orchestra seat for Ml� Saigon
Q Lunch or late dinner at the Stage Deli
Q Lower NewYork or Uppe i New York
sight-seeing tour
? Admission to th� South St. Seaport
Museum
? Air and hotel taxes
Q New York City information packet
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I
IB
(She �a0t (Earnlftiian
June 27,1991
SPORTS
Soccer team boasts 11 returning starters for '91 season
By Robert Owens
Staff Writer
ECU'S soccer team goes into
the 199 season with several keys to
succcssand onebigquestion: Who's
the coach?
Head coadl Bob Lust departed
from the team after the 19) season
leaving a vacancy which has yet to
be filled bv Athletic Director Dave
Hart. When a head coach is named
he will come into a team that boasts
the same starting lineup two years
running, a definite plus.
On offense the Pirates bnng
back junior forward Tonv Carr who
ranked ashighasninthinthenahon
with al2 goal, three assist sopho-
more campaign. In ECU's first game
in 1W0 Carr scored a team-record
four goals versus Mt. OliveCollege
in a 4-2 win.
Adding to the offensive punch
of the Pirates are junior Joe
Herrmann and senior Austin Batse.
Herrmann was the second
loading scorer tor the 1990 squad
with five goals and four assists A
midfielder, Herrmann has the speed
to cut the opposing defense wide
open and still get back on the defen-
sive side of the bail.
Batse adds experience to the
Pirate offense as a senior and may
be the most versatile man on the
team. He won CAA Player of the
Week honors his sophomore season
when he cameoff the bench to engi-
neer a defensive shut-out as the
goalkeeper.
Batse has most recently seen
time on the front line for the Pirates
scoring four goals and five assists
for the 1990 team.
On defense the experience will
come from Joe Abood. Abood kept
the area in front of the goal as a
fullback last season and withstood
a fierce assault bv oppsmg offenses.
He should be the backbone of the
Pirate defense.
The goalkeepmg position is up
for grabs in the fall as sophomore
BrvanDeWeese will have to battle a
recovering Todd Aspdert Aspden
injured hisarmearlv last season but
should be back for 1991.
DeWeesepreformd well in the
tnal bv fire that Aspden's injury
caused and matured early to help
the Pirates.
The fact that the Pirates re-
turned all 11 starters is key to the
successof the team. ECU's assistant
coach Scooty Carey ran the team
through some off-season drills in
the spnngand faces the 1991 season
with optimism.
With an experienced returning
team the Pirates look to improve on
last season's 6-16-1 record.
Celebrities come to Greenville
Fllapftato
Joe Herrmann adds speed scoring and defense tor the Pirates.
By Matt Mumma
Sports Editor
The Michael Jordan Celebrity
Golf Classic will be held June 38 at
the Brook Valley Country Cluband
includes over 45 sports and televi-
sion celebrities.
Some of the names that will
accompany Jordan arfootbalgreats
LC Greenwood, Ed "Too-Tall
Jones, Boomer Esiason and Hall of
Famer Bobby Bell.
From television and the big
screen Jason Bateman, lames
Woods, Gregory Hamson, Martin
Sheen, Muhammad All, and
Michael OLeary will be there.
"We have a waiting list for
sponsorships and celebrities have
Payne brings two new assistants
By Kerry Nester
Staff Writer
ECU new head basketball ciach
Eddie Payne has completed his
coaching staff with the additions of
Mike Hopkins and JoeDooley. Both
men were hired earlier this spnng
in Mav.
Hopkins comes to ECU from
WestemCarohna University where
he has been an assistant coach for
the past two seasons.
"Mike has demonstrated a ter-
rific abilitv to recruit at his previous
coaching stops Payne said. "Be-
vond that he has a great ability to
communicate and relate to young
people He will be a tremendous
asset to our staff
During his stay at WCU.
Hopkins helped to bnng in nine
newcomers to the Catamount pro-
gram which was undergoing a re-
building process for the ll
season.
Two of those pla ers pro ed to
be very beneficial to the WCL pro-
gram. Terrv Bovd, a junior college
transfer, averaged 23.7 points per
game and was named an All-
Southern Conference selection.
And Carey Rah. a freshman
from Columbia. S.G, was very im-
pressive in earning the league s
Freshman of the Year h. nors Mr the
1990-sl season.
Hopkins also served as an as-
sistant coach at Coastal Carolina for
one season before moving on to the
Catamounts.
There he helped bN recruit many
oi the players that advanced �
NCAA tournament this year and
almost upset the number two team
in the Eastern Region; Bobby
Knight's Indiana 1 foosiers.
Doolev has served as an assis-
tant coadi at the University of South
Carolina for the past three seasons.
During this time Coach Payne had
a rked with Dooiey and develop
an important relationship with him.
1 have had the opportunity to
work with loe tor three seasons
Payne said. "1 have confidence in
him as a person, his work ethic and
his ability to be successful as a re-
cruiterand coach
Dooley's duties while at USC
were mainly as an opponent scout,
daily practice session instniction,
video analysis, recruiting, game
preparation and monitoring of
(i nditioning and academics.
"lam very excited Coach Payne
game me thisoppirtunitv Dooiey
said. 1 am Uxking forward to the
c hailenge of competing in theCAA
it sa tough, very undented league.
'her. we can work and make
rates the best team they can
be
Doolev has some impressive
credentials on his resume that
would impress anyone. He has
served as counselor at the Five Star
Basketball Camp since 1 srt5 and a be
Dean Smith's basketball camp in
1985.
Also another big fan of Dooiey
is formerSouthCarolinaand North
Carolina basketball coach Frank
McGuire. "Joe has the makings of
an excellent coach McGuire said.
"He has the energy, enthusi-
asm, intelligence and the rapport
with voung people to be a great
asset to East Carolina Universitv
So enthusiasm runs high in
Greenville this summer as we all
look forward not only to the up-
coming football season, but also to
the new look Pirates that Coach
Pavne and companv will be bring-
ing to Minges Coliseum this fall.
been calling leaving us in a pick-
and-choose situation BillFnvkue
said, golf classic chairperson Mar-
tin Sheen is commg as a special
guest just to be Vikhael Jordan's
caddie Freelove added
And if that isn't crazy enough
there will bea mobile ATM machine
at the countrv club in case people
lose their American Express trav-
elers checks
All the celebrities .ia' here to
benefit the tour N.C Ronald
McDonald Houses in Greenville,
Chapel Hill, Durham, and Wins m
Salem.
In recent years the h nirnament
has raised over $250,000 for the
Houses and this year it looks like
over $346,008 wffl he raised.
One of the big sponsors for this
year's tournament is VC based
Empire Brushes who contributed
$100,000 and is the reigning con-
tributor
"The tournament is no doubt
becoming well known, thev know
that everyone here will go ut of
their wav to make sure thev are w ell
taken careot Fredovesaid' 1 gueas
that's what you call southern hos-
Tyson, Ruddock will fight again
LASVEGAS(AP)�There they
sat in high-back wicker chairs �
Mike Tyson and Donovan "Razor"
Ruddock, dressed like two gentle-
man of leisure.
Their manners were impec-
cable, too. Both concentrated on
talking about their rematch Friday
night at The Mirage and not about
each other.
At a satellite news conference
May 2, the two fighters acted like a
couple of alley cats.
Til make you my girlfriend
Tyson, who was in Las Vegas, told
Ruddock, who was in New York.
He also called him a transveshte
Asked at Tuesday's news con-
ference i f he f el t repen tantabout the
remarks, Tvson, feigning contrition.
said. "I'm sorry Razor that i called
you bad names
Mike Tyson is Mike Tvson
Ruddock said. "He can sav want he
wants. I don't pavattenbon to that.
He did in May
Reacting to Tyson "girltnend"
remark, Ruddock had said, "I think
he's trying to get brave enough to
come out of the closet
He also called Tyson a moron
and an ignorant little kid.
On Tuesdav, Tyson
complimented Ruddock, who he
stopped in the seventh mund of a
slugfest March 18. Referee Richard
Steele was roundly criticized for
stopping the fight.
"He's good Tyson said of
Ruddock. "No doubt, he's good
Not good enough, however, in
Tyson's opinion.
1 beat before and I'll beat him
again, Tyson said. "He's going to
get knocked out
Tyson, who will be 25 Sunday,
is a 5-1 favorite.
"I'm definitely very fortunate

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Location COId 264 Playhouse) Big blue building
behind Earl's Store on Farmville Highway 264 Alt
WEDNESDAYS:
Amateur Night (Female Dancers)
Cash Prize
THURSDAYS:
Silver Bullet's Female 'Topless'1 Dancers
FRIDAYS � SATURDAYS:
Silver Bullet's Female Topless" Dancers
Door Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:30pm
I
LUNCH
BUFFET
5-6 Meats, t
10-12 Vegetables, �
Salad, Dessert
and Beverage
rS Tuesday-Friday
tJ 11:00 A.M2:00 P.M4.76
Sunday
11:00 A.M300 PJt - 5.69
'Tuesday: BBQ Pork, Meal Cordon Blau, Clam
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'Wednesday. Shrimp, Chicken & Pastry. Country
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�Thursday: Baked Pork Chop. Ham n
Scalloped Potatoes, Deviled Crabs
'Fridoyi Cab Cakes, BBQ Chicken, Heattoaf
'Sundays Turkeu'n Dramming, Roast Bamf.
Shrimp, Chicken Pastry
752-0090
"Across Greene Street Bridge"
Sun Tu�Thur�. 11 A.M9 PM
Friday 11 A-M10 PM; Sat. 4 P.M10 P.M.
pitahtv
And what does Jordan have to
sav about the fact that his golf tour-
nament is becoming the premier
celebrity golf tournament in the
country?
"It's the kind of tournament
that I lookforward to year after year
because it's well put together and
abouts as enjoyable as anv event !
take part in Jordan said.
As an added attraction Paul
1 iahn will be on hand at the tour-
nament. He is a golf pro and he has
entertained manv people with his
famous tnck shots
The events will begin on Sat-
urday with an open house from
11a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Ronald
McDonald House in Greenville.
On Sunday the golfing will be-
gin at 730 a.m. and will continue
untill 4 p.m. There will also be a golf
exhibition featuring Hahn frem4
p.m. on Sunday also.
Tickets will be available the day
ot the tournament at the Brooke
Valley Countrv Club. Admission
for adults is SI 0 and 55 tor children
under the age of 13.
to have a second chance against
Mike Tyson Ruddock said. "Itwas
in my best interest to fight himagain
nght now
A victory would send the 27-
year-old Ruddock into a title fight
against undisputed champion
Evander Holyfield.
Should Tyson win, however,
there's a good chance that Holyfield
will not be his next opponent. Men-
tioned prominently as a Tyson op-
ponent is 42-year-old George Fore-
man, who lost a 12-round decision
in a title bid against Holyfield Apnl
19.
Hot Summer!
Hot Stuff!
Our hot stuff is comics and cards!
Best Selection Around!
Heroes Are Here. Too
Cards & Comics
116 E 5th St.
Greenville, NC 2783-
757-0948
Welcome all summer schoolers!
ECU students and faculty welcomed!





Title
The East Carolinian, June 27, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 27, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.815
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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