The East Carolinian, May 29, 1991






On the Mark
Twain predicted public reactions to Gulf War.
4
Budding Band 8
Darling Buds release their second album, "Crawdaddy
Hhz lEant Caraltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.65 No 30
Wednesday, May 29, 1991
Greenville, North Carouna
Circulation 5.000
8 Pages
a.w
r n
��tffljw� The Buccaneer may rise from dead
"I
Committee shows porn film
programming committee at TulaneUni-
versit .oted unanimously to show the X-rated movie
ys of .i Woman" on campus at
McAlisi ' rium despite facing possible conflict
irish obscenity law
Und urrentlaw an material depicting human
� dial that! isno literary, artistic, political or
an be c lassified as (ibscene.
ening the film the committee decided that
m does hold artistic merit and would not violate the
ite.
nes
.
IS programming
iui' Box' earlier in the year

lent's protest
WUNC to lose funding in 1992
r re ent budget cuts, Wl i will lost- its
of$300,000nextyear,statkw
manager Bill Da is said
ttempt t.v - ffset these cuts, the station will trv to
rais py encouraging listeners to donate
�r about Z percent of Wl i s
annu
I ),i engineering and programming
hie rediH rion in operating hours,
will be is to suffer.
Slasher mugs .C State student
is mugged by an unknown
assa ked out of a campus building
on "
bedoi his wallet and slashed
imes w itha sharp object after
eaii bushes The mugger
everal times with a

� pital ' r tits
stigating the incident and
President plans renovations
. � sident � � ersit) I Si 'uth
i make renovations
to thi : � house
Of 1 . � st Jl � � � each will come
fromth � nan � unts of the Carolina Research
and Development Foundation and the Educational IX-
partrro i I
1 vit s;ienn, 1'alms' , hiet executive assistant, cited
examples mi. h as stru tural damage ,ind peeling wallpa-
per as examples of the renovations needed.
Janitor fights off mugger
A 1 ulane 1 niversity janitor fought back the efforts of
a pot d was able to flee to safety around 5
Iht victim stated she was approached bv a man
carr anded her money, rhetwo
�nd the lanitor was struck in the hand as
her assailant tried to hit her in the head with a tire iron
The victim tr i b� an m roaming for help as she ran
down the hall while her attacker fled in an unknown
direc �
Discrimination charged at USC
According to a confidential computer analysis of a
1990 pay report, v. hi te male employees receive the highest
paychecks at the I -niversitv of Southarolina.
The analysis also found that from January to June of
IMt, newly hired white employees were given higher
Parting salaries than blatk employees
l SC provost ArthurSmithdenied that theallegations
do not pr ; - nmination at the university.
Drug bust nets eight students
Alter more than a v ear of an undercover investigation
that Nt;an in April 1W0, Indiana State Police arrested
eight Indiana "state University students simultaneously
i n si ispj( -K m f dfllgcharges ranging m m the possession
and salt t manjuana to 1 SD
Although the raids on six homes turned up nothing
ng the first raid, police used a drug dog to uncover 4S
hits of acid about "V) grams of manjuana ami drug para-
phernalia
According to Indiana State PoliceSgt. PaleMullikin,
the investigation centered on the alleged sale of narcotics
by the students to undercover police officers.
Inside Wednesday
Crime Scene2
fdifonal4
ClassifiedsS
Features�
Sportsi
Bv im Rogers
sutf Writer
I "here may be hope tor the
1990 91 edition of E U's year-
book, the Buccaneer
rhe Media Board suspended
yearbook operations Man h4due
to lack ot pn igress bv the staff and
limited student support.
OneE( I student is trying to
change that
Senior Michael Daughtry,
whowaseditorofthe 1989edition
ot the I proposed to
complete the yearbook during
summer schc I
The proposal to the Me-
dia Board came at last week's
meeting. This week, the board
will vote on whether to let
1 Xi ugh trv complete the year-
book. The vote will be based
on a 40-page advance sample
which is due to the board to-
day.
Daughtrv said he can
guarantee that we will have
no problems doing ithe
sample)
1 le current! v has a staff i t
five volunteers helping him
complete the hook.
Pa ugh trv said that he is
confident he will be able to
accomplish his goal ot com
pleting the yearbook because
it is onlv 350 pages
The 1989 edition
Pa ugh trv headed was almost
MX) pages
According to Daughtry,
the most difficult part ot (om-
pleting this yearbook is find-
ing enough photographs of
last vear'sevents He said that
the Intramural-Recreational
Services and Theater Arts
Department have been very
helpful.
Da ugh trv s motivation to
Student fees to pay
for Recreation Center
By I eClair Harper
News dilor
Student fees will increase $2i I
each semester beginning in the
fall to pay tor a nt w Recreation
( enter on the E 1 campus
The ivev reatii n i i ter has
been under discussion for about;
years and v ill cost less than $1 -
million, I V Mfred Matthews,vice
chancellor tor student life, said
"he cost will all be completely
� paid) from student fees he said
( ii n the center is
expei tedh begin in mid-summer
to late fall i A next ear Matthew s
said
e're in w hat s know i
the programming and site � i
turn stage Matthews said, rhis
means that the planning -
mirtoe is working on what the site
k like
W
hided
ated
�� t was nit
at the beginning o last semester
he said
�i (i rding to Student I k
emment Association Presi-
dent Alex Martin, the recm-
ation center will include
racketball courts, basketball
i ourts, weight room, aerobics
room, indoor and outdoor
swimming pxls, lounge and
Kh ker nxims.
The two most likelv sites
a reatMmges Coliseum or near
Mendenhall Student (enter.
Martin said
Martin is planning a Mir
v ev to find i ut where students
tool the center shim Id he
"Weteelthatthesrudents.
since it's their money should
have a voice in where (the
i enter) goes he said
Martin said he will he
pushing tor a central campus
location so that the facility is
easilv accessible to all students
St representatives will
be distributing me surveys on
uimpis.or interested students
may pick upacopvat theS ,
office in Mendenhall student
Center.
Home Economics
School has new name
By David White
Suit Writer
The title "School ii Home
1 onomk �" w ill no lortg� r be
found in course catalogues or
anywhere elsi ��. I U cam-
pus. lnst ame
� hi iofof I luman I nvironmental
St iences 1 he name change uxik
place t the dose of the 1W1)!
academic ; ear to ktvp pace with
the 11nit�.
Students and faculo of
the school otedovemhdmmgl)
to change the department name
nearly a ear ago In a survey of
faculty, students and alumni,
percent of the faculty, H) percent
of the students and 99 percent of
the alumni supported changing
the name
Pr Helen Grove dean of
the newlv named school of hu-
man env in mmenta! sciences, said
the change is recognition of the
professional nature oi the
school's program. "It is a re-
flection (f our primary con-
cern with people she said
"We an? still concerned with
helping people meet their ba-
sk needs
The school has 606
studentsm threedepartments:
Nutrition and Hospitality
Management, Child Devel-
opment and Family Relations
and Apparel Merchandising
and Intenor Design. They now
i iffer baccalaureate degrees in
eight fields, ranging from child
development to hospitality
management, and master's
degrees in child development
and family relations, marnage
and family therapy and nutri-
tion dietetics.
Babbi Hawkins, a
graduate student pursuing a
masters degree in nutrition,
See Name, page 3
complete the yearbook comes
from letters to The East Can
11man he has read that lead
him to believe the studi
really want a yearbook
Pa ugh trv also said that
the Media Board's yearbook
survey last spring was not a
good indicator of student
support of the yearbook be
cause onlv 250 students re-
sponded to it
"I'm doing it for the stu-
dents, Daughtry said
rhel991-92edit�n� I
oneerisalso in limbo. The
Media Board suspended op-
erations tor next ear's year-
NKik on pnl 15.
1 nightrv said there may
be hope for next year'sbook if
students volunteertheireftorts
trd its completion.
Pa ugh trv said any Stu-
' . ho has at least a 23
grade pointaverageandwants
� �� " � editorforthel991-92
� i an contact the
ffkes.
Daughtry said anyone
with phi tographs that amid
be used for the yearbook can
i intact the But ameer at 757
II.
Fii� j'noio
Volunteers give blood. one of the services provided by EC U Students for Community Service
Volunteers help Greenville area
By Amv Edwards
sutt Writes
More than 30 ser i e
agendesinthe( aeenvillearea
ha vebenetitt1 from a campus
volunteer program.
The program, K I Stu
dents forCorranunity Service
has supplied student volun-
teers to various service orga-
nizatk nssuch as the American
Red Cross said udy Bakir.
prograni director of the I lealth
Education Department
Through volunteer work,
several hundred ECU stu-
dents have worked m a local
soup kitcnen, serving nour-
ishing food to the hungrv and
homeless; have cared tor
voung children whose moth-
ers have sought special coun-
seling,and havecoached local
Special Olympians.
donated btood, deared
rKrsat theGreerr
Ronald McDonakJ H
worked on numerous other
community proje te dui
the 1990-91 tall and spring
semesters
Main of ECL 's stu
olunteers were hon
during last week's national
Volunteer Appreciation Week
ceremony Volunteers were
presented blue nbtx'ns. cer-
tificates of appreciation, spe
cial individual awards and
other honors. The program
was also recognized during
the National Celebration of
Service, which was set up by
President Bush'sPointof Light
Foundation.
In addition, last fall an
ECL student. Ruby
I lonev cu tt. recei v ed i me of the
� i -idential
: i t 1 ight awards for her
rh Speda! Olympics,
ilunteer pro-
gram now in its third vear.
recenth wonthel991 Award
for Com munitv Service
am� I legt - and universi-
ties m the nation.
ugh the program is
rt iat.velv voung, the number
. tmues to in-
tse each semester, Baker
said
it gives the students a
great sense of accomplish-
ment, self-worth and satisfac-
tion that cannot be obtained in
the classroom she said.
Students interested in
t mom about the vol-
unteer program can contact
Baker at her office in
QwistenburyMemorialGyfn,
- all her at 757-6432
Ethnic Studies minor ottered
By Amy Edwards
Staff Writer
A new minor will be
added to the University cur-
riculum in an attempt to e
pose students to the diversitv
of the student body at ECL
and of the country.
The program. Ethnic
Studies, will be ottered bv the
College of Arts and Sciences
beginning with the fall se-
mester
Under the unsdicrion i t
Dr. Keats Sparrow, dean of
the College ot Arts and Sci-
ences, the program's aim is
"to assist students in broad-
ening their cultural perspec-
tive and appreciation ot
American cultures different
from their own
The classes in the minor
will tivus on traditions be-
longing to or denv ing from
the culture, race, religion and
Plans for the program
were drawn up bv a commit-
tee representing various aca-
demic and administrative
departments on campus and
was chaired bv Pr Michael
Bassman of the LYpartment
of Foreign Languagesand lit-
eratures
Other group members
included David Dennard.
Mane Farr Henry Ferrell.
Christine Fitch lasper Regis-
ter, I arrv Smith. Louise
Toppin Veronica Wang and
GavWilentzandstudentSteve
Randolph
This interdisciplinary
languageof a peopieSanotn program w'llloffercoursesthat
said.
In these classes there will
be a wide k vus on the A f nca n
American, Asian-Amencan,
Hispanic-Amencan, Jewish
American and Native
American racial and ethnic
minorities.
Sparrow added that par-
ticular emphasis will be placed
on the African-American and
Nab ve American populations
indigenous to the eastern part
of the state.
will fulfill a�quirementsinthe
humanities, fine arts, social
sciences and other depart-
ments.
This fall, the class will be
offered by the humanities
detriment and w ill be taught
bv Wilentz under the title "In-
troduction to Ethnic Humani-
ties (It is listed as ASESS
2001 in the January 1991 course
catalogue supplement).
Bassman said that since
See Minor, page 2





2 m?t �aat (Earolfntan May 29. 1991
CRJMFSENE
Possible Hit and Run accident
investigated on College Hill
May 21
1004 Ragsdale Annex: checked out alarm; unable to reset.
ia2 Ragsdale Annex: checked out alarm, unable to reset and
advised a Brody faculty member about alarm.
1319 Ragsdale Annex: checked out the alarm again.
20f2 Gotten Residence Hall: non-student stopped for one-way
stnvt violation, verbal warning given.
2059 Cotton Residence fall: state citation given for no operating
Home and failure to burn headlights
2159 Fifth and Biltmore starts: verbal warning given to student
for exceeding posted speed
2251 Gotten Residence Hall: investigated report of fight. Same
was unfounded,
0424 Mamie lenkms Building (west), staff member given verbal
warning for stop sign violation.
0h?9 Ragsdale Annex reset the alarm located in theanimal facility.
May 22
0896 lenkms Art C enter: investigated report of suspicious activ-
ity Same was gone on arrival.
(X)10 Ficklen Stadium: three gates found unlocked; same secured.
0156 10th Street and R"k Springs Road: provided transportation
for two females to Sixth and Emu streets
May 23
0097 !onesResidena'Halinvestigakx1thavjuvenilesandbanm1
the same from campus.
May 24
1820 College I lill Drive responded to possible hit and run.
2024 10th Stnvt: verbal warning given to non-student for expired
plates
210� Nursing Building: verbal warning given to student for
equipment violation.
0626- WillisBuilding:discoveredbroken window. Buildingscarch
conducted.
May 25
1111 10th Stnvt: Student given verbal warning for stop sign
violation.
1 ?26 Nursing Building: two subjects transported to Public Safety
for suspicious behavior. Subjects released.
May 26
2225 -Tyler Residence I lall Two mates banned from campus after
a n-port of suspicious activity
May 27
1502 Public Safety investigated a report of breakingand entering
and larceny.
2200�College Hill Drive: student stopped for speeding. Verbal
warning given.
Crime Scene is taken from official Public Safety logs
By Tracy Wester
Special to Th� Ea�l Carolinian
The second annual Evening
with the Authors was held in April
at the Ramada Inn in Greenville.
The event was sponsored by
The Friends of the ECU Library
which is a public support group
organized to help Joyner Librarv
provide excellent library service to
the ECU community.
The friends organi7abon was
established in 1978 and has played
an important role in ECU's libra rv
since the beginning.
The organization has provided
funds for projects such as con
struction of an exhibit area for the
library, purchase of furniture for
Minor
Continued from page 1
students could take a variety of
classes from almost every depart
ment on campus, they could be ex
posed to a variety of perspectives
,uch as historical, sociological anil
literary.
To achieve a minor in Ethnic
Studies, students would need to
take a total of 18 hours, choosing
four classes from one list of topics
and two from another list.
A variety of courses will be of-
fered such as Black Literature, On
ental Literature, an anthropology
course, a course concentrating on
the Holocaust and classes from
Women's Studies.
En addition, an advanced inter-
disciplinary seminar in Ethnic
Studies is offered.
Eventually the committee
hopes to work with the Greenville
community and include local
speakers and lecturers
Because the minor incorpc r.�n-s
material from a variety of courses,
committee members feel that the
program will complement an)
major. It is especially suitable for
students majonng in education,
foreign language, political science
and history.
Attention Student
Organizations
Get A Booth for
Freshman Orientation
(New Student Initiation to Campus
Organizations-NSICO)
The Following Dates
In 244 Mendenhall
Student Center:
July 1,8,11,15,22, and 25
To Reserve Your Booth Call
7574726
the Archives and Manuscripts
Room, purchas. ol CD-ROM
equipment to replace LS2000,
cleaning of the stacks, replacement
of library materials and financing
for the News and Observer Index
publication.
The fnend s projects are funded
by money from membership gifts
and their spring and fall book sales
Reorganization is made upot
approximately 120 to 175 members
and 15 Board of 1 inv tirs nten ibers
who plan these events The i
hers include facult in i area . iti
ens
The two as i.
thee- nt wen i lizal
Durham and Hm from
Chapel I Ml
Cox teaches creative writing at
Duke University and has written
tw novels, FamiimrGround,and The
Rugged Way People Fall Out of Love.
Mclaunn works as a carpen-
ter, newspaper reporter, rattlesnake
handler in a carnival show and has
written three books.
Acorn Plan and Woodrow's
Trumpet have been published, and
he Keeper at the Mcxm will come out
in October.
Cox read from The Ragged Way
� I all Out of lsne, which deals
with the breakup of a family.
The title comes from the line,
I he didn't realize just the ragged
vay people fall out of love and how
thai it's never completely done
if Library
McLaurin read from The Keeper
offteM(�n,anautobiography about
his experiences in the changing
South.
Membership for the Fnends i i
the ECU Library is based on an
annual gift of any amount and the n
are no formal dues or categoric-
membership.
A gift of $25 or more entitles a
member to library card pnvnl
at Joyner Library All members r
ceive the Among Friends newsktt �
and invitations to special events
receptions and the annual fall ha
quet.
Membership forms are avail
able in the Archives and Man j
senpts Room at Joyner Library ,e
anyone is welcome to join.
iiiiiiiiiiisdau
IS
Classic llite
Rdmisslon. $2.00
0 mail KamlKaze's
i'
iii.oif leas miii Bahama mama's
inn Host in Classic rock 6 Dance mi Rite
limrsiMHi
College llite
5i.uo Members
$1.75 Pitchers
KamlKazes
5Z.M Nest
si.nn Domestics
058 .lullii ShOtS
NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
Would like to
Welcome The Summer Students
and
Invite You to Join Us In Worship
Campus Mass Schedule
Summer Sessions May 19 - July 28
Sunday: 11:30am and 8:30pm at the Newman Center
Weekdays: 8:00am at the Newman Center
Wednesdays: 8:00am and 5:30pm
For more information about these and other programs,call or visit
die Center daily between 8:30am and 11pm
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain & Campus Minister
953 East 10th St.(At the Foot of Collage Hill)
757-0376757-1991

7fe
3e fete at
�U& t found
9f
All ABC
permits
Spot ial Membership With Ih�s l
Lttftfftftfft rfxccH&tffc
Ail ABC
Vtudent Health oj
"Women's Health
By Jacque Farm
WOOfe p,er Health Educator
spretc ��
crisps The ECU Student Health Ser-
you Liceoffersa Women's Health Issues
jgge fjalass, which provides valuable m-
Ifprmarion concerning Pap smears,
letting ua'ly transmitted diseases,
land pr dsof i ontracepnonand breast
this t exams
anintt Iinng the summer sessions
alone11' 'ass W1" he ottered each
guiddnesday at 2 p.m. in t to Re- ur e
�x-rn on the second floor of the
HildlMi'nt Health Center All women
son-iutr encouraged to attend the class.
yourff iddition, any woman whoisin-
the rk'H-Med in obtaining oral contra-
anin-fc?t:t -s for the first time- from the
fftudent Health Service must attend
Irjcatfss.
itltvt !n pnee ot a Pap smear ex-
BnSrtiratton will be raised rrorn$15 to
yoi i t1 due to an increase in the aSt (4
HktrF vessmg the test The Student
tBBi hjealth Senice is not makinga pn nt
dfom this test. This price includes
chlamydia, and gonorrhea
bat I
Name

i1 lljontinued from page i
�v �id the name change is good for
� HI Nch(X1 Hawkins said "The old
lime was outdated. Home eco-
mics does not accurately reflect
e disciplines within the school
ilasses like Nutrition, tor example.
and1
can.
-you
iva
ud v the biochemistry of nu tnhon.
lanv of these classes can be very
lallenging
heir
Put
B
Theschcxi wasestabhshed
f l8 after a 40-year history as a
npular and strong academic de-
artment. The first rTUster'sdega'
ogram was als established in
3. In the school's earlv years,
irlv one-fourth of ECU students
Con
run
r�he
'mv
in
d.rrk
s. 1.
.the
af r
jbm
the
funl
:orr
he
via
are
RAPE
IS
FOR
REAL
REAL
FOR
HELP
758-HELP
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
Advertise in
g EAST
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Local Open Rate $5.00
Student $2.50
per column inch
Bulk & Frequency Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours
Monday - Thursday
7:30 - 5:00
Friday
7:30-11:30
757-6366
The cost of a Papj
private physician rang
to $90. This price dev;
the other two tests w
portant because the
symptoms of chlamvL
orrhea can go undetei j
sibly lead to sterility it k
The information
this class is valuable kG
sexually active (r not
tanceofthel'apsmearal
self-exam areemphusJ
detection of possible c,
shiiuld concern t : A
Models an- utilized tol
procedures ol both t-vj
pianarionsaregivt j
tost rosults
Ftr more inform
Women's Health Issud
the Student Health N-
6841.
"To Your Health
health education and
column. Pleasediroctanl
comments or suggest!
were majonng in hi v
ECU is not aio
ing the department 'si
two other unrversrrje
campus Universrj
lina system, L'NC aa
Western Carolina UnhJ
adopted name chang
home economics depal
I
I ho
jirapf
SSt�1
you
studi
OOHM
(iikti
Tt�sotler isavaM
processing cnargeiJ
Eacat and nOC rVin
Mciosott is a reas
hDC Computef Cor
6M Cor Dotation 19
�������- m �f. ���- ��-





is of Library
K l aurinread from TkeKeeper
toon wautobwgraphyabout
experiences in the changing
ith
, foi !fu- riendsof
i.ir is Ivwvi on an
tint and then?
categories oi
hershjp
� i ntrtlesa
i privileges
nembers n
H w slottt-r
- SI v. ul CV t'nts
kl � ill ban-
are avatt-
and Manu-
i ir) and
r�in
III I
Kll
l.illlih'l I I'lill'lilS
i; iimtci! mi mil'
ll!l
III.I!
. INI lilh
I llll ll!MiUii
ill Jllllll !i(j
AN
t Center
le to
ner Students
h In Worship
khedule
19-July 28
the Newman Center
ievvrnan Center
ind 5:30pm
��the r programsxall or visit
JOam and 11pm
'ampus Minister
of Collage Hill)
mi
at
i
ff
out
fa
ith This Acl
umIU
All ABC
permits
Itudent Health offers
bmen's Health class
Qlhe tagt (Earolfnjan May 29,1991 3
By Jacque Farris
Peer Health Educator
The ECU Student Health Ser-
iceoffers a Women's Health I ssues
'lass, which provides valuable in-
rmation concerning Tap smears,
xually transmitted diseases,
Cthodsof contraception and breast
�If-cxams.
Dunng the summer sessions
K class will be ottered each
ednciavat 2 p.m. in the Resource
(Xm on the SSOOfld flexor of the
indent Health Center All women
o encouraged to attend the class.
addition, any woman who is in-
rested in obtaining oral contra-
Iptives for the first timf from the
kudent 1 leaith Service must attend
US class.
The pnee ot a Pap smear ex-
Tiination will he raised from15 to
25 due to an increase in the cost of
rocessing the test The Student
ealth Service is not makinga profit
om this test This price includes
ap, chiamydia, and gonorrhea
�sts.
The cost of a Pap test from a
private physician ranges from $70
to $90. This price does not include
the other two tests which are im-
portant because the signs and
symptoms of chiamydia and gon-
orrhea can go undetected and pos-
sibly lead to sterility if left untreated.
The information provided in
this class is valuable to any female,
sexually active or not. The impor-
tanceof thePapsmearand the breast
self-exam are emphasized forearlv
detection of possible cancer, which
should concern every female.
Models are utilized to explain the
procedures of both exams and ex-
planationsare given for all possible
test results.
For more information on the
Women's Health Issues Class, call
the Student Health Service at 757-
6841.
"To Your Health" is a weekly
health education and information
column. Pleasediaxrtanvquestions,
comments or suggestions to 757-
6794.
991
Jame
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
ontinued from page 1
ud the name change is ihx! for
H?scrMxl. Hawk.inss.nd: The old
ime was outdated Home eeo-
imics Joes not accurately reflect
�e disciplines within the school.
lasses like Nutrition, for example,
udv the biochemistry of nutrition,
lany ol these classes can be very
lallenging
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uJlre iEaat (Earolintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Bi air SKlNNtR, Managing Editor
GREG JONES, rhrerforow-ftsins
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I he tist Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that directly af feels
ECU students. During the ECU school year. The East Carolinian publishes twice a week with a circulation of 12.000. The East
Carolinian reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisements thai discriminate on the basis of age, sex. creed or
national origin The masthead editorial in each edition does not necessarily represent the views of one individual, but, rather,
is a majority opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should
be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the nght to edit letters for
publication letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C
27834; or call (919)737-6366.
Congress betrays American labor
Congress recently voted to grant Presi- other nations. Either way, unemployment in
dent George Bush permission to negotiate the United States will increase. The trade
international trade agreements over the next agreement will mean a speedy death for the
two years. crippled textile industry, which is based
Supporters said this would clear the way largely in the Southeast,
for a free trade agreement between the United It is the responsibility of the Mexican
States and Mexico, among other countries, government to solve their unemployment
The Mexican agreement, along with standing
agreements with Canada, would rum North
America into the world's largest consumer
market.
The agreement, along with an increase in
exports fueled by a 43 percent increase in
problems. The United States is not obligated
to create jobs in Mexico. It is obligated to
protect the American job market.
Rather than blindly giving more power
to the president with this fast-track concept,
perhaps Congress should have spent a little
capital-goods machinery imports in 1990, will more time considering how to best serve the
reduce unemployment in Mexico.
Because of this, supporters said free trade
with Mexico will help discourage illegal im-
migration into the United States. The idea is
that the Mexicans will have no need to move to
the United States if they can find employment
in Mexico. Rather than working cheaply in the
United States, Mexican workers will work
cheaply in Mexico.
American people. Congress could have al-
lowed the president to forge his trade agree-
ment, while specifying what he would and
would not be allowed to.do from the start.
This limited form of power given to the
president would allow him to speed his deci-
sions along and would allow Congress to
have some minor control in the negotiations.
Instead, when the president brings his
As a result, the operating expenses of trade agreements back over the course of the
Mexican business will be lower than their
American competitors, who have to pay their
employees higher wages. Mexican products
will cost less.
American consumers will buy Mexican
goods rather than higher-priced American
goods. American businesses will suffer. In an
next two years, Congress will be able to only
accept them at face value, good ideas being
lumped in with any bad ones or reject them,
making all the president's work a waste of
time.
Once again, the members of Congress
have castrated themselves, giving almost all
effort to reduce spending, they will reduce their power to the president. Either way,
their work force in theUnited States, or worse, American businesses and laborers will again
American businesses could move factories to suffer from inept government.
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Twain predicts Gulf War reactions at home
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
An omnipresent hazard of
being a columnist is that no matter
how inventive you are, no matter
how original or clever, most of the
time someone else has already
made the essential point you're
trying to make, usually much
letter than you.
Here's an example. For
months, I've been writing columns
criticizing the United States' in-
volvement in the Gulf War. I've
been sickened by the brazen lies
the Bush administration used to
justify the war; by the overnight
transmogrification of the
populace's attitude from serious
disquiet to yowling, intolerant
zealotry; by the administration's
belated claim to respect Iraq's
sovereignty and its right to self-
determination (surely spurious, in
startlingly accurate description of
America'sinvolvement in theGulf
War. Satan says about war:
"There never was a just one,
never an honorable one �- on
presently such mouths will cease
to open.
"Next the statesmen will in-
vent cheap lies, putting the blame
upon the nation that is attacked.
and this rule will never change in
so many as half a dozen instances.
The loud little handful � as usual
� will shout for the war. The pul-
pit will � warily and cautiously
� object � at first, the gTeat, big,
dull bulk of the nation will rub its
sleepy eyes and try to make out
why there should be a war, and
will say, earnestly and indig-
nantly, 'It is unjust and dishonor-
able, and there is no necessity for
it
"Then the handful will shout
louder. A few fair menon theother
side will argue and reason against
the war with speech and pen, and
at first will have a hearing and be
'0fA
.
vL v)
Pearls For Swine
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fourKMVf Cemecr seBiL4Tm
FuSf B VC kATH AVgJZ iP iKfir7en
i
Correct political thought still debated
By Bill Egbert
Editorial Columnist
I've always been a moder-
ate, neither a textbook liberal nor
party-hneconservative. I try never
to get sucked into an ideology. I
don't trust them. Ideologies rob
you of your ability to think for
vourself. The more deeply you
commit yourself to a package of
assumptions, the less you accu-
rately see reality and the more you
see the world filtered through your
borrowed world view. At the radi-
cal extreme, vou'rea robot,blindly
believing vour ideological soft-
ware, and you'll stumble around
bumping into walls before you'll
admit that your programming has
a glitch.
Presently, there's an ideo-
logical debate bubbling on this
campus over issues of political
correctness Trj? fgqrvatlons
which we can identify with the
two sides of the debate are the
Women Studies and African
Studies Committees (which lean
toward political correctness) and
the East Carolina Association of
Scholars (which questions such
policies). I could take issue with
either side; both of their positions
have problems. However, the
Zeitgeist is obviously leaning
against the ECAS, and, though I
am a moderate, I'm also a devil's
advocate. So I'd like to point out
some of the sticky implications of
political correctness which most
of its advocates either don't see or
simply don't acknowledge.
Political-correctness policies
can be divided into three catego-
ries: proportional representation,
promotion of diversity in the
curriculum and sensitivity and
speech codes.
Proportional representation
policies call for university depart-
ments to favor women and racial
minorities in their hiring and
adoption of proportional repre-
sentation policies would pose,
such policies would make race and
sex more significant than thev de-
serve to be in an anti-racist, anti-
sexist society.
Policies directed toward the
promotion of ethnic and sexual
diversity in the curriculum raise
similarly intractable questions.
The rationale behind these poli-
cies is that the traditional canon
(particularly that of the humani-
ties) is composed primarily of the
writings of male Europeans,
theore tica ll v giving the curriculum
a "male-universalist" and
"Eurocentric" perspective To
broaden this limiting orientation,
some scholars propose the inser-
tion of female, minoritv and non-
European writers into anthologies
and courses of study. Again, while
the goal (broadening the experi-
ence of students) is appealing, the
method (insertion of works on the
basis of the author's sex, place oi
birth or ethnic-minontv status)
poses problems. For instance:
� "Afrocentrism" (seeing
Africa as the cradle of civilization,
with Egypt being a precursor or
parallel to the Roman Empire) has
recently become a popular his-
torical perspective among some
scholars and students. If we are
willing to take radical steps to keep
students from limiting themselves
through "Eurocentrism what
steps are we willing to take to
keep students from limiting
themselves through "Afrocen-
trism?"
� If we insert the works of
ethnic minorities into the general
curriculum solely for the sake of
increased diversity, wouldn't we
be reducing those works to the
status of tropical fish, sought after
primarily for their exotic value?
� Which ethnic groups
should be represented in the new,
diverse curriculum? Should the
growing Southeast Asian immi-
the part of the instigator of the and every man will be glad of
war. I can seea million yearsahead, those conscience-soothing falsi-
light of its policies regarding South applauded;but it will not last long;
Africa, the Baltic Republics and
Panama); the list continues ad
nauseam.
About most of my concerns I
wrote a column or two, because,
after all, that's what I get paid for.
I ittle did! know that my objections
to the war � the principles, if not
the particulars�had already been
enunciated, long ago, by no less
than Mark Twain.
ties,and will diligently study them
and refuse to examine any refuta-
tions of them; and thus he will by
and by convince himself that the
war is just, and will thank God for
the better sleep he enjoys after this
process of grotesque self-decep-
tion
If that ain't the Gulf War, I
don't know what is.
It would be hypocritical not
to point out that Twain's three
paragraphs (one long paragraph
in the original), especially the last
one, also paint a fair portrait of
Iraq's preparation for invading
Kuwait; the "process of grotesque
self-deception" is, as Twain indi-
cated, hardly unique to America.
But, damn it, one treasured
di fference between our society and
promotional decisions. The goal
of these policies is to increase the grant population be represented
racial and sexual diversity of fac- by a selection of Indochinese lit-
ulty demographics so that a wide erature? Should we include any
variety of students will have many ethnic literature which is under-
morphologically similar role represented in the curriculum or
models. While the object of pro- only that which is connected to
those others will outshout them,
and presently the anti-war audi-
ences will thin out and lose popu-
larity. Before long you will see this Iraq's is supposed to be our rever-
eurious thing: the speakers stoned ence for truth and our recognition
from the platform, and free speech of the value of dissent. Thafs a
strangled by hordes of furious men fundamental part of the American
who in their secret hearts are still Way that President Bush says we
at one with those stoned speakers were fighting for in the Gulf, and
� as earlier � but do not dare to history shows if s one of the first
say so. And now the whole nation
In Twain's The Mysterious � pulpit and all � will take up
Srmnger, published posthumously the war-cry and shout itself hoarse,
in 1916, Satan describes how na- and mob any honest man who
tions build up to war. If s also a ventures to open his mouth, and
things we discard when war is
imminent.
It ought to be a national em-
barrassment that we doggedly
continue to prove Twain right.
portional representation policies
sounds nice, the method (hiring
and promoting on the basisof race
and gender) carries with it some
difficult questions. For instance:
� Should the ethnic propor-
tions of the facul ty be based on the
demographicsof the studentbody,
the local community or the nation
at large?
� In order to ensure accurate
and fair proportional representa-
tion, should job applicants be re
quired to attach a racial pedigree
to their resumes? Will we have to
begin registering our children's
races at birth as they do in South
Africa?
� Given that 84 percent of
America's population is white,
would you support a policy re-
quiring that 84 percent of every
department's faculty positions be
reserved for whites?
� Will we draw straws to see
which ethnic group gets to fill the
35 percent of faculty slots desig-
nated as "Other?
As you can see by the diffi-
cult (even absurd) questions the
politically powerful American
ethnic groups?
� If a university's adminis-
tration wishes to increase the En-
glish curriculum's content of Af-
rican literature, would the addi-
tion of works by white South Af-
ricans be acceptable? Or would
the authors have to be both Afri-
can and black?
� You might notice that Nazi
literature is extremely under-rep-
resented in the traditional canon.
And there are probably a lot of
white supremacists in this country
who are upset about that. In order
to please that particular ethnic
more useful than the cumcuhtn
we have now
Bv far the most volatile issae
in the political-correctne iecfce
is that of speech and rwravAv
codes. The reason such adesjre
so controversial is that the Re-
strict freedom of speech in fie
arena where freedom ot speeciis
most sacred: academia Thenast
widelv cited rationale befnd
speech codes is that vocal anoo-
nism between groups can some-
times lead to violence ThustSe
prohibition of potentials otv
sive language may reduce ptofct-
cal clashes. Again, as with nenlv
every pMitical-correctnesspooCy,
the goal is desirable and the rea-
soning seems sound on a suprti-
cial level, but the method rases
more questions than it answers
and would cause more problems
than it solved.
You wouidxr t have to scam
vourself to see how a carxais
policy prohibiting potennallvof-
fensive language would open a
particularly unwieldy camof
worms:
� How far should mdt a
policy go? Most speech codes go
far beyond the simple prohibition
of racial slurs. Some schools hive
adopted codes which prohibit
"lookism forbidding one to refer
to a person as "handsome or At-
tractive
� Under such a polity,
should radical-feminist lueratare
be pulled from the shelves r or-
der to avoid offending some man?
� Who should decide hat
is offensive? For instance, shclld
we suppress language which
would offend a white suprema-
cist yet be acceptable to main-
stream whites? Should he trial
decision rest with a university
administrator's best guess ass to
what might be offensive?
� Should potentials sensi-
tive scientific research such: as
racial comparative anatomy' be
prohibited?
� Should great works of lit-
eraturewhichusethegenenc ae
be revised to eliminate the appr-
ance of "male universalism?"
� Should the study of evolu-
tion be prohibited because it of-
fends some fundamentalist Chris-
tians?
These questions, like the
others above, become tinftg�d
ridiculous, yet all extend logically
from policies enforcing political
correctness.
The intention of this edito-
rial is not to suppose that therhite
males are never disproporfln-
ately represented faculties nd
curricuiums, or to allege that ra-
cial antagonism doesn't ens' on
American campuses.
I'm not saying that peM
correctness policies wouldn't at
minority and further broaden the least cosmetically address these
experienceofourstudents,should issues. My purpose is to pom'0u
Mein Kampfbe required reading in the difficult questions the adop-
freshman composition classes?
Until we further define the
rationale behind policies which
insert ethnic diversity into the
curriculum, we will have to ac-
knowledge theinconstanciesof its
scope.
If we accept these inconsis-
tencies without question, then the
resulting curriculum will be no
tion of those policies wouk
If you advocate such policiesyou
must deal with such questioi
If you are troubled by69
questions, then you might wato
reevaluate your ideology- y1
have philosophically const
answers to them, then please drop
me a line and All me in. H be
interested in hearing your i
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Your achievements in everyday situ-
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hot-line and walk-ir center We will
be offering training classes in this
enriching field begi ruling une; 199
Call 758-HELP or come by 312 East
10th Street.
rmciEZ
Effective July 1, 1991, the
Level Examination Program
fees will increase from $38
Individuals registering by trd
28 deadline for the July test wij
to write two checks: one for $3
out to CLEP and one for $7 at
to East Carolina University
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NIMMH l N l





NO
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iht still debated
�he curricuMr
t volatiletssi.
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�� ndingsomeme
ould decide wl
r instance, shoi
anguage whi
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eptable to ma
should the f�
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ffensive?
potentially serK
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rative anatomy) ix
reat works of
tse the generic he"
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hibited because it
- i � indamentalistChr.s
� � questions, like the
itx . � become tiring rvd
is vet all extend logically
n policies enforang political
The intention of this edho-
"o suppose that the white
s are never disproportion-
rrpresented faculties and
ulums, or to allege that ra-
mtagonism doesn't exist on
American campuses.
I'm not saving that political-
rrei tness policies wouldn't at
cosmetically address these
issues Mv purpose is to pointout
the difficult questions the attep-
tion of those policies would-rwse.
II you advocate such policies you
must deal with such question
If you are troubled by these
questions, then you might we�to
reevaluate your ideology- tfyou
have philosophically consistent
answers to them, then please0?
�� a line and fill me in. I'd be
interested in hearing your ideas
Ql&e ggflt (ffaroUnian
May 29, 1991
kjLMuwin 11 Uu
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odeling. Ideal summer positions
� g lune 15 Thursday through
Saturday 11 am to t pm. Apply
� d) - IhePlaza,Mon-Wed,l-4pm.
t on sai i
BRAND NEW ROLLER BLADES:
Lightning 608, Black Saturn, Size 9
12, Used 1 hour. They retail for
$209.00. Best offer. Call Lee
Armbruster at 3554002 or contact
Bicycle Post on Arlington.
WANTED: Musical Instruments for
consignment sales: guitars - banjos -
mandolins - violins - cellos- bass -
horns- amps - keyboards - drums.
Gilbert's Music, 2711 E. 10th St. 757-
2667. 20 commission cost. Jim and
Debbie.
PERSONALS
COMING SOON: This summer at
The New Deli - An independently
run acting group, The Actors Me-
dium. 4 shows will appear this sum-
mer free of charge. Come enjoy this
student - run production on Monday
and Tuesday evenings.
IM USONAI S
FREE KITTENS: Tabbies (tiger,
blackwhite).Readyin2and4 weeks.
Callleave message for Meg before 9
pm.
(OH HI NI
GORGEOUS DUPLEX: Available all
summer. 2 bedrooms, 2 full bathsand
furnished! Great location and large
yard! $390 per month plus deposit.
Please call 757-0629 for more infor-
mation.
WILLIAMSBURG MANOR
APARTMENTS: Available now and
August 15th. New 1 and 2 bed mom
apartments. Washer and dryer
hookup. Sorry, no pets. 355-6187 or
355-3647.
ROOM FOR RENT: $135 00 plus
utilities. Only college students non-
smokers. Prior applicants need not
fOR RENT
apply. Year lease. Available August
1st, 1991 through July, 1992. Summer
sub-leasing available. Call 1-301-972-
8543 between 6 pm and 9pm, M - F.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female
upperclassman or grad student to
share duplex, six blocks from cam-
pus. $125.00 per month rent. 12
utilities. Available for fallspring se-
mesters. Call 830-1293 after 6 pm.
BIG ROOM FOR RENT: 3 blocks
from campus. ACKitchenNice
house. $90.00 per month plus 13
utilities. Male preferred. Call 830-
0660.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
At least both summer sessions. $157.5
per month plus 12 utilities. 2 bed-
room, 1 bath. No pets. Call 355-1644.
FOR RENT
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
A BeauufuJ Place lu Live
� All Vew �
� And RcaJv I u Kni �
UNIVERSITY PARTMENTS
289V 1: 5lh Si red
�Ijociicti Seat
�Sear Major Shopping i"rmers
�Across l-rom Hi$nv.j i'jirol Suiion
Luiuled Ofler $300 a mtjcuh
Contact j T or Tommy Williams
736-7815 or 830 1937
Office ooen Apis 12 5 30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS
' icaa irml jMcl r � . :n .me.l . � �
ttxtgy etr.icr� 1m taler md ��ri .itft't L-
n -�r rV ��pd ��-nit �-� Uafl � I
m cu vKJBll i MOMt KIMij-��pra
'USem aBal ttfui v u.c Cuvouy -rt
1 AXUM3 I I ' m rl '� 'lilarr
756 'HI5
Ringgold Towers
Now Taking Leases for August
1991 - 1 bedroom. 2 hednxim, &
Efficency Apartments,
CALL 752-2865
20 days left in 1st summer session
Staff writers
needed for
Features, Sports
and News
Departments
Apply to
The East Carolinian,
Publications Bldg
(across from the Library)
Sell Unwanted Items for Cash! Classified Advertising Works.
WtNEED
YQURiATERItNCE
our achievements in everyday siru-
ations can be useful to others. Earn
thai feeling of accomplishment Real
C risis (enter is recruiting volunteer
crisis aiunselors for our telephone
� line and waik-in center We will
be offering training classes in this
enriching field beginning June 3,1991.
v all 758-HELP or come by 312 East
�r Street
INCREASED FEES
FOR CLEP
Effective July 1, 1991, the College
Level Examination Program (CLEP)
fees will increase from $38 to $45.
Individuals registering by the June
28 deadline for the July test will need
to write two checks: one for $38 made
out to CLEP and one for S7 made out
to East Carolina University.
IEENSJ
Dial-A-Teen is interested in your
valuable time. We are looking for
special teens, between the ages of 15
and 18, who would like to volunteer
tharinvaluablelistening skills to help
others in crisis. We are offering
training classes for our teen hotline
beginning June 3, 1991. Call 758-
HELP or come by 312 East 10th Street.
QUAKER MEETING
WELCOMES YOU!
Are you interested in visiting a wor-
ship group that is part of a world-
wide network, working for peace and
doing positive, healing action in this
world? Greenville Friends Meeting,
1110 Arlington Blvd at the corner of
Sunset (near Memorial Drive). Sun-
days 9:00 am meeting for worship.
First Day School for Children. Please
call if you need a nde. 355-7335758-
6789. "Ye Are My Friends" John 15:14.
Classified M patw
!st 25 words: For Students$2.0
Non-students$3.00
EachaddlUonal word$ .05
Ileasr notify the paper Immediately if your ad is incorrect. We will not be
responsible for incorrect ads after the first day of publication. We reserve the
right to reject any ad for libel, obscenity.andorbad taste.Fraternities and
sororities MUST write out all Greek letters.You must fill out your name
address, pbne number, and ID number.
Summer Deadline
MoncLry at 4:00 pm for Wednesday's publication.
BAR-B-Q FRIED CHICKEN
Snutfycebl '
Real Value
Every Day
v
Good Time
Great Food
More Value
L
SUPER SAVER COUPON'
FREE
MEDIUM TEA
(From 6pm-9pm Daily)
With Purchase of any platter.
Exp. 6-5-91
SUPER SAVER COUPON
Please present coupon
before ordering. No
Limit on orders. Not
valid with any other
offers or dicounts.
Soar with the leaders!
Student Edition Software from
Addison-Wesley
? Proven, brand-name software
? Priced for students
? Each with a special manual designed for easy learning
? Available exclusively at your college bookstore
L
L
Full Meal Deal
(includes: Thigh, leg, vegetables and hush puppies)
I � I � Please present coupon
W W before ordering. No
) . r limit on orders. Not
valid with any other
Exp. 6-5-91 offers or dicounts j
SUPER-SAVER COUPON
VALUE PACK
(includes: Bar-B-Q sandwich, Reg fries, Med. tea)
I II I Please present coupon
� � W before ordering. No
i r - limit on onjrn. Not
vtlid with any other
Exp. 6-5-91 ofler m dicounts
Look for Student
Edition Software
at your college
bookstore!
752-3644
Hours:
Sun-Thurs 10-9
Fri-Sat 10-10
626 S. Memorial Dr.
Oreenvilk.NC
(by PUt County Memorial Hospital)
Nl-DDIH U IIH o 51 M l
1 (T Si iidl III S(Mis: Mini' llun jisf � WI.I hnil.liin:iioks I.Io (lolliJlN M�) f slHlKnt M'lloldt.S j'ln 'in : i O 1
1 IIIIMIi 1II. m-Mmi.1.1 1 Inn -mIin ,( . HlIII. ijvili. 1 I I.I.i , i i H11 ill. 1 1 : k.lll.





rut t jri1t&
TU -
tf
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kav rvk'U
um as tif
ill debated
- vurrirulil
si volatile sal
" i ss teN
d sensrtwt
�n MKh codes a
is that they r
' speech in
n -t speech is
idemia The mt
�tale behir
� a Tta�
ps can serf'
i e rhus i
ntially ottr
phes
is with near
� ra tness poii
ir .1 the n
-1. a super
nethod rasx
�� in it aftSWi
re : rol I
HELP WANTED
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble productsat home Call for
information 504-h4i-8om Ext 5920.
MAM ttWflSn WEEKLY: shift
g i nvetopesat home' Start now
i.A&E plus SI 1X1 to Home F.m-
�' ' yf ln� 1120 Plain �8B Las
races M 8801 1
WANTED: ACTORS WHO WANT
SI MMIR work: rhis summer
ictors are needed for an actingtroupe
� rw roRs medium
��� rkshops will be innovative and
nsk taking Performances will beheld
�l "HE NEW DEI I i all only if
ed 757 2944
! 11 ING
PRT-n1t POSI-
Mo
HIe iEaat (Carolinian
May 29, 1991
ri 'AQQiFiPrvQ
F OH SAl 1
BRAND NEW ROLLER BLADES:
lightning 608, Black Saturn, Size 9
12, Used 1 hour They retail for
$209.00. Best offer. Call Lee
Armbruster at 355-4002 or contact
Bicycle Post on Arlington
WANTED Musical Instruments for
consignment sales: guitars - banjos -
mandolins - violins - cellos- bass -
horns- amps - keyboards - drums.
Gilbert's Music, 2711 E. 10th St. 757-
2r7 20 commission cost. Jim and
Debbie.
PERSONALS
COMING SOON: This summer at
The New Pcli - An independently
run acting group, The Actors Me-
dium 4 shows will appear this sum-
mer free of charge Come enjoy this
student - run production on Monday
I ruesday evenings
PI HSONAI S
FREE KITTENS: Tabbies (tiger,
blackwhite). Ready in 2and4 weeks.
Call leave message for Meg before 9
pm.
I OR HI NT
GORGEOUS DUPLEX: Availableall
summer. 2 bedrooms, 2 full bathsand
furnished' Great location and large
yard' 1390 per month plus deposit
Please call 757-0)29 for more infor-
mation.
W1LLIAMSBURG MANOR
APARTMENTS: Available nowand
August 15th. New 1 and 2 bedroom
apartments. Washer and dryer
hookup. Sorry, no pets. 355-6187 or
�55-367.
ROOM FOR RENT: $135.00 plus
utilities. Only college students non-
smokers. Prior applicants need not
FOR RENT
apply Year lease Available August
1 st, 1991 through July, 1992. Summer
sub-leasing available. Call 1 -301-972-
8543 between 6 pm and 9pm, M - F.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female
upperclassman or grad student to
share duplex, six blocks from cam-
pus. $125.00 per month rent. 12
utilities. Available for fallspring se-
mesters. Call 830-1293 after6pm.
BIG ROOM FOR RENT: 3 blocks
from campus. ACKitchenNice
house. $90.00 per month plus 13
utilities. Male preferred Call 830-
0660.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
At least both summer sessions. SI 57.5
per month plus 12 utilities. 2 bed-
room, 1 bath. No pets Call 355-1644.
FOR RENT
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
A HeauutuJ Place i" i-ive
� AU New -
� And Read) . ' ni �
UNIVERSITY PRTMFMs
;sw h 5th v �
�IjUC-ilfti Ncjt
�New Mj)r Shopping � enteri
�Across trim HrgJlN�a nol Station
Liinmri Offn S30t)�raaaii
1 "onuu i T or lommv Ai.iiaim
r56 rff!3or83fl
1 tffice orn pi K, 12 5 JOpm
�I.K (, KDKNS-
irfg� effstSSN ror -�lf i�: �;
. �
wrrj ir
r A - k i.Ml KJ M -Vi �pfl
gld LpSftftW � � � . �
HOCAJ � : f' � I �� � .
Rinyyold Lowers
Now Taking Leases tor August
1991 1 bedroom, 2 bedroom. &
1 ffuem Apartments,
CALL 752-2865
20 days left in 1st summer session
Staff writers
needed for
Features, Sports
and News
Departments
Apply to
The East Carolinian.
Publications Bldq
(across trom the Library)
Sell Unwanted Items for Cash! Classified Advertising Works.
wt NEED
WfRtXFERItNCl
� achievements in everyday sttu-
� - .i- tx iseful to others. Fm
itf� ing of accomplishment. Real
enter s recruiting vo ;nteer
counselors for our telephone
� neai I w - center. W e will
- ur : g classes in this
1 beginning June; 1991
'58 HELP or com I East
treel
LNCREASEDfEES
FOR CLEF
Effective )uly 1, 1991, the College
Level Examination Program (CLEF)
fees will increase from $38 to $45
Individuals registering by the June
28 deadline for the Julv test will need
to write two checks: one for $38 made
out to CLEF and one for $7 made out
to East Carolina University.
IEENSJ
Oial-A-Teen is interested in your
valuable time We are looking for
special teens, between the ages of 15
and 18, who would like to volunteer
their invaluable listening skills to help
others in crisis. We are offenng
training classes for our Iwn hotline
beginning fune 3, 1991 Call 758-
HELForcomebv312 East 10th Street.
QUAKER MEETING
WEECOMES YQUI
Are vou interested in visiting a wor-
ship group that is part of a world-
wide network, working for peace and
doing positive, healing action in this
world? Greenville Fnends Meeting,
1110 Arlington Blvd at the corner of
Sunset (near Memorial Drivev Sun-
days 9:00 am meeting for worship.
First Day School for Children. Flease
call if you need a nde. 355-7335 758
h789 ;YeAre1vFnends"John 15:14.
QflssjfleAl Ad Rates
'st 25 wrrds. For Students $2 0
Non-students S�3 00
Eachaddition.il word$ .05
IVasr noUfy thr paprr inimediatrry If your ad is Incorrect. We will not be
responsible for Incorrect ads after the Brat day of publication. We reserve the
right to reject any ad for libel. obactnlty,and orhad taste.Fratemiues and
snrnrttles Ml'ST write out .ill r.rer�k letters Vou must SS out your name.
address, pi ne number indDDnumbeT
SumrncT Deadline
Monday at 4:00 pm for VednesLiv pubbcadon.
fT-tain icsof its
I ese inconsis
"Stion then the
m will N1 iii�
itr�
how a caffifi
- � � � �
a old open
ieldy can
� uld -
cech co -
pie prohibit!
� 9 hoots ha
hich pr
. inetorei
� - me ' cr"
- su( h a polH
mist literati
� shelves in
� g si tftH "it
� wf �
� tance, shot
ige vvhi
a hite suprert
ible to ma
Should the fir
a ith a univers
� M guesi as
� ave?
�� ntiallv Ml
rese if h 'such
� inatoflt)
ll works of
' . -� the generic "1"
natetheappe'
universAlisfn?
� study of evo
i bei 1UM 'f
i�meflUliM( hr
,nons, like I
- i me tino �'
et all extend logka .
pt ii ii enforcing politi
tentton of this edl
: �thattlMMN(d
r disproportK
represented faculties ind
or to allege that m
onism doetn't exist I n
in puses
I'm not .avingthatpohbwl-
' � polii ifs wouldn't .it
� ticslly address thf-s�-
l purpose is to posM out
lit questions the sd11
�� policies would r�ie
if' N ate such pcilicie, y"i
' usl desl with such question
I' vou an troubled by thP
(uestions, then vou might was It
� 'luate vour idtxilogy-Wyou
havr philosophically cunt4sent
answers to them, then plea�drnp
me a line and fill me In. I'd be
inieresMd in hearing your ideas
BAR-B-Q FRIED CHICKEN
Chicken 'N Bar-B-Q �
Good Time
Great Food
More Value
?SUPER SAVER COUPON
FREE
MEDIUM TEA
(From 6pm-9pm Daily)
With Purchase of any platter.
Exp. 6-5-91
Please present coupon I
before ordering. No I
limit on orders. Not
valid with any (Xher I
offers or rhcounts.
SUPER SAVER COUPON
Full Meal Deal
: includes: Thigh, leg, vegetables and hush puppies)
$2
m �� � Please present coupon I
"W W bcf(�c (rdenng. No I
. r limit on orders. Not
valid with any other
Exp. 6-5-91 offers or dicounts
?SUPER SAVER COUPON
VALUE PACK
(includes: Bar-B-Q sandwich, Reg fries, Med. tea)
$3
I II I PVease present coupon I
I I W before ordering No I
J .r limit an orders. Not j
valid with any other
Exp. 6-5-91 offer sordicounts.
752-3644
Hours:
Sun-Thurs 10-9
Fn Sat 10-10
626 S. Memorial Dr.
Greenville. NC
(by PUt County Memorial Hospital)
Soar with the leaders!
Student Edition Software from
Addison-Wesley
? Proven, brand-name software
? Priced for students
? Each with a special manual designed for easy learning
? Available exclusively at your college bookstore
3MDiH:cinii o ii mvsi
Look for Student
Edition Software
at your college
bookstore!
II ' Sdidciif Stint-s: Mnic (Inn jut luniks yoio (IoIIhin mi)h�i( .sfuiiitit vcholmsJ
Wiilil Ihnltlinc Iclt-plimu 7"7-67 M
SniiiiiH i II.miis: MoikI.in I IiuimI.i, : iO.i.m. Sp.lli. I rul.iv, 7: lO.i.lli1 I: Ul.lU.





6
(Bhz gaat (Earulfnian
May 29,1991
Darling Buds leap foward with Crawdaddy.
By Matt King
Features Editor
The Darling Buds have
slapped a backbone and skeleton
into what was once aimless and
flacid pop whine, with the re-
lease of their second full-length
I.P, Cntwdaddy. The Buds first al-
bum Pop Saul wound janglv
melodies around lvrics of emo-
tional turmoil.
Pop Said was a result of the
major label record industry's in-
evitable realization that record
buyers were willing to purchase
albums that did not appear in
Rolling Stone's top 50 album for
that month.
When bands like the Pixies
and Sonic Youth started putting
albums on their walls pressed
out of gold, record companies
started signing any band with.in
exciting name.
So the Buds landed a con-
-Photo Courtasy of CBS Racords
The Darling Buds say goodbye to their Pop Said days with a new revamped sound and powerful album
WZMB appoints new General Manager
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
ECU'seollege radio station has
undergone manv changes over the
last few months, led by its move to
Mendenhall Student Center and
the appointment of a new station
manager, Tim Johnson
Johnson is a 25-year-old
communication major from
Tarboro who previously' worked
at the station for a vear before his
promotion. He ongmallv became
interested in radio because he felt
there was no other field which
would match his personality.
"I've alwaysknown what I
wanted to dd said Johnson in an
interview Monday "Ever since I
was a kid, I've gotten into trouble
ror running my mouth. I figured
since 1 was so ginxi at it, 1 may as
well do it as a profession
lohnson seems to be heading
in the right direction for his career.
"Before 1 got this job, I had
aboutoneyear of experience here
he said. "1 just got here, buckled
down, worked hard, learned as
much as 1 could, as fast as 1 could,
and it paid off
Johnson replaces the Jeff
Skillen as the General Manager of
WZMB. Skillen was in charge oi
the station during its move earlier
this vear. Skillen performed the
arduous task of getting the station
back on the air, and Johnson gave
thanks for that being accomplished
before his arrival.
"Luckily, when I took over, a
lot of (the work had already been
done said Johnson. "(Much of
the work was) already taken care
of thanks to Jeff Skillen. It is easier
to keep something moving,
whereas its hard to start up some-
thing from dead stop.
'There is still so much to do,
but we are getting into those final
stages of getting everything com-
pleted and settled down
There have been some prob-
lems with the new station which
Johnson has had to work around
The greatest of which was the fail-
ure of an important component
which caused the station to go oft
the air three times since its
reintroduchon
Johnson said that the problem
has been remedied, and no further
glitches should arise.
As for the future of WZMB,
lohnson is working on a radio talk
show which is currently in the
planning stages.
"Hopefully we'll have it to-
gether by the fall he said. "Of
course, it has to pass through the
Media Board, but 1 don't foresee
any problem with it passing. We
have a list of great people who are
interested in the doing the show
He also commented on the
notion of a wattage increase tor the
station. At the present, WZMB
broadcasts at 282 watts which gives
the station a GreenvillePitt
County reception range.
"With the wattage increase
and if we raised our transmitter
level, wecould broadcast toa wider
area and reach a lot more people
lohnson said. "(It would broadcast
over) at least a three county area
land serve) people that commute
into this area for school.
They have expressed interest
in listening to WZMB to and from
school and to and from work
Although the wattage increase
would open the station to a much
larger audience, Johnson iterated
that the purpose for the station will
always remain the same.
"We're here for those who
want a radio alternative he said.
'Those who want a break from
classic rock and light rock and the
other forms of radio that are out
there.
Any changes made around
here, would definitely be for our
listeners
Although WZMB does cater
predominantly to a progressive
rock audience, either types of mu
sic may be found on the station
The heavy metal listeners should
tune in on Friday and Saturday
nights from midnight till 4 in the
mommg. Those students with a
taste for Jamaica (musically and
otherwise) will enjoy listening from
1 till 4 PM on Saturdays and from
8 to 10 PM on Sundays
The striving Bhiesmen in the
area ought to turn on 9 3 on Satur-
days from 11 AM to 1 PM. And for
those with a cultured ear, the Sun-
dav morningclassieal show from 8
to 11 should strike interest.
It is evident that WZMB of-
fers the students quite a lot, and in
the competent hands of General
Manager Tim lohnson, it should
continue to do so tor quite some
time.
tract with Columbia records and
Pop Said was born Although the
album met with a relative suc-
cess, it was an album without
direction.
Except for a gracious few
shining moments the album was
completely powerless
Crawdaddy is another story.
Stephen Street, who pro-
duced most of The Smiths al-
bums and all of Mornsev s re
corded work, manned the boards
on the bands latest impetus
"The Budsconjure upa great
combination of stvlish pop and
psychedelic feedback says
Stein. It is true, the band is
sounding quite ungirly this time
around.
The Buds have beefed up
their rhvthm section bv two
guitars, a presence thai is par
ticularly strong in the song "It
Makes No Difference rheir
lvrics are more enticing ,nJ less
pathetic.
Andrea, the lead singstress of
the Buds puts forth sexv Debbie
Harryish wails of defiance and
sexual inuendo.
Her voice lurches to the brink
of some verbal abyss and then
whispers softh back to solid groud.
Of their new album, a British
reveiwer hailed their music as,
"an explosive mix of brazen
honesty and guileless hedonism
has made them a walking, talk-
ing event: a post-Warhohnian
pet, a wet-dream
The Darling Buds come from
Caerteon, a small town that was
once an historic old Roman en-
campment, believed by manv to
be the site oi the tabled Camelot
SO they feel like their on their
1 loly Grail mission- to get a gold
record.
At first lumped into the so-
called "blond wave" of young
bubblepunk acts the Muds live
show quickly developed into a
delirious denotation of motion
and mayhem.
Egged on by their delight-
fully named cult of loyal fans.
The Skullfuck Crew concerts
tend to veer in an instant from
blindingly pure pop mongering
to bleeding aggression.
With Crawdaddy, which was
chosen as the name for the al-
bum because it is the name of bar
were the Beatles and the Rolling
Stones met for the first time, The
Buds will surly etch out their
place in rock music.
The Buds have a tentative United
States tour planned for this fall.
Communication Breakdown
cause of resolved romances
j
-Photo Courtasy oi Dm Raad ECU Photo Lab
Tim Johnson takes over the helm of the recently renovated WZMB
By Michael Harrison
Sutf Writer
If vou are involved in a roman-
tic relationshipor will ever consider
becoming involved in a romantic
relationship, read this article.
CharfJeVV.Shedd,adoctorwho
counsels married couples, wrote in
hjshestsellmg "JLetters to Philip On
How To Treat a Woman" that one
of the most frequent complaints
from women is that men communi-
cate uo little in a relationship. I n-
less a woman is some kind ot
aombie Shedd wrote, "she wants
to know what's going on in the
mind of her loved one
Talk very often ceases in a re-
lationship, Shedd explained Open
talk and communication can be
threatened bv thousands of things
from studying and nxvtings to
television and emergencies (bus,
fault lies not only with the men, but
the women as well.
Many couples believe that they
are very adept at communication
skills, Shedd said, but later they
often start to complain that He
won't talk" or "She clams up
Shedd said many people are
reluctant to reveal their inner selves
to their mates, and neither of them
may even be aware of it. Such a
condition leads nowhere. Shedd
explained, and the relationship
ceases to develop. People have to
make a determined stand to face all
the truths of their lives and break
the restraining chains to their past,
Shedd wrote.
Shedd cited seven point couples
should work on together to achieve
thus goal and improve communica-
tion
1 Aim to be best friends r
range at least one meeting or visit
with eachotherevery dav and plan
otheractivitiesaround it so as not to
interfere.
2. Go out together at least once
a week. Airy place, any occasion is
tineas tongas the, ouple talks f reel v.
Nothing should he allowed to pre-
vent this tinx-witheachothershodd
said.
) i omplete honesty is a must,
not only with each other, but with
themselves personally, as well. En-
ter self-analysis, it necessary. Dis-
cussion, studying and reading will
also help ti i find out how "personal
1 listories" afreet the relationship.
4 1 ton t keepsecretsfromeach
other Asan ideal, allow 48 hours to
lv a "hiding limit Shedd wrote.
1 low-ever, absolute honesty cannot
always follow a strict time limit.
Shedd explained, so at least trv to
express your feelings.Openlvadmit
the internal struggle in this task and
ask for continued patience.
5. Forgiveness and mercy
should be a chief aim with one an-
other Shedd advises people to
question, not condemn. Hear con-
tensions with tenderness. It will al-
low people to feel grateful to have a
place where they can face any
problem
6. Give each other privacy
Don't be overly inquisitive, Shedd
said. Realize that whatever you try
to hide can potentially harm the
relationship. 'Self-revelation must
come Croon the inside Shedd said.
7. Love fully what you have
today, and look forward to the fu-
See Breakdown, page 7
SILVER
V
BULLET
Adult Entertainment Center
Location (Old 264 Playhouse) Big blue building
behind Earl's Store on Farmville Highway 264 Alt.
WEDNESDAYS:
Amature Night (Female Dancers)
Cash Prize
THURSDAYS:
Silver Bullet's Female Topless" Dancers
FRIDAYS - SATURDAYS:
Silver Bullet's Female Topless" Dancers
Door Open 7:30pm Stmge Time 9:30pm
ATTIC
757-7303
5th St
Wednesday
-TV
CoMedY
Dave Parker
Friday
Gardners of Souk
(opened for Mack Crowes)
Special Guest:
Manifest Destiny
Saturday
WSa
UdeggllnTrtbjrteShow
Ud animals m
By LaTanya Boothe
Staff Writer
a quiet walk through the
js vou notice the treesgreenery
ad out above you and the clean
)smelloftheair Stiollingatong
see a woodland creature help-
on the ground You wonder
fther to leave it alone or risk
-ig it become u tun to a wood-
I predator. If vi u divide h i help
abandoned or injured wild
jnal the next time you rind
lie in the woods, here are some
Mines.
If vou can . ; tab treed the
I baby animal until you a �
Leone more knowledgeable than
nrseif in ai ire,you treon
right tr.u k. That � hat
Tial healers
If the anin al is a bird try to
be itsnesta i return the bird to
1 vi ai are u
b�M
g is to lea i � i tnimal where
found it More than likely its
kher is - md trying
rh her offspring the prey and
jator n lationship. Don't worry
jut ti UK lung the animal. The
th that the mother will reJK t the
if it smells like humans is just
, a mvth.
Ifyouki � ertain that the
ther isdead a I u hoosi I
�vide for the baby's basic needs
varmth, food and shelter, then
for ad He Alice Hirko of the
leman Animal Hospital advises
ball a wild life agency. Vou can
any veterinarian m Greenville
he or she will be glad to take
i of the feathery or tum animal
found, to help insure its
r
Here are .lit tocallfor
1 Animal Emergency Clin
C ounrj PA (355 �
2. Animal Hospital of Pitt
reakdown
itinued from page 6
Be gentle with eachI
Id said, and remember that the
rsterv of the future "is a biess-
rhese suggest ns i an be very
ficult for some people, Shedd
d Manv aret � veakl undergo
pain and fright that sometimes
bears when trying to become in-
Late with someone. There is i
fcdency tor such people to
door on the relationship and
ri awaj
However, if people can over-
ne these difficulties Shedd said,
?y will reach a high plateau of
lationships that very few people
�ever fortunate enough to enjoy
County (756-0148)
3. Bateman Anima!
(752-3148)
4 (.reenville Yeterinj
pita! (752-1891
There are two peof
(.reenville area licensed t
of wildlife and release it
the wild They are call�
n-habilitdtors The to
in the Greenville area a
Babuxk (83 � The
Bob! � nsoftheHui
ety at (756 1268 i
to reai h them, call th j
� �
arolina Wildlife-

-
6671
til you ai
animal toa veterinar
� rst thing
pr �. I
use a hot v.
list
proide eii
doesn tha
liquid detei
willd npla
- i plastk : �
cis a temp �rar i
r
m
L
Sport
pat
FREE W
OFPO
for ALL ECU Sr
One gift check per
Coupon expires
Free admission wit
Downtown Greeir





6
Bhz iEaHt (llaruHnian
May 29,1991
Darling Buds leap foward with Crawdaddy.
By Matt King
Features Hditor
The Darling Buds have
slapped a backbone and skeleton
into what was once aimless and
flacid pop whine, with the re-
lease of their second full-length
I.P, Crawdaddy The Buds first al-
bum Pop Said wound jangly
melodies around lyrics of emo-
tional turmoil.
Pop Saul was a result ot the
major label record industry's in-
evitable realization that record
buyers were willing to purchase
albums that did not appear in
Rolling Stone's top 50 album tor
that month.
When bands like the Pixies
and Sonic Youth started putting
albums on their wails pressed
out of gold, record companies
started signing any band with an
exciting name.
So the Buds landed a on-
-Photo Courtesy o! CBS Records
The Darling Buds say goodbye to their Pop Said days with a new revamped sound and powerful album
WZMB appoints new General Manager
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
FCl's college radio station has
undergone many changes over the
last few months, led bv its move to
Mendenhall Student Center and
the appointment of a new station
manager, Tim Johnson
Johnson is a 2 year-old
communication major from
Tarboro who previously worked
at the station for a year before his
promotion. He originally became
interested in radio because he fell
there was no other field which
would match his personality
"I've always known what I
wanted lo do said Johnson in an
interview Mondav. "Fver since I
was a kid. I've gotten into trouble
for running my mouth. I figured
since I was s� good at it. I may .is
well do it as a profession
Johnson seems to be heading
in the right direction for his career
Before I got this job, I had
abou tone ear of experience here
he said "I just got here, buckled
down, worked hard, learned as
much as I could, as fast as l could,
and it paid off
Johnson replaces the Jeff
Skillen as the General Manager of
WZMB. Skillen was in charge of
the station during its move earlier
this year. Skillen performed the
arduous task of getting the station
back on the air, and Johnson gave
thanks for that being accomplished
before his arrival.
"Luckily, when l tcxik over, a
lot of Jthe work) had already been
done said Johnson. "Much of
the work was) already taken care
of thanks to Jeff Skillen. It is easier
to keep something moving,
whereas its hard to start up some-
thing from dead stop.
'There is still so much to do,
but we are getting into those final
stages or getting everything com-
pleted and settled down
There have been some prob-
lems with the new station which
Johnson has had to work around
The greatest of which was the tail
ure ot an important component
which caused the station to go off
the air three times since its
reintroduction.
Johnson said that the problem
has been remedied, and no further
glitches should arise
As for the future of WZMB
Johnson is working on a radio talk
show which is currently in the
planning stages
"Hopefully we'll have it to-
gether bv the fall he said. Ot
course, it has to pass through the
Media Board, but I don't foresee
any problem with it passing. We
have a list of great people who are
interested in the doing the show
lie also commented on the
notion of a wattage increase for the
station. At the present, WZMB
broadcastsat 282 v. atts which gives
the station a (ircen ille Pitt
( ounty reception ranee
"With the wattage increase
and it we raised our transmitter
level, wecould broadcast toa wider
area and reach a lot more people
Johnson said. "It would broadcast
over! at least a three county area
land serve people that commute
into this area tor school.
They have expressed interest
in listening to WZMB to nd from
school and to and from work "
Although the wattage increase
would open the station to a much
larger audience, Johnson iterated
mat the purpose for the station will
always remain the same.
"We're here for those who
want a radio alternative he said
Those who want a break from
classic rock and light rock and the
other forms of radio that are out
there.
Any changes made around
here, would definitely be tor our
listeners
Although WZMB does cater
predominantly to a progressive
rock audience, other t pes ot mu
sic mav b.1 found on the station
The heavy metal listeners should
tune in on Friday and Saturday
nights from midnight till 4 in the
morning. Those students with a
taste tor Jamaica (musically and
otherwise I willenjoy listening fn m
1 till 4 I'M on Saturdays and from
8 to 10 PM on Sundays
ITie striving Bluesmen in the
area ought to turn on ul 3 on Satur-
days Irom 11 AM to 1 PM. And tor
those with a cultured ear. the 'sun
day morning classical show from 8
to 11 should strike interest.
It is evident that WZMB of-
fers the students quite a lot, and in
the competent hands of General
Manager Tim ohnson, it should
continue to do so tor quite some
time
tract with Columbia records and
Pop Said was born Although the
album met with a relative suc-
cess, it was an album without
direction
Except tor a gracious few
shining moments the album was
completely powerless
Crawdaddy is another story
Stephen 'street, who pro
duced most of The "smiths al-
bums and all of Morrisey s re
corded work, manned the boards
oii the bands latest impetus
rheBudsconjureupa great
combination ot stylish pop and
psychedelic feedback, says
Stein. It is true, the band is
sounding quite ungirlv this tune
around.
The Buds have beefed up
their rhvthm section bv two
guitars, a presence thai is par
ticularly strong in the song "it
Makes o Difference rheir
lyrics are more enti ing and le? s
pathetic.
Andrea, the lead singstress of
the Buds puts forth sexy Debbie
Harryish wails of defiance and
sexual inuendo.
Her voice lurches to the brink
of some verbal abyss and then
whispers-H'ttlv back to solidgroud.
Of their new album, a British
reveiwer hailed their music as,
"an explosive mix of brazen
honesty and guileless hedonism
has made them a walking, talk-
ing event: a post Warhohnian
pet. a wet-dream
I he Darling Budsc ome from
( aerleon, a small town that was
once an historic old Roman en
i ampment, believed bv many to
be the site of the tabledamelot
so they feel like their on their
1 loly (.rail mission- to get a gold
r i rd.
At tirst lumped into the so-
called blond wave" of young
bubblepunk acts the Buds live
show quickly developed into a
delirious denotation of motion
and mayhem.
Egged on b) their delight-
fully named cult t loyal tans.
'The Skullfu krev. i on erts
tend to veer in an instant from
blindingly pure pop mongering
to bleeding aggression
With Crawdaddy, which was
chosen as the name tor the al
bum because it is the name of bar
were the Beatles and the Roiling
Stones met for th first time. The
Buds will surly etch out their
place in rock music
we a tentative ntted
ed rthis fall.
Communication Breakdown
cause of resolved romances
Tim Johnson takes over the helm
-Photo CourUsy ot Dail RMd ECU Photo Lab
of the recently renovated WZMB
By Michael Harrison
sutl Writer
It you are involved in a roman
be relationshipor will ever consider
becoming involved in a romantic
relationship, read this arrk le
( harheW Shedd, a doctor who
counsels married coupli s, wrote in
hjsbesiselling "Letters to Philip On
How To Treat a Woman" that one
of the most frequent complaints
from women isth.it men communi-
cate too little in a relationship L n-
less a woman is some kind
zombie Shedd wrote, she wants
to know what's going on in the
mind of her loved i
Iaik very often ceases in .i i
lationship, Shedd explainedxn
talk and communication can be
threatened by thousands of things
from studying And meetings to
television and emergencies thus,
fault lies not only with the men, but
the women as well.
Many couples believe that they
are very adept at communication
skills, Shedd said, but later mey
often start to complain that "He
won't talk" or She clams up "
Shedd said many people are
reluctant to reveal their inner selves
to their mates, and neither of them
mav even be aware ot it Such a
condition leads nowhere. Shedd
explained, and the relationship
ceases to develop. People have to
make a determined stand to face all
the truths of their lives and break
the restraining chains to their past
Shedd wrote.
Shedd cited seven point couples
should work on together to achieve
thisgoal and improve communica-
tion
1 Ann to be best friends -r
at least one meeting or visit
with f.u h other every day and plan
other �� iroundttsoasnotto
interf i
2 Go out together at least one
a week Am place any occasion is
fineaslongasthi Duple talks freely
ling should be allowed to pre-
ventthistirnewitheachother,Shedd
said
; I �� ete honesty is a must,
� u h other, but with
themselves personally, as well En
ter self-analysis if necessary Dis-
: .ing and reading will
also help to find out how "personal
� � if feet the relationship.
4 I n"tl epsecretsfromeach
other -san ideal,allow48 hours to
be a hiding limit Shedd wrote
i It iwever, absolute honesty canrw I
always ft llov a strict time limit,
Shedd explained, so at least trv to
express yourfeelings. Openly admit
the internal struggle in this task and
ask for continued patience.
5 Forgiveness and mercy
should he a chief aim with one an-
other. Shedd advises people to
question, not condemn. Hear con-
fessions with tenderness It will al-
low people to feel grateful to have a
place where thev can face anv
problem
6 Cave each other privacy
Don't be overty inquisitive, Shedd
said Realize that whatever you trv
10 hide can potentially harm the
relationship. "Self-revelation must
come from the inside Shedd said
Love tullv what vou have
today, and took forward to the fu-
See Breakdown page 7
SILVER
BULLET
Adult Entertainment Center
Location (Old 264 Playhouse) Big blue building
behind Earl's Store on Farmville Highway 264 Alt
WEDNESDAYS:
Amature Night (Female Dancers)
Cash Prize
THURSDAYS:
Silver Bullet's Female 'Topless" Dancers
FRIDAYS � SATURDAYS:
Silver Bullet's Female 'Topless" Dancers
Door Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:30pm
ATTIC
757-7303
5th St
Wednesday
�The ����
CoMedY
2CNE
Dave Parker
Friday
Gardners of Soule
(opened for Black Crowes)
Special Guest:
Manifest Destiny
Saturday
led Zepplin Tribute Show
-
Wild animals m
By I aTanya Boothe
Staff Writer
'( )n a quiet walk through the
0OS' li notice the tn i
fjgf llofthi aii �-�� � . i
ou �'�
ess
�: to It avi I
tbecoi
vhc
ettfa
and
his
inn
dor
JUK
vil
on
XJM
he
mil
oca
tlf
Mr
w
no
tband
in th.

-lf in i
. end
if thi-
�nd
lat
reject the
i
U
. : . ose (
. id I
�hen
f the
eman
.ill a wild
i
11 � .



2 Animal I I ; � -
reakdown
itinued from page 6
County (75t
3 Bateman Ani
4 Greet
i
learea
-
I
reha
in tl
-
� �


1
1 � 1
:
j
1
-

why
SETHE
FOR AN
mm
Trfi
l"hes
cult �
.Mai
V.V. :
ears . hen fa
:� � re is a
kdency I
dooi
peoj
le these din4
. will reach i
hip:
ever tort ati
:
ft
t-v
v
SPOKE
Billiards v
r
L
FREK HO
OF PCX
for ALL ECU S'
One gift check per
Coupon expires
Free admission wit
Downtown Green1





May 29,1991
vdaddy.
rusm
(Sfte �aat (garulintan May 29,1991 7
Wild animals need special care
p
i
tr
P
u
iion Breakdown
ed romances
H
n
n
U
i
si

g, l .i Tanya Boothe
Staff Writer
quiet walk through the
i �tk e thetreesgneenery
iboveyouand the clean
�I the air Strolling along
Kxiland creature heh
und You wonder
ive it alone or nsk
ne utini to a wikxJ-
il i If you decide to help
icd or injured wild
i k lime you find one
� i ods, hen" are some
take i areot the
il until you contSN t
knowledgeable than
ial care you are n
k I ha is what most
tiers recommend.
ll is a bird try to
� ind return the bird to
able to do so thebest
r e the animal where
I More than likely its
� se by and trying to
offspring the prey and
lationship. Don't worry
i hing the animal I"he
tat the mother will reject the
t smells like humans is just
� for certain that the
,i ad and you cnoose to
the babj s bask needs
food and shelter, then
lue lirkc of the
; nimal Hospital advises
� life agency, i ou can
eterinarian in (Ireenville
w ill be glad to take
ithery or furry animal
� help insure its sur
.ill for
hi link of
�pital of Pitt
dieakdown
County (736-0148)
3. Bateman Animal 1 lospital
(752-3148)
4 Creenviile Veterinary Hos-
pital (752-1890)
There are two people in the
(iroenvi lie area licensed totakecare
of wildlife and release it back into
the wild. They are called wildlife
rehabilitators. The two rehabilitators
in the Greenville area are Nancy
Babcock (830-5347). The other is
Bobhv 1 'arsonsof the I iumane soci-
ety at (756-1268). If you are unable
to reach them, call the Humane so-
ciety at 524-4330. "here is a North
t arolina Wildlife Commission
ranger in kmston and Greenville.
1 le or she can be reached tor help in
Greenville at 752 6671.
Until you .ire able to take the
animal to a veterinarian or wildlife
agencj the first thing you (an do is
provide warmth. "i ou mav want to
use a hot water bottle or hearing
pad rhepadisbettei becauseitwil!
provide even heat longer and
doesn't have to berefilled Anemprv
liquid detergent bottle or class )ar
will do in place of a hot waterbottle
I m' .i plastic hem box or shoe box
is a temporary nest. 1 ill the con-
tainer you have chosen to use with
shredded facial tissue and shred-
ded rough paper towels to allow
the animal to snuggle down for
warmth. Don't use grass cuttings
because they may feel cold and
damp to the animals body.
It is important to protect North
Carolina's wildlife. It is against the
law for anyone without a license to
keep wild animals such a squirrels,
raccoons and opossums but you
mav help these creatures yourself
until professional help is available.
To report violation of wildlife such
as shwtings of endangered species
and or anyone keeping a wild
animal as a pet, call 1-800-662-7137.
Nest time while strolling in the
woods and you come across an
animal, don't hesitate to refer to
these guidelines to help save one of
Cod's manv defenseless woodland
creatures. As in Aesop's Fable of
the Ant and the Dove the dove
saved theant from drowning. When
minutes later the ant saw a bird
catcher about to pounccon thedove,
it bit the man allowing the dove to
fly awav to freedom. The moral
Aes p is trying to get across is good
deeds will be repaid in kind.
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
my
Upcorviiivc, Events at
MENdENhAll STUCJENT CENTER
ROCKABOWL
Thursday, May 30
12:30-2:30 pen
Bowling Center
Vbkrre
9J
i&jStKS
Rated R
STUDENT UNION
Monday, lune 3
9:00 pm Hendrix Theatre
Sponsored by the Student Union Films Committel
STUDENT UNION


i
i
i
inn the
� � must
� edd said
� ,(u have
rd to the fu
iKdown jage 7
om page 6
; remember that
� iture is a hless-
- (an he very
i . '� Shedd

' that sometimes
. �. become w
i meone "here is a
si h people lo dose
itionship and
r people an over-
ficulties,Shedd said.
. h a high plateau of F
� it t ery few people
nateenough to enjoy.
WHY
SETHE
FOR AN
ORDINARY
LUNCH,
WHEN
YOU CAN
GOTOA
SPOT
Daily Lunch
Specials
Monday. Chicken Orimichanga
Philly Met
Tuesday: Steak Picado
Grilled Chicken Sandwich
Wednesday. Enchilada Suisa
Steak Sandwich
Thursdav: Flaunta Del Mar
Philly Mex
Fridav. Beef Burrito
All Lunch Specials
$3.95
JOIN IS
FOR LUNCH
Hungry Pirate $3.45
(daily 2 5 p.m.)
UttSLNTANA
"Keep a tan all
I
�21 (otancheSt.
Greenville
757-1666
SPORTS PAD
Billiards & Sports Bar
ins cool
B
lid Joynerroom2S1
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ON
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FREE HOUR
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for ALL ECU STUDENTS
One gift check per visit or table
Coupon expires June 30th
Free admission with student I.D.
1
Sports
,J
nnuntnwn Greenville 757-3658
you can
I!
Wolff Tanning System
3212 South Memorial Dr.
756-9180
Daily Special $3.61
(complete meal)
Present ad for free devsert with meal.
Corner of Dickinson and Raleigh Ave. 752-5339
Open Mon-Fri 6:30am-7:30pm
We Mean Business
For over 75 years the
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As we look ahead,
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Tel: 757-0076
$2.00 OFF ALL SEVICES WITH THIS AD OFFER EXPIRES 6-26-91





9.1991
vdaddif.
uJlje �aat (Uarulinian
May 29.1991 7
n i lei animals need special care
a I anya Boothc
Mjlt Writer
kdown
i ronitincos
et walk through the
otiee the trees greener
ouand the clean
hi Strolling along
i ui v reature help
I You wondei
i avc it alone or risk
U tun to a wood
i dt ide to help
ii oi injured wild
'�ii ou find one
i rv are stme
takecareol the
intil ou conta t
iblethan
iu ireon
it is w hat most
il is i bird tr to
i bird to
� the animal u hen1
v' re than likch its
� m bv and trying to
� pre and
Vn t worn,
ihe animal
- ther w ill reject the
� humans is
J vou v ii.�ise to
CCdS
d shelter then
k e I lirko of the
spital advises
t N, ou
ii inreonville
� imal
sure its sur
to call for
akdown
County (756-0148)
3. Bateman Animal Hospital
(752 3148)
4 Greenville Veterinary Hos-
pital (752 1890)
rhere are two people in the
c ireem ilk? area licensed to take care
ot wildlife and release it back into
the wild lhev are called wildlife
rehabilitates Ihetworehabilitators
in the i ireenvilte area are Nancy
Babcock (830 5347) The other is
Bobb Parsonsol the 1 lumanesoc 1
et at (756 1268) It you an unable
to rea h them, call tin11 lumane w
ut at 524-4330 rhere is a North
Carolina Wildlife Commission
rang r in Kinston and Greenville.
K-oi shecanberea( hed tor help in
(Ireenv ille at 752 6671
I ntil you are able to take the
animal to a veterinarian oi w lldlite
iger� the first thing tni an do is
provide warmth You may want to
ust- a hot watei bottle or heating
pad rhepad isbetterbet auseit u ill
provide even boat longei and
doesn thavetoberofilled Anempty
liquid d toout bottle or glass .ir
will do in pine ota hot water bottle
I sea plastic born boxorshoebox
as ,i temporary nest, till the con
tamer you have chosen to use with
shredded facial tissue and shred-
ded rough paper towels to allow
the animal to snuggle down for
warmth. Don't use grass cuttings
because they may feel cold and
damp to the animals body.
It is important to protect North
Carolina's wildlife. It is against the
law tor anyone without a license to
keep wild animals such a squirrels,
raccoons and opossums but you
may help these creatures yourself
until professional help is available.
Io report violation of wildlife such
as shootings ot endangered species
andor anyone keeping a wild
animal as a pet, calll-800662-7137.
Nest time while strolling in the
mvk1s and vou come across an
animal, don't hesitate to refer to
these guidelines to help save one of
i .t vl s many defenseless woodland
creatures. As in Aesop's Fable of
The Ant and the Dove the dove
saved theantfrorndrowning. When
minutes later the ant saw a bird
catcher about topounceonthedove,
it bit the man allowing the dove to
fly away to freedom. The moral
Aesop is trying to get across is gcx vi
deeds will he repaid in kind.
'rom page 6
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STUDENT UNION
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laddxf.
HI?e Icaiit Uhuulintun
May 29,1991 7
V
ieed speaal care
I an) . Boothe
staff Writei
�t v
through the
ic trees greenen
ind the lean
j i
re help
ndei
� risk
� ount (756 0148
J Bateman Animal Hospital
(752 1148)
t (.nvin ille eteiinai Hos
pita! i T2 1890)
rhen are two peoi i in the
i irealu ensedtotake are
of wildlife and release it hack into
thr wild rhe) are called wildlife
i ulitators Phetv orehabilitators
in the Cireenville ana are Nanc
7) hv other is
R �bl � . � he I lumane si � i
ire unable
� i i himaiH1 s,
: 1 W

North

nville
�ilp in
dkdown
MY
SErm
FOR AN
LUNCH,
WHEN
YOU CAN
GOTOA
tainer von have c hosen to use with
shu-ddi-d facial tissue and shred
ded rough paper towels to aBow
the animal to snuggle down for
warmth Don't use grass cuttings
because they mav feel cold and
damp to the animals body.
It is important to protect North
( arolina s wildlife It is against the
law tor anyone without a license to
keep wild animals such a squirrels,
raccoons and opossums but vou
mav help these creatures yourself
until professional help is available
1 o report iolahon of wildlife such
as shootingsof endangered species
and or anyone keeping a wild
animal as a pet, call 1-800-662-71 7
Nest time while strolling in the
� sis and vou come across an
� � . immal, don't hesitate to refer to
th �se guidelines to help save one of
i do is kxi'smanv defenseless woodland
itures As in Aesop's Fable of
. nt and the Dove the dove
� � saved theantfromdrowning. When
: n ii utes later the ant s�iw a bird
. �. atcher about to pounceonthedove,
it bit the man allowing the dove to
- �� � � i va to freedom. The moral
� pis trying to get across is good
- � paid in kind

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Specials
Mondav. Chicken Ihimichanga
Philh Mex
luesdjv. Steak Picado
drilled lhiden Sandwich
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Thursday, May 3�
12:30-2:30 pm
Bowling Center
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9:00 pm H.
Sponsored by the Student i mion I vnmitte I
STUDENT UNION
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757-1666
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Billiards & Sports Bar
&!f

XJ

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GAME
ON
US!
EWA MATAYA
TOP PROFESSIONAL
WOMEN'S BILLIARDS PLAYER
Sports
FREE HOUR
of poor
for ALL ECU STUDENTS
One gift check per visit or table
Coupon expires June 30th
Free admission with stucient I.D.
n

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1
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vou can
u
Wolff Tanning System
3212 South Manorial Dr.
756-9180
Daily "pircial $3.6!
(complete meal)
Present ad for free dessert with meal.
We Mean Business
For over 75 years the
name Roses has meant busi
ness in cities and towns acn
the South. As one of the top
10 discount retailers in the
USA. we've focused our
efforts on playing a vital role
in every community. From
providing jobs, to support
ing local industry Roses is
extremely proud of the role
we've played in the development
of the South.
As we look ahead,
we plan to continue
to fulfill the needs of
our customers plus
expand our role in
supporting local
industries and being
a vital part of every community.
Because shopping at Roses
not only means business for
us, it means business for
everyone in the South.
DISCOUNT STORE
More ways
to save every day.
Mm
georges
hair designs
5
�FULL SEVICE UNISEX SALON
-EUROPEAN TRAINED STYLISTS
-WOLFFTANNING BEDS
-LATEST IN FACIAL & BODY WAX
-SKIN & NAIL (ARE
-PROFESSIONAL HAIR PRODUCTS
THE PLAZA
Open Mon-Sat 9:30-9:00pm
Sun l:00-6:00pm
Tel:756-6200
STANTON SQUARE
Open Mon - Eri 10:00-8:00pm
Sat 9:00-6:00pm
Tel: 757-0076
$2.00 OEE ALL SEVICES WITH THIS Ai) OFFER EXPIRES 6-26-91






8
Sire iEant (Carolinian
May 29,1991
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Pirates beat Rider, lose to Ohio State at NCAAs
By Matt Mumma
Sports Editor
The Pirates eliminated Rider
University on Saturday to stay alive
for a little while in the NCAA
baseball tournament.
The 6-5 win was tough and
tense. ECU got out to a 1-0 lead in
the first inning on a grounder bv
junior Tommy Eason that brought
in sophomore David Leisten.
Ridertiedthegameinthefourth
on a home run by Mel Edwards, but
ECU answered in the bottom of the
fourth. Eason singled and junior
John Cast tripled to right field to
bring him across and put the Pi rates
up
-1.

Dail R�4- ECU PhcXo Lab
Freshman Chad Tnplett went 2-for-4 in ECU'S victory over Rider Universityat the NCAA tournament
Rider again tied the game in the
fifth, but the Pirates returned with
three runs in the bottom of the fifth
that put them ahead 5-2.
Base stealing was a key in the
Pi rate victory as they capitalized on
an injury to Rider catcher Dan
Mahonev. ECU stole a season-high
Seven bases, four of which helped
bring runners across the plate.
Another homer by Rider's
Edwards brought the score to 5-4
and Rider tied thegameat 5-5 in the
eighth.
FreshmanChad Tnplettsingled
in the bottom of the eighth to bring
in the game-winning run.
Junior Tom Move pitched seven
innings for ECU and kept the Prates
in the game, but freshman l.yle
Hartgrove came in in the eighth to
get the win.
Hartgrove struck out the side
in the ninth with a runner on first
and recorded the victory moving
his record to 4-2 on the season.
As sweet as the win against
Rider was, ECU had to face Ohio
State on Sundav in order to stay
alive in the tournament.
The Buckeyes were the second
seed in the Midwest Regional and
ranked 10 in the country with a
record of 53-12.
The game was interrupted in
the fourth inning by a tornado
warning that may have had a
J hosts Special Olympic Game
Opening ceremonies to be televised
By Kerry Nester
Staff Writer
For the first time ever,
Greenville will host the North
Carolina Special Olympic Games.
The event is one of the largest an-
nual amateur sports competitions
in the state.
The opening ceremonies will
begin Friday night at 7 p.m. and
will be aired live by WNCT This
marks the only time ever that the
NCSO games have been televised
live.
N'CSOcxecuti vedirector Dave
Lenox said that WNCT general
manager Ed Adams was excited
about televising the event when he
first confronted him with the idea.
"The first time we met with
WNCT to inform them that the
1991 SummerGameswereooming
to Greenville, Ed Adams immedi-
atelv offered to televise the open-
ing ceremony 1 enox said.
"1 iebelieved this event would
be one of the largest events ever to
come 10 the Greenville area
Also on the agenda tor opening
day ceremonies will be a free con-
cert open to the public featuring
rock legend Chubby Checker. He
will perform in Ficklen Stadium
Friday night alter the telei ast
"Chubbv Checker and the
Wildcats promise 10 provide ,n
outstanding show 11 NCSO
director Connie Sappenheld said
"We're reallv happy that the
1991 Summer Games will be a part
of Chubbv's world tour
In the summer of 1989, officials
from ECU and the city of Greenville
expressed interest to the NCSO of-
ficials when they were in town to
evaluate the Pitt County Special
Olympics summer games.
Asa result,(reenvilleandECU
were selected to host the games not
only this year, but next year as well
when the athletes R'turn to com-
pete May 28-31.
In Older to host an event or this
magnitude, nearly 3,000 volunteers
are on haixi to assist during the four
day competition.
The volunteers will serve in
various rotes such as assisting as
chaperons, serving food during
meals and officiating in the compe-
tition.
NCSOottiaalsestimatethatthe
Summer games will have an eco-
nomic impact of approximately
$500,000 in the I'm County area
over the two year period.
Nearly TOO coaches and X)
family members are expected to
accompany the 1,500 athletes to the
summer games.
To be eligible to participate in
the summer games, a participant
must be at least eight years of age
and have mental retardation
Abo, the athlete must train tor
a minimum of eight weeks in his or
her sport before entering competi-
tion.
Events offered include the fol-
lowing: track & held, volleyball,
tennis, rollerskating, bocce, aquat-
ics, Softball, gymnastics and
powerlifting.
In order to ensure fairness,
competitions are based on the phi-
losophy of equalized divisioning.
This means that every athlete or
team should have a reasonable
chance for victory.
This weekend should prove
to be very exciting for everyone
involved, including the spectators
and volunteers.
Six Georgia Tech athletes arrested in Florida
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) -
Georgia Tech coaches now are
awaiting the backlash resulting from
the arrests of six athletes in thav
separate incidents this week.
Thesix included AtlanticCoast
Conference baseball player of the
year Andy Bruce and fullback Wil-
liam Bell, the leading rusher on
Tech's unbeaten football team.
Bruce,22,and teammate Darren
Bragg, 21, were released on $5(X1
bond each after being jailed bnefly
in Tallahassee, Fla on charges of
grand theftof electronicsequipment
and burglary of an occupied d wrell-
mg, police spokesman Phil Kiraoofe
said.
"1 know it's not going to help"
with recruiting, said Tech baseball
coach Jim Morris.
"People have just got to know
that thishas never happened before
and will never happen again
Morris said. "This doesn't reflect a
normal Georgia Tech player and I
don't expect that it will again
Morris suspended both Bruce
and Bragg from the team and sent
them home Fnday.
Their attorney, Ed Blanton of
Tallahassee, speculated the whole
incident may have been intended
asa jokeon twocoeds they had met.
BruaTech'scleanuphitter,hit
22 home runs with RBI this sea-
son.
Police said at about 3:45 a.m.
the two had gone to the apartment
of two 1&-year-old female Florida
State students they had met a few
hours earlier. The women were not
there, and they entered through a
window.
When the women returned
later, they discovered a television,
VCR, stereo and compact d isc player
missing, Kiracofe said.
He said police found the stolen
items in Bruce's motel room.
Bell, 19, and reserve running
back James Reese, 19, were arrested
bv campus security Friday and
charged with possession of stolen
merchandise. Tech police said the
two stole books and other items
from students on campus over
several days.
The other incident involved two
football linebackers, Rich
Strohmeier, 20, and Bill Neuss, 19.
Atlanta police charged them with
aggravated assault and criminal
trespass following an altercation
with a bouncer at the Wreck Room,
a bar just off the Tech campus. Both
spent Thursday night in jail.
Jim Langley, vice president for
external affairs at Tech, said Bell
and Reese were each charged with
four counts of theft, involving text-
books and other school supplies,
perhaps calculators.
negative affect on the Pirates.
The Buckeyes scored four runs!
in the fourth after the break tha t put I
them ahead for good. They won the
game 6-5, but Ohio State lost to
California later by a score of 6��;
California will face Witchita I
State in the Mid west Regional finals
and the game will determine who I
goes to the College World Senev
Sophomore Jim Ambrcsiusl
started in the 6-5 loss and ga e up
five runs. Senior John White i ant
in the game in the fifth and - v
gave up two hits and one urefl
run. That run proved to be the
game-winner and White got tht
pushing his record to 5-4 on the
season.
The Pirates finished the seasoi
with a 30-24-1 record and did much
better than manv would haw
pec ted. Winning the CAA an d id
vancmg through the N( A A tour-
nament against all the odds 11- per-
haps better than last year 5 a
in which everyone expected I
Pirates to win.
Skyhawks
stay in N.G
RALEIGH (AP) � Raleigh
Durham owner George Shinn said
Sa turday he plans to keep the W 'rid
1 eague of American F n itball team
here despite disappointing
support.
"As long as 1 own the club, the
best place for this team is in I
market Shinn said after the
Skyhawks' 28-7 loss to the Bir
mingham Fireended their season at
0-10.
Shinn, who also owns the
NBAs Charlotte Hornets and two
minor-leaguebaseball franchises ir
the state, said h�. Has no plans to sell
his WLAF franchise.
The Skyhawks drew disap
pointing crowds for five home
games this year at Carter-Finlev
Stadium, including a league-low
4,027 in a loss last Monday to Or-
lando. On Saturday, the Skyhawks
drew 16335.
Shinn said he failed in efforts to
market the team to the Raleigh
Durhamarea,buthethinki.theteam
can be supported in the future.
"It takes timeand effort to make
this thing work he said. 'Tor some
reason we failed here We don't
know why
Shinn said he and other team
officials will analyze everything
about the franchise in the offseason
and rrv to work with WLAF officials
to avoid a repeat next year. He also
said he wants more local investors
�so the community will have more
ties to the team.
"I've talked to no one about
selling the club he said. But, Shinn
added, "I do plan to talk to some
local people in this area � not so
much for financial reasons, but for
morale and ticket support and so
forth
w si jam SB m
Wednesday
Progressive Donee Night
10 Draft
$1.15 Toll Boys
$ 1.00 Kamikazes
�ladies Free til 10:30
i
5E
Thursday
Student Budget Night
$1.15 Tall Boys
$ 1.25 Imports
$2.50 Pitchers
$2.75 Ice Teas
�Ladies Free9
iffizz:
This Week's Entertainment
Thursday 30th
3 for Thursday
$3 at the door for all the
draft you can drink
Friday 31st
The Mood
Saturday 1 st
Bad Bob &
The Rockin1 Horses
Hoyrs
MoiV & Tue 11 am- 3pm
Wed. 11 am-3pm & 9 pm-1 am
Thurs. & Fri. 11am-1am
Sat.9pm-1am
513 Cotanche
(located across from UBE)
758-0080
KINSTON
INDIANS
$ 1.00 ADMISSION
FOR ECU STUDENTS �
OUBLE HEADER
LYNCHBURG REDSOX
FRIDAY MAY 31ST
6:00 pm 1-800-334-5467
INDIANS AT HOME ALL WEEKEND L
KCUOA
Tfioo saTshloTnTJ
I Admission
with coupon
PINEBROOK APTS.
formerly Rivcrbluff
under new ownership
?Renovations Underway
1 Bedroom apts & 2 bedroom townhouses
?12 price special for June & July (conditional)
?Water, sewer and Basic Cable included in rent
?Pool Low Deposit
?Pets Allowed (conditional) Laundry Room
?Accepting applications August 1
121RiverbluiTRd.
758-4015






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Title
The East Carolinian, May 29, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 29, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.811
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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