The East Carolinian, May 22, 1991






Senile Slashers 4
Budget cutters should reduce high salaries, not jobs.
Spider Stompers 9
ECU overcomes Richmond to win CAA tournament
�he iEaat (ftarritman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vex.65 No 29
Wednesday, May 22, 1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5.000
10 Pages
p�v�fOther-
USC student dies from fall
.
student tell to his death from a
inium window on April l J
and. ountv( oroner Frank Barron,
h k iile MJ died mstantlv from
ffcred from trie fall following a late
� - � fmls. The acodiTrt occurred
rcemcnl Division will determine
in Paw lak s system when he died
- I ti in thecoroner'soffice
Voters want to smoke it up
� rttssurveyed
a emment regulated
-
Men than ; students participated in the survey
� � I by two groups, the Students tor Individual
muds of Hemp, an ott-campus
hns Martin, chairman of the SfL, said the
rvev v is designed to promote awareness and legal-
luced the prison population, thereby
� relieve the budget crisis.
Two arrested for credit fraud
. � arrested three Indian State Uni-
rpui aisandsof dollars" in
�� dil cards believed to have been
h the mail
thestudi tudent employee with access
nter, is believed to have stolen the
I iniversity's mail system Local police
ered � - 00 of merchandise
FBI investigates hate mail
Follov � � discovery of 10 hate letters sent to
lents at Tulane University, the Federal Bu-
has begun It Hiking into possible
� i ns
�� all alike and were signed by a group
- � �� � Freshmen with hatred of minorities "
edasubtlethreatofvjolcnceandhave
id) eei - �� Washington, D.C for fingerprinl
n
Iul ii � " ils remain confident that no one on
i r but decided to begin 24-hour police
: residence halls
Indictments for Holderman
rmai I rmer president of the Univer-
tinues to be plagued by trouble
ril 11, he was charged with tax
me of about $25,000.
in question stems from two separate
occasions In I ictober 1986, Hokierrnan received $8,000
and then another $17,000 in February 1488.
According to DickFiarpootlian, the Richland County
Solicitor, i lotderman will receive a maximum five years
in pris �n and a $10,000 fine it convicted.
Tulane police make drug bust
Security rfffcers and residenoe life employees at
Tulane I Iniversity confiscated dnig paraphernalia and
possible illegal substances from four dorm rooms fol-
lowing internal investigation
The seized materials wen' then turned over to New
t tIi arts Police officials for crime analysis to determine if
they were inditd illegal drugs
Ninth floor to remain open
At Indiana "state, thenmth floor of the Student Union
will remain open to students, faculty and administration
following concerns raisl by the Student Government.
Vice President of Development and Public Affairs
(Yin Dahl said that tin- flKir's two dining rooms, parlor
and lounge will be opened to the campus for events that
require a "nice" surrounding
Students became concerned that access would be
limited when they teamed theUniveraityQub,anahimni
organization, had expressed interest in the area for their
headquarters.
Inside Wednesday
Crime SceneII
Editorial4
Classifieds6
featuresII
Sports79
Cleland addresses '91 graduates
By Jim Rogers
sum Writer
E I s graduating class ot
1991 was praised for past accom-
plishments, reminded ot future
responsibilities and blessed with
great weather during the com-
mencement ceremony last sat
urday
i have never seen a groupof
graduates more ready to gradu-
ate and celebrate, commence-
ment speaker Max leland said
The ceremon) was high-
lighted b leland senthusiastic
and in . i mal address, whk h
had �' i Fi - lenstadium � vdol
IO,lXX)laugl . � : applauding
( leland hailed by I
I ancellor Rk hard I akinas ' the
champion of veterans quoted
from President lohn Kennedy,
Henry lord. Lewis Crizzard,
Bobby Knight and others during
his lively address
leland is Secretary of State
of (ieorgia and a disabled Viet-
nam veteran who is well known
for his inspirational speaking and
untinng eff wts t� i impn we living
conditions ti.r the handicapped
He urged the graduates to
take advantage of their new start
in htebv preparing themsehes
tor success, believing in their
goals and fighting their way
through hard times
"You have to tight
through the vallevsot lite with
courage Cleland said, sitting
next to the podium in his
wheek hair
( leland also emphasized
to the graduates the impor-
tance of making a mirk on the
( 'rid
What is important is not
making your way in the world
but remaking the world
t leland said
Senior class president
1 rippl fogg presented a more
serious message to the 1,764
graduates. He focussed on
the transition from college life
into real lite.
"You can't skip work at
eight o'clock Hogg said, re-
ferring to students' tendency
to skip morning classes.
Hogg also spoke of the
importance of the graduates'
new role as alumni
"We must support our
s, hod and make sure it re-
mains respected and well-
liked Hogg, a second gen-
eration iI graduate, said
In a brief message to the
graduates, Dr. James M.Joyce,
chair ot the Faculty Senate,
said that despite sometimes
upsetting the graduates in
their years at E( I the faculty
trulv cared about the gradu-
atesand wished them the best
i f luck.
( T the 1,764
graduate degree
and A doctors
vs re awarded
degrees, 430
s, two PhDs
ot medicine
Dad Rad � ECU PHoto Lab
Georgia Secretary of State Max Cleland inspired the crowd at commencement
SK!
Alumni awards granted
Dul R��d � ECU Photo Lab
Students purchase books and supplies at the Student Store for first summer session classes
Students seek sumirier education
By Tracy Schwartz
Spec iai ti I hi1 .i-t C arolinian
While many students go
home for a three month vacation,
some will find themselves
spending time in the dassroom
this summer.
Students who enroll in sum-
mer sch(xl are subject to longer
than usual classroom hours, five
davs a week, for a full six weeks.
"I always wind up spending
the whole day on campus one
student said. "But it's worth it to
catch up on my studies
Enrollment for the summer
sessions is steadilv increasing
every year
According to preliminary
figures fmm the Department of
Planning and Institutional Re-
search, 3,2S() students are air-
rentlv enrolled in the first ses-
sion of summer school and
VMS a roenn Iled in the second
session.
'These figures are onlv
preliminary ones and can ei-
ther increase or decrease over
the next few weeks Kather-
ine a, research analyst for
the department said.
Hay is a recent ECU
graduate and she said shealso
spent many summers sitting
in the classroom.
"1 went to every session
of summer school just so I
could graduate early Hav
said.
Last year's actual enroll-
ment was 6,241 tor the first
session of summer school and
5,048 tor the second session.
Those figures are higher than
this year's preliminary data
but manv students don't reg-
ister tor summer school until
the last minute, Hav said.
"I went to summer school
a few years ago because I
needed to take a French class
and I heard it was easier in
summer school graduating
senior Alicia Ford said
For some, however,
summer school is not a pleas-
ant choice.
"I went to summer schxl
for one session and couldn't
stand it student Thomas
Fisher said. "I then decided
I'd just wait and finish up the
rest of my classes during the
regular school year
By Robin Duffy
Staff Writa
ently. the I
Alumni Asscm iatk n awarded
three graduating sen rs
University Awards tor their
scholastic achievement at
e ;
K.I Beeman ir of Mont
gomery, Ala Sally Elizabeth
Moseley of rarboro; and
Caroline Madeline Oth of
Wissembourg, France were
presented the University
Awards at the Spring com-
mencement on May 11.
� man, an electronics
major in the School of lech
nology, graduated with a 4
A former Marine and a
ti x tlill player, Beeman plans
to enter 1 iarvard I niversity s
School of Law.
"Mr Beeman s ability to
maintain a perfect acaden i
record while shuttling a busv
Uxitball schedule is remark
able said Stan Gather, acting
chair ot the IVpartment of
i turing 'No other
� nmyexpi riena has
ever surpassed Mr. Beeman s
present achievements. It is a
rantc to find such devotion
and dedication to work and
discipline "
Moseley majored in pi-
ano performance and peda-
. and has been on the
( hana llor s last each semes-
tor since her Freshman year in
1987
She is described by school
faculty as a 'role mtviel" to
the students m the music de-
partment.
In 1990, she won the EC U
mg Artist competition and
was a finalist in 1988. In 1989
she won first prize in the N (
Music Teacher s Collegiate
(' impetitk ot and came in sec-
ond in 1990
- year, Moseley was
named the School of Music s
Outstanding Senior and in
previous vears recei ved the Pi
Kappa Lambda FnNhmanand
See Awards, page 3
State Auditor investigates
Creative Living Center
By LeClair Harper
News tditor
The director of the Cre-
ative Living Center at ECU is
under investigation bv the
State Auditor's Office.
The office is looking into
actions.by Director Connie
Kuenzi according to Ray
Mozingoof the State Auditor's
Office. The office received a
tip by telephone about three
weeks ago.
'The allegations concern
the possible theft of state
property and misuse of state
time Mozingo said
The allegations were the
primary concern of the caller,
but the caller also mentioned
the possible misuse of Center
money. Mozingo said an ex-
ample of that tvpe of misuse
would be an employee using
the Center's money to buy
personal items.
Investigators were sent to
campus and should be fin-
ished this week.
"They've talked to a lot of
people, and looked through a
lot of records Mozingo said
If the allegations are sub-
stantiated,a report will he sent
to the University which will
have 30 days to respond be-
fore the report is made public.
If the allegations are not
substantiated but other prob-
lems are found such as low
morale, the Auditor's office
will wnte a management let-
ter to make the chancellor
aware oi those problems and
10 let him know the other al-
legations wen? not proven, ac-
cording to Mozingo.
If no other problem are
found and the allegations are
not substantiated, the office
will inform the chancellor as
well, Mozingo said.
This investigation is not
connected with the previous
investigation at ECU con-
ducted by the State Auditor's
Office. "This is a separate
hotline call We consider it
routine in nature Mozingo
said.

-0�v.





Senile Slashers 4
Budget cutters should reduce high salaries, not jobs.
Spider Stompers 9
ECU overcomes Richmond to win CAA tournament
�he �aat (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Voi 53 N
Wednesday, May 22, 1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 5.000
10 Pages
l S( student dies from fall
I is death from a
� � : . V pnl 13
� ner Frank 1 lanon,
M I died instantlv from
i �
' � ii ident �. inrvd
� - ' �
he died
� � 11 ICC
Voters want to smoke it up

in i pa ted in the sui
idents for Individual
temp an off-campus
lanoftheSH said the
� irencss and legal
� - . � : ilation tin rvK
Two arrested for credit fraud
: � havi been
it ici ess
n the
� i police
� ' dlSC
FBI investigates hate mail
� i

ters sent to
I � - Ii ral Mu
I issible
I
� th it no oni
ill n 24-h . � 11 � �
Indictments for Holderman
. . , ��
� �- : lodbyti il
ii :
from two separati
- � ' 8f. 1 Ii rman received$8,000
r 5 " � ruary lwvss
? larpootiian,theRichlandCounty
reo ive a maximum five years
� � UK) fine if o m u ted
Tulanc police make drug bust
ind residence life employees at
nfiscated drug paraphernalia and
� � � tai es from four dorm rooms fol-
� . r � I , t � t
� . i then turned over to Nev�
rleai " r crime analysis to determine if
. il drugs
Ninth floor to remain open
� � ndiana e ninth floor of the Student Union
pen to students, facility ami administration
rtcems raised by the Student Government.
resident of Development and Public Affairs
ihl said th.it the floor's two dining rooms, parlor
Ibt pened to the campus for events that
re a"i � surrounding
Students became concerned that access would be
limited v hcntheylcarnedthel niversitylub,anahimni
ressed interest in the area tor tht-ir
I i adquarters
Inside Wednesday
2
4
6
t eatures 7
Sports 9
Cleland addresses '91 graduates
11 v Jim Rogers
Stjtl VSnii-r
in lifeby preparing themselves liked Hogg, a second , n
for success, believing in their erafion E 1 graduate, said
petals and fighting their wa In a brief message to the
lc ' s graduating lass of through hard times graduates, Dr. JamesM.ji
lsl was praised for past accom- ifou have to fight hair of the Faculty Senate,
plishments, reminded of future through thevallevsof life with
responsibilities and blessed with couragi leland said,sitting
� il ithei tlunng the com next to the podium in his
emenl ceremony last Sat w hei I h.ur
I i . leland also emphasized
iha .1 cenagroupol to the graduates the impor
said that de: �� - t Kiel
upsetting the in ft 'fr4 legn es, 430
their vears at EC"I the! . I - two PhDs
truK ii �: � tors of rm liane
atesand wished them the best i led
craclu
�ot makmea markm the
- -
.
from IV'
Henn lord
land said hat is important is not
i was high makingvourwav in the world
s enthusiasti but remaking the world
� '�- Cleland said
. . , ! .
; : . . ; :� t I 1 .1 to, re
� . enous message to t
raduates He 1 1
�� � � transition iron
� 1 Kennedy into n 1II ifi
( Inzzard 1 ou can't skip work at
bb Knight and others during eight o'ekxrk Hoggsaid,re-
hislh i. 1 inss fernng to students'tendency
1 leland is Secretary of State to skip morning classes
ot Georgia 1 disabled V ii I H�gg also spoke of the
nan tvell known importance of th graduates'
forhisinspirati 1 1 peakingand new role as alumni
until ingi improveli ing
conditilehandicapped We must support our
He urged the graduates to school and make sure it re-
take advantage of their new start mains respected and well-
ECU Pho�o Lab
Georgia Secretary ot State Max Cleland inspired the crowd at cor �
Alumni awards granted
Bv Robin Duffy
Suit vs

m
Dail Raad - ECU Photo Lab
Students purchase books and supplies at the Student Store for first summer session class-
Students seek summer education
Hv I racy Schwartz
I �'�� ;nun
s me will find themselves
spending time in the classroom
this summer
Students who enroll in sum-
mer school aro sub(il to longer
than usual classroom hours, five
days a week, tor a full six weeks.
"I always wind up spending
the whole cUv on campus one
student said "But it's worth it to
1 at h up on my studies
Enrollment tor the summer
sessions is steadily increasing
every year
According to preliminary
figures from the Department of
Planning and Institutional Re-
search 5,280 student ; are cur
rentlvi nrollcd in I rst �
sion of summer sh and
� 695 ireenrolledinthesecond
S'Ssi, n
"These figures are only
preliminary ones and can ei
t her in, reaseor decrease over
the next few weeks, Kather-
me d, research analyst tor
the department said
Hay is a recent E( U
graduate and shesaid she also
sjX'nt many summers sitting
in th' (lassroom.
went to every session
ot summer school just so 1
could graduate early j
said
List year's actual enroll
merit was 6.241 tor the first
session of summer school and
5 4fl tor the c ond session
ire hi;
this year's preliminary data
but many students don't n g
istor tor summer s hool until
the last minute. a said
"I went tosummerschool
a tew years ago because 1
needed to take a 1 rench class
and 1 heard it was easier in
summer school graduating
senior Alicia 1 ord said
For some, however,
summer school is not a pleas
ant choice.
"I went to summer st hnl
tor one session and 1 couldn t
stand it student Thomas
1 isher said 1 then decided
I'd just wait and finish up th'
rest of mv classes during the
regular schHl year
thro raJ
� �.
sch - ' �'
1
R I .
gomerv. Ala; Sally 1
Moselev I arl 1
Caroline Made!
V issembour
presented I
Awards at the pm
meneement 1 May 1

th a A
; � � � - � � �
' �
Mr. ft tv 1
ma tain a pei
record w hile shuffling a bus
football schedule is remark
able " saioStan larber a l �
chair of the Department of

as
� � in s
t is a
�. � f md .
� � rk and
: - l
' " . � . ored in pi-
ce i
semes
tersn ' ' it mvearin
edbv school
tacull e rruxiel h 1
in th� mush
nt
� �
�� � petit � and
- 1 A )S8. In 19S4
' � � . �
ichei
. � � n se

' . . was
: � r Mu
Outstanding Senior and in
, iousvears received th
Kappa I ambda Freshmanand
See Awards, page 3
State Auditor investigates
Creative Living Center
Bv 1 eC lair Harper
ih I JHor
rhe director of the r-
atu e 11 ing enter at EC I is
under investigation b the
State Auditor sOffice
1 "he office is looking into
actions.by Director Connie
kueni according to Ray
Mozingo of the State Auditor's
1 ttn � rhe office received a
tip bv telephone about three
weeksagp
"I"he allegations cow em
the possible thrtt of stat'
property and misuse of state
time 1ome,o said
l"he allegations were the
primary cortcem t the caller,
but the caller also mentioned
the possible misuse ofenter
money Moine.o said -t ex
ample of that tvpe ot misuse
would be an employee using
the Center s money to bu)
p�'rs)rwil items.
Investigators were sent to
campus aixl should be fin
ishl this week.
'Thev' ve talked to a lot ot
people.and looked through a
lot of records, Mozmgosaid
It the allegations are sub-
stantiated a report will besent
to the University which will
have 10 days to respond he-
ft ire th roport is made public
It the allegations are not
substantiated but other prob
lems ,1a1 found such as kvi
morale, the Auditor s office
will write a management let-
ter to make the chancellor
aware of those problems vd
to let him know the other al-
legations were not proven ac-
cording to Mozingo
It no other problems an'
found and the allegations are
not substantiated, the office
will inform the chancellor as
well. Mozingo said.
l"his investigation is not
connected with the previous
investigation at ECU con-
ducted bv the State Auditor s
Office This is a separate
hotline call. We consider it
routine in nature Mozingo
said





2 Bht tajat (Earolinf an May 22, 1991
CRIME Si'ENE
Non-students swimming in Wright Circle
f ountain receive verbal warnings
May 10
2115�Flanagan Building (east): student given campus citation for
one-way-street violation and no headlights.
2254�Main Entrance of campus: investigated suspicious activity.
Subject identified as student loading personal belongings. No action
taken.
2433�Belk Residence Hall (northeast): investigated suspicious sub-
jects around the bike racks.
042e�Green Bam: checked on an unconscious female. Same was
transported to her residence.
May 11
1019�Umstead Residence Hall, investigated report of suspicious
subject; same was gone on arrival.
1035 Garrett Residence Hall (northwest): investigated a report of
damage to personal property.
0104 Belk Residence Hall (east): responded to a complaint of loud
subjects Subjects were advised to be quiet.
0323 Belk Residence Hall: damage discovered to fire extinguisher
cases.
May 12
ill 18� Belk Residence 1 fall (east): responded to loud subjects at the
basketball court. Subjects located and advised to leave the area.
May 13
1919�Flanagan Building: responded toachemicalsptM. Health and
Safety was contacted.
2105- -New Fast Hank, responded to an alarm. A staff member was
advised.
2322 Belk Residence 1 lail: responded to a disturbance. Subject left
cooperatively.
0014 Rockspring Road: responded to a suspicious person. Subject
was identified and let go.
0609�Chancellor's Residence: checked with the staff in reference to
no electricity.
May 16
0758�Student Health Center responded to an alarm; same was
only a test.
0931�Spilman Building: responded to a disorderly conduct report.
May 17
0219�Wright Circle: gave a verbal warning to four non-students
swimming in the fountain.
May 18
2114�Joyner Library: responded to an activated biu- light phone.
0138�Location unknown: state citation given to non-student for
one-way-street violation.
May 19
0058�Garrett Residence Hall responded to an activated fire alarm
on the third floor. Alarm was activated by water leaking on the sensor.
Crime Scene la taken from official Public Safety logs
Pageant winner to compete on state level
By Lynn Hardison
Staff Writer
Miss Greater Greenville will
compete in the Miss North Carolina
Scholarship Pageant in Raleigh at
Memorial Auditorium, June 22-29.
Angela Joy Wiggs won the title
of Miss Greater Greenville and a
$1,000 scholarship in January a'
Wright Auditorium on the ECU
campus.
According to pageant officials,
Wiggs is the fi rst pagea nt wi nner in
Greenville since the earlier Miss Pitt
County was discontinued 20 years
ago.
Currently an ECU sophomore
majoring in nursing, the 19-year-
old Pike ville,N.C. native isa former
English major at Barton College in
Wilson.
Wiggs said becoming acertified
emergency medical technician
through a course at Wilson Tech-
nical Community College spurred
her interest in nursing. According
to Wiggs, she has also worked for
the Wayne County Volunteer Res-
cue Squad.
"I fell in love with the work and
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decided to major in nursing Wiggs
said.
The five-foot-four-inch, straw-
berry blonde said she did not enter
the Greenville pageant with the
expectation of winning.
"1 did it for the experience and
I thought it would be a good way to
get involved with the community
she said.
Wiggs will compete in June
against approximately 47 county
and city representatives from North
Carolina. In compliance with the
official Miss America Scholarship
Pageant rules, each contestant will
be judged in a seven-minute per-
sonal interview, talent, evening
gown and swimsuit competition.
Although she has six years of
training in piano, Wiggs says that
she plans to sing in the state talent
competition. Wiggs sang 'The Birth
of the Blues" in the Greenville
pageant but plans to sing Barbara
Streisand's bluesy version of
"Happy Days are Here Again" in
the Miss North Carolina Pageant.
Wiggs savs her preparation for
the June pageant includes cycling,
swimming and polishing her com-
munication skills in mock inter-
views with other pageant judges.
The interview counts 30 percent
of her score, and Wiggs says she is
the most prepared for that segment
of competition.
'I've had a lotof speech classes,
so interviewing comes easy she
said.
'I'll do the very best that I
can but when you get to the statt
pageant, everybody is a winner,
she said.
Wiggs will be competing in a
different segment each night of the
pageant preliminaries starting June
22. The top ten finalists will compel .
Wiggssaid she at leasthopesto Saturday, June 29 and the produc
be one of the ten finalists in the state tionwillbebroadcasthveonWITV
pageant. TV at 9 p.m.
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Shortened
ECU News Bureau
ECU put a compressed, 4 12
day work week schedule for most
of its empk)yees into effect last week
to save energy costs during the
summer.
Last summer, in combination
with a broad rans
1 ng measures, the cj
week resulted in
$250,000, univtTs
The work wi
from 7:30 a.m. untj
through ThursOdj
until 1130 a.m. ol
v
This student participates in late registration tor summ
(H)e �aat (Enrol
Director of Adverti
Gregory Jones
Advertising Represental
Troy Dreyfus Jim Knis
Patrick Pitzer Net hoi Bo
Advertising Production Ma
Warren Kesslcr
DISPLAY ADVERTISING Business
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Student $2.35 7j()
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iHIlt gaat (Carolinian May 22,1991 3
on state level
lntjudges TH the very bat that I
Itv Wpen ent can but when you ;ct to the state
L says -K-1- pageant, everybody is a winner
H it segment she said
Wiggs will be compiling in a
rent segment each night of the
pageant preHminariesstarting lune
22 Fhe lop ten finalists will compete
I Saturday, une 29 and the produc-
oonwillbebroadcastliveonWnN-
r at 9 pm
ivh classes
is -ho
�sin the state
of 5th �� Cotanche
)1 G 5th Street)
I products & services
thru June 30
s. conditioning coloring
itact Amy or Tom at
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i
Shortened work week saves energy, money
ECU News Bureau
ECU put a compressed, 4 12
day work week schedule for most
of its employees into effect last week
to save energy costs during the
summer.
Last summer, in combination
with a broad range of energy-sav-
ing measures, the compressed work
week resulted in savings of nearly
$250,000, university officials said.
The work week schedule is
from 7:30a.m. until 5 p.m. Monday
through Thursday and 730 a.m.
until 1130 a.m. on Fridays. It en-
? �&
.
4
ables ECU to cut off air condition-
ing in most campusbuildings from
noon Fridays until Monday morn-
ing. During the work week, ther-
mostats on campus are set at 78
degrees.
ECU alsoannounced that it will
invest $416,693 in matching funds
of a $342,914 U.S. Department of
Energy grant to implement energy
conservation projects in three resi-
dence halls, the campus heating
plant and distribution system.
According to The North Caro-
lina Department of Economic and
Awards
Community Development, ECU
will substitute the use of a new
small boiler for larger existing
equipment during the summer
months and add heat recovery
equipment on the existing boilers
with part of its grant.
Vice Chancellor for Business
Affairs Richard Brown said the
measures will result in saving
$173X133 a year and repay the in-
vestment in about three years.
V
r


21 �W
Ml I
Oail Rood � ECU Photo Lab
This student participates in late registration for summer school classes in Whichard Building on Monday.
Continued from page 1
Sophomore Awards.
During the past two summers,
she has studied in London and
Aspen, Colorado.
"Sally Moseley is one of the
strongest students the School of
Music has had to nominate for this
award sinceitsincepbon said Brad
Folev, acting dean of the School of
Music.
This summer Moseley will be
working as an intern at the Friends
of the Kennedy Center in Wash-
ington, D.C. and then plans to con-
tinue her studies at the University
of Maryland.
Orth graduated magna cum
laude with honors in political sci-
ence. Before coming to ECU in
1988, she studied in Strasbourg,
France and at Darton College in
Albany, Ga.
She was named the Outstand-
ing Senior of her department, and
has been an active volunteer in
service and chan table work in com-
munity and service organizations
on campus. She has also served as
an officer of ECU'S International
Student Association.
Dr.SandraVVurth-Houghofthe
Political Science Faculty and
Lucinda Wnght, International Stu-
dent Ad via rand Assistant Deanof
Student Development said in their
nominating letter "Caroline has
been and will continue to be a role
model not just for eastern Nort.i
Carolina students, but also for our
growing international student
population
They added that Orth "actually
finished about a year and a half
(undergraduate education) at a
French university, studying law
She came to the United States on a
student foreignexchangeprogram.
Orth plans to enter the Master's
Program in Public Administration
here at ECU.
Students are nominated by the
universitysaspecti,edepartments
and are required to have an overall
academic grade point average of
3.5. They must also have letters of
recommendation from their de-
partments.
These University Award win-
ners received engraved plaques,and
$500 scholarships in each student's
name for their outstanding records
will be established.
uJiie East (Earoltman
Director of Advertising
Gregory Jones
Advertising Representatives
Troy Dreyfus )im Knisdy
Patrick Pitzer Nechol Boone
Advertising Production Manager
Warren Kessler
Business Hours
Monday - Friday
7:30 - 5:30
757-6366
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
Local Open Rate $5.00
Student $2.35
per column inch
Bulk & Frequency Contract
Dicounts Available
IMPORT SEVICE
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Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Saab, VW, Porshe, Volvo,
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good thru 6-12-91
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FREE
MEDIUM TEA
(From 6pm-9pm Daily)
With Purchase of any platter.
Exp. 6-5-91
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Please present coupon
before ordering. No
limit on orders. Not
valid with any other
offers or dicounts.
L
SUPER SAVER COUPON
Full Meal Deal
(includes: Thigh, leg, vegetables and hush puppies)
� MM � Please present coupon
w W before ordering. No
) r limit on orders. Not
valid with any other
Exp. 6-5-91 offers or dicounts
7&
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When it's hot
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Hours:
Sun-Thurs 10-9
Fri-Sat 10-10
626 S. Memorial Dr.
Greenville, NC
(by Pitt County Memorial Hospital)
N3)OiH3 aamj 6-a-Hva

m r





Campus Spectrum
2Hj� lEftHt (Enrnltntan History professor defends his position
Ma
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Gregory Jones, Director of Advertising
LeClair Harper, News Editor Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Matt King, Features Editor Stuart Rosner, Systems Engineer
Matt Mumma, Sports Editor Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Steve Reid, layout Manager JEFF Parker, Staff Illustrator
Amy Edwards, Copy Editor Margie O'Shea, Classified Ads Technician
Kerry Nester, Copy Editor Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The African Studies Committee and the this term with three experts in philosophy, and they
Women's Studies Executive Committee have criti- can find nothing Hegelian in my statements. Have
cized my recent reply to Mr. Darek McCullers as the committees really studied the metaphysics of the
being "reactionary, myopic and Hegelian They early 19th century philosopher? Or is it that they
also object to my 'tone" and suggest that I have simply wish to sound both obscure and learned in
"failed to meet the generally high standards expected the same sentence?
fhe EastCarolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that directly affects
ECU students. During the ECU summer sessions. The East Carolinian publishes once a week with a circulation of 5,000. The
EMI Carolinian reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisements that discriminate on the basis of age, sex, creed
N n Jiional origin. The masthead editorial in each edition does not necessarily represent the views of one individual, but, rather,
I d majority opinion of the Editorial Board. The EastCarolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should
v limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit letters for
;niblication. Letiers should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville, N.C
27834. and be signed. For more, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Thursday, May 22, 1991
of university professors I object to these character-
izations for a number of reasons:
� My reply to Mr. McCullers was based on the
specific points he raised. It was his views that Euro-
peans were committed to the "Big Lie They were,
he said, an "oppressive and hypocritical minority
and he spoke if this oppressive hypocrisy as being
"the white way of thinking The committees who
wrote against me do not decry this kind of language
and mentality, and do not respond in their letter to
the arguments which I raised. If the committees feel
"tone" to be so important to the University commu-
nity, why did they not respond to Mr. McCullers
when he wrote his column? Their indignation is
excruciatingly selective I nominate them for the
ECU Political Correctness Award for 1991.
� The committees' use of "buzz words" like
"reactionary" and "myopic" are simply bitsof jargon
to suggest embitters diagreement. This is not a
reasoned response, but actually much more like Mr.
McCullers who, for all I know, mav be a member of
these committees.
� I am at a loss to understand the meaning of
"Hegelian" in the present context. I have discussed
. The committees' letter beg:ns with "W. the
undersigned but they do not identify themseh
except under the rubric of "committees Surely this
isa violation of academic courtesy as well as the rales
governing open debate. They wish to question mv
objectivity while remaining hidden in the crowd
This is a regrettably inquisitorial stance.
I suggest that the committees' response is, quite
simply, an unfair one. It is a politically correct in vo-
tive rather than reasoned analysis. In closing, ho
ever, in view of the fact that the committee's call
attention to "high standards I must point out that
the anonymous writers' use of the term "enjoin as
in
enjoin a serious and productive debate is
in-
correct This is not a typo, but an elementary vocabu
lary error. The anonymo is writers think that it mea i -
to "join in" a debate, whereas it actually means I
"direct "command" or "prohibit none of whi
have done. In fact I "entered into" a debate The
author, authors or committees who applied their
"high standards" in crafting the letter in quest
will recognize that the distinction is not a subtle i n.
Michael Ennght
History Di partment
Campus Spectrum
Trim the fat, not the budget's meat Scholars meet, disappoint educator
There must have been an outbreak of
irtd stupidity in Raleigh.
North Carolina, like the federal gov-
ernment, is in debt. Lawmakers in Raleigh
are grasping at straws to find a solution, and
as a result, many state-run agencies, ECU
.Hid the other public universities for ex-
ample, expect their budgets to be cut.
The state representatives' logic appears
to be based on the foolish belief that large
organizations like universities can afford to
do without state money, hence their pro-
posed budget cut.
"Budget cur" is an idiomatic term that
has come into mainstream language as of
late. Like many other expressions, people
tend to ignore the more harsh, more true
word that the expression is associated with.
Apparently "terminate" or "lay off" are
easier to say than "fire" when you are in the
process of firing someone.
These euphemisms hide the reality of
the action behind them. State representa-
tives plan to cut the budgets of state univer-
sities, but the plans devised by those wea-
sels in Raleigh will slowly choke the state
university system to death.
Under a plan proposed by the state
t louse, ECU alone will lose $10.4 million
dollars from 1991 to 1993. Under a slightly
kinder and gentler proposal from the N.C.
Senate, ECU will lose only $9.5 million dol-
:s.
These reductions come after 3 percent
pi all staff positions were annulled and
-ending in all departments was curtailed.
If the House members have their way,
67 faculty members will be fired; 62 will be
unemployed under the senate plan.
Faculty reductions will also decrease
the number of classes available to students,
and the classes that remain will be over-
crowded.
If either of the proposed plans are en-
acted, North Carolina, the state that not too
long ago ranked 49th in Scholastic Aptitude
Test scores will be providing its young
people a substandard higher education to
go with their substandard elementary and
secondary education.
Perhaps, in their youth, our present
legislators had unwise representatives who,
then just as now, thought highly of substan-
dard education.
Some of the money needed to help bal-
ance the budget can be found in the salaries
of state employees. But only certain em-
ployees. The salaries of graduate assistants
or instructors � non-tenured faculty mem-
bers should not be lowered. That would
give possible educators reason to enter an-
other field.
A handful of professors, all employed
by the School of Medicine, make more money
per year than Chancellor Richard Eakin,
who gets paid $109,179. a year. Surely
these professors are highly qualified, but
Drs James Jones, Page Hudson, Yash Kataria,
Robert Bolande, Jascha Danoff and M.G.
Gilliland � with combined salaries total-
ling $784,059.47 � should not have higher
salaries than Eakin.
The six medical school professors have
served ECU well, one for more than 24
years, but another has been here for less
than two years. Admittedly, the work of
these professors is for the good of the School
of Medicine, and likewise for the good of the
University-
Howe ver, they are overpaid.
If the state legislature wants to find
money to pay for their budget mishaps, they
should look no further than the salaries of
overpaid state employees.
J thought it necessary to write this letter in part
as an antidote to the recent coverage of the National
Association of Scholars (NAS). I attended its first
meeting three weeks ago and found it illustrative of
anything but the values of fruitful debate and merit
and excellence of scholarship.
I'll use one incident to show what I mean. One
professor there from the history department made a
speech denouncing what he calls the p.cs (not per-
sonal computers, but soalled "politically correct"
people), and he claimed that Paul de Man, a leading
figure in literary and critical theory, was a Nazi and
wroteNazi articles, and is the chief guru of the p.cs.
I interjected � I have done much research and pub-
lished work on Paul de Man and regularly corre-
spond with Ortwin de Graef, who discovered the
existence of the wartime writings in question four
years ago � that he was absolutely inaccurate about
this. For one thing, out of roughly 200 literary and
music reviews that de Man wrote (at ages 20 to 22),
one has been characterized as anti-semitic. Inexcus-
able, but it is absolutely inaccurate to make the very
serious and slanderous charge that he was a Nazi.
Second, it is ridiculous to claim de Man is the
focal point of the p.cs, since de Man and the literary
theory he is associated with, de-construction, has
been roundly attacked by most political critics for
being apolitical, for denuding texts of any referential
or political consequence. If the history professor
knew the facts and had done research, he would
know that this was so. Third, it's a tenuous connec-
tion at best to reason from the premise that Paul de
Man wrote Nazi articles, therefore p.cs are Nazis.
What was his response? He shot off a barrageof
invective, pointing at me, shouting, and calling me a
"p.ccommisar" and saying various things associat-
ing me with Soviet politics. His characterizations of
me were totally unfounded � hedoesn't know meor
my work � and verge on slander. But what seems
especially ironic to me is that I only called him to task
on the grounds that the NAS supposedly represents
and that one of his colleagues eloquently defined:
merit in research and scholarship. Mv one fault was
that I perhaps spoke too vehemently, but I take those
protocols of scholarship and excellence very seri-
ously and have worked very hard to abide by them.
I think the scene I've just recounted is indica-
tive of the argument I heard there: projecting the
outline of an opponent with no concern for the facts,
the resort to slander when questions are raised,
generalizations from little or inaccurate evidence,
and so on. This, to me, is contrary to the ideals of the
western university. I hope especially that the stu-
dents who were there were not swayed by this anti-
communist, name-calling rhetoric.
Further, there are several issues that need ;
examined in relation to NAS, particularly in li
its national profile of late. As I take it, they are against
the pressure to conform among alleged politii
correct groups. Fair enough. But just as they call to
question the p.cs, they should question their own
categories.
First,despite their disavowal of a political starxt
I remain skeptical. The NAS is very seriously funded
(over $500,000 a year), by the Coors Foundation and
other politically questionable groups has drawn
members like Jeanne Kirkpatnck and l.vnne Chene)
and has been used as whetstone :n the recent attack
on the humanities, manifested in the severe scaling
down of the National Endowment for the Humani
ties and in attacks from those outside the academv
like Roger Kimball of The New Criterion.
These attacks belie a profound anti-intellevtu.i
ism and are no help to any of our disciplines A Is.
this point of politics, if they deny any affiliation why
do they need a group? What is the purpose of orgj
nizing? There is no correlate group of alleged pc s
should have thought that it would be far better to be
an independent scholar, autonomous from any gi
pressures.
Second, about the category of merit and the
great books. As one of my colleagues � and an NAS
supporter � put it, the canon or great nooks has
alwayschanged and shifted. Values are not universal
or transcendent as regards the canon This is not to
say that there are no values or that merit is a vacant
concept; rather, that concept has to be much more
fully examined and it indeed is affected by historical
pressures.
Finally, to close, I'd ask why all these people art-
going to all this effort. If one were to be at all informed
about the field of theory, which I profess and which
isa focal point of the attack on p.cs, one would kno
that the field is an incredibly contested and argued
one. There iscertainly no single ascendant partv, bul
at least eight to 10 major positions along with a flock
of minor ones.
Someone like Stanley Fish is attacked bv critk s
of science, they are in turn attacked by de-constnK
tive critics, who are in turn attacked bv Marxist
critics, who are then attacked by feminist critics, and
so on. My real impression of many of the members of
the NAS is that they are just making a final stab at a
larger field that has passed them by and at a critical
conversation that has moved on since they were last
immersed in it � sometime, 1 suppose, when thev
were in graduate school.
Jeffrey Williams
English Department
Letters To The Editor
Media Board member
defends yearbook decision
To The Editor.
Today I opened your paper and saw yet another
attack on the Media Board. I served as a day student
representative (for the 1990-91 year) on the Media Board
and would like to set the record straight.
I, too, am disappointed that asa graduating senior
I will not have a yearbook to share with my children. I,
too, paid an activity fee that included a yearbook. None
on the Media Board members are compensated for our
long hours of deliberation. All members serve on at
least on other campus organization, as does David
Bailey.
Perhaps we all have "spent too much time plac-
ing the blame on others The East Carolinian's general
manager and other staff members have been present at
all this past year's board meetings and the bulk of
editorial material has been on the yearbook's demise,
not the early problems.
Problems fist began in Feb. 1991 when the
yearbook's (general manager reported that the academ-
ics editor was not doing her job. One month later the
general manager and business manager resigned. We
advertised to fill all positions. In early April the board
entertained the idea of compiling the book ourselves in
order to save it. Wedecided thatour schedules leftusill-
prepared to do that, hence the vote to suspend this
year's publication.
Our intent was no to justify the decision to sus-
pend the 1991 publication, but to find out what students
wanted done with the money set aside for the Buccaneer
Several alternatives had been suggested, including a
magazine-style book published twice yearly. Only about
200 student bothered to fill out the five-question form.
SGA President (for the 1990-91 year) Allen Tho-
mas' suggestion that the survey did Aot represent the
SGA's or the student body s opinions may be correct. I
wish Mr. Thomas had attended more than one of the
regularly scheduled Media Board meetings that he held
a seat on. SGA Legislator Courtney Jones was correct
when she said the SGA needed to have a voice in this.
They need to have their people attend board meetings
and vote! �
The door is not closed on the Buccaneer. If students
feel strongly about the issue they should write or call
their SGA representatives, apply to work on next year's
book attend the open Media Board meetings or call the
Media Board at 757-6009.
I hope for future seniors that there is an outcry
that generates enough interest to continue this ECU
tradition.
Dave Robertson
Senior
Communications
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��M Corporation 1991





trum
his position
in philosophy and thev
statements. Have
ro taph)sicsofthe
� is it that thev
ire and learned in

th 'We the
themselves
Surely this
las the rules
uestion my
the crowd
is quite
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question
one
oint educator
I to be
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has drawn
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Bucemmr.
ri-hiding a
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� on form.
' ' ' year) Allen Tho-
lid not represent the
student body's opinions may be correct. I
h had attended more than one of the
a Board meetings that he held
irtney (ones was correct
eded to have a voice in this.
people attend board meetings
foor is not closed on the Buccaneer If students
y about the issue they should write or call
epresentahves, apply in work on next year's
Id the open Media Board meehngs or call the
�rd at 757-6009
for future seniors that there is an outcry
It, s enough interest to continue this ECU
Robertson
runications
There's an IBM PS2
made for every student body.
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wcabte
(Model HP 3630-A) 7))
I BM PS2
Model m 286 (HI)
Vfodel .55 SX (Tii)
Model 70 (T6I)
$3JD
Prr loaded
with IBM IK)S 1.0
and Microsoft Window 3.0
Whether you need a computer to write papers or create
graphics, charts and spreadsheets, theirs an I BM Personal
Svstem2" that's riht for you.
The IBM PS2" family of computers lias everything
vou asketl lorincluding preloaded software, a special
student price and affordable loan pavments. All models
come xv it 11 IBM DOS IjQ, Microsoft indon - 3.0. m �
diskette drive and an IBM Mouse.
Trx one on for size, e re sore xou
just right.
nd on a different note, tor
onlx $599, von can get the Roland
Desktop Music System that
transforms Your IBM PS2 with
�' i ii.ii! I into an ev �iy.
comprehensive music maker.
find one that fk&
ALL SOLUTION OFFERINGS EXPIRE MAY 31, 1991
PLACE YOUR ORDER TODAY WHILE SUPPLIES I .AST
ECU STUDENT STORES
757-6731
ThK a,y, nniv to Qualified college sttidents faculty and staff that purchase IBM Selected Academe Solutions trough participating campus outlets or IBM 1 800 222 T2S7 Prices quoted do not include sates tax handfcnqartar
r-rrZZCheck with your institution regarding these charges Orders are subiect to availability Prices are subject to change and IBM may withdraw the offer at any time without written notice 'Microsoft Word for Widows Mrocsott
SrrXinwii Utilities are Academe Editions t ZSoft SottType is the Academic Version � IBM Propnnter Personal System, 2 PS2 and Micro Channel are reqister-d trademarks of mternattonal Business Macranas Ce-pawhaP .
Mroisa re�sl�red trademark of Microsoft Corporation Roland is a registered trademark of Roland Corooration US "Windows and Word for Windows are trademarks o� Microsoft Corporation hDC Windows UttttM � a trademaft off
hOC ComputerCorporalion ZSott SottType a trademark o� ZSoft Corporation
�IBM Corporation 1991





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m ade for every student body.
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IBM PS2
Model 30 286 (I 31)
1M II meroory
30MB fiwd disk driw
8513 Color Display
Preloaded software:
IBM DOS 1.0
Mil r. .i�ft' indows " 3.0,
onl for Vt indowe
hlH: Windows I lilitie
Soft SoftTvp
$1,799
ibm ps2
Model 55 S (i 31)
2MB iiit'iiini
30MB fixed disk drh
8513 Color Display
lrpoackd software:
IBM M�v o
Mn rrsofl inflows 4 (X
Xnnl for 1'induw
IiIm Windows I liiities
ZSoft iilt'l)i �
$2,3 N
IBM PS2
Mode 55 SX (W6I)
2MB memory
nOMB fixed disk drh
l )olor �i.)l;i
Preloaded boniKare:
IBV
Mn pi-uit W , �� ma .
Word inr inflows and r I
hlM indows I tilkies
ZSofl Soft'Type
IBM PS2
In. If! 70(W61)
IVIJ mpmon
60MB fixed disk drive
8515 Color Display
Preloaded software:
IBM DOS lo
Miriiolt Xindows Vu.
Word lot W indowa and Excel
11 M W widow- I liiities
ZSofl SoftType!
$3,999

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Printers
IBM Proprintn 1Y
w mil i al4�'
(11 Model iii) s 291
IBM I aserPrinter I
.lll�
(�H)W 1,h, I in, $1,039
Hewlett-laekani Paintjel
color i'r.i�lii(�- printer
r.llllr
(Model HP 3630-A) s 7M)
IBM PS2
Model 30 286 (T31)
$r,64
Model 55 SX (T6I)
$2,699
Model 70 (T61)
$3399
Preloaded
Nvith IBM DOS L0
and Microsoft Windows 3.0

liother you n i �l a computer to write papers or create
graphics charts and spreadsheets, there's an IBM Personal
System2 that's right for you.
Tlie IBM PS2 famih of computers has everything
yon asked for including preloaded software, a special
stiilent i iee and affordable hum payments. Ml models
come with IBM DOS L0, Microsoft Window s 3.0,3.5-iro i
diskette drive and an IBM Mouse.
Tr one on lor size. We re sure vou II lind one that lit
jut right.
iid on a different note, for
onk $599, vou can get the Roland
I desktop Music System that
transforms vou r BM PS2 with
! I ll 11!
com pre
hensi
into -in et iii �.
e music m�
aker.
ALL SOLUTION OFFERINGS EXPIRE MAY 31, 1991
PLACE YOUR ORDER TODAY WHILE SUPPLIES I .AST
ECU STUDENT STORES
757-6731
�tm.�m��. i outadODteo��hidt�.tlculty�nd��H that purchase IBM Setected Academic Soluftons thi (hpa pattngcampu � '��� ' �M i 800222 7257 Prices quoted do not include sa�:s tax h.andimo andar
���mrhl' Us Ch k with voui institution regarding these charges Orders are sublet to availability Puces are sub)e I r, nange and IBM "nay withdraw the offer at any time without written not.ee -Microsoft Woid for Widows Mjoosott
f.?7ftrvw ndows i It.l.ties are Academic Editions 1 ZSott SoftType is the At adem.c Version � IBM Proprmter Personal SystemPS 2 and Micro Channel are reqte�-l trademark- s of international Business Maonnes Co'pota-
KAcrosofl -sa riqisteVed trademark of Microsoft Corporation Roland is a regu �� � h Kteman erf Roland Corporation US "Windows and Word tor Wind � M "M remarks of Mirso�1 Corporaon hDC Windows UW "es is a trademark of �he
hOC Computer Corporation ZSoH SoftType m a trademark of ZSoft Corporation
I IBM Corporation 1991






QEhg gggf (Carnliman
Mxv 22, 1991
CLASSIFIEDS
Hf I t WANTED
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at home. Callfor
information 504-6418003 Ext. 5920.
M AKE$50(V$1500 WEEKLY stuffing
envelopes at home! Start now�rush
S.A.S.E. plusSl .00 to Home Employ-
ers, Inc. 1120 Plain 8B, Las Cruccs,
NM 88001.
WANTED: ACTORS WHO WANT
SUMMER WORK: This summer
actors are needed for an acting troupe
titled THE ACTORS MEDIUM.
Workshops will be innovative and
nsk-taking. Performances will be held
at THE NEW DELI. Call only if
dedicated. 757-2944.
FEMALE EXOTIC DANCERS
WANTED: For adult night club.
Must be 18 years. 756-6278.
MOTHER'S HELPER: In the after-
noon. Must drive. No smoking. Call
355-2217 after 6 pm.
NOTICES
COMING SOON: This summer at
The New Deli - An independently
run acting group, The Actors Me-
dium. 4 shows will appear this sum-
mer free of charge. Come enjoy this
student - run production on Monday
and Tuesday evenings.
FOR SALE
BRAND NEW ROLLER BLADES:
Lightning 608, BlackSaturn, Size 9
12, Used 1 hour. They retail for
S209.00. Best offer. Call Lee
Armbruster at 355-4002 or contact
Bicycle Post on Arlington.
WANTED: Musical Instruments for
consignment sales: guitars - banjos -
mandolins - violins - cellos - bass -
horns - amps - keyboards - drums.
Gilbert's Music, 2711 E. 10th St. 757-
2667. 20 commission cost. Jim and
Debbie.
KOR SAl f
1982 LES PAUL- Burgundy with
white pick guard. $500 firm. 1983
Ibanez Blazer Srrat-type. Red with
tremlo. $400 neg. Bom in excellent
condition. 757-3057. Leave message.
FOR Rf NT
HOUSE FOR RENT: 3 bedroom, 2
bath. 3 blocks from campus. Central
ACheat. $550 per month. Call im-
mediately! 830-8994.
GORGEOUS DUPLEX: A vailableall
summer. 2 bedrooms, 2 full bathsand
furnished! Great location and large
yard! $390 per month plus deposit.
Please call 757-0629 for more infor-
mation.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
At least both summer sessions.
$157.50 per month plus 12 utilities.
2 bedroom, 1 bath. No pets. Call 355-
1644.
WILLIAMSBURG MANOR
APARTMENTS: Available now and
August 15th. New 1 and 2 bedroom
apartments. Washer and dryer
hookup. Sorry, no pets. 355-6187 or
355-3647.
ROOM FOR RENT: $135.00 plus
utilities. Only college students non-
smokers. Prior applicants need not
apply. Year lease. Available August
1st, 1991 through July, 1992. Summer
sub-leasing available. Call 1 -301 -972-
8543 between 6 pm and 9pm, M - F.
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female
upperclassman or grad student to
share duplex, six blocks from campus.
$125.00 per month rent. 12 utilities.
Available for fall spring semesters.
Call after 6 pm.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Ringgold Towers
Now Taking Leases for August
1991 - 1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, &
Efficency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
WELCOME
BACK
STUDENTS!
� iieauului Place to Live
� All New �
� And Rcailv 1 u Rent �
UNIVERSITY PARTIV!ENTS
2M9 ! L 5 Si reel
�Located Near ECU
�Near Major ShoprinS Centers
-Ai.rui� i;rom Highway 1'auol Suujo
Lamaed Offer - S30 a month
Contact I.T. or Tommy Willurnt
756-7815 or 830-IV37
Office open Apt 8. 12 - 5 30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS-
unctu effcien tre �� ind �wet ��alKl. irr
-n otfli fV Coup�-� .0141c.�uv 120 uncmttr.
1 imam taoa HOMIi HOMt ki n l �a-pn�
t jttics �fUTK�i. -ii�J MM �iic� �! Aa.e�
oucou r Bruo. �c. Cuiiiry Uah
GoMaCI J T or Tommy Williams
7S6 "815
Need Money For College
Over 6-X billion dollars
in scholarship money
(80Vt requires no proof of nccu
goes unclaimed every year
For information write nr call:
LBJ FINANCIAL SERVICES
PO Box 2686
Greenville, NC 27858
(919)355-6602
We guarantee six Mm of
nongovernmental aid or we will giv.
you your money back
WE NEED YOUR EXPERIENCE
Your achievements in everyday situ-
ations can be useful to others. Earn
that feeling of accomplishment Real
Crisis Center is recruiting volunteer
crisis counselors for our telephone
hot-line and walk-in center. We will
be offering training classes in this
enrichingfield beginning June3,1991.
Call 758-HELP or come by 312 East
10th Street.
INCE�ASEDFEES FOR ClEP
Effective July 1, 1991, the College
Level Examination Program (CLEP)
fees will increase from $38.to.$45
Individuals registering by the hne
28 deadline for the July test will need
to write two checks: one for $38 made
out to CLEP and one for $7 made out
to Fast Carolina University.
STOP SMOKING
The Student Health Service offers the
American Society Smoking Cessation
program free of charge to all stu-
dents, staff and faculty. The program
begins Tuesday, May 28th and runs
for fourconsecuti ve weeks. Class time
is 12 noon -1 pm. To sign up call 757-
6794.
TEENS!
Dial-A-Teen is interested in your
valuable time. We are looking for
special teens, between the ages of 15
and 18, who would like to volunteer
their invaluable listening skills to help
others in crisis. We are offering train-
ing classes for our teen hotline be-
ginning June 3,1991. Call 758-HELP
or.come by 312 East 10th Street.
IEEE
(INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL &
ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS)
An Amateur Radio (HAM Radio)
Novice License course will be taught
here on campus Thursday nights 6:30
- 9:30 pm from May 23rd to August
1st, 1991. Anyone interested should
sign their name on the sheet on the
IEEE bulletin board outside room F-
105. For more information contact
Dr. Stan Garren or Dr. Jerry Tester at
F-133,757-6018,or Donna Dunnehoo
at F-209,7574148. You may also sign
up during the May 23 and June 6
meetings.
HEY!
Staff writers
needed for Fea-
tures, Sports
and News De-
partments
Apply to
The East Carolinian,
Publications Bkjg
(across from the Library)
CLASSIFIED ADS AND
ANNOUNCEMENTS
RATES
Classified Ads
1st 25 words:
For Students$2.00
Non-studentsS3.00
any ad forlibel,obsceniry,and
or bad taste.
Fraternities and sororities
MUST write out all Greek let-
ters.
You must fill out your name,
address, phone number, and
ID number.
Eachadditional wordS .05
Announcements
Please notify the paper imme-
diately if your ad is incorrect. Each announcement may run 2
We will not be responsible for times free of charge. After the
incorrect ads after the first day first 2 times the charge will be:
of publication.
1st 25 words:
We reserve the right to reject For students$2.00
For non-students53.00
Fachadditional word$ .05
All announcements are to be
typed or neatly printed.
Hue to the limited amount of
space available, The East
�. arolinian cannot guarantee
the publication of announce-
ments. It is not advisable to
rely on these announcements
as a sole means of communi-
cation.
Summer Iadline
Monday at 4:00 pm for
Wednesday's publication.
CU alumn
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
"Michael Eury, a graduate of
JU, has the job of his dreams,
fter completing his degree,
lichael Eury faced the cold world
Lth a desire to work in the comic
jook industry, and after a few years
began to live his dream; he is
jrrentlv an editor for DC Comics.
The ECU alumnus grew up in
oncord, NC (near Charlotte),
Ihere his dream saw its beginnings.
e can recall nding his bike to the
earesl store to buy his supply of
-imics. The comics; Batman, Su-
erman, Justice League of Amenca,
iegan to become a passion, an ob-
ssion for him.
He can recall asking his father
pick up some comics on his way
ime from work. His interest was
Jso inspired by the Adam West
Batman" television series w hich
Le admits now was a little campy)
I well as the George Reeves reruns
"Superman
In junior High School he can
member drawing little cartoons
out his friends. He would make
em into superheroes and have
i?m nght each other
The entertainment his mends
jceived from these caused Eury to
ink about a career in comics. He
ever lost his interest in comics
rough his entire life, and is now
proaching his 13th year as a comic
Eader. He fondly remembers he-
es of the comic medium such as
Neal Adams and Curt Swa
In his college years (19
he turned his studies to mi
specific field of study
trombone In his sophor
his love of comics caus
change to an art major.
He quickly realized tr
art, you have to be verv d
and spend a lot of time
the craft: time he felt he did
SO he then switched back I
As far as his college c
says. "Even though I'm
my degree actively, mv cc
penence was a great one
maimed, mv college experil
the best of my life. 1 go
education at ECU even l
not using mv degree.
education I got there in
seventies helped me with i
doing now
After graduation, hd
back to theCharlotte area a
his life in the career world
jobs ranging from a school
to cable access channel w
record store, to a pizza
convenience store, to wor
television writer, to a t
camera man, to playing
in a jazz band Finally he I
as an aspiring stand up a;
He moonlighted wit
telegrams. While doing
he met his wnfe Rose. Re
began a career in a groui
they found traveling waj
their relationship.
Settling in Delaware
s�
-Photo Courtaay o� I
I Frank Sinatra, The Great One, calibrates his recent 75th btj
a world tour and a 75 song CD package that rs now avatlac �
STUDENT
Up Coming Evens in Mi
Chill Out and Make-Ycajr-Own Ice Cream
Thursday, May 23 3-4:30pm
The Underground Nightclub
Ground Floor, Mendenhall
jo Your Frwds For A CooiTkai
Sksnsobb) By Thi Student Union Productions f
Recreation Open Housi
Free Bowung, Bruardi ft Tarutwni
GtOUNDrHOURMWDBMAa
12:30-2:30mi
For RouND-TK-Ooa Campw Enwwnmbw I
Cau Tk Siuknt Unwn Proqram How
757-6400





May 22, 1991
22,1991
SHig iEaat (Earnlfman
7
- -�
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Ringgold lowers
or( ollege
I IAI SER H ES
POBox .

i
)
CU alumnus joins the ranks of DC Comics
By Cliff Coffey
SUM Writer
. Eury, a graduate of
the �h ot his dreams.
nplering his degree,
urj faced the cold world
re 10 work in the comic
liustry andafterafcwyeara
: live his dre.im; he is
i- editor tor DC Comics.
I alumnus grew up in
M (near Charlotte),
ream i wits beginnings.
ill riding his bike to the
re to buy his supplv of
"he comics; Batman, So-
'I eagueof America,
he ome a passion, an ob-
� - ill asking his father
- me comics on his way
rk I Hs interest was
by the Adam West
vision series (which
was a little campy)
leorge Reeves reruns
an '
, r I ligh School he can
� drawing little cartoons
nds He would make
supcrherocs and have
each other.
rtainment his friends
these caused Eury to
i (areer in comics. He
� his interest in comics
mire life, and is now
ghis 13th ear as a comic
remembers he-
mi medium such as
Neal Adams and Curt Swan.
In his college years (1975-1980)
he turned his studies to music. His
specific field of study was the
trombone. In his sophomore year
his love of comics caused him to
change to an art major.
Hequickly realized that tobein
art, you have to be very dedicated
and spend a lot of time perfecting
the craft: time he felt hedidn't have,
so he then switched back to music.
As far as his college career, he
says, "Even though I'm not using
my degree actively, my college ex-
perience was a great one. Until I got
married, my college experience was
the best of my life. I got a great
education at ECU even though I'm
not using mv degree. The English
education I got there in the late
seventies helped me with what I'm
doing now
After graduation, he moved
back to theCharlottearea and began
his life in the career world with odd
jobs ranging from a school teacher,
to cable access channel worker to a
record store, to a pizza place, to a
convenience store, to working as a
television writer, to a television
camera man, to playing trombone
in a jazz band. Finally he settled in
as an aspiring stand up comedian.
He moonlighted with singing
telegrams. While doing stand up,
he met his wife Rose. Rose and he
began a career in a group act, but
thev found traveling was hard on
their relationship.
Settling in Delaware, he began
to realize that comic books still held
interest, and he began to submit
work. After a few small sales, and
turning 30, he realized it was time to
get serious. He then wrote letters to
Comico Comics and DC Comics
desiring employment as an editor.
Comico Comics head editor Diana
Schutz quicklv hired him on as an
associate editor. He then moved to
Norristown, Pennsylvania, home of
Comico Comics.
After working with Comico
Comics for four months he was
promoted to hill-rime editor and
began to edit one of their most
popular titles, "Elementals He
ended up taking on five other titles.
"Trollords "Sam and Max,
Freelance Police Officers "Maze
Agencv" and "Gumbv's Winter Fun
Special
He saw that Comico was be-
ginning to experience economic
difficulty and decided to obtain his
life long dream, to work for DC
Comics. He wrote a letter, once
again, to Dick Giordano, the head
editor, asking for a chance to rulhil
hislife'sdream. Dick Giordano and
editor Mike Carhn gave him the
opportunity. Michael Eury packed
up and moved to New York in the
summer of 1989 and began his ca-
reer with DC Comics.
His first assignments were on
the "Hawk and Dove" and "New
Gods" series. He later got thechance
to develop a new version of DCs
"Who's Who series. He did such a
spectacular job that Marvel Comics
quickly followed with their own
version (which does not touch the
DC version). The praise for this col-
lection has yet to diminish.
As an editor for comic books,
his job is to keep the creative staff of
the comic ondeadlinesand keeping
the story in each comic as clear as
possible. The writer, the penciller,
the inker, the colonst, the letter are
all kept on schedule by him. He
helps the writer keep the story in-
teresting and moving.
He helps the penciller keep as
close to the story that the writer has
turned in. The writer also helps the
penciller understand what he wrote.
As the editor has has to keep every-
one on schedule, and since each
member of the team is working on
a different issue simultaneously, it
can be verv confusing and frustrat-
ing at times. The editor acts like a
coach keeping his team psyched up
and creating the best comics they
can.
His biggest treat was
when he took over "The
Legion of Superheroes
which he stopped
editting to become Dick
Giordano's assistant.
Now he is starting to ed 11
the book again. He has
big plans for the Legion,
including a projected
new title. Keith Giffen,
who has been the heart
of the Legion for many
vears, has recently re-
turned to the book. Mr
Eury has great expectations for the up-and-coming projects that are
title with Keith Giffen back at the
helm. He feels that the stories being
done are going to be very interest-
ing.
He gave some insights to some
brewing in DC Comics. Some of the
printable previews that he divulged
are the line of DC Comics trading
cards and a new Legion of Superhe-
See Editor, page 8
r
Sinatra offers audiophile treasure
By Matt King
Features Editor
After five decades Of Tom
Jonesish showmanship, hver-
hardening drinking, lung-harden-
ing smoking, speculative scandal
for the media mill, B-grade movie
appearances and melodramatic
bravado vou would think all Frank
Sinatra's time would have been
consumed.
Not true, Old Blue Eyes has
over the vears set aside ust enough
time and talent to lay down some
fetching songs. To most Sinatra
enthusiast their is one particularly
fruitful period in The Great one's
career.
In 1953, Sinatra joined the
Capitol Records label and began an
association that lasted seven years.
Some of his most famous and well-
liked recordings came from this
contractual bond.
All of the songs of this period
were arranged by Nelson Riddle
and Gordon Jenkins. Among the
musical conceptions in this fruitful
batch are songs like, "I've Got The
World On A String "I Get A Kick
Out Of You "In The Wee Small
Hours Of The Morning" and the
perpetual finger snapper, "The Lady
Is A Tramp
To commemera te Si natra' s 75 th
birthdav he, in collaboration with
Capitol Records is releasinga three-
compact disc, 73-song musical
retrospectrum of his productive
vears in Capitol's studios. All the
cuts on the CD are the original
remixed and digitally cleansed of
anv time turned flaws.
For anvone that enjoys lending
an ear to a tune this tribute to the
ltaliansinger is a almost worth the
$ 1 (X) price tag. But for that hundred
dollars not only do you get the music
vou also receive a 40-page photo
montage of the Sinatra persona.
The booklet portrav s Old Blue
Eves, flirting with Nancy Reagan,
snaking a fist at Sinnaed O'Connor,
wiping the drool off a wheelchair
bound Joe Lewis and stirring his
martini with a ciggarette.
Along with this stunning
booklet the purchaser also receives
a linnen pouch that would adorn
anv coffee table nicely.
And just to make the deal
square the Frankster will throw a
quart of his special, formulated at
home pasta sauce. Sugo Da Tavola,
which in Italian means shaken not
stirred is rumoured to be a true
Italian masterpeice of the palete.
For the seriosSinarra follower a
six hour miniseries on videotape is
available for the provocative price
of $29.95. The miniserious details
the life and timesof Sinatra from the
objective prospective of his daugh-
ter.
So don't be scarred to beat
Blockbuster to it.
Thor
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
Reid
-Photo Courtoay of Caoftol I
- Sinatra. The Great One, celibrates his recent 75th birthday with
rj tour and a 75 song CD package that is now available in stores.
The eternal struggle between
good and evil has always been the
topic of literature and fairly tales;
Marvel's version of this battle is
between Thor and Loki. Thor has
continually been a favorite charac-
ter in Marvel Comics, from his own
book to the numerous guest ap-
pearances to his recurring roles in
The Avengers.
His major foe, for most of his
life, has been his half-brother Loki.
Loki is the god of mischief, and has
been jealous of his half-brother since
he can recall. The strong god of
thunder has always been their
father's favorite. Odin always gave
more attention io Thor, or so Loki
thought.
Since childhood, Loki has tried
to hurt the people Thor wasclose to,
or even trv to kill Thor to be rid of
him. Numerous times Loki has risen
to strike at Thor, and numerous
times Thor has beaten Loki. Thor
always showed compassion to Loki,
even after their battles. Thor has
many opportunities to rid himself of
the menace forever, but never has
the hatred or anger enough to kill,
until Thor number 432.
Loki devised a devious plan to
attack Thor yet again. With the god
of gods, Odin, in dire shape, Loki
chose to assault Thor. Thor is the
protector of Midgard (Earth) and
therefore takes an identity of a hu-
man to fit in at times of rest. Loki
discovered the identity of Thor and
kidnapped a child that belonged to
the host body of Thor, Eric
Masterson, and used this to trap
Thor.
Thor played along with Loki
until the child was safe, and when
that time came, Thor showed why
he is the powerful god of thunder.
He brought a rain storm and thun-
der to help fight against a diseased
man. Loki's arrogance left him de-
feated, but not fearful. His hopes
See Thor, page 8
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8 flUte gagt (Earolfnian
May 22,1991
Sports medicine techniques not just for athletes
n a �o first to your family doctor for treat- use in a health Huh �rh �c c�air �� �k� �w -�- �
ByARS
Information Services
Sports medicine specialists,
physical therapists and
rehabilitation clinics aren't just for
professional and 'serious' athletes
anymore. Specialists treating sports
injuries are seeing more and more
patients who have injuries caused
by everyday activities as well as
recreational sports.
The current emphasis on
physical fitness has led more and
more Americans of all ages and
physical abilities to work out,
whether it be participating in a fa-
vorite sport such as golf and
swimming, or taking up stn-ngth
training, running or bicycling.
However, 'sports' injuriescan occur
form everyday activities that in-
volve strenuous or repetitive tasks
such as lifting boxes in your garage,
planting a garden or mowing the
lawn.
If pain and soreness from those
activities don't go away after a
reasonableperiod of rest, it's time to
consult an expert. Whether you go
Editor
first to your family doctor for treat-
ment or referral or choose to see a
sports medicine specialist or physi-
cal therapist, it's important to get
treatment promptly. Many seem-
ingly minor injuries can eventually
lead to chronic or degenerative
damage if not treated.
New technology has made di-
agnosing and rehabilitating these
injuries easier and more available
to the general public. One new tool
that many physical therapists and
sportsmedicincspecialistsare using
to diagnose and treat such injuries
is MERAC (Musculoskeletal
Evaluation Rehabilitation and
Conditioning). With this ompa-
hensive joint testing system from
Universal Gym Equipment, Inc
therapistscan evaluate, rehabilitate
and condition using six different
exercise mode for ef fecti ve thera py.
The therapist can set up M ER AC to
diagnose and treat knee, ankle,
wnst, hip, elbow, shoulderand Kick
injuries.
In addition, medical profes-
sionals may recommend using
equipment you ha veat home or can
use in a health club, such as stair crease the speed or intensity of the Following your workout, take
machines, bicycles, treadmills and activity. tjme to stretch muscles. Hold
strength training machines. It's just as important to cool stretches for 10 to 15 seconds and
Ofcoursethebestwaytohandle down as it is to warm up. Slowly don't bounce. Stretch slowly and
injuries is to prevent them. Experts decrease your level of activity to deliberately without stretching fur
recommend five minutes each of give your heart and blood circula-
warm-up, cool-down and stretch- hon time to return to a normal level,
ing to help muscles prepare for and If you stop suddenly, you may ex-
recover from strenuous activity, perience dizziness or cramping.
Whether you have a regular work- rrn
Thor
ther than what's comfortable.
gram.
Even with these precautions,
injuries can still occur. If it happens
to you, remember to see a medical
professional to get early diagnose
and treatment. With proper reha-
Remember to see your doctor bilitation, you can continue to par
for a complete physical exam be- ticipate in sports and other actiw
fore you begin any exercise pro- ties that you enjoy.
out program or just participate oc-
casionally in recreational sports,
proper warm-up, cool-down and
stretching routines are the key to
injury prevention.
Many overuse or stress injuries
are related to improper warm-upof
muscules and joints. The reason is
simple. Muscles use oxygen as fuel
and inactive (cold) muscles need
relatively little oxygen. But, the
harder they work, the more oxygen
muscles need to function. As you
warm up, your body increases the
amount of blood and oxygen it sup-
plies to muscles.
Begin your warm-up bv doing
whatever you will do in your actual
workout or activity, but at a slower,
more relaxed pace. Gradually m-
Contlnued from page 7
were not crushed. Loki knew that
Thor wouldn't kill him. He knew
that Thor would allow him time to
devise a new plan.
Thor tried to rid the Earth of the
scourge of lxki, but couldn't bring
himself to kill. Then Loki used his
magiks to devastate the life of an-
other of Eric Masterson's friends.
Thor rage wit hanger. Hethen knew
that Loki would never stop causing
pain and death to the people of
Midgard. Since Thor is their protec-
tor, he decided then that Loki must
be permanently stopped.
After the deed was done, Odin
announced that Thor had taken the
life of a brother god, and that is the
worst offense to the Asgard rules,
and banished Thor. Thor pleaded
that Midgard not be left without a
protector, and a new protector was
chosen, Eric Masterson. Masterson
became the new thunder god, like
before, only this time without the
consciousness of Thor. The Cain
and Abel of Marvel Comics saga
has finally been wound up, onlv it
was not Abel that was slain.
Tom DeFalco and Ron Frenz
are the creative team that brought
this tale to life. They have been
worki ng together on Thor si nee Wa 11
Simonson left the book. Simoason
left a hard space to follow He
brought Thor Kick into populanrv.
then he left. Tom DeFalco and Ron
Frenz stepped in and filled the void
with world shattering Tories such
as the storv in "Thor 432 "
Continued from page 7
rocs title.
A project that is m the works,
that he gave insight to, is a new
Captain Marvel (Shaam!) book (A
dream of his is to one day write for
the new Captain Marvel (Shazam!)
book. He admits that he has a lot of
dues to pay before he would be able
to take on such a character, and he
openly confesses that he is more
than willing to wait his turn for the
honor.). As of yet, he gave no indi-
cation to when these promts wi 11 he
made available to the public, if at
all.
As long as there have been
comics, there have been fan favwr-
ites. Neal Adams, Ross Andru,Car-
mine!nfantino,Gilkane,ackkirbv,
John Rorruta, and Curt Swan in-
spired the first generation of fan
favorites; they were soon
followed by the likesof John Byrne,
Alan Davis, Michael Golden, Frank
Miller, and Watt Simonson. The fa-
vorites of today include Art Adams,
Pat Broderick, Jim Lee, Rob Leifield,
Kevin Maquire, Todd McFarlane
and Bart Sears. Eury gave an in-
siders view of some of the artists
that he believes will take part in the
wave of the future comic book art;
these include Dusty Abell, Simon
Bisley, Norm Breyfogle, Adam
lughes and Jason Pearson.
Mr. Eury's biggest ambition in
comics is to bring a group of cre-
ators together and create a new
Comic Renaissance. He feels that in
this time penod, an augmentation
in intelligencehasoccurred leaving
the children behind.
Kids have been left out of the
comic medium for the most part,
the stones today are so involved
and very mature, that childrendon
find interest m them or are not ma-
ture enough to understand them.
Eury would like to begin a new
force in comics directed tochildren,
getting them back into actually
reading comics.
He said, "It's something that
could help kids to read, it certainly
helped me. In some cases it could
maybe even teach kids to read. I'd
like to be involved with making
comic eminently popular again, to
the masses, not just to comic fans
From East Carolina University
to New York City Eury has in-
dulged himself in his dreams, and
came up smiling. He stands out as
an example that as education and a
dream is all you need in the world
to achieve personal happiness and
succes.
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t
May 2? 1991
Pirates smas
By Matt Mumma
Sports Editor
The Pirates needed to take two
games from the first place, top-
seeded Richmond Spiders in the
last day of the Colonial Athletic
Association Championship to win
the tournament.
The Spiders had beaten ECU in
all four regular-season games and
had only lost two CAA games in
the tournament, Richmond was
seemingly cruisingto theCAA title
and eventual spot in the NCAA
tournament by sweeping William
& Mary, UNC-Wihnington and
George Mason IWversity
ECU was having a harder time
in the tournament compaRxl with
Richmond, losing to GMU in the
second round 13-6. But after that
loss the Pirates marched to their
third consecutive championship
and stomped Richmond in the final
two games, 4-2 and 14-7, to win the
title.
In the first game against Rich-
mond, thenumberoneand number
three pitchers in the CAA faced off.
Sophomore ace Jim Ambrosius (4-
4,354 ERA) started for ECU against
veteran Sean Gavaghan (11-5,2.44
ERA).
The game was a pitching duei
and was perhaps the most exanng
game of the season for the ECU
fans
Sophomore Davi
off for the Pirates wij
wascaught leading ol
far after freshman
popped up a bunt tol
Junior Tomrm
shot to center held K
Chns Larkin made
that stole a sure dour.
and ended the first n
The game was fit
defensive plays bv
the bear-handed gral
Gast in the se I
threw it to an outsti
shun at first tor the a
came up with doubi
second, third and oj
that ended scoring tt
In the third in
Pat Watkins singk
mningand Clark i
bases withoneout. Ei
to Kevin McNan
home for the first
Chns I'iela, threvs
double p
Fine pitching
made up for the si lei
he held the Spidei
through the fifth n
stnke outs.
But in the fifth Ri
two runs that brol
game.
Piela singled to
ning and stole secol"
stole third but Eason'
went to left neld ar
GMU falls to Piral
Triplett hits grai
By Owen Cox
Staff Writer
ECU held off a strong charge
by George Mason to take a 8-5 vic-
tory in game nine of the CAA
tournament. With the victory, the
Pirates went on to play Richmond
for the CAA title and a berth in the
NCAA regionals.
ECU, it's pitching depleted,
went with Cory Redick whose only
appearance on the mound was m
an exhibition game. Coach Gary
Overton said: "We asked Cory for
three and he gave us four. We
hoped Lyle (Hartgrove) could give
us three, he gave us five
ECU jumped to an early lead.
Centerfielder Dave Leisten led off
the game with a double. After a
ground out moved Leisten to third.
Tommy Eason grounded to short to
bringhimhome. Thisput the Pirates
up 1-0.
GMU countered with a run of
their own. James Timbers reached
on an error. Timbers then mcved to
second on a wild pitch. With two
outs, Travis Brunson reached on an
error which allowed Timbers to
score. This tied the game at 1-1.
In the bottom of J
was again on the of
N'arron walked to
rung. Leisten followi
to center. After a si
doubled to lert bnnt
N'arron and Leisten
Glynn Beck doubled
Eason and giving th
lead.
GMU got thin
top of the fourth,
singled to center Petl
doubled to left to
second and third. Ke
doubled to center
and Adams. After a f)
singled to left to put i
and third. The next
Goldberg, singled tc
ing home McNaman
scoreat4-i.LyleHar
to relieve for ECU ar
two batters out.
ECU got back
the fifth. Leisten sins
start the inning,
walked. Eason movj
over when trying to 1
hit. John Gast, co-C
year, was walked vi
load the bases. Beck
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t tor athletes
May 22.1991
blowing vour workout, take
i stretch muscles Hold
psfoi 10 to 15 seconds and
ounce Stretch skwJj and
Hel) ivithoutstretchingrur-
w h.u s comfortable
ivmrvr to hv your doctor
Implete physical exam tv-
begin am exercise pro-
(gite ga-rt CCarnltntan
.cram
Even with these piecautions,
mpinos can still occur It it happens
to you, remember to see a medical
professional to get early diagnose
and treatment With proper reha-
bilitation you can continue to par-
ticipate m sports and other activi-
ties that you enjoy
p Since Thor is their Droter j i ,
ruis tinalh been wound up. only u
wasnol bei that was slain.
Tom Defakt) and Ron Frenz
-ir- the creative team that brought
his tale to life rhey have been
"fcngtogetheronTrwsii-eeVvaJl
monson left the bonk Simonaon
�i hard space to Ibtlow He
iNThor back into popularity
mDeFakoandRon
stopped in and filled the void
ring stories such
one lAhn
It
Ik y
'
Thor432
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Piratessmash Spider's web, advance to NCAAs
By Matt Mumma Sophomore David Leistcn led Larkfe ihpn hnm -i bi. . . a, A X.tF
By Matt Mumma
Sports Editor
rhe Pirates needed to take two
games from the first place, top-
seeded Richmond Spiders in the
ast day of the Colonial Athletic
Association Championship to win
:he tournament
rhe Spiders had beaten ECU in
�- '���-fv�vdIn.vtxIvvllnrlnt,
t IT rTAnamesand de,cns,ve rbvs bv 'h���
onlj lost two C AA games. In thebear-han.iedgrabbv.iniorlohn
phomore David Leisten led1 Larkin then homered and Rich-
ott tor the Pirates with a single but mond was ahead 2-0
wascaught leading off first base too
far after freshman Heath Clark
popped up a bunt to the catcher.
Junior Tommy Eason sent a
shot to center field but Richmond's
Chris Larkin made a diving catch
that stole a sure double from Eason
and ended the first inning.
The game was flecked with tint
the tournament, Richmond was
Mvminglvcnnsing hi theCAA title
and eventual spot in the CAA
tournament by sweeping William
Si Mary, UNC-Wumington and
Jeorge Mason University.
ECU was having a harder time
Cast in the second inning, who
thaw it to an outstretched Corey
Short at first for the out. Richmond
came up with double plays in the
second, third and eighth innings
that ended scoring threats.
ECU did not take long to an-
swer as they came up with three
runs in the sixth. Leisten and Clark
both singled to start the inning and
Eason laid down a bunt down the
first base line that advanced them to
second and third base.
Gast then stepped up and
smashed a doubleoff thecenterfield
fence that scored two runs.
Gavaghan then threw a wild pitch
that moved Gast to third but Piela's
throw was off the mark and Cast
crossed easily for what turned out
to be the game-winning run.
In the top ot the eighth the Spi-
ders gave ECU a scare when Urkin
Ambrosius recorded the vic-
tory and Moye got the save.
In the final game the Pirates
came out eager for a victory and battle but the second game was a
ready to impress the hometown slugfestwhereECUhadllhitsand
fans. The first game was a pitching SeePlretes. page 10
the tournament compared with Pat Watkins" angle to lead off the
In the third inning freshman had a lead-off single. Mark Eoster
rhmond, losing to CMC in the
econd round 13 But after that
�ss the Pirates marched to their
consecutive championship
Stomped Richmond in the final
� vogames, 4-2 and 14-7, to win the
In the first game against Rich-
mond the number one and number
three pitchers in the CAA faced off.
Sophomore ace Jim Ambrosius (4-
I 3 51 ERA) started for ECU against
veteran Sean Gavaghan (11-5, 2.44
ERA).
The game was a pitching duel
and was perhaps the most exdbng
came of the season for the ECU
tans.
mningand Clark walked to toad the
bases withoneout. Eason grounded
to Kevin McNamara who threw it
homelut tltefirstoutand thecatdher,
Chns Piela, threw to first for the
double plav.
Fine pitching by Ambrosius
made up for the silent Pirate bats as
he held the Spiders to one hit
through the fifth inning and four
strike outs.
But in the fifth Richmond scored
two runs that broke a scoreless
game.
bunted and Eason threw to second
but the runner was safe. Steve
Bemhardt bunted and Tom Move,
who came in for Ambrosius in the
seventh, threw to third for an im-
portant out.
A grounder advanced both
runners but the scare came when
clean-up man Mike Eydenburg hit
a ball to the warning track that
looked deceptively likea home run,
but instead was the third out.
ECU scored an insurance run
in the eighth on a sacrifice fly by
freshman Chad Triplett that scored
Piela singled to lead oii the in- Eason. Moye ended the game with
rung and stole second. Piela then two strike outs in the bottom of the
stoleth.rdbutEason'sthrowtoGast ninth to finish off the waning Spi-
went to left neld and Piela scored, ders in the 4-2 victory.
GMU falls to Pirate sluggers
Triplett hits grand slam in fifth
Richmond eliminates Mason
Spiders take game 8 of CAA tournament
By Owen Cox
Staff Writer
By Owen Cox
Staff Writer
In the bottom of the third ECU
was again on the offensive. Barry
Narron walked to lead off the m-
ECU held off a strong charge rung. Leisten followed with a single
b George Mason to take a 8-5 vie
I tv in game nine of the CAA
: nirrument. With the victory, the
Pirates went on to play Richmond
for the CAA title and a berth in the
NCAA regionals.
ECU, it's pitching depleted,
a erd with Cory Redick whoseonly
appearance on the mound was in
an exhibition game. Coach Gary
Overtoil said: "We asked Cory for
three and he gave us four. We
hoped Lyle (Hartgrove) could give
us three, he gave us five
ECU jumped to an early lead.
enterfieJder Dave Leisten led off
the game with a double. After a
ground out moved Leisten to third,
I ommy Eason grounded to short to
bring himhome. This put the Pirates
up Ml
GMU countered with a run of
their own. James 1 imbers reached
�nan error. Timbers men. moved to
second on a wild pitch. With tvo
outs, Travis Brunson reached on an
error which allowed Timbers to
score. This tied the game at 1-1.
to center. After a strikeout, Eason
doubled to left bringing home both
Narron and Leisten. One out later,
Glynn Beck doubled to left scoring
Eason and giving the Pirates a 4-1
lead.
GMU got things rolling in the
top of the fourth. Chns Widger
singled to center. Pete Adams then
doubled to left to put ru nners on
second and third. Kevin McNamara
doubled to center scoring Widger
and Adams. At ter a flvout. Timbers
singled to left to put runners on first
and third. The next batter, Lonnie
Goldberg, singled to center bring-
ing home McNamara. This tied the
scoreat4-4.LyleHartgrovecamein record dropped to 4-6. Wil he
to relieve for ECU and got the next loss GMU was eliminated from the
two batters out. tournament.
ECU got back on the board in Leisten led the Pirates with a 3-
the fifth. Leisten singled tocenter to 3 performance, with three runs
start the inning. Heath Clark scored. Beck was 2t and Triplett 1-
walked. Eason moved the runners 3 with the grand slam and four
short. Chad Tnplett worked the
count full, then hit the next pitch
over the left field fence for a grand
slam home run. This blast put the
Pirates up 8-4.
GMU had only one serious
threat the rest of the game, that
coming in the seventh. Mark Moeller
doubled. Two outs la ter McNamara
singled to center putting runners
on the corners. Chns Evans singled
to right allowing Moeller to cut the
score to 8-5.
Hartgrove held the Patriots in
check the final two innings. He
allowed no one to reach base.
Hartgrove, now 3-1, got the win
going five and two-thirds innings
allowing six hitsand one run. Mark
Sawyer was the loser for GMU his
Game eight of the Colonial
Athletic Association baseball tour-
nament showed why Richmond
was the team to beat in this war's
tournament.
Richmond was not the better
looking team early, though.George
Mason's leadoff batter, Lonnie
Goldberg, hit the first pitch of the
game over the trees in left field.
Mike Erigault and Travis Brunson
then walked. After a fielders choice
and a pop-up, Pete Adams singled
to left scoring Brunson to put GMU
up 2-0 after a half inning.
Richmond came back with
three runs in the second. Kevin
McNamara reached on an error
After beingsacnficed to second and Kelley singled toleftbringinghome
a fTTIIirWI Dill Uhi-K rrir�w4 K;� � t. �
third, Mark Foster walked. Steve Chris Larkin then sacrificed
Bemhardt then hit a fly ball to cen- home McNamara for another run.
ter which appeared to be the third Kelley moved to third on a wild
out, but GMU centerfielder James pitchandscoredonagroundoutfor
Timbers dropped the ball for an Richinoitf'sfourmnmofthemning.
emr Bemhardt reached on a error and
McNamara and Foster scored moved up on a wild pitch. Burton
and Bemhardt took second. Steve doubled to center brought home
Burton, the co-CAA player of the Bemhardt with Richmond'sjfifth
year, then doubled to right which run of the inning and put the Spi-
brought home Bemhardt to give ders up 8-2.
the Spiders a 3-2 lead, a lead the Both teams scored a run in the
Spiders would not relinquish. fifth tornakethescore9-3infavorof
Richmond.
Richmond exploded for five George Mason got things going
runs in the bottom of the third, again in the top of the eighth. Chris
helped by five hits and a GMU er- Widger led off with a walk Adams
ror. Tom Scioscia and Chris Piela doubled to left putting runners on
singled. McNamara singled to left, second and third. Widger then
scoringScioscia. After adoublesteal scored on an RBI groundout. Chris
by Piela and McNamara, Erskine Evans reached on an error which
allowed Adams to score cu trine the
Piela.
a ground out which moved him to Pteht see GMU. page 10
Irates avance to NCAA Tournament
in Wisconsin against ACC rivals
By Gary Hurley
Staff Writer
qualify at their regional level to ad-
vance to Madison. The Irates are
one of three teams to come out of
over when trying to bunt for a base
hit. JohnGast,co-CAAplayerof the
year, was walked intentionally to
load the bases. Beck popped out to
RBl's. Eason had three RBI's for the
Pirates. Moeller, Widger,
McNamara and Timbersall had two
hits for the Patriots.
addition toNorth Carolina, the Mid-
Adanfic includes Virginia, Mary-
land, New Jersey, Deleware, Penn-
, ir? � 3E2 S? M,d-AUant,c �� A total of sylvania and Washington D.C
in the 1991 Collegiate National 12 teams from across the country in qualifying for the nationals
l?etoU2ame,ltiS "N �� Wds to go to the �h thelratesdereatedtearnsincluding
tedbvtheUlhrtePbyersAs- tional finals. Haverford, Penn State, Navy and
?" "SMd May24" The M-Antic regional FrircetoaThecteamtoouhicore
26 in Madison, Wisconsin. tournament washeld April 27 at St ECU at the regionals was the Uni-
Participating teams had to Mary's College of Maryland. In See irates page 10
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May 22.1991
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Piratessmash Spider's web, advance to NCAAs
Bv Matt Mumm Sophomore David IPkden ur1 t iri�� �k. 11 . �, , . . �'X. A.X. -VL
By Matt Mumma
Sports Editor
"he Pirates needed to take two
es horn the tirst place, top-
i Richmond Spiders in the
asi da) of the Colonial Athletic
ssociabon Championship to win
tournament
rheSpidershad beaten ECl in
four regular-season games and
� nlv lost two CAA games. In
the tournament, Richmond was
seemingly cruising to the CAA title
: eventual spot in the NCAA
mament bv sweeping William
(" in UNC-Wilmington and
? Mason University
E( Uwas having a harder time
� tournament compared with
nd, losing to GMU in the
I round 13-6 But after that
the Pirates marched to their
urd consecutive championship
mped Richmond in the final
1 - 4 2and 14-7, towinthe
In the first game agaiast Rich-
nd the number one and number
three pitchers in theCAA faced off.
Sophomore ace Jim Ambrosius (4-
I4ERA)started for ECU against
tn Sean Cavaghan 111 -5, 2.44
ERA).
he iinv was a pitching duel
ind was perhaps the most exciting
ol the season for the ECU
Sophomore David l.eisten led" Larkin then homered and Rich-
Off for the Pirates with a single but mond was ahead 2-0.
wascaught leading oftfirst base too
tar after freshman Heath Clark
popped up a bunt to the catcher
junior Tommy Eason sent a
shot tocenter field but Richmond's
Chris Larkin made a diving catch
that stole a sure double from I .is, m
and ended the first inning
Thegame wasflecked with fine
defensive plays bv both teams like
the bear-handed grab bv nmiorlohn
�.ast m the second inning, who
threw it to an outstretched Cbre
Short at first for the out Ki hmond
came up with double plays in the
second, third and eighth innings
that ended scoring throats
In the third inning freshman
Pat Watkins single to lead oft the
inning and Clark walked to load the
baseswithoneoul Easongrounded
to Kevin McNamara who threv� it
homeforfhefirstoutandthecatcher,
Chris Piela, threw to first for the
double play.
Fine pitching by Ambrosius
made up for the silent Pirate Kits as
he held the Spiders to one hit
through the fifth inning and four
strike outs.
But in the fifth Richmond scored
two runs that broke a scoreless
game.
Piela singled to lead off the in-
ning and stole second. I Via then
stole third but Eason's throw toGast
went to left rieJd and Piela scored.
ECU did not take long to an-
swer as they came up with three
runs in the sixth. l.eisten and Clark
both singled to start the inning and
Eason laid down a bunt down the
first base line that advanced them to
second and third base.
Cast then stepped up and
smashed adoubteoffthecenterfield
fence that scored two runs.
Cavaghan then threw a wild pitch
that moved (iast to third but IVla's
throw was off the mark .md Cast
crossed easily for what fumed out
to he the game-winning run.
In the top of the eighth theSpt-
dersgave E Uasi are when 1 arkin
had a lead-off single Mark Foster
bunted and Eason threw to second
but the runner was safe. Steve
Bernhardl bunted and Tom Move,
who came m tor Ambrosius in the
seventh, threw to third for an im-
portant out.
A grounder advanced both
runners but the scare came when
clean-up man Mike Evdenburg hit
a ball to the warning track that
looked deceptively hkea home mn,
but instead was the third out.
ECU scored an insurance run
in the eighth on a sacrifice fry bv
freshman Chad Tnplett that scored
Eason. Move ended the game with
two strike outs in the bottom of the
ninth to finish oft the waning Spi-
ders in the 4-2 victory.
Ambrosius recorded the vic-
tory and Move got the save.
In the final game the Pirates
came out eager for a victory and battle but the second game was a
ready to impress the hometown slugfest where ECU had 11 hitsand
fans. The first game was a pitching See Pirates, page 10

GMU falls to Pirate sluggers
Triplett hits grand slam in fifth
ZTZLT, S79S 3' a MCh ECUS 42 VIC,� �ver Rhmon� lh� CAameEc"
beat Richmond in the final two games to win the CAA championship lor the third year in a row
Richmond eliminates Mason
Spiders take game 8 of CAA tournament
By Owen Cox
Staff Writer
By Owen Cox
Staff Writer
ECU held off a strong charge
(leorge Mason to take a 8-5 vic-
'� in game nine of the CAA
urnament. With the victory, the
rates went on to plav Richmond
- the A A title and a berth in the
A regionals.
ECU, it's pitching depleted,
�� ent with Cory Redick whoseonfy
- arance on the mound was in
n exhibition game. Coach Garv
orton said: "We asked Cory tor
� e and he gave us four We
ped; yle(Hartgrove) could give
three, he gave us five
I' lumped to an early lead
i nterfielder Dave l.eisten led oft
ime with a double. After a
d out moved Leisten to third,
� Eason grounded to short to
him home. ThisputthePirates
CMU countered with a run of
their own. James 1 imbers reached
n an error. Timbers then mcved to
sei ond on a wild pitch. With tvo
its fravis Brunson reached on an
rr - which allowed Timbers to
- to This tied the game at 1-1.
In the bottom oi the third ECU
was again on the offensive. Barry
Natron walked to lead off the in-
ning. Leisten followed with a single
to center. After a strikeout, Eason
doubled to left bringing home both
Narronand Leisten. One out later,
Glynn Beck doubled to left scoring
Eason and giving the Pirates a 4-1
lead.
GMU got things rolling in the
top of the fourth. Chris Widger
singled to center. Pete Adams then
doubted to left to put runners on
second and third. Kevin McNamara
doubled to center scoring Widger
and Adams. Afteraflyout, Umbers
singled to left to put runners on first
and third. The next batter, Lonnie
(loldberg, Singled to center bring-
ing home McNamara. Hustied the
score at 4-4. Lylel lartgrovecamein
to relieve tor ECU and got the next
two batters out.
ECU got back on the board in
the fifth. Leisten singled to center to
start the inning. Heath Clark
walked. Eason moved the runners
over when trying to bunt for a base
hit. JohnGast,co-CAAplayerof the
year, was walked intentionally to
load the bases. Beck popped out to
short. Chad Tnplett worked the
count full, then hit the next pitch
over the left field fence tor a grand
slam home run. This blast put the
Pirates up 8-4.
CMC had only one serious
threat the a-st oi the game, that
coming m the seventh. Mark Mc viler
doubled. Two outs later McNamara
singled to center putting runners
on the corners. Chns Evans singled
to right allowing .Moeller to cut the
score to 8-5.
1 lartgrove held the Patriots in
check the final two innings. He
allowed no one to reach base.
Hartgrove, now 3-1, got the win
going five and two-thirds innings
allowing six hits and one run. Mark
Sawyer was the loser for GMU his
record dropped to 4-6. With the
loss l. ML waseliminated from the
tournament.
Leisten led the Pirates with a 3-
3 performance, with three runs
stored Beck was 2 A and Tnplett 1 -
3 with the grand slam and four
KBl's. Eason had three RBl'sfor the
Pirates. Moeller, Widger,
McNamara and Timbersall had two
hits for the Patriots.
Came eight of the Colonial
Athletic Association baseball tour-
nament showed why Richmond
was the team to beat in this war's
tournament.
Richmond was not the better
looking team early, though.George
Mason's leadoff batter, lonnie
Goldberg, hit the first pitch of the
game over the tm-s in left held
Mike Frigault and Travis Bninson
then walked. After a fielders choice
and a pop-up, Pete Adams singled
to left scoring Brunson to put GMU
up 2-0 after a half inning
Richmond came back with
three runs in the second. Kevin
McNamara reached on an emir.
After boing sacrificed ti second and
a ground out which moved him to
third, Mark Foster walked. Steve
Bemhardt then hit a fly ball to cen-
ter which appeared to be the third
out, but GMU centerfielder James
Timbers dropped the ball for an
error.
McNamara and Foster scored
and Bemhardt took second. Steve
Burton, the co-CAA player of the
year, then doubled to right which
brought home Bemhardt to give
the Spiders a 3-2 lead, a lead the
Spiders would not relinquish.
Richmond exploded for five
runs in the bottom of the third,
helped by five hits and a GMU er-
ror. Tom Scioscia and Chris Piela
singled. McNamara singled to left,
scori ng Scioscia. After a double steal
by Piela and McNamara, Erskine
Chns Larkin then sacnficed
home McNamara for another run
Kelley moved to third on a wild
pi tch and scored on a groundou t for
Richmond's fourth run of theinmng.
Bemhardt reached on a error and
moved up on a wild pitch Burton
doubled to center brought home
Bemhardt with Richmond'sjifth
run of the inning and put the Spi-
ders up 8-2.
Both teams scored a run in the
fifth to make the score9-3 in favor of
Richmond.
George Mason got things going
again in the top of the eighth. Chns
Widger led off with a walk. Adams
doubled to left putting runners on
second and third. Widger then
scored on an RBI groundout. Chris
Evans reached on an error which
Kelley singled toleftbringing home allowed Adams to score cutting the
PSela. See GMU, page 10
Irates avarice to NCAA 1
in Wisconsin against ACC rivals
,m ilifi. it ik iti. � .
By Gary Hurley
Staff Writer
I he ECU Irates- are competing
in the 1991 Collegiate National
Tournament. The tournament is
hosted by the Ultimate Players As-
sociation and will be held May 24-
26 in Madison. Wisconsin.
Participating teams had to
qualify at their regional level to ad-
vance to Madison. The Irates are
one oi three teams to come out of
the Mid-Atlantic region. A total of
12 teams from across the country
will receive bids to go to the na-
tional finals.
The Mid-Atlantic regional
tournament was held April 27 at St.
Mary's College of Maryland. In
addition toNorthCarolina, the.Mid-
Atlanhc includes Virginia, Mary-
land, New Jersey, Deleware, Penn-
sylvania and Washington DC.
In qualifying for the nationals
the Irates defeated teams including
Haverford, Perm State, Navy and
Princeton. The only team to ou tscore
ECU at the regionals was the Uni-
See IratM, page 10
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10 (Eire gagtCarolinian May22,1991
Pirates
Continued from page 9
scored first.
Leisten led off the game with a
triple. Clark brought him home and
Eason walked his first at bat. Gast
then hit a two-run home run that
put the Pirates ahead 3-0 in the first
inning.
Starter Scott Robinson struck
out the first batter he faced and
Richmond went down in order in
the first. The Richmond players,
embracing their imminent defeat
ignobly, began a series of protests
that made this game rather ugly.
In the bottom of the fi rst, Larkin
wascalledoutat first inaclose play.
As he went to his position in
centerfield he said something to the
umpire that got him thrown out of
the game. Richmond's head coach
Ron Atkins protested the call to no
avail and Tom Scioscia replaced
Larkin.
The Pirates went on another
tear in the second. Short and
Watkins walked and sent the Spi-
der starter, Craig Saccavino, to the
dugout with three walks and three
runs in 11 3 innings. Andy Szarko
came in, struck out Leisten and gave
up a three-run home run to Clark.
Eason walked for the second
time and Gast came up once again
and hit a two-run shot. Back-to-
back two-run homers by Gast that
made the score 8-0 effectively took
the spark out of Richmond's game.
This prompted the third pitch-
ing change of Richmond and sent
Szarko to the dugout. Freshman
Benp Krise came in and ended a
merciless second inning for the Spi-
ders.
In the third inning Berry Narron
tripled to bring in Watkins in a close
play at the plate that made the score
9-0. ECU scored again in the fourth.
NEWMAN
Catholic Student Center
Would like to
Welcome The Summer Students
and
Invite You to Join Us In Worship
Campus Mass Schedule
Summer Sessions May 19 � July 28
Sunday: H:30am and 8:30pm at the Newman Center
Weekdays: 8:00am at the Newman Center
Wednesdays: 8:00am and 5:30pm
For more information about these and other programs,caU or visit
the Center daily between 8:30am and 11pm
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain & Campus Minister
953 East 10th St.(At the Foot of Collage Hill)
757-0376757-1991
Eason doubled and Johnny Beck
singled to bring in the tenth run of
the game.
The Pirates increased their lead
to 12 after Leisten doubled and Clark
singled and brought him in. Eason
walked for the third time and Beck
doubled to bring him across the
plate.
In the bottom of the sixth Rich-
mond scored on a sacrifice fly by
Steve Burton, 12-1.
The Spiders made their fourth
pitchingchangebringing in reliever
Tom Hartwig. He gave up only one
run in the seventh after walking the
bases loaded.
In the bottom of the seventh
Richmond made a desperate try for
a comeback. Robinson, who had a
one-hitter up to the sixth inning,
gave up two hits and two runs in
the eighth was replaced by junior
Jamie Bell. Robinson had seven
strikeoutsandhadagutsyefforton
the mound.
Bell, however, gave up a two-
run homer to Burton and was qui-
etly called back to the sidelines. Se-
nior Mike Whitten came in and did
the job for ECU. He struck out Drew
Kirschner on a dose pitch. Atkins
said something from the dug out
and was ejected from the game.
Richmond was without a head
coach but they scored two more
runs in the inning and closed the
gap 13-7.
In the ninth, Richmond's fifth
pitcher, Rick Jarvis was called for a
balk and that sent theSpider'sassis-
tant coach Mark McQueen to pro-
test thecall. He wasejected and sent
to commiserate with his teammates
in the stands.
On the balk, Narron moved to
third and came home on a wild
pitch that evened the score at 14-7
and was the last score in an ugly
win.
"We've all played many in-
nings over the last few days and we
are all tired both mentally and
physically. The mental fatigue can
cause some unpleasant situations
head coach Gary Overton said.
The Piratesha ve no w won three
consecutive CAA championships
and will travel to Wichita State
University in Kansas to play host
Wichita University on Friday.
After a 24-21-1 season the
unlooked-for opportunity to play
in the NCAA tournament is a bless-
ing.
"We were inconsistent all war
but we peaked at the right hmeanj
played toourpotential Ambnsiu.s
said.
GMU
Continued from page 9
Richmond lead to 9-5.
GMU made things close in the
ninth. With two outs, Mark Moeller
singled to left.
After a walk to Widgcr, Rich-
mond changed pitchers. Adams
then homered to left to bring the
Patriots to withinone. GMU'sKevin
McNamara then grounded out to
end the game.
Mark Foster got the win for
Richmond to improve his record to
3-1. Brian Helms came in for his
second save of the year. Tom
Balducci got the loss for the Patriots
dropping his record to 5-4.
Burton paced the UR hitting
attack, going 3-4 with two doubles
and two RBI's. Scioscia, Kelley and
Larkin all went 1-3. For GMU
Adams was 3-5 with a home run, a
double and four RBI's. MoeBerand
Widger were both 1-3 with two
walks.
The wm by Richmond put them
in the final day of the CAA tourna-
ment where thev needed only or-
victory to go to theNC A A Regk mal
finals.
Irates
Continued from page 9
versity of Pennsylvania. The U of
Penn. tooksecond place atSt. Mary's
behind tournament champion
UNC-Wilmington.
ECU is currently ranked 15 in
the nation by the UPA. The number
of college teams included in the
ranking exceeds 150. Carlcton is the
current number one team, but UNC-
W is ranked number three in the
country.
The '91 collegiate series will be
ECU'S fourth national appearance
in five years. The Irates best finish
was in 1989 when they ended the
year ranked fifth in the nation
"I've been to two nationals now
and we've never broken the final
four barrier said Irate Kevin
Rhodes. "1 hope this is our year "
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first summer session campus recreation opportunities
Intramural Sport Schedule
Softball Registration � May 28 � 4:00pm � BIO N-102
3 on 3 Basketball Registration � May 28 � 4:30pm � BIO N-102
Bowling Singles Registration � May 29 � 4:00pm � Bio N-102
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Beach Horseback Riding � June 2 leaving 10:00am
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Windsurfing Afternoon � une 20 leaving at 3:00pm
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Title
The East Carolinian, May 22, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 22, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.810
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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