The East Carolinian, April 23, 1991






Plastic Pleasure
Americans live beyond their means with credit,
4 Rock against rape 7
Attic hosts second annual concert to promote rape awareness.
She lEafit (Hartfltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.65 No.27
Thursday, April 23, 1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
12 Pages
IFC bans kegs during fall rush
rhe Inter Fratemit) Council .it tlv University ot
North Carolina at (hapel fill recently voted to Km the
use of shared containers, such as kegs and thecollection
ol Funds to buy alcohol during rush
I"his nilf will ho in effect from Aug. 21 to Sept 17
during next semester s rush period
Some national headquarters ol the fraternities on
campus allow the purchase of alcohol and the useof kegs
during rush but these fraternities will tall under the
same guidelines as the others on ampus
Student's attackers convicted
Throe former employees ol the Faculty 1 louseat the
UniversityofSouthC arolina wereconvicted las! weekol
assault on a former I IS( student last eai
Michael K And rson, wht i initiated the atta k, was
given a six year sentence, rhe other two men were given
lesser sentences
Douglas Warner, then a sophomore, was atta ked
a vd kicked by the three males Warner's glasses shal
tered into his left eye Sincethen he has received a o rnea
transplant.
Warner is now a student at t lemson I Inivei
Tulane alumnus joins lawsuit
Tulane University alumnus Joseph E i �
recentlv joined a lawsuit filed by a .
students from across the nation against the I s i h. part
nx-nt ot Education, tllegi . that i fit scholar-
ship; � tie VI of tl IRij 'Us Act ol 1964
The suit alleges that "mere than 701' Auk i i an
leges and universities rej �� th
viding i r administi ring fina is a
only to selected racial mirtoi tygrouj toa
press release.
The suit is also filed in part by the Washington i egal
Foundation, a non ; I I �up from Washington, D
Governor invites discussion
(,ov. Iim Martin invited sev en student leaders fn �m
the University of Northarolina hapel i lill to dis� uss
their concerns about state budget cuts
The meeting was called in a response to a former
student hKiv president's letter to Martin. The student,
Bill Hildebolt, asked Martin to talk to student leaders
about the budgetrisis and educational cone
Smoking banned in library
�smoking is not longer permitted in the Howard-
Tilton Memorial Library on Tulane University's cam-
pus The decision came after pressure from student
groups and the provost.
This ban includes the lounge elevator kbbies on
each level and the snack Kir. where smoking was
permitted before.
Scandal causes minor damage
Despite the s andal sum tunding former I niversity
of South Carolina President lames Holderman, the
university's image is not suffering.
HoWerman is currently on tnal tor the alleged mis-
use of funds I le served as president tor 1 years before
his resignation.
Freshman applications for the 1991-92 school year
are still high, at 6,800 s.tid an admissions representative,
and gift-giving hasonh slowed down sightly, partly due
to the recess n
Bushes bum at Berry college
Almost six acres of tall grasses and brush burned
b�-hind the faculty houses al Berrvollege in (.eorgia.
Because of wind, the fire spread rapidlv, but never
endangered anything, said the chief of campus police
Area fire departments and the state forestry depart-
ment were called in to contain the blae.
UNC computer lab to close
A computer lab in the English Department Building
at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill wall not
be open next year due to budget nits.
TheCreenlaw lab houses Macintosh and PC equip-
ment Sixteen graduate students who staffed the lab will
not have jobs next year due to the closing.
Inside Tuesday
Crime Scene 2
Editorial4
Classifieds6
Features17
This Week in Film8
Sports11
Insert: Pirate Voice � A Journalism 3200 project
Administrators clarify position
Black Greeks responsible for own involvement
By Sheleathea Wright
Spe i.il !�� I h 1 at i irnlinian
Man) black i .a'oks feel
thattht dol" t havea pn4111-
nent place 111 the university,
but an administrator dis
Km. 1hmond, in inter
mation processing major, is
cue SUCh student
Therearenobla ki ireek
houses, no special events
gean d just foi tin m, and the
y art �� l ha onlya few black
� ireek ads although the year-
b� - laden with ads ur
whi ti he said
went I i k people
questioned telt the university
needed to uet in step w ith the
M.n k Ireeksoncampus.They
said that, compared to other
edlegi s they had v isited,E( I
administratorsseemed uncar-
ing in their attitudes towards
black (,reeks
"The way that black
I .reeks are treated at E U is
very inadequate snd one
black student wishing to be
unnamed. "It could be much
better 1 k at all the para-
phernalia up around campus
tor 1 ireek Week How many
black (ireek signs do you see
hanging on the Mall?"
Administrators say black
(.reeks'in olvemcnt in Greek
Week 15 their responsibility.
"The activities planned
during Crook week aie
planned thelnter fraten
( ouncil mJ Panhelleni(
ncil, said 1 1 .u ry !
smith, assistant vice chancel
lor of minority student affairs
'To participate. Creeks have
t ft illow certain guidelin s,
one (it vs iiu h is having acer
tain numbt r ol members
ih said that efforts in
under way to get at l( ast one
of the black ore. mizations
I pro
.Us.
Si 1 I � .
: t � - � i I � -
policy on black I irei ks
"Are th,
,1 part ol the yard? asked
junior Ni ole Battle "I kr
: .it the h.e e lines, but
they even u insidered to be on
campus, because thev don't
haw a house or anything?
smith said that black
(in eks are recognized as part
of the university. Black (iroeks,
like all fraternities and sorori
ties, are tree to pun base a
house Greek houses are pn
vateryowned,and the univer-
sity has no hand in buying
them for the Greeks, Smith
said. It is up to the organiza-
tion to buv a house, he said
Other students feel the
university has a nonchalant
attitude toward blackireeks
possibly motivatii by a revs
unrelated incidents
"It there isa fight at oneof
the functionsor shooting, they
immediati ly blame us said
another blacl Aching
to be lost of the
time it's the f ople who are
notpartoftheunivi. I. fart-
ing the trouble "
Smith agn � - that most
disturbances at black Greek
functions are attributable to
non-students.
'People come fn im all
around Pitt County looking
t.r somethir I I Smith
said. "Theys ea partyat E I
and the 1 � � che k it ut
� times sitting arid drink-
inginthi isparkinglots
looking t �r a imething t ii'
"It seems like every little
thing that the black peopled 1
See Greeks page 3
Dining services
reduce prices
By Christie Woodlief
Special to The Last Carolinian
College students are find-
ing food prices on campus
1 bei ome less expensive
latelv.
f-kth the faculty and stu-
dent (afeterias in Mendenhall
Student Center offer buffet
dining for about four dollars
With 11 ilems in the salad bar,
six dessert choices, fruits
hotdogs, hamburgers and
about s hot meal choices
buffet dir � seems to be a
d deal Man) of the regu
lar diners polled agreed that
fi r the money, buffet di nil
the best choice
"It's not the faculty
at(Nstate, but I think both
the food and the prk es ire
great psychology professor
Steve Tacker said His wife.
Shirley, who oats on campus
twice a weel rees.
This is me best place in
the most reasonable
price � ise she said
students agree as well.
Sophomore Bryon Lyons says
thepricesarereasonable "con-
See Dining page 3
Jacksonville wins third annual quiz bowl
By Audra Means
�1 to 1 hf 1 ait l irolinian
What was the IV Com-
munist name of Russia?
llus is just one example
ol the questions asked when
students from Jacksonville
1 ligh S 1 ool won the Third
Annual E Alumni Quiz
� 1
final rounds ol com-
petition were hekl in Wright
Auditonum 1 m April 17.
Vying for first place were
representatives from a kson-
ville High School and
WilliamstonI ligh School.The
competition for third place
was also fierce, pitting East-
ern Wayne High School
against Wallace Rose Hill
1 In h School.
1 a h team consisted of
fcuir members who were
asked about topics ranging
SGA
wants to
keep
yearbook
By Amber Wilson
Special to Thr East Carolinian
On Monday, the SGA
passed a resolution on the dis-
approval of the media board
decision to halt the produc-
tion of the yearbook through
1992.
rhe resolutions follow
articles in Raleigh's News &
( faaver and The East Carolin-
ian blaming student apathy at
ECU for the yearbook's de-
mise
Courtney Jones, an SGA
legislator, said that she did
not think the survey given by
the media board was repre-
See SGA, page 3
from history to mo ie trivia.
Questions were fired from
the host, John Shearin, head ol
the theater department, to the
panel ol students When thev
thought thev had the answer
the students would hit a
buzzer drd a light on their
panel would flash on
1 heideaforthequizbowl
was the brainchild of one per-
son who telt that the academia
of i'astern North Carolina
needed to be in the spotlight.
One of the sponsors rep-
resenting entura Bank, Bruce
Gillikin, was in agreement
when he said, "The academic
does not got the billing that
some sportsprogramsat some
sclvxils get 'This is a chance to
boost academics
Other principal sponsors
for the quiz bowl were Caro-
lina Telephone and Telegraph
and ECU Student Stores
Collar Halmbaugh � ECU Photo Lab
The members of the Jacksonville High School team conferduring the finals of the ECU Alumni
Quiz Bowl Wednesday in Wright Auditorium, which they won
The team from Jackson-
ville High scored 430 points
while Williamston High's
team finished with W) points.
The competition forthiai place
ended with Eastern Wavne
taking honors with 395 points
over Wallace-Rose Hill with
160 points
Marine corps club donates
books to local school
By Larry Huggins
Staff Writer
Team Semper Fi, a SGA-
sponsored group, collected
books that were no longer
needed by the ECU faculty
and donated them to G.R.
Whitfield, a Pitt County
school, on Wednesday.
The group is comprised
mainly of Marine Corps Offi-
cer Candidates and Reserv-
ists who areattending the uni-
versity. The group actively
participates in various activi-
ties including training and
community service during the
school year.
Team Semper Fi decided
to undertake this project after
members noted the lack of
books in the school. This be-
came such a problem that
school officials had to ask
student's parents to collect
soup can labels in order to get
a copy of Tom Sawyer in their
library.
The project was headed
bv the officer of opera tioas for
the group, Scott Bailey. Al-
though it took many hours
working-out the planning and
logistics, Bailev said it was well
worm the time spent.
"1 was greatlv relieved to
see everything come together
dunngthepast two weeksand
end so well he said.
Steve Ridenhour, one of
the members ot Team Semper
Fi, stressed the importance of
education in our country.
"The schools are having
trouble being an effective
learning tool due to the air-
rent cuts being imposed on
them by the government he
See Marine, page 3





I
2 She gaat (EaroHntan April 23, 1991
crimfS'ene
v �
Student receives citation for public
urination at White Residence Hall
April 17
1157�Jones Residence Hall: took a breaking and entering and
larceny report.
1639�Scott Residence Hall: responded to a report of larceny of
keys. Five juveniles located and transported for processing and
interviews. Charges are pending.
1834�PublicSafety: took a walk-in complaint of simple a ssau 1 f
0214�Greene Residence Hall (west): investigated a distur-
bance between four subjects.
0244�Aycock Residence Hall: investigated a suspicious per-
son; subject was identified as a student. Window reported broken.
April 18
1429�Garrett Residence Hall: investigated a fight. One student
was banned; two non-students were given state citations
1842�larvis Residence Hall: four campus citations issued to
students for possession of pyrotechnics and alcohol.
2345�Jarvis Residence Hall: assisted the residence hall staff
with an overflowing toilet
2347�Clement Residence Hall: responded to a report of a male
urinating in public. Same was gone on arrival.
2350�White Residence Hall (north): male student issued cam-
pus citation for having urinated in front of building.
2359�Cotten Residence Hall (east): responded to a report of a
male subject climbing the construction ladder. Subject was gone on
arrival.
0115�10th and Elm streets: two students charged with careless
and reckless driving, driving while intoxicated and aiding and
abetting.
April 19
1825�Messick Theatre: responded to a report of hit and run
propertv damage.
2136�10th Street and College Hill Drive: state citation issued to
student for stop sign violation.
2302�10th Street: state citation issued to student for stop sign
violation.
0353� (ones Residence Hall: investigated a fire alarm being
activated on the fourth floor by unknowns using pyrotechnics.
0409�Jones Residence Hall: responded to a strong smell of
smoke coming from a room; same was a result of an attempted
breaking and entering and arson.
April 20
0215-�Clement Residence Hall (north): investigated a fight in
progress; four subjects were transported to the magistrate's office.
Rescue was called for one but the subject was not transported.
April 21
1158�Pitt County Memorial Hospital: took a report of a subject
falling in a hallway of Minges Coliseum while attending a swim
meet.
1322�Cotten Residence Hall: took a report of threatening
phone v:alls and breaking and entering of a residence hall room.
Crimt sctnt i� Mjten from Official Public Safety Log
Student marshals chosen for spring commencement
ECU Newt Bureau
Twenty students with out-
standing academic records have
been selected to serve as marshals
for spring commencement at ECU
May 11.
The marshals, all of whom have
grade pointaveragesof3.0orhigher,
serve as assistants to the graduates
and as hosts for the commencement
guests, providing information and
assistance in seating.
Max Cleland, a wounded Viet-
nam war veteran and former head
of the Veterans Administration, will
be the speaker at the commence-
ment scheduled to be held in Ficklen
Stadium.
The marshals march in the fore-
front of the traditional academic
processional of faculty and nearly
2,500 graduates in caps and gowns.
The chief marshal will be Sarah
Jane Pulley of Roanoke Rapids.
Assistant chief marshal will be
Wesley Wayne Stallings of Foun-
tain, N.C.
"We are proud of the students
who will be representing the uni-
versity in thiscapacity said Carol-
Ann Tucker, advisor to the student
marshals. 'Theresponsibility isone
of importance and honor
The 1991 spring commence-
ment marshals include:
Sarah Jane Pulley, chief mar-
shal and Wesley Wayne Stallings,
assistant chief marshal.
Marshals include Sherry Ann
Askew, Amy Denise Beale, R. Wes
Boyd, Benita Kimberly Bryant,
Robbie Louise Harris, Lucy Adams
Hocutt, Kimberly Anne Horton,
April Michelle Jenkins, Mane
Nicholson Jenkins, Denise Jensen,
Beth Page LaNier, Dena Gail Price,
Diane Noreen Quigley, Angela
Diane Smith, James Oliver Tisdale,
Victoria Elizabeth Vaughan, and
Shenll Kae Wobbleton.
Ways receives fellowship from National Institute of Health
ECU News Bureau
A faculty member at the ECU
School of Medicine has received a
National Institute of Health fellow-
ship to conduct research at the
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Re-
search in London.
Dr. Douglas Kirk Ways, endo
crinologist and associate professor
in the Department of Medicine at
ECU, is spending six months as a
senior international fellow work-
ing in the institute's cell regulation
laboratory. He will collaborate with
researchers trying to identify mecha-
nisms responsible for regulation
changes in a human protein. Ways
and the collaborating scientists be-
lieve that a broader understanding
of the protein could enhance knowl-
edge about how cancer develops as
well as lead to the discovery of new
treatments for cancer.
Ways is one of 35 fellows se-
lected to participate in the annual
program overseen by the John F.
Fogarty International Center, the
NfH's international division. The
program promotes the exchange of
ideas and information on the latest
advances in health sciences by
supplementing research projects of
interest to both U.S. and foreign
scientists.
Ways, who has been a member
of the ECU medical faculty since
1985, has a special interest in the
identification of biochemical mecha-
nisms involved in rransforrrungcan-
cer cells into normal cells.
In recent years, his research has
focused on understanding the ef-
fects of a plant-derived compound
He has sought to determine it
the compound, which is derived
from the seeds of a tropical tree can
be used to treat leukemia patients
New Maritime History annex named, f oundation announced
F.CU News Bureau
A fellowship to support the
study of maritime history was an-
nounced a t ECU Wed nesday in con-
junction with thenamingofabuild-
ingin honor of a retired naval admi-
ral and scholar.
"The fellowship will be called
the Admiral Ernest M. Eller Fellow-
ship said Dr. Fred D. Ragan, a
formerchairmanof the Department
of History. Ellens name is also be-
ing attached to the Maritime His-
tory Annex,a building used as head-
quarters for the ECU Graduate Pro-
gram in Maritime History and Un-
derwater Research.
Adm. Eller resides in Annapo-
lis, Md and is a supporter and
benefactor of ECU. Last year he
donated his pcTsonaHibrary of 2,000
volumes to the school. Historians
have called the library one of the
best personal naval history libraries
in the country.
The fellowship, supported with
private contributions, will be used
to support the study of maritime
history at ECU. It is the first fellow-
ship in the ECU Department of His-
tory that specifies a particular area
of study- ECU's program in Mari-
time History and Underwater Re-
search is a graduate program in the
history department.
"It is noteworthy that private
individuals recognize the need to
give so that quality might be main-
tained and advanced Ragan said.
Members of the Eller family,
other ECU officials and a Navy de-
partment historian also spoke at
Wednesday's ceremony.
"You honor Admiral Eller and
yourself by undertaking this pro-
gram at ECU said Dean Allard,
director of the Na va! Historical Cen-
ter in Washington, DC. Allard de-
scribed Eller as a man who is filled
with "energy, love of the Navy and
love of North Carolina
Eller was bom in Manon, Va
but grew up in North Wilkesboro,
N.C. He entered the Naval Acad-
emy in 1921.
The Rev. Herbert Weber at
Winston-Salem, a nephew of Eller,
recapped highlights of Eller's life.
He told how Eller's career in the
Navy carried him into World War II
as a witness to Hitler's blitzkrieg
before the VS. declared war with
Germany. Hedescnbed a campaign
in which Eller commanded U.S.
Naval forces in the Persian Gulf in
the Early 1950s. Eller is writing a
book about the Persian Gulf experi-
ence.
Until his retirement in 1970,
Eller was director of Naval History
and Curator for the Department of
the Navy at the Naval Historical
Center in Washington. Eller's son,
Dr. Peter Eller of Cincinnati, repre-
sented his father at the ceremony.
"I'vealways felt this great state
is part of my heritage Elier said.
He and his father consider the
dedication "an overwhelming
honor Eller said his father was
proud to be associated with a pro-
gram that was educating people
about the sea.
ECU Chancellor Richard Eakin
called the dedication one of the "im
portant occasions in the life of the
university
"Admiral Eller honors us bv
allowing us to have his name asso-
ciated with East Carolina Univer-
sity he said.
Dr. Marlene Springer, vice
chancellor for Academic Affairs
praised the faculty in making the
program oneof the nation's "distin-
guished programs in mantime ar-
chaeology . . . and a truly exciting
field of study
The Mantime History and Un-
derwater Archaeology prograrr,
began 10 years ago. Field schoois
and expeditions are conducted an-
nually to study shipwreck sites
Lower, midclie cU
1 fAP) Middle and low-in-come families t
1 tome families in North Carolina arethe study by j
1 paying more of their income in taxestice.
1 than affluent state residents, a newThe study
1 study says.rates on the stal
1 North Carolinians makingest residents hJ
I $654,300 pay a tower overall stateover the past sJ
1 and local tax rate than middle-in-for the real
1 School of medicine pre the health sneJ

1 ECU Newt Bureau
Mosl August 1 sud
1 Dr. John C. Moskop of the
1 School of Medicine waselected chairJoyce, a proies
1 of the faculty at ECU for 1991-92Two othej
1 Wednesday and pledged to workprofessional sj
1 toward "greater understandingvice chair and
1 among the colleges and schools ofulty for thecoj
I the universityDr. Patr. I
1 "I will stand up for facultyofEducal
I nghts said Moskop, a professor 14and Dr. 1 J
1 medical humanities. He becomesof nursing, wi
I the first faculty chair elected fromAt as
I thedi vision of health sciences whichthe facu. � - -j
� includes the schools of medicine.vacai i
I nursing, allied health sciences andultvandadmiri
1 Greeks
I n this campus is under investiga-
� tion said a third black student'
1 one thing bad happens, they are
1 ready to close us down at the dropdons
1 (if a hat. Not to mention calling inrespons
1 ery officer in the county to sub-he &
� due a not that thev feel is inevi-�
table Smith said that the univer-thatther
sity is not going to the extremes of
law enforcement for black Gn - �turn i
"We're concerned about (stu-den"
dents'safety and well being heto Wad i
said. "The visibility of law helpsafter
safetypart) �
Dining
sidenng you eat all you want�
ManlynOgaro, the manager ofcustom i
ARA Dining Services for ECU, saidm me) s
that the number of diners offsetsWh:
food and labor costs, allowing theu me tor
service to make a profit while keep
ing prices relatively low. She also -� i
said, however, that was not alwaysrrience
I the caseIt
Keep
informed
of the
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I
(

�ommencement
.
v � rsl I lr Cherry Ann
vmse Beale, R. Wes
. Mrnbrrly Bryant,
I Ums, I �icv Adams
it KnnKrlv Anne Morton,
He lenkins. Marie
�s lVni� Jensen,
lief t Vna C .ail Price,
� HkOev. Angela
)tv�; Oliver Tisdale,
iheth Vaughan, and
hbietnfl
I institute of Health
medk il faculty since
! irtere!t in the
li�T'�H-almecha
'nmng ran
� lls
irs his research has
ling the ef-
-1 ivmpound
hi to determine if
I hich is derived
�n'pnal tree can
ikemkl pahents
mdiit'on announced
father jrwldff the
iti erwhelming
id his father was
i�' d �� ith a pn
�ting people
� Ku h.irdEakin
�i(cf the'im
us in the life of the
i F.llet honors us bv
� fm namcasstv
lint Iniver-

�pnner, vice
v idemic Affairs,
miking the
' tl i i ,ifu n's "distin-
n maritime ar
I i tmlv exdfing
tor) and Un-
teology program
� �arv ago 1 icld �.hxils
ndtM ttl an-
n vk tHa
tL
vents
pie
the
pus
jmunity
tat Carolinian
rulintmi
i '
dual ($25 00yr)
"turn to �
I Ml t .trotinian .
'hhcilons BWg . LCU �
mnm, NC 27858-1353 !
Lower, middle classes bear the brunt of taxes
(The EaHt (Earolfnfan April 23,1991 3
(AP) Middle- and low in-
come families in Nkirth Carolina an
payingmoreof their income in taxes
than affluent state residents, a new
study says.
come families earning $35,300, says
the study by Citizens for Tax Jus-
tice.
The study also found that tax
rateson the state's richest and poor-
North Carolinians making est residents have remained steady
$o54,300 pay a lower overall state over the past six years. Buttaxlevies
and kxal tax rate than middle-in- for the rest of the state's families
increased.
The findings were part of the
organization's analysis of major
taxesand who pays themir,50states
and the District of Columbia.
Citizens for Tax Justice, sup-
ported by unions and religious and
social action groups, long has ad vo-
cated higher taxes on the wealthy
and greater reJianceon income taxes.
Poor families earning $11,500
pay 10.6 percent of their income in
income, sales and property taxes,
the study said. Thaf s 26 percent
more than the 8.4 percent rate paid
by the wealthy, the survey said.
Sch(xl of medicine professor elected Chairman of faculty senate
ECU Newt Bureau
l ohn C. Moskop of the
St hoolof Medicine wasekxtedchair
of the faailty at ECU for 1991-92
Wftfntlday and pledged to work
toward "greater understanding"
among the colleges and schools of
the university
1 will stand up for faculty
rights said Moskop,a professor of
medical humanities. He becomes
the first faculty chair elected from
thedivisionof health sciences which
includes the Khoob of medicine,
nursing, allied health sciences and
the health sciences library.
Moskop will assume office
August 1 succeeding Dr. James
Joyce, a professor of physics.
Two other faculty from ECU'S
professional schx�ls were elected
vice chair and secretary of the fac-
ulty for the coming ft ademic year.
Ir. Patricia Anderson of the School
of 1 dotation MTMCfeCted vice chair
and Ir trances EMOft, a professor
of nursing, was elected secretary.
At an organizational meeting,
the faculty senate also voted to fill
vacancies (xvurring on various far
ulty ami administrative committees
Greeks
i m this campus is under Investiga-
tion said a third black student "It
one thing Kid happens, they arv
ready to close us down at the dn�p
ot I hat Not to mention calling in
every officer In the county to sub
due a not that they feel is inevi
table Smith Mid that the univer-
sity is not going to the- extremes of
law enforcement for black (Ireeks.
We're concerned about (stu
dents') safety and well being he
said "The visibility of law helps
safety
Dining
Smith pointed out tunes when
non students were on ctmpus with
Hrearmsal black organizatti n tune
tions. "We have I legal and moral
responsibility for vour well being
he said
n unconfirmed source said
thai thercarerumorsof limiting the
parties to the I edonia Wright cul-
tural center, and (.losing off Men-
denhall Studententer n hi.i1 nxm
to black Greek parties This comes
after damage was reported after a
party several weeks ago
sidering vou eat all vou want
Marilyn Ogaro, the manager of
aka tuning Services for ECU, said
that the number of diners offsets
IchkI and labor costs, allowing the
servk e to make i profit while keep-
ing prices relatively low She also
Mid, however, that was not always
the case
"We st.irtixi with only 60 to 70
Customers a day and we were lov
Ing money she said
While dining halls rvlv on vol-
ume t makei pn h t, t he si nia sh( ps
protit from customer's willingness
to sacrifice lower prices for conve-
nience.
"It costs more to package food
BAR B-Q BARN
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Students recervt Nv disoouni
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Call ahead for Takeout Orders 752-3000
THE LEO JENKINS
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APRIL 26-27
Starting time: 6 PM
Registration begins at 4:30 PM at Hast Carolina
University track. Get your team of K-10 people
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Team members run or walk in shifts for 24 hours.
For more information call 752 2574.
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Greenville, NC 27835
Moskop was elected by a vote
of 27-15 over Dr. Eugene Hughes of
the School of Business. The two
nominations were submitted by a
nominating committee and there
wen' no nominations from the floor
The chair-elect, addressing the
faculty senate, said he would up-
hold EC'U's "strong tradition" of
shared governance.
"I would seek to uphold EC U's
strong tradition of faculty gover-
nance as we con front thechallenes
of implementing our strategic plan
ning, revising our tenure and pro-
motion policies and making ECU
more congenial as an institution of
life-long learning Moskop said.
Moskop has been a member of
the med ica I huma ni ties facu 1 ry si nee
1979 He was elected to the faculty
senate in 1990 and is completing a
three-year term as an ECU delegate
to the UNC faculty assembly.
In addition to teaching medical
studentsand n-sidentsmthe School
of Medicine, Moskop had taught
undergraduates in the ECU Hon-
ors IVogram, in ECU'S 1987 sum-
mer program in Ferrara, Italy, has
served as guest lecturer in under-
graduate classes.
Continued from page 1
Smith said that the rumors t
limiting parties to the cultural cen-
ter (VCR untrue. I k-said somedam-
ages were reported and a fine im-
posed to the organization that held
the party.
"Students need to take respon-
sibility in monitoring outside the
lobby and bathrooms during the
dance Smith said. I le ttid .ill tra
ternihesandsnrontu"sare the object
of administrator's scrutiny.
"We monitor white Creeks as
well as black Creeks Smith said.
"Off- campus Creek parties that
have bands ,rc nuirod to have
security officers on the site He
snd there were no differences in
treatment toward white and black
Greek organizations
Smith said he thought the uni-
versity gave no more recognition to
white Greeks than to black Creeks.
"I"here are more white Creeks
than black Greeks on this campus
he said. He said that ultimately it is
on the shoulders of the organiza-
tion to participate on campus.
Continued from page 1
than to mass produce it Fred
Bissenger, an ARA manager, said.
"Thesandwiches tvebuy have to
be marked up for us to nuke I
profit. We have to make a certain
percentage, therefore we have to
charge(more) to make that percent-
age' Bissenger said that he hopes
recent changes to the Wright Sxla
Shop will attract mom students,
which would encourage lower
prices. He said there are plans to sell
pizza, grilled foodand fnedchicken
rather than pre-packaged food,
which would help lower prices.
Monday the Wright Soda Shop
re-opened, after renovations that
allow them to offer grilled foods
instead of the pre-packaged items.
"The Oroatan will tentatively
be renovated during the second
summer session (as well)
Bissenger said. "The food will be
similar to that in Mendenhall
Wed 24th:
The
CoMedY
ZONE
ATTIC
752-7303
Peter DearujoDanny Brown
immediately following
KARAOKE
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Fifth St.
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April 23th & 26th: Mike Mesmer"eyesM
World's most powerful hypnotist
SGA
Continued from page 1
sentativeof the student body. About
200 students filled out these sur-
veys.
"The SGA needs to ha vea voice
in this Jones said. "A lot more
could have been done to save the
yearbook
President Allen Thomas said:
"Yes, we need annuals, but we need
to change the process. It's some-
thing that needs to be reorganized
The resolution was approved
by a vote of 26 to 16.
In other business, Sean Smith
was elected attorney general. Two
Marines
groups received money and three
constitutions were approved.
Phi Beta Lambda received
$1,986 to attend a convention in
California.
The semorclass received $1,500
for the senior class gift � new
benches outside Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
A constitution for Bacchus, an
information group on alcohol pre-
vention, was approved. Also, con-
stitutions were passed for the
Women's Studies Alliance and the
Surf Club.
Continued from page 1
said. "Without outside help the
problem will only worsen in time;
we all need to contribute in some
way
Team Semper Fi does not have
any follow-up community service
programs planned until next fall.
The group is currently prepar-
ing and training members for Ma-
rine Corps Officer Candidate's
School to be held this summer at
Quantico, Va.
JilftharryEcHJ'Photo Lab
Snake!
You never know what you can p�ck up at Barefoot on the Mall,
which was held Thursday.
�lie iaBtfltarnltman
Director of
Advertising
John E Semelsberger II
Production Manager
Mary Piland
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
per column inch
National$6.00
Local Open Rate $5.00
Bulk Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours: Monday - Friday 9:00 - 5:00
757-6366
Advertising
Representatives
David Bailey
Greg Jones
Tim Peed
Patrick Pitzer
Deadlines
for advertising:
Tuesday's issue -
4 PM Friday
Thursday's issue -
4 PM Monday
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
(DON'T WE ALL?)
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M-Sat





�lje �ast Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Michael D. Albuquerque, Managing Editor
Blair Skinner, News Editor LeClair Harper, Asst. News Editor
Matt King, Features Editor Stuart Ouphant, Asst. Features Editor
Matt Mumma, Sports Editor Kerry Nester, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy Edwards, Copy Editor Jason Johnson, Copy Editor
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The Fast Carolinian has served ihc East Carolina campus community since 1925, cmphasi.ing information that directly affects
ECU students During the ECU school year, The East Carolinian publishes twice a week with a circulation of 12,(KX). The East
1'aroltnian reserves the nght to refuse or discontinue any advertisements that discnminate on the basis of age, sex, CTeed or
national origin The masthead editorial in each edition does not necessarily represent the views of one individual, but, rather,
is a majority opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should
be limited to 2words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C
27834; or call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, April 23, 1991
U.S. role must be defined
Today, an American flag flies over Zakho, Iraq.
Zakho is not a strategic linchpin along the demilita-
rized one on the Kuwaiti boarder. It is a town in
northern Iraq, host to the first of the U.Sprotected
kurdish relief camps.
Over the next week, the United States Marines
will establish several more of these garrisoned en-
campments and distribute tens of millions of dollars
in relief. While many observers praise this aggres-
sive new aid policy, others have criticized it as too
little too late, to resolve a tragedy that never needed
occur.
The kurdish refugee crisis has been called the
worst in modern history. It has also been called the
responsibility of the Bush administration. Many out-
spoken members of the media elite have said that the
refugee crisis would never have occurred if Bush had
not urged the Iraqi people to rebel and then left them
to be crushed, unaided. Calls went up to support the
kurds in the field � to ground helicopters, to provide
arms, to participate militarily in the civil uprising.
But the Bush administration held back.
After the kurds weredercatcd and subsequently
left thctr homes fcarmg reprisals, the same voices
shouted even louder for immediate and intensive
humanitarian assistance to the displaced rebels.
The irony is that many of the same voices that
initially criticized the Bush administration for mak-
ing war in the Middle East ended up assailing Bush
forultimately not making enough war. Furthermore,
they now shout for a deep and likely prolonged
military commitment in the that very region.
The purpose of this editorial is not to argue
against aid to the kurds, but rather to highlight the
philosophical inconsistency exposed by the aid de-
bate. The same camp that rejected the idea of America
as the world's police officer are now embracing the
idea of America as the world's social worker. Is it
immoral to violate a nation's sovereignty to reestab-
lish national boarders, vet moral to violate a nation's
sovereignty to feed its rebels? Both involved moving
military forces into another nation's territory. Both
were done against the will of the violated nation.
Both arc putting the lives of U.S. soldiers in jeopardy.
Are the implications of being a global social
worker any less complex than being a global police
officer? Hardly. How many oppressed, impover-
ished peoples are there on this planet? Should we
service them all? Should the U.S. Marines set up
relief camps in Liberia to aid and comfort those
displaced bv that country's hurricane of a civil war?
Or should we limit out aid only to those peoples who
we urged to rebel against their oppressors? In that
case, the 101st Airborne should be landing in Krakow
and Prague to help the Eastern Europeans deal with
the harsh, free-market economy we urged them to
fight for.
Of course, there is little difference between the
implicmions and responsibilities ot those two roles.
In fact, fo a targe extent, each implies the other. H we
are to bring peace to the world, we must be prepared
to relive any suffering our actions may cause. If we
are to eliminate suffering in the world, the we must
be prepared to end the political squabbling which
creates such a constant supply.
The question isn't whether America should
wage war or wage peace in the world, but whether or
not America is to have a principle role on the world
stage. And a quick look at the opinion polls �
regarding the war or the relief effort � will show that
we have already made up our minds on that ques-
tion.
fPlTOKS NOTE tit UlSti To
APot,o&rz�- foR THE
V'SEPBESEAJiaTioU Of WHEY
l4 THE VZrfli tAsT CAQ0UAAA("�V 'S
AC.njAu.y a itautP ptsru�2 r&bAt milk
AAD KIOvJ, THE. Ke.S'S�-P CAYTtcJ
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wnay
Letters To The Editor
ECU student
concerned with
inefficiency
To The Editor:
In the March 26,1991 edi-
tion to The East Carolinian, I had
an article published concern-
ing grievences I had against
ECU. One of the complaints I
had was that a student was hit
while trying to cross 10th Street,
with the lights off in the com-
muter parking lot across the
street at night, and that nothing
was said of the incident. I felt
that the story had been "swept
under the rug
The letter I received from
ViceChancellor Richard Brown
pointed out the student was jog-
ging along 10th Street when he
was hit by a speeding vehicle
that made no attempt to stop
and left the scene of the acci-
dent. The accident was filed
with the city of Greenville. He
concluded by encouraging me
to contact the Department of
Public Safety to find out what's
going on around campus.
If I had asked the Depart-
ment of Public Safety about the
incident in the chemistry build-
ing last month concerning
Tollen's Reagent, I would have
simply been told that it was a
chemistry experiment that had
went awry, when in fact it was
not an experiment at all. It was all
due to the incompetence of one of
our chemistry professors. Even I,
a lowly student, knew that
Tollen's Reagent should not be
left around on the shelf.
In regard to the letter writ-
ten to The East Carolinian by Ms.
Julie Toler on April 4,1991,1 must
correct her on some points. First,
my article was published on
March 26, not March 25 as she
stated in her article. I guess the
previous part of this article cleared
up the fact of why the jogger was
hit. Maybe the car's headlights
were not turned on Ms Toler.
Ms. Toler commented on
how students walk through cam-
puslike they arein another world,
taking for granted that drivers
will see them and stop. 1 agree,
and I must clarify for the record
that I never said that some stu-
dents don't watch for cars.
I am concerned aoout what
is being "swept under the rug"
here at ECU. I am concerned about
things such as students being sent
from one end of the campus to the
other end at registration time only
to find the paper pusher on the
other end needed the divine sig-
nature from the paper pusher
on the other end.
I am concerned when
grown adults in college have to
get an advisor to sign their reg-
istration slips as if they can't
read the course catalog and fig-
ure out what classes they need.
I am very concerned when
people sit in an office around
campus, and when asked a
simple question, they have to
transfer you through many
people before anyone knows
what's going on. These same
people act as if everything is the
student's fault.
Some of the problems
arise from students and some
arise from the school's depart-
ments; however, you should
keep in mind that the fact that
we are paying you and that the
customer is always right.
In conclusion, perhaps
Ms. Toler should think twice
about some of the other causes
of problems around campus.
Thank you both for responding
to my editorial. Your comments
are always welcome.
Ronald Mercer
Sophomore
Chemistry
See Letters, page 5
Quiz
Pearls For Swine
Credit cards create disturbing cycle
By Bill Egbert
Editorial Columnist
My fall has begun. I am go-
ing the way of all flesh. My
Citibank Classic Visa card arrived
in the mail yesterday. It's not my
first credit card. It is, alas, my sec-
ond, and that's what scares me.
The worst part is my reason
for applying for this second card:
I wanted a higher credit limit.
Yes, I'm giving in to theGreat
Temptation. I'mdevelopinga taste
for credit, the milk and honey of
the American Promised Land.
But I can't really blame my-
self. Citibank sent me a wantonly
serpentine letter praising mycr edit
rating and telling how much they
wanted me as a member of the
Citibank Classic Visa family. They
said they wanted to help me attain
mv goals of prosperity and secu-
nty. They said they cared about
my dreams. Then they lavished
upon me that highest of all praise:
thev called me an "excellent risk
How could I resist? Am I not but
flesh, after all?
What's more, they said they
had so much faith in me, my card
was pre-approved. Would 1 ac
cept their cardHell, alter reading
that letterid have slept withheir
CEO.
And the card could do so
manv niftv things, too. I could get
cash at any bank in the Milky Way
and at automatic tellers in Alpha
Centan. 1 could even call a toll-
free number, and they'd tell me
where the nearest teller machine
was. These Citibank folks said
they'd slap a warranty on just
about anything I bought on the
card, and they'd even plan my
vacations if I asked 'em to. Just
carrying this card would entitle
me to $100,000 in travel accident
insurance. I could even accumu-
late "Qtidollar$" and purchase
keen stuff from a special catalogue.
This card could do every-
thing. Why would 1 ever need to
carry anything else? I could just
go naked and hold my Visa in
frontof my privates. With my Plas-
tic Shield and towering credit limit
I will be invincible! I am the Lizard
King!
Citibank made it all sound
soappealing, I feltlikeliving with-
out that card would be like giving
up a lung.
But what really got me was
that higher credit limit. I would
have the privilege of spending even
more money that I don't have but
hope to make someday. When I
thought about that prospect, it
worried me.
Because I proved myself able
to manage a lower credit limit.
Citibank offered mea higher limit,
reassuring me that I could handle
this one, too. When 1 was offered
the higher limit, 1 accepted That's
how credit works, and it looks like
a disturbing cvcle.
If I never refused a higher
limit, 1 would eventually reach a
level that I couldn't manage. I'd
screw up my raring and there I'd
stay �ata level 1 couldn't handle,
alwaysowing a little more than I
could pav. Before I knew it, I'd be
mortgaging mv house to Mr. Cash
and paying off my Visa with my
Mastercharge. It's like a twisted
version of the Peter Principle: 1
will eventually be promoted to
mv level of insolvency. It's like a
conspiracy � to make credit so
useful, so convenient and so easy
to obtain, that 1 would embrace it,
salivate on it and grow completely
dependent on it.
Their Orwellian scheme is
for me to end up bound to mv card
like a Medieval serf was bound to
the land, paying tribute to my liege
and creditor.
As a matter of fact, that's
what happens to most or us
become addicted to en lit fjJ
rather, we become addicted toM
ing beyond our means - j
something credit cards:
easy to to do.
We middle-class A I
strive to live beyond our it
That's how we can "afford '�
as lavishly as we do it our -
dried up, hell, we'd live liki
tians.
How can we blame irg �
em men t for spend in g it -
hole when it's just foil
le id of every hou hold
nation?
But then again, in ur 9 -
ety, credit cards are n
simply magical devices for
ing a fiscal switch-an
ID cards They prov
Thev prove webelong. The
we're oka v.
Getting a credit card is �
growing facial hair or breasts
you don't have tine, there n
something wrong
In fact, most people an
picious of anyone who does
have a credit card. Thev
that if you don't spend
money than you have, they
shouldn't trust you. "i oti re as -
versive. Maybe ev en a corr
you don't have credit cai
would pull their kids out of your!
children's school.
So, I suppose w e '
damned to end up in debt
cards are becoming like bod
organs. In fact, they re bee
like a certain, particular b
organ. A organ that seems to hatt
a mind of its own. An organ that
lets vou perform wonderful feats,
but can also get you to do some
pretty stupid things. An organ that
gets you in a lot of trouble, buto
you'd never consider living with-
out.
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Quiz your knowledge of American values
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
Wheredoyoudrawtheline?
Here's a quiz:
� Should books like Slaugh-
terhouse-Five and Catcher in the
Rye be available in bookstores?
How about public libraries? High
school libraries? What about small
towns where the public library is
a school library?
� Consider Kitty Kelles
controversial book about the
Reagans � should she have been
allowed to publish it? If not,
should Nancy Reagan have been
allowed to publish My Turn? How
about the books Barbara Bush
spits out every once in a while?
� Should groups like the
American Nazi Party and the Ku
Klux Klan be allowed to make
programs for cable's public ac-
cess channels, just like everyone
else? How about paid political
announcements on television and
radio? Should they be allowed to
hold peaceful marches and ral-
lies?
Would you answer the same
way for the National Association
for the Advancement of Colored
People? The National Organiza-
tion for Women? The American
Civil Liberties Union?
� Should women be allowed
to have abortions? Women who
were impregnated by rape?
Women who will probably die if
they carry the fetus to term?
Women who would die from this
childbirth, but who could safely
have other children and want to
have other children?
If a woman wants an abor-
tion but can't afford one, should
the state pay? The federal gov-
ernment? What if the woman is a
"repeat customer" who refuses
to use condoms or the pill?
What about situations like
one prominent recent case, in
which one fetal twin had devel-
oped no heart and was threaten-
ing the life of its sister? Should
the mother have been allowed to
abort the � er � heartless twin?
Should she have been forced to, in
order that the other might be
saved?
� In the spirit of free in-
quiry, should college students be
allowed to say whatever they
want to say in class? Does that
include racist and sexist com-
ments? What if if s not in the spirit
of free inquiry, but in angerWhat
if if s just a statement of opinion,
not said in anger?
Should black college stu-
dents be allowed to denigrate
whites as a group? Should a black
student be allowed to denigrate a
white student, using comments
based on the white student's race?
How about a female denigrating
a male on the same basis?
Does your answer apply for
statements of opinion only, or
does it extend to statements of
fact which could be considered
insulting?
How about music that discourages
sex or suicide or drug use? Does
the same hold for movies and
other entertainment aimed at
teens? How about ad verbsements
the Partnership for a Drug-Free
America aims at teens?
Should entertainment and
literature that deals with sex or
violence be altogether withheld
from minors7 What if it discour-
ages sex or violence?
What if it encourages sex, but
only among consenting adults?
Only among consenting adults of
the same sex? Only consenting
adults married to each other? Or
between any two (or more) per-
sons who loveeach other and take
appropriate precautions? Be-
tween anybody and anybody else,
with consent? Without consent?
Should we ban material
dealing with sex or violence if it
Should they be allowed tc
make such comments out of eiass
hut still on campus? Should pro-
fessors be allowed to make them7
Staff? Administrators? And who
decides what's insulting'
� Should college students!
be allowed to "experiment' with I
drugs, the wav many dru� MB
nors now reluctantly admit they
did when they were in college
How about high school students I
High school or college dropouts'
All drugs, or just marijuana? Al-
cohol, for the underage crowd7
� Should there be regula-
tions limiting the amount ot vio-
lence on prime-time television
shows? How about the amount of
sex? The amount of profanity'
How about daytime soap operas
and late-night shows? Broadcast
only, or is cable included?
Should regulations Hrni
violence in afternoon children s
shows, like G.I. Joe? How about
Saturday morning shows?
Should there be regulations
to end kids' shows which are ba-
sically half-hour commercials'
How about program-length com-
mercials aimed at adults, like that
irritating Soloflex thing? Wouk
15-minute commercials aimed at
kids be okay? Five-minute com-
mercials? One-minute commer-
cials? Thirty-second commer-
cials?
� Should the lyrics in mus�
aimed at teens be allowed to dis-
cuss sex or suicide or drug u?
See Quiz, page 5
might fall into the ham
nors, even if it's meant foj
� As purveyors
tially deadly products
cigarette companies be
to advertiseon televisioi
Magazines? Billboards
they always include u
pnate Surgeon General
ings?
Should they be al
target specific groups
race? Based on gender? I
age?
Are your answers
for advertising aimed
male adults, as it was foj
before anybody cared'
What about alcoh(
nies, who are also pui
potentially deadly pre
� Should soft-cor
raphy be sold over the
convenience stores Hi
New treasurer
responds to
recent editorial
To The Editor
My name is Enc Hilliard (not
Hillard), and 1 am the new SG A Trea-
surer. In the future I would appreci-
ate you spelling my name correctly. I
do not misspell The East Carolinian.
In response to the editorial on
April 11,1 would like to congratulate
you on another perfect example of
"finger pointing" by the press. As
usual, the university newspaper has
picked out one or two "culprits"
whom are to be blamed for the low
voter turnout in the recent SGA elec-
tion. The column, once again, gives
us several reasons to despise one
group (GREEKS) tor exercising their
voting rights. 11 s easy picking on one
group, isn't it? Hitler did it.
You have given us a group to
hate, and a reason to hate them. So
why didn't the other 13,602 or so,
students vote You suggest the cam-
paign was not publicized very well. 1
guess they did not see one of my 200
posters, two banners, ads in the ECU
paper,400 cards and stickers, as well
as mv opponents and SGA's count-
less other items. Maybe no one read
t he " Meet the Candida tes" article you
published. 1 guess nobody reads The
East Carolinian anymore.
Lackof publicity isnot the prob-
lem. So what are the problems with
ECU? Wh v did only 2.3 percent of the
campus vote? Why did only Greeks
(with the exception of Ms. Carstens,
Mr. Beamer. and Ms. Ery) run" Why
does the maionty ot voters seem to be
Greek? Why doesn't SGA do some-
thing? Why don't you ask Mr. Edi-
tor?
Instead of writing a short edito-
rial about who we should blame for
our troubles, research this topic, do a
little reporting, find the facts and sug-
gestions of the campus; and then give
us a real opinion
And next yei
a candidate spom
Carolinian for SG.
By the way, tl
Allen Thomas was
may not fulfill a sij
promise, but I an
my best. Allen die
Enc Hi I
SGA Tn
Editor's Not
the masthead edi
11 wasnottopoii
the Greek organi
Hilliard suggest
pointed out hoi
various groups
hind a fellow me
cited the Student
Democracy, the
ourselves, and sol
received any thr
from any mei
groups.)
Next year,
see a candidate H
East Carolinian
dent However,
one candidate
tion, we see no
this charade for
On a light
Carolinian woul
gize for incorrec
Milliard's name!
April2and4edii
paper. Like Mr.
Hilliard, we al�
sometimes we
little harder.
Scholars!
acknowll
other cu!
To The Edl
1 was ha pi
thertewhorgai
m
It took Galileo 1(
You have one ni
It seems unfair. The genius had all thatl
short hours to learn your sun spots from
dreaded astronomy exam.
On the other hand, Vrvarin gives you
keep you awakeand mentally alert for h
even when the subject matters dull, your I
If Galileo had used Vlvarin, maybe he'
system faster, too
���j"





Stye last Carolinian April 23, 19915
Continued from pag� 4
disturbing cycle
is! il
f us. Wtl
iddicted tolrj
means, which i?
irdsmakevei
ISS Americans
d our means.1
" rd" to live!
is we do If our credit!
d live like HcH-l
� ourgow
ts If into al
v� ing thol
hold in the
nn. in our soci-l
ore thin
for pull-
i-roo They rel
we exisll
rheyprovn
ird is likel
air or breasts. Ifj
there must bel
� pei ; e are sus-
ne who doesn't!
ird They ftgurn
� ;x'nd morel
. have, they
. u luu'rea sub-1
�mrrfle K
ird, people
ut of vi'iirl
�se wore all
p in debt. Credit
. like bodily
t. they're becoming
. irticular bodily
it seems to have!
An organ that
nderful feao)J
i to do some
n organ thai j
� trouble, but one;
li r living with-

er Hammer
f American values
allowed to
mmts out of class
impus? Should pro-
il to make them?
fi itors7 And who
a hat s insulting?
�SI ild i ollege students
experiment" with
many drug war-
� . tantl) admit they
. were in college?
igh school students?
� ollege dropout
� ist marijuana? Al-
� � the underage crowd?
� Should there be regula-
limiting the amount of vio-
e on prime-time television
S? How about the amountof
- � The amount of profanity?
How about daytime soap operas
and late night shows7 Broadcast
' is i able included?
Should regulations limit
fnce in afternoon children's
shows, like G.l. Joel How about
Saturday morning shows?
Should there be regulations
to end kids' shows which are ba-
sically half-hour commercials?
How about program-length corn-
mercialsaimed at adults, like that
irritating Soloflex thing? Would
1 -minute commercials aimed at
kids be okay? Five-minute com-
mercials? One-minute commer-
cials? Thirty-second commer-
cials?
� Should the lyrics in music
aimed at teens be allowed to dis-
cuss sex or suicide or drug use?
See Quiz, page 5
'xist i
hot in the spin t
It anger? What
nt ot opinion.
college stu
?" denigrate
bouldablack
to denigrated
ng comments
tudent'srace?
e denigrating
asis?
wer apply for
ion only, or
'atements of
considered
How about music that discourages
sex or suicide or drug use? Does
the same hold for movies and
other entertainment aimed at
teens? How aboutadvertisements
the Partnership for a Drug-Free
America aims at teens?
Should entertainment and
literature that deals with sex or
violence be altogether withheld
from minors? What if it discour-
ages sex or violence?
What if it encourages sex, but
only among consenting adults?
Only among consenting adultsof
the same sex? Only consenting
adults married to each other? Or
between any two (or more) per-
sons who love each other and take
appropriate precautions? Be-
tween anybody and anybody else,
with consent? Without consent?
Should we ban material
dealing with sex or violence if it
might fall into the hands of mi-
nors, even if it's meant for adults?
� As purveyors of poten-
tially deadly products, should
cigarette companies be allowed
to advertise on television? Radio?
Magazines? Billboards? What if
they always include the appro-
priate Surgeon General's warn-
ings?
Should they be allowed to
target specific groups based on
race? Based on gender? Based on
age?
Are your answers the same
for advertising aimed at white
male adults, as it was for decades
before anybody cared?
What about alcohol compa-
nies, who are also purveyors of
potentially deadly products?
� Should soft-core pornog-
raphy be sold over tlie counter at
convenience stores' How about
at book stores? Mail-order? What
about the "harder stuff?
� Should people be allowed
to burn U.S. flags? How about
state flags? What if they're burn-
ing them as a means of respect-
fully disposing of the flags, as
most flag codes allow?
If the intent is to communi-
cate disrespect, should they be
allowed to spit on flags? What if it
isn't a real flag, but only a picture
of one?
Should people be prevented
from defacing flags in any fash-
ion for any reason, even pictures
or drawings of flags? How about
pictures of flags on postage
stamps? What about the post
office's cancellation of a postage
stamp?
� Should people be allowed
to protest a war while the war is
going on? Should they be allowed
to protest our impending involve-
ment in a war? Should they be
allowed to say we shouldn't ever
have been in a war thafs now
over? Does this apply only to de-
clared wars, or also to de facto
wars like the Gulf War and our
invasions of Panama and
Grenada? Should news media
cover groups that protest wars?
� Should all television net-
works have a rule mandating that
drug-using or drug-selling char-
acters on television programs ei-
ther reform or come to a bad end
by the end of the episode? (NBC
has one.) How about cable net-
works? Movie studios?
Should this include stories
which would be ruined or ren-
dered ludicrous by such an end-
ing? Should it apply to characters
who are murderers? Rapists?
Muggers? Shoplifters? Jaywalk-
ers?
� Should people be allowed
publicly to do things that offend
most people? Privately? At all?
What about things that don't of-
fend a majority, but offend siz-
able minorities? What if the of-
fended minority comprises 49
percent of the population? Forty
percent? Twenty percent? Five
percent? What if it comprises an
identifiable ethnic or racial group,
regardless of percentage?
� Should science textbooks
used in high schools con ta in theo-
ries that are not supported by the
facts, like creation "science"?
How about other popular absur-
dities, like astrology? How about
numerology? Crystal healing?
Channeling7 Fsp?
Thafs just part of the list of
controversial questions (and
some of their logical extensions)
that have plagued America in the
last decade. Fundamentally,
they're all the same question: do
we have too much freedom?
Sadly, the average response
seems to be: yes, we do. Adults
should be "protected" from hav-
ing to deal with things that of-
fend them, and minors should be
"protected" from things which
offend adults until they learn to
sublimate their interest.
The average response seems
to indicate that we feel there's no
harm in propaganda (what was
your answer to the questions
about the rock lyrics?) and that
politically incorrect views should
be punished.
That response is what passes
for patriotism today, in the land
of the free and the home of the
brave. Makes you think.
Letters Continued
New treasurer
responds to
recent editorial
To The Editor.
My name is Eric Milliard (not
Hil!ard),andlamthenewSGATrea-
surer. In the future I would appreci-
ateyou spelling my name correctly. I
do not misspell The East Carolinian.
In response to the editorial on
April 11,1 would like to congratulate
you on another perfect example of
"finger pointing" by the press. As
usual, the university newspaper has
picked out one or two "culprits"
whom are to be blamed tor the low
voter turnout in the recent SGA elec-
tion. The column, once again, gives
us several reasons to despise one
group (GREEKS) for exercising their
voting rights. It's easv picking on one
group, isn't it? Hitler did it.
You have given us a group to
hate, and a reason to hate them. So
whv didn't the other 13,6(12 or so,
students vote? You suggest the cam-
paign was not publicized very well I
guess they did not see one ot my 200
posters, two banners, ads in the ECU
paper, 400 cards and stickers, as well
as my opponents and SGA's count-
less other items. Maybe no one read
the "Meet the Candidates" article you
published. I guess nobody reads The
East Carolinian anymore
I ck of publicity is not the pmb-
lent So what are the problems with
ECU? Why did only 2.5 percent of the
campus vote? Why did only Greeks
(with the exception of Ms. Carstens,
Mr. Beamer, and Ms. Fry) run7 Why
does the ma jonty ot voters seem to be
Greek? Why doesn't SGA do some-
thing? Why don't you ask Mr. Edi-
tor?
Instead of writing a short edito-
rial about who we should blame for
our troubles, research this topic, do a
little reporting, find thefactsand sug-
gestions of thecampus; and then give
us a real opinion.
And next year, I hope to see
a candidate sponsored by The East
Carolinian for SGA President.
By the way, that last bit about
Allen Thomas was a cheap shot. I
may not fulfill a single campaign
promise, but I am willing to do
my best. Allen did his.
Eric Hilliard
SGA Treasurer
Editor's Note: The intent of
the masthead editorial on April
11 was not to point any fingers at
the Greek organizations, as Mr.
Hilliard suggests. We merely
pointed out how easy to is for
various groups to organize be-
hind a fellow member. (We also
cited the Students for Economic
Democracy, the Latin Club and
ourselves, and so far we have not
received any threatening letters
from any members of these
groups.)
Next year, we also hope to
see a candidate endorsed by The
Fast Carolinian for SGA presi-
dent However, as long as only
one candidate runs for the posi-
tion, we see no need to play out
this charade for the students.
On a lighter note, The East
Carolinian would like to apolo-
gize for incorrectly spelling Mr.
M111 iard's name four times in the
April 2and4editions of the news-
paper. Like Mr. Thomas and Mr.
Hilliard, we also do our best �
sometimes we all need to try a
little harder.
Scholars must
acknowledge
other cultures
To The Editor:
I was happy to leam from
the newly organized ECU arm of
the Na tional Association of Schol-
ars (411) that they intend "to
support and encourage an open
intellectual life But that open-
ness is hardly displayed by their
total rejection of scholarship
which reveals Eurocentric and
patriarchal biases in traditional
disciplines and curricula.
Galileo was excommuni-
cated by the Catholic Church for
daring to say that the earth re-
volved around the sun and not
vice versa; Columbus had doubl-
ers among the "flat earthers
Darwin was denounced as a
fraud; and Florence Nightingale
was called crazy. Feminist schol-
ars in the '70s found their work
equally threatening tocolleagues,
who therefore denied the valid-
ity of their conclusions.
These conclusions show
that white women and ethnic and
racial minorities of both sexes
have been systematically ex-
cluded from Western history and
denied their rightful places in our
system of education. For ex-
ample, it took me until quite re-
cently to discover that the cor-
nerstone of Western civilization,
Greek culture, significantly built
on existing African culture. We
do indeed "absorb" other cul-
tures � but then forget to ac-
knowledge them. Women'sStud-
ies, Ethnic Studies, African Stud-
ies, Hispanic Studies � all are
attempts to acknowledge forgot-
ten contributions.
As we all know, "value" is
relative and has no fixed point of
reference. Ernest Hemingway's
fiction is praised and criticized
according to the values of the
age. Much as the National Asso-
ciation of Scholars would like to
"fix" Western civilization at a
specific time in the past when
white upper-class male perspec-
tives ruled, that is as impossible
as trying to halt the waves. The
evolution of knowledge, like bio-
logical evolution, is unstoppable.
Marie T. Farr
Director
Women's Studies Program
Reader sees no
positive result
from columns
To The Editor:
I am responding to the edi-
torial written by Darek
McCullers on April 16,1991. His
column tided "Columnist re-
sponds to being called racist" was
another attack on everyone who
is not an African-American.
I am not a racist, and it
makes me angry seeing others
who are. That is why I find Mr.
McCullers columns so offensive.
Why do you allow him to con-
tinue to write for your paper?
Suppose an "Anglo-Saxon" were
to write a column blaming Afri-
can-Americans for all of their
problems? Mr. McCullers shows
all the characteristics of being a
racist. He blames everyone else
but himself for his problems.
I agree that African-Ameri-
cans have had a hard time ob-
taining equal rights. They have
had a difficult struggle and much
still needs to be done. But I do not
see how Mr. McCullers' articles
will achieveanything positive for
either side. His articles are full of
anger and self pity.
Sean Cavanaugh
Senior
History
Editor's note: The East
Carolinian is an equal opportu-
nity employer and does not nec-
essarily agree with the opinions
of our editorial columnists. We
do, however, accept the differ-
ent viewpoints expressed on the
opinion page and allow all indi-
viduals the right to voice their
opinions.
Separation will
not promote
racial harmony
To The Editor:
This is in response to Darek
McCullers'article dated April 16,
1991. Also, references will be
made toward articles from the
preceding two weeks.
To begin with, Mr.
McCullers has willingly general-
ized all white people into the cat-
egory of White Anglo-Saxon Prot-
estants. In his most recent article,
he offered some sort of an apol-
ogy for this error, then continued
to make the same mistake again.
This must stop. I am confident
that he does not want me to gen-
eralize him into a category la-
beled by a few choice words of
my own.
For the record, my mom's
family came from France. My
dad's family came from England,
and he married a Cherokee. By
Darek's standards this makes me
a European-Indian. In reality, I
am an American.
Secondly, Darek refers to
the black race as African�Ameri-
can. I'm betting that Darek, his
parents and probably his grand-
parents were all born and raised
right here in the United States. If
this is correct, wouldn' t this make
him an American also?
Before we can ever begin to
have racial harmony, we must
stop putting ourselves into dif-
ferent categories and realize that
we are ALL AMERICANS This
notion was split into different
categories once before, and it led
to a Civil War. So why are we still
making the same mistake?
It seems to me that Mr.
McCullers is searching for
someone to blame for his
short-comings. I have never
prevented him from obtain-
ing any goal, so quit blaming
me. If he must have someone
to blame, then look in the mir-
ror, Darek. Thafs the person
you should blame.
Lastly, I would like to
point out the fact that we are
not equal. Darek can do things
I can't do. He knows things I
don't know. I can do things he
can't, and I know things he
doesn't know. Life would be
dull if we were all equal. That
inequality should not be at-
tributed to the fact that one is
white and the other is black.
This I agree with.
There is a solution to this
problem. However, I'm not
sure what it is, but I do have a
suggestion on how to find it.
Stop blaming each each other
first. Then, stop looking at oth-
ers and seeing skin color. If
we could do this, then a lot of
Mr. McCullers' complaints
would already be solved, and
we could finally work together
to stop the rest.
Unfortunately, Darekor
anyone else cannot make any-
one stop seeing skin color as a
major issue. So turn to some-
one who can, Darek.
You and I both believe
in God and Christ, try turning
to Him one time. The same
Bible that you like to quote
also tells you to "ask believing
that you shall receive, and you
shall receive Why is there
any problem in believing this
also?
John Carter
Freshman
English
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I
6
GTir SaBt CSIaraltnian
April 23, 1991
&m �� Nix: � V'i
CLASSIFIEDS
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES:
Term papers, dissertations, letters,
resumes, manuscripts, projects- Fast
rum around. Call Joan 756-9255.
TYPING SERVICE: Term Papers,
Reports, Resumes, Letters, Theses,
Typed on PC. Laser printer. Fast
turnaround. Call 756-1783.
GILBERTS MUSIC open for busi-
ness. ECU students, show us your ID
card and we will give you a 20
discount on all parts, strings and in-
struments. Located at 2711 E. 10th
Street, by the Villa Roma. Phone 757-
2667. Hrs9-8 Mon-Fri, 10-6 Sat, closed
Sun. I do instrument repairs. Jim and
Debbie Gilbert.
r OR SAl t
FENDER GUITAR AMP: Deluxe85.
758-0464.
FURNITURE FOR SALE: Good
condition. Beige couch, loveseat, chair
and kitchen table. $250. Call 830-
1765, Mon-Fri.
WANTED. Musical instruments for
consignment sales: guitars-banjos-
mandolins- violins-cellos-bass-homs-
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music, 2711 E. 10th Street, 757-2667.
20 commission cost. Jim and
Debbie.
FOR SALE Queen size waterbed
with headboard, shelfsand drawers
in light wood. $225.00. Call 758-3670.
f OR III Nl
DOUBLEWIDE TRAILER on pri-
vate lot for rent in area. Call 459-9355
after 5 JO p.m.
AVAILABLE: Apartment to sublet
for summer. Three bedroom, Wilson
Acres, 4 blocks to campus, phone
758-6283. Ask for Jim.
APARTMENT TO SUBLEASE for
summer Two bedroom, one bath,
fully furnished. $295month plus
utilities. Call evenings, 752-5320.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Two
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August. Call 830-3680.
ROOMMATE WANTED Respon-
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need only to bring bedroom furni-
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SUBLEASE EFFICIENCY: Ringgold
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Available May 1. Phone 758-1815.
Great location.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Male or
OR RLN1
female to share a 2 bedroom apt. in
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and responsible. $170month plus
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0966.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share a
three bedroom townhouse. $195
month pi us 13 utilities. Non-smoker
preferred. Call 355-0986.
CLEAN, QUIET FEMALE room-
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very close to campus and downtown.
Please call 752-3867.
TWO CO-OP STUDENTS need to
sublease furnished apartment for fall
semester. One or two bedrooms. Call
758-9415.
ROOM FOR SUBLEASE: May
through August. Walking distance
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244-1577.
NAGS HEAD: Two roommates
needed for modem condo on beach
road. Fbrablastatthebeach,call931-
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NEED TO SUBLET for summer East
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newly remodeled. Call 931-9332 or
823-1993.
ROOMMATES WANTED: One or
two females, preferably non-smok-
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bam apt. at Tar River Estates for Fall
91,14 rent and 14 utilities. Call
Amanda at 792-4147.
HELP WANTED
EASY WORK1 EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at home. Call for
information 504-641-8003 Ext. 5920.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
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EXCELLENT PART-TIME SALES
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A Beauuful Place 10 Live
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Luruted Offer - $300 a monta
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756-7:15 or 830-1937
Office open Apt 8. 12 - 5:30pm
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Contact J T or Tommy Williams
7567815
HELP WANTED
The Plaza, Mon-Wed, 14 p.m.
SUMMER LNTERNSH1P. Find out
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PART-TIME HELP WANTED at the
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VIDUAL to sit with small children
during the summer. All day, two
days each week. Call756-0417before
9fl0p.m.
SMITHFIELDS CHICKEN N'
BAR-BE-QUE Now accepting ap-
HELP WANTED
plications for our Greenville store.
We offer good wages, benefits, ad-
vancement opportunities, flexible
hours. Apply in person at our
Greenville location, 2-4 p.m. (daily).
OVERSEAS SUMMER JOB
CATALOG: A very popular catalog
for universitycollege students to
work in EUROPE and other
WORLDWIDE locations. Many sat-
isfied customers. Send $25.00 (check
or money order) to: C L. Chumrley,
3549 Lincoln Street, Gary, Indiana
46408.
HELP WANTED: Students who are
going to resorts, beaches, etc for
summer Make own hours, easily
can be done as second job. Good
money if willing to deal with people
Call Bill at 752-6953 or go to BLT's.
PERSONALS
HEADING FOR EUROPE THIS
SUMMER? Jet there anytime with
AIRHITCH � for $160 from the East
Coast! (Reported in NY Times &
Lefs Go!) AIRHITCH � 212-864-
2000.
ALL GREEKS: Theta Chi is hosting
an ALL GREEK 4 on 4 volleyball
tournament, Saturday, April 27th.
ALL FRATERNITIES and SORORI-
TIES are invited to participate. The
registration fee is $20.00 per team or
$30.00 for two teams. Reserve a spot
on your teams soon. For more info,
call"75S-6969, ask for Tony Walz or
Buddy Sargent.
CONGRATULATIONS to the 1991-
92 ADP officers! President�Angela
Sutton; Vice- President�Amy Jordan,
Treasurer�Kim Cummings; Re- THE CHANCELLOR'S CLP ;�
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
PERSONALS
cording Secretary�Rachel Brown;
Corresponding Secretary�Caroline
Doby; Rush Chairman�Bo
McDonald; Membership Education
Vice-President�Ashlyn White; Jun-
ior Executive�Crystal Cross; Senior
Executive�Tammy Kivela; House
Manager�Debbie Garner;
Intramurals�Carrie Cook; Social
Chairman�Jeana Shall cross; Stan-
dards�Sarah Fallon; Panhellenic
Delegate�Ellen Smith; Philan-
thropy�Kelly Hawthorne.
THE NEWMAN CATHOLIC STU-
DENT CENTER wishes to announce
that its Sunday, April 28, 11:30 a.m.
Mass will be held outdoors at the
NewmanCatholicCenterand will be
followed by an end of the year cook-
out. In bad weather, the Mass will be
held as usual in the Ledonia Wrighl
Cultural Center. If in doubt, call the
Center at 757-3760.
PKF: Thanks for having us for the
togapartv. We had a blast. Love, the
ADPi's. '
TO THE ALPHA PHI'S that hi
in the rugby tournament: Than) I r
the bodies to allow for pet�: el
and drink! Way to flirt for s
kidding1 Thanks, ECU Ruj
TODD POYTHRESS: HAPPY
BIRTHDAY�TO MY FAVORITE
SOUTHERN MAN! I LOVE YOU-
NATALIE.
CONGRATS to DC fraternity and
PD sorority. We are excited to have
you join the ECU Greek system Love,
the ADPi's.
PERSONALS
OUTS�80 don't slow down and ,et?
win the damn thing. Also, pledge
vou re doing better, but is it enough I
the Brothers of FKT
TO ALL THE PEOPLE AT
INTRAMURALS Thanks so much
for putting up with us bom-heads"
s-irrv for the trouble! We couldn't
have run the tournament withi rul wj
all! Thanks again. ECU Rugby!
SURVIVORS OF SEXUAL ABUSE
CROUP will meet on Tuesday eve
nines for seven weeks begin!
May Cifl Elizabeth Wooten (
at "2-6661 for more informal f
JULIE TREPAL: Your wedding
shower was full of great surprise
We are happy for you Love, the
Alpha Phi's.
CONTRATULATIONS to A.e
Martin, the ADP Greek Mar
'i ear! Also congrats to Emily Pi �� �
the PDA Greek Woman i : u �
Love, the ADPs.
THE CIRCLE FOR CIVINX,
elf-love and inner p
FJizaberhWootenat752-6
more information.
THE BROTHER OF PHI KAPPA j
TAU want to wish Will Harr and j
the brothers of BTP good lud
quick recovery!
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
If you're
Pregnant
and need help making choices
�Free, confidential professional
pregnancy counseling
�Financial assistance
�Help select adoptive family
1-800-632-1400
yv The Children's Home Society
l!Sv of North Carolina
����' A United Way Agency
SUMMER UORK
Work Available
Weeklj P�j
isil one ol our office! u
,t the oportunities awaitii
Skills needed
TYPISTS
r NGINEERS
SECRETARY
RAFTERS
WBDATA ENTRY
WAREHOI Si
�MANPOWER
Raleigh � Carv �Durham
Chapel Hill � Oxford
Rocky Mount
Fayetteville �Kinston
Greenville �Laurinburg
Wilmington � RTP
Ringgold Towers
Now Taking Leases for August
1991 - 1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, &
Efficencv Apartments,
CALL 752-2865
WANDSWORTH
COMMONS
GREENVILLE'S NEWEST NAME
IN MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING
Excellent location on Arlington Boulevard.
Choice units available. Our and two.
bedrooms, energy efficrni. carpet, range,
refrigerator, washer-dryer .odcups. Brick
construction, quiet withxlia insulation.
lREE BASIC CABLE TV
Gntuifc
The Reallv Group
758-4711
COLLEGE STUDENTS - TEACHERS- ADULTS AGE 19 and up
LINE UP SUMMER WORK now!
WHEN: Early MayJune to Late WHAT: Field scounts to
AugustEarly Sept.
WHERE: Eastern NC Cos.
Lenior, Craven, Pitt, Jones,
Onslow, Greene
PAY: Min 5.50hour plus
Mileage expenses
SEMDIRESUMES TO: MCSI - PO Box 179
Grifton, NC 28530
monitor crops. We train.
QUALIF: Conscientious,
Good physical shape, Have
Own Vehicle, Reliable
GOVERNMENT
JOBS
$16,040 -
$59,230yr.
Call
1-900-468-2437
24 Hour Hotline
$2.95 per min.
. .JOBS . . .JOBS . . .
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY COLLECTS
CALL FOR ENTRIES
The Gray Art Gallery is seeking mu-
seum quality art works for a summer
exhibition highlighting the collections
of East Carolina University faculty,
staff and students. Works to be con-
sidered for the show will be juried at
theGray Art Gallery on May 9 and 10,
1991, from 10.00 am to 4:00 p.m. A
maximum of two works per person
will be accepted. The exhibition will
be limited to the first 60 works ac-
cepted. The Gray Art Gallery will
provide insurance for all works on
display during me exhibit Lenders
will be responsible for picking up
their work when the exhibit doses on
August 12,1991. for rnore inforrna-
bon on East Carolina University Col-
lects, contact Charles Lovell at 757-
6336.
INTERNATIONAL DINNER
International Students Association
presents its annual dinner with food
from over 10 different countries and
live performances on stage at
Mendenhall's multipurpose room on
Saturday, April 27,1991 from 6:30-
lftOO p.m. General admission is $8
and $6 for students. Tickets are on
sale now at Mendenhall Student
Center. Don't miss this chance to
sample international cultures!
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
MOTORPHYSICAL FITNESS
COMPETENCY TEST
The tests will be held at Minges Coli-
seum on Tuesday, April 30,1991 at
1.00 p.m. A passing score on this test
is required of all students prior to
declaring physical education as a
major. Students must maintain an
average T-score of 45 on the six-item
test battery and haveat-score of 45 on
the aerobics run. Any student with
a medical condition that would
contraindicate participation in the
testing should contact Mike
McCammon or Dr. Gay Israel at 757-
4688. To be exempted from any por-
tion of the test, you must have a
physician's excuse. A detailed sum-
mary of the test components is avail-
able in the Human Performance
Laboratory (Room 371, Sports Medi-
cine Bldg.). You physician's excuse
must specifically state from which
items you are exempt
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student Cen-
ter wishes to announce that its Sun-
day, April 28,11:30 a.m. Mass will be
held outdoors at the Newman Center
and will be followed by an end of the
year cookout. In bad weather, the
Mass will be held as usual in the
Ledonia Wright Cultural Center. If
in doubt, call the Center at 757-3760.
NORTH CAROLINA Cn rNr
OF TEACHERS pf
MATHEMATICS
NCCTM will be holding its last meet-
ing this semester on Thursday, April
25 at 5O0p.m. in Austin 220. Apanel
of student teachers will be speaking
about their experiences and answer-
ing any questions. Refreshments will
be served. ALL education majors
(including elementary ed middle
grades math and secondary matfl'
majors) are strongly encourages to
attend. See you there!
RiP-E LIKE THE
WJNI
join ECU Recreational Services on a
Windsurfing trip to Cape HattentS
on April 26-2& Take a study breaXj
and test out your windsurfing ski'
while havinglot of fun! Costis$25Xw
students and $30.00faculty-staff-
guestsand inchidesequipment, fo�L
transportation and instruction. ApnL j
trip meeting wil be held on April 24r j
S pm in Brewster D-101. For
further information, call 757-6911 or
P by 117 Ovistenbury Gym-
PIRATE
Drunken
By AMBER WILSON
Pirate Voice
Anyone who drinks and
is a potential threat to so.
and at East Carolina 11
this threat i ling.
Two out of three
drive alter midnight in Grec
intoxicated and 1 . . . �i0Uj bc
charged with DW1 (Driving While
Impaired.
Drunken driving on the I
PUS is i;
intense adverl
services like "sober cha
like "Stud
Drunk Driving" have .
Many ECU stud.
the town is small and they will only
ive to drive a mile cm ake it
home safely.
Charles Vincent is a lea
vyer for drunk h .
tnville Karen K
luate, was Vincei
Kmg said that about 60 perc
.em's DW1 clients are I
King DW1
rider ha I en in
fice, he or she is lil reiun

King said "We hat.
tudents the
igtial shocl rcceh DW1
cares the hell out of them, but
most of the tin I
the wheel drunk
get off relatively
a matter of money
After being com
North Carolina, dn
licenses for a year
ADETS (Alcohol II
Traffic School) tor
course stresses the e
provides DW'l siatil
about accident fatal)
drivers under the I
' the r
involved in
driving in ; .
jtii i
nvicted
also required
community
hours in jail I
program arid ht J
-
Kit i
on campu a
blames the studen
poli
addressing the pr j
The police ml
inconsistent King
� � tudents driving
are the main .
Once they stop
�dent, the police!
student keep dn .
sense. The system
this vvay Kil
fff
C. M. K1RKPATRIC
Dog Days�Snoopy sits outside enpymg the warm!
Record-breaking performance
more internships to East Carol
By
TRACY SCHWARTZ
Pirate Voice
Varsity Book Company has
expanded internships from 16 to 41
posiuons this year due to record-
breaking performances last summer
bv ECU students
Felix Forbes, assistant sales
manager for Varsity Company, said
that last year's group of students set
a company record in book sales
averaging $6,000 per person.
"My company was pleased with
the performance of last year's group,
so thev decided to expand the
program to allow more student
ptfucipation Forbes said.
As of April 8, the program has
accepted 31 students and only nine
spots remain open.
Forbes said that he is very
pleased with the students selected
thus far and is anticipating a fun-
fiUed summer.
"1 think it will be a challenging
summer but also rewarding
Forbes said "Students will have a
chance to run their own businesses
and, in my opinion, that's the best
type of learning experience
Forbes seemed positive when
asked how the program's quick
growth could affect performance, l
don't see hr j
anything but hell
"Other univcrsiud
Arizona Suite are
ECU must expanj
continue to stay oq
Forbes said wl
an applicant for
looks for students
above average soci
looks for those
working, who shoj
and are easy to
Forbes said that su
be willing to rj
summer.
Last summci
worked in school
Oklahoma City a
Forbes said, "stuj
than likely have tlj
work in Georgia
Atlanta"
Forbes said he
of thanks to the Ca
Placement prograr
campus. They
cooperative with
helped him
prospective applic
added that the
Education pro!
Community Co(
helpful with slue
the program.
��





I
V
April 23, 1991
PERSONALS
w down and let1
Vbo, pledge
butisitertougj
THV I'l-OPLE AT
VMURALS 'Tuks � mucji
H boneheadj
e We couldnl
� ntwithoutyi
ECU Rugfcy
RS �1 SEXUAL ABUSI
� ' uesday evi
� - s beginning ir"
� WootenCCSV
n formation.
weddim
i:rpnse$i
1 ove, the
T IONS to Ale
- � Man of thq
ilyPhxtcu
� the Year!
IVING: Fbcui
I'M I KAPPAl
Harris anc
. od luck and!
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
nriER UORK
- . ailable
r.i
RS
if
MANPOWER
� �Durham
� I )xford
� Mouni
�Kinston
�I aurinbure
ton � KIT
OVERNMENT ffJ
JOBS
$16,040 -
$59,230yr.
Call
900-468-2437
24 Hour Hotline
$2.98 per min.l I

in
3
. JOBS . . . JOBS . . .
I
11 ruralei
!A�0LN"C1L
LRSOi
IAT1CS
�ng its la�.t meet-
Thursday. Apnl
Ishn 220. A panel
(will be speaking
Ves and answer-
refreshments will
luattan makm
�� fou there!
ele lentary ed middle
rath and secondary rnatfi-
trongly encourages to
tM
MM LlKtJTiiE-J�lNJ
loin ECU Recreational Services ona
jurfing tnp to Cape Hatterw
on Apnl 26-28. Take a study breaj3
and test out your windsurfing sldlB
while havinglotoffun! Oast is S-OOT ,
students and mOOfaculty-staf-
guestaand lncludesequipmenLrOOjLg
transportation and instruction. ApTfo
tnp meenng wtl be held on April 24 ar
500 p.m. in Brewster D-101. &
further information, call 757-6911
stop by 117 Chnstenbury Gym.
Zoice
LOOKING AROUND
"I think Earth Day was
really informing and
educating, but I tend to
forget those lessons
�Kim Rose
J
A .Journalism 32fH) Publication Protect
KSDAY
Drunken driving on the rise at ECU
By AMBER WILSON
Pirate Voice
Anyone who drinks and drives
is a potential threat to society,
and at East Carolina University,
this threat is spreading.
Two out of three people who
drive after midnight in Greenville arc
intoxicated and legally should be
charged with DWI (Driving While
Impaired), officials say.
Drunken driving on the ECU
campus is increasing, despite the
intense advertising campaigns. Also,
services like "sober chauffeurs" and
organizations like "Students Against
Drunk Driving" have little impact.
Many ECU students have said that
the town is small and they ill only
have to drive a mile or so to make it
home safely.
Charles Vincent is a leading
lawyer for drunk drivers in
Greenville. Karen King, an ECU
graduate, was Vincent's assistant.
Kmg said that about 60 percent of
Vincent's DWI clients are ECU
students. King said once a DWI
offender has been in Vincent's
office, he or she is likely to return
again with another offense.
King said: "Wc have files on
students the sic of books. The
initial shock of receiving a DWI
scares the hell out of them, but
most of the time they gel behind
the wheel drunk again. People
get off relatively easy. It is just
a matter of money
After being convicted of DWI in
North Carolina, drivers lose their
licenses for a year and must attend
ADETS (Alcohol Drug Education
Traffic School) for four weeks. The
course stresses the effect of alcohol,
provides DWI statistics, and tells
about accident fatalities caused by
drivers under the influence. Statistics
show the relative risk of being
involved in a fatal crash while
driving impaired is about three umes
as great as it is for a sober driver.
Convicted DWI offenders are
also required to perform 24 hours of
community service or spend 24
hours in jail. Both the ADETS
program and the community service
cost between S50-S100 each.
King said drinking and driving
on campus is a problem. She
blames the students and also the
police for being lenient and not
addressing the problem.
"The police in Greenville are
inconsistent King said. "They look
for students driving drunk. Students
are the main concern of the police.
Once they stop an intoxicated
student, the police often let the
student keep driving. It doesn't make
sense. The system will never work
this way King said.
King said the only way there
will be a reduction of DWI's is if
the government enforces more strict
penalties. There were 663 DWI's in
Greenville in 1990. A large portion
of these offenders arc college stu-
dents. The problem is not getting
better on the ECU campus; it is
getting worse, she said.
Not all students arc caught
and convicted, and they still
continue to drink and drive. An
ECU senior, using the name
Kelly Smith, says he drives drunk
at least three times a week, and even
if she received a DWI she didn't
know if that would slop her from
doing the same thing again.
Many other students responded
similarly. Students say getting
caught would scare them and they
probably would not get behind the
wheel again when they were drunk.
"When I get into my car after drink-
ing, I'm paranoid Smith said. "I
look forward, backwards and down
every side street, looking out for cop
cars. I never have to drive that far
Smith added that most
students at ECU drink and
drive and will continue to do so.
An ECU junior using the name
Jim Johns, who was convicted of
DWI said: "I was driving down a
highway, speeding. I got pulled, and
the officer smelled alcohol on my
breath. He asked mc to step out of
9 ?? fr p0 -?
JAMIE BAILEY P�. - �
Smashed�As DWI rates increase at ECU, sights such as this will become more common.
my car and do some tests. The next
thing I knew, I was sitting in the
jailhouse. I didn't think I was drunk,
but apparently I was. I blew a .16
Johns explained the importance
of the ADETS class he had to
take. The class made him realize
that drinking and driving
endangered his life and others.
Johns said, "Showing the fatalities
caused by drunk drivers was
horrible-I mean disgusting. I'll
never drink and drive again
A source going by the name
Lisa West received her DWI
March 27, 1987. "I was more sober
than anyone else so I drove. I
thought I was all right, but I hit a
car, so obviously I wasn't
West said. "Drinking and
driving is drinking and driving,
no matter how much you've had
to drink She has not driven
drunk since then.
West also said it took a DWI to
stop her from repealing the offense
and to change her drinking habits.
War scars environment
By WENDY COUEY
Pirate Voice
The environmental effects of
the war may be felt for many years
to come, according 10 Dr. Joseph
Luczkovich, a biology professor
at East Carolina University.
"The Gulf area is not a pleasant
place to live at this time by our
standards he said, due to the smoke
and oil pollution in the Gulf. Also,
scientists arc unable to fully
measure the environmental impact
of the war at this time.
"There arc about 700 oil wells
burning night and day, continuously
putting out smoke clouds
Luczkovich said. This pollution
caused a "blackening of the sky in
the area around Kuwait"
According to Luczkovich, this
"blackening could possibly disrupt
the photosynihclic cycle of plant life
in the region If this occurs, he
said, there could be a slowing of
food production in the region. Other
subsistence staples could suffer from
the "war pollution" as well.
"The Gulf nations depend on
dcsalinization of salt water for the
majority of their drinking water. But
the deliberate oil spills can inhibit
and disrupt the dcsalinization
process Luczkovich said.
"If oil got into the water
ucatmcni facilities, it could clog the
Tillers used he said. "This would
slow down fresh water production,
but it would not prevent it
Luczkovich also said that the
impact on animal life in the region
may be substantial.
"Animals there will be affected
with any obvious oil spill,
especially semi-aquatic birds that
feed in the waters. They go down in
the water for food, and then they get
coated in oil. Then it's impossible
for them to fly. They will
eventually die because they cannot
move around
Other Gulf animals suffer
but ii'&hwt'taprcdicL . mny samtatioo facilities in the
the consequences of the pollution
as well.
"Larval fish would be affected,
due to the oil spills in the
Gulf. Adult fish probably wouldn't
be affected too much. They, are.
not talking major damage to
fisheries;
According to Luczkovich, water
pollution is not the only potential
threat for the animal population.
"Oil fresh out of the ground can be
toxic, he said. This can also place
animals at risk.
The human population is not
immune to the effects of the
pollution either.
"There will probably be an
increase in emphysema he said.
"Pollution can get into the lungs
and could have a significant effect on
the cilia (hairlikc growths on certain
cells). There will probably be a
long-term increase in the rate of
lung cancer in Iraq and Kuwait.
"I would guess that the old
(65 yearsand the very young
(under 5 years) and anybody who has
respiratory problems would be
most vulnerable and would suffer
more effects
The spread of other diseases
could ajsp reftuH Jjpm ty war.
region. It will probably lead to
more dysentery and dysentery-like
diseases he said. Dead bodies
from the war pose another problem.
At the present, the corpses
increase the possibility of disease.
"The best thing (to prevent
diseases) would be to bury them
Luczkovich said.
Increased global warming poses
another environmental threat Global
warming seems to be heightened by
the environmental damage of the
war, according to Luczkovich.
"There's a lot of carbon dioxide
released into the environment. Some
scientists think it will increase
global warming, but they're not sure
how much
C. M. KJRKPATRICK'Prate Voice
Dog Days�Snoopy sits outside enjoying the warm weather.
'Risky' business could prove a success
By WENDY COUEY
Pirate Voice
Record-breaking performances bring
more internships to East Carolina
By
TRACY SCHWARTZ
Pirate Voice
Varsity Book Company has
expanded internships from 16 to 41
positions this year due to record-
breaking performances last summer
by ECU students.
Felix Forbes, assistant sales
manager for Varsity Company, said
that last year's group of students set
a company record in book sales
averaging $6,000 per person.
"My company was pleased with
the performance of last year's group.
so they decided to expand the
program to allow more student
anticipation Forbes said.
As of April 8, the program has
accepted 31 students and only nine
spots remain open.
Forbes said that he is very
pleased with the students selected
thus far and is anticipating a fun-
ftikd summer.
"I think it will be a challenging
summer but also rewarding
Forbes said. "Students will have a
chance to run their own businesses
and, in my opinion, that's the best
type of learning experience
Forbes seemed positive when
asked how the program's quick
growth could affect performance. I
don't sec how our growth can do
anything but help Forbes said.
"Other universities like LSU and
Arizona State arc expanding too, so
ECU must expand if wc want to
continue to stay on top
Forbes said when he interviews
an applicant for the program, he
looks for students with average to
above average social skills. He also
looks for those who arc hard
working, who show determination,
and arc easy to get along with.
Forbes said that students must also
be willing to relocate for the
summer.
Last summer ECU students
worked in school districts in the
Oklahoma City area. "This year
Forbes said, "students will more
than likely have the opportunity to
work in Georgia, just north of
Atlanta
Forbes said he owes a great deal
of thanks to the Career Planning and
Placement program here on ECU's
campus. They have been very
cooperative with Forbes and have
helped him contact many
prospective applicants, he said. He
added that the Co-operative
Education program at Pitt
Community College was also
helpful with student placement for
the program.
Greenville's newest health food
store opened in February, but how
long those doors will stay open is
another maucr.
Wendy Compton and Stephanie
Ingram may soon find out what it
takes to not only open, but to
maintain a small business in
Greenville.
The two vegetarians, tired of
limited selections and variety,
pooled their resources and opened the
Evans Street Organic Grocery.
Compton, an ECU sophomore, and
her partner, Ingram, a former ECU
student, jumped into the business
waters this spring a little hastily,
said local small business advisers.
"There should have been some
market research said Pamela Hart,
the director of the Small Business
Development Center at ECU. "There
are a lot of pitfalls to starting a new
business, and one is not researching
an idea enough
The pair began serious
investigation into their business
plans back in November and
December of 1990. But with little
business experience, how long their
store lasts will depend on how they
approach their marketing. Hart said.
"About 70 percent of small
businesses fold in their first year
Hart said, "but they made it past the
crucial stage because a lot of people
fail before they even open their
doors
Walter Fills, the director of the
North Carolina Small Business
Technology and Development
Center for the Ea- .rn Kej, nal
Center, also recommended that the
young entrepreneurs consider
conducting market research.
"The very first thing we focus
on is market analysis he said. "In
Greenville, I don't know that there
are that many students and faculty
that are into health foods
"Any business, regardless of size
or whatever, has got to have a
business plan �Walter Fitts
Fitts also said that the novice
businesspersons should develop a
business plan to enhance their
marketing potential. Fitts said that
nationally, 80 percent of new small
businesses fail.
"Any business, regardless of
size or whatever, has got to have a
business plan. If they don't have
one, they're skating on that 80
percent
But the future is not completely
bleak for the two, he said.
"If they could almost treat this
as a quasi-hobby, over a long period
of time, they may make it Fitts
said. "I compliment them on their
initiative, but they will be the
exception to the rule if
they're successful
But, as Wendy Compton said,
"We only owe money to a few
people, so we won't be in debt (if
the business fails)
SHAWNA CHANCEPirate Vote
Food Storeo�Stephanie Ingram hopes to prove experts wrong.





t
Features
Students remember Earth Day

By TONY SMITH
Pirate Voice
Many ECU students participated
in a worldwide event last year. Some
of them spent the warm, breezy
April afternoon riding bicycles and
enjoying the heightened sense of
contentment. Others visited local
parks to join in the enthusiasm
surrounding the affair.
The event was Earth Day. Held
on April 22, 1990, the day was a
memorable experience for many. Or
was it?
"I'm not really sure what Earth
Day was about or why they had it
ECU senior Robb Imperato said. "1
thought it was a good excuse to
party though
These sentiments are shared by
ECU students. Most can remember
what they were doing on that day
but forget why they were doing it.
"I went out to River Park North
because that's where everybody said
they were going ECU student Lori
Hunter said. "There were a lot of
really neat animal exhibits and some
information about recycling, but I
really didn't know why 1 was mere
Earth Day 1990 was actually
the 20lh anniversary of the original
Earth Day (held on April 22, 1970).
That day was the brainchild of
Denis Hayes, a Harvard Law School
dropout turned environmental
activist.
Hayes appealed to Congress to
support a day of environmental
awareness. His intent was to hold
rallies, speeches and demonstrations
to promote the welfare of the planet.
Congress approved, and the day
became a success, with more than
20 million Americans participating.
In short order, Congress enacted
a number of regulations to protect
the environment.
These actions led to the
resurgence of Earth Day in 1990.
In a recent Los Angeles Times
interview (Feb. 28, 1991), Hayes
said that he wanted to hold the event
again to find out two things. "First,
I wanted to determine whether we
were better off doing all that we
have done since 1970 he said.
Second, I wanted to see if we, as a
planet, were in better shape now.
The answers to those questions arc
cs and no, in that order
Hayes' feelings are mirrored bv
many ECU students, who also find
the answers to those questions
becoming clear.
'The 1980s just crushed the
environment said David Ritchie,
an environmental design student. "I
think that the world is going to have
to work really hard to suppress the
damage we have done to it in the
past few years. Earth Day is a good
idea, but it doesn't stick with
people. They need to be reminded of
their responsibilities constantly
Junior Kim Rose said: "I think
Earth Day was really informing and
educating, but I tend to forget those
lessons. The planet is definitely
belter off for the efforts we have
made, but we still have a long vy
to go
Some students remember the
day a bit more personally. ECU
senior Walt Hammctt said: "I was
definitely involved in Earth Day
1990. Growing up in Washington.
I learned the importance of trees in
rotation to the atmosphere. So last
Earth Day, I planted a few pine
saplings and now they're getting
pretty big
There arc no plans yet for a
third Earth Day.
Dance Theatre holds Spring Concert
, i
3T
Has this ever happened to you?
JA1VBE BAILEY'Pirafe Voice
To prevent embarrassment, go to Greenville's formal wear shops.
Puttin' on the Ritz
By LaTARA BULLOCK
Pirate Voice
The East Carolina Dance
Theatre will once again present its
annual Spring Concert this month.
The concert consists of five
dances, or "pieces choreographed
by five dance teachers in the East
Carolina dance program.
The teachers: Alan Arnctt,
Joseph Carow, Palti Weeks, Patricia
Pertalion and Dawn Clark, will use
their ideas to concentrate on five
different types of dances.
The choreographed pieces
will attempt to show a variety of
dance styles including jazz, ballet,
modem and lyrical.
Alan Arnctt said that some of
the dances may have a serious
message or theme behind them,
while others may be light-hearted or
purely entertaining, but each piece
will be different because of its
individual choreographer.
Arnett's untitlcd piece, for
example, will consist of recorded Alter seeing last year's
music as well as live music Spring Concert, many people (even
composed by percussionist Rodney the ones who said they knew
Howard. "My piece is about nothing about dance) said that while
freedom and human rightsArnctt they didn't alwavs understand the
said. The piece will contain five meaning behind a dance, they sull
sections including a duct m which enjoyed the concert
Arnett will dance. ,
The dances in the Spring Christie Evans, an ECL dance
Concert are performed bj ECl major and participant in this year i
students, most of whom are dance concert, said: "Seeing last year s
majors and minors.Thc dancers have performance was a learn.
a very lon� and involved preparation experience. It contributes to v
process ahead of them because the understanding of the art of da:
finished product is a reliction ol The show was very entertain ij
their instructors' work. "I he because it's not just jazz or
preparation starts with auditions at ballet but all types of dancing
the beginning of the semester, The Spring Concert will
continues with intense, late night start on Wednesday and last
practices and culminates with the through Saturday. It will be
performance in April. hclJ in McGwms Theatre at
The Dance Theatre gives die 8:15 each night. Tickets will be
public a chance to sec the talent S3 for students and $7.50 for
of the dancers at East Carolina, general admission.
It also allows the public to sec "r more information on the
different types of dances and Spring Concert contact the East
the choreographers particular
interpretations of them.
between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
Local merchants
offer a variety
of formal fashions
for the season
By ANN JOHNSON
Pirate Voice
Springtime wakens hibernating
nature and dresses it in fresh attire. It
is the season that blooms with fun,
love and, at ECU, formal events.
Whether it's a fraternity, sorority,
debutante, military or organizational
function, Greenville stores have
what you need to look your best for
that special occasion.
Bridal Boutique of Bells Fork
Square is an all-in-one formal wear
shop. One dress of each style offered
is kept in stock in different sizes to
ensure fit. When ordering a dress,
extra material can be sent to provide
your dale with a matching tie and
cummerbund. A tuxedo service is
also offered.
Another all-in-one formal wear
shop is Brides Beautiful of 109 E.
Arlington Blvd. They combine a
complete bridal service with a tuxedo
service and extensive formal gown
selection. Not only can they dye
your shoes to match your dress, but
they also have matching jewelry and
accessories to finish your look.
Looking for a more original
dress? Go to Matita, located in
Arlington Village. The shop has
been in existence for 25 years and
has one of the largest selections of
ladies formal wear in North
Carolina.
"Our apparel is strictly special
occasion and cruise owner and
manager, I.aura McConncIl said.
Matita features designer dresses
and have their own label to remain
exclusive. There is also a sale closet
with specials from 50 percent to 70
percent off. Featured are sizes 2-20.
Sharpc's Formal Wear is the
only exclusive men's formal wear
shop in Greenville. The store has
been in business since 1949, and a
new store is opening on Greenville
Boulevard in the Boulevard Shoppcs
The leading contemporary
tuxedos for the '90s aie the L2!ic. the
Rivoli and the Paris "These lear.
more toward European fashion said
employee Tun Gomez. Grjcr
discounts arc also available at
Sharpc's, including a free tuxedo
rental lot the social chairman and
president Of Uie fraternities.
"We encourage students not to
wear tails for night social functions
i � ause the trend leans more toward
a contemporary look Gomez said.
"If somebody comes in here
right now and needs a tux-
edo for tonight, I can fit
him �Frank Steinbeck
Steinbeck's Men's Shop of 604
Arlington Blvd. has a complete
tuxedo service. What sets them apart
from any other shop in Greenville is
that they stock their own tuxedos.
"This means that if somebody
comes in here right now and needs a
tuxedo for tonight, I can fit him
said owner Frank Steinbeck. The
basic black tuxedo is kept in slock,
but grays, whites, stripes or special
requests have to be ordered.
The tuxedos are ordered from
four different wholesale formal wear
houses to provide a diverse selection.
Stei,K ' ,?'so has three full-time
udo.i . . tormal wear consultant
in the store.
Summer 1991 brings daring styles ,
to swimwear fashions and accessories
By CM. KIRKPATRICK
Pirate Voice
Most women work hard to
achieve the perfect body for summer.
As the weather begins to get
warmer, the beaches begin to get
crowded, and the competition on the
beach is outrageous.
An important part of a girl's
summer wardrobe is a bathing suit.
According to Sports Illustrated
magazine, what was hot last
summer is not this year.
David Cutlip, an employee at
The Surf Report, a surf shop in the
Plaza, said, "The main difference in
the bathing suits this year is that
neons are out"
He explained that new suits
are being made that do not fade after
wearing them for a summer. This
means that you can throw out your
old suit and look for a new one.
When buying a suit for the
summer of 1991, keep these few
simple rules in mind.
JAMhr BAILEYPrate Voce
Fashion Innovation�Students sport the hottest looks in swimwear
Rule number one: Be daring
with your suit. Stay away from the
"safe" look.
Rule number two: Gel rid ol
those neon, wild-patterned suits.
Cutlip said, "Companies arc
experimenting with earthy colors
and toning down the exotic
patterned suits
If you wear makeup on the
beach, remember to keep it very
light. Be sure to use sunscreen each
time you go out in the sun.
Most importantly, dress
according to what best fits your
style.
oice
EditorAnn Johnson
Layout EditorShawna Chance
Photo EditorJamie Bailey
News EditorWendy Couey
Features EditorTony Smith
Student Life EditorJ.D. Jamison
Entertainment EditorJeff Becker
Copy EditorsColleen Kirkpatrick
Kim Rose
Amber Wilson
Alicia Ford
Layout DesignersTracy Schwartz
Shari Edwards
Stephanie Creasey
Scott Gosney
Project AssistantLaTara Bullock
Faculty AdviserBrenda Sanchez
Graduate AssistantSteve Harding
Prate Voice m a laboratory publication for Journalism 3200, Copy-Editing and
Design Views presented are those of the individual student writers They do not
reflect the views of the communication department, journalism program or East
Carolina University
i Quicksilver offers
music alternatives ?
By TONY SMITH
Pirate Voice
"1 like giving people what
they want
That's the way Tom Ives,
owner of Greenville's Quicksilver
Record and Book Exchange,
describes his business philosophy.
Quicksilver, as it is more
commonly referred to, opened in
downtown Greenville 10 years ago.
Ives transplanted the store from
Jacksonville, N.C in an effort to
bring something new to a small
college town.
"I wanted to bring a big city
record store to a smaller town Ives
said. "I thought people might
appreciate a music store with a
different variety of albums
Quicksilver's musical inventory
ranges from Mozart to Metallica,
The Itals to The O-Jays and Chopin
to the The Sex Pistols. The store is
literally stacked with compact discs,
albums and cassettes, which are
usually sold at discount prices.
Ives frequently stresses that
Quicksilver is open to whatever
people suggest, especially students.
"A tot of Greenville businesses have
a bad relationship with students
Ives said. "But we love them in
here. I think that they feel
comfortable when they walk in
The store's additional
merchandise includes current music
magazines, T-shirts and a large
selection of oversized posters.
In addition to musical
paraphernalia. Quicksilver also
offers a vast selection of hardback
and paperback books. The store's
book section is full of classical
literature, as well as science-fiction,
mystery and action novels.
"I've always carried books
because my wife. Rebecca, likes to
read Ives said. "But recently I've
increased my book selection due to
requests. My main interest is still
music though
Ives interest in musk has led to
many good connections over the
years and he frequently shares these
benefits with his customers.
"I've got avenues open to me
which I can special order music
upon request Ives said.

C
d
PIRATE
ll-l-SIMY.AI'RIL 23. 1WI
SHAWNA CHANC
Buddies at Bunny's�a typical evening at ECL
Relax and enjoy at B

By AMBER WILSON
Pirate Voice
Cheap pitchers, good food and
a relaxing atmosphere lure students
downtown to Bunny's Grill.
Anf Safi, owner of Bur.n 's
Gnll, said he aims his business to-
ward the students.
"I nave enjoyed Bunny's so
much, it has become a personal
projeciof mineSail said "When I
bought Bunny's, I never planned on
changing anything. But no. I see
how well Bunny's is doing and how
much students enjoy it, so I want to
make changes Safi said.
Many changes are due to stu-
dents' requests, he said.
"I was asked several umes to
build an outside deck by siuderr.
I did Safi said. Safi said he be-
lieves the outside deck has in-
creased business substantially.
Bunny's also recently had 99-
cent pitchers, and this added to
business, he said.
"I've increased the price of
pitchers to SI .50. and business has
actually gotten better Safi said
"Before we were going through
about 17 kegs a night, and now we
are going through 21 kegs
Safi said he has many other
changes planned for Bunny's. He
plans to build a deck aboe the cur-
rent outside deck. This deck w ill be
lion, il
Sat. -
� � .�:
'�eek
I
ning - � j
college studei
Mil
a I
j Jv
bars all the time.
is the:
can't b
upper deck would i
because there � J
for more
Catherine i
set r, said
is � ! LiC ft Ct K
you always run n
know. You .
i �' �
"The .
concern S- 1
"I want 1
are m bu
FUTURE OUTLOOK
job opportunities are
By ALICIA FORD
Pirate Voice
Graduation is approaching in
just a few weeks, and many future
graduates still do not have a "real"
job lined up.
Because fewer jobs are avail-
able, many students arc not anxious
to jump into the job pool. The ma-
jority of graduating students have
not been on any interviews, made
any phone calls or even comprised a
resume. Some graduates will move
back home to live off Mom and Dad
until a good job knocks on their
door. Others, will conunue working
their school jobs until something
better comes along. Many graduates
find that they are earning more
money now than they could in an
entry-level job.
Cartene Moore graduated last
year and works at Annabel's as a
waitress. She has been on several
interviews related to her major in
communiv, j
find a good enol
"The
ting,
lor the money,
four years of c
start out makinl
If I didn't airl
would be
stead of 01
Jake Fine
cember 1990
dustry and led
in construction
months Later.
job fin j
still be workir
his graduation
Fine said'
do now. and
bad. That makj
motivated; 1
the nght job.
the time, I ju
really go out
"Besides
time just find
Counseling Center
provides answers
for students
JAME BALEYftrate Voce
Relaxing In the rays�Students enjoy the beautiful spring weather.
is
By J.D. JAMISON
Pirate Voice
University life can bring much
stress and anxiety. To learn to cope
with these problems, one can visit
the Counseling Center.
The Counseling Center,
located on the balcony of Wright
Auditorium, offers counseling to
students, faculty and school
empfoyees. It offers workshops in
assertveness training and study
skills, and it helps students cope
with the death of a loved one and
sexual assault
Thepe workshops, as well as
many others, are scheduled
throughout the year.
Special groups are also added
whcncerta.n
group wa-
cope with thd
Individul
available
minutes, arc
weekly ba
arranged in
The cer
five full-umj
part-time hel
Julie lnj
selor with
said she sec
seven peopi
Allhouj
in women s
variety of
though, pec
the counselc
Atum�
that require
cases are
an appo
psychiatrist
One





th Day
planet is definitely
the efforts we have
-ill hje a long way
lenis remember the
personally. ECU
lammett said: "I was
lved in Earth Day
up in Washington,
tance of trees in
itmosphere. So last
1 planted a few pine
- ihej re getting
plans et for a
Si ing Concert
ig last year's
nan) people (even
n.iuI they knew
K c I said that while
s understand the
a dance, they still
v an ECU dance
u ipam in this year's
Seeing last year's
was a learning
tributes to your
: ihe art of dance.
. cr entertaining
I Hist ja or just
pesol dancing
g Concert will
Incsday and last
i It will be
M -innis Theatre at
I k kets will be
ts and $7.50 for
information on the
contact the East
ise at 757-6829,
and 4 p.m.
v and accessories
PH -ijMBr
1
JAMIE BAILEY Pirate Voce
)ttesl looks in swimwear.
vear makeup on the
.member to keep it very
to use sunscreen each
il in the sun.
! importantly, dress
what best fits your
Student Life
Hazing in black Greek organizations
By LaTARA BULLOCK
Pirate Voice
SHAWNA CHANCEPrafe Voice
Buddl� at Bunny's�a typical evening at ECU
Relax and enjoy at Bunny's
By AMBER WILSON
Pirate Voice
Cheap pitchers, good food and
a relaxing atmosphere lure students
downtown to Bunny's Grill.
Anf Safi, owner of Bunny's
Grill, said he aims his business to-
w ard the students.
"I have enjoyed Bunny's so
much, it has become a personal
projectof mine Safi said. "When I
bought Bunny's, I never planned on
changing anything. But now, I see
how well Bunny's is doing and how
much students enjoy it, sol want to
make changes Safi said.
Many changes are due to stu-
dents' requests, he said.
"I was asked several limes to
build an outside deck by students, so
i did Safi said. Safi said he be-
lieves the outside deck has in-
creased business substantially.
Bunny's also recently had 99-
cent pitchers, and this added to
business, he said.
"I've increased the price of
pitchers to $1.50, and business has
actually gotten better Safi said.
Before we were going through
about 17 kegs a night, and now we
are going through 21 kegs
Safi said he has many other
changes planned for Bunny's. He
plans to build a deck above the cur-
rcnt outside deck. This deck will be
used for private parties. When it is
not being used for a particular func-
tion, it will be open to the public.
Safi will also install several
televisions inside Bunny's for
viewing sporting events.
Bunny's Grill will offer bands
frec-of-chargc one or two nights a
week on the outside deck. He may
also obtain a liquor license, he said.
Safi said he will continue run-
ning weekly food specials for the
college students' budgets and mak-
ing changes for his customers.
Mike Lane, an ECU senior,
said that Bunny's Grill is a great
place to go before downtown.
"I used lo hang out at other
bars all the time, but now Bunny's
is the place to go Lane said You
can't beat the cheap pitchers
Lane said that building the
upper deck would increase business
because there would be more room
for more people.
Catherine Holland, an ECU
senior, said: "It doesn't matter what
day of the week you go lo Bunny's,
you always run into someone you
know. You can sit outside with a
group of friends and see what's
going on downtown
"The students are my main
concern Safi said.
"I want ihem lo be comfort-
able and enjoy themselves. They
arc my business
Hazing crackdowns on the East
Carolina University campus are
causing the black Greek
organizations to begin to ban
pledging.
The black Greek fraternities and
sororities have been known to have
the most tedious pledging process.
A typical scene at ECU would
be a group of women walking across
campus in military style and carry-
ing potted plants or a group of men
running across campus wearing
similiar outfits and chanting loudly.
This is what the public and
potential members have come to
expect of the black Greek pledging
process. And most of the members
respect and value their hazing
traditions.
Hazing has been responsible for
many accidents including death. One
fatality occurred at Morchousc
College in Atlanta, Ga. A freshman
pledge died of cardiac dysrylhmia
after attending a meeting where
fraternity brothers pounded on the
chest of potential members.
Some localized accidents
occurred at schools including North
Carolina A&T and North Carolina
Central University.
After several incidents, the
Greek organizations on the national
level decided to change the pledging
process, abolishing hazing for good.
Hank Nuwer, author of "Broken
Pledges: The Deadly Rite of
Hazing said pledging is
demeaning.
"If you end pledging, the
students will not stop hazing
Nuwer said.
"They will only take it
underground, where it will be even
more difficult to stop. We don't
have a lot of rites of passage these
days, and young men and women
seem to want rites of passage. As
obnoxious and dangerous and silly
as these rituals are, students
continue to cling to them
Dr. Larry Smith, assistant vice
chancellor of Minority Student
Affairs, said that Greeks think of
hazing as a rite because of its
tradition. "It's hard to change
people's attitude Smith said.
"When something has been done to
you for so long, you automatically
want to do it to someone else. But 1
think abolishing hazing is right
Smith said that he doesn't agree
with any form of hazing within any
Greek organization, black or white.
Smith said that he never pledged. "I
didn't sec the need for anyone to beat
me and call me their brother
However, Shari Edwards of
Delta Sigma Thcta Sorority said that
hazing helps to build character and it
teaches you how to be verbal if
you're shy. Edwards said that
everything is done for a purpose.
"Beating" is just a misconception.
"The pre-plcdging process
teaches you how to be humble when
you never thought you would and
you bond with individuals that
you've never met Edwards said.
"Now, the process is too short
and too optional. You don't have to
learn the history (behind the soror-
ity) if you don't want to
Edwards said that the pledging
process used to have a sense of
testing one's mentality, whereas
now all one has to do is pay money
10 gel accepted into the sorority.
Steve Holmes, a member of
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, said
that he and others think that
abolishing hazing will make
members and potential members
lose interest. As a result, pledging
will deteriorate and eventually die
out. Holmes said that many
members think that hazing activities
build unity within a chapter and
create an element of respect.
At ECU. pledging costs more
now, and ihe process has been
shortened. The pledge period is also
run by the university, whereas
before it was run by individual
chapters.
"Hazing in the form of beating
is wrong Holmes said. "But
hazing as far as giving up
something to gain a new love for a
fraternity or sorority should still be
a part of pledging
Transition means learning to cope
By TRACY SCHWARTZ
Pirate Voice
Students who return to school
or enroll for the first time when
they are 25 years or older may not
feel comfortable because they do not
fit the traditional stereotype of ihe
18- lo 22-year-old college student.
These students enrolled at ECU
who are over 25 are classified as
non-traditional students. There arc
more than 3,000 this semester, and
each year that number grows larger.
The Division of Student Life
tries to help these students
adjust lo their new scholastic
environment.
One way tficy help is through
their publication "Bridging the
Gap a handbook for the older
student. This guide helps the
students become familiar with the
school. It is a composite of the
experiences of older students who
had to cope with getting in
college and staying in.
The handbook is designed to
make the older students' transition
from the outside world to the
classroom a little easier. It
concentrates on making the best of
one's university experience and
offers a guide to ihe many different
academic services available at ECU,
such as main labs, handicapped
student services, health services and
other university services.
It also gives a complete
listing of telephone numbers and
times of operation for these
places. This publication, when
used with other ECU publications,
such as the "ECU Handbook" or
ihe "General College Student
Manual enhances the older stu-
dents' chances of academic survival.
Christopher Zigovsky, 33,
returned to ECU last fall after
dropping out in 1977 when he was
placed on academic probation.
Zigovsky said: "After all those
years of not having a college
diploma, I felt it was time to return
and get my degree. I decided
this when I was turned down for a
promotion just because I lacked a
piece of paper. Now that I'm
older and more mature, classes
seem to be easier on me. I
actually take time out to study.
That's something I didn't do 13
years ago
He has a 40-hour-a-wcck job
and is a full-time student. He is also
still an active member of the Navy
Reserve. Zigovsky said paving his
own way has played a big part as
far as grades are concerned. "I don't
want to throw my money away
he said, "so my grades are far
better now, than back in 1978
Another non-traditional student,
Lorie Carver, has returned to
school now that her children are
grown and are in school. She is
35 years old and has decided to
continue her education and get her
degree in interior design
"I was out of high school for
15 years before I decided to resume
my education at the University of
Cincinnati Carver said.
She ended up at ECU when her
husband transferred to Greenville
with his company. ECU had the
program she was interested in, so
she enrolled, she said.
Some teen-agers may feel forced
to go to college by their parents and
tortd not i tO"da 'well. An
advantage for older students is thai
they enter college for a specific
purpose. They arc also more
mature and have better study habits.
FUTURE OUTLOOK: According to seniors,
job opportunities are looking grim after May
Percentage of Degrees by School Division for Academic Year 1989-1990
UNDERGRADUATE
Education 16�c
Technology 6
By ALICIA FORD
Pirate Voice
Graduation is approaching in
just a few weeks, and many future
graduates still do not have a "real"
job lined up.
Becaasc fewer jobs are avail-
able, many students are not anxious
to jump into the job pool. The ma-
jority of graduating students have
not been on any interviews, made
any phone calls or even comprised a
resume. Some graduates will move
back home to live off Mom and Dad
until a good job knocks on their
door. Others, will continue working
their school jobs until something
better comes along. Many graduates
find that they are earning more
money now than they could in an
entry-level job.
Cariene Moore graduated last
year and works at Annabelle's as a
waitress. She has been on several
interviews related to her major in
communication, but she has yet to
find a good enough offer, she said.
"The jobs are there in
broadcasting, but I'm holding out
for the money Moore said. "After
four years of college, I don't want to
start out making less than I do now.
If I didn't already have a job, I
would be out looking every day in-
stead of once or twice a month
Jake Fine graduated in De-
cember 1990 with a degree in in-
dustry and technology and a minor
in construction. More than four
months later, and he has not found a
job. Fine said he never expected to
still be working as a bartender after
his graduation.
Fine said: "I enjoy the work I
do now, and the money is not too
bad. That makes it hard to really get
motivated; I guess I'm wailing for
the right job, but with working all
the time, I just don't have time to
really go out there and look.
"Besides, I'm having a hard
time just finding anything in my
field
Vickie Long finished her degree
in Special Education in 1986 and is
currently employed at Burroughs
Wellcome as a quality assurance
technician, mainly dealing with
chemical composites and sampling.
She taught school at Nashville Ele-
mentary to special ed students
briefly after graduating.
She quit leaching school after
only six months mainly because of
the money. "It just isn't there,
especially in N.C and I really re-
gret majoring in the field I did
Long said.
"If I had a choice. I would have
changed it to engineering or chemi-
cal technology
The security of already having a
job may be appealing to many grad-
uates, and in light of the current job
recession, it may not be a bad idea.
Sooner or later, though, there comes
a time when people must move on
and put to use the degree they have
earned during their years at ECU.
Home Economics 7
Nursing 4
Social Work 4
Allied Health 4
Siness 1S
Art 3 m
Music 2
Arts & Sciences 35-
Graduating students ponder future
By JAMIE BAILEY
Pirate Voice
Counseling Center
provides answers
for students
By J.D. JAMISON
Pirate Voice
JAME BAILEY Pin Voiot
iys�Students enjoy the beautiful spring weainer.
-
:9
University life can bring much
stress and anxiety. To learn to cope
with these problems, one can visit
the Counseling Center.
The Counseling Center,
located on the balcony of Wright
Auditorium, offers counseling to
students, faculty and school
employees. It offers workshops in
asseriveness training and study
skills. and it helps students cope
with the death of a loved one and
sexual assault.
Theae workshops, as well as
many others, are scheduled
throughout the year.
Special groups are also added
when certain crises arise. One such
group was added to help people
cope with ihe war in Iraq.
Individual meetings are also
available. They run about 50
minutes, are usually scheduled on a
weekly basis and should be
arranged in advance.
The center's staff consists of
five full-time counselors and some
part-time help.
Julie Ingram, a full-time coun-
selor with a degree in counseling,
said she sees an average of six to
seven people daily.
Although her concentration is
in women's issues, she handles a
variety of cases. When possible,
though, people are geared toward
the counselors' specialties.
At times, there are some cases
that require consultation. "These
cases are sent to Student Health for
an appointment with the
psychiatrist Ingram said.
One point stressed by Ingram is
these services help students deal
with developmental and situational
concerns. "It is normal for students
to feel anxiety about visiting,
thinking they must be abnormal,
when the truth is that most
problems we address are everyday
concerns she said.
The center not only deals with
problems, but it also can help
students decide upon a major or
possible career.
One way of doing this is
through the Meyers-Briggs
Personality Type Indicator. This is a
counselor-administered test that
interprets social and career types.
The SIGI Plus s a computer
that individuals use on their own. It
offers self-assessment and career
research. The results are printed
instantly, whereas the other tests
require a waiting period.
The Counseling Center is open
from 8-5, Monday through Friday,
and the phone number is 757-6661.
What do you want to be when
you grow up? As children, we were
all asked this familiar question. As
graduating seniors, we must finally
find an answer.
Each year. East Carolina
University conducts a study through
the Office of Planning and
Institutional Research to determine
the specific number of students who
graduate from each school. Last
year's findings revealed changes in
the graduation rate. The most
noticeable change was the rise in the
number of students who graduated
with health and recreation degrees.
According to its 1989-90 study,
the largest number of ECU graduates
will pursue a career in a business
field. Last year, the School of
Business graduated 381 students.
The study also revealed that
teaching is the second most popular
profession for ECU students. The
School of Education graduated 338.
For 11 years, the number of
business majors has topped those in
education. They have always been
side by side, with only the School
of Industry and Technology breaking
into the top two from 1985 to 1988.
Although a career in business
proves to be the most popular
among ECU students, the school's
strict entry requirements only allow
for fewer high-qualily students.
Ernest B. Uhr. dean of the School of
Business, said. "We have artificially
tried to reduce the number of
business students by imposing these
rules and regulations
He said that with their limited
resources, they do not have the
means to educate 1,400 pre-
business students each year who
want to enter the school.
"We just don't have any place
to put them Uhr said.
The study also revealed an
increase of students who are
interested in pursuing careers in
health and recreation. The
department of health, physical
education, recreation and safely
graduated 164 last year.
The study also recorded 161
home economics graduates and 139
in technology. Throughout the
1980s, technology remained in the
top three, but this year's study
revealed its drop to fifth.
According to ECU records dated
back to 1968, the highest number of
students who have attended graduate
school have been education majors.
The second-highest number of
students in graduate school are
business majors.
In order to find out what the
average ECU student wants to do
-when he grows up a survey
compiling the responses of 50
sludents found results comparable to
the university study.
Twenty-three percent wanted to
be teachers and find a job
immediately after graduation, with
no plans to auend graduate school.
This contrasts with the 232
education majors who went on to
attend graduate school last year.
Lisa Webb, a home economics
major who would like to teach on
the high school level, said, "I just
want to graduate and go to work
Most students said they did not
have the time or the money for
graduate school right now, but they
would consider it in the future.
Seventeen percent wanted to
further their education in graduate
school and possibly go on to teach
in their field. They reasoned that
there is more money to be had with
a graduate degree. The majority of
the students were English majors.
However, one English major,
Byron Tolson, was part of the 10
percent who were undecided about
their future career. "Graduate school
could be in the picture, but I
wouldn't mind being a full-ume
loafer Tolson said.
With graduauon ahead in May,
many ECU students will don a cap
and gown to soon face the real world
after graduation. So, perhaps they
will finally be able to answer the
childhood question: "What do you
want to be when you grow up?"





y
1
Entertainment
April 23.1991
No money? Get a job
By ALICIA FORD
Pirate Voice
During the course of the average
college student's mid-semester
break, asking mom and dad for extra
cash can be a touchy subject, espe-
cially if they don't have any.
So, many of us find ourselves
perusing through the classifieds,
looking for that "perfect" part-time
job. There is probably an opening at
the Fast Fare, but they are open 24
hours and you would get off work
just in time to make it to your 8
a.m. class. Brody's is always hiring,
but if catering to old ladies
and loud teeny-boppers is not in
your future, you could always gel a
job waiting tables.
The important thing to remem-
ber about waiting tables is that we
have all eaten in a restaurant
before. Try to remember the
last time you got lousy service and
the reasons why.
The following are a few tips
(mainly for college students
and surfers) for the beginning waiter
or waitress.
First, the customer is GOD.
That includes the somewhat
homicidal lady who is bulging from
her lime-green polyester pantsuit
and wants a pitcher of diet coke to
go along with her three
cheeseburgers and two apple pics.
That also includes the three
screaming monsters who are
throwing spaghetti across the
restaurant and knocking over
everyone's beverage glass in sight.
This category also includes the
couple who are having a huge fight
and taking their argument out on
you, and the couple in the corner
booth who won't come up for air
long enough to give you their order.
After ensuring your customers
that the universe does indeed
revolve around them, at least for the
next hour and a half, introduce
yourself. Customers like to know
your name so they can scream it
across the room. "Hi, my name is
Susan, I'll be your slave tonight
will usually suffice.
Now is the time to suggest a
before-dinner cocktail. Try to push
the wine, that way they can't com-
plain "my drink doesn't have any
liquor in it Or, in some cases,
"this drink is too strong, I can't
drink this" In either case, tell the
customer that the bartender is
really a lush. Say he is either
drinking on the job, and
therefore loo stingy with Jim Beam,
or he is already drunk and over-
pouring all the drinks.
If something is wrong with
their food, ALWAYS blame the
kitchen. "I'm really sorry your food
is cold, they must have prepared it
too fast If that doesn't work,
blame the hostess. "That dumb
blonde is forever seating people way
back here in the dark, and I must
have given your food to the wrong
table
Try to always keep their table
cleared of used dishes. When the guy
eating the all-you-can-eat ribs has a
small pyramid of bones piled up to
the ceiling, that's usually a sign that
he is finished. Another good sign is
the crushed-out cigarette butt in the
plate of mashed potatoes.
Now it is time for dessert. Be
sure to cut the hot fudge cake into
eight separate pieces for the group of
ladies who "just want a bite Now
go ahead and pa-pare to make seven
more of them.
When presenting the check, al-
ways bring back the correct change.
"I said keep the change not the
dollar bills" docs occur (often).
Also, be careful not to drop the 87
pennies the customer gave you for
his bill of SI5.87.
After you give them their
change and are through groveling for
your tip, tell them "thanks for that
50 cents, now I can get that opera-
tion I've been needing Be sure to
let the busboy clean the table.
Bass fishing offers escape
By TONY SMITH
Pirate Voice
The advent of warm weather
brings the inevitable urge for out-
door activity. Unfortunately, this
time of year many Greenville resi-
dents utter that timeless springtime
cry, "There's nothing to do in this
town
However, there is one source of
outdoor recreation that few take ad-
vantage of�bass fishing.
Greenville is abundant with
small lakes and ponds that are home
to an ample amount of largemouth
bass. Bass, which range in size from
a few ounces to more than 12
pounds, are recognizable by their
dark gray color and their wide, oval-
shaped mouths.
Often elusive and always
exciting to catch, bass provide ex-
cellent fishing for both beginners
and experts.
Every bass fisher has a theory
on how to catch more and larger
fish. In fact, fishing strategy has
become as much a part of the sport
as bait and tackle. When fishing for
bass, there are several considerations
to make:
� Fishing area: Obviously, a
good fishing area is one that is a
proven site for catching bass. River
Park North, operated by the
Greenville Parks and Recreation De-
partment and located on Mumford
Road, is a great local spot to catch
bass.
There are also many small
ponds around Pitt County Memorial
Hospital that yield good catches.
The Greenville City Engineer's of-
fice publishes a topographical map
of Pitt County that can be helpful in
discovering new fishing areas. Just
be sure that the area is not on pri-
vate property.
� Equipment: The two pieces of
equipment essential to bass fishing
arc the rod and reel. According to
bait shop owner Linda Faulkner, de-
ciding on a rod depends orr several
factors.
"Where you fish, the type of
bait you use, and the lime of year all
play a part Faulkner said. "For
instance, plastic worms require a
stiffer-action rod than natural
worms Rods range in price from
SI5 to $50.
Any type of reel may be used
for bass fishing, although those un-
familiar with the sport should con-
sider the "push-button" model.
Reels arc the most expensive piece
of equipment needed for bass fish-
ing, starting at around S25 and go-
ing as high as S250.
� Bait: Bass arc a unique fish
bevjue they are attracted to many
different types of bait. They will
strike at the conventional night
crawler worm and hook, or hold out
for a siable minnow.
Artificial bait comes in all
shapes, colors and sizes, and is rela-
tively inexpensive. Artificial bait
also tend to have strange names:
buzz-bait, spinner-bait, hula-popper
and lunker-lure, to name a few.
Faulkner said, "This time of
year, when the water is cold and the
fish are spawing, half of the people
use spinners and half use minnows
The warm weather will have the
bass up near the surface, which
provides an excellent opportunity.
Stones release new album
By JEFF BECKER
Pirate Voice
The Rolling Stones took
several songs recorded from last
year's world tour, produced a couple
new ones and put them on an album
called Flashpoint.
Flashpoint seems to have all
the right ingredients mixed together
in just the right way. Mick Jagger
and Keith Richards have a certain
chemistry on stage. Combine this
with the crowd's electricity and a
superb song selection, and the
Stones have one hot album on their
hands.
Only two songs off the album
are new releases: Highwire, the first
song to be released as a single, and
Sex Drive. The rest of the album
contains live versions of 15 classic
Stones tunes. Ruby Tuesday, Brown
Sugar, Satisfaction and Jumping
Jack Flash, just to name a few.
The album's standout is a five-
minuf rendition of Willy Dixon's
Little Red Rooster. The gritty guitar
of Keith Richards, the voice of Mick
Jagger and a special appearance by
guitarist Eric Clapton make the
song come alive. The blues just
don't get any better.
A laid-back version of You
Can't Always Get What You Want
and a funky, upbeat version of Miss
You also highlight the album.
Mick and the boys will not take
the album on the road, but expect to
see a new studio album and tour
sometime in 1992. Also, keep an
eye out for Keith Richards this
summer when he goes on tour with
his second solo album.
Welcome
to
Margaritaville
By ALICIA FORD
Pirate Voice
Having worked my way
through school as a bartender, I
thought I had learned to judge a
person's favorite drink based on
outward appearances. However,
during my last semester in school.
I realized that an old drink was
gaining new popularity.
Little old ladies were drink-
ing them. Business executives in
pin-striped suits were drinking
them. Mothers with small children
were tossing back the strawberry
version during their lunch hours.
Instead of bellying up to the bar to
quaff a few beers, college students
were even ordering them.
A new favorite cocktail of
this decade's happy-hour genera-
tion had been reborn. It wasn't a
martini or even a Rob Roy. It was
that sally, lick-your-lips Mexican
favorite - the margarita.
The origin of the margarita is
vague. One story concerns an
Aztec noblewoman called
ZochiU. who devised a "potent
brew" from the maguey plant
(where tequila comes from) for the
emperor. He thought so highly of
the drink, he married her.
Later, during the Mexican-
American War, American soldiers
tried the fiery mixture called
ZochiU and brought the recipe
home with them. Over the years,
the name was somehow changed
to the margarita.
There are several variations
in the creation of this popular
drink, but the primary ingredient
agreed upon is tequila. You can't
have a margarita without it
Tequila is distilled from the
maguey cactus, also known as
mescal. Mescal grows extensively
in Mexico, around die village of its
namesake - Tequila. The sap ot
the mescal ferments rapidly. The
fermented drink, called pulque.
JAME BAILEY Prate Vokx
Sign of the times- the essentials
then becomes tequila alter the distil-
lation process.
There are two basic types of
tequila, white and gold. Tequila"de
ptata "(silver)or"blanca"(white)is
aged in vats lined with wax to make
it colorless. Tequila "amanlla"
(yellow) ages in unlined oak, im-
parting the color of the wood and a
certain mellowness.
The longer the tequila ages, the
better the flavor becomes. Mexican
law requires tequila to age at least
three years.
High-quality mescal is aged
several years. It ased to be identified
by the worm thai was found in the
bottom of the bottle, called the gu-
sano. which made its home in the
center of the maguey cactus. Most
of the worms floating around the
bottom of a bottle of mescal uxtn
are plastic, bul the tequila con-
noisseur may find a dustv old boitle
containing the real ihing.
The best tequila for making the
perfect top-shelf margarita is gold.
Jose Cuervo Gold is as good as as
more expensive counterpart,
Mezcal. Generally, gold tequila is
better than while in its overall qual-
ity. Keep this in mind when foilow-
JAMIE BAILEY Pirate Voice
for making a margarita
ing the recipe- below:
2 ounces tequila
1 ounce orange liqueur
2 ounces lime juice
4 ounces lemonsour mix
Grande glass with salted nm
Lime wedge garnish
Triple-sec can be substituted
tor the orange liqueur, but a top-
quality margarita is achieved only
when using die liqueur. I Grand
Marnier and Cointreau are good
choices).
For a stKiwberry margarita,
subsututc 1 ounce of sour mix with
1 ounce of pureed straw berries
(sugared rim).
For a melon margarita. substi-
tute 1 ounce of tequila with 1 ounce
of Midori Melon liqueur For a fro-
zen Meat, add all die ingredients into
a blender, throw in three scoops of
crushed ice and blend foraminute or
two.
Once ou decide on your fa-
vorite ingredients, fill a mixing glass
ith ice and pour in all the liquids.
Shake vigorously, strain into the
salted glass filled with fresh ice, get
a big straw, and enjoy!
SHAWNA CHANCE Pirate Voice
Students drink up at Splash�a bar with a beach scene SpiashcersarTotheropbctoGreenvile'sriclte.
Night club makes big 'Splash'
The Rolling Stones� Flashpoint hits the record stores.
By S.A. CREASEY
Pirate Voice
Many people remember the
opening of Splash in October be-
cause it caused some hard feelings
among Grogs' loyal customers.
Grogs' fans talked of banning the
new bar, but since the bar scene in
Greenville is limited, downtown-
goers started to venture in to have a
look at the new establishment
Once they wandered in, they
usually stayed to listen to the mu-
sic, watch the videos on TV and
have a few drinks. The customers
realized that Splash is Grog's with a
face-lift and a few additions.
You can tell now, as you hear
"Where are you going tonight?
Splash?" that the bar has become
popular with students.
The idea of Splash originated
with George Saiecd and Gary Pete
Taylor. Saiecd and Taylor wanted to
create a new bar, with new atmo-
sphere, for a new clientele.
Splash is decorated with a beach
theme. Fish nets hang from the
ceiling with shells and sea urchins
attached. The walls are painted with
an ocean scene and orange baskets
sway over the bar.
A Splash fan describes the bar
as a great place to go because the
beach theme creates a cozy
atmosphere. "I like Splash because
it is different than the other bars in
Greenville since it has a theme, and
the people there are basically the
same group I used to see from the
Grog's days
Splash has a fully stocked bar
with seven employees willing to
serve any drink you want.
Another Splash fan attributes
the success of the bar to the bar-
tenders. Marcia Jaurcgui saidMeff
Willingham has been one of the
special reasons for the bar's success
because of his friendly disposition
and expertise in making Splash an
enjoyable place
Splash features its special fruit
drink made with freshly squeezed
oranges. Friday nights start at Sp.m.
with a happy hour in-chiding free
appetizers. Except for happy hour.
Splash is a members-only club for
people 21 and over. Memberships
are available at the door.
At first, students showed a dis-
like for the bar, but as their Grog's
T-shirt grew old and faded, so did
their resentment
Attic to host
REAL Crisis Cent
By Stuart Oliphant
Assistant Feature -
And so � ��?�
vouhavv'
acssptrSv
your n
You have
are gui �' '
been forced
You hardly ki
he thinks he ki e has
taken db
on a rrui
He knows rthii �
much you in
thinks he km
wanted.
The pre
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describe the ang
by a ra;x victim, Bu-
tantlv � � poet
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friends an I " has
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-

.
.
crams.
Daii Rd
Venus and Mars are all right
Actualv eventhough Venus and Mars are alngrttongrt
and the Moon. Venus and the Moon get trw dose -
Big band jazz to
By J.D. Jamison
Sutt Writer
in small setsaccom
Carolina azz pi
verge BRM8
Steve Creech
Ford. Dick Cabl
Sterhenson
ers is an IS-ptoo.
and regional
may seem light -hoj
is much more sen
Fnends in Nej
unteer-run
organization. FT
A chantv concert iearunnc Big
Band Jazz musicians paying S" ing
music from the MM. 40s and
will be held this Sundav at the
Ramada Inn in Greenville.
Sponsored hv Friendsm Meed,
the "Big Band Bash and lazz Ex-
travaganza" headlines national jazz
recording artists Dan Barrett and
Ken Peplowski. They will pertotm
ECU graduate does w
By Scott T. Batchelor
Staff Writer
My lather has a bookmark
given to ,him many years ago. It is
long and rectangular, with a frayed
bhjetassddeperkiingfromoneend.
Inscribed on this bookmark, faded
by time, yet still legible, is the fol-
lowing aphorism; Anything is pos-
sible, if only you believe. Scott Coo-
per believed.
Almost two years ago in the
suiTunerofl989,ScottCooper,whik
still a senior at ECU, started a much
needed business
pare! (The "H" n
Fladdock, Coop
mostly takes care
Working at Shar
Cooper became
merous complail
voicing concer
prices of formal
to do something
problem.
1 took fliers!
clothing manufa
them and asked
of other manufa
; "7'1 � ��j.





p
Entertainment
Apr 23.1991
PA(. 4
No money? Get a job
By ALICIA FORD
Pirate Voice
Duratg the course ot the average
college student's mid semester
break, asking mom and dad lor extra
cash can be a touch) subject, espe-
Cta))) it thc don'l have any.
So. matt) oi us find ourselves
perusing through the classifieds,
looking for thai "perfect'1 pan lime
iob rhcre is probabi) an opening at
the Fast Fare, but the) are open 24
hours and you would got oil uoik
lust in tune to make it to JfOUt S
am class Brody's is always hiring,
but it catering lo old ladies
and loud teen) hoppers is not in
sour future, sou could always get a
iob waiting tables.
The important thing to remem-
ber about waiting tables is that vve
hae all eaten in a restaurant
before. Try to remember the
last time ou got lousy sericc and
the reasons win
1 he following are a lew tips
(mainl) lor college students
and suitersi lor the beginning waiter
or waita-ss
lust, the customer is GOD.
lhat includes the somewhat
homicidal lad) who is bulging from
her lime green polyester pantsuit
and wanls a pitcher ol diet coke lo
go along with her three
cheeseburgers and two apple pies
That also includes the three
screaming monsters who arc
throwing spaghetti across the
restaurant ami knocking OVCI
everyone's beverage glass in sight.
This category also includes the
couple who are having a huge tight
and taking their argument out on
you. and the couple in the corner
booth who won't come up lor air
long enough lo give you their order
Atter ensuring your customers
that the universe does indeed
revolve around them, at least lor the
next hour and a hall, introduce
yourself. Customers like to know
vour name so the can stream it
across the room. "Hi. my name is
Susan. Ill be your slave tonight
will usually suffice.
Now is the time to suggest a
before dinner cocktail fry to push
the wine, that way the) can't com-
plain "my drink doesn't have ,jiv
liquor in it Dr. in some cases.
"this drink is too Strong, I can't
drink this In either case, tell the
customer lhat the barteinlei is
really a lush Sav he is either
drinking on the job. and
therefore too stingy with Jim Beam.
or he is already drunk ami over
pouring all the drinks
It something is wrong with
their food, ALWAYS blame the
kitchen. "I'm really sorry your fixnl
is cold, they must have prepared it
too last" It that doesn't work,
blame the hostess "lhat dumb
blonde is forevci seating people way
back here in the dark, and 1 must
have given vour UhhI lo the wrong
table
Try to always keep their table
cleared ot used dishes When the guy
eating the all you ean eat ribs has a
small pyramid ol bones piled up to
the citing, that's usuall) a sign that
he is I unshed Another gcnnl sign is
the crushed out cigarette butt in the
plate ol mashed potatoes.
Now it is nine tor dessert. He
sure to cut the hot bulge cake into
eight separate pia cs lor the group of
ladies who "just want a bite " Now
go ahead and piepare lo make seven
more of them.
When presenting the check, al-
ways bring back the correct change.
"1 said keep the . hangt not the
dollar bills" does occur (often).
Also, be careful not to drop the K7
pennies the customer gave you fot
his hill ol S15 8 '
Alter you give them their
change and are through groveling for
vour tip, tell ihem "thanks lor that
50 cents, now I cm get that opera-
tion I've been needing " Be sure to
let the busboy clean the table.
Bass fishing offers escape
By TONY SMITH
Pirate Voice
The advent of warm weather
brings the inevitable urge for out-
door activity. Unfortunately, this
time of year many Greenville rest
dents utter lhat timeless springtime
crv. "There's nothing to do in this
town
However, there is one SOUKX ot
outdiHir recreation that lew take ad
vantage ot bass fishing
Greenville is abundant with
small lakes and ponds that are home
to an ample amount of largemoulh
bass Bass, which range in size from
a tew ounces to more than 12
pounds, are recognizable b) their
dark grav color and their wide, oval
shaped mouths.
Often elusive and always
exciting to catch, bass provide ex-
cellent fishing for both beginners
and experts.
Ever) bass lisher has a theorv
on how to catch more and larger
tish In fact, fishing stralegv has
become as much a part of die sport
as ban and tackle When fishing for
bass, there are several considerations
to make:
� Fishing area: ()b iousl), a
good fishing area is one that is a
proven site lor catching bass Kiver
Bark North, operated b) the
Greenville Barks and Recreation De-
partment and located on Mum ford
Road, is a great local s)vot to catch
bass
There are also many small
(Hinds around Bill ('ount) M mortal
Hospital lhat yield good catches
The Greenville City I nginccr's ol
lice publishes a topographical map
of I'm County lhat can be helpful in
discovering new fishing areas Just
be sure that the area is not on pri-
vate propct lv
� Equipment: The two pieces ol
equipment essential to bass fishing
are the rod and reel. According to
bait shop owner 1 uuia Faulkner, de-
ciding on a rod depends orr several
fat tors
"Where you fish, the type ol
bait sou use, and the lime ol vear all
play a part Faulkner said. "Foi
instance, plastic worms require a
stiller at lion rod than natural
worms" Rods range in price from
$15 io $50
An) type ot reel ma) be used
lor bass fishing, although those un-
lamiliar with ihe sport should con
sidcr the "push button" model.
Reels are the most expensive piece
ol equipment needed tor bass lish-
ing, stalling at around $25 and go-
ing as Inch as $250
� Bait: Bass are a unique tish
because the) are attracted to ma
different tvpes ot bait. The) will
sinke at the conventional night
crawler worm and hook, or hold out
lor a sizable minnow.
Artificial bait comes in all
shajx's, v.olots and sizes, and is rela-
nvelv inexpensive. Artificial bait
.i! o tend lo have strange names:
buzz-bait, spinner ban. hula-popper
and lunker hue. io name a lew.
Faulkner said, " I his time of
vear. when the water is cold and die
tish are spawing, hall ot the people
use spinners ami hall use minnows
The warm weather will have the
bass up near the surface, which
provides an excellent opportunity.
Stones release new album
By JEFF BECKER
Pirate Voice
1 he Rolling Stones took
several songs recorded from last
year's world tour, produced a couple
new ones and put diem on an album
called Flashpoint.
Flashpoint seems to have all
ihe right ingredients mixed together
in just the right way. Mick Jagger
and Keith Richards have a certain
chemistry on stage. Combine this
with the crowd's electricity and a
superb song selection, and the
Stones have one hot album on their
hands.
Only two songs off the album
arc new releases. Hihwire, the first
song to be released as a single, and
Sex Drive. The rest of the album
contains live versions of 15 classic
Stones tunes. Ruhy Tuesday, Brown
Suar, Satisfaction and Jumping
Jack FLish, just In name a few.
The album's standout is a fivc-
minutc rendition of Willy Dixon's
Little Red Rooster. The gritty guitar
of Keith Richards, the voice of Mick
Jagger and a special appearance by
guitarist Eric Clapton make the
song tome alive. The blues just
don't get any better.
A laid-back version of You
Can t Always Get What You Want
and a funky, upbeat version of Miss
You also highlight the album.
Mick and the boys will not lake
the album on the road, but expect to
sec a new studio album and tour
sometime in 1992. Also, keep an
eye out for Keith Richards this
summer when he goes on tour with
his second solo album.
Welcome
to
Margaritaville
By ALICIA FORD
Pirate Voice
Having worked my way
through school as a bartender. I
thought I had learned to judge a
jvrson's favorite drink based on
outward appearaiiv.es However,
during my last semester in school,
1 rcalied that an old drink was
gaining new popularity.
Littk old ladies were drink
ing them. Business executives in
pin-striped suits were drinking
them Mothers w ith small c hif hen
were tossing back the strawtvrrv
version during their lunch hours
Instead ol hcUvmg up to the bar to
quail a few beers,college students
were even ordering diem.
A new favorite cocktail ot
tins decade's happy-hour genera-
lion had been reborn It wasn't a
martini or even a Rob Roy. It was
dial salts, hck-your-lips Mexican
favorite the margarita.
Hie origin ot the margarita is
vague. One story concerns an
Aztec noblewoman called
Zochid, who devised a "potent
brew" from die maguey plant
t w here tequila omes from) tor the
emperor. He thought so highly ol
the drink, he married her.
Later, during die Mexican-
American War, American soldiers
tried the fiery mixture called
Zochitl and brought die recipe
home with them Over the wars,
the name was somehow changed
io the margarita.
Iliere are several variations
in the creation Ol tins popular
drmk. bul the primary ingredient
agreed uin is tequila You can't
have a margarila without it.
Tequila is distilled from the
maguey cactus, also known as
mescal Mescal grows extensivelv
in Me x il o, around ihe village �d its
namesake Tequila Ihe sap ol
the mescal ferments rapidly. Ihe
fermented drmk. called pulque,
Sign of the times the essentials
JAMIE BAILEY Pirate Voice
for making a marganta
Uien becomes tequila after the dist
lation process.
There are two basic types ol
tequila, white and gold !cqui!a"de
pl.ita" (silver) or "blanca" (white) is
aged in vats lined with wax to make
it colorless. Tequila "amarilla"
(veil'i� -� in unlined oak. im-
parting the color ol the wkxI and a
certain mellowness.
Hie longer the tequila ages, the
better die flavor becomes Mexican
law requires tequila to age at least
three vears.
High-qualit) mescal is aged
several vears. It used lobe identified
b) the worm that was found in the
bottom ot the bottle, called die gu-
sano, which made Us home in the
center ot die maguev cactus. Most
ol the worms floating around the
bottom ol a bottle of mescal toda)
arc plastic, but the tequila con-
noisscurma) find a dust old bottle
containing die real dung.
Hie best tequila for making ihe
perfect top-shelf margarita is gold.
lowuervo Gold is as cjhhI as Us
more expensive counterpart,
Mccal Generally, gold tequila is
'�� ici than a hue in its overall qual-
ity. Keep this in mind when follow -
il ing ihe rc�. ipc Ivlow :
2 ounc cs tequila
liqueur
inccs lime juice
4 ounces lemon sour mix
(Iran i glass � nh salted rim
1 in, g gamisl
Triple-sec can be substituted
lor the orange liqueur, hut a lop-
qualitv, margarita is achieved only
when using the liqueur. (Grand
Manner and Cointreau are good
choices).
For a sBkiw berry margarita,
substitute 1 ounce ol sour mix with
1 ounce ol pureed strawberries
ired rim).
For a melon margarita, substi-
tute 1 ounce ol tequila with 1 ounce
oi Midori Melon liqueur. Fota fro-
zen treat,add all die ingredients into
a blender, throw in three SCOOps of
crushed ice and blend tor a minute or
two.
(tacc you decide on your fa-
; ingredients, fill a mixing glass
widi ice and pour in ail the liquids
Shake vigorously, strain into the
salted glass filled widi fresh ice, gel
a big straw . and enjoy '
SHAWNA CHANCE Pirate Voce
Students drink up at Splash�a bar with a beach scene. Splash offers another option to Greenville's nighttfe
Night club makes big 'Splash'
JAME BAILEY Pirate Voice
The Rolling Stones� Flashpoint hits the record stores.
By S.A. CREASEY
Pirate Voice
Many people remember the
opening of Splash in October be-
cause it caused some hard feelings
among Grogs' loyal customers.
Grogs' fans talked of banning the
new bar, but since the bar scene in
Greenville is limited, downtown-
goers started to venture in to have a
look at the new establishment.
Once they wandered in, they
usually stayed to listen to the mu-
sic, watch the videos on TV and
have a few drinks. The customers
realized that Splash is Grog's with a
face-lift and a few additions.
You can tell now, as you hear
"Where are you going tonight?
Splash?" that the bar has become
popular with students.
The idea of Splash originated
with George Saiecd and Gary Pete
Taylor. Saiecd and Taylor wanted lo
create a new bar, with new atmo-
sphere, for a new clientele.
Splash is decorated w ith a beach
theme. Fish nets hang from the
ceiling with shells and sea urchins
attached. The walls are painted with
an ocean scene and orange baskets
sway over the bar.
A Splash fan describes the bar
as a great place to go because the
beach theme creates a cozy
atmosphere. "I like Splash because
il is different than the oiher bars in
Greenville since it has a theme, and
the people there arc basically the
same group 1 used to see from the
Grog's days
Splash has a fully stocked bar
with seven employees willing to
serve any dnnk you want.
Another Splash fan attributes
the success of the bar to the bar-
tenders. Marcia Jaurcgui saidJeff
Willmgham has been one of the
special reasons for die bar's success
because of his friendly disposition
and expertise in making Splash an
enjoyable place
Splash features its special fruit
drink made with freshly squeezed
oranges. Friday nights start at 5p.m.
with a happy hour in-chiding free
appetizers. Except for happy hour.
Splash is a members-only club for
people 21 and over. Memberships
arc available at the door.
At first, students showed a dis-
like for the bar, but as their Grog's
T-shirt grew old and faded, so did
their resentment.
Attic to host
REALC risisCeni
By S!
And -
you I
acs
v. I
You 1
aro . �
beet
he " ' -
taki i I
mu I �
think; � �
wai
the �
des �
by a ra �
tan. �
natun
.
Venus and Mars are all right
Actuaty.i
and the Moo
Big band jazz to
Bv .D. ami�
sut! Writer
A chantv coi
Band! a
music from tho 1
will be held this Sund
Ramada Inn inGn
-
the Pig Kaixl Bash and
travagarcu headline!
recording artists Dan Kim
Ken IVpiowski They
ECU graduate does w
-
set

By Scott i. BaUhelor
Start Writer
My tather has a bookmark
given to Aim many vears ago It is
long and rectangular, with a rra ed
blue tassel depending from one end
Inscribed on this bookmark, faded
by time, yet still legible, is the fol-
lowing aphorism: An vthi ng is pos-
sible, if only you believe Scot! Coo-
per believed.
Almost two years ago in the
summer of l989,ScottCooper, while
still a senior at ECU, started a much
needed busine
parel (The "H'
Haddock I I
� takes
Working at Shan
Cooper became
merous complaij
voicing conceit
prices ot formal
to do something
problem.
"I took fliers
clothing manufac
them and asked tl
of other manuf ad





� 23.1991
�m ft
I 1
ThtKe
ig 'Splash'
� ittributcs
the bar-
i 5Jeff
1 the
a cess
f. ition
: la h an
i! Iruit
� '� �� hl squeezed
1 it 5p m
� hmr r ling tree
hippy hour.
Splash is a members-only club for
Memberships
ivatlable ai the door.
theAt tr t students showed a dis-
! M hut as their Grog's
shirt grew old and faded, so did
their n sentment
Hlie �aHt (Carultntan
7
��
:
Attic to host second annual Rock Against Rape
REAL Crisis Center and 36 area businesses sponsor four bands for event
art Oliphant
itures Ed
i the tim
t themani
� � m
1

-
k
ent
. '� rw
HheT
enville there is a pla e v here rape
turn to tor help and
guidance, the RE Al risis( en1 �
private non pr fil corp ra
Pitt i bounty . itizens in i risis.
he whole
italtocourt saysl isa
v-vkes program coordinator tor
RE M and advex ate for the i ictims
dial assault Wc will K th.it
Ivocatea
Ki ffcrs
� Supportive counseling pro-
ind family tra rr
bersl � � ounselorsvia
�.one. wa r dispatched
; teams
� Accom ' ictn

� � ourt pn par iti m and
. mentforthos ' iswho
� . - secute.
confidential and free of charge.
� Appointments are never
needed si nee counselors are always
available to assist von.
Currently, the Student Volun-
ti vrs tor K E A1. are preparing for the
second Annual Rixk Against Rape
concert to be held tonight at The
Mix. The event will begin at 8 p.m.
and will feature: Ihe Beam,Gael &
Rich, Earth Murchants and the Sex
Polks WZMB and Z1Q3 will he
broadcasting live. Also, 3f area
businesses have donated prizes to
be given away during the course oi
the evening.
The i urposeof the event is to
heighten awareness and toeducate
people here in Pitt County about
rape say s Sykes. "The relaxed at-
nn 'sphere of the event should help
increase the community s under-
standing of a very heavy subject
houttheevening,infor-
� on will be given to the audi-
� . rnin � rape awareness;
VI it is date rape?
What strategy - can be used to
See Rape, page 14
Photo CourtMy ot Th� Earth Murchant�
The Earth Murchants are one ot the bands that will be hosting the second annual Rock against Rape concert
that will be held at the Attic tonight. Student volunteers have organized the project the last two years
Bunny's asserts claim as king of downtown
tr - . . 1 . "U .1n.lk.rt.ini'ilL
By Matt Jones
Start Writer
a i ; rful place to re-
ECL student. Shelly
It gets your mind off
da stresses oi
� � i
� as well as nun-
� that Bunny's
: finitely one of the
hottest ;pots in Greenville. Located
on the corner of 5th and Reade
streets just across from the ECU
�� � its itr �nsa van-
id in ludii ;old fashioned
American ta i ' is well as as-
d -xamplesiethnic dishes. In
addition to food, Bunny s also of-
54 competitive
prices tor beer in the area (if not all
areas I
What more, you might ask
could a hungry, tun-loving beer-
drinking, ECU student want? How
about an outdoor patio, the place
where everyi �ne km ws eating and
drinking should be done.
Apparent!v this notion has
caught on, and the business at
Bunnv s shows it But a few months
m:o. all the things were nothinu
more than a dream in one man's
mind. And that man is the owner,
ArifSafi.
Bunnv's Restaurant was taken
over by Safi on Febl, 1991. Shortly
thereafter, business increased tor
the establishment tremendously
When asked what could be attrib-
uted to this ru w influx of customers,
� � � i concrete answer,
aid, maybi
. -
it seems as though Safi is per-
- � � - ither modest About
.�t acquiring owner-
si dp, he added i in theoutside patk)
During the same time frame, the
new owner also lowered the price
ot pitc hers o( beer. 11 "he price need
not be mention since probably ev-
� fent already knows it)
rhese improvements, in addi
non I ill changes in scen-
en certainly attributed to the
nrsnewfoundsuccess Safi
apparently has a knack for the res-
taurant business. However, he ac-
tually never had a real interest in it.
"Before i moved to Greenville,
1 owned a couple oi grocery
storessaid Safi. 'I had never even
seen the back of restaurant before i
bought this place
Amazingly, the 21-year-old
businessman started out in busi-
ness on his own. While attending
University of Kentucky he bought
a en icery store (a small convenient
type) at the age of 17, and before
leaving had acquired another.
When Sin decided he wanted
to leave Kentucky, a friend in Ra-
leigh tipped him off to the town of
( .rivnville.Ona flukehedccided to
visit, and while hen' heard of the
opp rtuniry to buy Bunny's
"It was all serendipitous said
See Bunny's page 13
Army ROTC hands out this year's awards
ECU Army ROTC
By j.D. Jamison
suit Writer
� certfi rturinj Big
ngsv ing
m the 1930s, 40s m
held this Sunda it the
: , rm in �
-
Band I ' ' I
, adlinesnational jazz
i mg artists Dan Barrett and
lowski They will perform
in small setsaccompanied by rth
i arolina jazz players su h as.
George Broussard, hm Crawford,
Steve reech, oe DiStefano, Mark
Ford, Dick Gable and Michael
Stephenson. Alsojoiningtheseplay
ers is an 18 piece big Kind of local
and regional artists Wl iteth � �� I
seem light-hearted, its purpose
much more serious.
Friends in Need
anttvr run nor profit charitable
organization FIN raises money to
i E U Department of Mih-
tarySctenceArm) R( rTCconducted
r annual Spring Awards Cer-
� . April 11 in the grassy
are � fr nt f the (arvis Building.
The purpose of the ceremony was
to present various awards-metals,
ribbions.andplaques-tocadetswho
� edexcellencethisschoolyear
. sand patriotism. Major
David Santa Ana. Army ROTC de-
partment chairman, presided over
the ceremony along with the Cadet
Battalion Commander,Cadet Lieu-
tenant Colonel Michael B. Bailey.
Most awards were presented
by Ma�or Santa Ana. However, dis-
tinguished visitors horn outside or-
n Ramada
make health care equipment, sup-
plies or services available to the
population. It aids the thousandsof
people who face the day-to-day
struggle of living with a chronic
diseaseordisablingcondition who
.irealso without the financial means
to pu rchase hea 11 h care i terns, which
will allow them to lead a more pro-
ductive life.
Their target is individuals who
have "fallen through the cracks" of
See Jazz, page 12
gardzatfonswereonhandtopresent
their own respective awards
Mr Keith Gardner, president
ot the Braxton Bragg chapter of the
Association of the United States
Armv I AL SA . presented the ACS A
Military Cadet Staff Sergeant
Wolfgang T. Biggerstaff.
olonel Clarence F. Fatten.
from the Camp LeteuneChapter of
the National Sojoumers presented
the National Sojoumers Award to
Cadet Corporal ChnstopherCrcvr
Colonel Pntchard G. Adams,
Jr from the Retired Officers Asso-
ciation, presented the Retired Offic-
ers Assxnation ROTC Medal to
Cadet Staff Sergeant Andrew I.
Knell.
Other award recipients and
their awards were Cadet Lieuten-
ant Colonel Michael B. Bailey-
American Defense Preparedness
Award and Distinguished Military
Student; C adet captain Sonya D.
Mclaughlin-Daughters of the
American Revolution Award; Ca-
det Major (ason P. ohnson-Reserve
Officer Association Gold Award
and Distinguished MihtarvStudent;
Cadet Captain Michael D. Benson-
American Legion Gold Military
Excellence Award; Cadet Captain
lack B. Midvette-DA Supenor Ca-
det Award and Distinguished Mili-
tary Student; Cadet First Lieuten-
ant Darren 1. Brcxime-Department
of Military Science Outstanding Se-
nior Award; Cadet Staff Sergeant
Patrick R. Campbell-Amencan Le-
gion Bronze Military Excellence
Award; Cadet Staff Sergeant
Howard T. Hunt-Amencan Legion
Silver Military Excellence Award;
Cadet Staff Sergeant Dernck M.
Llewellyu-Amencan Legion Silver
Schoiastic Award.
Other award recipients wen-
Cadet Mark E. Aycock-Reserve Of-
ficer Association Bronze Award:
Cadet Todd E. Ervin-Mihtarv Or-
der of World Wars Bronze Metal;
Cadet Russell D. Parker-Society of
the Warof 1812 Award;Cadet Paul
Garcia-DA Supenor Cadet Award;
Cadet Lindev M. Thomas-Military
Order of World WarsSilver Award;
Cadet Captain Alfred . T. Evans,
JrDistinguished Military Student
See ROTC page 13
ECU graduate does well with local business
By Scott T. Batchelor
Staff Writer
My father has a bookmark
given to him many years ago It is
long and rectangular, with a frayed
blue tassel depending from one end.
Inscribed on this bookrruirk, faded
by time, yet still legible, is the fol-
lowing aphonsm. Anything is pos-
sible, if only you believe. Scott Coo-
per believed.
Almost two years ago in the
summer of l9,ScottCooper, while
still a senior at EOI started a much
needed business called C & H Ap-
parel (The "H" in "C & Fl" is Lyn
Haddock, Cooper's Partner who
mostly takes can' of bookkeeping.)
Working at Sharpe's Formal Wear,
Cooper became aware of the nu-
merous complaints people were
voicing concerning the inflated
pnees of formal attire. He decided
to do something to alleviate this
problem.
"I took fliers sent to Sharpe's by
clothing manufacturers and I called
them and asked them for the names
of other manufacturers
Cooper said he incurred $300
worth of telephonebillsin thisstage.
"I found a really good Califor-
nia-based company that would send
me the merchandise without hav-
ing the cash up front he said.
Faced with the daunting task of
beginning a new business, Cooper
says he probably couldn't have met
the challenge withoutbeingenroUed
as Technical Sales major at ECU.
This program gave him the practi-
cal knowledge and the confidence
to say to himself, "Look,Scott, when
See Student, page 14





April 23.1991
gtfag lEant (EaroKntan
17
nvwmx.M�SS2
W r.
r
� ii
A
I
JAMIE BAILEY , -M




n
h s Itc1 nm
rush
ubsiiiuicd
ilop-�
1
i irj inu,
ol vnu mix nh
iwtx rrics
� trgarita, subsu-
icquila uith I ounce
liqueur For a fro�
lienisintn
toops of
lininuieor
oil our fa-
fill a mixing glass
- - in all the liquids.
strain into ihc
with fresh ice, get
SHAWNA CHANCE Pirate Voce
Irs another option to Greenville's mghtHe
ig 'Splash'
Initiated
rv Pete
in ted to
atmo-
la beach
bm the
luahins
led with
(baskets
I the bar
use the
cozy
:causc
I bars in
ic, and
lily the
�Dm the
ted bar
with seven employees willing to
sere any drink you want.
Another Splash fan attributes
the success of the bar to the bar-
tenders. Mareia Jaurcgui saidJcff
Willmgham has been one of the
special reasons for the bar's success
because of his friendly disposition
and expertise in making Splash an
enjoyable place"
Splash features its special fruit
drink made with freshly squeezed
oranges Friday nights start at 5p.m.
with a happy hour in-chlding free
appetizers. Except for happy hour,
Splash is a members-only club for
people 21 and over. Memberships
arc available at the door.
At first, students showed a dis-
like for the bar, but as their Grog's
T-shirt grew old and faded, so did
their resentment.
Attic to host second annual Rock Against Rape
REAL Crisis Center and 36 area businesses sponsor four bands for event
By Stuart Oliphant
Assistant Features Editor
And so, when the time comes,
von hatj-toturntohim, themani-
,h -x-rfteull greasing your thighs,
your mind whirling like crazy
You have to confess to him, you
nltv of the crime of hawing
;xvn forced.
You hardly know him but now
lx thinks he knows you: he has
taken down your worst moment
nachine and filed it in a file.
��as orthinksheknows.how
much you imagined; heknovs n
ho knows, what you seaetlv
wanted.
. preceding excerpts from
-1111. "Rape by AdnenneRich
describe the anguish experienced
by a rape victim. But, more impor-
tantly, the poem stresses the violent
nature ol rape and its effect on the
m. ! "� many victims, the p dice
. eem indifferent and only in-
the facts Other than
mencis and family, the victim has
J
here to turn. 1 lowc ver, in Gre-
enville there is a place where rape
victims can rum to for help and
guidance, theREALCrisisCenten a
pnvate non-profit corporation for
Pitt County citizens in crisis.
"We will go through the whole
process, hospital tocourt says Lisa
Sykes, program coordinator for
REAL and advocate for the victims
of sexual assault. "We will be that
one advocate all the way
REAL offers:
� Supportive counseling pro-
vided to victim and family mem-
bers by trained crisis counselors via
telephone, walk-in or dispatched
ensis teams
� Accompaniment of victims
to medical and legal facilities.
� Court preparation and ac-
companiment for those victims who
choose to prosecute.
� Individual and group coun-
seling.
� Hot-line (758-HELP) for rape
or anv other personal affliction.
� Community education pro-
grams.
� All programs by REAL are
confidential and free of charge.
� Appointments are never
needed si nee counselorsare always
available to assist you.
Currently, the Student Volun-
teers for RE AL are preparing for the
second Annual Rock Against Rape
concert to be held tonight at The
Attic. The event will begin at 8 p.m.
and will feature: The Beam, Gael &
Rich, Earth Murchants and the Sex
Police. WZMB and Z103 will be
broadcasbng live. Also, 36 area
businesses have donated prizes to
be given away during the course of
the evening.
'The purpose of the event is to
heighten awareness and to educate
people here in Pitt County about
rape says Svkes. 'The relaxed at-
mosphere of the event should help
increase the community's under-
standing of a very heavy subject
Throughou t theevening, infor-
mation will be given to the audi-
ence concerning rape awareness:
What is rape? What is date rape?
What strategies can be used to
See Rape, page 14
Pholo Courtaay of TV Earth Murchants
The Earth Murchants are one of the bands that will be hosting the second annual Rock against Rape concert
that will be held at the Attic tonight. Student volunteers have organized the project the last two years.
Bunny's asserts claim as king of downtown
By Matt Jones
Staff Writer
"It's a wonderful place to re-
lax said ECU student, Shelly
Traultham, "It gets your mind off
the normal everyday stresses of
school
This student as well as hun-
dreds of others agree that Bunny's
Restaurant is definitely one of the
hottest spots in Greenville. Located
on the comer of 5th and Reade
streets just across from the ECU
campus, it offers its patrons a vari-
ety of food including old-fashioned
American favorites as well as as-
sorted examples of ethnic dishes. In
addition to food, Bunny's also of-
fers one of the most competitive
prices for beer in the area (if not all
areas.)
What more, you might ask,
could a hungry, fun-loving, beer-
dnnking, ECU student want? How
about an outdoor patio, the place
where everyone knows eating and
drinking should be done.
Apparently this notion has
caught on, and the business at
Bunnv'sshowsit.Butafewmonths
uted to this new influx of customers,
Safi did not give a concrete answer.
"1 don't know he said, "maybe
luck maybe fate
It seems as though Safi is per-
haps being rather modest. About
two weeks after acquiring owner-
ship, he added on the outside patio.
During the same time frame, the
new owner also lowered the pnee
"Before I moved to Greenville,
I owned a couple of grocery
stores'said Safi. "I had never even
seen the back of restaurant before 1
bought this place
Amazingly, the 21-year-old
businessman started out in busi-
ness on his own. While attending
University of Kentucky he bought
a grocery store (a small convenient
of pitchers of beer. (The price need type) at the age of 17, and before
ago, all these things were nothing not be mention since probably ev- leaving had acquired another
more than a dream in one man's
mind. And that man is the owner,
ArifSafi.
Bunnvs Restaurant was taken
over by Safi on Feb 1,1991. Shortly
thereafter, business increased for
the establishment tremendously.
When asked what could be attrib-
ery ECU student already knows it) When Safi decided he wanted
These improvements, in addi- ' to reave Kentucky, a friend in Ra-
tion to other small changes in seen- leigh tipped him off to the town of
ery, certainly attributed to the
restauranrsnewfoundsuccess.Safi
apparently has a knack for the res-
taurant business. However, he ac-
tual lv never had a real interest in it.
Greenville. On a fluke he decided to
visit, and while here heard of the
opportunity to buy Bunny's.
"It was all serendipitous said
See Bunny's page 13
Army ROTC hands out this year's awards
ganiza tions were on hand to present
their own respective awards.
Mr. Keith Gardner, president
of the Braxton Bragg chapter of the
Association of the United States
Army (AUSA),presented the AUSA Mclaughlin-Daughters of the
Military Cadet Staff Sergeant American Revolution Award; Ca-
Wolfgang T. Biggerstaff. det Major Jason P. Johnson-Reserve
Colonel Clarence F. Patton, Officer Association Gold Award
ribbions,and plaques-to cadets who from the Camp Lejeune Chapter of and Distinguished MilitaryStudent;
achievedexcellencethisschoolyear the National Sojourners presented Cadet Captain Michael D. Benson-
the National Sojourners Award to
Cadet Corporal Christopher Greer.
Colonel Pritchard G. Adams,
Jr from the Retired Officers Asso-
ciation, presented the Retired Offic-
ers Association ROTC Medal to
ECU Army ROTC
The ECU Department of Mili-
tary Science Army ROTC conducted
their annual Spring Awards Cer-
emony on April 11 in the grassy
area in front of the Jarvis Building.
The purpose of the ceremony was
to present various awards-metals,
in academics and patnotism. Major
David Santa Ana, Army ROTC de-
partment chairman, presided over
the ceremony along with the Cadet
Battalion Commander, Cadet Lieu-
their awards were Cadet Lieuten- gion Bronze Military Excellence
ant Colonel Michael B. Bailey- Award; Cadet Staff Sergeant
American Defense Preparedness HowardT. Hunt-American Legion
Award and Distinguished Military Silver Military Excellence Award;
Student; Cadet Captain Sonya D. Cadet Staff Sergeant Derrick M.
Llewellyn-American Legion Silver
American Legion Gold Military
Excellence Award; Cadet Captain
Jack B. Midyette-DA Superior Ca-
det Award and Distinguished Mib-
tary Student; Cadet First Lieuten-
Scholastic Award.
Other award recipients were
Cadet Mark E. Aycock-Reserve Of-
ficer Association Bronze Award;
Cadet Todd E. Ervin-Military Or-
der of World Wars Bronze Metal;
Cadet Russell D. Parker-Society of
the War of 1812 Award; Cadet Paul
Garcia-DA Superior Cadet Award;
Cadet Lindey M. Thomas-Military
By J.D. Jamison
suit Writer
A charity concert featuring Big
Band Jazz musicians paying swing
music from the 1930s, 40s and 50s,
will be held this Sunday at the
Ramada Inn in Greenville.
Sponsored by Friends in Need,
the "Big Band Bash and Jazz Ex-
travaganza" headlinesnational jazz
recording artists Dan Barrett and
Ken Peplowski. They will perform
in small setsaccompanied by North
Carolina jazz players such as,
George Broussard, Jim Crawford,
Steve Creech, Joe DiStefano, Mark
Ford, Dick Gable and Michael
Stephenson. Also joining these play-
ers is an 18-piece big band of local
and regional artists. While theevent
may seem light-hearted, its purpose
is much more serious.
Friends in Need (FIN), is a vol-
unteer-run, non-profit charitable
organization. FIN raises money to
ECU graduate does well with
iiullri.UAn.
By Scott T. Batchelor
staff Writer
My ,father has a bookmark
given to him many years ago. It is
long and rectangular, with a frayed
blue tassel deceiving from one end.
Inscribed on this bookmark, faded
by time, yet still legible, is the fol-
lowing aphorism: Anything is pos-
sible, if only you believe. Scott Coo-
per believed.
Almost two years ago in the
summer of 1989,ScottCooper, while
still a senior at ECU, started a much
needed business called C & H Ap-
parel (The "H" in "C & H" is Lyn
Haddock, Cooper's Partner who
mostly takes care of bookkeeping.)
Working at Sharpe's Formal Wear,
Cooper became aware of the nu-
merous complaints people were
voicing concerning the inflated
prices of formal attire. He decided
to do something to alleviate this
problem.
"I took fliers sent to Sharpe'sby
clothing manufacturers and I called
them and asked them for the names
of other manufacturers
tenant Colonel Michael B. Bailey.
Most awards were presented Cadet Staff Sergeant Andrew J.
by Major Santa Ana. However, dis- Knell,
tinguished visitors from outside or- Other award recipients and
n Ramada
make health care equipment, sup-
plies or services available to the
population. It aids the thousands of
people who face the day-to-day
struggle of living with a chronic
disease or disabling condition who
are also without the financial means
to purchase health care items, which
will allow them to lead a more pro-
ductive life.
Their target is individuals who
have "fallen through the cracks" of
See Jazz, page 12
local business
Cooper said he incurred $300
worthoftelephonebillsinthisstage.
"I found a really good Califor-
nia-based company that would send
me the merchandise without hav-
ing the cash up front he said.
Faced with the daunting task of
beginning a new business, Cooper
says he probably couldn't have met
thedtengewithoutbeingenroQed
as Technical Sales major at ECU.
This program gave him the practi-
cal knowledge and the confidence
tosaytohim9elfLook,Scott,when
See Student, page 14
ant Darren J. Broome-Department Orderof World WarsSilver Award;
of Military ScienceOutstandingSe- Cadet Captain Alfred J. T. Evans,
nior Award; Cadet Staff Sergeant JrDistinguished Military Student
Patrick R. Campbell-American Le- See ROTC, page 13





8 �lie Cant (Harulinfan April 23,1991
Walkers Illumina title challenged
Henry and June drop in on Hendrix
"I am trapped between the beauty of June and the genius of
l lenry. lam devoted to both, a part of me goes out to each of them.
Are we three immense l gi 8 tighting for domination, or for love,
or arc- these things mixed
From the words of Anais Nin's diaries comes a deceitful and
sexually charged drama, "1 lenry and June The steamy, lushly
photographed film earned its place in film history last summer
when it commanded the first NC-17 rating ever awarded by the
Motion Picture Association of America, finally forcing much
needed refinement in the ratings system.
Set m Pans of 1931-32, the film studies the complex and
intensely erotic triangle between Tropic nf Cancer author Henry
Miller (Fred Ward), his wifeGJflM Thurman), and French writer
Anais Nin (Maria de Medeiros). Anais is a particularly sexual
being who enjoys a safe but boring marriage to her dull husband
(Richard E Grant) but it isn't until she meets Miller that she is
able to indulge in some of her darter carnal urges.
However, Anais also develops desires for June, along with
doubts about 1 tenry For much of the film, Anais goes from bed
to bed, turning to June, and then her husband, and then Henry
again in search ot contentment.
If "Henry and June" were at nit just any promiscuous three-
some, it would not be too different from most of the luridly
packaged tapes in the dimly lit corner of your local video store.
What legitimizes this ambitious and highly cerebral drama is that
Miller and Nin were erotic pioneers, controversial and often
bannedscribi s � hobrotedownbarriersofsexualrepresaionand
-� rote about it in great detail
The weekend brings a ob's 1 adder" to Mendcnhall. The
film is about Jacob Singer I rim Robbins), a downcast Vietnam
veteran who loses his grip on reality. A chemist tells him that his
i allucinations are fl result - � a chemical experiment that was
pet formed n his unit in Vietnam But that's not the answer at
all
"Return to Q istK Sundayfeature Combining live-action
i holograph - ith ' h t the-art sped �l effects including day
animation and pup �tr the film adapts! Frank Baum's classic
story of Dorothy's return to the land of Oz here she must rescue
her companions from tht. e il Nome King who has destroyed the
Emerald C ity
Henrj an Ij ir ililx prea nted Wednesday night, April
:4 �t S puv at Hendri Theatre "Jacob's ladder" will roll
Thursday, 24 Aprilthrouj hSaturday,27April,at8pm. "Return
to Oz" screens on Sunday 28 April alsoat8p.m Admission is
free vi ith a studei t ID
i ittMarit �lHgMl
By Eileen Archer
Staff Writer
Some students were concerned
with the outcome of the 1991
Illumina Art Competition that was
sponsored by the Student Union
last month
Following the competition,
some contested the guidelines for
eligibility into the competition.
Manv felt that first place win-
ner, C.CE. Walker, an ECU gradu-
ate student, had an unfair advan-
tage.
She had completed her gradu-
ate study and exhibited her thesis
show prior to winning the award
for her lithograph, "Untitled Figure
M.C. 3
AccordingtoOtherineWalker,
those factors were not rekvent in
considering an artist's eligibility
before. The show was supposed to
be open to any student enrolled at
ECU, and Walker was enrolled in
two courses, art and music. A visit-
ing art professor sided with Walker.
Micki Muhlbauer said, "You can't
go changing the rules in the middle,
or should I say, the end of thegame
Walker pointed out that she
was winning prizes on her art work
before completing her thesis.
"1 was winning prizes before
my thesis show was done. I don't
win more prizes now that it is com-
pleted Walker added that her
work is rejected from as many com-
petitions as it is accepted.
An artists' chances of winning
a jury show such as the Illumina Art
Competition, Walker explains, is a
matter of luck. The ratio, Walker
added, is fifty percent luck and fifty
percent quality.
"Jurrs' usually know nothing
about the medium they are judg-
ing, therefore, it is all a matter of
luck she said.
Prior to her exhibition in the
Illumina Art Competition, Walker
entered three pieces into the Rebel
Show. One of those three portraits
was exhibited and the other two
were rejected. Ironically enough,
said Walker, the two that were re-
jected in the Rebel Show was ac-
cepted, and one awarded, in the
Illumina Competition.
The Student Union confirmed
the eligibility requirements for the
1991 competition, but is considered
redefining eligibility for next year.
Lynne Jobes, the assistant program
director for the Student Union, said
Walker won fairly because she has
met the criteria that was set by the
student union. Adds Jobes "It
would be unjust not to grant Walker
the award because she met our
specifications. The Student Union
is taking the students' concern into
account, and isconsidenng restrict-
ing eligibility to undergraduates
next year.
David Lynch tries new market strategies to save 'Teaks"
Gannett News Service
LOS ANGELES (AP) � Fans
of 'Twin Peaks set down your
pens and pick up a white flag.
All those letters didn't work.
Sure, the 10,000feverish notes
to ABC Entertainment President
Bob Iger did get 'Twin Peaks
resurrected from its first cancella-
tion. But they were not enough to
keep it from going down a second
time.
After only four weeks in its
new, old time period of 9 p.m.
Thursdays, 'Twin Peaks" hasbeen
yanked again. This time the show
appears more dead than Laura
Palmer.
So let us pause now in a mo-
ment of silent reflection for a series
that redefined television,
overexcited critics, spawned
countless newspaper articles
And made absolutely no
sense.
When 'Twin Peaks" debuted
on April 8, 1990, television view-
ers were beside themselves. David
Lvnch, the weird genius behind
"Eraserhead" and "Blue Velvet"
had come to the small screen.
The attendant hoopla befit-
ted the Second Coming. Millions
of viewers came. And then they
went. Lynch's weird genius looked
more and more like just plain
weird ness.
Dwarfs spoke backwards.
Junk food and coffee took on
profound proportions. No one
knew who killed homecoming
queen Laura Palmer. Characters
spoke in riddles. Sex and violence
consumed virtually every inhab-
itant of the fictional Pacific
Northwest lumber town.
Including the ones who were
dead or in comas.
The media seemed to expen-
ence a collectivedementia. Starved
for intelligent television fare, critics
wrote volumes about the lavishly
produced and utterly confounding
new series. Their editors de-
manded more.
Lynch and co-executive pro-
ducer Mark Frost sat back and
smiled knowingly.
"What does it all mean7" the
critics demanded. "We're totally
confused. Who killed Laura
Palmer?"
Who cares, Nielsen families
began to say Despite an avalanche
of publicity, ratings began to
plummet. By the end of the 1990-
91 television season. Twin Peaks'
would finish in 100th place out of
134 shows.
Lvnch and Frost continued t
smile knowingly. And then they
started marketing "Twin Teaks"
coffee, cherry pie, cassette tapes,
Laura Palmer diaries and Agent
Cooper autobiographies.
ECU Student crowned Watermellon Queen
Jan Walters, a 22-year old
daughter of Frank and Sylvia
Walters of Whiteville, N.C cap-
tured the North Carolina Water-
melon Queen title in Raleigh re-
cently.
The pageant was held in
conduction with the annual conven-
tion of the North Carolina Water-
melon Association.
Walters, a rising senior at ECU
majoring in BroadcastCable
Management.
SheisalsoamcmberoftheZeta
Tau Alpha sorority, will represent
the watermelon industry at parades,
promotions, festivals and other stale
events throughout North Carolina
and the east coast.
She will also represent North
Carolina at the National Water-
melon pageant to be held in Febru-
ary 1992 at Penesecola, Ha.
A former Miss Whiteville High
School and Miss Southeastern
Community College, Walters is
currently the 1990-91 Fair Bluff
Watermelon Queen.
She was sponsored by the Fair
Bluff Watermelon Growers Asso-
ciation and pageant committee at
the state event.
J une B. Wa rren of M u rf reesboro
will serve as the official business
manager for the new queen and can
be reached at 919-398-3907.
Jazz
Miss Melon
Continued from page 13
our public and private health care
system.
More specifically, those not
poor enough to qualify for public
assistance and not financially sol-
vent enough to pay for ongoing
health-related services and equip-
ment.
FIN also sponsorsa larger event
each September, the Triangle Jazz
Partv in Raleigh. This event fea-
tures 14 internationally renowned
jazz musicians playing traditional
and mainstream jazz.
The "Big Band Bash and Jazz
Extravaganza will nin from2:00 to
500 p.m. Tickets for the event are
SI 5 per person or $25 per couple.
They may be purchased at
Jefferson's Florists and the Ramada
Inn in Greenville, or by contacting
Steve or Dottie Blades at (919) 752-
hM7. Tickets will also be available
at the door on a first-come, first-
serve basis starting at 130 p.m.
As if the satisfying sounds ot
jazz and swing are not enough rea-
son for attending, there is the more
important satisfaction that a friend
in need is being helped.
EasLCarplina
ouse
presents
Ap
1990-1991
Season
A Galvanic Evening of Dance
e o s t
c o r o I i n q
DANCE
theatre
April 24, 25, 26 and 27
8:15 p.m.
FIT Students: $3.00 General Public: $7.50
CALL 757-6829
Wi
WA
Hound Tnp� mrtngj
Boston-London 388
Atlanta-San Jose 330
Raleigh-Hong Kong 979
Greensboro-Paris 715
Greensboro-London 595
Miami-Caracas 978
Hew York-Malaga 578
Taies not inckxted RMMHM apply
Far�s $ub)ecl � change One wavs ana
(acuity lares avaiiawe Work. Sr-xiy Aoroaa
orOQ'arrs Inwrnationai Student & Teacnc
I0.EURAIL PASSES ISSUED ON
THE SPOT!
FKEE Student Travel Catalog!
Council Travel
TO NhHfc Succt. ft-t
Du�am,MC 17703
919-786 4644
Attention Returning Students
If you plan to live off-campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by
arranging your utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save
valuable time - - and possibly money. The following options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required Option B: Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your
utility service may be put in their name.
Just pick up a "Request for Utility
Service" application from room 211 in the
OfT-Campus Housing Office, Whichard
Building or at Greenville Utilities' main
office, 200 W. 5th Street
Have you parents complete the
application (which must be notarized) and
mail to GUC, P.O. Box 1847, Greenville,
NC 27835-1847, att:
Customer Service.
�Remember to attach a "letter of
credit" from your parents power company.
If you wish to have the utility
service put in your name, a deposit will be
required. Deposits are as follows:
$75
$85
$85
$75
BectricOnly $100
Ekctric& Water $100
Electric, Water & Gas 110
Electric & Gas $100
You can save time by mailing the
deposit in advance. Be sure to include
your name, where service will be required,
when service is to be cut on, and a phone
number where we may reach you prior to
your arrival at the service address.
p
V
Galloping Hoaxter clai
By Lisa Gonzalez
Staff Writer
Is what you see really what you
get? Or is there more to it7 Well,
when it comes to advertising, it
seems as if what you get is more
than just what you see.
Most ads use a technique of
sellmgand manipulation called sub-
liminal seduction. Examples of this
method were demonstrated Tuev
day night by Dr. Wilson Bryan (Bill)
Kpv, author of the Signet best sell-
ers, Subliminal Seductier '�'� I
Sexploitation and the Gam-Plate
Orgy-
Key is an expert on!
ogy of mind manipul
message Key revealed
students at Hendnx
was not subliminal, tr
was; "Advertisers are
ing us, and we don't ev
Imagine in an ad
Walker Black Label Sccl
glass filled with ice cut
glance, it looks like no
than a glass of ice, butl
-t, the icecube rt
images � ills, i
shnekir.
But why are
placed in these ads"
U.S. lags decades behind ii
By Michael H. Hodges
Gannett News Service
U.S. consumersare accustom -
to abundant choices in everything
fhxndeodorantstodogfoodtociga-
rettes, but variety stops at the bed-
room door
Instead, the Urati
decades behind Western Eun : �
the development of promising new
birth control methods. Even clini-
cally proven methods � �
marketed, experts say
Less than 10 year- �
companies were involved in
traceptive research. In 1991
onecompanycontinued
according to a National Academy
of Sciences study.
US. companies ften fail to in-
vest in already-researched meth-
ods, for fear of futur
consumer boycott by anti-ab
forces, that report found
With the except
cenily FDA-approvi I " -plant.
"we in the United J
with thesame ran.
able 30 years ap I
troiaruii, chairmaj
mittee that autht i j
'In som J
� � pie can choosi
contrao
contraceptives, and a
iUDs ai
not availar
Birth c
reducethenun �
-� �
inel �
avedevi
Council, "and I
ernment funding
mechanism -
pre-inn
abort �
h re tht
uterine ��
Says
ROTC
Award and Gem - imics Ca-
det Award; Cadet Staff -
Russell M Spry-Reserve Officer As-
sociation Silver Award; Cadet Start
Sergeant Adrian E. Bamhill- Ameri-
can Veterans of WW II Award; Ca-
det Sergeant First Class lennirer A
Meno-AmericanLegjonGold
lastic Award. I
Mich i
Cadet Am
Cadet
Sabat-V I J
Gold Award; and J
Kennedy-DA Su
Award, Daug
Projecting
higher
sales
4C
3
20C
100
6:
Source: Electrode Industries Association
FOSDIC
1890 SEA
I 756-2011
I Lunch onl
1 Small Shrimp
Platter
� onl
l $2.99
I Sun-Fri
' Beverage not included
� Expires: 4-25-91
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756-21
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Regular
Planer at!
Gel thef
Regular
Pfatier Ij
Good an
Beverage noj
1 pire-
:

1991 BS
STUDEI
Jg Enter the Air Force
immediately after gradud
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(919) 850-959
COLLECT





')
�tre SaBt (EaroHnian April 23. 1991 9
allenged
a�trian am-
ted
of vMnning
�lllumina Art
�xplauis is a
(ratio, Walker
uck and tut
m ivMhiny;
� are judg-
III a nutter oi
nnon m the
Walker
ortraits
e other two
none

jected in the Rebel Show was ac-
cepted and one awarded, in the
Illumnu CoanfNtMoti
The Student Union confirmed
the elipbilttv requirements for the
11 competition, but isOOMtdcnsd
redefining eligibility for next year
I Mine lobes, the assistant program
director tor the Student Union, said
Walker won fairly because she has
met the criteria that was set b tht-
student union Adds lobes It
would be unjust not togrant Walker
the award because she met our
"he Student Union
s taking the students concern into
account and isconskJering restrict
ing eligibilit) to undergraduates
t year
es to save "Peaks"
ducer Mark Frost sat back and
smiled knowingly.
What does it all mean?" the
ided We're totally
ised Who killed Laura
Nielsen families
Jespitean avalanche
!t ratings began to
I the 1990
in Peaks
h place out oi

s( ontinued u
Vnd then they
i . in Peaks"
pie assette tapes,
iries and Agent
hieen
Miss NKMon
Continued from page 13
� : . contacting
- - 752
� a ailable
:v first
p.m.
satisfying sounds of
ugh rea-
there is the more
�lit a fnend
being helped.
Boston-London 388
Atlanta San Jose 330
Raleigh HoroKons 979
Greensboro-Paris 715
Greensboro-London 595
Miami-Caracas 278
New York-Malasa 578
Taies no! "c d Rev o-s aoo'y
i � On oiays and
dfes avaraa� wy.Srufiy Aofoafl
- ,�' � ,i " � KtorM & Teacnef
�D.EUBAU. PASSES ISSUED ON
THE SPOT1
FRXE Student Travel Catalog!
Council Travel
703 Ninth SUM I ft-t
Durtiam, MC 17705
919 786 464
ing Students
:an eliminate at least one long line by
y planning ahead, you can save
ollowing options are available:
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility
service put in your name, a deposit will be
required. Deposits arc as follows.
with eleexne h �jl etcui
or u mqb realnf � u Mcc nr�laij
ElearicOnly $100 $75
Electric & Water $100 $85
Electric. Water & Gas 110 S85
Electric & Gas $100 $75
You can save time by mailing the
deposit in advance. Be sure to include
your name, where service will he required,
when service is to be cut on, and a phone
number where we may reach you prior to
your arrival at the service address.
Galloping Hoaxter claims advertisers let it all hang out, subliminally Bunny's
By Lisa Gonzalez
Staff WriteT
Is what you see really what you
0t� (r is there more to it? Well,
when it comet to advertising, it
gems as it what you get is more
just what you see.
Most ads use a technique of
g and numpulation called sub-
r seduction. Examples of this
d were demonstrated Tues-
ghtb) I Wilson Bryan (Bill)
itht ot the Signet best sell-
blinnnal Seduction, Media
tation and the Gam-Plate
Key is an expert on the technol-
ogy of mind manipulation. The
message Key revealed to 300 ECU
students at Hendrix Auditorium
was not subliminal, the message
was; "Advertisers are manipulat-
ing us, and we don't even know it
Imagine in an ad for Johnnie
Walker Black Label Scotch: a small
glass filled with ice cubes. At first
glance, it looks like nothing more
than a glass of ice, but if you look
closer, the icecubes reveal startling
images of skulls, monsters and
shrieking faces.
But why are these images
placed in these ads? "It's simple
explains Key; "ad people put them
in because it sells. Why it sells, we
don't know
Key believes that almost every
time you pick up a magazine, look
at a billboard, or rum on a televi-
sion, you are being brainwashed in
ways you don't realize, because the
manipulation is subliminal.
Key proved his theory by pre-
senting a slide-show of subliminal
messages in ads. Some examples
include; the word SEX molded on
political figures' faces, the word
CANCER in cigarette ads, and the
use of female genitalia in cake ads.
As Key pointed out, words and
imageson theslidescreen,you could
hear the reaction of the audience as
they gasped in disbelief. Most
people don't look at ads for more
than two or three seconds, bu t tha f s
all you need. Key explained; "you
don't consciously see it but it goes
right through you
'The bottom li ne of the lecru re
said Key, is; "what does this mean?"
Key cannot give an answer to this
question. All he knows is that it
works. Subliminal messages, rela-
tive to the ad or not, sell a product.
"Advertisers don't care what the
messages do said Key, "as long as
it sells"
Dr. Sex
U.S. lags decades behind in theworld race for the perfect form of contraception
In Michael H. Hodges
tiannett News Service
S a Msunvns are accustomed
undant choices in everything
k riorartts to dog food tociga-
but variety stops at the bed-
lOT.
tead, the United States lags
les behind Western Europe in
vetopment of promising new
ontrol methods. Even clini-
. proven methodsare not being
ted experts say.
ess than 10 years ago, 17 U.S.
inies were involved in con-
ptive research. In 1990, only
impany continued such work,
rding to a National Academy
- it nces study.
S t ompanies often fail to m-
n already-researched meth-
r tear of future litigation or
nsumer boycott by anti-abortion
forces, that report found.
With the exception of the re-
� y FDA -approved Norplant,
"we in the United States make do
with the same rangeof optionsavail-
able 30 years ago says Dr. Luigi
Mastroianni, chairman ot the com-
mittee that authored the Study.
"In some European countries
people can choose among various
contraceptive implants, injectabte
contraceptives.and a variety oi pills,
IUDs and sterilization techniques
not available here he savs.
Birthcontroladvocatosalsosay
the dispute over abortion stymies
even research that could sharply
reduce the number of abortions.
"I'm developing a birth control
vaccine for women says Dr. Rose-
mary Thau, director of contracep-
tive development at the Population
Council, "and 1 ain't get any gov-
ernment funding because the
mechanism might be, technically, a
pre implant
abortion one that occurs be-
fore the egg has implanted in the
uterine wall.
Says Jcannie Rosoff, president
ROTC
of the Alan Guttmacher Institute,
which specializes in birth control
issues, "A lot ot the controversy
about abortion has spilled over to
developmentof new contraceptives.
Like the lawyers say, it's had a chill-
mgeffect on fundingand undertak-
ing in this area. It's a contentious
subject and there's no money, so
nobody makes a career of it
But Douglas lohnson, legisla-
tivedirector at the National Right to
LifeCommittee, denies that theanti-
abortion movement has sUxxi in
the way.
"We don't want the federal
government supporting research on
the French abortion pill he savs,
but bevond that, "We do not see
contraception as a nght to life is-
sue
(As an index of the respect the
anti-abortion movementengenders,
Roussel Uclaf, the French corpora-
tion that makes the abortion pill,
RU86, has opted to confine distri-
butionof thepill to Franceand Great
Continued from page 11
Britain out of concern that US. ac-
tivists might launch a consumer
boycott here against Roussel Uclaf's
parent company, Hoechst of Ger-
many.)
The National Academy of Sci-
ences report said 1.2 million to 3
million accidental pregnancies oc-
cur in the Uni ted States each year as
a result of botched contraception �
either from improper use or failure
of the contraceptive device itself.
About half the 1.5 million
abortions performed in the United
States each year result from such
failures.
Early this year, one revolution-
ary new system � Norplant, im-
planted beneath a woman's skin
and effective for five years � was
approved by the FDA. Two other
devices, the intrautenne device
ParaGuard and the�.ervica 1 cap.also
have been approved. Both are
merely variations on existing tech-
niques.
Problems with existing meth-
ods are both technical and behav-
ioral. The daily routine of using the
pill is difficult for some to master.
The diaphragm, sponge and
condom all come in for complaints
that they are uncomfortable and
interrupt the pace of lovemaking.
In the meantime, both the pill and
the IUD suffer from the specter of
unpleasant side-effects
The contraceptive maker's
nightmare is the experience of the
AH. Robins Co whose defective
IUD, the Dalkon Shield, generated
more than 100,000 damage claims
in the 1970s from users whoclaimed
injuries including infections, mis-
carriages and sterility.
"1 hecompanyevenruallysetup
a$2.47-billion trust fund to pay those
claims and, three years ago, was
reorganized under bankruptcy
laws
Since then, the number of dif-
ferent types oi IUDs available has
plummet id a manufacturers with-
drew their produt ts.
Continued from page 11
Safi, "But it certainly has worked
out. I love it here, I haven't had this
much fun since I was in college
As for the future, Safi said that
he would personally like to acquire
his degree which he didn't com-
plete in Kentucky. When asked why
he still wanted to pursue a degree
even after the lcct
his own business, he gave a simple
response. "A degree says a lot he
said.
As for the future for Bunny's, it
looks bright. One customersummed
up his feelings concerning the es-
tablishment with a toast of his beer
cup.
"Bunny's is the victor of the
beer wars said Pitt Community
College student Jody Theriaul
"This is the happeningest place in
town
It was unclear how long
Theriault had been at Bunny's when
he made the previous statement,
but he did appear to be particularly
"happening" himself.
Of course the easiest way to see
how the business at Bunny's is do-
ing is to simply go by on a Sa tu rday
night.
When you see the scores of
people outside on the patio and
inside the restaurant you will in-
stantly understand its attraction.
There's nothing more beautiful than
seeing a group of ECU students
doing what it is they are famous for.
And if by someamazingchance
you might see through that crowd
of people, you probably catch a
glimpse of Safi. He'll most likely be
walking around talking to his cus-
tomers, doing what he likes best.
And you can rest assured that
he'll have a smile on his face.
rd and General Dynamics Ca-
Vward; Cadet Staff Sergeant
isellM. Spry-Reserve Officer As-
sociation Silver Award; Cadet Staff
5 rgt ant Adrian E.Bamhill-Ameri-
ir V eteraris oi WW II Award; Ca-
� Sergeant First Class Jennifer A.
Amoncan LegionGold Scho-
lastic Award; Cadet Staff Sergeant
Michael A. Drake-DA Superior
Cadet Award.
Cadet Staff Sergeant John C
Sabat-Military Order of World Wars
Gold Award;and Cadet MicheleR.
Kennedy-DA Superior Cadet
Award, Daughtersof the Founders
and Patriots of American Award,
and Colonel Mattie V. Parker
Award.
Following the presentation of
awards, the cadet battalion con-
ducted pass-in-review, for visitors
and guests, to conclude the cer-
emony.
Projecting
higher
sales
50
jrce: Electronic Industries Association
Maraa Staimer, USATODAY
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
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Expires: 4-25-91
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Buy one
Regular Shrimp
Platter at $6.50
Get the 2nd
Regular Shrimp
Platter FREE
Good anytime
Beverage not included
Flxpires: 4-25-91
1991 BSN
STUDENTS.
I
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W immediately after gradua-
tion without waiting for the
results of your State Boards. You
can earn great benefits as an Air
Force nurse officer. And if selected
during your senior year, you may
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at a major Air Force medical facili-
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2.50 GPA. Serve your country
while you serve your career.
USAF HEALTH PROFESSIONS
(919) 850-9549
COLLECT
PINEBROOK APTS.
formerly Riverbluff
under new ownership
?Renovations Underway
1 Bedroom apts & 2 bedroom townhouses
12 price special for June & July (conditional)
Water, sewer and Basic Cable included in rent
?Pool Low Deposit
?Pets Allowed (conditional) Laundry Room
?Accepting applications August 1
121 Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
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Gauze separates, Batik T-shirts,
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Progresssive Dance Night
introducing
M0 Draft
1.15 Tall Boys
1.00 Kamikazees
Ladies Free til 10:30





f
10 �l?e Eaut (Earolinian April 23, 1991
April 23.1991
Amusement parks ring it up big in U.S.
Student
Continued from page 11
By Craig Wilson
Gannett News Service
You can almost hear thrill-seek-
ers' happy screams.
One in three US. households
went to an amusement park in 1990,
but as theprime summer season
approaches, park owners aren't
banking on habit.
Parks nationwide expect an es-
timated 250 million visits this year
� upslightly from 1990. And to
pull people in the gates, they're
pulling outallthepromotional stops.
The pitch? All the fun is only a
day trip away.
About 70 percent of the nation
lives within day-tripdistanceof one
of 38 major parks � not to mention
scores of smaller operations, says
John Robinette of Economics Re-
search Associates, a los Angeles
consulting firm specializing in lei-
sure development.
The one-day outing is a popu-
lar vacation answer for dollar-
strapped familiesina recession, says
Ray Braun of Economics Research
Associates. He says he's never seen
such a marketing effort by the parks
as he's seen this spring.
New rides and special dis-
counts are being heralded in na-
tional and regional ads.
John Graff of the International
Association of Amusement Parks
and Attractions cites the end of the
war and the recent upturn in airline
bookings as positive signs.
TS)vhologically, there's been
a positive lift after the war says
Spruce Richardson, head of Six
Flags Over Georgia. "Vacations are
a way of life People want to get
away asa family unit, and they will,
no matter what
Summer � theme parks' big-
gest season � will be the proof.
"All the signs we get from the
travel industry are good. By sum-
mer we should be very healthy
says Tom Williams, president and
CEO of Universal Studios Florida.
But not to tempt fate, most parks
are hold ing prices at or close to 1990
levels, Graff says.
Universal has kept its admis-
sion price at $29 and will add a new
attraction every 30 days during the
summer to keep interest alive.
Universal also is offering un-
limited free admission to all mem-
bers of the military May 1 through
Nov. 11, combined with special pric-
ing for their families: $21 for spouses,
$16 for dependents.
And Knotfs Berry Farm in
Buena Park, Calif is entering the
summer season with a new $9.95
children'sadmission price, the low-
est of any major theme park in the
country.
Bucking the trend: Disney
World.
Citing its new attractions,
Disney raised its entry fees. The
standard single-day admission to
either the Magic Kingdom, Epcot
Center or the Disney MGM Studio
isnow$34.85,upfrom$32.75;$27.45
for kids under 10 (tax included).
To lure tourists, the Orlando
Orange County Convention and
Visitors Bureau, site of Universal,
Sea World and Disney World, plans
tooffer a "MagkCard" in thesouth-
eastem market in May, offering dis-
counts on restaurants, lodging and
entry to these major attractions in
central Florida.
"You can just feel people want
to get out and do things thisspring
says Richardson.
Says Bruce Neal of Six Flags
over Texas in Arlington: "One of
the last things people give up is
something the whole family can do
together and get away from wor-
ries of the world
Copyright 1991, USA TODAY!Apple College
Information Network
Amusemiteers get what they pay for this year
The tallest and fastest wooden
roller coaster in the world is wait-
ing. So is the fastest and steepest
steel one, a ride back to the future.
and amusement parks across the
nation are touting new thrills. A
sampling:
� Universal Studios Honda in
Orlando opens i ts$40 mill ion "Back
to the Future" ride May 2. lime-
travelers will be hurled through
molten lava and Ice Age chasms
The American Tail Show with
characters from the animated film,
opens Memorial Day and "The
Wild, Wild West Stunt Show" to!
lows Julv 4.
� Cedar Point theme park, in
Sandusky, Ohio, unveils its $75
million Mean Streak wooden roller
coaster May 1 LBiUedastheworkTs
tallest and fastest one, if s 160 feet
tall and travels 65 miles per hour.
� Disney's MGM Studios near
Orlando plans to open
N1 uppet Vision 3-Don May 1. (plans
were clouded Wednesday by a suit
filed by the family of Jim Hen son,
seeking to halt the show.)
� Several parks under the Six
Hags banner arc offering new at-
tractions. Included are Six Flags
Over Georgia near Atlanta, which
adds four water slides; Six Flags
Over Mid-America in St. Louis, a
water ride; and Magic Mountain,
alencia, Calif a wooden roller
coaster.
Kings Dominion in
DodsweU,Vaisboastingaone-of-
a kind S million steel coaster,
launched this spring, that hits 50
milesan hour and loops through an
underwater tunnel.
� Kenny wood Park near Pitts-
burgh is promoting the nation's fast-
est and steepest roller coaster, The
Steel Phantom, opening mid-May
at a cost of $4.5 million. Speed:up to
80 mph. Toughest drop: 225 feet
� Sea World in San Antonio,
Texas,spent$l 1 million to add a log
flume ride and new marine shows
with dolphins and beluga whale's
and to update the Shamu show.
� Universal Studios Holly-
wood is undergoing a $100 million
expansion, including a (36 million
"E.T. Adventure scheduled to
Open June 1 and a tribute to Lucille
Ball, which includes sets and cos-
tumes trom the comedian's classic
shows.
OCopynght 1391. USA I l A Apple College
Information SetU'ork
you get out of class, whether you
want to or not, go grab some lunch,
throw on a suit, and go out there
And he did.
Armed with a couple of cata-
logues sent to him by a clothing
manufacturer, Cooper headed
downtown to the East Carolina
School of Bartending. He left
there withanorderfor$l,000worth
of merchandise.Cooper promptly
deposited the money in the bank,
illustrating a financial philosophy
he has adhered to ever since. Over
the course of the next several
months, he sold apparel to Sharky's,
Sweet Caroline's, the Hilton and
Hamingo's.
Whilethebulkofhissalesareto
businesses, Cooper also sells for-
mal wear to individuals.
"I can sell you a nice tuxedo
he says, "for what it would cost you
to rent one twice
If people knew how much
money they wasted buying on the
retail level, saysCooper, they would
be angry.
"If you were to go into a store,
say Brody's or Belk's, for a bow tie,
you would pay between $9.95 and
$15.00. We sell the same ties for
$3.00 apiece. Nobody in this town
can beat it he said.
Obviouslv the word is getting
amund.Cooper said sales have been
improving all the time, with the last
Rape
two months showing a large num-
ber of tuxedo purchases. He has
even sold clothes to students from
UNC Chapel Hill and N C State.
Scott Cooper radiates genuine
enthusiasm when he speaks of his
business. It is easy to see why this
25- year-old, with his easy manner
and personable character, chose to
pursue a profession in sales. Still,
Cooper doesn't want to remain
primary salesman with C & H.
"I'd like for this business fa
keep going, but I want want some
body else to work it for me he said
Fresh from graduating in De
cember, Cooper is now looking fi r
what he calls a "real job employ-
ment with steady pay from whk h
he can gain a good base of experi-
ence. Income from C & H helped
pay for almost all of his o
education, rent and food, but the
business tends tifluctuate from :
week to the next, and Cooper is
seeking a little more financial si�
rity. It is a sure bet that he will Hi
it.
Many people dream of owning
their own company; many dn an
of owning a home with a
picket fence and a two car garaf
many simplv dream of having a
stable financial future lor all I
these people though, their
tive reveries have a commi m
We call it the American Dream.
Continued trom page 11
thwart an attacker?
Tickets to the event are S and
are available at the dcxr and in
advance from East Coast Music &
Video.
All proceeds will go to REAL.
For more information cont
the REAL Crisis Center. 312E
St,GreenvilleN.C(919)758-Hl
REAL is open 24 hours, seven da
a week. Walk-m services are also
available 24 hours.
SPORTS PAD
Family Billiards & Sports Bar
A jL JL
GAME
ON
US!
Beware the bug's bite
Lyme disease, primarily spread by deer ticks, has infected
humans in 43 states as well as in Europe, Asia and Australia
Symptoms include red dot on skin encircled by increasingly
faint rings, arthritis, neurological and or cardiac malfunctions.
Ignore "experts" who tell you to suffocate ticks with butter,
petroleum jelly, fingernail polish or ointment, to burn with a cigarette or match, or to apply gasoline or
kerosene. You may not kill the tick and may stimulate it to spew bacteria into your body. Here's the safe way
How to remove a tick
Most common
Lyme carder
Ixodes dammim
adults are about
tne size of a
sesame seed
� � MM
Grab tick with fine
tweezers, grip close to
skm and pull straight
out with even motion.
Don't squeeze.
Or
a
feiKiojJ'

1 . -
If you don't have
tweezers, place a
tissue between you
and the tick Wash
hands with soap and
warm water afterward.
Save tick in jar with
tight 'd for later
identification.
June 6
M
r
Record date and
location cf b.te If you i
develop skin lesions, ,
see your doctor.
Sou'ce Socce News. GNS rosea-c
Gannett News S-
EWA MATAYA
TOP PROFESSIONAL
WOMEN'S BII 1 1ARDS PLAYER
FREE HOUR
OF POOL
for ALL ECU STUDENTS
One gift check per visit or table
Coupon expires May 31st
Free admission with student I.D.
420 S. Cotanche � 757-3658
i
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're Kth repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as .i member o( the Army Nurse
Corps, rhe caduceus on the left
means you're part t a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not rhe exception. The gold bar
on rhe right means you command respect as an Army officer. It you're
earning a RSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, RO. Ro 7713,
Clifton, NJ 07015. Or call roll tree: 1-800-USVARMY ext. 458.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE
Attention ECU, Your All New
Hit Radio Station is
CATCH THE WAVE
WAV.
THE BEST MUSIC MIX
Spring fool
3y Matt Mumma
Sports Editor
For hosedie-hard football fans
the annual spring football s. �
mage wa: a brief but impres
foreshadov of the upcoming sea-
son.
Senior suarterback efi ;
threw a 62 yrd pass! - �
receiver Hunvr
end of the first. �
of a complete nshing pa
scoring drive
Senior fullba
in rhebeginningoithe 80-yard s r
ing drive, gained nne yardsuj
middle
Junior runningiackh.
Miles followed with o first down
run off the left side thatsi I up tl
bomb toGallimore
Overthecourseofthc �y �
ran for 23yards cm � nfesfbi
theGoidteamand � tree
carries for the Purple b tm Team
mate Schizo Sherman ra. ked i;p
vards on 13 carries for th
team and looked read : r
this coming � �
Another fine pi
freshman full
He accumulated 31 van- i si)
carries, an average of five yards
every time Wilson touched the ball
Along with veterans
Van Buren, David Danielsand Rhett
the ECU backheld looks to t�
plete in its rushing attack ��
emergence of excellent
prospects.
The quarterback
stobeiu
returning for his
backup will b
McConnellw
passes butrJ -
in thescrimm
Fre

. man for the
Filling in fo
rd man in I
rCnimpk
� '
no act
Seekford
j
rum
Kill
� �
I

WaTjprha j
re �ckk
led dght
There wen I
,1
backs as
es
a chance
Pirates to face
By Kerry ester
Assistant Sports hditor
The Pirate baseball team
dropping two games I
leading Richmond an I
narionallv-ranked N Stati
week, have fallen to -16-1 u
in conference play.
The losses to Richmoi t �
the first time since 1988 flat a con-
ference team has svt ept the Pi-
Earlier this seas
24,theSpiderstookb sofa
doubleheader from ECU at
Harrington Field, wi n
of 6-4 and 4-2.
It also marks the first tin -
1988 that a Pirate team has I
below .500 in conference play
That year ECU began tii
son 1-4 but finished 9-8 in a ti -
second place
With the Colonial Athletic As-
sociation tournament coming
-
second I i
- i
5

conference:
The d

Pirates and I
-

i the
third in


�p�t-
You take it!
Junior quarterback Sean McConnell hands off tj
31 yards on six carries and also caught two par1
Cardinals draft Sw;
SALEM, Mass. lAP) � When
Eric Swann shook his thick arms
high above his head in a victory
pose reminiscent of Rocky, it was
clear the sixth pick in the NFL draft
had achieved hs dream.
Swann, 20, waschosen Sunday
by the Phoenix Cardinals, a team
that obviously didn't care about his
lack of college football experience.
"I've been waiting for this day
for a year. If s a dream come true
he said.
The310-r
sive lineman is I
1946 to be pkr
out having attc
wasn't for lad
Swann took tht
Test eight tir
score high encnj
man.
Now that
heplanstosruc





Continued from page 11
1991
(Bht iEnat (Unrulinuiu
ii
W$&�WM '$f$8$&$8i&
'��'
Spring football scrimmage previews season
MaU Mumma
rts I d i t o r
' tballfans
g football scrim-
' but impressive
sea
� ft Blake
i
i
�T
seernstobeunderconrolwithBlake
returning for his fin�i year. His
backup will be hinkr Sean
Met onnellwhocompletesixofn
passes but threw two intonations
in the scrimmage.
Freshman QB Michael AmT-
son completed six of 14 passes for
yard ind i howed good compo-
sure in the pocket
� quarterback
isonil Vi V only
be if Blake suffers an injun I
I) bo ause Blake is (learly the
man for the job
' � irdsFilling in for the hurt I uke
�� j wasKurtSeekfordwhoisthe
d man in the tightend ;ition.
Nesteri !rumpler,6-6226pounds,
w nis the second string tightend but he
.no action in the scrimmage.
eekf 'rit caught three passes for 25
1. " ' � and showed some abilitv at
1runn iroutesandcatching the
V -
er� senior Robert
1 Kei Bumette will lead
the; � �ne more ear.
�tta klesin thescrim-
� hardlv needs to prove
�ball
Rhett
'�� 1 red
netacklesandsopho
kk Alex i lenderson re-
cord i : lead the defense
rhere wen fii,r interceptions on
the da; sj r�ed among the defen
backs a- veil .is 12 broken up
passes
n t �� �
a i haj hev could do
i t u a t i
Ka
id coa '� Lewis said
D�it R�d � ECU Pholo Lib
Junior Tim Marshmon returns an interception m the second quarter robbing the Purple team ot an almost certain touchdown The Gokj team won
the scrimmage 17-14 The first game of the regular season begins Aug 31 against Illinois
rhe Pirates look like they have The game will be aired on ESPN Oci lb for ECU burgh in Greenville but hopes re-
a solid team for next season which and should be a good indicatoi I i tSyracuseinthe main high as the Piratescouldcome
begins August 31 against Illinois the rest of the season The month of Carrier � tndoneagainstPittSr away with a winning season.
Pi. ates to face tough CAAs
El
4 o
SIDES TO
!SE IN THE ARMY.
,
Nestor
rts I
IE ALL YOU CAN BE
nan aiau m. -m t
1 New
s
r at
i
feren e play
'�
ning up
fourth pv i"i, i mfer-
behind i,upon Miison,
- ' ; hn. I
stonlyheir
ferci imeol thefc'a-
last Satu ' '� �'
�� � �. it 10 6and withinsti �
� rice ol the Spiders. (Ml i�
ne game ah ad f ECU at 7-7 in
ference play
' I i lisapp tinting record
� ' wn funiors' fohn
ever,
.is they continue to hit well for the
Piratesa
( A
din batting with
I average and Eason comes in
at number Is with i ;l" batting
a et i
on's seven home runs is
thud in the conft rei e and I last is
i I in runs batted in with 31; he is
also tied tor third with 10 doubles
and leads the conference in stolen
bases with 15 steals on 18 attempts.
Pirates producing xd statis
tics on the mound are Mm
�mbroMiv who is seventh in the
v onference with a i s earned nin
averaj Move is ninth with a
i 91 R lohnny Beck is 11th with
a 438 ERA and John White is 14th
with a 4.70 ERA.
With onlv two conference
games remaining against I NOW,
Uong with a few other non-confer-
ee egames thePirateslasthopes,it
j Id seem, for a bid torheNCAA
tournament lie in the I AA tourna-
ment
B they can manage to put to-
gether five straight days of com-
petitive baseball, which they are
capable an automatic bid to the
tournament awaits them. The con-
nce tournament winner auto-
matically earns a trip to the NCAA
Regionals.
Oail Rotd � ECU Photo L�b
Senior shortstop Bern Narron swing s at a pr) I :rron is batting 236 with 30 hits and 17 RBI m the Pirates
worst season since 1988 ECU is new 6 �' ' and the tournament r May 15
Lacrosse ends season with loss
By Mike Broyhil
Staff Writer
Despite losing to N State 14-
15 last Friday, the Ft L lac n
had an oi ' �� ' season with a
10-2 record andi division tit
The Pirates, coming off oda
their best seasons ever faced the
Wolfpack in the first nn
playoffs.
In the eold and wet conditi
lastFridaynight,ECl andN
Kittled it out in a hick and forth
hard hitting game.
In the first quarter. ECU took
an early lead by scoring three goals
in the first two minutes of play.
I quarter was all V
tredfiveunanswered
half.
klizedon ECl s
� osl of their goals were
man-up situations.
Th was back and forth
ndol the third quarter. At
that time the Wolfpack began to
id take control of the
ing
d
goals ng NC Stale's lead to
"It there were ten more sec-
onds in the game we would have
won. we didn't give up and came
back to almost winit iietensemen
Lirrv t ortier said.
Attackmen Scott Smith said,
"Everybody played tl
and it sa shame wed n .
we have a young b imand
back next year.
nthesames
said. "This year was a g
experien e
an put thatexp riencet
� year .m
u
nitely made i '
year and nl tw stai
graduating, they'll bebai k nod
with the same inta rtsit) thai
brought into this � son.
Kite club takes off, travels to New jersey
Fliers spend memorial day on the road
Cardinals draf Swann out of high school
SALEM, � �a AP) When
Erk Swann shook his thick arms
high above Ms head in a victory
.se reminiscent of Rocky, it was
tear the sixth pick in the NFL draft
dream.
� ,mnvi v hosenSunday
by the Phoenbi Cardinals, a team
'hat obviously didn't care about his
ark of college football experience.
'I've been waiting for this day
tor a year It's a drean cook true
he said.
The 310-pound, 6-foot-4 defen-
sive lineman is the first player since
1946 to be picked in the draft with-
out having attended college. And it
wasn't for lack of trying: in 1989,
Swann took the Scholastic Aptitude
Test eight times but could never
score high enough to play asa fresh-
man.
Now that he's made the NFL,
he plans tostudy sports medicine in
college.
"I had to do it in reverse. I had
to get to the NFL before I could get
to school Swann said. He said his
contract with thcCardinals will pro-
vide for a further education.
Swann, who has been clocked
at the 40-yard dash in 4.8 seconds,
last played football with the now-
defunct Bay State Titans, a minor
league team based in Lynn, Mass.
See Swann, page 16
By Mike Marshall
Staff Writer
April has been a busv month
for the ECU kiting club. As spring
has arrived so has the wind and the
warm weather allowing for many
good days of flying.
On the weekend of April 13
and 14 the ECU Corsairs stunt kite
team traveled toOceanCity, Md. to
compete in the Mid-Atlantic Stunt
Kite Championships. Although the
weather was cold and rainy there
was plenty of wind.
The Corsairs placed third in the
team precision category and two
members placed in thf top five in
other events, junior t hns ShultZ
placed fifth in the master individual
precision category and sophomore
Mike Brovhill placed fourth in the
novice individual precision cat-
egory
Last weekend the dub was in-
vited to the Biltmore Estate in
V rille to give kite making dem-
onstrations and workshops as part
of the spring Festival of Flowers in
Asheviile.
l"he Corsairs taught 73children
the art of building and tlvmg their
own kites
Vi April V then orNiirswillbe
traveling to New Bern to give a
stunt kite demonstration as part ;
a dav-long kite festival. The
also be going to Wild wood, N
Memorial Day weekend to
pete in the East Coast Stunt Kile
Championships.
The club is looking for people
with stunt kite experience to fill
spaces on the traveling team as two
members are graduating this se-
mester.
Any interested persons are in
vi ted to contact club president Chns
Shultzat752-27. Look for the team
practicing on windy davs on 4th
Street near Overtons





tSbe lEniit (Jlarultutau
ii
p i
�pring football scrimmage previews season
Mun
i;i ike
�. .mi His
be ju ior Sean
i til
intei tions
l �


"� n returns an mterceptic
I je TT-14 rhe first game of 1

hev I
� hich
� �
Oail R�a EC- Phc'o I b
toucndowri � -
istr Pirates � come
i a,h with .i winning - -
I'll EL
EALIYOUCANBE.
I New
g i
s
tes to face tough CAAs
1
'�
. i ��� i m
.nth m the
1: i8 earned run - - 1 1th with 1 Vhite 14th �
� .
� -�-�. �
- 1 � . nage to j

� �
�I
j t winner auto-
�i � � �,�.�.
� �' ��
� �
.
toad ECU Pc
Jf7P � - :� :
Lacrosse ends season with loss
B Mike Bi �
E5Ia �
had an
their �
-
lecold and .
last! rida
battled it out m a ba k and I
hard hitting
In the first q
an early lead eorinj
in the first tw
V� �� �
�-

1 1-

Wl
1"

-
ante
Kite club takes off, travels to New Jersey
Fliers spend memorial day on the road
C ardinals draf Swann out of high school

'� I
a team
nbvii ireaboi
lexperk
� this day
Irca me I
the 110 pound,6 foot 4deten
,r. .lint in.in is tin- fir � plaver since
w to be p ked in the draft with-
(,11th ittcnded ollege Andit
I for 1.x V 't trying: in 1989,
ntooV �hel� holastic Aptitude
Itt eight times but could never
score high i n ughtoplayasarresh-
ni.1
� m that he's made the NFL,
he plans to study; port i medicine in
college
"I had to do it in reverse. I had
to get to the NFI. before 1 could get
tost hool Swann said. He said his
contrat t with theCardinals will pro-
vide for a further education.
Swann, who has been dodked
at the 40-yard dash in 4.8 seconds,
last played football with the now-
d eh met Bav State Titans, a minor
league team based in I.vnn, Mass
See Swann. paqe 16
Bv Mike Marshall
Staff Writer
April ha been a busv month
for the ECU kiting dub As 5
has arrived SO has the wind and the
warm weather allowing tor manv
good days of flying
On the weekend ot April 13
and 14 the ECU Corsairs stunt kite
team traveled toOceanGty M d u
compete in the Mid Atlantic Stunt
Kite Championships Although the'
weather was cold and rainy them
was plenty of wind
The Corsairs placed third in the
team precision category and two
top f n
phornore
rth in the
aon cat-
. n
� cekend the lub was in
to the Bilt Estate in
dem
ps as part
t Flowers in
� � ; ilk
The Corsairs taught 75ehfldken
the art ot building and tiding their
. �wn kites
I k Vpril Vthev rsairswiDbe
traveling to New to gi
stunt kite deni.
a day-long k I bval rhe
N ildwood
Mem
pete in the East Coast Stunt
hampiortships.
lhe club is looking tor people
with stunt kite experience to nil
spaces on the traveling team a
members an- graduating thi� se-
mester
Any interested persons are m
vi ted to contact clubpmsidentOins
Shultzat7S2 I ookforthi
practicing on winds days on 4tvi
Street near Overtone





T

12 (Hilt �aat (Earnltnlan April 23. 1991
Rocket signs with CFL for $262 million
NEW YORK (AP) � Rocket he recruited me
who? At $8 million for five years,
Just because Raghib Maryland ushers in an NFL-style
Ismail decided to accept a suit- recession. He was considerably
case full of Toronto Argonaut
dollars to play in the Canadian
Football League, don't for one
moment think that upset the plans
of the Dallas Cowboys in
Sunday's NFL draft.
The Cowboys weren't all that
fascinated with the Rocket any-
way, certainly not at the $26.2
million pricetag Toronto attached
to him.
No sir. said coach Jimmy
Johnson. The man he wanted all
along was the man he got with
the No. 1 pick � defensive tackle
Russell Maryland from the Uni-
versity of Miami.
"We 100 percent traded up to
get Russell Maryland Johnson
said of the deal the Cowboys
made with New England to cor-
ral the No. 1 spot. "We had every
intention to do what we had to do
to get Russell
For Maryland, the opportu-
nity to play, for his old college
coach made being No. 1 even bet-
ter. "I'm flabbergasted and over-
whelmed the Outland Trophy
winner said. "It will be great to
be reunited with Jimmy Johnson,
who took a chance on me when
less expensive for the Cowboys
than Ismail would have been. And
went to Denver.
Then the Los Angeles Rams
took defensive back Todd Lyght
of Notre Dame and Phoenix
grabbed defensive lineman Eric
Swann, who came into the draft
his contract � compared to the from semipro football with no
$13 million that No. 1 Jeff George college experience.
got last year and the $11.2 million
that No. 1 Troy Aikman signed
for two years ago � is certain to
reduce the payoffs for all the re-
maining first-round picks.
All three are represented by
attorney Leigh Steinberg, who
also is the agent for defensive
back Eric Turner, selected by
Cleveland as the No. 2 pick in the
draft
Cowboys owner Jerry Jones
The string of defenders ended
when Tennessee guards Charles
McRae and Antone Davis went
on consecutive picks, McRae to
Tampa Bay and Davis to Phila-
delphia. It was the first time in.
draft history that players from
the same school who play the
same position went on consecu-
tive choices.
In all, the round produced
said he had negotiated in good just nine offensive skill position
faith with Ismail's representa- players, only two of them quar-
tives. "His numbers were totally
out of our league he said.
Exit Rocket. Enter Russell.
The Cowboys' No. 1 pick
touched off an unprecedented run
on defensive talent � the first six
picks were all defensive players.
Following Maryland, Cleve-
land took Turner, the earliest se-
lection fOr a defensive back since
1�56. Next to go were Nebraska
teammates Bruce Pickens, a de-
fensive back chosen by Atlanta,
and linebacker Mike Croel, who
terbacks. The first passer to go
was Dan McGwire of San Diego
State, picked by Seattle at No. 16.
The Los Angeles Raiders went
for Southern Cal sophomore
Todd Marinovich with the 24th
pick.
The selection of Maryland
was just the beginning of a busy
day for the Cowboys, who spent
the first round talking to just
about every club, wheeling and
dealing. When they were done,
the Cowboys had swung three
trades, moving down in the draft
rotation to accumulate extra
picks.
After choosing wide receiver
Alvin Harper � the third Ten-
nessee player chosen�at No. 12,
the Cowboys yielded to New En-
gland, picking up an extra fourth-
round pick for allowing the Patri-
ots to take running back Leonard
Russell from Arizona State. Then
Dallas stepped aside for Wash-
ington, which turned over a f irst-
and fifth-round choice to get de-
fensive tackle Bobby Wilson.
When the Cowboys got
around to making their third
choice of the first round, it was a
temporary selection. They picked
defensive tackle Kelvin Pritchett
from Mississippi and then imme-
diately passed him off to Detroit
in exchange for second tbftd-
and fourth-round picks.
Ismail was not ennrely ig-
nored, however. In fhe fourth
round, the Raiders swapped a
pair of picks to New England for
the right to make the 100th selec-
tion of the draft and chose Ismail.
The Raiders did the same
thing in 19S7, when they chose an
ex-Nopick named Bo Jackson
in the seventh round. Draft rules
give Ismail's NFL rights to the
Raiders for four years�the same
length as his Argonaut contract.
Safe!
ECU Photo Lab
Berry Narron watches as a runner slaes head first into second
Narron has three home runs on theear as well as five doubles
Swann
The former general manager of
the Ti tans. Dick Bell, is now Swarm's
agent.On draft day, Swann sat on a
couch in Bell's office anxiously
watching the draft on television.
Then, shortly before Phoenix
announced its selection.Swann took
two calls from Cardinals general
manager I .irrv Wilson just before
the selection and knew he was
headed for rhoenix.
All it took was one team to
believe in me he said.
Upon hearing the official an-
nouncement. Swann jumped up to
hug his parents and his girlfriend,
22-vear-old Roseyn lrnhoff, a se-
nior at Duke.
lrnhoff said she "had a feelingit
was going to be Phoenix and
added that she was morv jittery
than Swann about draft day.
Tie wasn't really nervous un-
til this morning lrnhoff said. "But
even then, he wasn't really worried
We all knew it would work out
At Western Hartnet High
School inSanford.N.C,Swann had
his sights set on college. I le had 99
scholarshipoffersand in lWsigncd
a letter of intent to attend North
CanMina State.
Swann needed at least a 700 on
the Scholastic Aptitude Test to play
for the Wolfpack as a freshman.
However, he could not reach that
score in eight attempts.
Swann didn't care for the pros-
pect of sitting out his first year of
college, so he came up with two
options: join the Marines or the mi-
nor leagues. He played 11 games
with the Titans, finishing with 72
tackles, 11 sacks and four blocked
field goals.
The only other non-college
plaver ever drafted into the NFL
was Emil "Six Yard" Sitko, selected
in the first round by the Rams in
1946, the year they moved from
Cleveland to Los Angeles.
ButSitko never played with the
Rams, and opted instead to attend
Notre Dame. He eventually caught
on with the San Francisco 49ers in
1950.
Bell helped Swann meet the
Continued from page 15
February deadline for entry into the
draft and secured him an invitation
to a league tryout in Indianapolis
for draft hopefuls-
Bell was as excited as Swann
about the Cardinals.
"When I woke u p this morning
and I saw Ismail had gone, I knew it
meant good things for Eric Bell
said, referring to expected No. 1
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i
12 BJje Cast CarolinianApril 23. 1991
Rocket signs with CFL for $26.2 million
NEW YORK (AP) � Rocket
who?
Just because Raghib
Ismail decided to accept a suit-
case full of Toronto Argonaut
dollars to plav in the Canadian
Football league, don't for one
moment think that upset the plans
ol the Pallas Cowboys in
Sunday's NFL draft
TheCowbovs weren tall that
fascinated with the Rocket any-
wav, certainly not at the $2b.2
million pricetag Toronto attached
to htm.
No sir, said coach Jimmy
iohnson. The man he wanted all
along was the man he got with
the No. 1 pick defensive tackle
Russell Maryland from the L'ni-
versity or Miami
We 100 percent traded up to
get Russell Maryland' Iohnson
-aid of the deal the Cowboys
made with New England to cor-
ral the No. 1 spot "We had every
intention to do what we had to do
to get Russell
For Maryland, the opportu-
nity to play tor his old college
coach made being No. 1 even bet-
ter "I'm flabbergasted and over-
whelmed the Outland Trophy
winner said. It will be great to
be reunited with Jimmy Iohnson.
who took a chance on me when
he recruited me
At $8 million for five years,
Maryland ushers in an NFL-style
recession. He was considerably
less expensive for the Cowboys
than Ismail would have been. And
his contract � compared to the
$13 million that No. 1 Jeff George
got last vear and the $11 2 million
that No. 1 Troy Aikman signed
for two years ago � is certain to
reduce the payoffs for all the re-
maining first-round picks.
All three are represented by
attorney Leigh Steinberg, who
also is the agent for defensive
back Eric Turner, selected by
Cleveland as the No. 2 pick in the
draft
Cowbovs owner lerrv Jones
said he had negotiated in good
faith with Ismail's representa-
tives. "His numbers were totally
out of our league he said.
Exit Rocket. Enter Russell.
The Cowboys' No. 1 pick
touched off an unprecedented run
on defensive talent the first six
picks were all defensive players.
Following Maryland, Cleve-
land took Turner, the earliest se-
lection for a defensive back since
1956. Next to go were Nebraska
teammates Bruce Pickens, a de-
fensive back chosen bv Atlanta,
and linebacker MikeCroel, who
went to Denver.
Then the Los Angeles Rams
took defensive back Todd Lyght
of Notre Dame and Phoenix
grabbed defensive lineman Eric
Swann, who came into the draft
from semipro football with no
college experience.
The stringof defenders ended
when Tennessee guards Charles
McRae and Antone Davis went
on consecutive picks, McRae to
Tampa Bay and Davis to Phila-
delphia. It was the first time in.
draft history that players from
the same school who play the
same position went on consecu-
tive choices.
In all, the round produced
just nine offensive skill position
plavers, only two of them quar-
terbacks. The first passer to go
was Dan McGwire of San Diego
State, picked by Seattle at No. 16.
The Los Angeles Raiders went
for Southern Cal sophomore
Todd Mannovich with the 24th
pick.
The selection of Maryland
was just the beginning of a busy
dav for the Cowboys, who spent
the first round talking to just
about every club, wheeling and
dealing When they were done,
the Cowboys had swung three
trades, moving down in the draft
Swann
rotation to accumulate extra
picks.
After choosing wide receiver
Alvin Harper � the third Ten-
nessee player chosen� at No. 12,
the Cowbovs yielded to New En-
gland, picking up an extra fourth-
round pick for allowing the Pa tn-
ots to take running back Leonard
Russell from Arizona State. Then
Dallas stepped aside for Wash-
ington, which turned over a first-
and fifth-round choice to get de-
fensive tackle Bobby Wilson
When the Cowboys got
around to making their third
choice of the first round, it was a
temporary selection. They picked
defensive tackle Kelvin Pntchett
from Mississippi and then imme-
diately passed him off to Detrrit
in exchange for second tbrd-
and fourth-round picks.
Ismail was not entirely ig-
nored, however. In fhe fourth
round, the Raiders swapped a
pair of picks to New England for
the right to make the 100th selec-
tion of the draff and chose Ismail
The Raiders did the same
thing in 1987, when they chose an
ex-No.) pick named Bo Jackson
in the seventh round. Draft rules
give Ismail's NFL rights to the
Raiders for four years � the same
length as his Argonaut contract.
Continued from page 15
I he former general nianagor of
the Titans. Pick Roll, is now swanns
' Qn draft day, Swann sat on a
couch in Bell's office anxiously
watching the draft on television.
Then, shortly before Phoenix
announced its se!ection,Swann took
alls from Cardinals general
� � i rry Wilson just before
electii n and knew he was
led for Phoenix.
All it took was one team to
eve m me, he said.
Upon hearing the official an-
nouncement, Swann jumped up to
I is parents and his girlfriend,
2 year-old Roseyn lmhoft, a se-
� it Duke.
Imhoffsaid she "had a feeling it
was going to be Phoenix and
added that she was moa jittery
than Swann about draft day.
"I le wasn't really nervous un-
til this morning mhoffsaid. "But
even then, he wasn't really worried.
We all knew it would work out
At Western Hartnet High
S ru-l in Sanford.N.C.Swann had
his sights set on college. 1 le had MQ
scholarshipoffersand in 1989signed
a letter of intent to attend North
Carolina State
Swann needed at least a TOO on
the Scholastic Aptitude Test to play
for the Wolfpack as a freshman.
However, he could not reach that
score in eight attempts
Swann didn't ca re for t he pros-
pect of sitting out his first year of
college, so he came up with two
options: torn the Marines or the mi-
nor leagues. He plaved 11 games
with the Titans, finishing with 72
tackles, 11 sicks and four blocked
held goals.
The onlv other non-college
plaver ever drafted into the NFL
was Emil "SixYard" Sitko,selected
in the first round by the Rams in
1916, the vear they moved from
Cleveland to L.os Angeles.
But Si tko nevei played with the
Rams, and opted instead to attend
Notre Dame He eventually caught
on with the San Francisco 49ers in
1950.
Bell helped Swann meet the
February deadline for entry-into the
draft and secured him an invitation
to a league tryout in Indianapolis
for draft hopefuls.
Beil was as excited as Swann
about the Cardinals
"When 1 woke up this morning
and 1 saw Ismail had gone. 1 knew it
meant good things tor Eric Boll
said, referring to expected No. 1
CTTgga. - Krrarxyaiiniimi nrc
oducing
Stock and Custom Ribbons
from ' Greenville Graphics
pAVIp'S
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; E. 10th St. � Green.
Phone 752-0123- F 2-0620
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Tom Mitchell
Songs of
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(In front of The Plaza Mall) 756-7818





Title
The East Carolinian, April 23, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 23, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.808
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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