The East Carolinian, April 18, 1991






History Lesson 4
Professor responds to 'Euro-centric thinking' column.
Harping Feminist
Women's Studies presents singer Kay Weaver.
H
Sire iEafit (Earaltman
Servi lathe East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.65 No.26
Thursday, April 18, 1991
Grefnville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
16 Pages
� � � �������� ilium. � � i � iw ������m.n
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T "�,
Li
Fraternity to fight budget cuts
c oed sen ice fraternity at the University of North
Carolina "hay I t lill is sponsoring a letter-writing cam-
paign conci ming the recent education budget cuts.
Alpha i "hi �- )mega fraternity will also hold a question
and answer session this week forstudentsatUNC CHto
become more aware of the budget aits'
After thediscusston,stattonary,envelopesand legis-
lators' addresses will be provided for students who wish
ti v: ite to state representatives
N system which includes E U, will face a
S"u
Band forced off stage at State
I "he annual Wolfsti� k (elebration at North Carolina
me to an abrupl end List week when
Pul rdered the band Rshbone to slop playing.
Pul - � t) said thatthecrowd was getting unruly
and the possibility of in juries was great si nee people were
packed to tf
Hit �� ponsored by WolfstockIRC, featured
tour other bands that played before Fishbone. They
included Mi - ad Information Society, Side-
winder and Maggie - ream
Dining hall receives low rating
Ilv. �. ility at the University of North
Carolina- � eccntly received a "B" health rat-
ingbyth nty Health Department
ireas of protection of food, clean
equirn I utensils cleanliness and storage of ice
ana
hick
io ;vi inspection, Lenoirl hning Hall earned
Tulane police releases reports
lents at rulane I niversity in New Orleans will
novs haveai i sto� impus police records
Pre ioush this information was not made public to
Ihe rhe University Senate C ommittec recom-
mendt m the disclosure of rep irts u keep students a ware
� I ingi � � impus
Student releases health records
� student worker in the University Health Center at
TulaneUniversitydia tosedccatfidentialrecords to friends
and acquaintances, a classmate of the student said
rhe classmate said that the student worker told
about cases of venereal disease, pregnancy and AIDS
tests.
Trw �. who was subsequently Bred, violated
the 1972 Buckley Amendment, which prohibits the re-
lease of any educational records to the public
Whili then arc no criminal charges with this viola-
tion the hool could face withdrawal of federal funds
Homosexuals plan celebration
(,av and lesbian awareness and pride will be high-
lighted at a week long celebration at UNC-Chapel Hill.
The week is filled with activities such as speeches,
darn es and discussions in an effort to make the Univer-
sity community mi ire aware of gay and lesbian issues.
The act vi ties are sponst red bv the Carolina Gay and
Lesbian Association (CGLA)on campus.
Joint program receives grants
The I hike L C latin American Studies program
will receive two large grants that will greatly expand the
program
The L s Department ot Education will provide the
joint program with $235000 every year for three years,
said the pmgram's director.
()ne of the grants will provide funding for foreign
language and area stud tea fellowships. The other will be
used to start outreach programs to train high school and
college instructors.
Student hit by bus while cycling
( lent Kader, a student at Tulane University, was
hospitalized tor minor injuries after she was hit by a
transit bus while bicycling.
The bus driver was also hospitalized and treated for
abdominal injuries suffered when he drove off the road
to attempt to avoid Rader.
Inside Thursday
Crime Scene�
Editorial4
Classifieds
lournalism J200 Insert
Features11
Metal Notes12
ComicsJ
Sports15
Sophomore recovering in hospital
Beta fraternity brother listed in critical condition Wednesday
B 1
Harris
islisti �
Pitt
tal afti � �
ofthi -
;ht
a. k Han
mg
� ii :
'
aid 1 on was
ns ious, able to h .tr
and respond to wi rds but is
unable to sit up,open hiseyes
�reports, Wil-
i! sitting on the rot if,
rtg .i v i t. rt when he
- . I tried tn get a
. � � . . �! higher par of
Harris thei I on �
. � hkeice ind he
ff. Mi
William's foot gjot caught
on the gutter forcing him to
fall head first onto the band's
sound truck. Me thin fell to
the ground next to the truck.
Reports are varied about
whether William had been
drinking when the accident
occurred.
Nevertheless, ac ording
to William's father, it was of
no consequence
"Uhewas
root in the middle o! the day
and stepped onto the same
,nv the sai vould
r-fflk
HP'
A little makeup
Subliiiiinal
have happened Mr Harris
said.
According to his father,
William's vital signs are g od
but his recovery could take
months.
Ine Pitt County Hospital
Trauma Team has been treat-
i ng William since they arrived
at the scene on Saturday.
Although the accident
x curred at the Beta Theta h
house, the party was spon-
sored bv the Inter-Fraternity
( i iunal.
IK representatives were
unavailable for comment
Dee 1 larlin, a representa-
tive from fvta Theta Pi main
office in Nashville, Tenn said
the fraternity is, "greatly sad-
dened" bv the incident.
He said initial reports say
a security guard was on durv
at the partv and was only i
few feet av William
when the a
1 larlin sa
inveshgat i
cum ntl nder � ind
i
. i
By LaToya Hankins
suit Writci
I il - Bry in Key en-
lightened an audteru eol �
people, Tuesday night on h �
their minds were being used
by businesses ti sellprodu ts
Subliminal sedu bon was
the topic of the talk sponsored
by ECU Student Union Fo-
nim Committee
rhe subjei� matter of thi
talk was thi useof sul liminal
messages ii produ � idver-
bsements - send mess as
to consumers of which they
are not conscioush aware.
He has taught at the Uni-
versity of Denver I niversity
.if Kansas and I niversit) of
Puerto Rico.
Before Key began his talk,
he advised the audience that
his subject matter would h
dealing with subjei tsth in
can he seen as obscene ind
anyone whobecameotfended
could leave when the slide
show began
"But you can t leave he
ECU celebrates
Alumni Weekend
o
d White
Weekend.i re
unii ��
and thi.
Gold Sprii
The events,
dents andplace
Apnl 19
Events!l! � p m r-ri-
day with a�n At '
sarv rei eption t rthe lassof
1941 and sill, -r ai who
grad� i
I"he event�d bv
Chano lloi
Eakin
tion the al. hue a
Reunion Dlnne'
aJ � .� �
W
� � -1$
Coll��n Halmbauflh � ECU Pholo Lab
Now you're cookin'
Turning their backs on the dining hall cuisine, some
residents of Garret Residence Hall cook out
said. "It you left without see
ingtheshow,youw( ul Irn ���r
forgive yourself it is as it i
have placed i bar acn sthat
Kick d(xr
Then he beg in thi
show of subliminal messa
in ads The first slide Key
show I'd was a pu tun
flowers on several I -shirts
He ti Id the audience to
pay attention to the intertwin-
ing of the flowers and their
symbolic meaning.
He said it was an example
, ; foregrounding, or what the
mind perceives that it is see-
ing.
Backgrounding is the
placement of words, such as
the word sex, in the back-
ground.Backgroundir1gis vis-
ible with close scrutiny, but
Kev said the average time that
Americ ans rd an ad is only
ne second.
kev then discussed on
of the most famous sublimi-
nal ad campaigns: "Camel
Man
First Kev said that the
.
efact
S a man I i
standing with his r I

He is what we lil I
adkKiew iver Key said
the hoopla over the Canal
un 'rx-ing a loner �ut in the
jungjehasbeenexposed .w
we know why he s out there
alone
TTiat figure, which has
hven on the package tor over
50 years, now has competi-
tion from the new "Smooth
Character" ads.
Kev said that on any
"Smovth Character' the nose
appears to he a penis if the
eves are covered up. The
mouth appears to be a vagina
with a cigarette hanging out.
'ITiat is the epitome oi
See Sex page 2
� Student C enter
Saturday's events begin
- i.m with in Alumni Re-
Breakfast in (.ray Art
( alk ry
� ts will take
i ai a.m. on Saturday.
penl ws� for high school
niiui r md seniors, fiarents
friends will begin at Men-
denha 11 Student (enter, along
with the parent association
met ting An open house tor
parents of current students
iviil take place at the Taylor
ighter Alumni Center.
At 9-30 a m. the Coffee
I lour and Spring Mivting for
tired l iculty Association
m illbe hosted bv the Fakinsin
See Alumni page 3
Professors f ound National
Association of Scholars
By Jim Rogers
Staff Writer
A newlv formed campus
association of professors and
students in support oi "rea-
soned scholarship in a free
society" is holding it's first
meeting on Monday in Men-
denhall Student Center.
The East Carolina Asso-
ciation of Scholars, a local
chapter of the Nabonal Asso-
ciahon of Scholars, is a group
dedicated to upholding the
ideals of freedom of speech,
freedom of poli heal choice and
academic advancement based
solely on merit.
Steven Mandelker, the
coordinator of the associabon,
said he feared that some
people may classi Kit as "right
wing" polibcally-
During an interview
Tuesday, Mandelker stressed
that the associabon holds no
political affiliabon whatsoever
and has absolutely no racist or
sexist tendencies.
A letter endorsed by the
founders of the associabon
was printed in the Apnl 11
edibon of The East Carolinian.
This letter expressed the
association's posibon on many
topics, including the de-
nouncement of groups who
demand changes in the uni-
versity curriculum for polib-
cal reasons such as represen-
tation of women and minon-
bes.
The associabon of schol-
ars claims that a work should
be recognized on the merit of
its content and not the race or
gender of its author.
During an interview,
Mandelker referred to an ECU
Women's Studies newsletter
article about an edition of
Great Books of the Western
World that did not include a
workbva black author.
According to Mandelker
the newsletter implied the
editors of the collection were
racist for failing to represent a
black author.
"In this case, there is no
basis for the claim of racism
Mandelker said.
The April 11 letter stated.
"Race and sex are irrelevant to
See Professors page 2





2lflfre gflBtOIarollnfan April 18. 1991
Police investigate rash of invalid
driver's licenses; same unfounded
120? Brewster Building: investigated a malfunctioning eleva-
tor
1841 Polk Residence Hall: responded to anacrivated firealarm.
Sanx' was activated by unknown subject(s) spraying aerosol de-
odorant on the sensor.
1928 Intramural Field: assisted a Greenville officer in serving
a warrant.
215U Garrett Residence Hall: responded to a report of harass-
ing phone calls.
22(W Chnstenbury Menxmal Gym (south): verbal warning
given to statt member for speeding.
2249 UHh Stnvt: non-student given verbal warning tor a one-
way stnvt violation
2314 Scott Residence Hall: responded to a fire alarm set off by
cigarette smoke
i5 (. .anvtt Residence 1 lall: banned a subject
lXHu Belk Residence Hall: responded to an attempted suicide
April 1
Fletcher Residence Hall: investigated a missing person
report; subject returned to residence.
1012 Fletcher Residence Hall: investigated report of a stolen
license plate.
1117 Slay Residence Hall (north): investigated a breaking and
entering of a vehicle.
1311 Austin Building: investigated a report of an ill subject;
subject refused transport.
1 U White Residence Hall: took a lareenv report.
1821 �Uinstead Residence Hall: responded to a fin? alarm
Same was caused bv a person cooking.
N20 Garrett Residence Hall: took a report of a stolen radio
Aycock Residence 1 lall: responded toa firealarm Cause
unknown; there was no fire.
2113 Fifth and Harding streets, stopped subject suspected of
driving while license revoked. Everything was okav.
2130 Fletcher Residence Hall: investigated a male shouting
bscenities at the girls there.
2253- College Hill Drive student given a verbal acknowledg-
ment that he was suspected of driving while license revoked. Same
had a valid license.
2307 lenkins Art Center (south): student given a verbal warn-
ing for speeding.
2312 Mendenhall Student Center: took a report of a larceny of
a bicycle.
lXX)2 Tenth Stnvt: verbal warning given to student tor speed-
H 65 Hrewster building (front): verbal warning given to stu-
for stop sign violation.
0228College Hill Drive and 10thStreet verbal warning given
to non-student for stop sign violation.
( rim Srenr is ukrn from official Public Safety Iors
Professors
Gray Art Gallery
Other morning activities in
elude a planned support council
meeting, professional socict v semi
nars and open houses, campus
tours and the Alumni Association
Board of Directors Meeting.
The Alumni luncheon and
Alumni Association Annual Meet-
ing begins at noon in the VK nden-
hall Student Center Great Room.
Three graduates will receive 1991
Distinguished Service Awards
ohn. Anema r. of Greenville. Vii-
liam Howerof Raleigh and Furnev
Riverbark of Favetteville ill be
Continued from page 1
honored.
The Saturday events continue
at 2:30 with the Purple and Gold
Football game at Ficklen Stadium.
The weekend activities wind
up with the sixth annual School of
Music Alumni Concert at 7:30 p.m.
in Fletcher Rental Hall. Theconcert
will feature two jazz musicians from
the class of 1973. Ronald Rudkin,
director of the jazz program and
professor of music theory at the
Virginia Commonwealth Univer-
sity, will plav saxophone Bob
I lallahan, also a faculty member at
VCU, will play piano.
Scientists discuss cleanliness
of eastern waterways
ECU New Bureau
if BAR-B-Q if FRIED CHICKEN if
StHittyielct'&
Chicken 'N Bar-B-Q .
Seven scientists will partiapate
in a panel, "Where Do We Go From
Here? at ECU Friday. It will focus
on sol vingen vironmental problems
facing North Carolina's estuaries.
The panel discussion will be a
feature of the all-day symposium,
"Assessment of the Present and
Prospects for the Future to be held
at ECU'S Willis Building. The pro
gram includes presentations by 25
research scienristsdealing wi th such
pmblenvsassalinitv, sedimentation,
pollution and fish and shellfish dis-
eases attacking the state's sounds
and bavs.
"This is one of the largest con-
centrations of scientists ever as-
sembled to address the present and
future of North Carolina esruanes"
Dr. Scott Snyder, ECU geokgist and
president of the ECU chapter of
Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research
Society, said.
Sigma Xi issponsonng the sym-
posium which will also feature an
evening address by the director of
the Chesapeake Research Consor-
tium, Joseph Mihursky, on efforts
to restore water quality and pro-
ductivity of the Chesapeake Bav
Posters will be on view depict-
ing research on such specific prob-
lem areas as nitrogen cycling in the
euse River and esruanne heavy
metals and estuary water quality
Continued from page 1
theartof marketing Key said about
the camel. That campaign has
helped make the Camels one of the
highest selling brands, he said.
While the some companies relv
on sex to sell. Key said the alcohol
industry relieson more graphic tac-
tics.
He said in an ad for Johnnie
Walker Scotchonecan wa scream-
ing mask, a skull and a castrated
penis.
"1 took that picture to the UCLA
medical school and they said that
the picture of the castrated penis is
SO clear and obvious that it vould be
used as a textbook example Key
said.
Key said this display of the ma-
cabre in adsas the industry's way of
showing the audience how self-de-
structive alcohol can be.
The use of subliminal messages
in ads is not restricted to print me-
dia. In a chewing gum ad on televi-
sion, we see a man and a woman
walking with a picnic basket When
the woman almost drops the bas-
ket, the man catches it, they smile
and go on their way. Key said.
When thecomnvraal isslowed
di 'wn, the man places his hand be-
tween the woman's legs, Ke) said
The third type of subliminal
advertisement is the use of
anomphic art. This is when an im-
age iseither reduced or enlarged so
that an image doesn't appear to be
there.
According to Kev, the first
known record of this was found in
Leonardo De Vinb'sdiary over SI
vearsago. Another example would
be a picture ordered by Henry VIII
showing French ambassadors with
a ray of sunlight splashing at their
feet When approached from a cer-
tain way, a distinctive skull can be
seen at the men's feet
"It was obvious that the ing
didn't like the French ambassa-
dors Kev said.
Norman Rockwell, in a plate
titled "Mother's Blessing shows a
scene of a boy and a girl offering
prayers at their mother's knee
But as Key pointed out, the
mother seems to be guiding the
girl's head toward her pubic area
while the boy seems to have his
penis in his mother.
"Now Rockwell was a good
artist and if he wanted to draw a
forearm he would have drawn a
forearm Kev said.
Real Value
Every Day
v
Good Time
Great Food
More Value
Keep
informed
of the
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Department of O
to honor top stud
ECU Nn�$ Bureau
The ECU Department (f Chem-
istry will recognize its best students
during the annual Chemistry
Awards Day ceremony April 19
The ceremony will be held in
Flanagan Building, Room 201, at
430 p.m. and will precede the
Chemistry Professional Sober)
picnic, organized by the student af-
filiates of the American Chemical
St K'tV
The award recipients and the
a wards are Claire Shields i f C ireen-
ville, the Joseph N. LeConte Memo-
rial Award; Michael Wells of Dunn
and Rodney Tee Mc askill of
lsboro, the (In ��. ��r Evei H
Chemistry Award, I i
Draughon )r. of Dunn, the Amen-
Alumni
can lnstitj
Award, Ml
ville, the c
Sonva Lei
AnalvtKa
Mavhuef
standing
Departn
awards
shif
cherrustr.
- igraze
met -
dentai rnal
the u I
The
Chemists
thn

Continu
gpod teaching and to the si
knowledj
Mandelkersaid th st a hi
port the recent movement aa
the nation to sway the university
currkulumaway from Western ide-
als "don't realize what they aa' at-
tacking
'If people had a proper .
,t the' history of Western cu
they would see that freed i
speech, human rights arid democ-
racy were all products of Western
culture and these are the sound
and correct value
According to the editorial, the
association of scholars "strongly
supports the university's Equal
-��

bers
the
� hi lars
meeting i
second fl
den;
Stye lEaatCar
Director of
Advertising
John F. Semelsberger II
Re
r
Prcxiuction Manager
Mary Piland
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Atten





cuss cleanliness
tcrvvays
- 4 scientists ever a.
idd r�vs the present and
v jrohndesruanes
� r KKeologKtand
I the ECU chapter of
tht SrtentiAc Research
�i i t nstnngthesynv
iii .ilso feature an
Idresa bv the director erf
- ik Research Cowy.
i Mihurskv. on efforts
- i.ilirv and pro-
hf napwht Bay
� on view depict-
stM h txThcproh-
! n aling m the
�sruarine heavy
water quality.
m page 1
' Niihliminal
s the use of
i� hen an im-
�r enlarged so
I appear to he
Ki the first
as found in
liary over 300
� in pie would
. I ienrv VIM
: assadors with
�shing at their
ma ccr
kull t.in be
thai the king
� .lmbassa-
in a plate
i shows a
rl offering
� sknee
ted out, the
� , .iJing the
I her rubic area
een ive his
�. a �ixd
� draw a
irawn a
t,v,
V,7
vents
)le
the
pus
unity
tit (Carulinian
.iliutan
� NC 278564353
Department of Chemistry
to honor top students
ECU Nfwj Bureau
The ECU Denartrnentof Chem-
istry will recognie its best students
during the annual Chemistry
Awards Day ceremony April 19.
The ceremony will be held in
Flanagan Building, Room 201, at
4:30 p.m. and will precede the
Chemistry Professional Society's
picnic,organized bv the student af-
filiates of the American Chemical
Society.
The award recipients and the
,i wards are Claire Shields ot Green-
ville, the Joseph 1 eConte Memo-
rial Award; Michael Wellsof Dunn
and Rodney Lee McCaskiil of
Goldsboro IheGroverW. Everett
C hemistry Award; fohnson
Draughon Jr. ot Dunn, the Amen-
Alumni
can Institute of Chemists Senior
Award; Marty Ray Nealey of Nash-
ville, the ENCACS Senior Award;
Sonva Lee Kersey of Sanford, the
Analytical Award; and Bruce Allen
Mavhue of Virginia Beach, the out-
standing senior in the Chemistry
Department.
The LeConte and Everett
awards were founded as scholar-
ships by the f.imiliesof former ECU
chemistry professors. The awards
recognize the academic acci �mpl ish-
montsor chemistry, pre-met! or pre-
dental majors who are members of
the junior class.
The American Institute of
Chemists Senior Award, presented
through the North Carolina Insti-
tute ot Chemists, honors chemistry
or chemical engineering majors.
Continued from page 1
good teaching and to the search of
knowledge
Mandelkersaid those who sup-
port the recent movement across
the nation to swav the university
curnculumawav from Western tde
als "don't realize what they are at-
tacking
"If people had a proper grasp
tH the history of Western culture,
they would see that freedom of
speech, human rights m democ-
racy were all products of Western
culture and these are the sound
and correct values "
According to the editorial, the
association of scholars "strongly
supports the university's Equal
Opportunity I'ohcv which declares
that ECU will 'recruit, hire, train
and promote persons in all posi-
tions without regard to race, reli-
gion, color, creed, national ongin,
sex, age or handicapping condi-
tion
The National Association of
Scholars is based in Princeton, N I
and consists of approximately 20
chapters
Any students or faculty mem-
bers who are intended in joining
the East Carolina Association of
Schola rs a re welcomed to Monda v' s
meeting in the Great R(xm on the
second floor of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center at 4 p.m.
CUiie iEaBt (Earollnfan April 18.1991 3
Student Health Center study
measures exam
By Leigh Anne Wiggins
Special to The East Carolinian
Many students feel that sick-
ness increases on campus around
exam time, but a Student Health
Center official says that may not be
the case.
Ten students talked to all agreed
that sickness lncreasesat exam time
Six of the 10 students polled, said
that the stress involved with exams
makes people more vulnerable to
getting sick.
Ron Morra, a sophomore ma-
joring in political science, said that
"after studying for hours upon
hours, their immune system wears
down and they are forced to go get
medicine
Angie Ratdiff agreed. Ratcliff,
a sophomore mapnng in chiki life,
added that tension and lack of sleep
often times "lead to headaches and
exhaustion This leaves some stu-
dents no other choice than to go get
medicine, she said.
Eour of the ten students, how-
ever, had different opinions about
whv more people visit the infir-
mary at exam time.
Roger Orndorff, a junior ma-
time sickness
johng in business management, said
that "some people can get out of
exams with a note from the center,
and take them later
James Frye agreed. He said that
since sometimes people might have
more than one test on the same day,
some want more time for their ex-
ams.
Rodney Turner, a senior ma jor-
ing in marketing, said that some
people may even be going to the
infirmary "forsome moral support"
He added that normally students
would get this motivation and en-
couragement from their families.
The students look to the Health
Center for some of this while they
are away from home.
While many students think the
traffic at he Student Health Center
increases around exam time, this
may not be so.
Suzanne Tumage, data ctxmii-
nator for the Health Center, found
that the number of students need-
ing medical attention during one
sample exam penod actually de-
creased.
Tumage compiled data from
the Fall lWcxam week and from a
randomly chosen week.
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�he Ia0t (Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Michael D. Albuquerque, Managing Editor
Blair Skinner, Neivs Editor LeClair Harper, Asst. News Editor
Matt King, Features Editor STUART Ouphant, Asst. Features Editor
Matt Mumma, Sports Editor Kerry Nester, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy Edwards, Copy Editor Jason Johnson, Copy Editor
Doug Morris, Layout Manager
Jeff Parker, Staff Illustrator
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Carla WHITFIELD, Classified Ads Technician
Phong Luong, Business Manager
Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Stuart Rosner, Systems Engineer
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that directly affects
ECU students Dunng the ECU school year. The East Carolinian publishes twice a week with a circulation of 12,000. The East
Carolinian reserves the nght to refuse or discontinue any advertisements that discriminate on the basis of age, sex, creed or
national origin The masthead editorial in each edition does not necessanly represent the views of one individual, but, rather,
is a majority opinion of the Editonal Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should
be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville, N.C
274; or call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Thursday, April 18, 1991
Students need to learn from alumni
Most of the time, this space is used to
point out the bad side of things: the firing of
Mike Steele, improprieties by administra-
tors found by the state auditor and the Per-
sian Gulf War. Far too often we avoid com-
mending events in Greenville.
Now, however, we have something to
speak in favor of: alumni involvement.
Not enough attention is paid to alumni.
They are faceless. It is doubtful that stu-
dents know or care about alumni, or that
students know how much alumni do for the
university.
Alumni work harder for the benefit of
the university than most students.
Alumni Weekend � a celebration of
graduates � will be this Friday and Satur-
day, including such activities as campus
tours, music recitals and a Parents Associa-
tion meeting
Three alumni � John Anema Jr Wil-
liam Flowers and Burney Rivenbark � will
receive Distinguished Service Awards.
Anema coordinates the ECU Quiz Bowl,
where regional high school students com-
pete for a $1,000 scholarship.
Flowers is active in the Pirate Club, is a
volunteer in his community and plans fund-
raisers for the university.
Rivenbark has held several offices in
the Alumni Association and organized a
luncheon to promote ECU to high school
guidance counselors.
Honors students work with alumni on
the Quiz Bowl in an effort to attract top
students to ECU. Wednesday, teams repre-
senting Jacksonville and Williamston High
Schools competed in the finals.
With that in mind, take these recent
indicators of students' unwillingness to be-
come involved:
� The Student Union committees, which
handle more than $300,000 in student activ-
ity fees, are hard pressed to find student
volunteers.
� Candidates in three of the four races
for Student Government Association execu-
tive offices ran unopposed.
There are bright spots to this, however.
The Student Union-sponsored Barefoot on
the Mall, which will be held today, promises
to be one of the best ever.
Student volunteers at the REAL Crisis
Center are sponsoring the second annual
Rock Against Rape benefit concerts.
These two examples are highlights, but
they are too few. By not becoming involved
on campus, students are wasting opportu-
nities.
Perhaps, after students graduate, they
will work harder for ECU than they did as
undergraduates.
Perhaps the item that separates ECU
from "public Ivy League" schools like The
University of Miami (Ohio) and UNC-
Chapel Hill is student involvement.
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Letters To The Editor
Thompson
defends recent
criticism
To The Editor:
First I would like to ad-
dress the "awkward sentence
structure" that Mr. Becker re-
fers to in his letter (The East Caro-
linian, March 28). If my original
letter is consul ted by the editors
it will be found that much of the
awkwardness comes from an
error on their part. The portion
of that letter criticizing Mr.
Becker's work was grossly mis-
printed halfway through the last
paragraph.
Secondly, Mr. Becker's
claim that my criticism was "ba-
sically an atrocious exercise in
inane, pedantic dilettantism"
misses the point. As a work of
art his poem certainly has little
merit, and though I sympathize
with the criticism directed at 'art
for arf s sake' that Mr. Becker
alludes to, that doesn't excuse
him from the demands of the
poetic form when he intends to
have his work published. These
artistic conventions can be over-
looked or wholly ignored if one
is merely writing for themselves
or friends, but it is unreasonable
to expect thousands of students
to do the same, especially with a
piece that shocks for apparently
no other reason than to shock.
Next, I would like to ad-
dress Mr. Becker's claim that his
poem expresses the "religious
convictions of an overwhelming
majority of Americans" � I will
assume he meant 'Christian' con-
victions. If the majority of Chris-
tians believe in nuking people (as
I understand the term "NUKE
Saddam Hussein would not be
the only life extinguished); or
support the wholesale slaugh-
ter of people because they have
different beliefs (That Infidels
must perish by the Sword"
and "Their days are numbered
As the hairs of their head"
seem to strongly imply); or ha ve
the self-righteous and inhuman
idea of life presented with "their
corpses rot in a fiery Hell then
I will concede I do not under-
stand even the most bask te-
nets of Christianity.
Furthermore, the expres-
sion of the various aspects of
war is not what I found offen-
sive with Mr. Becker's poem. It
is when an author decides to
propagate a viewpoint that is
inexcusably distorted about the
'joys and sorrows' of war that I
find my sensibilities being of-
See tatters, page 5
V
535222
m me - n fv cmv
BtV THF SHrRT-
OR THfCAP!
CmPtr-
Campus Spectrum
History professor responds to column
To The Editor:
In his awkward column of
April 4, Mr. Derek McCullers seeks
to enlighten us by arguing that
there is a "white way of thinking"
and that "Euro centric thinking
promotes 'Big Lie If so, then his
feeble response is hardly an intel-
lectual aid, for its reasoning is so
internally inconsistent as to seem
childish and so emotional as to
excite sympathy for the hormonal
imbalance of adolescence.
His bizarredescription of the
"oppresive and hypocritical"
white Europeans is unlikely to
convince any except exotic co-re-
ligionists since, along the way, he
has managed to forget such Afri-
can glories as cannibalism, slavery,
polygamy, clitoridecdemy, tribal-
ism, not to mention the frequent
and casual massacre of thousands
� so common an event in Africa
as to have become banal. How
convenient of the columnist to
have forgotten all this!
Or is it his view that Europe-
ans an? now in open season and
may be casually shot where found?
Is he the only one to be issued a
hunting licence? Perhaps he sup-
poses that African pangas and
assegais were principally em-
ployed as tableware. Or, in a more
contemporary vein, perhaps he
imagines that the burning tires
around Zulu necks are a rustic
substitute for street-lights akin to
the ECU campus beautification
program.
It is, however, the internal
illogic of his column which is so
startling since Mr. McCullers prac-
tically wallows in eurocentric
thinking himself. After all, he is
writing in his native language,
English, a Germanic tongue in
which many abstract terms derive
from Greek and many concrete
terms from Latin. Many other
lexial items derive from the Ro-
mance languages and from extra-
European cultures, a point which
simply highlights the flexibility of
Europeans and their American
decendants.
The journalisitic tradition in
which he wri tes provides even less
justification, for it derives from
18th century England while the
right to free expression which he
utilizes denves from England and
the United States.
Similarly, the evocation of
the "noble savage" myth from
which Mr. McCullers draws sus-
tenance is also a 17th and 18th
centurv invention whose leading
proponent was the Swiss-bom and
French-educated Rousseau. His
romantic conception of the tnbal
chief as "instrumentof the people"
is one which excites much interest
in 19th century Germany and En-
gland, from whence it derives, al-
though scholars have long since
abandoned or greatly modified
that premise.
To cap it off, his notion that
freedom "is about power" is
drawn from Thomas Hobbes, a
17th century English political
phiolosopher (who, incidentally,
thought that life in a state of na-
ture was ugly, brutal and short)
and his belief that "we are not
free" because "we are the poor"
derives from Karl Marx, a 19th
century German. Our columnists'
scholar, on the other hand, might
best be explained by reference to
19th century European romanti-
cism or, perhaps, by reference to
Sigmund Freud who, however, is
also beyond the pale because he
Let's Be Adamant
was Austrian.
It is worth noting that Mr
McCullers gets all of this wr ng
while meditating in a university.
That too is a European institution.
It was invented in 11th centurv
Italv and adapted in 12th century'
France Perhaps he also contem-
plates this background when vot-
ing, using a typewnter or com-
puter, ordering a prescript
nding in a car or airplane, calling
a friend on the telephone, watch-
ing a movie, going to an opera -
switching on an electric light. Un-
fortunately for him, all of these are
products of the same "hypocriti-
cal minority" rooted in the West
Will he therefore stop using
them and simply live on the beach
like Crusoe and Friday? Dozens
of other examples might be ated
but this list would simply wearv
us all and the horse has alreadv
been flogged. The critic's anti-Eu-
ropean nag won't trot for him � it
is too European.
In charity, a few things may
be said in Mr. McCullers' favor It
is, surely, nght to protest injus-
tice, right to know one's origins
and a proper exercise of filial pietv
to praise them. In all of this, I can
only bless the enterprise and sin-
cerely wish him well. The prob-
lem is that he seeks to do it by
digging pits forothers whilebuild-
mg sand castles for himself. It is
giddy bombast to indict an entire
race of people. Considering the
advantages which the "hypo-
crites" have provided him, it also
seems more than a little mean-
spirited.
Dr. Michael Enright
History Department
Tokenism in workplace hurts everyone
By Darek McCullers
Editorial Columnist
Tokenism is an evil that ef-
fects everyone. Quotas and asso-
ciated programs are instruments
of tokenism. They hurt white
people as well as black people.
There is no magic number or pro-
portion of blacks to whites in
America's job market or other in-
stitutions, except 100 percent.
What the African-American wants
and needs is total empowerment.
This will not come through the
piecemeal efforts of those who call
themselves white liberals and the
people of color that fall into their
camp.
Minister Malcom X realized
the white man's scheme of token-
ism a long time ago. The white
man would rather allow your
physical presence on the toilet, in
the hotel room, in the school ho use
and in token numbers of signifi-
cant jobs so that he could keep the
money, resources and labor of the
masses. They thought that by inte-
grating and allowing us to see a
few black politicians, entrepre-
neurs and successful people that
we would be satisfied. This is not
the case. There are those, black
and white, that are rising up to see
through this scheme.
Tokenism hurts whites be-
cause it hampers their progress as
well as ours. They also seek to get
jobs in the corporate structure at
the entry level, which is controlled
by whites.
However, these spaces be-
come greatly competitive because
the bulk of black employees can
be found in entry level manage-
ment. Some estimates go as high
as 75 percent (with 20 percent in
middle management and 5 per-
cent in upper management).
What then happens to the
blacks who occupy these lower
positions is that they find that they
can't get any progress. The major-
ity of them will never realize the
so-called "American Dream I
read in one magazine that less than
5 percent of black people earn over
$50,000 per year.
This black middle-class is
growing because tokenism has
provided access to the entry level
of corporate America. As this
group grows, our socialconomic
and political awareness de-creases.
Some of us need to be re-
educated about the white man's
methods of oppression or "Prin-
ciple of Effective Occupation" as
it is called in African Studies. To-
kenism is a component of this pro-
gram
Tokenism will never solve
the problems that hamper the
masses of black people. Malcolm
X talked about this when he re-
ferred to the Democrat's trick of
1964, to appoint a black cabinet
member.
He stated that the "token"
would go up to the White House
claiming that African-Americans
were making so much progress
and that the problem is being
solved when only his personal
problem (of empowerment) was
solved. Really, such tokens have
no power because they can only
offer lip service on behalf of a
people that they do not represent.
The answer to the black
man's problem of empowerment
is not their token social action pro-
gram, it is not integration of our
schools and institutions. Rather, it
is in the words of an old proverb,
for them to quit blocking our sun-
light � which rightfully is ours.
They don't have to displace anv
white workers with quotas the way
they do. These are two classic il-
lustrations of the government s
misguided policies.
The Equal Employment Op-
portunity Commission recently
made a ridiculous ruling. Mike
Webell, the white owner of Daniel
Lamp Co. was prosecuted for ra-
cial discrimination.
His business is located in the
Hispanic area of a major northern
city. His staff is all black and His-
panic. However, the number or
employees that he hires greatly
fluctuates according to the eeo-
nomiccond itions of his small com-
pany. He maintains a staff that
ranges from 12 to 30.
At a particular point and
tinv, a Mack lady applied and was
not nired. She sued, and the EEOC
ruled that the man had to pay over
$140,000 (this has recently been
reduced to $124,000) for lost wages
to be divided among every black
person that applied and was re-
jected in the year 1988-1989.
If there was anybody that I
can say was not prejudiced (at
least in economics), it was this man
He contributed to this commu-
nity, he was putting back in what
he took out The number of staff
that he was maintaining was low
at that time. There was no position
available. When the case was taken
to the EEOC, Mr. Webell offered
to give the woman a position and
pay her back salary. That was a
fair and specific remedy for a ques-
So6 Tokenism, page 5
fended. In this case 1 dearly feltAll the
that I was not the only one v. h helped MUt rn
ild be offended. Two hunHowever, wej
dred and twenty-seven Ama special tharJ
can lives were lost, and thaitions th I
.i- but an attempt to dehu-Kappa Phi lei
manize the lives lost by Iraq.
which is being placed at 10 (�
now, is no less tragic, andm trJ
has to all into question the'
� wpointi
�i
rid of art � �1
� my part
the stud � eethi;
.i
, ,i

. ��
Gamma Sigma�
expresses thanks
to contributors

Fr larch 5 t Vpr
-Senior
ao ' the DnJL V V 1
� -
ten -challer


� �

-
a dream Gamr
expi
that participated. �
- pport 1
qua


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(Sire Eagt(Carol!nfan April 18, 1991 is
ponds to column
� .in
noting that Mr
i� ts .ill oi this wrong
iitating in a university.
iropean institution.
ted in 11th century
i ui in 12th century
ips he also eontem-
background when vot-
pew ritCT or com-
ng a prescription,
r airplane, calling
telephone, watch-
ng to an opera or
in electric light. Un-
him allottheseare
- � the same "hvpocriti-
rity nntod in the West
re stop using
ply live on the beach
lay? Dozens
pies might be cited
list w uld Mmplv weary
ind the horse has already
rhe critic's anti-Eu-
' mt tor him� it
I few things mav
Mr. Md ullers' favor. It
ghl to pretest injus-
knovk one's origins
t filial piety
- them. In all of mis, I can
is the enterprise and sin-
vell The prob-
i 9eeks to do it bv
r.tthers while build-
for himself. It is
bast to indict an entire
t p�- rtsidering the
'he "hypo-
Ul him, it also
than a little mean-
I H Michael Enright
History Department
e hurts everyone
�nd institutions. Rather, it
� m old proverb,
it blocking our sun-
h rightfully is ours.
n't have to displace any
A-ith quotas the way
fhese arv two classic il-
f the government's
guided policies
The Equal Fmployment Op-
-tunitv Commission recently
a ridiculous ruling. Mike
ell, the white owner of Daniel
Lamp Co. was prosecuted for ra-
hscnmination.
His business is located in the
ispanicareaof a major northern
city His staff is all black and His-
panic. However, the number of
employees that he hires greatly
fluctuates according to the eco-
nomic cond itions of his small com-
pany He maintains a staff that
ranges from 12 to 30.
At a particular point and
i me, a black lady applied and was
not hired She sued, and the EEOC
ru led that the man had to pay over
$140,000 (this has recently been
reduced to $124,000) for lost wages
to be divided among every black
pervm that applied and was re-
jected in the year 1988-1989.
If there was anybody that I
can say was not prejudiced (at
least ineconomics), it wasthisman.
He contributed to this commu-
nity, he was putting back in what
he took out. The number of staff
that he was maintaining was low
t that time There was no position
avai lable. When the case was taken
to the EEOC, Mr Webell offered
to give the woman a position and
pay her back salary. That was a
fairand spenfie remedy foraques-
See Tokenism page 5
p
It
s this

man s
Tnn-
pwtu.n" as
) To-
pro-

'per the
Malcolm
Ion he re
s tnck of
k cabinet
token
Ite House
mencans
progress
is being
personal
nt) was
?ns have
If an only
heM of a
?present.
black
verment
ion pro-
kn of our
Letters Continued
fended. In this case I clearly felt
that I was not the only one who
would be offended. Two hun-
dred and twenty sewn Ameri-
can lives were lost, and that is
tragic, but an attempt to dehu
manize the lives lost by Iraq,
which is being placed at 100,000
now, is no less tragic, and one
has to call into question the val
uesot su h a viewpoint
Mr. Becker's criticisms di-
rected at the world of art need no
rebuttal on mj part I leave it to
the students here to see through
his rhetoric
Glenn Thompson
(unior
EnglishPhilosophy
Gamma Sigma
expresses thanks
to contributors
To The Editor
From March 5 to pril 5,
c lamma Sigma Sigma sponsored
a ioin drive for the Dream f ac
lory an organization which pro-
ides terminally ill children with
last wishes (tor an average cost
of about $2500) In order to reach
this goal, we asked fraternities
sororities and residence halls to
compete with each other to see
who uld raise the most m ne
As of now we have r lised
$690. We hope more donations
will be made so we can sponsor
a dream. Gamma Sig wants to
express a sincere thanks to all the
people that participated. Your
support has not t; ne unnoticed
All the organizations that
helped out made a great effort.
However, we would like to give
a special thanks to the organiza-
tions that led their divisions. Pi
Kappa Phi led the fraternity di-
vision, and the sorority division
was won by Delta Sigma Theta.
larvis won the residence hall di-
isionbv a landslide. Thank you
tor all your help. It makes us feel
good to know that so manv East
C arolina students care.
It would be really nice if
we could make a dream come
true tor a child. 1 also want to
give a special thanks to all the
sistei s ind pledges who worked
so hard to make this a success,
thiscould not have worked with-
out you. Look for the second
Annual Gamma Sigma Sigma
Coin Drive next spring.
Natalie Rocke
Sophomore
( immunity Health
Senior upset by
ECU'S lack of
challenge
To rhe Editor
The most recent dilemma
in the business world, Ameri-
can education, has not taught
� iple how to think, onlv how
to take orders. Funny. I didn't
realize this w.is a problem.
The majority of the profes-
sors I nave encountered feel the
quantity oi work tar outweighs
the importance oi quality. Not
to mention the ever present com-
ment, "I think this would be
muchbetterif (fill in the blank
with how the professor would
do it.) This is not learning. This
is not thinking. This is pushing
people through the system.
Who is to blame? Is it the
students (who don't give a
damn), or the professors (know-
ingly raping the profession for
monetary gains, and noteducat-
ing the students?)
It I were truly an intelli-
gent person, I would have real-
ized many years ago a large per-
centage of students don't care,
(which discourages professors),
and that a large percentage of
professors don't cwv, (making
student feel like an education is
pointless).
I would have understood
education is trapped in a vicious,
perpetuating circle with no so-
lution in sight.
1 could have gone to class,
done exactly what the professor
asked and graduated earlv,
(probably with honors). I could
have saved thousands of dollars
and a portion of my sanity. After
graduation 1 could have gone to
a sch(xl which pndes itself in
the education it provides (in-
stead of priding itself with the
possibility oi a winning football
season).
1 realized this too late
People are right when thev sav
"If you can't make it at ECU, you
can't make it anywhere ' But
remember this: if vou can't get
an education at ECU, should you
really be in schixil?
1 have, luckily, met and
studied under some brilliant
people here. It is those few I
thank, for I would not realize
how worthless my degree isoth-
erwise.
They are the professors
who have challenged me, taught
me how to think, and inspired
me to further my education
(whether they realize it or not).
There are many of them. Listen
to your friends when they say.
Take Dr. (X). You will LEARN
so much
In the great words of Wil-
liam Blake, 'Any man of me-
chanical talents may, from the
writings of Paracelus or pro-
duce 10,000 volumes of equal
value. But when he has done
this, let him not say that he
knows better than his master,
for he only holds a candle in
sunshine
I don't feel like I amgradu-
ating from college. I feel like I
am graduating from high school.
Robin M. Andrews
Senior
Anthropology
Media chairman
clarifies intent
of Sanford letter
To The Editor:
Tim Payne mistakenly in-
terpreted Greg Harmon's letter
in March 28 edition ot The East
Carolinian to mean that Sen.
Terry Sanford wasn't entitled to
his own views and that Flarmon
was attacking Sanford for not
backing the president.
Harmon attacked Sanford for
HIS VOTE on the use of force and
for whatever caused him to take
such a stand.
Sure, Sanford is entitled to his
own views, but being a senator
makes him accountable to the
people for the vote he casts.
Mr. Payne's suggestion that
we bought the U.S. vote with prom-
ises of foreign aid is ridiculous.
Saudi Arabia and Kuwait certainly
needed no prodding. Each country
voted for what would be in its best
interest.
The world remembered
Neville Chamberlain's mistake
with Hitler.
Saddam would not be al-
lowed to keep Kuwait and use its
resources to finance further aggres-
sion.
Payne's most humorous
charge was that "Republicans go
looking for a winnable war" when
things aren't going so well at home.
If the president really wanted
to keep our minds off of the domes-
tic situation, he would have gone
after Saddam Hussein, prolonging
the war.
Mr. Payne attacked Bush for
not doing this. The same people
who would let Saddam have Ku-
wait would now have us interfere
with the internal affairs of another
country.
Such action would reduce
worldwide respect for America to
the level of the Carter years.
Jonathan Vernesoni
Media Chairman
ECU College Republicans
Tokenism
Continued from page 4
tionable incident of discrimina-
tion. However, the EEOC did not
accept. They made him a token
example of what they should be
doing to the major corporations in
America that represent the previ-
ously discussed corporate struc-
ture, which is prejudiced.
Now, Mr. Webell faces bank-
ruptcy. In the words of a Hispanic
social worker in that community,
the result would be to put 26 mi-
norities on the unemployment
roles. We must ask is it worm it for
8.2 blacks. These type of actions
hurt the black and white commu-
nities and hampers their progress.
On the other hand, a recent
federal court ruling is using quo-
tas in a massive way against black
people. They have ruled that a
major university in the South,
which happens to be predomi-
nantly black, must integrate. The
ruling ordered them to be 50 per-
cent white by the end of 1991 and
to increase this number to 60 per-
cent by 1992.
One has to wonder if the
court is sending a message to the
nation which is representative of
the power structure's attitude on
black development and progress.
This is wrong because blacks have
bent their backs long enough, and
it's time we straighten them.
1 pray that our leaders have
the strength of God to resist this.
These schools should close before
they submit to this treachery.
We can't afford to give up
what little power we have. We
won't give up any of our power
unless the whites give up a lot of
theirs!
I I r�-P�T��
SOVtRTISED ITEM POLICY-Each of these advertised items s required to be read'ly available for sale m each Kroger
Store except as specifically noted in -his ad If we do run out of an advertised item we will otter vou your choice of
.omparabie item, when available reflecting the same savings O' a raincheck which will entitle vou to purchase the
advertised item at the advertised pnc� within 30 days Only one vendor coupon will be accepted per rtem
r-t-t-f- l t t t I t t
� vRIGHT 1991 THE KROGER CO ITEMS AND PRICES GOOD SUNDA i APRIL 14 THROUGH SATUR
DAY. APRIL 20, 1991, IN GREENVILLE A'E RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES NONE SOLD TO
DEALERS
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
756-2011
Lunch onlv
Small Shrimp
Platter
onlv
$2.99
Sun Fri
Beverage not included
Expires: 4-25-91
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
756-2011 i
Buy one
Regular Shrimp
Platter at $6.50
Get the 2nd I
Regular Shrimp I
Plauer FREE I
Good anytime, B
Beverage not included
VWixfrik
O'Rockefeller's
presents
DOLLAR NITE
EVERY TOURS.
that's rieht
Everything is a DOLLAR
1.00 Pitchers
1.00 Hi balls
1.00 Domestic Beer
1.00 Kamikaze
and many more!
BallPark 1 $1 79
Meat Franks n& X
CRISP
Granny Smith CQC
Apples b Vw
NEAT SQUEEZE
Crest 9 W
Toothpastefceo, w
300 SHEETS PER ROLL 1 PLY -
Charmin 4rhQQ
Bath Tissue Pkg� VV
ECONOMY MINI
STORAGE
USE YOUR
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
SHARE WITH A ROOMMATE
SPECIAL RATES MAY 1 - AUG 31
300 FARMER ST
GREENVILLE
757-0373





$
utfje iEaet (Carolinian
Ap
April 18, 1991
LLroO
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES
Term papers, dissertations, letters,
resumes, manuscripts, projects. Fast
turn around. Call Joan 756-9235.
TYPING SERVICE Just in time for
those ve.ir end papers. You write it
and I'lltypeit. Call 7524289and ask
tor Rhonda.
TYPING SERVICE: Term Papers,
Reports, Resumes, Letters, Theses,
Typed on PC l-aser printer Fast
turnaround Call 756-1783
GILBERTS MUSIC open for busi-
ness. ECU students, show us vour 11)
card and we will give you a 2CWS
discount on all parts, strings and in-
struments. Located at 2711 F 10th
Street,by the Villa Roma. Phone 757-
2667.Hrs9-8Mon FrLlO-oSaLckwed
Sun. 1 do instrument repairs. Jim and
bhe Gilbert
FOR SALE
FENDER GUITAR AMP Deluxe85
758-0464.
FOR SALE 1985 Honda CRX. Good
condition, only 50 000 miles asking
$3 600. Call 7580246, leave message
SUPER SINGLE WATERBED: Ex
cellent condition, new waveless
mattress and heater Bookcase
headboard and 4 sets of drawers be-
low. Extra's included MUSTSELLJ
757-1001 after 7 p.m.
FURNITURE FOR SALE: Good
condition Beigeanich,kn-eseat,chair
and kitchen table. $250. Call 830-
1765, Mon-Fn.
FOR RENT
DOUBLEWIDE TRAILER on pri-
vate lot for rent in area. Call 49-9355
after 530 p.m.
AVAILABLE; Apartment to sublet
fotsummer. Threebedroom,Wilson
cftt Mocks to campus, phone
-r?R1' Ask for Jim.
APARTMENT TO SUBLEASE for
summer. Two bedroom, one bath,
fully furnished S295month plus
utilities Call evenings, 752-5320.
ROOMS FOR RENT: Three rooms
available for summer, 4 rooms open
for next school year. Rent plus utili-
ties. Great location, house behind
Belk Dorm. College Hill. Call 757-
3027.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed at
least both summer sessions. $157.50
month plus 1 2 utilities, 2 bedroom,
1 bath, no pets. Call 355-1644.
ROOMS FOR RENT. First summer
session only, kitchen, AC, close to
campus and Overton's. $13730
month plus utilities. Call Rusrv. 830-
6659.
FURNISHED ROOM tosubleasefor
summer in beautiful home located
close to campus. Ideal for dorm
residents who can't take summer
schcx)l with no AC. Call home 758-
7993
� lieauuluj Place lo Ljve
� AU Ne �
� -nd RtiJv 1 v Kcni �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
IZW I ! Si rtci
�Located Vear ECU
�Neat Majoi Shopping Cenier?
�Across l-rom Hifchwav 1'ilrol Slaticn
.itmod Offer S30O a munOi
tJooua J T or Tomfny Wiilumt
756 7815 or 830-1937
Office opaa Apt 8. 12 5 30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS'
l�aw u�i ucl �'� ���l'�i MaM Mpmnrrmrvi
- m t- � ' � me iff ind �����' �uftn dry
en rm T Ccwpwa �� MIM 120 unotth
amamiama MOM ' HOMI KfclVTAftJ l�p��
�t . -&t.t Vfwmti ami rrmfvue ��;�� j Ajyura
-iidcni cu Hn.u uie Eiwniry Cab
CMttd J - r Fommy Wtliiam
r� 7HI5
FOR RENT
ROOMMATES WANTED to share
three bedroom apartment at Planta-
tion for summer and or fall. Access
to weight room, tanning beds, pool
and sauna. 514900month plus
utilities. Call NOW! AskforCateor
Knsten. 355-9502.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Two
hedrwm, 1 12 bath, condo. Coble
and water included, pxl, washer
dryer facilities. S315.00month. As-
sume lease, option to renew at end of
August. Call 830-3680.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Available second week in May, for
both sessions, to share 14 rent and
1 futilities. Twobedroom,spacious,
fully furnished apartment close to
campus! Call 758-9380.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Respon-
sible male student to share two bed-
room, 1 12 bath, fully furnished,
need only to bring bed room furniture.
One mile from campus, 5175month
plus 1 2 utilities, 830-0388.
SUB LEASE EFFICIENCY: Ringgokl
I ov ers. Option to take over lease in
fall. 5260month plus deposit
Available May 1. Phone 758-1815.
Ireal location.
ROOMMATE: WANTED Looking
tor female to share 2 bedroom, 1 bath
apartment, Mav-August. SI70
month plus 12 utilities. 931-9629.
HELP WANTED
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at home. Call for
information 504-r41 -8003 Ext. 5920.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT fisheries. Farn S000
month Free transportation' Room
andfkwrd' Over8,000openings. No
experience necessary Male or Fe-
male. For 68-page employment
manual, send $8.95 toM& 1. Research,
Box 84008, Seattle, WA 98124 - Satis-
faction (.uaranried.
EXCELLENT PART-TIME SALES
POSITION in JuniorsMissy
sportswear and accessories. Flexible
hours around summer school
schedule. Good working conditions
dothing discounts. Apply Brady's,
The Plaza, Mon-Wed, M p.m.
SUMMER INTERNSHIP: Find out
what IBM, Xerox and Fortune 500
companies like about our summer
program. If saving over SXX), in-
valuable career experience, building
your resume, and college credit ap-
peal to vou, call for an interview to-
day (919) 249-2213.
HELRJW ANTED
WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR
THE SUMMER- Going to stay in
Greenville, going to SummerSchool?
Brady's currently has sales positions
available in Juniors and Mcns that
will run through the summer and
into the fall. Fill your free time with
a part-time position with Brody'sand
Brody'sforMen. Apply Brody's,The
Plaza, Monday through Wednesday,
1 to 4 p.m.
MAKESS00-$1500WEEKLYstuffing
envelopes at home! Start now�rush
S.A.S.E. plus SI .00 to Flome Em-
ployers, Inc. 1120 Plain 8B, Las
Cruces,NM 88001.
SUMMER JOBS AT NAGS HEAD,
NC: Would you like to make at least
51,000 Ma week? Would you like to
work on the beach? Are you willing
to train? If you are a motivated en-
thusiastic individual, call 305-296-
4841 collect, for an interview in you
local area.
A NATIONAL CORPORATION
has position open for manager trainee.
Need decisive and competitive indi-
vidual seeking career in financial in-
dustry College preferred. We offer
competitive salaries and a full benefit
package. Send resume to: P.O Box
3802, Wilson, NC 27895.
HELP WANTED: To work week-
ends at surrounding festivals, musi-
cal events, etc. for setting up retail
booths. Must have drivers license
and car if company van is not avail-
able. Good pav Easily done as sec-
ond job Call 757-1007. AskforDenise
SUMMER BLUES, NOTHING TO
IX)? Come and join the winning
team of the Credit Bureau of
Greenville. Weare looking fro sharp,
aggressive people with gcxxj com-
munication skills. We will train! If
interested contact Mvrna Bunns at
757-2133. PT 20-30 hrs per week
including 8a m12 p.m. Sat.
HELP WANTED: Part-time help for
sales and stock. Heavy lifting re-
quired. Apply at The Youth Shop in
Arlington Village.
DESIRE A RESPONSIBLE INDI-
VIDUAL to sit with small children
during the summer. All day, two
davseach week. Call 756-0417before
9:00 p.m.
SMITHFIELD'S CHICKEN N'
BAR-BE-QUE Now accepting ap-
plications for our Greenville store.
We offer, gcxxi wages, benefits, ad-
vancement opportunities, flexible
hours. Apply in person at our
Greenville location, 2-4 p.m. (daily).
HELP WANTED
OVERSEAS SUMMER JOB
CATALOG: A very popular catalog
for universitycollege students to
work in EUROPE and other
WORLDWIDE locations. Many sat-
isfied customers. Send $25.00 (check
or money order) to: C. L. Chumrley,
3549 Lincoln Street, Gary, Indiana
4408.
HELP WANTED: Students who are
going to resorts, beaches, etc, for
summer Make own hours, easily
can be done as second job. Good
monev if willing to deal with people.
Call Bill at 752-6953 or go to BLT's.
PERSONALS
HEADING FOR EUROPE THIS
SUMMER? let there anytime with
AIRHrrCH 8 for SI60 from the East
Coast! (Reported in NY Times &
Lefs Go!) AIRHITCH � 212-864-
2000.
DO YOU HAVE DIFFICULTY re-
lating to people that don't under-
stand you? Do you feel guilt and
isolation associated with feelings of
homosexuality? We understand and
are currently meeting on campus to
discuss these issues. Call 757-6661.
FRISBEE APPRECIATION DAY:
Apnl 20th at the bottom of College
Hill. Action starts�2:00 p.m. Helios
and Irares hosting Ultimate games.
Anyone welcome Come to play or
toss with friends.
BE BAREFOOT AND TIE-DYED at
the Craftsmen Fast Booth Barefoot
on the Mall. $2.00 for any item he-
dyed, look for handmade items as
well. Don't get "tied" up anywhere
else.
AEA'S. Fridaymoming was too much
and you all were also. Lefs do it
again sometime. Thanks again.
PIKES.
DAVID GASKINS, JENNIFER
PERSONALS
CHAPMAN and the rest of the I R. S.
Crew: You people ware underpaid,
overworked, and do one hell of a job
Thanks for another great year. The
Brothers of Sigma Nu.
FIKA: Formal has finally rolled
around. Get that tux and a lot of
bucks because the PIKES are VA
Beach bound. FULL THROTTLE.
WE HOPE TO SEE EVERYONE at
Barefoot on the Mall today Don't
forget to eat lots of hot dogs'
TO ALL FRATERNITIES AND
SORORITIES. We hope everyone
had a great Greek Week! The AZA's.
PIKA'S: The champagne breakfast
was awesome. We love you guys.
Love, the AZA's.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new
Pi Delta officers: President-Meg
Lewis; Vice-PTesident-Trao Bums;
Secretary-Nicki Pratt; Treasurer-
Cathy Maas; PI edge Educators-Tracy
Scott and Nikki Samuel; Social�Jen-
nifer Thompson; Publicity -lean
Caraway; Fund raisersShannon
Burks and Amy Humphries;
Intramurals-SusanFalk.Sergeant-at-
Arms-Ginny Sanborn; Historian-
lean Caraway; Altruism-Lisa Fox;
Scholarship�Celeste Resh; Member -
at-Large�Jill Zang. We know you
will do a terrific job! Love, the sisters
of Pi Delta.
ALL GREEKS: Theta Chi is hosting
an ALL GREEK 4 on 4 volleyball
tournament, Saturdav, April 27th.
ALL FRATERNITIES and SORORI-
TIES are invited to participate. The
registration fee is $20.00 per team or
$30.00 for two teams. Reserve a spot
on vour teams soon. For more info,
call'758-6969, ask for Tony Walz or
Buddy Sargent.
KAREN ISHIE Tomorrows the big
day! Get psyched for the hunt. Alpha
love and panda hugs. YBS.
PERSONALS
GREEK COUNCIL Thanks for i
great Greek Week! Love, the sister
and pledges of Delta Zeta
ADP'S AND FORMAL DATES Gej
ready Don't be late' We'll star ,r
Greenville with Cream of Soul, thw
off to Busch Gardens we will go
Saturdav night�all dressed up an��
fit to kill. Have a blast�WE KNOW'
WE WILL!
DELTA CHI You guys were awe-
someteammatesdunngCreek Week
Who knew the toilet raft woul I wjrj
therace?' Love,thesistersand pledges
of ZTA.
CONGRATULATIONS to thi 191
92 AAIT officers' President�Angela
Sutton; Vice-President - Kim
Cummings; Recording Secretary�
Rachel Brown; Correspond:rg becj
retary�Caroline Doby; Rush Chaur
man -Bo McEonald; Membership
Education Vice-President�Ash at
White; Junior Executive�Crysta.
Cross; Senior Executive�Tarr.rry
Kivela; House Manager�Debbie
Garner; Inrramurals�Came Cook;
Social Chairman�jcana Shallaoss;
Standards- -Sarah Fallon; Par.heiierv.qr
Delegate�Ellen Smith; ?har�
thropy Kelly Hawthorne. �
DELTA ZETA PLEDGES: Keep jfi
the good work We love you' Tn�f
sisters.
ZETA TAU ALPHA SORORITtr
supports Panhellenic Fall Rush Go
Greek
DELTA CHI: Congratulations off"
your colonization! Love, ZTA Sisters
and Pledges.
8X PLEDGES: Hope you ail are
enjciyingthishecticweek. ROLLCHI
ADVERTISE vourclassifiedsin THE
EAST CAROLINIAN.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
If you're
Pregnant
and need help making choices
�Free, confidential professional
pregnancy counseling
�Financial assistance
�Help select adoptive family
1-800-632-1400
yv The Children's Home Society
vHV of North Carolina
A United Way Agency
WANDS WORTH
COMMONS
GREENVILLE'S NEWEST NAME
IN Mil II FAMILY HOUSING
I xi client kc�tOf! qp Arlington Boulevard
Choice units available Otic and two
bedrooms, tacta efficrnt (.imcl. range,
refrigerator, washer dryvr.�� Kups Brick
II "minic lion, quiet with extra insulation
l-KIl: BASIC CAliLh I"V
GrJQS
The Restllv l)n�p
758-4711
COLLEGE STUDENTS - TEACHERS- ADULTS AGE 19 and up
LINE UP SUMMER WORK now!
WHEN: Early MayJune to Late WHAT: Field scounts to
AugustEarly Sept.
WHERE. Eastern NC Cos.
Lenior, Craven, Pitt, Jones,
Onslow, Greene
PAY: Min5.50hour plus
Mileage expenses
SEN� UESUMES TO: MCSI - PO Box 179
Grifton, NC 28530
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY COLLECTS
CALL FOR ENTRIES
The Gray Art Gallery is seeking mu-
seum quality a rt works for a summer
exhibition highlighting the collec-
tions of East Carolina University
faculty, staff and students. Works to
be considered for the show will be
juried at the Gray Art Gallery on
May 9 and 10,1991, from 10:00 a.m.
to 4:00 p m A maximum of two
works per person will be accepted.
The exhibition will be limited to the
first 60 works accepted. The Gray
Art Gallery will provide insurance
for all works on display during the
exhibit. Lenders will be responsible
for picking up their work when the
exhibit closes on August 12, 1991.
For more information on East
Carolina University Collects, con-
tact Charles Lovell at 757-6336.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
MOTORPHYSICAL FITNESS
COMPETENCY TEST
A passing score cm this test is re-
quired of all students prior todeclar-
ing physical education as a major.

monitor crops. We train.
QUALIF: Conscientious,
Good physical shape. Have
Own Vehicle, Reliable
Students must maintain an average
T-score of 45 on the six-item test
battery and have a t-score of 45 on
theaerdbicsrun. ��Any student with
a medical condition that would
contraindicate prtidpaaon in the
testing should contact Mike
McCa mmon or Dr. Gay Israel at 757-
4688. To be exempted from any
portion of the test you must have a
physician's excuse A detailed sum-
mary of the test components is avail-
able in the Human Performance
Laboratory (Room 371, Sports
Medidne Bldg.). You physicians
excuse must specifically state from
which items you are exempt
INTERNATIONAL DPflflR
International Students Association
presents its annual dinner with
from over 10 different countries
live performances on stage at
MerxientaU'smulbpurposercomon
Saturday, April 27,1991 town &30j
1O00 pjn. General admission is $8
and $6 for students. Tickets are OUT
sale now at Mendenhall Student
Center. Don't miss this chance to
sample international cultures!
EAST
April 18, 1991
)
Cheating p
ir
C
t
d
c
h
r
F
c
c
J
1
1
I
By JIM ROGERS
Staff writer
"Hey, you cre in my bioloev
class
"Really?"
'Yeah. 1 remember because e
cheated off of the same person "
This conversation between two
ECU students was overheard by
another ECU student on campus as
the students walked to class.
Change magazine, a
publication focussed on topics
dealing with higher education, says
today's college students are cheating
more than ever before.
"Students seem to put their
work I off until the last minute and
then opt for the easy way out ECU
graduate student Cliff Morgan said.
Morgan j
� while grading
graduate 3
department la
Dr. Gaj
department said
plagiarism several
career at ECl
amazement
copy mai
for rev .
"Stud
WUentz
we profe
world
The SGA D
lists cheating
"academic inf j
others listed
falsification and atj
Cheating I
any assistan I
resulung in tl I
Vietnam veter
commencemen
By WENDY Q-NEIL
Staff writer
In 1969, man walked on the
moon. In 1980, a movie star was
elected president, and in May of
1991, 1,715 students will graduate
from East Carolina University.
There will be two
commencement ceremonies, one at
10 a.m. and another at 2 p.m. at
Ficklcn Stadium. Each ceremony
will be preceded by a band concert
by the ECU Marching Band
Max Cleland, a decorated
thfl government during the Carter
administration. He currently works
fo� the Program Corporation of
America in �
The dcadhn
receiving guest
Students receiving
have up to si
Students with
may request ad
at the Organiatj
MendenhaJl Student
General parki
and guests will be
Minges Coliseum
Field. Off campus
available a!
Fickkn Drive and ll
A free shuttle!
provided by the uni
Allied Health
Harrington Field.
Handicapped
Bubble sheets swam
By BLAIR SKINNER
Sthff writer
For years, students have been
required to use a computer form � a
"bubble sheet" � for multiple-
choice exams in many classes.
Computer forms are used
because they save time for
professors who have many exams
lo grade in a little time.
I At ECU, bubble sheets are
graded at the Computer Information
Service office on the first floor of
Austin Building.
Barbara Briggs, a computer
operator at CIS, has graded bubble
sheet exam forms since 1982. She
says her job is not hectic during
most of the semester.
However, for the last two weeks
of each semester, the pace changes.
"Exam time is crazy Briggs
said. "During exams, every two
hours, like at 10:15, vou can look
out and we have
coming to the windc
Professors or
drop off compiei
reception window
entrance of Aui
Professors then fi
requesting how the
results printed as
information that c
from the lest results
Briggs said
process around 4r
during most of the
By contra-
operators at CIS pro
during exams last D
"The final gradij
when it increases tre
said. "About half
week. You can
sometimes in just a
Briggs said the
it takes to grade
depends on the size
A
I !
Lacrosse Pirates practice hai
Trie Pirate Lacrosse club finishes me '90'91 season
At 19-21. ECU is the only North Carolina ctub partial





April 18, 1991
PERSONAl S
(,RHK COl'NUL I hanks
eekWeck! I ove, the aatj)
- : I X-lta eta
WPIORMALDATES:
late! We'll start iT
rtth ream of Soul, then
m h I .miens we will
�II dressed upi
i bl.ist VVEKNOV
i
HI oii ci'vs were awe-
�'��vdunnpC.reekWeek.
ilet raft would wiff
he �.Itvrsand piedgQ
'Hit
��U I ATIONS to the 1991?
r-vsulent�Angela
� resident�Kia�,
- rding Sxretarv-�
v- rvponding Safi
Doby; RushChairf'
- M Donald; Membership1
. a- President�Ashlyn
� Executive�Crysti,
.s Senior Executive�Tammjti
is� Manager�Debbial
irals Carrie Cook; "
leans ShallcToss;
I i Ion Panhellenii I
Smith; PhilanJ
� - -tic.
' PLEDGES: Keepuf
We love you! Thar
M PHA SORORiTll
. lenic Kail Rush. Go
�Offll
HI Congratulation cjjj
- Ive.ZT A Sisters !
noa
ES Hope vou all an&y
.MvkROLLC�f
iiw I
RTISI � � irvIavsinedsinTHtd '
AN!
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
FREE fc
PRKGNANCY
TESTING
v I ontldential
v Counseling
if
I
ofina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
3rd Street
I ec Building
(ireenville, NC
do
Hima
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Collegian
EAST CAROLINA UNIVE RSITY
-t
Arjril 18, 1991
A Journalism 3200 Publication Project
Four Pages
Cheating policy ignored by faculty, students
By JIM ROGERS
Staff writer
"Hey, you were in my biology
class
"Really?"
"Yeah. I remember because we
cheated off of the same person
This conversation between two
ECU students was overheard by
another ECU student on campus as
the students walked to class.
Change magazine, a
publication focussed on topics
dealing with higher education, says
today's college students arc cheating
more than ever before.
"Students seem to put their
work off until the last minute and
then opt for the easy way out ECU
graduate student Cliff Morgan said.
Morgan encountered cheating
while grading term papers as a
graduate assistant in the philosophy
department last year.
Dr. Gay Wilentz of ihc English
department said she has encountered
plagiarism several limes during her
career at ECU. She expressed
amazement towards students who
copy material straight out of a book
for research papers.
"Students do not think
Wilcntz said. "They must think that
we professors live in a different
world
The SGA Documents Handbook
lists cheating as one of four
"academic integrity violations The
others listed are plagiarism,
falsification and attempts.
Cheating is giving or receiving
any assistance on an assignment
resulting in the student gaining an
unfair advantage.
Plagiarism is copying any form
of written work and claiming it as
your own thought or idea
Falsification is any lie, spoken
or written, pertaining to any form of
academic work.
The handbook defines
"attempts" as any attempt of
cheating, plagiarism or falsification;
successful or not.
Any academic integrity
violation constitutes a university
honor code violation and is grounds
for punishment
According to the handbook,
possible punishments arc fines,
written reprimands, community
service, academic probation and
expulsion from the university.
The procedure a professor must
follow to punish a student for
cheating is defined in the handbook.
It calls a "primary interview"
between the professor and the
student within three class days of the
alleged violation.
This initial interview must be
observed by a non-participating
faculty member, usually the
chairperson of the department, and
any faculty or student representative
the accused student desires.
At this meeting both sides
present evidence toward their case
and if the matter is still unresolved,
the charge is referred to the
Academic Integrity Board.
The Academic Integrity Board is
composed of four faculty members
elected by the Faculty Senate, three
students nominated by the SGA
Executive Council. The Dean of
Students serves as administrative
officer of the board.
The professor and the student
present their cases to the board, and
the board makes a verdict.
The student has a right 10
appeal any decision made by the
Academic Integrity Board.
According to the handbook, the
student is always innocent until
proven guilty by the board.
Most prolcssors find the
procedure defined in the handbook
inconvenient to pursue, especially in
plagiarism cases when evidence
against the student may be vague.
Maria Denoia. SGA attorney
general, said the Academic Integrity,
Board has only met twice this year.
Both cases involved plagiarism and
both cases were unanimous
decisions against die student.
According to Denoia. the case
usually will not reach the board
unless the student believes the
professor was "out of line
Most faculty members contacted
said they usually deal with any
cheating violations one on one with
the student rather than follow the
procedure according to the handbook
Dean of Students Ron Speier
recognized the fact that some faculty
members do not report instances of
cheating to his office.
He said a faculty member who
fails to report cheating is violating
the academic integrity policy.
Speier said the policy is just as
much a faculty policy as it is a
student policy.
When a teacher docs not report
instances of cheating, it makes it
difficult for repeal offenders to be
punished because the first offense is
not annotated in the students records,
according to Speier.
Vietnam veteran to speak at
commencement ceremony
4�
WENDY O'NEIL
&T writer
In 1969, man walked on the
moon. In 1980, a movie star was
elected president, and in May of
1991, 1,715 students will graduate
from East Carolina University.
There will be two
commencement ceremonies, one at
10 a.m. and another at 2 p.m. at
Ficklen Stadium. Each ceremony
will be preceded by a band concert
by the ECU Marching Band
Max Cleland, a decorated
VnamvelcjaDi the scheduled
ciPtS�ker!Wfand worked for
ih government during the Carter
administration. He currenUy works
for. the Program Corporation of
America in White Plains, N.Y.
The deadline for requesting or
receiving guest tickets is Friday.
Students receiving a degree may
have up to six guest tickets.
Students with large families
may request additional tickets
at the Organizational Booth in
Mendenhall Student Center
General parking for graduates
and guests will be available next lo
Mingcs Coliseum and Harrington
Field. Off campus parking will be
available along Bcrkcly Road,
Ficklcn Drive and 14th Street.
A free shuttle service will be�
provided by the university from the
Allied Health Building and
Harrington Field.
Handicapped parking will be
available in the north parking lot
adjacent to Mingcs Coliseum and on
the the south stands of the stadium.
Caps and gowns should be
picked up from the Student Store
anytime before graduation. The
Student Store is located on central
campus, for those graduating seniors
who have never been on campus.
In the event of a monsoon,
tornado, lidal wave or any other
unfavorable weather, graduation will
be moved to Mingcs Coliseum.
Alcoholic beverages and fire-
works arc prohibited under North
Carolina law. Any violation of if :se
rules will result in your removal
from the commencement, a per-
manent mark on your record and
possibly the electric chair.
Bubble sheets swamp CIS during exams
3
StB
BLAIR SKINNER
ff writer
' For years, students have been
required to use a computer form � a
"bubble sheet" � for multiple-
choice exams in many classes.
S Computer forms are used
because they save time for
professors who have many exams
to-grade in a little time.
I At ECU, bubble sheets are
graded at the Computer Information
Service office on the first floor of
Aastin Building.
Barbara Briggs, a computer
operator at CIS, has graded bubble
shfeet exam forms since 1982. She
says her job is not hectic during
most of ihc semester.
However, for the last two weeks
of each semester, the pace changes.
"Exam time is crazy Briggs
said. "During exams, every two
hours, like at 10:15. you can look
out and we have 10 to 20 people
coming lo ihc window
Professors or their assistants
drop off completed tests at a
reception window at the front
entrance of Austin, she said.
Professors then fill out a form
requesting how they would like ihc
results printed as well as other
information that can be gathered
from the lest results.
Briggs said the operators
process around 460 tests a month
during most of the semester.
By contrast, Briggs said
operators at CIS processed 570 tests
during exams last December.
"The final grading period, that's
when it increases tremendously she
said. "About half come on exam
week. You can get a hundred
sometimes in just a couple of days.
Briggs said the amount of time
it takes to grade an entire test
depends on the size of the class, the
length of the test and instructor's
special requests about the data.
"Our turn-around time is two
hours, but we can get them out in
about 15 minutes if we have to
Briggs said.
After they arc received by the
operators at CIS, the forms arc fed
into a machine that reads the
blacked-in bubbles and marks which
answers are incorrecL
Briggs emphasized the
importance of nearness when filling
out a bubble sheet during a test. "If
there's smudge marks on it, the
machine will kick it out she sa�
The information gathered from
the bubble sheets is then transferred
to the University's Mainframe
computer, which grades each test
An accuracy program is run
after the tests are graded to ensure
the validity of the results.
Th� CdtogmnJHL DOCZ!
Lacrosse Pirates practice hard for NCLL playoffs
Tilt Write Lacrosaa club fWahw the K91 season witWheir best �!?'�.
Apr! 19-21. ECU U the onty North Carolina ctub participating from the Southern Division of the NCLL
The N.C. Highway Patrol uses
new device to increase arrests
By SHANNAN COPELAND
Staff writer
Arrests for driving while im-
paired are increasing, partly be-
cause of bcucr ways of detecting,
according to the North Carolina
Highway Patrol.
Sgt. Dennis Campbell, who is a
trooper in Pill County, said every
trooper is now carrying a device
called an alco-sensor.
An alco-sensor is a portable
brcalhalizcr that gives a very accu-
rate reading. It is about as accurate
as ihc breathalizcr, Campbell said.
Campbell said there were more
than 60,000 DWI arrests in North
Carolina in 1990. In Pitt and Martin
counties combined, there were
about 1,300.
"This year, we're running a
little behind Campbell said.
"We're running about 12 percent
under
Campbell said these figures arc
comparable to national statistics.
Everyone's figures run about the
same, he said.
The fine for a DWI is $500 or
six months in jail, or both. For re-
peal offenders, it can be more.
There is a stale felony DWI law
for anyone who has more than three
DWI convictions in a seven-year
period. This carries a mandatory
one-year sentence, he said.
With ECU situated in Pitt
County, one may wonder if it is the
college students affecting the num-
ber of DWI arrests.
Campbell said probably not
Drunk drivers come from all walks
The CollegianJILL 0OCZ1
A Greenville police officer makes a routine traffic check.
of life, he said.
However, according to a recent
study by ihc National Clearing-
house for Alcohol and Drug Infor-
mation, the typical college student
spends more money on alcohol
than on book
The statistics said more than 40
million gallons of alcohol arc con-
sumed at colleges across the coun-
try: enough to fill an Olympic-sized
pool at every university in the
United States.
There are many alternatives to
driving drunk.
A taxi is a safer ride than a ride
with someone who has been drink-
ing. Also, the price of a cab is sig-
nificantly lower than the price of a
DWI conviction.
Program improves student-athletes' skills
ByCHAOGRIER
Staff writer
To support student-athletes in
their academic efforts, ECU has im-
plemented a program of student
development within the university's
ath letic department.
The student development pro-
gram monitors the academic
progress of ECU athletes and keeps
them on schedule to graduate. It also
arranges tutors for athletes who are
struggling, but want to do better.
The program also encourages
� athletes to participate in non-athletic
activities and community service.
Student Development Director
Pam Penland has two full-time as-
sistants and a small army of student-
helpers. She said that going to class
is essential to academic success.
"We monitor all of our athletes'
sjsjfjsjall progress through evalua-
tion forms used by the professors
Penland said. "This procedure gives
the instructors valuable input
into die development of
athletes as students
Any athlete who receives poor
evaluations or who has a low GPA
must attend a supervised study hall
Monday through Thursday nights.
Study hall provides athletes
with a quiet environment to study
and gives them the guidance of
knowledgeable proctors.
Lisa Edwards, academic coordi-
nator for athletes, said the goal of
the program is to help athletes help
themselves The ultimate objective
is for every athlete to graduate.
When an athlete is working hard
in class but still is struggling to
make good grades, the student
development program provides a
tutor. There are more than 60
tutors on staff who can assist
athletes hi subject matter as
diverse as biochemistry and
geology, Edwards said.
Tutors are trained and supervised
by Penland and Edwards. The tutors
are there to help the athletes leant,
but not to give answers. The tutors
attend study hall with their assigned
athletes to help them succeed.
Edwards oversees the tutorial
program, and only athletes who put
forth a sincere effort receive the
aid of tutors.
The student development pro-
gram promotes developing well-
rounded people. Penland sail
Some athletes, such as senior
football player R.L. Beemon (4.0
GPA), do not need external
academic motivation.
These athletes are encouraged
to participate in other services
provided and promoted by the
student development program.
Career planning workshops
offered by die program help prepare
upperclassmea for their life
Penland and her I
athletes to go into the
and work with children and the dis-
abled. Many athletes participate as
volunteers in events such as Special
Olympics and Senior Olympics.
speaking skills by talking with large
groups, such as the Boy Scouts and
church groups.
The office of student develop-
ment at ECU serves as a model to
universities across the





Features
The Collegian
April 18, 1991 Page2
Career service assists ECU graduates;
Bloxton House
counselors provide
future direction
By CELESTE HOFFMAN
Staff writer
"Is there life after college?" is
one question many seniors pondei as
their graduation date approaches. The
Career Planning and Placement
Service oi ECU is helping students
find the answers
Acting Director Jim
Westmoreland said its purpose is to
"assist students in the job search
process and lo encourage seniors and
(graduate) students to register in our
office Westmoreland said his office
helps students from writing their
resume, to the interviewing process,
to getting a job.
All registered students receive a
bulletin called "The Job Guide The
guide contains campus interview
dates and a list of the job openings
sent to the office from companies.
The service also offers resume
and interviewing workshops, career
counseling, information on
businesses, school systems and
governmental agencies, free
handouts on resume tips, magazines
and a college placement annual.
In the interviewing workshops
Westmoreland shows films about
what happens in most interviews, he
said.
"Wc show the kinds of things
they should be" doing posture, body
language and general conversaUonal
concerns Westmoreland said.
Students also watch a video ol a
mock interview between the student
and Westmorland.
"I try to coach and point out
things as wc go along he said.
Next, they go over the video
together to sec where his or her
laults might lie. "I usual!) doti'l
even have to say anything Ihc
spot their own problems right off
The office also help students
get their resumes together by .n ing
them handouts of sample resumes
and reviewing theirs.
"Wc try to help present the
information in the best possible waj
for that person Wcsunoreland said.
Westmoreland said students should
register with Career Planning and
Placement Service by Sept. 1 of the
year before they graduate. This
allows students time to register,
participate in the workshops and do
on campus interviews, which lake
place between (Xtohcr and April.
Students who are not graduating
for a while can also benefit from the
service, he said. Even though they
would not be registering, they can
still take advantage of the
workshops, counseling and a
computer program, SlCH which
stands lor System of Interactive
Guidance and Information.
Westmoreland said SIG1 helps
students identify what jobs may be
right for them. SIG1 starts by listing
different values to the student.
He said students pick which of
these values are his or hers. For
example. "I want to be my own
boss " The program then narrows
down a list of jobs that lit his or her
values.
Alter the siudeni uses the
program, "we can figure out things
we could be doing to get them
started toward their career and lo
make the necessary contacts
Westmoreland said. Faculty and
alumni also use the program to see
what other careers are available, he
said
For graduating students, a
registration packet is available at the
office. The folder contains reference
sheets and pamphlets explaining
what the center offers and
information cards that the office
keeps on file SO they know who is
interested in what field.
Alter registering, the office sets
up a credentials file on the student,
which contains a resume and
references. This file is sent lo
prospective employers upon request
The office sends each student's
first 10 copies out free, bul there is
a SI charge for each additional one
after that.
The ser ices offered by the office
are free lo students and alumni until
one year after graduation. After that,
there is a S7 fee.
The office is located in Bloxton
House between Mendenhall Student
Center and Green Residence Hall.
For more information about the
program, call 757-6050.
The Collegia JILL COC2
Acting Director Jim Westmoreland gives advice to Shannon Livingstone as part ot the program of the Career Planning Service.
Crisis Center celebrates 20th anniversary
By MIRIAM DRIQT
Staff writer
The Real Crisis Intervention
Center, located on 10th St is
celebrating its 20lh birthday.
Initially started by students
during the "60s and mid-70s, the
program was responding to a
nationwide awareness based on the
concept of "peers helping peers Ii
functioned with the help of
donations of various kinds. In 1974,
the center received its first funding
from United Way. Shortly after it
rcceiwd its first grant enabling the
hiring of its first director.
Since then, a few changes have
been made. From a universit)
organization, the center has evolved
into a community-wide center. The
arrival of the director provided a
more structured organization,
including formalized training,
program ccx)rdinators and volunteers.
The center is open 24 hours a
day, seven days a week and is here to
provide people with the counseling
of various matters.
Mary Smith, current
administrative director, said: "We
deal with issues as diverse as
roommate problems, relationships,
suicide, rape and eating disorders
The staff consists of three full-
time administrators, three resident
counselors and 28 volunteers who
usually work an average of three
hours per week.
"I have heard so
many different
things, from the
bizarre to the
9?
very scary,
Mary Smith, administrative
director, Real Crisis Center.
Foundation to lend us a room fal
our classes Smith said
'1 he center makes about 500
contacts per month, 15 tvrcent are
student calls. The most frequent
problems deal with drugs and
alcohol, rape and sexual assault.
"The increase in date rape has
been quite appalling lately, and it
really gets to me when I deal with
someone who is not even sure that
she was raped because she was on a
date Smith said. "A rape is a raV
The center, a ' non-profit
organization, offers training three
times a year (in the fall, the spring
and the summer). It usually starts a
few weeks after the school semester
starts to allow student volunteers to
organize their schedules.
The training is composed of
two phases: classroom training and
on-thc-job training.
"Wc used to have 10 to 15
people per session, but in the past
few months this number has
doubled, which has led the Wesley
us director in 1979. She mpar:s
working in a crisis center wtj
working in an emergent r. rn. The
only difference being that u �
not plugged into one area, you Beta
quite know what the next
going lo bring
Smith said she has hear! quite a
Lit of stories during the past
ears. "I have heard
different things Smith said �From
Ilk- bizarre to the very v. an
One particular episode she v
was a man playing Rusmj:i �
1 he center provides a rape on the phone with her.
counseling (.enter and public "This was the most stressfi
awareness program. April is call I had ever received Smith said
"Sexual Assault Awareness Month" "And it took us three hours tc
and June will be "Rape Pjeyention resolve the situation
Month A benefit concert will be Even whcn handling sucb
organized Tues April 2? at thAhJficW situations, the centers
Attic. It is sponsored by local policy is to avoid immediately
businesses, calling the police or an other
"What the center tries to rJo is emergency units, and by no mean
to help people clarifj their situation will it trace the calls received
and to provide them with informs- "Some centers do have no
lion on the different options the allowing them to trace their calls-
have Smith sai 1
Smith is onginalU from
Virginia and has a degree in
psychology.
manasemen
Smith said. "This is not the concept
we deal with here
She said the best part of this
A career in retail job is the feedback she cots irer
brought her to previous anonymous callers who.
Greenville. She started working with once their situations are settled.
the center IS years ago and became drop by to simply thank her
Heart lab tests for disease
By CHRISTY WILSON
Staff writer
The CdtegianJILL DOCZI
Andy Johns checks Marc Shinebarger's blood pressure at the Human Performance Lab.
Greenville residents can now
become aware of the possibilities of
cardiovascular disease and how they
can avoid this problem.
Through the Human
Performance Lab, located in the
Sports Medicine building, residents
and students can enroll in the
Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor
Identification Program.
Dr. Gay Israel, director of the
Human Performance Lab, goes
around the community speaking to
Lion's and Kiwanis clubs about the
risk of heart disease. During his
presentation, he shows a 45-minute
slide show and explains the
problems one can expect from heart
disease.
Israel speaks to bankers,
insurance people and all walks of
life about the program. At the end of
the program, Israel receives phone
numbers from interested participants
and later contacts them.
Andy Johns, a graduate student
in the department of health and
physical education and recreation,
and a lab assistant with the program,
said that the program offers a
cheaper and more personal
alternative to hospital care.
"The program costs only $200,
but outside the university, the
program cost could range anywhere
from $500 to $600
Johns said that the program
consists of three stages.
The client is taken through a
preliminary stage. This involves
checking the client's blood,
cholesterol level, blood pressure and
lung function. Then they check the
client's strength, flexibility and
body composition, which is checked
by skin folds and underwater
weighing. An electrocardiogram will
also be taken.
The client's second stage is a
graded exercise test on a treadmill,
which grades fitness and screens for
heart disease.
The last stage is a personalized
follow-up consultation with the
client.
"We go over all results with
each client and give them an exercise
prescription based on their fitness
level Johns said. "It's more of a
personal follow-up. We tell them
areas in which they need to
improve
Johns said what makes his job
in the Human Performance Lab so
interesting is the people.
"I like to work with people
because each one brings something
new to the program he said
"That's what keeps me going
For more information on the
Human Performance Lab, com!
Dr. Gay Israel or the Human
Performance Lab office at 75"T-68$
The Collegian
Editor: Shannan Copeland
Layout Editor: Nancy Yarborough
Photo Editor: Jill Doczi
Layout Designers
Rebecca Barber
Celeste Hoffman
Wendy O'Neil
Kelly Hoyt
Page Editors
Jim Rogers
Christy Wilson
Chad Grier
Bobby Hodes
Copy Editors
Anne Paul
Blair Skinner
Dave Robertson
Tracy Kirk
Project Assistants
Miriam Driot
Jimmy Robinson
Faculty Adviser: Brenda Sanchez
Graduate Assistant: Steve Harding
The Collegian is a laboratory publication for Journalism 3200,
Copy-Editing and Design. Views presented are those of the
individual student writers. They do not reflect the views of the
journalism program, the communication department or East
Carolina University.
Enter
Barefoot o
By JILL DOCZI
Staff writer
Where can any ECU student go
to hear four bands and partake in a
variety of fun and entertainment free
of charge and with the approval of
ECU and the city of Greenville'7
Barefoot on the Mall, the annual
celebration, which is sponsored by
the Student Unions Special Events
Committee, is being held on the mall
today from noon unul dark
Lynn Jobes. assistant program
director for University Unions, said:
"It's the biggest thing that the
Student Union docs. It's all
freeIt's alread paid for through
siudeni fees
The Stegmonds, Awareness An
Ensemble, Love Tractor and Stop the
Press are scheduled to play on ihe
main stage, aording to Ka Jones.
University Unions secretary
Jobes said there v.ill be two
carnival-type games called the
Teddy Bear Toss and the Cork Gun
Shooting Gallery. Studems uho win
the games will receive prizes with
ECU motifs.
There will be a ride called the
Gyro. Jobes describes it as three
circular tubes that intersect lo form a
sphere. A person is strapped into the
circle, and the tubes roll on a track to
spin the person in all directions
"It simulates the weightlessness
of an astronaut, the tree-fall of a sky
diver and the freedom of free-
falhng Jobes said.
�3
More than 6J
that's Baref
There v. ill
Mudio. which is
students tan lipl
props and in
provided. Johes j
On the m
Lauiere,an ami
act out humo
performing hi'
Comedian Tom
pertorming on U)
Jobes said
human-conirollc
F
V-v S
The
A golfer aims for an Island green at a local
264 driving
makes 'Big Sp
By CHAD GRIER
Staff writer
Two local entrepreneurs have
created a big wave on the
entertainment scene with The Big
Splash aqua driving range. They
have the only lake in Greenville
designed for hitting golf balls.
"The original idea was Chuck's
Drink and Drive named for a friend
of ours who had gotten a DWI,
owner Tim Norris said, insurance
problems kept us from serving
beer Beer or not, The Big Splash
has become one of the hottest,
and cheapest, sources of fun
in Greenville.
Norris and his partner, Steve
Curtis, scoured the eastern North
Carolina golf market for an idea that
was both popular and affordable.
"To gel in the golf business you
either open a golf course, a pro
shop, or a driving range. Wc opted
for the range Norris said.
Norris said that location is vital
to the success of any business.
Finding affordable land for their
business was not easy. "I contacted
the owner of the man-made lake off
Highway 264 and told him I
wanted to hit golf balls in his
water Norris saidHe thought I
was nuts.
Nuts? Maybe. Successful? Yes.
Norris and Curtis have climbed
their way into the latest trend in
golfing. Their
putting green
ana they oth
tnstrucuon, ch
Golf has
recent boom i
sport is branj
traditional re
the wealthy.
"Wc stay
day that the tej
degrees Nor
love to com
regardless of
here and I'll oj
who wants to
The Big
serious golfc
techniques ar
just looking
different TheJ
floating gree
yards, 150 yj
don't worry
you don't hij
they float.
The mos
boat used to;
summer I
the boat arou
could hit ball
"He was
the people
nailing the
to have a,
You wor
JMMKS �





April 18, 1991 Page 2
ra duates;
t
f
egianJILL DOCZ1
Career Planning Service.
II anniversary
I '79. She compares
a vnsis center with
rgency room. The
being that "you arc
one area, you never
' al the next call is
said she has heard quite a
ring the past 15
heard so many
Smith said. "From
vet) scary
episode, she said,
. aying Russian roulette
i itll her.
: the most stressful
ived Smith said.
� us three hours to
on
�-�hen handling such
i, the centers
avoid immediately
e or any other
and by no means
the calls received.
rs do have wires
trace their calls
his is not the concept
he best part of this
ack she gets from
nymotts callers who,
tuations are settled,
thank her.
for disease
hat makes his job
an Performance Lab so
the people.
work with people
each one brings something
program he said.
hai keeps me going
more information on the
n Performance Lab, contact
Krael or the Human
nance 1 ah office at 757-4688.
Collegian
r uopeland
I Editor: Nfancy Yarborough
'hoto Editor: .Jill Doczi
vv
ofFman
litors
Kers
i ilson
rwr
odes
Copy Editors
Anne Paul
Blair Skinner
Dave Robertson
Tracy Kirk
Project Assistants
Miriam Driot
'Jimmy Robinson
Adviser: Brenda Sanchez
He Assistant: Steve Harding
laboratory publication for Journalism 3200,
Jesign. Views presented are those of the
�vnters. They do not reflect the views of the
m, the communication department or East
I
Entertainment
The Collegian
April 18, 1991 Pa;
Barefoot on the Mall returns
By JILL DOCZI
Staff writer
Where can any ECU student go
to hear four bands and partake in a
variety of fun and entertainment free
of charge and with the approval of
ECU and the city of Greenville?
Barefoot on the Mall, the annual
celebration, which is sponsored by
the Student Unions Special Events
Committee, is being held on the mall
today from noon unul dark.
Lynn Jobes, assistant program
director for University Unions, said:
Its the biggest thing that the
Student Union docs. It's all
free It's already paid for through
student fees
The Stegmonds, Awareness Art
Ensemble, Love Tractor and Slop the
Press are scheduled to play on the
main stage, according to Kay Jones,
University Unions secretary.
Jobes said there will be two
carnival-type games called the
Teddy Bear Toss and the Cork Gun
Shooting Gallery. Students who win
the games will receive prizes with
ECU motifs.
There will be a nde called the
Gyro. Jobes describes it as three
circular tubes that intersect to form a
sphere. A person is strapped into the
circle, and the tubes roll on a track to
spin the person in all directions.
"It simulates the weightlessness
of an astronaut, the free-fall of a sky
diver and the freedom of free-
falling Jobes said.
More than 6,000 people are expected to attend today's festivities at Woodstock, oops,
that's Barefoot on the Mall, sponsored by East Carolina University Student Unions.
File Photo
There will also be a superstar
studio, which is a video booth where
students can lip sync to songs with
props and a backdrop that are all
provided, Jobes said.
On the main stage, Michel
Lauziere, an artist from Canada, will
act out humorous skits while
performing his art, Jobes said.
Comedian Tom Young will also be
performing on the main stage.
Jobes said robotic boxing, a
human-controlled boxing match
between two robots, is returning.
At sunset, there will be a
showing of the "Rocky Horror
Picture Show Students are asked to
throw birdseed rather than rice
during the show.
The Student Union issued a
letter inviting all campus-recognized
student organizations to set up
booths promoting themselves or
selling their products.
The Student Union contracted
12 security guards from campus
public safety to enforce die alcohol
policy and keep the peace.
No alcohol, coolers or glass are
allowed at Barefoot on the Mall.
These items will be confiscated.
Throughout the event, the
Student Union will hand out free
neon huggers, foot-shaped fi ip-fiops
and foot-shaped magnets to promote
die Barefoot on the Mall theme.
"We just want to invite
everybody to come out and have a
good time Jobes said.
ECU playhouse finishes season
with Dance Theatre production
By DAVE ROBERTSON
Staff writer
The East Carolina Playhouse
will finish its '9091 academic
season with a performance by the
East Carolina Dance Theatre
"This is an exciting, original
dance production and includes a
modern piece by New York
choreographer Rodger Bclmcn said
Gary Faircloth, theatre manager.
The production has a variety of
styles and music including ballet and
mcxlern dance. Fain, loth said The
commissioned piece by Bclmen is
so good that it is entered in the
American College Dana' Festival
Associations' Southeastern R(.yi i
conference, Faircloth said.
"It surprises me that more
students don't attend Faircloth sai I
"We are cheaper than a movie and
students can sec people they kno
Our productions are the onlj
that involve students in even a
ol the si � from box o
manage mem to si. t construe li
Man) p oplc think thai �
we are an amateur com an
the academic year that
performances are not ol .
quality. 1 his is a mi
The difference between ama
professional is thai in pn i
theater the a. U rs are paid.
"We're here to
enu nain Faircloth said
people do not realize thai ;
are open to the public
company en
and students to partii i
I ickei are i n ale
box office
adn.i
sh� runs April 24-2 .
it-1 your tk keu
ti atci sills usually out
the p
arts from ail around
in � 'aroli
andGrccnvil
Bold men's fashion change:
By JIMMY ROBINSON
Staff writer
Fishy business is success
By CHRISTY WILSON
Staff writer
When John Wiley Jr. bought a
fish lank to fill up space in his
college apartment, he did not realize
il would become his business.
Wiley, 23, of Raleigh, has
owned The Greenville Aquarium for
almost two years.
"I had a friend in Baltimore who
had a 55-gallon tank filled with all
kinds of wild-looking fish he said.
"I decided I would get one and start a
new hobby
Wiley became addicted to his
aquarium. Within the next six
months Wiley had three large tanks.
Soon after that, he got a job
working at a pet store.
"I worked there for about a
year he said. "I learned a lot about
fish, and it helped to give me a base
on understanding the type of care
fish need
During this time, Wiley's
hobby grew; he had 20 different fish
tanks in his new house.
"I would go to Raleigh to buy
fish to put in my tanks he said.
"After a while, I had lots of people
wanting to buy them from nic
Wiley made plans to open his
own aquarium store. He hooked
some investors on his idea, and
together they have reeled in a
successful business.
"I was spending up to $6,(XX) a
year in fish and upkeep he said. "I
thought if I could spend that much
money, why not make it back?"
For many years, men's clothing
has been looked at as just something
to wear, simple patterns and color
combinations that left tittle room
for expression. In the past few years,
the menswear industry has taken
major steps in producing clothing
that allow men to show more
expression through their clothi
Along with new innovative
colors and patterns, the men's
clothing industry has also bet
an industry of comfort Clothing for
spring in the '90s is being
manufactured to be more loose
fitting and lightweight
Light fabrics such as silk.
piina-cqllon and linen are Popular
materials being used lo produce a
relaxed fit that does not sacrifice Ihc
fashionable styles men arc looking
for. These light fabrics produce an
easy-going look that suggests a free-
spirited tone of die dev ade ahead.
For the professional man, the
changes in suit patterns and color
combinations are unbelievable.
Businessmen used lo wear a blue or
gray suit every da without
question, but in today's changing
market, the color combinations and
patterns are endless. Colors such as
olive and brown are becoming r
professional, as well as boundstoofJ)
and glen-plaid patterns.
Another area lal
in fashionable directions is
industry 11 I i k
from the once populai
wild an ! . olorful fl
the norm once again.

. change i tl
traditional button
lot ol comj i
manj n
most populai the
C( liar" shut. This ! j ol
snap 11 b iti is
sides oi the collai and h
collar �
tic
1 be
I
oi fabrics are being used I
different textures and
the clothing Sport shirts
ICCd W ill hk h ,1
and lit
shirts a . i iibfc ICxtui
John CoJTrna
Men's VVcai in Gr
"lias spring I n the ;
selection i ha
he industry product
'leased that m
mall) taking steps toward
colorful and t i icing st; I
hope the indu:
change in this direction
Shape up for summer with outdoor recreation
By MIRIAM DRIOT
Staff writer
The CotlegtanJILL DOCZI
A golfer aims for an Island green at a local driving range.
264 driving range
makes 'Big Splash'
By CHAD GRIER
Staff writer
Two local entrepreneurs have
created a big wave on the
entertainment scene with The Big
Splash aqua driving range. They
have the only lake in Greenville
designed for hilling golf balls.
"The original idea was Chuck's
Drink and Drive named for a friend
of ours who had gotten a DWI,
owner Tim Norris said. "Insurance
problems kept us from serving
beer Beer or not. The Big Splash
has become one of the hottest,
and cheapest, sources of fun
in Greenville.
Norris and his partner, Steve
Curtis, scoured the eastern North
Carolina golf market for an idea that
was both popular and affordable.
"To get in the golf business you
either open a golf course, a pro
shop, or a driving range. We opted
for the range Norris said.
Norris said that location is vital
to the success of any business.
Finding affordable land for their
business was not easy. "I contacted
die owner of the man-made lake off
Highway) 264 and told him I
wanted to hit golf balls in his
water Norris saidHe thought I
was nuts
Nuts? Maybe. Successful? Yes.
Norris and Curtis have climbed
their way into the latest trend in
golfing. Their aqua range includes a
putting green and a chipping range,
and they offer individual golfing
instruction, club repair, and clinics.
Golf has been experiencing a
recent boom in popularity, and the
sport is branching away from its
traditional roots of being only for
the wealthy.
"We stay open year-round any
day that the temperature is above 40
degrees Norris said. "But people
love to come out and hit balls
regardless of the weather; I'm always
here and I'll open it up for anybody
who wants to hit
The Big Splash attracts both the
serious golfer who is polishing
techniques and the novice who is
just looking for something fun and
different The 20-acre lake has three
floating greens anchored at 100
yards, ISO yards, and 200 yards. And
don't worry about losing the balls if
you don't hit them on the green;
they float
The most popular target is the
boat used to retrieve the balls. "Last
summer I paid a guy to just drive
the boat around the lake so people
could hit balls at him Norris said.
"He was protected with a screen, and
the people seem to get a thrill out of
nailing the boat. We want everyone
to have a good rime
You won't see this written on
any bathroom walls, but, for a good
time, try the Big Splash.
The ECU outdoor recreation and
fitness center has put together a
complete program that will enable
you to enjoy a recreational summer.
"Summer is a big time when it
comes to equipment rental Kaihy
Hill,director of the program said.
"And we have enough material to
satisfy most everyone
Hill and her staff can help you
plan a camping trip and can rent you
everything from the tent to cooking
appliances. Equipment can be rented
for any length of time. Rales
decrease for rental periods longer
than one week.
"We always try to keep rental
fees at a reasonable amount because
what students can afford is our pri-
decides to do so, ihc Garrett
mary concern Hill said.
The outdoor recreation program
includes far more than just camping
equipment. Students can rent soft-
ball and volleyball equipment and
they can plan summer trips.
A variety of trips arc offered
during ihe first and second summer
sessions, ranging from one day
windsurfing afternoons to a white-
water rafting weekend.
Other trips include horseback
riding, backpacking and beach
camping weekends. The costs of
these trips range from $25 to $60.
The fitness program, mainly
composed of aerobic classes, will be
offered as it was throughout the
year. Aerobics and toning classes
will be taught from Monday through
Friday.Schedules will be available
by the end of April.
"We are planning to teaJi the
morning classes in Chrislenbury,
but this year wb want to hae the
afternoon classes in Garrett
basement because of the air
conditioning system Hill said
The new features of the fitness
program arc the aqua aerobics which
was already offered biweekly during
the spring semester. It will he
taught once a day (Monday through
Thursday) during the summer. Also
for the first time at ECU a "step"
aerobic class will be offered
Instructors have been training since
the beginning of the spring semester
for these classes, which will begin
during die first summer session.
"This summer, we also would
like to keep some facilities open
during the weekend Hill said.
If the intramural department
basement, equipped v ilh
weight : ould be th
stay open.
"Y hal 1 am reall
.ird to is to start
Adventures Program Hill
This tK a program is v.
ol initiative games and
courses, and is designed to
and improve interpersona
The program is open to I
even outside busine:
community asso iatii
program is restricted to g
eight to fourtec n j� oplc.
Located behind lh
Health Building the a ti
are constructed w itfa rope
Ivams. ladders mh platibrn
up io 50 feet above the gro
The outdoor and r
tuness office is located i
Chrislenbury757-638
Local bars have cheap drinks
By WENDY O'NEIL
Staff writer
Th CottegwVJILL DOCZI
Students enjoy outdoor nightlife
Spring la back and so Is warm weather. Students flock to
outside patios at local bars to hang out and meet friends.
Greenville has many bars that
offer drink specials to ECU studenis
who are constanUy searching for the
cheapest way to have a good time.
Sunday is Dollar Import Night
at Wrong Way Corrigan's on Fifth
Street. Admission is free unless
there is a band playing. This bar
gets crowded quickly, so it is a good
idea to get there early. This will
ensure that you get a good scat.
Monday is a good night to try
out Bunny's Bar and Grill on Fifth
Street. For $1.50, students can get
either a pitcher of Busch or
Milwaukee's Best beer. Bunny's has
a patio that students crowd,
especially on the weekend. The
menu offers a variety of hot and cold
subs, salads and sandwiches.
Tuesday is 10-cent Draft Night
at the Elbo Room on Cotanche
Street There is usually a disc jockey
playing top-40 hits. The Elbo has a
dance floor with strobe lights and
multi-colored light rays. Two-dollar
long island Iced leas are
here, a favorite among
Other specials include SI 2
shots. Admission is $2.
W ednesdav is Progres
Night at Bogie's on Fit
This bar is similar 10 i
except for the musk
Natural Lights are the spa ial uV
and cost SI. Other specia
dollar shots and 25-cenl ,1
Admission is S2.
Thursday is a goxl ni
Sub Station II on Third St
serve S2 pitchers of beer and I
patio that students can t. .
Station II is a little qui
most other places and i- I
place to go to talk and han
Every place is crowded on the
weekend. A student's best bet is lo
find a keg party and avoid going
downtown until later in the evening.
Tar River Apartments, off First
Street, is usually a good place to
check out. If that docs not
students can always go
Shop on Fifth Street and I
people who arc picking up





s. 1991 Page 2
raduates;

� I DOCZ
annlng Service.
ersary
She com
1.1 i n C r
�. room
lhai "y u
a, you i
next cal
heard qu
pa 15
ird so n
said "I
.ir
ide, she said,
mi .
iosi stressful
: Smith
e hours
dling such
the centt i -
I immediai
r any oiher
eived.
have wires
:r . alls
I the con
he gets '
callers who,
.ire sell
k her.
case
nakes his
nance Lab so
rk Aiih people
s something
im he said
going
' rmation on the
ncc Lab, contact
r the Human
� at 757-4688.
(OIXEGIAN
� ,nd
rough
� loezi
opy Editors
Anne Paul
Blair Skinner
� Robertson
Kirk
Project Assistants
Miriam Driot
�Jimmy Robinson
: - Sanchez
itaafc Steve Harding
n for Journalism 3200,
� nted are those of the
' reflect the views of the
rnumeation department or East
Entertainment
The Collegian
April is. L991 Pa
Barefoot on the Mall returns
By JILL DOCZI
Staff writer
Where can any ECU student go
to hear four bands and partake in a
variety of fun and entertainment free
of charge and with the approval of
ECU and the city of Greenville?
Barefoot on the Mall, the annual
celebration, which is sponsored by
ihe Student Unions Special Events
("ommittec, is being held on the mall
uviav from noon until dark.
1 vnn lobes, assistant program
director tor University I nions, said:
It's the biggest thing that the
Student Union does it's all
free It's already paid for through
sin dent fees
The Stegmonds. Awareness Art
Ensemble, Love Tractor and Stop the
Press are scheduled to play on the
main stage, according to Kay Jones,
Universal) Unions secretary.
Jobes said there will be two
carnival-type games called the
Teddy Bear Toss and the Cork Gun
Shooting Gallery. Students who win
the games will receive prizes with
ECU motifs.
There will be a ride called the
Gyro. Jobes describes it as three
circular tubes that intersect to form a
sphere. A person is strapped into the
circle, and the tubes roll on a track to
spin die person in all directions.
"It simulates the weightlessness
ol an astronaut, the tree-tall of a sky
uer and the freedom of free-
falling Jobes said.
File Photi
More than 6,000 people are expected to attend today's festivities at Woodstock, oops
that's Barefoot on the Mall, sponsored by East Carolina University Student Unions.
There will also be a superstar
studio, which is a video booth where
studcnLs can lip sync to songs with
props and a backdiop that arc all
provided, Jobes said.
On the main stage, Michel
Lau.ierc, an artist from Canada, will
act out humorous skits while
performing his art, Jobes said.
Comedian Tom Young will also be
pertornung on the main stage.
Jobes said robotic boxing, a
human-controlled boxing match
between two robots, is returning.
At sunset, there will be a
showing of the "Rocky Horror
Picture Show Students are asked to
throw birdseed rather than rice
during the show.
The Student Union issued a
letter inviting all campus-recognied
student organizations to set up
booths promoting themselves or
selling their products.
The Student Union contracted
12 security guards from campus
public safety to enforce the alcohol
policy and keep the peace.
No alcohol, coolers or glass aie
allowed at Barefoot on the Mall.
These items will be confiscated.
Throughout the event, the
Student Union will hand out tree
neon huggers, foot-shaped flip-flops
and foot-shaped magnets to promote
the Barefoot on the Mall theme
"We just want to invite
everybody to come out and have a
good time Jobes said.
ECU playhouse finishes seaso
with Dance Theatre production
By DAVE ROBERTSON
Staff writer
I lie Hast Carolina Plaj
will finish us '90 '91 a
season with a performance h
East Carolina Dance Theatre
"This is an cv itii
dance production and ini 1 . les a
modern piece b)
chorcographci Ri I. r Belm i
Gary Faircloth, theatre ma
The production has
styles and musk in lud
modem dance, Faircloth
commissioned piece 1
so good that u is entered in the
American College Dan . I
Associations' Southeastern R
conference, Fairctoth
"It surprises mc ll
students don't attend Fail
"We are cheaper than a n
students can see p pic ll
Our productions arc the
that involve studcnLs in
Of tlK'
'
�i' are ai
thi .
.
1 tu dill
1


.



Bold men's fashion change
By JIMMY ROBINSON
Staff vn!t-r
Fishv business is success
By CHRISTY WILSON
Staff writer
When John Wile) Jr. bought a
fish tank to fill up space in his
college apartment, he did not realize
it would become his business.
Wiley, 23, of Raleigh, has
owned The Greenville Aquarium for
almost two years.
"1 had a friend in Baltimore who
had a 55-gallon tank filled with all
kinds of wild-looking tish he said.
"I decided I would gel one and start a
new hobby
Wiley became addicted to his
aquarium. Within the next six
months Wiley had three large tanks.
Soon after that, he got a job
working at a pet store.
"I worked there for about a
year he said. "1 learned a lot about
fish, and il helped to give mc a base
on understanding the type of care
fish need
During this time. Wiley's
hobby grew; he lud 20 different fish
tanks in his new house.
"I would go to Raleigh to tniy
fish to put in my tanks he said
"After a while, I had lots ol p
wanting to buy them from me
Wiley made plans to open
own aquarium store. He hooked
some investors on his idea, and
together they have reeled in a
successful business.
"I was spending up to S6.000 a
year in fish and upkeep he said. "I
thought if I could spend that much
money, why not make it bat k
for mans eai
has been lex k d at a . i
to wear, simple pa)
combinations that left little
for expression In tl
the menswear indu
major steps in pi I
that allow men
expression through their .
Along with new inn
colors and patterns lh
clothing industry has al
an industry oi comfort :
spring in the 90s
manufactured to be mi i
fitting avJ lightwi
Light fabrics u . .
pima-cqtton and lint n
materials being used to
relaxed fit that does not sacnfii
fashionable stk me i ai
lor. I he fabrics pri
eas) going look that suggest a free
spirited tone of the de� ahe;
Foe the profes
changes in suit palli rns
combinations ai: ml
Busmcs .men used i i -
gray si it ever) da) �. j
question, but in ti o s (
market, the col combina
patterns are endless (ol rs
olive and brown are becoming
professional, as well a
and glen-plaid patterns.
Shape up for summer with outdoor recreati
i
By MIRIAM DRIOT
Staff writer
The CollegianJILL DOCZI
A golfer aims for an island green at a local driving range.
264 driving range
makes 'Big Splash'
By CHAD GR1ER
Staff writer
Two local enuepreneurs have
created a big wave on the
entertainment scene with The Big
Splash aqua driving range. They
have the only lake in Greenville
designed for hitting golf balls.
"The original idea was Chuck's
Drink and Drive named for a friend
of ours who had gotten a DWI,
owner Tim Norris said. "Insurance
problems kept us from serving
beer Beer or not. The Big Splash
has become one of the hottest,
and cheapest, sources of fun
in Greenville.
Norris and his partner, Steve
Curtis, scoured the eastern North
Carolina golf market for an idea that
was both popular and affordable.
"To get in the golf business you
cither open a golf course, a pro
shop, or a driving range. We opted
for the range Norris said.
Norris said that location is vital
to the success of any business.
Finding affordable land for their
business was not easy. 'T contacted
the owner of the man-made lake off
Highwayl 264 and told him I
wanted to hit golf balls in his
water Norm saidHe thought I
was nuts
Nuts? Maybe. Successful? Yes.
Norris and Curtis have climbed
their way into the latest trend in
golfing. Their aqua range includes a
putting green and a chipping range,
and they oiler individual golfing
instruction, club repair, and clinics.
Golf has been experiencing a
recent boom in popularity, and the
sport is branching away from its
traditional roots of being only for
the wealthy.
"We slay open year-round any
day that the temperature is above 40
degrees Norris said. "But people
love to come out and hit balls
regardless of the weather; I'm always
here and I'll open il up for anybody
who wants to hit
The Big Splash attracts both the
serious golfer who is polishing
techniques and the novice who is
just looking for something fun and
different. The 20-acre lake has three
floating greens anchored at 100
yards, 150 yards, and 200 yards. And
don't worry about losing the balls if
you don't hit them on the green;
they float.
The most popular target is the
boat used to retrieve the balls. "Last
summer I paid a guy to just drive
the boat around the lake so people
could hit balls at him Norris said.
"He was protected with a screen, and
the people seem to get a thrill out of
nailing the boat. We want everyone
to have a good time
You won't see this written on
any bathroom walls, but, for a gocd
time, try the Big Splash.
The ECU outdoor recreation and
fitness center has put together a
complete program that will enable
you to enjoy a recreational summer.
"Summer is a big time when it
comes to equipment rental Kathy
Hill.director of the program said.
"And we have enough material to
satisfy most everyone
Hill and her staff can help you
plan a camping trip and can rent you
everything from the lent to cooking
appliances. Equipment can be rented
for any length of time. Rales
decrease for rental periods longer
than one week.
"We always try to keep rental
fees at a reasonable amount because
what students can afford is our pri-
decidcs to do so, the Garret!
mary concern Hill said.
The outdoor recreation program
includes far more than just camping
equipment. Students can rent soft-
ball and volleyball equipment and
they can plan summer trips.
A variety of trips are offered
during the first and second summer
sessions, ranging from one da)
windsurfing afternoons to a white-
water rafung weekend.
Other trips include horseback
riding, backpacking and beach
camping weekends. The costs of
these trips range from S25 to $60.
The fitness program, mainly
composed of aerobic classes, will be
offered as it was throughout the
year. Aerobics and toning classes
will be taught from Monday through
Friday.Schedules will be available
by ihe end cf April.
"We are planning io teat h the
morning classes in Chrislenbury,
but this ear we want to ha
afternoon classes in Garrett
basement because of the air
conditioning system Hill said
The new feature!
program are the aqua acn bics ��. hk h
was already offered biweekly during
ihe spring semester. It will be
taught once a da) I Monda) thn
Thursday i during the summei
for Ihe first tune al H 'I a "step
aerobic class will be offered
Instructors hae been training
the beginning ol the spring scmesti
for these classes, which will begin
during die first summer sessii
"This summei we also
like to keep some facilities open
during die weekend. Hill said
If the intraiiiui.il department

tl


:i







(



:

beams

'

.
I Local bars have cheap drii
The CollegwrVJIlL DOCZI
Students enjoy outdoor nightlife
Spring Is back and so Is warm weather. Students flock to
outside patios at local bars to hang out and meet friends.
By WENDY O'NEIL
Staff writer
Greenville has many bars thai
offer drink spec laK to It'I students
who are constant!) searching foi the
cheapest was to hac a good time.
Sunday is Doilai Import Night
at Wiong Was Corrigan's on Fifth
Street. Admission is free unless
there is a band playing. I his bai
gets crowded quick!) . so it is a giod
idea to get there earl) lhis will
ensure thai you get a gixl seal.
Monday is a good night to trv
out Bunny's Bar and Grill on Fifth
Street. For Slt). students can get
either a pitcher ol Busch or
Milwaukee's Best beer. Bunny's has
a patio thai students crowd,
especially on the weekend The
menu offers a variety of hot and cold
subs, salads and sandw tehes
Tuesday is 10-ccnt Draft Night
at the Elbo Room on Colanche
Street. There is usually a disc jocke)
playing top-40 hits. The I Ibo has a
dance floor with suobe lights and
multi-colored light rass Two-dollar
. island
here, a favorite
(Hhei specials includi
shots Vimis ion is -
v edn da; is Pn
Night at Hv . Hi
lhis bai is sim i
exct the m
Natural 1 ights are ih.
and tost M � V; i ,
doltai shots and
Admission is s I
Thursda) is a good n
Sub Station 11 on 1 bird Sti
serve V pitchers ol Is 11
patio that students e.ni (
Station II is a little qu
most other places and i
plate to go to talk and fur.
Ewer) place is crowd
weekend student's best
find a keg part) and a-1
downtown until later in Uk
1 ,u Riser Apartments
Street, is usually a �w
check out. If thjt does
students van alwav
Shop on fifth Street and
people who are picking up





Sports
April 18t1991
The Collegian
April 18,1991 Page 4
Pro's in Olympics
By BOBBY HOPES
Staff writer
The United States will bring a
basketball team to Barcelona next
year that will be lacking amateur
collegiate talent, but have the lop
professional players of the United
States on the court.
A ruling by the International
Governing Association of the
Olympics in April, 1989. made it
possible for professional athletes to
participate in Olympic competition.
With this done, it will soon be time
to sec which professional players
will tryouL The latest response to a
player's poll was "overwhelming"
said Charles Grantham of the NBA
Players Association in the February
12 article in Sports Illustrated. Over
80 of the 1991 NBA all-star
basketball squad gave a "tentative
yes" to the question of whether or
not they would like lo participate.
Among those players were
Magic Johnson, Charles Barklcy,
Michael Jordan and Carl Malonc to
name a few.
The team will also have a
professional coach for the games.
The chosen coach Chuck Daly, of
the Detroit Pistons qualified for ihc
job which required at least eight
years experience, including three
years of professional coaching
experience. Daly has won two NBA
championship titles and was the
foremost choice on a list which
included Larry Brown, head coach
for the Houston Rockets, and
Golden State Warrior head coach
Don Nelson.
Daly, an NBA coach who has
won two championship titles, has
had litile experience with the
international game but said his
assistant coaches "will have very
recent experience" in international
coaching. Daly's staff will consist
of one other NBA head coach, and
two collegiate head coaches. One of
the collegiate coaches being looked
at to fill one of the positions on the
Olympic staff is Duke basketball
head coach Mike Krzyzewski.
Krzyzcwski who has coached a U.S.
international basketball team
saidit'U be easier to go from pro
coaching to international experience
than from college to international"
because NBA rules such as the
shooting clock, and the 3-point line
arc the most stringent in the world.
The United States team will not
be the only basketball team playing
with professional talent. Among
the teams participating at this level
is the Yugoslavia national team,
who won the gold medal in the
games at Seoul. The team could
have at least four players from the
NBA including Vlade Divac of the
Los Angeles Lakers.
With all this talent for the
American team many people
anticipate that the United States
team will crush opposing countries.
but some say this will not happen.
In the Fcb 12 SI article NBC
anaylist Al Mcguire said "An NBA
all-star team will not win an
Olympic gold medal "The reason a
team of superstars doesn't always
win is because the game isn't
always played at the highest level.
Sometimes a less talented team
brings the better team down to its
level said Boston Celtic Larry Bird
in the Fcb 12 SI article.
Keeping all this in mind the
United States will undoubtedly bring
to Barcelona one of its top teams
ever. "You're talking about
awesome talent, as talented a team
as has ever been put together Daly
said.
The CollegianJILL DOCZI
Chris Hall, a four-year member of the ECU Irates. works out In
preparation for an upcoming frlsbee match.
A member of ECU'S
underwater hockey
team comes up for
air at a recent
practice. ECU has
two squads, the gold
and the purple.
They are currently
the only teams in
North Carolina.
The ColtegiarvJILL DOCZI
Underwater hockey is swimming success
By TRACY KIRK
Staff writer
Underwater hockey, which
originated 35 years ago, is relatively
obscure in America, but very popu-
lar in Canada and Europe. The sport
was introduced to East Carolina
University four years ago by stu-
dents visiting from South Africa.
"We are North Carolina's only un-
derwater hockey club and one of the
fastest growing in the United
States said Bill Thiesen, president
of ECU'S underwater hockey team.
Underwater hockey shares
similar traits with ice hockey. The
game is just as rough, and players
are required to wear equipment such
as gloves and ear protectors.
This sport has its obvious dif-
ferences from its ice counterpart as
well. Underwater hockey consists
of 10 players on each team. Six
people play continuously and four
rotate in during the game. Each
game lasts 33 minutes: two 15
minute halves and break lime.
The most obvious difference is
that the game is played entirely un-
derwater. "The key is a players aer-
obic condition and how long they
can stay under water Thiesen said.
Equipment for this sport is not
readily available. The equipment is
constructed by individual team
members. Although there are
guidelines set by the Under Water
Society of America, standardization
of equipment is difficult. At games,
officials inspect equipment and
verify adherence to UWSA standards.
Several of the ECU team mem-
bers constructed a state-of-the-art
goal post made entirely of PCB, an
inexpensive, durable plastic. The
team is proud that they were the first
American club to build a regulation
goal. "No one in the country has
anything like it Thiesen said.
"We're really fortunate our team
members arc so talented
Although not traditionally a
spectator sport, fans can watch by
getting in the pool with the players.
"Our pool at Mingcs has the room
and occasionally people get in the
pool lo watch Thiesen said.
ECU hosted a sanctioned
tournament on March 16 and 17 of
1991. This tournament was their
introduction to underwater hockey
competition on the national level.
Although the two ECU teams
placed fourth and sixth, out of six
teams, the games were competitive.
Thiesen said the ECU purple and
gold teams did well for their first
tournament. "We have national
recognition now Thiesen said.
The team will travel to Florida
June 8 and 9, to compete with the
Gainesville club. This is the first
off-site competition since the teams
formation. By next fall the team
hopes to begin traveling regularly.
Most of the team members,
who arc students in Leisure Systems
Studies. Maritime History and
Biology, are certified divers. This
is a great way for divers to stay in
shape during the off season. "It im-
proves under water endurance, keeps
you in condition and gets you
accustomed lo breathing under wa-
ter Thiesen said.
Because there arc no other local
teams, the ECU players scrimmage
amongst themselves the majority of
the season. The East Carolina club
is trying to get local military per-
sonnel and area colleges to form un-
derwater hockey teams of their own.
Thiesen said that he feels the Navy
Seals, an elite division of the Navy
specializing in amphibious opera-
tions, would be the perfect
competition for the East Carolina
team. "I'm sure that after being in
the desert all those months they arc
due for a cooling off Thiesen said.
ECU grad takes 'get fit' attitude to Beverly Hills
By TRACY KIRK
Staff writer
Attention all aerobic nuts:
This summer may be your last
chance to "bust-a-move" with Mark
Brunetz, international fitness
consultant and exercise physiologist
for the Jane Fonda Workout in
Beverly Hills. Calif.
If you are actively involved in
aerobics and spend any time in
Greenville, you have probably heard
of Greenville's fitness guru, Mark
Brunetz. Schedule permitting, the
ECU graduate plans on visiting his
alma matter at least once this sum-
mer, although no date has been set
Visits to Greenville are becom-
ing increasingly difficult for
Brunetz. In the next month his
international fitness tour, titled
"Bust-a-Movc will take him to at
least five countries, including Italy,
Africa, England, Spain and Mexico.
When he returns to his home in
Los Angeles in June, he will begin
shooting Jane Fonda's 13th fitness
video. June is also the month
Brunetz will serve as a honorary
committee member on a national
campaign for cancer research.
In addition to this busy sched-
ule, Brunetz runs his own company,
Exerfit USA. He also serves as the
program director for a celebrity
training service, L.A. Trainers.
While still a student at East
Carolina University, Brunetz learned
of a job opportunity with the Fonda
Co. while attending a conference in
Maryland. The announcement,
through a career services bulletin,
called for an exercise physiologist
"I remember my colleagues and
I laughing in envy of the person who
would land that job Brunei, said,
"and I knew instantly it was mine.
After 700 applications, two phone
interviews and a two-day trip to
L.A Jane hired me. It seemed to
happen overnight
As the exercise physiologist for
the Jane Fonda Workout in Beverly
Hills, his primary responsibilities
include product developing and di-
recting the studio aerobic and per-
sonal training programs. Brunetz re-
cently choreographed two children's
workout videos in coordination with
Jane Fonda. The videos debued on
the television program "Funhouse
"I'm proud to have been a cre-
ative force in Jane's first two videos
for kids Brunetz said. "Warner
Home Video distributes the tapes
and has already pre-sold over
100,000 copies to date
Brunetz said he feels his aca-
demic background combined with
his dance training has been very in-
strumental in creating his image as a
"scientist who can groove He
plans to release his own video in
Italy and is currently negotiating a
fitness show pilot series in
Guadalahara, Mexico.
Brunetz laid the foundation for
his booming career here in
Greenville about nine years ago.
After obtaining his undergraduate
degree in biology, he went on to get
his master's in exercise physiology.
While amassing knowledge at
East Carolina, Brunetz was also
accumulating quite a following in
his ECU aerobics classes. A risk
taker, Brunetz entered the field of
aerobics when male instructors were
virtually unheard of and it has
worked to his advantage.
"He's been able to corner an
untapped market said David
Brunetz, Mark's brother and East
Coast workshop coordinator.
While in Greenville, Brunetz
also taught aerobics and consulted
for local health clubs. Word of his
teaching and consulting practice
spread throughout North Carolina,
and the workshop offers started
pouring in. It was then that he con-
ceived the idea for his company,
which specializes in fitness instruc-
tor training workshops and product
development and consulting.
Exerfit USA grew rapidly as
companies go, but it didn't really
take off until he relocated to Los
Angeles. "L.A. is the fitness capital
of the world Brunetz said. "My
move to Los Angeles was the best
step in my career, followed closely
by my job at Jane Fonda's
"Jane has given me the oppor-
tunity to make contacts that would
have taken 10 limes as long to make
on my own Brunetz said.
Although quite confident in his
abilities and the future of his
company .Exerfit USA, Brunetz said
his success takes him by surprise.
"My rolodcx is filled with names I
only used to read about he said.
ECU students get active H
Carolina Princess lures
fishers to N.C. coast City of Greenville to hold
REBECCA BARBER
W writer
By BOBBY HOPES
Staff writer
While many students at East
Carolina University enjoy watching
their football and basketball teams
compete against other schools, other
students enjoy playing in the
intramural sports that ECU offers.
The Intramural Recreational
Service at ECU is the organization
in charge of directing, organizing
and coordinating student sporting
events. Currently, there are more
than 34 sporting activities the IRS
offers to students during the school
year. Sports enthusiasts can choose
from a wide variety of sports.
"Intramural sports are important
to a lot of students at ECU said
junior, Sean Smith. "We aren't on
scholarship, but when your playing
in a close game there is really no
difference. You play just as hard
In the 19989-90 school year
nearly 9,000 students participated in
intramural sporting events. "There
are sports that anyone can participate
in freshman Charlie Hiatt said.
"You don't have to be an experienced
athlete, in order to play
The IRS oversees student sports
and coordinates the sporting clubs.
Some of the clubs involved are the
Lacrosse Club, the Rugby Club, and
the Irate (frisbee) Club. The IRS
issues grants which help finance the
clubs, and they also allocate fields
and equipment. "It would be
impossible to have an organized and
successful team without the help of
the IRS, we are lucky to have such a
good program here Lacrosse co-
captain, Brannin Thome said.
For students not interested in
team sports, there are activities set
up for the individual. Aerobics and
swimming are two activities that are
organized for the student interested
in staying fit. The aerobics classes
are taught by instructors in the same
way health clubs teach their classes,
and both Minges and Christianbury
gyms offer swimming pool noun
for students interested in swimming.
Team sports being played
include softball, which is played on
the intramural fields, and indoor
soccer at Christianbury Gym.
Ellen Smith, a member of
Alpha Delta Pi Sorority, said,
"There is something for everybody,
even for people who just enjoy
watching people play sports
The Carolina Princess Fishing
Center, located in Morehead City, is
one of the most popular fishing
businesses in Carteret County.
A spokesman for the Carolina
Princess said that although the
center operates only one day a week
during the off-season months, they
expand their fishing trips to seven
days a week during the summer to
accommodate the more than 8,000
seasonal fishing enthusiasts.
The Carolina Princess fishing
headboat carries up to 100 people
per trip. On alternating days, the
boat goes on half or full-day trips.
A half-day trip takes passengers
about 30 miles offshore, and allows
about three hours for fishing. The
boat makes two half-day trips, and
the price is $25 per person.
The full-day trip, the most
popular among fishermen, carries
passengers 40 to 60 miles offshore
to the Gulf Stream. This trip allows
five hours to fish, and the price is
$50 per person. On a full-day trip,
there is a better chance of catching a
greater variety of large fish.
The Carolina Princess is a
bottom-fishing boat These trips are
equipped with mates that will help
you bait your hook and remove any
catches. Snapper, grouper, and sea
bass are the main catches from
bottom fishing, the spokesman said.
These boats also supply the
necessary equipment needed for the
trip. A cooler to carry fish home is
all that a fisher needs to bring. Most
fishing centers offer a cleaning
service on their docks. For a small
fee, the customers can have their
fish cleaned and filleted.
Some fishing centers offer
charier boats. Charter boats carry a
maximum of six people and cost
$600-$700 per day. Customers can
troll or sport fish, instead of bottom
fish. Fishermen pull up king
mackerel, Spanish mackerel and
dolphin, a spokesman said.
Fishers who are vacationing and
have no place to store their catch
have die choice of selling the fish to
the local fish markets. These
businesses will buy a catch by the
pound before cleaning. Spanish
mackerel and grouper usually go for
the highest market prices. If it was a
lucky day, the price of the fishing
trip will be covered by these sales.
The Carolina Princess Fishing
Center and other fishing centers on
the North Carolina coast offer a va-
riety of fishing that is exciting for
both the beginner and the expert
Special Olympic games
BySHANNANCOPELANO
Staff writer
Beginning May 30. larger
cities like Raleigh and Charlotte
will no longer be the only homes
to the North Carolina Special
Olympics. This year the sute
games are coming to the city of
Greenville.
This is the first time the
games have ever been held east of
Raleigh said Alice Kene, co-coor-
dinator for volunteers. "It's the
largest single event ever to be held
in Greenville Kene said.
The Special Olympic games
provide athletic competition for
children and adults who are
mentally retarded. Millions of
individuals, in more than 80
countries, have participated in the
Special Olympics since its
beginning in 1968.
Events will be held at several
locations in Greenville, but most
sporting events will take place at
Minges Coliseum on the East
Carolina University campus. The
athletes participating in the
Special Olympics will stay in
residence halls on the ECU
Kene said they are seeking
volunteers to train for the positions
of scorekeepers. chaperones and
game officials. "Anybody over 16
can volunteer Kene said. The
reason they need to be 16 is be-
cause they are more independent
and can drive
Special Olympics is looking
for "buddies Buddies are volunteers
that will be paired with the
athletes and escort them to the
sporting events and to lunch. "We
are trying to recruit groups on
campus, it's much easier to get
volunteers if you get groups as
opposed to individuals Kene said.
Games for tke state of North
Carolina will be held May 30
through June 2. The Pitt County
games will be held in April.
Mark O'Brien, a senior at
East Carolina, said being a Special
Olympic volunteer is a great
experience. "Seeing tke
excitement hi neir facet gives
you a feeling of total ex-
citement he said. "Something
you mast experience yourself
'Toy Soldi
drug war tl
By Margi Morin
Suit Writer
The Miller Scrwol, a private
military boarding school in
Charlottesville, Va is the scene tor
this year's newest movie,
dim
When a South American drug
czar is brought to the United States
his son and an elite -�juad at COnv
mandos take the students of the
prestigious schwl hostage Thestu-
dents, considered "problem" chil-
dren from wealthy and influential
American families serve as excel-
lent hostages for the terrorists
To end the siege, the authon
ties must either a-lease the drug
czar or mountanattackon the school
which would inevitably jeopardize
the lives of all students inside
Meanwhile, a small group of
resourceful voung men decide to
wage a deadly campaign against
the terrorists themselves Leader ot
the group is prankster Billy Topper
played by Sean Asbn.
His followers include loev
Trotta (Wtf WheateeO.aon of a pow-
erful gangster father; Snuffy
Bradberry (Keith C
the top official
Party; ftcafdo Me-
Perez), sonofaninif
and Hank(.
to the louse �n,n
mittee chairman
The group sinj
ti) thv fullest .v � e
leader decide �
. until his t�
rrom prison
aderrn I
�-tt ir s! :
no-nonsense deanj
Parker who is no
when it is taken
FBI as they de I
Special Age
RhoadsottheFbl
Cel adviser r, � j
fore permitting th"
used in the movie.
props and wardn
Mason Ada
Deputy Director
lingo and metn�oc
Toy Soldier
the Miller School, i
hoarding school
Cated in i"hark'tt
Wearing seatbelts
By SherriLynn Jernigan
Staff Writer
Would yOU dive 00 I nine-
storv building Would you drive
60 mph without the protection of
safety belts or air bags7
If your car were to crash at h0
mph, the impact would be equiva-
lent o furnpW off a' tall building,
according to Dr. Steve yWa
save your tife eve
as 12 mph, and
cur at speeds less
Finding excu
ing safer) Kits
say .� safety belt
dent victims m
merged can � -
ever) 200serioua
a tire, explosion
driver's education protestor.
About 25 million people are
injured in car accidents each war,
and about tWTOdie. If more people
buckle up or install air bags feet
figures can be reduced bv almost
half, as well as the seventy of the
injuries, Taylor says.
A pamphlet published bv the
Governor's Highway Safety pro-
gram states that safety belts can
In such a c
would probabh
from injury or urj
that he could re
able to eat �
Others say d
are greater when)
from the vehicle
ing in a crashin
safety belt (iettij
yehkleisnvmsof
Performer to su
'heretor Mori
By Joseph Campbell
Special to The East Carolinian
'Take the Power is a treasu red
part of my own personal archive -
and it should be so for all women
everywhere - Gloria Steinem
"One Fine Day is a strong,
stirring and spiritual film about
the women who paved the way, to
economic justice, political equal-
ity, and full self-expression " - Bella
Abzug
" A powerful performeT Kay s
performance wasa potent addition
to our Washington, DC March for
Women's Lives - Molly Yard
These are just a few of the
overwhelming responses to Kay
Weaver's equally overwhelming
one-woman show. She will per-
form for the public on Monday,
April 22, at 8 p.m. in Jenkins Au-
ditorium She is being brought to
the campus b
Studies Proj
l or the pal
Weaver has wor
of both musk i
me artist soni
former In
songwriting
Waxenbergtorr
a record com
promoting posi
tor women
Then V e,i v
tional attentio
video One Fin
can Film Fcsti
mtnute film is
video that evok
sweep of Amei
the 19th centu
moment" Wei
also chosen bv
bra. v Associati
its 1986 list of 1
The Fixx returns
By Jimmy Robinson
Special o Th� E� CarolinUn
The Rxx has a new record on
the market after a two year record-
ing break. The album is titled Ink
and features a dynamic collection
of songs that will surely add to the
artistic credibility the band has al-
ready earned.
The Rxx has developed a new
sound for tneweelves with the re-
kaaeoflftt The band has escaped
the dense keyboard-dn ven sound
that was the basis of their previous
afounandrrovedmtoa raw. hard-
driven, guitar sound.
The rWa guitar-driven env
pruuusisverypcnerfulandappTO-
priate for the changing styles of the
music industt
Jamie Westorar
able to retain tj
strived for on
add the best eV
days to make
best record evet)
music of Ink:
tic ability to
composing mi
sound won me
attention i
hardleadguit
The lyrics
Cumin are
than on any
bums. O
express to
tance of what
through his





April 18,1991
Blfz iEetHt QTarultntan
ii
April 18, 1991 Page 4
A member of ECU'S
underwater hockey
team comes up for
air at a recent
practice. ECU has
two squads, the gold
and the purple.
They are currently
the only teams in
North Carolina.
12 success
Most of the team members,
w students in Leisure Systems
Mjriume History and
gy, are certified divers. This
a for divers to stay in
ng the ofl season. "It im-
BS under water endurance, keeps
you in condition and gets you
accustomed to breathing under wa-
ter Thicsen sajd.
ause ihcre are no other locaJ
teams, iru. Ed' players scrimmage
amongst themselves the majority of
season. The East Carolina club
is tring to get local military per-
sonnel and area colleges to form un-
Mer hockey teams of their own.
sen said that he feels the Navy
an elite division of the Navy
specializing in amphibious opera-
tions, would be the perfect
competition for the East Carolina
team. "I'm sure that after being in
the desert all those months they are
due for a cooling off Thicsen said.
ICirriN
six

)nda
the
irst
uns
Beverly Hills
ed on
UsC
Miner
tapes
ith
� in-
lc as a
He
ico in
ig a
s in
n for
e in
ago
Iduate
Ito get
I
ge at
also
ng in
nsk
ild of
were
has
"Hcs tven able to corner an
pod market said David
Mark's brother and East
� rfc sfiop coordinator.
v-hilc in Greenville, Brunctz
taught aerobics and consulted
al health clubs. Word of his
teaching and consulting practice
spread throughout North Carolina,
and the workshop offers started
pouring in. It was then that he con-
ceived the idea for his company.
which specializes in fitness instruc-
tor training workshops and product
development and consulting.
Excrfit USA grew rapidly as
companies go. but it didn't really
take off until he relocated to Los
Angeies. "LA. is the fitness capital
of the world Brunctz said. "My
move to Los Angeles was the best
step in my career, followed closely
by mv job at Jane Fonda's
"Jane has given me the oppor-
tunity to make contacts that would
have taken 10 times as long to make
on my own Brunctz said.
Although quite confident in his
abilities and the future of his
company.Excrfil USA, Brunctz said
his success lakes him by surprise.
"My rolodcx is filled with names I
only used to read about he said.
eenville to hold
lympic games
Kene said they are seeking
volunteers to train for the positions
arger of scorckecpers, chapcrones and
-lotte game officials. "Anybody over 16
can volunteer Kene said. The
reason they need to be 16 is be-
cause they are more independent
and can drive
pomes
ccial
tate
lity of
the
ist of
:oor-
the
held
lames
for
are
of
1 80
the
its
kveral
Imost
at
East
The
the
IV in
ipus.
Special Olympics is looking
for "buddies Buddies arc volunteers
that will be paired with the
athletes and escort them to the
sporting events and to lunch. "We
are trying to recruit groups on
campus, it's much easier to get
volunteers if you get groups as
opposed to individuals Kene said.
Games for the state of North
Carolina will be held May 30
through June 2. The Pitt County
games will be held in April.
Mark O'Brien, a senior at
East Carolina, said being a Special
Olympic volunteer is a great
experience. "Seeing the
excitement in their faces gives
you a feeling of total ex-
citement he said. "Something
you must experience yourself
'Toy Soldiers' takes
drug war to school
By Margi Morin
Staff Writer
The Miller School, a private
military boarding school in
Charlottesviile, Va.f is the scene for
this year's newest movie, 'Toy Sol-
diers
When a South American drug
ar is brought to the United States,
his son and an elite squad of com-
twmdos take the students of the
prestigious school hostage. The stu-
dents, considered "problem" chil-
dren from wealthy and influential
American families, serve as excel-
lent hostages for the terrorists.
To end the siege, the authori-
ties must either release the drug
czarormountanattackon the school
which would inevitably jeopardize
the lives of all students inside.
Meanwhile, a small group of
resourceful young men decide to
wage a deadly campaign against
the terrorists themselves. Leader of
the group is prankster Billy Tepper
played by Sean Astin.
His followers include Joey
Trotta (Wil Wheaton), son of a pow-
erful gangster father; Snuffy
Bradberry (Keith Coogan), son of
the top official of the Republican
Tarty; Ricardo Montoya (George
Perez), son of an influential lawyer;
and Hank Giles (T.E. Russell), son
to the House Armed Services Com-
mittee chairman.
The group's ingenuity is tested
to the fullest when the terrorist
leader decides to kill one hostage
each day until his father is released
from prison.
Academy Award winner, Louis
Gossett, Jr. starsas Dean Parker, the
no-nonsense dean of the school.
Parker, who is not at the school
when it is taken over, advises the
FBI as they devise a rescue attempt.
Special Agent R. Douglas
Rhoads of the FBI served as techni-
cal adviser for 'Toy Soldiers Be-
fore permitting the FBI seal to be
used in the movie, he worked with
props and wardrobe and coached
Mason Adams, who plays FBI
Deputy Director Otis Brown, on FBI
lingo and methodology.
'Tov Soldiers" was filmed at
J
the Miller School, a private military
boarding school built in 1876, lo-
cated in Charlortesville, Va. The
1,600 acres of wooded area sur-
rounding the school and the school's
lake were used in filming, and the
school's football field became an
airport of U.S. Army Apache and
Blackhawk helicopters.
According to production de-
signer, Chester Kaczenski, the film-
makers wanted the school to have a
wealthy look: traditional dark tones
and mahoganv wood. Since direc-
tor Daniel Petrie, Jr. went to board-
ing school he had a lot of input in the
designing.
The film production wrapped
up in San Antonio, Texas, at the U.S.
Post Office in Almo Plaza, which
doubled for a courthouse in
Barranquilla, Colombia, where the
terrorists first try to force the release
of the drug czar.
Accord ing to the film's prod uc-
ers, San Antonio had the perfect
Spanish colonial architecture to
double for Colombia, and Alamo
Square was easily transformed into
downtown Barranquilla. All store
and street signs were changed to
Spanish and a newspaper vendor
was set up with Spanish-language
newspapers.
� Photo CourtMy of Trl-SUr Picture
Billy Tepper (Sean Austin) tries to elude terrorist leader Luis Cali
(Andrew Divoff) in "Toy Soldiers a Tri Star Pictures release.
Wearing seatbelts prevents intimate knowledge of dashboard
By SherrtLynn Jernigan
Staff Writer
Would you dive off a nine-
storv building? Would you drive
h0 mph without the protection of
safety belts or air bags?
If your car were to crash at 60
save your life even at speeds as low
as 12 mph, and most accidents oc-
cur at speeds less than 40 mph.
Finding excuses for not wear-
ing safety belts, some individuals
say a safety belt would trap acci-
dent victims in burning or sub-
merged cars. Less than one out of
every 200 serious accidents involve
mph, the impact would be equiva
lerif WTtirnplrtgoff a'tallbvlfldirig: a fire, explosion or submersion in
IbJ.wiili Ijfniji ft. A 11 I ynli l i " Jii�' ll j�l,ii I L.WI I 111.
according to Dr. Steve Taylor, water.
driver's education professor.
About 25 million people are
injured in car accidents each year,
and about 45,000die. If more people
buckle up or install air bags these
figures can be reduced by almost
half, as well as the severity of the
injuries, Taylor says.
A pamphlet published by the
Governor's Highway Safety pro-
gram states that safety belts can
In such a case, a safety belt
would probably protect the victim
from injury or unconsciousness so
that he could remain unhurt and
able to escape.
Others say chances of survival
are greater when a victim is thrown
from the vehicle, instead of remain-
ing in a crashing car because of a
safety belt. Getting thrown from a
vehicle is more serious than it seems,
though. The only way out of the
vehicle is through the window or
the windshield,and thelandingspot
mav be in front of a moving vehicle,
on top of trees, rocks or pavement.
L. Taylor says some people
often wear their safetv belts but only
on long trips or on the freeways.
Ironically, he says freeways are the
safest roads to be on. Speeds may
be 65 rhphand greater, butheacT-dn
collisions, pedestrians, houses, and
objects, such as telephone poles are
eliminated, he adds.
The pamphlet also states that a
final excuse for not wearing safety
belts concerns the individual's
choice, because he may feel that he
is only hurting himself. A person
who is not wearing a safety belt
may be thrown against other pas-
sengers, injuring them. Ultimately,
the family and fnends of a dead or
injured accident victim, who was
not wearing his safety belt, may
suffer emotionally.
Anaircushion nstraintsvstem
is also designed toincreasechances
of survival. A pamphlet published
bv the Department of Transporta-
tion states that dnver air bags and
inflatorsareplaced in thehur(rhe
sharing wheel,miltfytterfger air
bags and inflatorsare placed in the
dashboard.
When the car starts, the system
ischarged and ready toinflate in the
event of a frontal crash at 10 mph
and greater. The sudden decolora-
tion causes the nitrogen gas inflator
to inflate the bag, and then the hag
deflates. The process takes about
125 of a second.
Air bags must be aplaced after
being inflated. Safety belts, too,
should be replaced after being sub-
mitted to high levels of stress. The
costs of installing and replacing air
bags are considered economical
when compared to the cost of a
human life.
Air bags are unaffected by age,
since thev are sealed from the envi-
njnmemwiUl osed. In addition, air
bfpW ItfRtdriilijblt und
likely to inflate without reason or
not inflate during a crash.
Even if an air bag were to go off
without cause, the deflation would
occur so rapidlv that the driver
probablv would not lose control
over his vehicle.
Furthermore, the gasin air bags
is not poisonous, nor should the
inflation processcauseheanngdam-
age
Jenkins
hosts
public art
forum
By Heather Modlin
Staff Writer
A Forum on Public Art was
held on Thursday, April 11, at 7
p.m. in Jenkin's Auditonum. The
forum, open to the public, was spon-
sored by the North Carolina Arts
Council.
A proposal to appropriate $25
million funding for renovations and
additions that will expand Joyner
Library's current square footage by
49 percent will soon go before the
general assembly.
The new addi tions will create a
main entrance which will open to
the southern currently less devel-
oped side of campus.
Visual Arts Director Jean
McLaughlin discussed current
guidelines in Percentage for Arts
Programs in North Carolina.
McLaughlin was accompanied by
panelists from the Joyner Library
Public Art Commission Selection
Committee, including Minnesota's
Director of the Percent for Art pro-
gram Regina Hannegan and ECU
artist and professor Clarence Mor-
gan.
Other panelists included Direc-
tor of Joyner Library Dr. Kenneth
Marks, architect Larry Robbs, artist
and chairman of Louisburg
College's Department of Fine and
Performing Arts William Hinton,
and Eugene Langford of the State
Campus Planning Office.
ECU student panelists included
art students Ethan Skemp, Sarah
Singh, and Jams Henderson.
The selection panelist reviewed
200 applications from artists work-
ing in a variety of different medi-
ums, in search of the artist that will
be commissioned to design the
$88,000 public art project. The ap-
plications contained nine slides of
the artists' recent work, an accom-
panying slide script, a current re-
sume, and a letter describing the
See Art, page 12
Performer to sine of
'herstory7 Monday
By Joseph Campbell
Special to The East Carolinian
'Take the Power is a trcasu red
part of my own personal archive -
and it should be so for all women
everywhere - Gloria Steinem
"One Fine Day is a strong,
stirring and spiritual film about
the women who paved the way, to
economic justice, political equal-
ity, and full self-expression - Bella
Abzug i
"A powerful performer. Kay's
performance wasa potentaddition
to our Washington, DC March for
Women's Lives - Molly Yard,
These are just a few of the
overwhelming responses to Kay
Weaver's equally overwhelming
one-woman show. She will per-
form for the public on Monday,
April 22, at 8 p.m. in Jenkins Au-
ditorium. She is being brought to
the campus by the Women's
Studies Program.
For the past eighteen years.
Weaver has worked as a producer
of both music and film, a record-
ing artist, songwriter, and per-
former. In 1983, she and
songwriting partner Jeri
Waxenberg formed Ci rce Record s,
a record company dedicated to
promoting positive role models
for women.
Then Weaver gained interna-
tional attention in 1985 for her
video One Fine Day. An Ameri-
can Film Festival Finalist, this 6-
minute film is touted as a music
video that evokes "the panoramic
'Golden Bo swallowed by time's progression
Kay Weaver
Young Adults" and was part of
PBS's "American Playhouse" se-
ries.
Soon after, Weaver joined
forces with scenarist Martha
Whelock to produce a sequel to
her remarkable debut. Take The
National Lampoons' Laugh break
I'm not sure when it happened.
It could have been a slow process
like radioactive decay, as week af-
ter week I had to get up at six and
put on a suitand consequently was
too tired on weekends to do any-
thing but look through my old high
school yearbook and weep.
Or maybe it happened sud-
denly, the first time I began a sen-
tence with the words "When I'm
gone In any case, one day roughly
eight months after graduating from
college, I realized 1 wasover the hill.
vously fingering their checkbooks.
"Hey I said, "first one who runs to
the Pacific Ocean and back gets to
sign me' and they took off through
four lanes of traffic.
Needless to say, the three who
returned enjoyed the joke im-
mensely, even when I said 1 was
kidding about signing. When Na-
tional Lampoon made me the best
offer 1 signed with them, becoming
head of the entire College Humor
division.
And I soon made them mil-
lions with my line of "I'm Drinkin'
Beer
I stood there in horror as my
personal table was swept and reset
for some kid, a ragged and stubbly
figure in sweats. But just as I was
about to unleash a devastating sat-
ire T froze. The new guest's clothes
were outlandish, and his sardonic
asides to the waiter seemed barely
English. But suddenly I had the
eerie feeling I was looking at my-
self, two years earlier�when I was
younger.
Through the restaurant's front
window it looked like the kid was
sweep of American herstory from Power plays tribute specifically to
the 19th century to the present modem women. Starting with the
moment Weaver's video was
also chosen by the American Li-
bra, y Association for inclusion in
its 1986 list of "Selected Films for
rural woman in touch with Mother
Earth, it moves to the city scene
featuring the working woman a nd
mother.
eating pate' de foie gras, which
all-purpose mugs, and the they'd told me they were out of. It
was hard to tell because of the rain,
though. As I walked away I was
all over for my 'Tarty University" accosted by a homeless person who
column. I was a star. But a few held his pathetically thin hand out
weeks later, an actor friend and I for alms. Fumbling in my pocket I
were lunching at Four Seasons, a told him, "Hangon a minute, I think
posh Manhattan restaurant I'vegotabuckforyousomewhere
As I charged the Lobster He winced and looked disgusted.
Thermidor to my NatLamp Visa, I "Nobody says 'buck' anymore; they
pointed to the waiter and joked to say a George' if they want to be
my friend, "Friend of yoursr The colloquial I held out the money
but he was already backing away,
The Fixx returns with revamped sound
By Jimmy Robinson
Special to The East Carolinian
The Rxx has a new record on
the market after a two year record-
ing break. The album is titled Ink
and features a dynamic collection
of songs that will surely add to the
artistic credibility the band has al-
ready earned.
The Rxx has developed a new
sound for themselves with the re-
leaseofJn. The band has escaped
the dense keyboard-driven sound
that was the basis of their previous
albums and moved intoaraw,hard-
driven, guitar sound.
The Rxx's guitar-driven em-
phasis is very powerful and appro-
music industry. Lead guitarist,
Jamie Westoram said, "we'vebeen
able to retain the rawer sound we
strived for on our last record, yet
add the best elements of our earlier
days to make what we feel is our
best record ever Theguitar-driven
music of Ink shows The Rxx's artis-
tic ability to explore new styles of
composing music. The band's new
sound won me as a fan and held my
styling The lyrics of the songs
examine the individual's role in a
constantly changing and complex
society. The Rxx adresses personal
greed"How Much Is Enough
"All Is Fair"), the loneliness of love
( "Crucified "Still Around"), and
the attempt to maintain intimacy in
an impersonal worU("ShutItOur").
JnJk is a pursuit onto new
grounds for The Rxx and they ha ve
111 tell you how it happened; maybe popular "HEY! BLOW ME base-
youll learn something. In many ball caps. Fan mail poured in from
primitive societies, the elders of the
tribe are looked on with respect
because of their immense age and
wisdom. In others, they are driven
out onto the icy tundra to die like
dogs.
My senior year in college, I was
a Golden Boy. Everyone wanted
me; I was known as one of the three
hippest college kids in the middle- gag here is that unemployed actors
weight bracket. traditionally moonlight as food ser- saying, "Get away from me, man, I
And they spared no expense to vice professionals. But instead of don't want your uncool money
try to recruit me. I remember once smiling at the incredibly witty com- As he shambled up an alky I heard
the heads of three agencies and a ment, the waiter sneered, "Jesus him mumble he hoped nobody had
ratty little guy from Rolling Stone Christ, that joke is at least three seen him talking to me
were sitting around the pool at the years old. Now beat it; I need your
Beverly Wilshire with me, ner- table
As I walked back to work I
See Boy. page 13
COMINGUP
attention through the energy of the foundwhatappearstobethesound
hard leadguitar. they have been searching for
The lyrics of lead vocalist Cy through their years of writing mu-
Cumin are more powerful on Ink
than on any of their previous al-
bums. Cumin has the ability to
express to the listener the impor-
tance of what the song is saying
priate for the changing styles of the through his impeccable vocal
sic. I recommend Ink to old Rxx
fans and those who like guitar-
driven music Ink hasmademean
honest Rxx fan and I look forward
to their next record sometime in the
future.
Attic
Thursday
Yams From
Outer Space
Friday
Earth Murchants
Saturday
Nantucket
New DeliCRocksMendenhall
ThursdayThursdayThursday
Old Habitsdollar nightFriday
FridayFridaySaturday
BadBob&TheBruce FryeMisery
Rocking HorsesSunday
SaturdayParents
Dillon Fence





12 She Cant (Carolinian April 18,1991
�yiETt isiOTES �! Big band jazz extravaganza comes to Ramada
� Ml fc� � -��� alaa � J� C7 3 . . . V TK, "JW FUnd Bash and
BulletBoys to release new home video
Welcome to Metal Notes! This week's notes are dedicated to
Cristea Tache, a fellow headbanger and friend of mine from Roma-
nia. Yes, that'sright� Romania. Cristea was in a serious car acddent
a couple months ago and his only enjoyment these days is jamming
to bands like Aerosmith, Slaughter, Metallic, the Black Crowes,
Mass and much more. Happy healing, Cristea, and keep rockin
Now, on with this week in metal. It has been confirmed that Skid
Row will be the opening act on the first leg of the Guns N' Roses tour.
The tour will kick off in Wisconsin on May 24. Meanwhile, Skid Row
is currently tracking LP number two. The record should be out
around June 11.
Toxa Tora's second opus, Wild America, is in its finishing stages.
VoiVod hopes to release their next album. Angel Rat, in the
summer.
TNTs fourth effort is due out in June with John Macaluso on
drums.
LA. Guns will be releasing their third LP, 3-D, soon.
Guitarist Doug Aldrich, who is currently filling in on the road
with House of Lords, has left Hurricane to join Bad Moon Rising, a
band that features Kal Swan. You may remember Swan and Aldrich
together before when they played in Califomia-based outfit Lion.
Contraband, which features the all-star lineup of Raft's drum-
mer Bobby Blotzer, L.A. Guns' guitarist Tracii Guns, Vixen's bassist
SharePedersen,MSG'sguitarist MichaelSchenkerand Shark Island's
vocalist Richard Black, will put out their first album on April 30. The
leadoff singlevideo from the LP is "All the Way From Memphis a
kickm' song originally done by Ian Hunter's band, Mott the Hoople.
Raft is working on a new record that will include their top singles
from six albums. The rock rodents plan to tour from late June until
the fall before they cut their next LP.
White Lion premiered their newest video "Love Don't Come
Easy" on Headbanger's Ball this past weekend.
Pick up the latest issue of Rip magazine and get the seoopon what
reallv happened to Def Leppard's Steve "Steamin" dark before he
passed awav in early January. The article also includes background
information on Clark and his rise to superstar guitarist.
Correction: Pantera's latest video is 'Tsyco Holiday not "Psycho
Cowbov Speaking of Pantera, they have a new home video coming
out this month. The "vid" will contain three video clips and live
footage
And the BulletBoys will release their own home video, 'Tigs in
Mud this month. Videos include "Smooth Up "For the Love of
Monev" and live performances from Japan.
North Carolina's Firehouse recently shot their second video for
the ballad "Love of A Lifetime" 'n Los Angeles.
Vile Extistence will open up for heavy metal glam band Eclipse
at Bikini's in Atlantic Beach in May. There's no set date at this time,
but Metal Notes will keep you posted.
Until next week, play it loud or don't play it at all.
� Compiled by "Diuy" Dann� Nevgloaki
By J.D. Jamison
Special to The Ea�t Carolinian
A charity concert, featuring big
band and jazz musicians playing
swing music from the 1930s, '40s
and '50s, will be held this Sunday at
the Ramada Inn in Greenville.
Sponsored by Friends In Need
(FIN), the "Big Band Bash and Jazz
Extravaganza" headlines national
jazz recording artists Dan Barrett
and Ken Peplowski. They will per-
form in small sets accompanied by
North Carol ma jazz players: George
Broussard, Jim Crawford, Steve
Creech, Joe DiStefano, Mark Ford,
Art
artists' philosophical approach to
public art.
Selection Panelists said thatart-
ists are encouraged to look holisti-
cally at the plaza and passageway
areas to create pedestrian gathenng
places, neutral zones.
Thought before entering the li-
brary, and gestures which reference
and extend the central role played
by the library throughout the cam-
pus.
The project calls for an inte-
grated approach which creates a
sense of place, rather than the place-
Dick Gable and Michael
Stephenson. Also joining these play-
ers is an 18-piece big band of local
and regional artists. While theevent
may seem light-hearted, its purpose
is much more serious.
FTN is a volunteer-run, non-
profit charitable organization HN
raises money to make health-care
equipment, supplies and services
available to the population.
FIN aids the thousands of
people who face the day-to-day
struggle of living with a chronic
disease or disabling condition who
are without the financial means to
purchase health-care items, which
will allow them to lead a more pn
ductive life.
Their target is individuals who
have "fallen through the cracks" of
our public and private health-care
systems. MorespedficaUy, those not
poor enough to qualify for public
assistance and not financially sol-
vent enough to pay for ongoing
health-related services and equip-
ment.
FIN also sponsorsa larger event
each September, the Triangle Jazz
Party in Raleigh. This event fea-
tures 14 internationally renowned
jazz musicians playing traditional
swing and mainstream jazz
The "Big Band Bash and Jazz
Extravaganza" will run from 2 to �
p.m.
Tickets for the event are15 per
person or$25 per ample Trxvmay
be purchased at lefferson's Florists
and the Ramada Inn in Greenville,
or buv contacting Sieve or DottK
Bladesat'W7S2 aK47 rickets will
also be available at the door on i
first-come, hrst sere basis starting
at 1.30 p.m.
As if the satisfying so
(azzand swing are nor. enough rea
son for attending then' is the
important satisfaction that a fl
in need is being helped
Continued from page 11
ment of discreet objects.
The Selection Panelistsalsosaid
that the project provides opportu-
nities for the artist to engage the
University community in an active
conversation about the importance
of art and the artist to the public
environment.
Student Panelist Jams
Henderson said of the project, "Pub-
lic Art is the way artists can commu-
nicatetheirmessages,intentionsand
concepts to the public. It's a good
way for the public to see the artist
workoutMdeofthegallery setting
Dunng this presentation, pan-
elist Flannegan showed slides illus-
trating the possibilitiesof public art
Examples included the Statue
of Liberty, the Vietnam Veteran's
Memorial, a sculpture garden, rec-
reational areas and others.
Architect Larry Robbs ex-
plained the physical changes that
would occur in Joyner Library
Renovations would include a new
entrance, additions to the library's
space, a plaza with a bell tower and
other added extras.
Hmton bneflv summarized a
few of the artists' phik - : il ap-
proaches to public art Opinion;
varied, but Hinton stressed the mv
portanceof" making something
you can see, otil .it something that
doesn't exist
Morgan emphasized thi �
mat the project should not �
callv overt, and that the multi-cui
rural values of a divers' commu-
nity should be considered in the
project.
Heaiso stressed mat tb
should not only be decorattvi
functional as well
TJw East Carolinain would like to wish everyone a happy
and safe Barefoot on the Mall. Enjoy the festivities and
remember to throw birdseed, not rice at 77k7 Rocky Horror
Picture Show.
OAVIO's
AUTOMOTIVE
Focaign DontMhc
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Prices Effective Wednesday, April 17
through Saturday April 20, 1991
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w MMc� aami
Boy
convinced myself it was nothing.
The waiter was just some wannabe
actor who'd taken offense at my
joke and the homeless guy was ob-
viously a nut. I hadn't gone soft
No, I was shll hungry�hungry like
the wolf.
just then 1 entered mv office
and saw the weirdest human being
I'd ever seen, sprawled in mv La-Z-
Boy, feet upon my mahogany desk
It turned out to be female, dressed
in a bartered poncho and a plaid
acrylic tam-o-shanter The back of
its head was carefully shaved and
tattooed with a disturbingly life-
like human face, and its real face
was hidden by a mass of he-dved
dreadlocks.
It rose, walked backward tome,
and extended a hand "Aloha,
homeboyo, O'Keefe, nest ce pas1"
It started at my leather jacket and
hightops. "Rad threads you w,
sort of late-eighties retro, very
campv George, my boss, cleared
his throat. "Danny, this is Miss
Charboneau, here about the intern-
ship he said 1 tried not to stare
"Cool. Some coffee?" I asked
They were silent. George said qui-
etlv, "Danny, coffee's history. Diet
Slice is the way to go now; that's
what Miss Charboneau savs the kids
are drinking
They exchanged a hx�k Ner-
vously, I plunged back in. "Yeah, I
think you'll like it here 1 said.
"Right now we're working on the 1
Went to College and All I got was
TOTALLY WASTED T-shirt se-
ries I couldn't help but giggle
once again at my own nlliance
Miss Charboneau looked pained
"Damage report on Sir Tardlmg
&�
CUSTOM MA-DL
WEDDZHQ XHp
jMpDESMXH) Bfps'
CCTor appointment call.
fliUSctrcyat 757-553
you Tt'xiff-W
r-
here?" she said to '
voice There was a
awkward silence
was asking if she'd
on as her secretary, I
be pensioned off.
I finally had to fa
"out of the loop,
curve" Not only wa
longer "on the puls
seemed to be hrmlv
was completely out!
the current vouth i
My dav was
vavvned before me
meaner, leaner rwt
hacks were getting
me in
The worst pro
lingo. It 1 could rust i
slang, 1 thought, thel
low 1 deeded to goj
suburban home to
and intensi 1
match with the yo
the false face
I'd listen to t
radio station, mai
rnends shll in sen
again I'd be honed
edge of hipness.
Arriving at thei
I expected a warrm
I called, but there
Wandering into th
found mv pa rents
mv younger broth
He was lvingj
home from college
with newlv acqi
dreads, coiorful
tattooed on the
Mv mother was fee
as he reclined, in RJ
Mv father wasl
MTh 11 am-
Break open yo
WZMB is
a 250 Al
6

Cr





omes to Ramada
pmio lead a n
t!t is indn id
rhe Big Kind K�sh and azz
inza v ill run tmm 2 to s"
� te for the event are$15 per
t'uple The) ma)
ised at k?fferson's Florists
the Ramada Inn in t ,nnn ille
t finana g Steve or Dotbe
f84 ' fit kctv v ili
kxr on a
i
i is �
, ige 11
.
, irl O �
led the im
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thini
it tho multi � ul

at
i happy
; and
orror
4ITED COLORS
� BENETTON.
I I
'R (
MRS

n
PENS
Deposit Required: $20.00
�3
�mplrtr nnS vlntKW on dismay in vmir r,MUr ho.s�orp
n . n r ,m �,
Boy.
glfre Caat (Earoltnfan April 18,1991 13
convinced myself it was nothing.
The waiter was jus some wannabe
a-tor who'd taken offense at my
joke and the homeless guy was ob-
viously a nut. I hadn't gone soft.
No, 1 was stall hungry�hungry like
the wolf.
lust then I entered my office
and saw the weirdest human being
I d ever seen, sprawled in my La-Z-
flov. feet upon my mahogany desk.
!t turned out to be female, dressed
in a bartered poncho and a plaid
acrylic tam-o-shanter. The back of
its head was carefully shaved and
tattooed with a disturbingly life-
like human face, and its real face
vn is hidden by a mass of tie-dyed
dreadlocks.
It mse, walked backward tome,
and extended a hand. "Aloha,
imeboyo, O'Keefe, n'est ce pas?"
� started at my leather jacket and
jhtops. "Rad threads you got,
soil of late-eighties retro, very
wimpy" George, my boss, cleared
his throat. "Danny, this is Miss
Charboneau, here about the intern-
ship he said I tried not to stare.
Cool. Some coffee?" I asked.
"hey were silent. George said qui-
etly, Danny, coffee's history. Diet
Slice is the way to go now; that's
v hat Miss Charboneau saysthe kids
are dnnking
They exchanged a look. Ner-
vously, I plunged back in. "Yeah, I
think you 11 like it here I said.
Right now we're working on the '1
Went to College and All I got was
I 'TALLY WASTED T-shirt se-
ries " 1 couldn't help but giggle
once again at my own brilliance.
Miss Charboneau looked pained.
Damage report on Sir Tardling
here?" she said to George in a low
voice. There was a few minutes of
awkward silence. When I left, he
was asking if she'd like me to stay
on as her secretary, or if I should just
be pensioned off.
I finally had to face facts. I was
"out of the loop "behind the
curve Not only was my finger no
longer "on the pulse my thumb
seemed to be firmly "up my ass I
was completely out of touch with
the current youth culture.
My day was over; the grave
yawned before me. And younger,
meaner, leaner twenty-something
hacks were getting ready to shove
me in.
The worst problem was the
lingo. If I could just master this new
slang, 1 thought, the rest would fol-
low. I decided to go to my parents'
suburban home for the weekend
and intensively train for my return
match with the young witch with
the false face.
I'd listen to the local college
radio station, make a few calls to
friends still in school�and once
again I'd be honed to a razor-sharp
edge of hipness. Or so I thought.
Arriving at the old homestead,
I expected a warm greeting. "Hello
I called, but there was no answer.
Wandering into the living room, I
found my parents hovering over
my younger brother.
He was lying on the couch,
home from college for the weekend
with newly acquired rainbow
dreads, colorful denim hat and face
tattooed on the back of his head.
My mother was feeding him grapes
as he reclined, in Roman fashion.
My father was removing bun-
Contlnued from page 11
ions from his feet with a pumice
stone. I couldn't contain myself.
"Larry I burst out. "You've got to
helpme! I need you to teach me all
the lastest college slang, and teach
me to braid my hair like that, and
maybe you know a good tattoo par-
lor nearby
I ran out of breath, and my
brother's "face" convulsed as the
other side of his head spluttered
with mirth. "Jack my ass, thee art
maxin' faced, mon! Give it up,
shiv?"
My father smiled, tears of pride
inhiseyes. "Son,you'rethecoolest
he told my brother, gently rubbing
his face against his foot like a cat.
"You, on the other hand �" My
own parents began to point and
laugh at my clothes. When my
mother ceremoniously unrolled her
Supp-Hose and handed them to
me, I left the room, cheeks burning,
and took refuge in what had once
been my own room.
My old collection of well-
thumbed pornography comforted
me a little, though the same cannot
be said of the moldy towels and
broken chairs my paren ts had stored
where my bed used to be.
I thought about it again, this
rjmeitdidn'tseemsobad. Irealized
that the painof aging was natural. It
was only right that I step aside, give
the new generation its day, and en-
joy my golden years as best I could.
Miss Charboneau decided
NatLamp wasn't cool enough for
her and went to work for Sassy
instead. I got my old job back. I'm
23, and not as funny as I once was,
bu 11 ha ve learned to enjoy checkers
and shuffleboard.
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Its lik� some . . . I n;t 111 if HI dream
Fish Sandwich
Bie Adam
Rich's Nuthouse By Rich
BAHCroor w rue . vecpep � . . .� � oo
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Aprl 78,7997
Pirates con
JuniorthirdDaseman JotinG I
5 2 and are now rr" '
i
Rising track
on NCAA to
Bv Rick Chann
Staff Writer
Vef) little if any, mari I
would be needed too mvince p -
that Danita Roseboro is one of the
top spnnters m theolonial
lebc Association.
Roseboro's running careei
started six yi a whensh �
gan running summer track ti "
grade. Her her older sister
was also a sprinter, served
Roseboro's impetus to begin run-
ning in high sh.H-l
At North Faisyth High
she competed in track and volley-
ball for four vearsand basketball fi w
two. She earned tour varsity letters
in track and was also the capta i
tour years.
While in high school, Rosi �
broke her sister s 101 -meter si
record to go along with all confer-
ence honors in the 10O and 2 0-
meters. At the state meet her senk
year, Roseboro was second in the
2tXmeter and third in the 1 (O-meter
Committee to
take criminal
activity out of
NCAA
(AP) �The idea or decriminal-
izing anvthing scan- somt pei pk
but apparently not the folks at the
NCAA. And at hrst glance you
might think that theorganizatk w
little faith is taking a big leap on this
one.
For manv years the NCAA had
a rule prohibiting colleges and foot-
ball bowl committees from cutting
deals for their postseason extrava-
ganzasunhl theconclusionof games
on the first Saturdav alter the third
Tuesday in November
Being long-winded was not
"pick'em" dav'sonlv drawback It
seems that even, hodv absolutely
everybody at one time or another
ignored the rule governing the X
lechon process to such an extent
that it was finallv deemed unen-
forceable.
So back in January, the NC A A
simply wiped bvlaw 308.4 trom
the books. And the bowl commit-
tees, abhorring a vacuum, have
rushed into the void w ith pmmises
to police themselves
In meetings beginning Tues-
day in Orlando. Fla and running
through Thursday, the directors of
the 18 bowls sat down at the same
table to work out the detail s onhi m
to achieve that lofty goal.


wa-
When someone mentioned to
NCAA ofhcial John Swofford that
such a self-governing arrangement
sounded suspiciously like putting
the foxes in charge of the henhouse,
he laughed.
'Teople have every right to be
cynical said Swofford, athlete di-
rector at North Carolina and an in-
See NCAA, page 16
Twc �
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By Ml
For'
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ball gam I
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day with the
Auction.
On Fndi
earnest with
and a concert
tennis toumaj
cooking cont
and the awa
cookers will





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3Ec M. fejgUt dF
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Junto �'
5 2 a
Rising trad
on NCAA to
Bv Rickhann
Suf



ba forfourvvar
tw

broki -
ri . ' i I
end
rrx-tor
year Roseboi
200-rrvetei
Committee to
take criminal
activity out of
NCAA
���� idearfd i
izinganvi - -
but appai
NCAA ��
little fa� Stal
one
For mam years th Si '�
a rule prohibiting (
ball bowl v �� �' tteesli
deab tor their postseasoi
ganzasunti tl
on tht- first Sarui
Tuesda) in N
Being long ivinded ��
"pkk'em da - �nl di
seeirBthateverv'bixi abs
everybody itonel
ignored the ruk � � "
iection process to s
that it was fina
farceabte
So back ; i
simplv wiped b aw
tK Kks And the bowl
lees abhornng i
rushed into thl
to poboe themselves
In meetings beg nning
dav in Orlando F runr
through Thursday thedirecl
the 18 bowls &
table to work
to achieve that loftv goal
Pit
Whtn snHxrKi mentioned
NCAA official John Swoftbrd that
such a setf-goverrung arrangement
sounded suspiooush like putting
the foxes in charpe ot the henhou s
he laughed
"People have every nght to be
cynical said Swofford. athletic di
rector at North Carolina and an in
See NCAA, page 16


- � �





V i- hatr Primus
April 18,1991
MUTING
it to discuss the
Lin the greatest
tiii
By Rich
fllje iEaat (EaruHntan
15
By Parnell
sxW'X�Sa-S: ��x-x �:
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Wti WsESt vfc
SPtctM. HtfMb dF
TuvtNXX rlfct CMt'
-fecT MKNb
TAJuft PrM0T VH
V. THt VH K -WMTfcrtt
Wolf pack
By Owen Cox
Staff Writer
Celesta Hottman � ECU Pholo Lab
Juntorthird baseman John Gast dives back to first base on a pick off attempt ECU lost to N.C. State Tuesday
5-2 and are now fourth in CAA standings
Rising track star sets sights
on NCAA tournament
It looked like a home run derby
for the first four innings, then settled
into a pitcher's duel for the last five,
when ECU took on N.C. State Tues-
day evening at Harrington Field.
The Pirates, hurt by four Wolfpack
homers, lost 5-2.
The long ball was the story
early,withboth teamsaccounted for
five home ru ns a nd all the scoring in
the contest. "Give credit to their
(N.C. State) hitters; they hit good
pitches (for their homers) Head
Coach Gary Overton said.
Overton was pleased with the
Pirate effort also. "We played better
than we have all year; we played
outstandingdcfense'Overtonsaid.
'Tonight we learned we could play
well on a daily basis
The Pirates fell behind early.
With two out in the first, Wolfpack
batter Jeff Piercedrilled a John White
pitch over the trees in left to slake
N.C. State to a 1-0 lead
The third proved no better n r
White, as the first two betters be
faced in the inning, catcher Jimmy
Holland and centeriielder Chris
Long, both went deep to put the
Pack up 3-0.
ThePiratescountered with h. i
in the bottom Of the frame. I
Beck flied to right to lead off the
inning. Corey Short then tripled to
right center for the Pirates tirst hit
the game. Aftera Barry Nan n p p
out, David Leisten knocked a
Donahue fastball over the
leftforhissecondhomrotU. n
Pat Watkins grounded to short �
end the inning with the Pirate ;r a il
ing by one, 3-2.
The fourth brought more p ���� r
for the Pack, though. With oi
Jeff Monin singled off Johnny ! k
That was followed bv N.C Sta
fourth
By Rick Chann
Staff Writer
rev
in
Verv little, if any, marketing
would be needed tocon vtnee people
that Danita Roseboro is one of the
top sprinters in the Colonial Ath-
letic Association.
Roseboro's running career
started six years ago when she be-
gan running summer track in 8th
grade. Her her older sister, who
was also a sprinter, served as
Roseboro's impetus to begin run-
ning in high school.
At North Forsyth High Sclxxl
she competed in track and volley-
ball for four years and basketball for
two. She earned four varsity letters
in track and was also the captain all
tour years.
While in high school,Roseboro
broke her sister's 100-meter school
record to go along with all confer-
ence honors in the 100- and 21XV
meters. At the state meet her senior
year, Roseboro was second in the
200-meterand third in the 100-meter
Committee to
take criminal
activity out of
NCAA
(AP) �The idea of decriminal-
iing anything scares some people,
but apparently not the folks at the
NCAA. And at first glance, you
might think that the organization of
h ttle faith is taking a big leap on this
one.
For many years the NCAA had
a rule prohibiting colleges and foot-
ball bowl committees from cutting
deals for their postseason extrava-
ganzasuntil the conclusionof games
on the first Saturday after the third
Tuesday in November.
Being long-winded was not
"pick 'em" day's only drawback. It
seems tha t everybod y�absol u tely
everybody at one time or another�
lgrtored the rule governing the se-
lection process to such an extent
that it was finally deemed unen-
forceable.
So back in January, the NCAA
simply wiped bylaw 30.8.4 from
the books And the bowl commit-
tees, abhorring a vacuum, have
rushed into the void with promises
to police themselves
In meetings beginning Tues-
day in Orlando, Fla and running
through Thursday, the directors o(
the 18 bowls sat down at the same
table to workout thedetailson how
to achieve that lofty goal.
and set the citycount
the 100-meter.
Roseboro wasal� honored by
theWtnsfon SalemChronkk herjun-
ior year when she was named the
rvst female high school ithlete in
Winston-Salem
List season Roseboro has the
benentot running with neofE L 5
best sprinters. Vanessa Smith, who
influenced her to workharder Bet-
tor training in college has improved
her times and last season she set
personal bests running the 100
meter in 1 1 and the 200 meter in
245,onlytwotenths4 fa isoondofi
Smith's school record.
Her goals include the school
record in the 100-meter and 200-
meter as well as qualifying tor the
NCAA meet in both events.
Roseboro feels she is physk all) ca-
pable of these goals and only needs
10 sharpen her mental appro h
She is well on her waj to these
goals. In her freshman season, she
was second in the 100-meter and on
the winning 4xl00-meter team at
the Colonial Athletic Association
meet She also placed sixth at the
prestigious Penn relays.
"If I know 1 did my best then
the place doesn't mean as much
Roseboro said.
Ihis season, though,
Roseboro's places have been very
good She placed second in the 200-
meter and third in the 100 4x100-
and 44i H-meter relays this past
weekend at the CAA tournament.
Roseboro also says that first
year head coach Carol Slowick "has
dene a good job and she's a good
coach Coach Slowick has moved
Roseboro on to the 4400-meter re-
lav team which Roseboro feels has
helped her 100-meter and 200-
mrneter efforts.
Along with seniors Joy Dorsey
and Diane Jacobs, Roseboro enjoys
leading the team and helping them
vork together. Her efforts, along
with a gixxi attitude, will make the
team stronger and bring respect and
exposure to the woman's track pro-
gram.
Lady Pirates sw p
doubleheader
By Joe Corley
Special to the East Carolinian
Danita Roseboro
The most important area of
Roseboro's strength comes from a
supportive family. She speaks on
the phone to her mother to get
support and encouragement for
school work and track.
She also has a close relation-
ship with the person she looks up
to, her grandmother. Since Roseboro
was young, she has been traveling
with her grandmother, strengthen-
ing their rdationship.This past sum-
mer they traveled to Canada for the
third time.
If, in the near future, Roseboro
places in the NCAA meet she will
be planning another trip with her
grandmother.
The Lady Pirate softball team
sweptbothgamesofadoiib'H ;
against visiting UNC-Char
Monday afternoon. ECU �
first game by a score of 1-Oand
second game by a score of 2 1 Bol
games went into extra innirtj
Astrong wind blowing in : i.
both games defensive duels a
ther teams' offense wasabie to
up with much. ECU's Jenn)
sonsandUNCCsCourtni y 1 Lai s
both pitched complete games
both games.
Theonlv run scored in thx
J
game came in the bottom I
eighth inning. In extra ton
softball,eachteamstartstrv
with a runner on second has,
UNC C went down in order i i
top of the eighth, ECU cam �
with Rachel Chamberlain !� st
base.
The first batter, Lisa Corj
reached first on a bunt . ha
Hooker then advanced runners to
Ultimate team s
fnsbee extravagc
By Gary Hurlev
Staff Writer
DallR��d-fcCU Photo Ub
Two Helios members practice before a game on College Hill. This Saturday the ECU Ultimate club is
sponsoring a Fnsbee Appreciation Day on the bottom of College Hill.
ECU'S Ultimate Team
sponsoring Fnsbee Appro iat
Day this Saturday at the he-
College Hill. The day is -
bv the Irates and Helios ? �
J
together anyone who er
"throwing the plastic A
begin around 2:00 p.m.
The basic idea for Rrisbee p
preciation Day is to spend a fun
afternoon centered around fri
"We're also using the da)
propaganda and promotion
Keith Lewis said. "We'd like
somenewplayersforthetea and
we always enjoy playing f
crowd
"Theday is not corner- daroui
Ultimate Frisbee though, added
Hdioscaptain DocOrndort. "l omt
down just to toss it around. We like
to see a lot of discs in the air. Or you
could bring a blanket and just h
out
The clubs' main interests be in
Pirates prepare
By Matt Mumma
Sports Editor
igskin Pig-Out
i
this
When someone mentioned to
NCAA official John Swofford that
such a self-governing arrangement
sounded suspiciously like putting
the foxes in charge of the henhouse,
he laughed.
'Teople have every right to be
cynical said Swofford, athletic di-
rector at North Carolina and an in-
See NCAA, page 16
For eight vears now the annual
Pigskin Pig-Out has graced ECU
every spring with football and base-
ball games among other festivities.
The rig-Out begins or Thurs-
day with theGolf Classic Social and
Auction.
On Friday the action starts in
earnest with fircw 'ks, � carnival
and a concert, as well as a golf and
tennis tournament The actual pig
cooking contest begins on Friday
and the awards for the best pig
cookers will be announced on Sat-
urday.
A Breakfast of Champions at
the Hilton Inn will select and honor
the finest atheletesatECU.The Punt
Pass and Kick contest as well as
other fun games will be around for
the kids in the morning before the
big football game.
At ?:30 the football scrimmage
will get under way at Ficklen Sta-
dium for those die hard fans who
cannot get enough football. After
the game the Four Tops will play a
concert hashing out all their old hits
as only the Four Tops can
The Pirate baseball team (18-
16-1) will play UNC-Wilmington
(22-16) at Harrington Field in their
first game of the weekend. On Sun-
day they will play another game at
2 p.m.
To conclude the festivities the
Teenage Mutant Ninjai Turtles, on
the road on their latest 'Coming
Out of their Shell' tour, will play in
Minges Coliseum on Sunday at 5
p.m.
The cost of the football game
and Four Tops concert is $12 for
adults at the gate and $5 for stu-
dents. To eat some barbecue on Sat-
urday the cost is $4 from 10a.m. to
4pm or $350 for those who pay in
advance.





We hate Primus
MEETING
eet to discuss the
plan the greatest
e year
By Rich
- SfCe Try LiT6
r
-
.�:
)
Bie Adam
;
90- Ctffc. J4� f-t�f
'I
H2
lc �r
yu r
PEOPLE WHO SHOULDN T BE ALLOWED TO LIVE
By Chris
By Brad
-jf
. :
April 18,1991
Olhg lEant (Carolinian
15
By ParneM
rfcT ivv:oukv
SKctKL feMMt dF
-fcuTT HLM
TUJfcJCrYSMT
. TM VH K saWTUMea
MYa�4�USUM,1�J
SPORTS
Wo
2
By Owen Cox
Staff Writer
batter JenTfercedrilledaJcihn White
pitch over the trees in left to stake
N.CStatetoal-Otead.
The third proved no better for
While, as the first two batters he
faced in the inning, catcher Jimmy
Holland and centerfielder Chns
Long, bom went deep to put the
Pack up W).
ThePiratescountered with two
in the bottom of the frame. Glynn
Beck fbed to right to lead off the
CMta Hoffman � ECU Photo Ub
Junior third baseman John Gast dives back to first base on a pick off attempt ECU tost to N.C. State Tuesday
5-2 and are now fourth in CAA standings
Rising track star sets sights
on NCAA tournament
It looked likeahome run derby
forthe first four inriings, then settled
into a pitcher's duel for me last five,
when ECU took on N.C State Tues-
day evening at Harrington Held.
The Pirates, hurt by four Wolfpack
homers, lost 5-2.
The long ball was the story
early ,withboth teamsaccounted for
fivehomerunsandanthescoringin inning. Corey Short then tripled to
the contest "Give credit to their rightcenterforthePiratesfirsthitof
(N.C State) hitters; they hit good thegame. After a Barry Narron pop
pitches (for their homers) Head out, David Leisten knocked a Matt
Coach Gary Overton said. Donahue fastball over the wall in
Overton was pleased with the left for his second homerof theyoar
Rrateeffortalso. "We played better Pat Watkins grounded to short to
than we have all year, we played end theinningwith the Pirates trail
outstandingdefense Overtonsaid ing by one, 3-2.
Toraghtwelearnedwecouldplay Thefourthbroughtmorepower
well on a daily basis forthe Pack, though. With one out
The Pirates fell behind early. Jeff Monin singled off Johnny Beck
Wim two out in the first Wolfpack That was followed by NX
fourth homer
byPatOougl
their k l '
he
hitv ;i r
held m check bv the
Donata
�eft �
wary
(Dim
take-
.v- j
inf
tWO I
re'
ar.J
rnv
aga
�j
tkmv
: this
�enes
:ton
By Rick Chann
Staff Writer
Very little, if any, marketing
would be needed toconvince people
that Danita Roseboro is one of the
top sprinters in the Colonial Ath-
letic Association.
Roseboro's running career
started six years ago when she be-
gan running summer track in 8th
grade. Her her older sister, who
was also a sprinter, served as
Roseboro's impetus to begin run-
rung in high school.
- At North Forsyth High School
she competed in track and volley-
ball for four yearsand basketball for
two. She earned four varsity letters
in track and was also me captain all
four years.
While in high school, Roseboro
broke her sister's 100-meter school
record to go along with all confer-
ence honors in the 100- and 200-
meters. At the state meet her senior
year, Roseboro was second in the
200-meterand third in the 100-meter
Committee to
take criminal
activity out of
NCAA
(AP) �The idea of decriminal-
izing anything scares some people,
but apparently not the folks at the
NCAA. And at first glance, you
might think that the organization of
li ttle faith is taking a big leap on this
one.
For many years the NCAA had
a rule prohibiting colleges and foot-
bail bowl committees from cutting
deals for their postseason extrava-
ganzas until theoondusion of games
on the first Saturday after the third
Tuesday in November.
Being long-winded was not
"pick 'em" dasonly drawback. It
stwrothatevetybody�absolutely
everybody at one time or another�
ignored the rule governing the se-
lection process to such an extent
that it was finally deemed unen-
forceable.
So back in January, the NCAA
simply wiped bylaw 308.4 from
the books. And the bowl commit-
tees, abhorring a vacuum, have
rushed into the void with promises
to police themselves.
In meetings beginning Tues-
day in Orlando, Fk and running
through Thursday, the directors of
the 18 bowls sat down at the same
table to workout thedetailsonhow
to achieve that lofty goal.
and set the citycountry record in
the 100-meter.
Roseboro was also honored by
the Winston-Salem Chwntck her jun-
ior year when she was named the
best female high school athlete in
Winston-Salem.
Last season, Roseboro has the
benefit of running with oneof ECU'S
best sprinters, Vanessa Smith, who
influenced her to work harder Bet-
ter training in college has improved
her times and last season she set
personal bests running the 100-
meter in 11 8 and the 200-meter in
245, only two tenthsot abscond off
Smith's school record.
Her goals include the school
record in the 100-meter and 200-
meter as well as qualifying for the
NCAA meet in both events.
Roseboro feels she is physically ca-
pable of these goals and only needs
to sharpen her mental approach.
She is well on her way to these
goals. In her freshman season, she
was second in the 100-meter and on
the winning 4xl00-meter team at
the Colonial Athletic Association
meet. She also placed sixth at the
prestigious Penn relays.
"If I know I did my best then
the place doesn't mean as much
Roseboro said.
This season, though,
Roseboro's places have been very
good. She placed second in the 200-
meter and third in the 100 4x100-
and 4x400-meter relays this past
weekend at the CAA tournament
Roseboro also says that first
year head coach Carol Slowick "has
done a good job and she's a good
coach' Coach Slowkk has moved
Roseboro on to the 4x400-meter re-
lay team which Roseboro feels has
helped her 100-meter and 200-
mmeter efforts.
Along with seniors Joy Dorsey
and Diane Jacobs, Roseboro enjoys
leading the team and helping them
work together. Her efforts, along
with a good attitude, will make the
team stronger and bringrespectand
exposure to the woman's track pro-
gram.
Lady Pirates sweep
doubleheader
Danita Roseboro
The most important area of
Roseboro's strength comes from a
supportive family. She speaks on
the phone to her mother to get
support and encouragement for
$chooJ work and track-
She also has a dose relation-
ship with the person she looks up
to, her grandmother. Since Roseboro
was young, she has been traveling
with her grandmother, strengthen-
ing thefrrelationship.Thispast sum-
mer they traveled to Canada for the
third time.
If, in the near future, Roseboro
places in the NCAA meet she will
be planning another trip with her
grandmother.
By Joe Corley
Special to the Eait Carolinian
The Lady Pirate softbal! team
sweptbothgamesofadoubleheader
against visiting UNC-Chariotte
Monday afternoon. ECU won the
first game by a score of 1-0 and the
second game by a score of 2-1 Both
games went into extra innings
Astrong wind blowing in made
both games defensive duels a-
ther teams' offense wasabie toconv
up with much. ECU'S Jenny Tar
sonsand UNCCsCourtnev Hankes
bom pitched complete games m
. bothgames.
The only run scored in the hrt
game came in the bottom of the
eighth inning. In extra innings in
softbalLeach team starts their at bat
with a runner on second base After
UNC C went down in order in the
top of the eighth, ECU came to bat
wimRachdChamberlaminsecond
base.
The first batter, Lisa Corprew
reached first on a bunt. Chanel
Hooker then advanced runners to
Ultimate te�
frisbee exta
By Gary Hurley
Staff Writer
5,
choke t - tr� second out
Tamnv. Newman cam through
with ns a
daam � � K m tne
win;
. - - � -1 h

SOI �
drew hrt blood with
it but peached I
thecau her dropped tl
3cm thenstoli sea
The next b
ed, iv i :�,Ji ' ,
base. Fox th.
parsed "
JennvPiikshitrntoahek: - -
tor the second out Betsy V
then struck
The Lad
arunontsown�n th
third inning. W
Mcchefle lones -
on an inti
second b�i
See Sweep
expa
o
I
Two Helios members practice before a game on College Hal This Saturday the ECU UWmata dub it
sponsoring a Frisbee Appreciation Day on the bottom of College Hit
ECU'S Ultimate Teams will be
sponsoring Frisbee Appreciahon
Day this Saturday at the bottom I
College HUl. The day is contrived
by the Irates and Helios to inng
together anyone who enjoys
"throwing the plastic Action will
begin around 2:00 p.m.
The bask idea for Frisbee Ap-
preciation Day is to spend a fun
afternoon centered around frisbee-
"We're also using the day for
propaganda and promotion Irate
Keith Lewis said. "We'd Uke to get
some new players for the team and
we always enjoy playing for a
crowd
"Theday isnot centered around
Ultimate Frisbee though added
HeKoscarjtamDeeOrrrfori'Corne
down just to toss it around. VVe'like
to see a lot of discs in the air. Or you
could bring a blanket and just hang
out"
The clubs' main interests He in
Pigskin Pig-Out
Asd -
sect i
abievMvr
merit
The GCl Liumat
more p :ne fu
the id
ankttramut
tor t'
top nni
The d
becon
chib
'5.r
inrramu
natu na
row,
what
mate pn
champ m -
this wee I
na-
aave
�Xinong
rizes tor
ilar Ultimate
the better our
When someone mentioned to
rCAAoffidalJcaSwoffordthat
suchasdf-govemirtgammgement
sounded suspiciously like putting
the foxes in charge of the henhouse,
he laughed.
"People have every right to be
cynical"said Swofioid, athletic di-
rector at North Carolina and an in-
See NCAA, page 16
By Matt Mumma
Sports Editor
For eight years now the annual
Pigskin Pig-Out has graced ECU
every spring with football and base-
ball games among other festivities.
The Pig-Out begins on Thurs-
day with theGolf Classic Social and
Auction.
On Friday the action starts in
earnest with fireworks, a carnival
and a concert, as well as a golf and
tennis tournament The actual pig
cooking contest begins on Friday
and thr awards for the beat pig
cookers witt be announced on Sat-
urday. CB-16) at Harrington Field in their
A Breakfast of Champions at first game of the weekend. On Sun-
theHihonlnnwiBstlectahonor day they will play another game at
thefinestathetoesaeBCUThePunt 2 pm �
Pass and Kick contest as well as TomnctootteieayiBtatne
other fun games will be around for Teenage Mutant Mnja Turtles, on
the kids m the mornmg before the the road on ft ���
big football game.
At 230 the football scrimmage
will get under way at Fkftden Sta-
dium for those die hud torn who
cannot get enough footoafl. After
the game the Four Tops w�playa
or�rtheshgoutalooUhta
as only the Pour Topa can.
The Finale bawlul team (1S-
16-1) wii pk�y UTC-Wumtagton
Maea Coliseum on Sunday at 5
V .
The cost of thcaooftalpme
and Pour Tops eoncert is $12 for
attheg�atand$6forsh





Aphil 18,1991
tUlje least (Carolinian
Wo
By Owen Cox
Staff Writer
v
m

t� x�
4 v
By Parnell
� ' St j,
'� � T TWT"
'J-f Pi �Mt df
rAUo NWV fe�tU
TUJt kTYfcMT "i�M
Junior third baseman John Gast dives back to tirst base. .
5 2 and are now fourth in CAA standings
C�'�st� Hoffman � ECU Photo Lao
osttoNC State Tuesday
It looked like a home run derby
for the first tour innings, then settled
into a pitcher's duel for the last five,
when ECU tixik on N.C. State Tues-
day evening at Harrington Field.
The Pirates, hurt by four Wolfpack
homers, lost 5-2.
The long Kill was the story
eariy,withbothteamsaccminted tor
five home runsand all the scoring in
the contest "Give credit to their
(N.C State) hitters; they hit good
pitches (for their homers) Head
Coach Gary Overton said.
Overton was pleased with the
Pirate effort also. "We played better
than we have all year; we played
outstandingdefense Overton said.
'Tonight we learned we could play
well tn a daily basis
The Pirates fell behind early.
With two out in the first, Wolfpack
batter Jeff Pierce drilled a John V
pitch over the trees in left to
NX. State to a 1-0 lead
The third proved no bettei
White, as the first two batter
faced in the inning, cat her
Holland and centerfielderI
Long, both went deep i
Pack up 3-0.
ThePiratescounten
in the bottom ot tht h
Beck ftied to right to li id
inning. Corey Short tl �
right center for the l'ir
thegame. After a Barn
out, David I.eiMen k:
Donahue fastball ovei
leftforhissecondhori i
Pat Watkins grounded to shi
end the inning with the
ing by one, 3-2.
The fourth brought rm n ;�
for the Pack, though V
jertMonin singled off
That was followed b " l
ring track star sets sight
NCAA tournament
By Rick Chann
Staff Writer
Yerv little, if any, marketing
w ould be needed to com mce pa pie
that Danita Roseboro is one ot the
p sprinters in the Colonial Ath-
letic Association.
Roseboro's running career
started six years ago when hi- be-
gan running summer track in 8th
� ide. Her her older sister, who
uas also a sprinter, served as
Roseboro's impetus to begin run-
ning in high schtxT
At North Forsyth 1 ugh School
she competed in track and volley-
ball tor fouryearsand basketball ft r
two. She earned tour varsity letters
in track and was also the captain all
� ir years.
While in high school, Roseboro
� n 'ke her sister s 100-meter school
i ord to go along with all confer-
ence honors in the h1- and 2lV-
meters. At the state meet her senior
war, Roseboro was second in the
; i i-meterandthirdinmelOO-meter
Committee to
take criminal
activity out of
NCAA
(AP) �The idea of decnminal-
rtg anything scaressome people,
I ut apparently not the folks at the
N AA And at first glance, you
might think that the organization A
little faith is Liking a big leap on this
one.
For manv years the NCAA had
a rule prohibiting collogosandfoot-
hall bowl committees from cutting
deals for their postseason extrava-
ganzasunrjlthecondusionof games
i n the first Saturday after the third
Tuesday in November.
Being long-winded was not
pick 'em" dav'sonlv drawback. It
seeirathateverybody -absolutely
everybody at one timec another
ignored the rule governing the se-
lection process to such an extent
that it was finally deemed unen-
forceable.
So back in January, the NCAA
simplv wiped bylaw 30.8.4 from
the books. And the bowl commit-
tees, abhorring a vacuum, have
rushed into the void with promises
to police themselves.
In meetings beginning Tues-
day in Orlando, Fla and running
through Thursday, the directors of
the 18 bowls sit down at the same
table to workout thedetailson how
to achieve that lofty goal.
and set the �-
the lOO-mel
Roseboro v
theWin
best �� �
Winsti ; S.
.
be
be

infiw need
tertrainii .
her tin
persi nal
meter in
24.5 �: �
Smith s s
Hei pal
record in tl
meti rasw . �
N( AA mi i
Roseb rof �
pablei
to sharpen I
Shi �
goals In her fi
was st i
the winnir � '

tholonial Athletic Association
meet She also placed sixth at the
prestigious Penn relays.
"If 1 know I did my best then
the place doesn't mean as much
- b r i said.
ihis season, though,
si boro s places have been very
d She placed second in the 200-
icterand third in the 100 4x100-
and 4x4 O-meter relays this past
weekend at the CAA tournament.
9
i
iseboro also says
that first
� i �
v need
eason, s
tead coachCarol Slowick "has
� . a �d job and she's a giod
oach Slowick has moved
x to on to the 4x4tXVmeter n-
. � am which Roseboro feels has
I ed her 100-meter and 200-
eti r efforts.
Al ng with seniors loy Dorsey
and I Xane lacobs, Roseboro enjoys
rig the team and helping them
work together. Her efforts, along
a g.HKi attitude, will make the
ti im stronger and bringrespectand
exp isure to the woman's track pro-
im.
Danita Roseboro
The most important area of
Roseboro's strength comes from a
supportive family. She speaks on
the phone to her mother to get
support and encouragement for
schx)lwork and track
She also has a close relation-
ship with the person she looks up
to, her grandmother. Since Roseboro
was voung, she has been traveling
with her grandmother, strengthen-
ing their relationship.Thispast sum-
mer thev traveled to Canada for the
third time.
If, in the near future, Roseboro
places in the NCAA meet she will
be planning another tnp with her
grandmother.
Lady Piral
doubleheac
By Joe Corlev
Special to thf V j' ' i
The Lady Pirati � M
swept both gamosot a o
against visiting I v.
Monday afternoori
tirst game by a scon
second ganx- by a s n
games went into extra
Astrongwnx.lt
both games detensiv
ther teams' offense w
up with much. HC I s
sonsandUNCC'sCourtr,
both pitched complete
both games
Theonlv run scored
game came in the boti
eighth inning. In extra �
softball,each teamstarts'1;
with a runner on second
L'NC C went down in ord
top of the eighth, EC U a
with Rachel C hamberlain
base.
The first batter, I isa
reached first on a bunt
Hooker then advanced rum
Ultimate tec
frisbee exttv
i 1
Bv Gary Hurl
Staff Write:
ECU'S Ultimate Ti i i
sponsoring Frisbee A;
Day mis Saturday at
College Hill. The da
by the 1 rates and Hi
together anyone wh
Dail R��d � ECU Photo Lab
Two Helios members ictice before a game on College Hill. This Saturday the ECU Ultimate club is
sponsoring -cation fay on the bottom of College Hill.
"throwing the plastic A
begin around 2:00 p m
The basic idea for Fri -
preciahon Day is to spei
afternoon centered around I
"We're also using the I
propaganda and promotion
Keith Lewis said. "Wed like
some new players tor thi
we always enjoy plaj
crowd
"Thedayisnot center
Ultimate Frisbee thou
Helioscaptain DeeOnv
down ust to toss it around Wi
to see a lot of discs in the air Or yo
could bnnga blanket m-
out
The clubs' main intent '
Pii ates prepare for eighth annual Pigskin Pig-Out to be he!
i
Bv Matt Mum ma
When someone mentioned to
NCAA official John Swofford that
such a self-governing arrangement
sounded suspiciously like putting
the foxes in charge of the henhouse,
he laughed.
'Teople have every right to be
cynical said Swofford, athletic di-
rector at North Carolina and an in-
SeeNCAA, page 16
Fbreightye n �� theannual
Pigskin Pig-Out has graced E( U
every spring with football and base
ball games ami �ng other festivities.
The Pig-Out begins on Thurs-
daywiththet klf lassk Socialand
Auction.
On Friday the action starts in
earnest with fire � � imival
and a concert, as well as a goU and
tennis tournament I"he aihial pig
cooking contest begins on Friday
and the awards for the best pig
cookers will be announced on Sat-
urday.
A Breakfast of Champions at
the 1 lilton Inn will select and honor
thetmestatheletesatECU.The Punt,
Pass and uick contest as well as
other tun games will be around for
the kids in the morning before the
big football game.
At 2:30 the football scrimmage
will get under way at Ficklen Sta-
dium for those die hard fans who
cannot get enough football. After
the game the Four Tops will play a
concert hashingout all theiroldhits
as onlv the Four Tops can.
The Pirate baseball team (18-
16-1) will play UNC Wilmington
(22-16) at Harrington Field in their
first game of the weekend On Sun-
day they will play another game at
2 p.m.
To conclude the festivities the
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, on
the road on their latest 'Coming
Out of their Shell' tour, will play in
Minges Coliseum on Sunday at 5
p.m.
The cost of the football game
and Four Tops concert is $12 for
adults at the gate and $5 for stu-
dents. To eat some barbecue on Sat-
urday the cost is $4 from 10 a.m. to
4p.m. or $350 for those who pay in
advance.
-






16 CBhe SuBtUiarulinian April 18, 1991
NCAA
Continued from page 15
fluential member of the
organization's postseason commit-
tee
Bui we N he havee
erv right to havt i chance it it
before welookat what wo rery
he a radical hang in how the) go
about thru business
It ti N - s
postseasoncon ittei neets very
year at the sai - ' An
the hall from th� � ball
Bowl sscx ia i !n
. asethesell ei ivernit ;doesn't
work i season o
tee alreadv has a t ontingency plan
di iwnup
� afted b) a
NCAAsubcon �� ' nacl
II K.�d
uld
liketoatl ' ' �est-
� . � . , heir
. v want
tivelvtietl
"For the first time in a long
tune Swofford said, "there is a
real movement toward change and
an outline for how to do it, some-
thing in the shadows that could be
brought into the sunlight
What prompted the movement
was the chaotic finish to last year's
i haotk college tixtball season.
In case vou forgot, it ended with
a national champion, Colorado, that
will he remembered for one play
that should not have counted but
did the infamous fifth-down
touchdown at Missouri � and an-
other that might have counted but
did not the last-minute, 91-yard
touchdown on a punt return by
Notre Darne's Rocket Ismail in the
(. range Bowl that was erased bv a
i lipping call
Indeed, by the time the usher-
out-the old, nng-in-the-new-vear
org) of bowl games was complete
there wereeight played Ian. 1 �
few people pushed back from the
table feeling satisfied.
Unbeaten and once-tied Geor-
gia Tech and their fans, shuttled off
to the Citrus Bowl, could stake as
legitimate a claim to the champion-
ship as the Buffaloes. And loud-
mouthed Miami and their fans, ex-
iled to the Cotton Bowl, trashed
Texas and still had enough breath
left over to lobby for their third
national title in less than a dozen
vears.
The reason none of the three
best teams wound up playing one
another is that representatives erf
the Orange, Sugar, Cotton, etc. com-
mittees and the marquee teams
made arrangements to go bowling
together nearly three weeks before
last season's sanctioned "pick em"
date.
But several things happened to
expose the selection process for the
fiasco that it had become. The first
was losses by some of those mar-
quee teams (Notre Dame and Vir-
ginia) and the second was the in-
ability of the Fiesta Bowl to serve as
a safety valve.
Hornets on roll, beat Heat, 92-87
. �. ii v���u,��ko Hit fivp of his first six shots in the
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Char-
lotte has won six of its last 11 games
with productive play fromits bench,
and the Hornets' victory over Mi-
ami was no exception.
"1 think the bench has been a
spark for us all season said Dell
Curry, who led four Charlotte re-
serves in double figures with 19
points Tuesday night as the Hor-
nets beat the Heat 92-87. "Espe-
cially with Muggsy (Bogues) and
the way he pushes the ball up the
court
Bogues added nine assists to
his 10 points.
But it was Curry who was the
star. He made 7 of 10 shots in the
fourth quarter to push the Hornets
ahead.
"I've done this before Curry
sud. "It felt good to get the minutes
Anv player needs consistent min-
zzx&2
This Week's Entertainment
� ii ��
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Friday April 19
Had Bob
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Saturday April 20
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n
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rom UBE) 758-0080
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utestoplay well. I've gotten that the
last few games
"When Dell's hot, we call his
number Charlotte coach Gene
Littles said. "Uell popped open and
knocked down the shots. When he's
shooting well, we want him to have
the ball
Charlotte's reserves provided
all of the Hornets' 27 points in the
final period andoutscored Miami's
non-starters 52-13.
Miami haslost its third straight.
Rex Chapman was the only
Hornets' starter in double figures
with 14 points. Reserve Kelly
Tripucka had 11 and Kenny
Gattison has 10. Sherman Douglas
had 23 points for Miami. Rony
Seikalv added 11 points and 15 re-
bounds.
The Hornets trailed 68-65 en-
tering the fourth quarter, but Curry
Sweep
hit five of his first six shots in the
final quarter and his layup with
4:36 left put Charlotte up 84-31 His
20-foot jumper made it 90-85 with
49.6 seconds remaining.
Grant Long made a slam dunk
for Miami to cut it to 90-87 and he
tied up Curry to force a jump ball.
The Heat got possession after the
tap, but Glen Rice put up an airball
from 3-point range and Bogues
made with two free throws with 5.1
seconds left to seal the win.
Douglas made seven of eight
shots and scored 17 points in the
first half as Miami took a 44-42 half-
timelead. Allot hisbasketscameon
layups Charlotte struggled, hitting
41 percent of its shots and commit-
ting 10 turnovers.
Meanwhile, Charlotte's bench
made 11 of 20 shots in the final
quarter
Continued from page 15
the next batter, Cammie Smith,
doubled to right field.
Although both teams had their
chances to score after that, neither
could team could score and extra
innings ensued.
L'NC-C's Nikki Stutts was on
second base to begin the top of the
eighth inning. Stutts went to third
on a sacrificebunt bv Beny,but the
'49ers were unable to score.
ECU began the bottom of the
eighth inning with Laura Crowder
on second base, (ones sacrifice
bunted to move Crowder to third
base smith, who knocked in the
winning run in the first game, fol-
lowed with a game-winning single
to score i rowder
Parsons was once again the
winning pitcher, stnking out three
while only giving up three hits
With the doubleheader sweep,
the Ladv Pirate's record now stands
at 21-12.
ECU takes to the field once
again this weekend in the 14-team
F TOSl Cutlerv tournament. The tour-
nament will be held in Chattanooga.
Term.
ATTIC
503
209 Last
fifth St.
Friday, April 19: Earth Murchants
(Sunshine Alternative Productions) ;
32 o. Drafts tor Si 1 j H
Sat April 20:
f A .
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Wed. April 24:
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its KAROKE � Sing-along
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Also appearing: Trashed Gypsy cv Ovature
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i

I
tg OJiie gagt (Earollnian April 18, 1991
NCAA
fluential member of the
organization's postseason commit-
tee.
"But we believe they have ev-
ery right to have a chance at it
before we lookat what would surely
be a radical change in how they go
about their business
It turns out that the NCAA's
postseason committee meets every
year at the same time and just down
the hall from the College Football
Bowl Association But this year, in
case the self-governing thingdoesn't
work out, the postseason ammit-
tee already has a contingency plan
drawn up
The proposal, drafted by a
NCAA subcommittee, would enact
a draft in which the highest-ranked
teams select the howls they would
most like to attend, or the highest-
ranked bowls (based on their
payouts) select the earns thev want
most. Ether way, it would effec-
tively tie the hands of the bowl com-
mittees and change the selection
process entirely.
"For the first time in a long
time' Swofford said, "there is a
real movement toward change and
an outline for how to do it, some-
thing in the shadows that could be
brought into the sunlight
Wha t prompted the movement
was the chaotic finish to last year's
chaotic college football season.
Incase you forgot,itended with
a national champion,Colorado, that
will be remembered for one play
that should not have counted but
did � the infamous fifth-down
touchdown at Missouri � and an-
other that might have counted but
did not � the last-minute, 91-yard
touchdown on a punt return by
Notre Dame's Rocket Ismail in the
Orange Bowl that was erased by a
clipping call.
Indeed, bv the time the usher-
out-the-old, ring-in-the-new-year
orgy of bowl games was complete
� then? were eight played Jan. 1 �
few people pushed back from the
table feeling satisfied.
Continued from pay 15
Unbeaten and once-tied Geor-
gia Tech and their fans, shuttled off
to the Citrus Bowl, could stake as
legitimate a claim to the champion-
ship as the Buffaloes. And loud-
mouthed Miami and their fans, ex-
iled to the Cotton Bowl, trashed
Texas and still had enough breath
left over to lobby for their third
national title in less than a dozen
years.
The reason none of the three
best teams wound up playing one
another is that representatives of
theOrange, Sugar, Cotton, etc. com-
mittees and the marquee teams
made arrangements to go bowling
together nearly three weeks before
last season's sanctioned "pick em"
date.
But several things happened to
expose the selection process for the
fiasco that it had become. The first
was losses by some of those mar-
quee teams (Notre Dame and Vir-
ginia) and the second was the in-
ability of the Fiesta Bowl to serve as
a safety valve.
Hornets on roll, beat Heat, 92-87
� �-u k.� �� n( his first six shots in tht
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Char-
lotte has won six of its last 11 games
with productive play fromitsbench,
and the Hornets' victory over Mi-
ami was no exception.
"I think the bench has been a
spark for us all season said Dell
Curry, who led four Charlotte re-
serves in double figures with 19
points Tuesday night as the Hor-
nets beat the Heat 92-87. "Espe-
cially with Muggsy (Bogues) and
the way he pushes the ball up the
court
This Weeks Entertainment
Thursday April 18
Old Habits
Large draft .500
Imports $1.50
Friday April 19
Bad Bob
&
The Rockin Horses
Saturday April 20
Dillon Fence
r
Buy 1 sub and get
I your 2nd sub 12 price
i
I 513 Cotanche
(located across from UBE) 758-0080
1
1
J
SPORTS PAD
Family Billiards & Sports Bar
PLAY A
GAME
utes to play well. I've gotten that the
last few games
"When Dell's hot, we call his
number Charlotte coach Gene
Littles said. "Dell popped open and
knocked down the shots. When he's
shooting well, we want him to have
the ball
hit five of his first six shots in the
final quarter and his layup with
436 left put Charlotte up 84-�1 His
20-foot jumper made it 90-S5 with
49.6 seconds remaining.
Grant Long made a slam dunk
for Miami to cut it to 90-87 and he
bed up Curry to force a jump balL
Charlotte's reserves provided The Heat got possession after the
all of the Hornets' 27 points in the tap, but Glen Rice put up an airball
final period and outscored Miami's from 3-point range and Bogues
non-starters 52-13.
Miami has lost its third straight.
Rex Chapman was the only
Bogues added nine assists to Hornets' starter in double figures
his 10 points. with 14 points. Reserve Kelly
But it was Curry who was the Tripucka had 11 and Kenny
star He made 7 of 10 shots in the Garason has 10. Sherman Douglas
fourth quarter to push the Hornets had 23 points for Miami. Rony 41 percent of its shots and eomrrut-
ahMH Seikaly added 11 points and 15 re- ting 10 turnovers.
I've done this before Curry bounds. HTZ
sakl1tfeltgoodtogetthem,nutes. The Hornets trailed 6865 en- made 11 of 20 shots ,n the final
Any player needs consistent min- tering the fourth quarter, but Curry quarter.
made with two free throws with 5.1
seconds left to seal the win.
Douglas made seven of eight
shots and scored 17 points in the
first half as Miami took a 44-42 half-
time lead. All of his baskets cameon
layups. Charlotte struggled, hitting
Sweep
Continued from page 15
the next batter, Cammie Smith,
doubled to right field.
Although both teams had their
chances to score after that, neither
could team could score and extra
innings ensued.
UNC-C's Nikki Srutts was on
second base to begin the top of the
eighth inning. Srutts went to third
on a sacrifice bunt by Berry, but the
'49ers were unable to score.
ECU began the bottom of the
eighth inning with Laura Crowder
on second base. Jones sacrifice
bunted to move Crowder to third
base. Smith, who knocked in the
winning run in the first game, fol-
lowed with a game-winning single
to score Crowder.
Parsons was once again the
winning pitcher, striking out three
while only giving up three hits.
With the doubleheader sweep,
the Lady Pirate'srecord now stands
at 21-12.
ECU takes to the field once
again this weekend in the 14-team
Frost Cutlery tournament The tour-
nament will beheld inChattanooga,
Term.
ATTIC
757-7303
Friday, April 19: Earth Murchants
(Sunshine Alternative Productions) p
32 oz. Drafts for $2 Ell
Sat April 20: mk
Wed. April 24f
The
CoMedY
ZONE
immediately following:
its KAROKE � Sing-along
All six original members!
Also appearing: Trashed Gypsy & Ovaturc
ON
US!
EWA MATAYA
TOP PROFESSIONAL
WOMEN'S BILLIARDS PLAYER
r
"l
Sports
FREE HOUR
OF POOL
for ALL ECU STUDENTS
One gift check per visit or table
Coupon expires May 31st
Free admission with student I.D. MUlMj
Sports
pad
ion s rrtfanrhe � 757-3658
A





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Title
The East Carolinian, April 18, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 18, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.807
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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