The East Carolinian, April 16, 1991






Build bridges, not walls 4
Race relations can be improved through diversity and equality.
Toe Jam-boree
Climb on the 'Love Tractor' at Barefoot on the Mall.
II
Wcz iEaat (Eamitman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Voc.65 No.25
Tuesoay, April 16, 1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
12 Pages
v" .
.ndoth
Residents protest over hot air
Students at the I nivcrsity of South Carolina have
been sleeping in the residence halls' lobbies and hallways
to protest the uncomfortable conditions in their rooms.
Even the resident assistants arc fining in. limmv
I loneycutt, an R said th.it hot and muggy nxims are
not comfortable enironments for studying. He has made
.i banner with IK NOW" printed in large red letters
which hangs on the outside of his residence hall to call
attention to the matter.
Student professor sue for false ad
A student and a dentistry professor at the University
I v. rtharolina Chapel Hill are suing the American
FamilyPul lisfv I � � � l leading them tobeheve they
had won $10 million in the sweepstakes.
Celebrity Ed McMahonof'TheTonightShov'serves
as the official sp l person of the sweepstakes.
Student Ponya Sharp and Dr. Donald Warren n
ceived similar letters stating that it the letter was re-
turned, the recipient w uld win the $10 million prize.
Both rs tuned into the Jan 27 broadcast of
'The ronight Show expecting to hoar each of their
names announced as new millionaires.
North Carolina law states that the practice of not
delivering something that has been promised is decep-
tive and unfair saidanattorneyrepresentingSharp. "I'm
looking at the law and applying it to that practice
lawer M i: � ides �� ited.
Tulane officials ban porn flicks
t an annual pom film presentation at
in New Orleans may have come to an
Tulane
end
Tins ii
cancelled after a
(Cleans
plied to the shoi
The filmw i
� pie V movie, "The Blue Roy' was
i official at the university said that the
tatute i'n obs enity could easily be ap-
� ing it the i ampus theatre
-arn died bv the director cf the Tulane
University i ampus Programming after a student ques-
tioned the legality ol showing a pornographic film on
(.ampus
USC president to face trial
Richland Counl iu) torities released former USC
president James I iUcrman on a $10,0U) personal recog-
nizance bond April 2 Holderman, who was indicted
March 22 on charges t misusing his position for personal
gain, will face a trial in nine to 12 months.
In addition to the bond, Holderman will face a
mandatory prison termoi one year and a $1,(XX) fine if he
tails to stand trial
Professor accused of murder
lury selectii m began last week in the murder trial of
a professor at Indiana State University. Robert David
Little was named as an accomplice to the 1982 murder of
Steve Agan. Agan was stabbed to death.
Jurors were difficult to choose as the case involves
homosexual relationships. Many potential jurors were
disqualified due to preconceived notions of Little's guilt
and their views on homosexuality.
Gunsconfiscated inresidencehall
Two Smith and Wesson guns were confiscated by a
dormi tory residence assistant at Indiana State University
recently after a student warned the staff of the weapons.
The student chose to remain anonymous. Also confis-
cated were ammunition and holsters for the guns.
University officials said that while the two owneraof
the guns had permits for them, it is against university
policy to possess weapons on campus.
N.C. students protestbudget cuts
Chanting "Educate- save our state about 12200
students from North Carolina colleges and universities
marched thn ugh downtown Raleigh last week to protest
budget cuts that will greatly affect education. Students
who protested said that they were unsatisfied with the
level of political commitment bv state legislators.
Students, teachingassistantsand graduate assistants
said that the cuts would hurt not only the students and
universities, but the state as well.
Some demonstrators who marched into the Legisla-
tive Building angered representatives who said the stu-
dents did not "have any class and, apparently, very little
education
From Staff Report.
Inside Tuesday
Crime Scene72
Editorial4
Classifiedslb
Features17
This Week in FilmJ 8
Sports711
Media board suspends yearbook
I11M1M Ufnlii.l m A irv-K A OCA -� �4� -� - - � �-�aJ.�.� � .� �
By Jim Rogers
Staff Writer
The next two classes of
ECU graduates will leave ECU
without an official memento
of their final voar.
The Media Board voted
unanimously to suspend year-
book operations for the 1991-
q2 school vear during their
meeting Monday afternoon.
The lss(V9i publication was
suspended on March 4.
According to Media
Board Chairperson Fran
Frazier, the results of the vote
are a result of the apparent
student apathy towards The
Buccaneer.
A yearbook survey was
conducted last week in front
of the Student Stores to gauge
student opinions about the
yearbook and it's format.
Frazier said only 200 to
250 students took the rime to
complete the five-question
survey.
The results of the survcv
showed students wanted a
yearbook but did not want to
have anything to do with put-
ting it together, Frazier said.
The Buccaneer currently
has no editor or staff.
Frazier said the Media
Board's vote to suspend year-
book publication may be
"something for the better be-
cause maybe the students will
miss it and decide to show
more interest in the future
Not everyone had given
up hope for The Buccaneer.
I.ewis Coble, a former copy-
editor for the yearbook, cre-
ated an entirely new format
and presented it to the Media
Bcard.
The proposed format,
which was similar to a maga-
zine format, nveived lmlesup-
port from the students who
responded to the survey and
was therefore not enough to
salvage the yearbook.
According to Fraier, the
alternative format idea .
generated because "
tional yearbook format is,
ing popularity around th
tion.
"A lot of colleges d
have a yearbook Frazier sai I
Davidson professor talks
about European unification
By Mike Harvey
Special to The East Carolinian
On Wednesday night,
April 19, a professor from
Davidson College spoke on
the integration of Europe and
the role the United States
should play in the develop-
ment.
Dr. Lewis Dartmaver, a
professor of political science
at Davidson College, referred
to Europe as having "enor-
mous diversity" and sud that
it will face great problems in
its attempts to unity.
"In a new Europe, you
will add 11 countries, 325 mil-
lion people, 9 different lan-
guages, 12 different forms of
government and many na-
tional differences that would
make unification very diffi-
cult he said.
Dartmaver said th.it a
united Europe will also have
to change its outlook on the
world and how it acts in it.
"Europe will have to relv
more on diplomacy, rather
than an army, to handle world
problems he said
Dartmaver said that with
the end of the Persian Cult
War, the idea of solving prob-
lems with diplomacy, rather
than with guns, could cause
Europe to gameven more con-
trol in global aftairs.
Dartmaver said that uni-
fication is inevitable. "Major
trends all over the world have
convinced manv European
countries that the survival ot
Europe depends on unifica-
tion. The end of the traditional
Soviet threat, the fact that the
Berbecker foundation
donates $25,000 to ECU
Funds to aid in expanding School of Medicine
Warsaw pact is gone and (,t
manv is now one country have
all convinced the Europeans
that they can takecareof them-
selves and will be bettor ott it
they are together and not sepa-
rated he said.
Dartmaver also said that
European countries "can no
longer thnveon their separate
economical bases. ITio onlv
way they can survive as .1
country, or separately, is to
integrate their economic sys-
tems
Dartmavi r said that the
plan of unification does have
problems "The new idea of
peace and brotherhood is
threatened. Not by tanks or by
the threat of war, but bv the
thousands ot refugees that
pour into the continent from
See Davidson page 2
ECU New Bureau
The Berbecker Founda-
tion, a private philanthropy
with ties to eastern North
Carolina, has reinforced its
commitment to health sciences
education at the university
with a gift of $25,000 to the
Berbecker Heal th Sciences En-
dowment.
Income from the endow-
ment will enable the univer-
sity to award additional fel-
lowships to outstanding stu-
dents in the schools of allied
health sciences, medicine and
nursing.
The Berbecker Endow-
ment is the cornerstone of
ECU's efforts to provide fel-
lowships for qualified gradu-
ate students within the Divi-
sion of Health Sciences, offi-
cials said.
The Berbecker Founda-
tion Health Sciences Endow-
ment will be a significant fac-
tor in assisting the university
in maintaining and expand-
ing its programs in graduate
education in the health sci-
ences Dr. )ames A. Hallock,
dean of the School of Medi-
cine and vice chancellor for
health sciences, said.
The gitt was presented by
Samuel A. McConkey, local
counsel for the Berbecker
Foundation to Micah D. Ball,
director of planned giving for
the Office of Institutional Ad-
vancement, in a ceremony at
the Webb Civic Library in
Morehead City.
The Morehead Citv site
was chosen because it sym-
bolizes ties of the Berbecker
Foundation, based in Con-
necticut, to North Carolina
through its creator, the late
Lillie A. Webb.
Formerly of Morehead
City, Webb created a memo-
rial upon the death of her hus-
band, Earle W. Webb, Jr to
fund and operate the Webb
Library.
Tne Berbecker Founda-
tion was established upon
Webb's death and makes an-
nual donations for scholar-
ships and fellowships in medi-
cal and health related schools
in New York, North Carolina
and Connecticut.
Five Army ROTC cadets to attend airborne school
By Jason Johnson
Staff Writer
Editor's Note�fason John-
son attended Airborne School in
the summer of 1990.
Five ECU students will
travel to Georgia to attend the
U. S. Army Airborne School at
Fort Benning this summer.
The five Armv ROTC ca-
dets will attend the Army's
basic parachutist qualification
course. If thev successfully
complete the three-week
course they will be awarded
the silver wings of an Army
pa ratn v�per.
Only those who have ex-
celled in the ROTC program
are sent to the school.
The participants were se-
lected from a group of volun-
teers on the basis of their per-
formance ratings. Taken into
consideration were the cadets'
grade point averages, Army
Physical Fitness Test scores
and theiroverall participation
in the ROTC program.
Any cadet chosen for the
airborne school must be in
excellent physical shape, pos-
sess a posi tjve mental attitude
and be highly motivated to
succeed.
The five cadets from ECU
who will attend will be sopho-
mores Russell Parker, Paul
Dierickx and Nevin Gamble
and juniors Michael Drakeand
Patrick Campbell.
The course they will at-
tend is a grueling program,
divided into three phases. The
first phase is ground week,
during which they will run up
to five miles each morning and
jump from 34-f t. training tow-
ers, attached to elastic lines to
slow their descent.
Also during this phase,
thev will learn the proper tech-
niques for exiting a moving
aircraft.
Dunng the second phase,
tower week, they will continue
to run as manv as five miles
each morning and will be
dropped from a 250-ft. tower,
wearing a real parachute.
They will also train on a
device that allows them to
perfect their landing tech-
niques.
ECU students compete in Appalachain's World Geography Bowl
By Heidi Laderberg
Special to The Ea�l Carolinian
On Saturday, April 6,
eight students represented
ECU in the North Carolina
World Geography Bowl.
The Geography Bowl en-
courages students to study
world geography and en-
hances their appreciation for
other cultures through the
competitive teamspi rit. Italso
provides the opportunity to
interact with different people
while at the same time learn-
ing various customs that are
unlike ours.
The World Geography
Bowl was established in 1987
at North Carolina State Uni-
versity by a Syrian engineer-
ing student, Bachir Rabbat.
The World Geography Bowl
is similar to the College Bowl.
It is a competition which con-
sists of teams running against
the clock and each other.
The World Geography
Bowl has been held for five
years, and this year it took
place at Appalachain State
University. The winner hosts
the bowl the following year.
N.CStateand Duke have each
won two bowls.
Among the North Caro-
lina schools competing were
Appalachain State, Duke,
North Carolina Central, N.C.
State, Meredith College, Pem-
broke State, UNC-Chapel Hill,
UNC-Greensboro and West-
em Carolina. Duke showed
its extensive knowledge of
geography this year by win-
ning the bowl for the third
time.
The ECU Geography De-
partment works with the
American International Pro-
gram to make students aware
ofthebowl.Anyoneinterested
in geography is welcome and
encouraged to join.
"The World Geography
Bowl will probably become a
national event because pres-
ently ifs a strong regional
event said Dr. Lucy Wright.
Wright joins the ECU team at
each bowl. She called each
bowl "a fun, good-will com-
petition"
Team members find it
stimulating to meet people
who share their interest in the
world. 'Teopletend toexdude
geography and an? ignorant
See Bowl, page 2
t





(
2 Sire �oHt (Carolinian April 16, 1991
CRIMESENE
Two subjects picked up at McDonalds
one was released, the other banned
April 10
0013�10th and Elm streets; investigated an intoxicated driver;
the situation was handled bv Greenville Police Department.
0122� Mendenhall Student Center: gave an intoxicated subject
a state citation.
024& Cotanche Street: non-student given a verbal warning for
speeding and weaving.
0327�Avcock Residence Hall: responded toa fight; theincident
was handled bv the residence hall staff.
April 11
CW2� Tvler Residence Hall: two male non-students banned for
being in female's room.
1213 Fast Ninth Stnvt: responded toa female having fallen on
the sidewalk Subject was transported to Student Health Services.
1332 Avon "k Residence 1 fall: responded toa report of subjects
throwing water balUxns at females. Subjects located and turned
over to residence hall staff lor disposition.
2330 Public Safetv (south): intoxicated subject asked to leave
the area
0232 -lones Residence Hall (north): motorist stopped for driv-
ing while intoxicated
0251 � lones Residence 1 lall (north): transported two subjectsin
custodv to the magistrate's office.
April 12
1409- Spilman and Whichard parking area: responded to re-
ports of loud music. Subject located and music turned down.
0047 -McDonald's: transported two subjects to Public Safetv.
One subject was banned, and the other was released.
0121 �Scott Residence Hall: responded to report of subjects on
the roof; was unable to locate.
April 13
1846- -Fleming Residence Hall: responded to the alarm sound-
ing on the first floor; was caused bv cooking.
0253- College Hill Dnve: subject taken into custody for DW1.
0302 Seventh Street and Ringgold: subject with pyrotechnics
banned.
034V Clement Residence Hall (east); stopped motorist tor
driving after consuming alcoholic beverages. The driver was re-
placed
April 14
214 Scott Residence Hall (west): campus citation issued to
student for speeding.
0041 C.arrett Residence r lall: investigated a disturbanceon the
third floor; contact was made with a distraught subject. Same was
settled bv officers.
005K Clement Residence Hall: took a report of an assault.
0159 Mendenhall Student Center (north), subjects sitting on
the stairwell asked to leave the area
C rime Scene i� taken from official Public Safety lojr,�
Davidson
Continued from page 1
the Middle East and the Soviet Block
countries he said.
He also said that the Persian
Gulf War demonstrated that Eu-
rope will never be totally separated
from American and Soviet influ-
ence. "When the war started,
America called on the Europe Al-
lies for help as members of the
NATO alliance and not as indi-
vidual powers. Many people still
perceive Europe as too weak to do
anything on their own he said.
Dartmayer said that the prob-
lem the United States and other
nations face is what to do about
their diminishing influence in Eu-
ropean economics. "Many compa-
nies involved in banking or the per-
sonal-services industry will benefit
by a unified Europe because of the
universal standards thatthey would
have to adopt he said. "Export
companies will suffer, though, due
to the attempt by Europe to
strengthen their own production
industries"
Dartmayer said that there are
alternatives to the unification of
Europe that will be beneficial to
everyone. He said that by keeping a
loose NATO alliance in place to
guarantee security, the conbnua-
tionof the status-quo with new trade
treaties, or the formation of a na-
tional assembly so that all Euro-
pean countries can participate in
global affairs, can accomplish all
the European's desired goals.
Dartmayer said the United
States government should not get
directly involved with helping Eu-
rope make up its mind He said the
United States will always be a
"dominant influence in European
affairs
Dartmayer's lecture was part
of "The Great Decisions Dxture
Series which seeks to inform
people of current events in the
world.
The next lecture will be on con-
stitutional development in Poland.
It will be held Thursday. April 18 at
12: 30 p.m. in the General Class-
room Building, Room 1006.
Bowl
Continued from page 1
of the world, so I enjoy the Geogra-
phy Bowl because everyone has
something in common said Sandra
Singh, who has dual citizenship in
the United States and India.
'1 am a foreigner interested in
everything in the rest of the world
said I .ecreciaRojasfromCosta Rica.
Another member, Qasim Abu-
Hantash from Jordan, simply said
" am proud to represent ECU"
There are three basic rules
which govern the Geography Bowl.
These rules are that both genders
must participate, at least one inter-
national student and one student
with VS. Citizenship must be in-
volved and that the teams must
include both undergraduate and
graduate students.
Each team must be co-spon-
sored bva Geography Pregramand
an International Studies Program.
The team consists of six members.
A neutral moderator asksquestions
and there are three judges
� ��
Are You Being Being Sexually
Aroused By This Picture?
Probably!
WMTMjtf. � "O rf,t "�j
The Camel Man
To find out, see
DR. WILSON BRYAN KEY'S
presentation
SUBLIMINAL SEDUCTION
TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 1991
8:00 PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
sponsored by
THE STUDENT UNION
FORUM COMMITTEE
�i
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For more information call 757-4533
April 16- 7:00 until 9:00 PM
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in the Memorial Gym
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�Jl� lEaHt (Earoltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tim C. Hampton, General Manager
Michael D. Albuquerque, Managing Editor
Blair Skinner, News Editor LeClair Harper, Asst. News Editor
Matt King, Features Editor Stuart Oliphant, Asst. Features Editor
Matt Mumma, Sports Editor Kerry Nester, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy Edwards, Copy Editor Jason Johnson, Copy Editor
DOUG Morris, Editorial Productum Manager Phong Luong, Business Manager
JEFI Parker, Staff Illustrator LARRY HUGGINS, Circulation Manager
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician Stuart Rosner, Systems Engineer
Carla Whitfield, Classified Ads Technician Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East f. iroliman has served the East Carolina campuscommunity since 1925, emphasizing information that directly affects
ECU students. During the ECU school year. The East Carolinian publishes twice a week with a circulation of 12,000. The East
Car, dinian reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisements that discriminate on the basis of age, sex, creed or
national origin The masthead cditonal in each edition does not necessarily represent the views of one individual, but, rather,
is a majority opinion of the Editorial Board. The EastCarolinuin welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should
be limited to 250 words or leas. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit letters for
publication 1 etters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C
27834: or call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, April 16, 1991
No one benefits from segregation
In recent months, race relations has
been discussed and scrutinized withincreas-
ing regularity both nationally and locally.
Incidents such as the senseless, brutal attack
have shown, how our society still holds
some oi the racist, sexist ideology of the
past. He stressed that we must learn to
appreciate people who are different from
against a black man last month by members ourselves, and on this point we agree with
of the Los Angeles Police Department raise him.
new questions about just how far we have We would also like to take this idea one
come since the Civil Rights Act of 1964. step further. While we must take the time to
This is not the first incident of a raciallv understand and accept other people's per-
motivated attack, or perhaps even the most spectives and cultural heritage, we must do
recent. An alarming number of crimes are so without alienating others because they
reported every day against all people that are "different
sting with the all-too-familiar air of racism. The key to improving race relations
Closer to home, Chancellor Paul does not lie in building walls that keep us
I lard in, oi UXC-Chapel Hill, decided to seperated from those who are "different
move a group of sculptures located in front for it is on that principle that segregation
oi Davis Library to a less conspicuous sight was founded. Rather, we must learn to build
amid complaints that at least one of the bridges with others so we can become more
statues was raciallv offensive. Mr. Hardin's integrated intoone cooperative society based
decision came after months of debate and on equality.
shortlv atl�ra�oindais tried to destroy the � - - As Dr, Smith said last week, prejudice,
statue discrimination and stereotyping must be
Here at The East Carolinian, our own replaced by community spirit, diversity and
forum for community opinions has hosted equality.
numerous views differing on the subject of We must learn to view ourselves as
racism and race relations. human beings, each with a diverse mix of
I ast week, Dr. Larry Smith, the director cultural backgrounds and heritage. And
of Minority Student Affairs, spoke before through this variety we must recognize that
the SGA about ECU'S Purple Pride, a phi- each of us can bring something good to the
losophv founded on the importance of rec- community as a whole. Until we accom-
ognizing and accepting individual and plish this, we will be doing nothing more
group diversity. than drawing racial "battle lines" to a war
Dr. Smith pointed out, as recent events that most of us do not want.
Ott pzopdml Tb injure:
RACIAL 44ty ON OU
COUEGB CAMPUSES'
Letters To The Editor
Recent column
demonstrates
writer's racism
To The Editor:
I would like to respond to
Darek McCulIers editorial of
Thursday, April 4, "Euro-cen-
tric thinking promotes 'Big
Lie The first issue that I would
like to address is the racism
clearly evident in the writings
of the "anti-racist" crusader.
Because he is a member of an
oppressed minority, he seems
to feel that everybody who is
not a "person of color" is among
the oppressors; he further dem-
onstrates his racism by refer-
ring to people of European de-
scent as an "oppressive and
hypocritical minority This
type of generalization shows
quiteclearly that Mr. McCulIers
is guilty of the same tendency
toward stereotyping that has
perpetuated racial tensions in
this country and around the
world.
I ha ve been a wa re of preju-
dice ever since I was a child and
have always abhorred it, but I
have seen many people rise
above the limitations placed
upon them by racial prejudice
and make the most of what they
have to offer.
I am quite aware that there
are doors that are closed to
people in their search for per-
sonal betterment, but I resent
being categorized asoneof those
who is responsible for perpetu-
ating this situation. This type of
categorization smacksof racism
tome.
Racism, no matter who it
is inflicted upon, is despicable
to me and to the majority of
Americans, regardless of what
some may think. I also have a
big problem with ignorance,
narrow-mindedness and a lack
of historical knowledge.
I am of Irish descent and
am a member of a minority
that was once very oppressed
in this country; there are many
people still living who remem-
ber seeing "help wanted" signs
that said "no Irish need ap-
ply The Irish, although for
the most part now free from
British imperialism, were
forced into the same economic
patterns that Mr. McCulIers has
been learning about in his Afri-
can Geography class.
In the 1840's, hundreds
See Letters pages
THE
DAY
AFTER'

t� VOE TAKE
PACKAGES HT
�S�22!
SUCKEXS WE
SoAKfcD WY
MAYBC '
i
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Lotteries to replace higher taxes?
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
We won't sec the end of the
state budget crunch any time soon.
And as long as we have budget
problems, we'll have lobbyists
pushing for a state lottery for
North Carolina.
Pardon me while 1 momen-
tarily don my George Will mask.
Okay, one pundit has observed
that the lottery is a tax on the stu-
pid. (Ba-ding-bang!) Another has
pointed out that you have basi-
cally the same chance of winning
the lottery whether you play or
not. (Ba-ding-bang!) Mask off.
Well, such critics are right,
though the innumerate (math-
ematically illiterate) populace
doesn't fully grasp the fact. By
their nature, lotteries are a waste
of monev for nearly everyone who
plavs. State lotteries also tend to
promote dishonesty in govern-
ment, like there's a shortage of
that.
In Florida, for instance, the
lottery was sold to voters by prom-
ising the proceeds would go to
"enhance education much the
same way they re trying to sell it
here. But lottery proponents in
Florida � like the ones here �
glossed over the fact that when
thev said "proceeds they were
talking about what was left over
after lottery advertising was paid
for. Advertising ate about half the
profits.
Faced with budget shortfalls
a couple of years after the lottery's
introduction, legislators
unhesitatingly siphoned funds
from education, replacing them
with an equivalent amount of
money from the lottery.
If paying for education with
lottery money produces better
education than paying for it with
general revenue, then 1 guess the
Florida lottery lived up to its prom-
ise. Otherwise, it provided yet
another wav for politicians to duck
fiscal responsibility.
Worse yet, state lottery com-
mercials (everywhere, not just in
Florida) are exempt nom the Fed-
eral Communic'icn: Com-
mission's regulation: governing
truth in advertising. Conse-
quently, states like Virginia sell
lottery tickets by convincing
innumerate citizens (of whom
there is no lack) that the lottery is
a sound alternative to retirement
plans.
A further objection to lotter-
ies, one more in keeping with stan-
dard political practice, is that at
least some low-income parents
buy lottery tickets instead of pro-
viding for their kids' basic needs.
True. Another is that low-income
and middle-income people buy a
disproportionate share of the tick-
ets, while rich folks buy vachts
instead Also true.
No doubt about it, state lot-
teries are a bad idea. But if polls
are any useful guide, North
Carolina's voters want one any-
wav.
Lottery opponents have
therefore prevented votes on the
subject. That's undemocratic, but
understandable. There'sadistinc-
tion between giving the people
what they want and giving the
people what's good for them, and
within verv narrow limits the lat-
ter course is better.
But maybe anti-lotterists, or
anti-lotterians, or whatever, ought
to take another look at the lottery.
Let's Be Adamant
It'salmost inevitable that we
one, so we may as well start
ing to live with it
Consider the points
lottery's favor For one thir
lottery amounts to a tax all
highly regressive tax thatp
are actually hapj-v to pav 11
practically begging to pav it
ciansneed to raise taxes but
and lotteries can give them si i
of the extra monev thev need
Of course, it's more
the lottery will become a su
tute for fiscal responsibtlit;
did in Florida. But that illuminate
the other advantage you
ha veto play the lottery if y
want to. If you don't like whtl
your elected representatr.
doing with the money, you
simplvstopplavinganv tin-
like, with no penalty. All �
should be this wav.
Come to think of it n
all taxes should be this wa) j
could replace taxes with lot! �
at every level of government tnffr
local on up, where the hih. �
els of government were fundt b
id-
I

lotteries that had prop rt i
higher ticket prices, r .
offs and (no need to trumpet tl
part) smaller chances to win
What better wav to fui : a
American government1 It - �
tirelvdemocratic � vote with .
wallet,momentbvmoment ltaj
makes a gnm exercise t pa:rk-
tism (tax paying) potential
itable, no bad thing. It has th'
disadvantage that the rich i
hardlv pav anv taxes at all, bfct
then again, they're not pav
now.
Maybe Reagan was I
something when he blathenfd
See Lottery, page 5
Columnist responds to being called racist
By Darek McCulIers
editorial Columnist
Several readers have re-
sponded with anger andor in-
dignation to my recent editorials.
Before I even endeavor to respond,
I would state that only the guilty
are implicated in my writing. If
one knows in one's heart that they
are not guilty by commission or
ommission of the things that I talk
about, then they will not be upset
at what I say. On theother hand, if
they are, they might respond to
me the way that they did to Avtar
Jesus bar Joseph.
Several times when Jesus
was healing the people who had
been discarded by society and
when he taught them the words of
truth and knowledge, which the
one God gave him, his detractors
tried to kill him. The words of
truth disturbed their delusion of
righteosness. Some of these people
thought that they were righteous
because of the things they did or
didn't do. Jesus came and told
them that salvation for mankind
comes neither through laws nor
works, it comes through truth.
We who listen to and under-
stand the words of Avtar Elijah
Muhammed, prophet to the op-
pressed, know that this is a hard
pill to swallow. However, Jesus
said that "Ye shall know the truth
and the truth shall set you free"
He wasn't talking about turning
him into a God, although he is, as
Robert de Ropp graciously stated,
the svmbol of the perfect man. He
is the pattern son. no other human
being can claim thi This is whv
he is to be exalted in heaven and
earth.
These critics who accuse me
of being a racist have distorted
and misunderstood my message.
This is to be expected, as the Bible
reveals that there are those whose
eyes have been blinded by the
enemy, lest they hear and under-
stand the truth. The truth of the
matter is that the enemy to the
betterment of the human race is
neither the white man or the black
man. It is delusion. Our delusion
can be described in biological and
spiritual terms.
Biologically, man is capable
of getting beyond his delusion.
We can get beyond it if we use our
navigator and our steersman. Our
navigator is our God conscious-
ness or knowledge. It is the mecha-
nism through which we under-
stand the Sumon Bonon or high-
est good as revealed in the holy
books of God. The steersman is
our conscious that watches our
actions and tries to prevent us from
leaving the narrow path of which
Jesus spoke.
The conscious does not act
automatically as some contend.
"It involves the operation of neu-
rone circuits in the brain that have
not been provided by nature but
which have to be deveoped by
training" (refer to M. Maltz's
Psycho-Cybernetics). This ex-
plains the scriptures that eshort us
to "study to show ourselves lb-
proved" and to "givedilligen
make our election sure "
Spiritually, wecanovcr
our delusionsas white people and
black people. Although, ourdeht-
sionscome from different soura
Whites have a paternalistic prob-
lem. You think that by your token
good works, you can repair a long
legacy of injustice toward a people
No good work can bring us free-
dom, only giving us what is ours
will do that.
We have a nght to be Net
from the type of psychological
bartering that I have observed in
various classrooms. Our children
are treated as discipline cases, po-
tential dropouts and "at risk" stu-
dents. They are tracked into these
areas in elementary school. I'll sa
it over and over again that this isa
shame.
We have the nght to be it
from redlining practices that have
been proven to exist a nd the "Good
Ole Boy" networks that help white
people to get over. We have a right
to be free from educational sys-
tems, particularly at the college
level, that teach our future leaders
to act white and to think white
(even when they are not aware oi
this).
I'll say it over and over again
that the race of White Anglo Saxon
Protestants have committed great
evils against the people of color
throughout history. They have
humiliated, degrada ted and even
See Columnist, page 5
of thousands of Insh starved to
death because the greater part
of theiragnculture wasdevoted
to the production of inedible
cash crops for British trade, or
for produce to be consumed by
the British people. The only
thing left for the Insh to subsh-
tuteon were potatoes from their
small family plots, when a
blight wiped out all of their
potatoes, they were left with
twoalternahves: starve to death
or emigrate to America, which
millions did.
I will freely admit that Af-
rican Amencans have been lll-
treated in thiscountry,and that
mam opportunities are closed
to them ov narrow-minded
policies and attitudes, it is a
national c�
American!
muchindijj
their arriv,
an even bil
mind, thai
have been
given so f
help themj
ways feel
those v ho
not, ho we'
se!f,orailo
any guilt t
minorities
do notbeoi
the term
1 hav
efforts torn
people of
world, as
Lotteries
about giving government back to
the people. Except he ought to
have tried civ ing taxes back to the
people instead It people want
small government, they can buy
tower lottery tickets. Buv more tor
larger government. Collect them
r
Tjrj C-iLvRM MA'IE
�j W2 rESMA I'D TH&. � "
f L'For appointment caff:
.iSccrcy at T5?
,r:TJKACTL'y'U'MA-l
all! (Sorry, 1
pro
nun
the �
ing of Amei
we had
J� � -
Z
� r
M-Th 1
Attention Re
If you plan to live off-campu?
arranging your utility service in adv;
valuable time - - and possibly mono
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your
utility service may be put in their i
Just pick up a "Request for Utility
Service" application from room 211 in the
Off-Campus Housing Office, Whichard
Building or at Greenville I 'ulities' main
office, 200 W. 5th Street.
Have you parents complete the
application (which must be notarized
mail to Gl'C. P.O Box 1847. Greem
NC 27835-1847. an:
Customer Service.
Rememhci to attach a "letter of
credit" from your parents power compan
MADE IN





SS��
ullje �ast Carolinian April 16, 1991 ,$

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ierIaxes?
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re iik.
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time o
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elves �"
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pie and
ur delu-
� �
, ticprob
ui tola n
. � a
ii I i pe
h in bring us free-
.� us what isours
� to be free
ological
: served m
I hir children
ises, fv
ind atrisk"stu-
i intone
, . .1 I llsav
that this is a
e the right to be ft
pra licesthal ha'
i �t and the"Gpo
h .it help white
We have a right
�� in education! syv
trtkulariy at the college
ll teach our future leaders
t white and to think white
even when thev are not aware
Of
I llsav it over and over agan
nthatha it themceof White Anglo Saxon
iwturebul mts have committed Mf�'
I eoped b) evih igainst the people of color
1 M� throughout history They hve
rhis i humiliattxj. degradated and even
h it eshot See Columnist, page 5
Letters Continued
of thousands of Irish starved to
death because the greater part
oftheiragriculturewasdevoted
to the production of inedible
cash crops for British trade, or
for produce to be consumed bv
the British people. The only
thing left for the Irish to substi-
tute on were potatoes from their
small family plots; when a
Might wiped out all of their
potatoes, they were left with
two alternatives: starve to death
Of emigrate to America, which
millions did.
I will freely admit that Af-
m an Americans have been ill-
treated in this country, and that
many opportunities are closed
to them bv narrow-minded
policies and attitudes; it is a
Columnist
national disgrace that African
Americans have suffered so
much indignity,beginning with
their arrival here as slaves. It is
an even bigger disgrace, in my
mind, that Native Americans
have been treated so poorlv and
given so few opportunities to
help themselves, and I will al-
ways feel pain in mv heart for
those who are oppressed. I will
not, however, take upon my-
self, or allow to be put upon me,
anv guilt for the present state of
minorities in the world. (Please
do not be offended bv mv use of
the term "minority)
I have alwavs supported
efforts to helpthedisadvantaged
people of America and the
world, as long as these efforts
do not attempt to punish living
people for the mistakes of their
ancestors, as some would like
to do.
I would like to conclude
by saying that if someone
thinks that there is injustice in
America, then they should
adopt a morally superior posi-
tion. If you think that your eth-
nic or religious group is un-
fairly treated, show that vou
are better than your oppres-
sors. You will convince nobody
but yourself and a few "tag-
alongs" if you try to fight rac-
ism by being a racist yourself.
Brendan Kilcovne
Senior
English
KURPS
4
Lotteries
Continued from page 4
about giving government back to
the people. Except he might to
have tried giving taxes back to the
people instead it people want
small government, they can buv
all! (Sorry, I got carried away I with a nationwide lottery would
Last but least, think of the surely provide the last bit of m-
propaganda value. Millions of centive thev need to overthrow
people in untree countries around their oppressors.Whv, I can hear
the world alreadygo to bed dream- the Voice of America broadcasts
tewer lottery tickets. Buv more for ing of America but learning that now: "It pays to discover the gov-
larger government. Collect them we had replaced outright taxation ernment that pays you back
CMJ ��Aw" -lA�
��. 3 A P&ES MA �'� Ac
ippcnnti
�yxrn � t
X � �
� r.
?All you can eat
shrimp and trout
$4.95 ' AWUOFAMEAL
(919)758-0327
105 Airport Road
M-lli 1 lain Spin F: Sal liam-9pm Sun lhun-4pni
? tt
Attention Returning Students
It' you plan to live off-campus, you
arranging your utility service in advance,
valuable time - and possibly money. The
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your
utilil) service maj be put in their name.
Just pick up a ' Request tor I'tihtN
Service" application from room 2 i 1 in the
Off-Campus Housing Office, Whichard
Building or al Greenville 1 ittltues' main
.11 . . T(V W Cll. Clt
Building .
office, 200 W. 5th Street
Have you parents complete the
application (which must be notarized) and
mail loGUC, P.O Box 1847, Greenville,
NC 27835 1847, att:
Customer Sen. ice
?Rcmembei to attach a "letter of
credit" from your parents power company.
can eliminate at least one lone line by
B) planning ahead, you can save
following options are available:
Option B: Deposit Required
It vou wish 10 have the utility
service put in your name, a deposit uill be
required. Deposits are as follows:
- �). r.l'K -I c.r : (
� !�� m, � r hasting " l�' -f �� �
Electric-Onl $100 $75
Electric & Water $100 $85
Electric, WatervV Gas lit) S85
Bectric&Gas $100 $75
You can save time by mailing the
deposit in advance He sure to include
your name, where service will be required,
when service is to be cut on, and a phone
number where we may reach you prior to
vour arrival at the service address.
MADE IN THE SHADE
Continued from page 4
exterminated a race of people.
History proves this.
Take for instance, the
Tuskegee Experiment. This hap-
pened during some of your life-
times. Black men were exposed to
svphilhsand wereallowed to have
unlimited sex. However, thev were
notallowed to be treated. The gov-
ernment did this, and it's geno-
cide. There are documented cases
as late as the 1970s of where black
women had to be sterilized to re-
ceive medical treatment, that's
genocide. A friend of mine stated
that a certain anw of this state -
should be bombed because of the
trash that lived there (black,
hispanic and Native American
trash I might add). That's geno-
cidal thinking.
(ne member ot the blxds
told Minister Farrakhan ot how
the police would bring them a crip
anil say 'what do y m want me to
do with him " They left that
brother there and because of the
gangrivalries,hewaskifled. When
this triggered a chain of black in-
black violence,thepolicedid noth-
ing to stop it. This happened in the
'80s; that's government-sanc-
tioned genocide.
I he problem with African
Americans is that we have been
deluded into patterns ot inferior-
ity The evidence presented by the
NAACP in the Brown vs. Topeka
case included a scientific survey
of black children. When asked to
choose the better of the two dolls
(black and white), they almost al-
ways chose the white one. Conse-
quently, we need an action pro-
gram that will expedite a process
to change these perceptions.
My comments recently are
not intended to make any sweep-
ing generalization that all white
people are evil. There are many
white people who I know and love.
However, the power structure is
controlled bv whites (and perhaps
a few black tokens who think that
thev are white), and anyone who
aids and abets that structure is
guiltv of the worst of crimes.
It's time that the black lead-
ership, once again, have the cour-
age to think about what's best for
their people and not what's best
for other people. This is true be-
cause the first principle of truth is
that we must improve ourselves
and our people before we can im-
prove others.
Regardless of public opin
ion and ignorant claims of preju-
dice in reverse, I will forever stand
and strive to be that kind of leader
Don't condemn me (White Anglo
Saxon Protestants) because your
leaders have been that wav for
years. We put you first, and you
put us last.
The time will come when the
African Americans will awaken
as it is prophesied, and sav "no
more of this" and take action on
all fronts to recapture their great
ness.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
(DON'T WE ALL?)
$ WE ARE PAYING CASH $
FOR
RAPE
IS
FOR
REAL
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FOR
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STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
ECU Student Union
Making'W Things Happen At ECU
Program Hotline: 757 6004
TONIGHT!
SUBLIMINAL SEDUCTION wfch Dr. W.lson Bryan Key
-TUES APRIL 16, (TONIGHT!) IN HENDRIX THEATRE-
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-ON THE MALL FROM 12-6PM-
(NO COOLERS OR ALCOHOLIC
BEVERAGES ALLOWED)
(&Z





6
Hhe jEaat (Earn lint an
Apr. 76, 99;
CLASSIFIEDS
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES:
Term papers, dissertations, letters,
resumes, manuscripts, projects. Fast
turn around Call Joan 756-9255.
IYPING SERVICE: lust in time for
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md I'll type it. Call 752-4289 and ask
for Rhonda.
rYPING SERVICE: Term Papers,
Keports Resumes, Letters, Theses,
1 yed on PC. Laser printer. Fast
imaround. Call 756-1783.
GILBERT'S MUSIC open for busi-
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card and we will give you a 20
discotmt on all parts, strings and in-
struments. Located at 2711 E. 10th
street, by the Villa Roma. Phone 757-
W. HrsO-SMon-Fri, 10- Sat, closed
Sun. Ido instrument repairs. Jimand
t Vbbie Gilbert.
FOR SALE
FENDER GUITAR AMP: Deluxe85.
'584)464.
: (R SALi Brand now moped and
met (used only 3 months), S7ii.
irkout equipment, S60. All ex-
nses paid vacation package tor two
: no Honda resort or vour choice for
lays '4 nights, $200. Call 355-6284
d leave message.
YLV.O $49,000 miles, blue 4-
peed, one owner-mechanic, 51,000,
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OR SALE 1985 Honda CRX. Good
ondirion, onlv 50,000 miles, asking
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FOR RENT
OOUBLEWIDE TRAILER on pri-
vate lot torrent in area. Call 459-9355
after 5:30 p.m
ROOMMATE WANTED looking
for male non-smoker to .share 2 bod-
oom, fullv furnished apartment for
mmccXbuo tampus �a11 Kevio
r Brian at 355-8372.
�iLW 2 BEDROOM APT Sublet-
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PS ACS HEAD AREA Student
Housing available for summer em-
.Miyment at the beach. Call Seagate
Realty (919) 441-3127.
WAll ABLE: Apartment to sublet
ir summer. Three bedroom, Wilson
FOR REN1
Acnes, 4 blocks to campus, phone
758-6283. Ask for Jim.
APARTMENT TO SUBLEASE for
summer Two bedroom, one bath,
fully furnished. S295month plus
utilities. Call evenings, 752-5320.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom, 1 bath
apartment located at Cypress Gar-
dens on 10th Street. S375month.
Availableimmediately. Call 756-3320.
ROOMS FOR RENT. Three rooms
available for summer, 4 rooms open
for next school year. Rent plus utili-
ties. Great location, house behind
Belk Dorm, College Hill. Call 757-
3027.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 3 bednxim house. Four blocks
from campus. Own bednxim, $200
month plus 13 utilities. Call 830-
9087.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed at
least both summer sessions. $157.50
month plus 1II utilities, 2 bedroom,
1 bath, no pets. Call 355-1644.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Respon-
sible male student to share 2 bedroom
apt partially furnished, 12 mile
from campus. $125month plus 12
utilities. Available 8 May '91. Call
757-2859, leave message.
ROOMIE NEEDED: Starting May
to share 2 bednxim, 1 12 bath,
dishwasher, pool, plus 24 hour
laundry mat, one mile from campus
for entire summer. $180monthplus
12 utilities. Call 752-9459.
ROOMS FOR RENT First summer
session only, kitchen, AC, close to
campus and Overton's. $137.50
month plus utilities. Call Rustv, 830-
6659.
FURNISHED ROOM to sublease for
summer in beautiful home located
close to campus. Ideal for dorm
a residents who can't take' summer
school with no AC Call home 758-
7993.
ROOMMATES WANTED to share
three bedroom apartment at Planta-
tion for summer and or fall. Access
to weight room, tanning beds, pool
and sauna. $149.00month plus
utilities. Call NOW! Ask for Cate or
Knsten. 355-9502.
DISP1AYC1 ASSIFH D
FOR SALE
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Two
bedroom, 1 12 bath, condo Cable
and water included, pool, washer
dryer facilities. $315.00month. As-
sume lease, option to renew at end of
August. Call 830-3680.
DESPERATELY SEEKING
ROOMMATE: Female, non-smoker
needed for a 3 bednxim apt. in Wil-
son Acres. Low rent plus utilities.
Call Jennifer or Sheila at 752-9618. If
busy, call Kevin at 752-7534.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
Available second week in May, for
both sessions, to share 1 4 rent and
1 futilities. Twobedroom,spacious,
fullv furnished apartment close to
campus! Call 758-9380.
HELP WANTED
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at home. Call for
information 504-641-8003 Ext. 5920.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT: fisheries. Earn $5,000
month. Free transportation! Room
and Board! OverS,000opening- No
experience necessary. Male or Fe-
male. For 68-page employment
manual, send $8.95 to M&L Research,
Box 84008, Seattle, WA 98124 - Satis-
faction Guarantied.
EXCELLENT PART-TIME SAILS
POSITION in JuniorsMissy
sportswear and accessones. Flexible
hours around summer school
schedule. Good working conditions
clothing discounts. Apply Brady's,
The Plaza, Mon-Wed, 14 p.m.
SUMMER INTERNSHIP: Find out
what IBM, Xerox and Fortune 500
companies like about our summer
program. If saving over $5,000, in-
valuable career experience, building
your resume, and college credit ap-
peal to vou, call for an interview to-
day (919) 249-2213.
CLASSIFIED ADS TECHNICIAN
needed for summer sessions and or
fall semester. Must be enrolled as
ECU student. Perfect job for English,
HELP WANTED
Broadcasting or Journalism majors,
but all majors welcome. Part-time,
flexible hours, little expenence nec-
essary. MacintoshMicrosoft Word
expenence helpful. Apply in person
at The East Carolinian or call 758-7652
after 5:30 p.m.
WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR
THE SUMMER- Going to stay in
Greenville, going toSummerSchool?
Brady's currently has sales positions
available in funiors and Mens that
will nin through the summer and
into the fall. Fill vour free rime with
a part-time position withBrodv'sand
Brady's for Men. Apply Brodv's, The
Plaza, Monday through Wednesday,
1 to 4 p.m.
MAKL$5OO-$1500 WEEKLY stuffing
envelopes at home! Start now�rush
S.A.S.F. plus SI.00 to Home Em-
ployers, Inc. 1120 Plain 8B, Us
Cruccs, NM 88001.
SUMMER JOBS AT NAGS HEAD,
NC: Would you like to make at least
SI,000.00 a week1 Would you like to
work on the beach? Aa1 vou willing
to train? I: you are a motivated en-
thusiastic individual, call 305-296-
4S41 collect, for an interview in vou
local ani.
A NATIONAL CORPORATION
hasposihon open tor manager trainee.
Need decisive and competitive indi-
vidual seeking career in financial in-
dustry. College preferred. We offer
competitive salariesand a full benefit
package. Send resume to: P.O. Box
3802, Wilson, NC 27895.
SUMMER BLUES, NOTHING TO
DO? Come and join the winning
team of the Credit Bureau of
Greenville. Weare kxiking fro sharp,
aggressive people with gixxi com-
munication skills. We will train! If
interested contact Mvrna Bunns at
757-2133. PT 20-30'hrs per week
including Sa.m12 p.m. Sat.
HELP WANTED: Part-time help for
sales and stock. Heavy lifting re-
quired. Apply at The Youth Shop in
Arlington Village.
PERSONALS
TONIGHT: ECU Baseball vs. NC
STATE. ThcStudcntPirateClubwill
be having a pre-game cookout start-
ing at 5:30 p.m. S3, non-members; $2.
members. Behind thebasehallstands
HEADING FOR EUROPE THIS
SUMMER? let there anytime with
AIRHrTCH � for SIN) from the East
Coast! (Reported in NY Times &
Let's Go!) AIRH1TCH � 212-864-
2000.
KAPPA SIGS: Get psyched for our
social Thursday night, we can't wait!
Love, the AXEYs.
DO YOU HAVE DIFFICULTY re-
lating to people that don't under-
stand you? Do vou feel guilt md
isolation associated with feelings ol
homosexuality? We understand and
are currently meeting on campus to
discuss these issues. Call 757-6661.
AOP ENCOURAGES all eligible
girls to participate in fall nish. Sign
up now until Apnl 18. Go Greek'
ARE YOU BEING SEXUAI I i
AROUSED by camels, ice cubes and
shoulders in advertisements? Som
people believe vou are. Find out why
when Dr. Wilson Bryan Key does his
presentation on Subliminal Seduc-
tion, Tuesday, Apnl 16th at 8KX3 p.m
PERSONALS
in Hendrix Theatre Sponson?d bv
the Student Union Fonirr (
tee.
CONGRATULATIONS to tht
naUstsof AXD All-in1 EPs - -
first place. ZTA's with second place
and a he for third with EEE and ADP
Thank you to all other sorontx -
your participation We hope I
you again next year The AXD
FRISBEE APPRECIATION DAY
Apnl 20th at the bottom ol (
Hill Action starts ?.Vp-r ��
and lrates hosting Ultimate . i � �
Anyone welcome. Come to pi
toss with trends.
HAPFY APRIL BIRTHDAYS I
Theresa Connelly, ennif r
( hriso Smith, Meredith Grogai
� r Hudgins, Jennifer Spiv � �
Sherry Damrort ac a good
girls 1 ove AOP sisters and pledges
GREEKS Wop: everyone ha 1 I a
during Greek Week it was a
l,ook forward to it next vear '
sri DENT PIRATE CLUB
ing a pre-game cook .�
thebaseballstandsTONIGm it i
S3, non-members; S2, me
( ome out and support PIRA '
they play NC State.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
APPLY NOWFOR
�'SUMMER POSITIONS AT
THE EJLST CAROLZMZA.2!
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
A Ucauuiui tat: lo Live
� Ail New �
� And Ready 1 u Rcm �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
289J 1: 5lh Street
�l-ooaied Near ECL
�Near Major Shopping Centers
�Acruss i-rom Highway i'airoi Station
i-united Offer S300 a month
Contact J T. or tommy Wuiuuns
756 7815 or 830-1937
Office open Apt 8. 12 5 30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS-
Ml a�l lMI OH '�:�: lusliilhcu ipnmeruj
- jciv cllKicnl. tree waicr MM ��� ufcu dry
en. .otr rv . , ,u .tb.iLv S240 AtrMBiUl.
it oa��M iK)MU:HOMkRkJfT4Lfr-sala
wdrm Hnul V kUcy Cnifltry Onb.
Contact J 1 Tommy Williams
756-7815
Ringold Towers
Now Taking Leases for August
1991 - 1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, &
Efticency Apartments,
CALL 752-2865
COLLEGE STUDENTS - TEACHERS- ADULTS AGE 19 and up
LINE UP SUMMER WORK now!
WHEN: Early MayJune to Late WHAT: Field scounts to
monitor crops. We train.
QU'ALIF: Conscientious,
Good physical shape. Have
Own Vehicle, Reliable
WANDSWORTH
COMMONS
GRHKNVII.I.KS NEWEST NAME
IN MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING
Excellent location on Arlington Boulevard
Choice units available. Oi.r and two
bedrooms, energy efficcnt. r.irpct, range,
refrigerator, washer-dryer .�oJcups Brick
construction, quiet with eu� insulation.
FRHE BASIC CABLE TV
GnMfc
The Renlt. :r�.np
758-411
AugustEarly Sept
WHERE: Eastern NC Cos.
Lenior, Craven, Pitt, Jones,
Onslow, Greene
PAY: Min 5.50hour plus
Mileage expenses
SEMD RESUMES TO: MCSI - PO Box 179
Grifton, NC 28530
If you're
Pregnant
and need help making choices
Free, confidential professional
pregnancy counseling
�Financial assistance
Help select adoptive family
1-800-632-1400
�IlLHWai
of North Carolina
A United Way Agency
GOVERNMENT
JOBS
$16,040 -
$59,230yr.
Call
1-900-468-2437
24 Hour Hotline
$2.95 per mln.
. . . JOBS . . . JOBS
ANMDI IMrFKyiFMT
MSIDrniUALL
ASSQCIAHQN
lite Resident Hall Association filing
ites for offices in HouseCouncil and
IAarr?Aprill5th-Aprill8th. There
� ill be an interest session held April
th at 5:00 p.m. in the social room of
I lendenhall. Resident Hall Associa-
�n elections will be from 9 a.m4
pjn. in each Residence Hall. Any
it-sfions, call 7574709.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The 1991 Greenville-Pitt Co. Special
Olympics Spring Games will be held
, .11 April 19th at E B. Ayoock Jr. High
i ,iol in Greenville (rain date. April
24). Volunteers are needed to help
serve as buddieschaperones for the
Special Olympics. Volunteers must
c able to work all day - from 9 a .m. -2
i in. (The first ones there will be as-
ncd a position). An orientation
eting will be held on April 17 in
Old Joyner Library, room 221 from 5-
6:00 p.m. Free lunches and volunteer
t-shirts will be provided the day of the
games to all volunteers who have at-
tended the orientation session. For
more information, contact Lisa Mills
at 8304551.
ECU STUDENT UNION
Have you seen the Pink Flamingos?
Barefoot on the Mall will be here on
April 18 starting at 12 p.m. Featuring
the band Love Tractor and comedian
ToddYohn.
ECU BIOLOCY CLUB
Dr. Mark D.Dibner of the North Caro-
lina Biotechnology Center will speak
about 'The Explosive Growth of the
US Biotechnology Industry. Trends
and Opportunities" on Tuesday,April
16 at 5 p.m. in Room BN 109 of the
Science Complex Anyone wishing to
attend the spring fieid trip to the Outer
Banks should also come to this meet-
ing.
RACE LIKE THE WIND!
Get ready to take off for Whichard's
Beach with ECU Recreational Ser-
vices. They will be sponsoring a Wind
Surfing II workshop on April 18.
Participants will receive beginning to
intermediate instruction in
windsurfing techniques. Partici-
pants interested in attending should
meet at 2:30 p.m. in the Christenbury
Gym. Theeostis$4.00studentsand
$5.00faculty-stafi-guests. Forfurther
information call 757-6911 or stop by
117 Christenbury Gym.
WHATATHRILU
ECU Recreational Services is sponsor-
ing a White Water Rafting trip April
19-21. Experience the thrills of the
French Broad River near Hot Springs,
NC Oneday will also be spent hiking
in Pisgah National Forest. The cost of
S60.00students and S65.00faculty-
staff-guestsindudesequipment,food,
transportation and activity fee. Apre-
trip meeting will be held on April 17 at
5:00 p.m. in Brewster D-101. come
rock-n-roll and join the fun! For fur-
ther information call 757-6911 or stop
by 117 Christenbury Gym.
PEACH POUND!
Spend a day with ECU Recreational
Services exploring the beaches of Cape
Lookout. The trip on April 21 also
focuses on recognizing the 21st anni-
versary of Earth Day and participants
will helpout with beachdean-up while
hiking. The cost of $7.00students
and SlO.OOfaculty-staff-guests in-
dudes transportation, equipment and
lunch. A pre-trip meeting will be held
on April 17at6:00 p.m in Brewster D-
101. For further information call 757-
6911 or stopby 117ChristenburyGym
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY COLLECTS
CALL FOR ENTRIES
The Gray Art Ga llery is seeking mu -
seum quality art works for a summer
exhibition highlighting the collec-
tions of East Carolina University
faculty, staff and students. Works to
be considered for the show will be
juried at the Gray Art Gallery on
May 9and 10,1991, from 10:00 a.m.
to 4:00 pjn. A maximum of two
works per person will be accepted.
The exhibition will be limited to the
first 60 works accepted. The Gray
Art Gallery will provide insurance
for all works on display during the
exhibit. Lenders will be responsible
for picking up their work when the
exhibit closes on August 12, 1991.
For more information on East
Carolina University Collects, con-
tact Charles Lovell at 757-6336.
April 16,1991
PHYSICAL EDUCATION.
MQIQBPHYSICAL FITNESS
COMPETENCY TEST
A passing score on this test is re-
quired of all students prior todeclar-
ing physical education as a major.
Students must maintain an average
T-score of 45 on the six-item test
battery and have a t-score of 45 on
the aerobics run. Any student with
a medical condition that would
contraindicate participation in the
testing should contact Mike
MCammon or Dr. Gay Israel at 757-
4688. To be exempted from any
portion of the test, you must have a
physician's excuse. A detailed sum-
ma ry of the test components is avail-
able in the Human Performance
Laboratory (Room 371, Sports
Medicine Bldg.). You physician's
excuse must specifically state from
which items you are exempt.
Love Tractor
By Lisa Marie Jernigan
Stiff Writer
Ifs time to slip off thos�' sh les,
pack the cooler and head dwn to
the mall. The Student Union's hall-
mark annual event, Bareli mt on the
Mall, is set for Thursday Apr -
Events will begin at noon and con-
tinue into the night
As usual, the highlight of the
day is the music. This year, four
bands are slated to plav G
radio giants Love Tra I r an
headliners Th Mi-m. ind
ness Art Ensemble and � p the
Press will also play
Opening up Ban I - I
noon are The Stegmonds, a five
piece band based in Raleigh rhe
group was fom-
here in the Emerald '
since gained !a
across the state
TheSterr n
hand, plavin all of
classic n� k hits
eBeal rhe Do
linand the Si
likeahveWRDU
The next band
ireness Art �
then set oft at ; :
� known
� mg colleg �
theirur:
rhe bai I
�he con
This yeaf s Barefoot on the Mall is exponentially blessec
Tractor Other bands on the barefoot ticket include Awa
icester
Polytechnic
to join ECU
through
exchange
ECL News Bureau
His accent was decidedly Bnt-
ish. Hers was not. But the messages
spoken to ECU students this week
by Robert Hartley and Levela
Rickard were almost identical.
'Study in England they said.
Hartley and Rickard are mar-
keting professors at Leicester Poly-
technic in Leicester. England. The
school is located in the heart of the
English countryside, the Midlands,
where King Lear, immortalized n
the works of William Shakespeare,
built a castle and where later kings
fought battles-ThereShervvwd For-
est rustles with soft wind noises
and sometimes the ghostly twang
ota longbi w. The i
back to mere 130
birth of Christ
ECU and Lekestt
have formed an a
change students a
puses. Under thi j
dents pav their tuit
swap places witi J
other campus. Tl
room and board I
school thev attend
In a recruitr j
Hartley said 30ofabd
dents at the Bnn-
to attend ECU next
the students ha e I
the exchange and H
hoped an equal nur
students will sign uj
Leicester.
The mam differ
the two campus
Hartley, is that the
gland is in a town of
people and the1 camj
multicultural than E(
has 350 overseas shi
over the world
hat we would liil
more American-
Key discuss
By Lisa Marie Jemigan
SUf f Writer
formation presented
selling books, Subln
Media Sexploitation,
Orgy and Age of Mi
cites actual cases fro
magazines, televisu
and other influence
age our purchasmgl
interpersonal and
iors.
The highlight
undoubted lv the sli
Are you sexually aroused by
the dromedary in the Camel ciga-
rette ads? How about the Sobflex
magazine ads? "No pain, no gam"
indeed.
Dr. Brian Wilson Key, the
world's leading authority on the
use of subliminal messages in ad-
vertising, contends that we do find
these images arousing and that re- filled with specific
tailers are profiting from their use. hminal manipulati
Key will speak on the topic of "sub-
liminal seduction" tonight, Apnl
16, at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
Key, who has a PhD. in com-
munication studies and has taught
at the universities of Denver, Kan-
sas, Boston and Western Ontario,
will tell you thatresearchhasproven
that it is impossible for us to resist
subliminal messages. Furthermore,
he asserts that the vast majority of cigarette ads and t
ads,rnanyofwhkhareveiyfamil- the packaging. In a
iar to us, contain suHirninal mes- Marketing Magazxne
what he calls the
Key's program is based on in- on every pack of
include male and
hidden in ice cubes j
ing, orgy scenes in I
and, what Dr. Key-
most disturbing, tl
lightly embedded
fromcrackerstopolit
In Key's latest
dresses the latent
"Smooth





April 16, 1991

PERSONALS
rheatre Sponsored bv
Forum Commit-
(NV.RATl i M IONS to the R.
V S ng! EPs with
Vs with second place
l with I EEandADP
' uonties for
a e hope to see
� vAis
Rl (. IATION DAY
' " xt College
Opm Helios
' mate games
���� to play or
i'K!l BIRTHDAYS to
. lennifer Spain,
redith( irogart, en
�� i Spivey and
� i good one
rs ind pledges
ryone had fun
� - was a blast'
t year ADP&
n ciin w.
� bel
MM ;HTat5:3l
S2 members
� � i'lKAFFSas
DISPLAY CLASSFIED
rnAT 72 AM
V I
OVERNMENT
SEIZED
Ci
00-468-2437
4 Hour Hotline
$2.95 per min.
CARS . . . CARS
OVERNMENT '
JOBS
$16,040 - I
$59,230yr. I
Call
900-468-2437
24 Hour Hotline
$2.95 per min.
. JOBS . . . JOBS

101 IN A
iqllects
JKIRIES
I
' rheGra)
j�"ide insurance
Nay during the
1 be responsible
vork when the
igust 12, 1991
ition on East
Collects. con-
It "7-6336
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
MOIOK.nnblCALMT.NtSS
COMPETENCY TEST
- -v on this test is re-
gents prior todeclar-
i education as a major.
Sl maintain an average
- � - 45 on the six-item test
ivea t-score of 45 on
run "Any student with
ondition that would
Ikate partiapation in the
' g should contact Mike
mmon or Dr. Gay Israel at 757-
iw To be exempted from any
portion of the test, you must have a
prvsician s excuse A detailed sum-
mary of the test components is avail-
able in the Human Performance
laboratory (Room 371, Sports
Medicine Bldg.). You physician's
excuse must specifically state from
which items you are exempt.
April 16,1991
uUfe i-aat (Earulintan
7
Love Tractor headlines '91 Barefoot on the Mall
By Lisa Marie Jernigan
Staff Writer
It's time to slip off those shoes,
pack the cooler and head down to
the mall. The Student Union's hall-
mark annual event, Barefoot on the
Mall, is set for Thursday. April 18.
E vonts will begin at noon and con-
tinue into the night.
As usual, the highlight of the
day is the music This year, four
bands are slated to plav. College
radio pants Love Tractor are the
� �� k! 11 ners. The Stegmonds. A vv,i n
ness Art Ensemble and Stop the
Press will also plav.
Opening up Barefoot at high
oon are The Stegmonds, a five-
piece band based in Raleigh. The
group was formed in late '87 right
here in the Emerald City and have
since gained fame and fortune
across the state.
TheStegmondsarea greatpartv
band, playing all of vour favorite
classic rock hits by such bands as
The Beatles,The Doors, U�d Zeppe-
lin and the Stones. They're kind of
likealiveWRDU.
The next band up will be
Awareness Art Ensemble, kicking
their set off at 3 p.m. A AE, as they
are known to their manv fans, have
become very popular among dis-
cerning college music listeners for
their unique brand of reggae music.
The band combines the feel of
reggae, the complexity of jazz, the
soul of R& Band the energy of rock
and roll to provide an exhilarating
experience of rhythm and a dynamic
display of visual showmanship.
The headlining band, starting
at 4:30 p.m is the band that defies
classification, Athens-based L.ove
Tractor.
During my endeavorsover the
past few weeks to promote the Bare-
foot bands, I discovered that there
aren't many ECU students who
have ever heard of Love Tractor let
alone heard their music. Well, it's
time to WAKE UP AND SMELL
THE COFFEE! Jump on that
outerspace ship Thursday at 4:30
p.m. and listen to some themes from
Venus.
Love Tractor, the band that is
referred tobvinsidersasFuckTruck,
Leicester
Polytechnic
to join ECU
through
exchange
ECU News Bureau
� Photo Court��y ot T�M��yn
This year's Barefoot on the Mall is exponentially blessed to bare witness to Athens Ga wonderband Love
Tractor Other bands on the barefoot ticKet include Awareness Art Ensemble and The Stegmonds
our students gain a better perspec-
tive of the world he said.
Hartley said the British students
were looking forward to coming to
ECU because they are interested in
experiencing American and seeing
new faces and meeting new people.
"Our students believe that in
America they can get a good educa-
tion because the US. is the world's
leader in such things as computing
and marketing" he said.
The exchange agreement be-
tween the two campuses grew out
of a meeting last spring between
Levela Rickard, one of the
instructiors from Leicester, and Dr.
Maurice Simon, the head of Inter-
national Snidies at ECU. Rickard is
a nati veNorthCarolinian from Lex-
ington who moved to England four
years ago to teach.
I n developi ng an exchange pro-
gram at the Leicester campus she
looked to her home state to form
and exchange. She said she con-
tacted Simon at ECU and an agree-
ment was signed.
"We're a good match with
ECU said Rickard. She said both
See Exchange, page 9
have frustrated the music
industry for years as ear-
nest critics have tried to
categorize theirsound. At-
tempts have included
"Southern surf "psyche-
delic Ventures "Hannery
OConnor rock" and "psy-
chedelic porch funk Mean-
while, the group's audiences
have been expanding readily em-
bracing their experiments in folk,
funk, psychedelia, rock and pop
that mesh together to yield that dis-
tinctive Love Tractor sound.
Love Tractor have been plow-
ing the musical fields since 1980.
When thev first got together, their
main purpose was to play at parties
around their idvllic hometown of
Athens, Ga also home of REM and
the B-52's. lacking microphones
and a good PA. system, the band
was limited to playing
instru mentals.
Their first LP, theall-instrumen-
tal Love Tractor, was released in 1982
by Atlanta's DB Records. It was met
with unequivocal critical success
and led to VXffs Around the Bend
whoa- the band subtlcv incorpo-
rated vocals for the first time.
In 1986 Love Tractor firmly es-
tablished themselves as a dorm-
hold word with the release of This
Ain't NoOuterspace Shipon BigTime
Records. The album immediately
wentToplOonallthecollegecharts.
The LP featured a Tractorized ver-
sion of the Gap Band's'Tarty Train"
which actually received some com-
mercial airplay here and there across
the country.
Love Tractor regrouped witb
DBRecordsin 1989 for the rcleaseof
their most successful and accessible
LP to date, the utterly swell Themes
From Venus. The album produced
rave reviews and resulted in a 50-
plus city tour with the B-52's.
1991 Barefoot on the Mali
Schedule of Events
Noon-12:45
�� Stegmonds (Classic Rock)
Michel tauiere (Confedic performance art)
2:15.3 p.m.
Todd Yohn (Stands comedy)
is
at
a
times
The album
finely textured,
frenzied, work. It was mas-
terfully produced by Mitch
Easter who has helped launch
many a Southern band's career.
The band had desired to work
with Easter for a number of years,
but the timing was never right
until Venus was ready to be re-
corded.
Love Tractor shows are well
known for their warped rendi-
tions of such tunes as "Disco In-
ferno" and Eddy Grant's "Elec-
tnc Avenue The band actually
has a side project known as Wheel
of Cheese, which sometimes drags
in some members of REM, where
they showcase all of their covers.
Love Tractor's sound is gener-
ally upbeat and playful, shaped
around the expert guitar playing of
Mark Cline.
Those of vou who like to dance
will be well pleased.Closingout the
day at 7:15 p.m. are Stop the Press,
a progressive pop band. The group
is being brought back after receiv-
ing a great audience response at
3-4:1 S p.m.
Awareness Art Ensemble
(Rggae)
4:30-55 p.m.
Love Tractor
(Defies classification)
7:15-8 p.m.
Stop the Press
(Progressive Rock)
Dusk (8:15
The Rocky Horror
p.m.)
Pi
icture Show
their show at The Underground
earlier this semester.
Barefoot on the Mall is spon-
sored by The Student Union. Glass
and alcoholic beverages are prohib-
ited on the grounds. "Rocky Horror
Picture Show" viewers are re-
quested to throw birdseed instead
of rice at the show.
His accent was decidedly Brit-
ish Hers was not. But the messages
spoken to ECU students this week
by Robert Hartley and Levela
Rickard were almost identical.
Study in England they said.
Hartley and Rickard are mar-
keting professors at Leicester Poly-
technic in Leicester, England. The
school is located in the heart of the
English countryside, the Midlands,
where King Lear, immortalized n
the works of William Shakespeare,
built a castle and where later kings
fought battles.ThereSherwood For-
est rustles with soft wind noises
and sometimes the ghostly twang
of a longbow. The town itself dates
back to mere 130 years after the
birth of Const.
ECU and Leicester Polytechnic
have formed an agreement to ex-
change students at the two cam-
puses. Under the agreement, stu-
dents pay their tuition at home and
swap places with students at the
other campus. They pay fees for
room and board charged by the
school thev attend.
In a recruiting trip to ECU, Bob
Hartley said 30 of about 10,000 stu-
dents at the British campus applied
to attend ECU next year. Seven of
the students ha ve been accepted for
the exchange and Hartley said he
hoped an equal number of ECU
students will sign up for classes at
Leicester.
The main differences between
the two campuses, according to
Hartley, is that the school in En-
gland is in a town of about 300,000
people and the campus is far more
multicultural than ECU. "Leicester
has 350 overseas students from all
over the world said Hartley.
"What we would like to do is get
more Americansover here to help
Transplanted Texan teaches
By Michael Harrison
Staff Writer
Extremely talented, patient,
outgoing, sometimes disappointed
and "youthful at heart" are words
students used to descnbe one of the
ECU School of Arfsnewest instruc-
tors, Micki Muhlbauer.
Micki Muhlbauer was bom in
New York in 1950 but quickly
moved to Texas, where shelived for
29 years. Texas is a place unlike any
other in the world, Muhlbauer said.
Its people are like reptiles, she
added. "They can survive any-
where she said.
Men in Texas displayed what
she cal led a gen tie sense of chauvin-
ism, which she said was a "takin-
care-of-your-little-woman-type
thing Not all men are like that, she
said but added she felt she had
found all those who were. These
experiences were later adapted into
her artworks.
Living there had much to do
with the devekpment of her sense
of humor, she said, which is also
reflected in her paintings. "There's
a real warm spirit there she said.
"People learn to laugh at themselves
there. I think my sense of humor in
mv paintings had a lot to do with
the way I saw things when 1 was
growing up
A nu mber of yea rs ago (bu t not
too many), Muhlbauer worked in
Texas as a free-lance artist while
working other jobs, as well. Around
1979, she took a trip to Europe. "I
left with full intent of never coming
back, she said. Nevertheless, she
said she finally realized, months
later, the United States was "a pretty
good place to live
Finished with her trip in Eu-
rope, Muhlbauer traveled back to
New York, where she stayed for
about a year. Afterward, she moved
back to Texas and worked from
1980 to 1986. next, she attended The
Maryland Institute College of Art
forher Master's Degree. Atthesame
time, Muhlbauer found work there
in Baltimore.
Her job was part of an experi-
mental program that was geared to
channel idle energy of inner city
children into constructive talents.
Muhlbauer described the children
as being hard-edged. "Someof them
were so used to seeing somebody
murdered on the street she said.
Yet, she added that some of them
were extremely creative, and de-
spite the havoc and disadvantages
of this challenging job, she said her
work there was a very valuable ex-
perience.
Shestayed in Baltimore for two
years, then traveled once again to
New York and stayed for a couple
of years. She went to Iowa as a
visiting artist and afterward she
found herself back in New York. At
this time, she traveled on what she
called the "Great Northwest Tour
She traveled to Canada and came
through Washington and Montana.
Her job at ECU came next Out of
171 applicants, she was theonecho-
sen for the job.
See Professor, page 8
subliminal seduction'
By Lisa Marie Jernigan
Staff Writer
formation presented in his four best-
selling books, Subliminal Seduction,
Media Sexploitation, The Clam-Plate
Orgy and Age of Manipulation. He
cites actual cases from newspapers,
magazines, television, billboards
and other influences which man-
age our purchasing reproductive,
Are you sexually aroused by
the dromedary in the Camel ciga-
rette ads? How about the Soloflex
magazine ads? "No pain, no gain"
indeed.
Dr. Brian Wilson Key, the interpersonal and political behav-
world's leading authority on the iors.
use of subliminal messages in ad- The highlight of Key's show is
vertising, contends that we do find undoubtedly the slide presentation
these images arousing and that re- filled with sped fie examples of sub-
tailers are profiting from their use
Key will speak on the topic of "sub-
liminal seduction" tonight, April
16, at 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
Key, who has a PhD. in com-
munication studies and has taught
at the universities of Denver, Kan-
sas, Boston and Western Ontario,
will tell you thatresearchhasproven
that it is impossible for us to resist
subliminal messages. Furthermore
iminal manipulation. Examples
include male and female genitalia
hidden in ice cubes and cake frost-
ing, orgy scenes in fried-clam pia tes,
and, what Dr. Key feels may be the
most disturbing, the word "sex"
Dr. Brian Wilson Key
"There's a little man standing
there looking back towards the rear
lightly embedded in everything of the camel. He has his right hand
from crackers to political candidates, on his right hip and he has a rather
In Key's latest book, he ad- prodigious erection. This is the
dresses the latent sexuality of the camel man. He's a 'dkekie waver
"Smooth Character" of the Camel But, according to Key, the
ZZXZSZmZ cigararteadsaraJthecameHogoon ��� �)� . , ���
he asserts ttat the vas.n.F 7 f - g ��� m the latest series of ads featuring
m to us, contain subhminal mes- �� y j fr M- jc or "Smooth Character "The
prcgtm'bonuv oneveryckofC.me Se. MM page 9
ARE YOU
BEING SEXUALLY
AROUSED BY THIS CAMEL?
MCwrfl.Dr.WM.Iry.itK
Dr. Wilson Bryan Key will discuss the famed, phalic camel and many other sexual advertising ploys tonight
in Hendrix Theatre. Keys forum entitled, Subliminal Seductionl begins at 8 p.m, admission is free with ECU





8 fflhe Cam (Carolinian April 16,1991
century Milky Way
By Clifford Coffey
Staff Writer
In the 31st century the Earth
has died in its original state, and the
other planets of the solar system are of the universe for so many years.
Guardians is the bal member of own wars. Taserface was the cham- the nght to the shield, and the Force
their respective races, and the re- pion of the Stark. The Guardians won.
percussionsof that point are thank- came to the planet that he was at- Only, when the Wterome
fullv avoided now that they have tacking, and they stopped him, but into its possession of it, hetound
been theself-prodaimed protectors not before they fought an entire that no special powers resided
Stark army Vance Astro, a 20th-
Hendrix Theatre expands courtship
realm with "Tie Me Up,Tie Me Down
This week the Student Union Films Committee presents three
black comedies, the outrageous Spanish sex-comedy 'Tie Me Up!
Tie Me Down Stephen King's "Misery" and the very strange
"Va rents
Pedm Almodovar ("Women on the Verge of a Nervous Break-
down") returns with a dark comic book look at love with his
provocative and controversial, and originally X-rated, 'Tie Me Up!
Tie Me Down
rhis twisted bov-meets-girl tale is about Rickv, an ex-mental
patient who decides that it's time to settle down and marry the girl
of his dreams, soft-core pom star and junkie, Manna.
Forsaking the usual flowers and candy, Ricky rnes to woo
Marina bv kidnapping her and rvinghertothebed. Heisconvinced
that it is just a matter of time before she falls in love with him. And
he's right!
'Tie Me Up! Tie Me IVwn is a wonderfully silly view of the
the ties that bind Tut those subtitle-reading skills to work and check
it out tomorrow night at Hendnx Theatre
In "Miserv" fames Caan plays Paul Sheldon, a writer who ison
his wav to Niew York todeli ver his new novel when hiscar overturns
lnablizard.Unfortunatelv.hislifeissavedbyAnnieWilkesdCithv
Bates), a frightfully demented nurse and Sheldon's "number one
tan
"Misery" is a Classy horror film sure to please even the most
finicky of ECU'S film tana tics. Kathv Bates' Academy Award-
wmriing performance as Annie is the scariest thing in an age.
'Tarents" is sort of like "Leave it to Beaver" as interpreted by
David Lynch. Set in 1958, the story is a warped nightmare about
death, evil and the not-so-gentle-art of raising a child.
Nick and 1 ilv l.aemle( Randy Quaidand Marv Beth Hurt), have
just moved to the suburbs, where their days and nights are filled
with barbequing,practicinggolfswingsand reclining on their tacky
space-aged furniture. They seem pleasant enough, but their son
Michael is slowly being overwhelmed by the sense that there is
something dreadfully askew with his ever-cheerful folks.
For much of the film, it is not revealed what exactly the Laemles
are up to Onlv gradually do Michael's suspicions begin to center on
the peculiar cutsof meat that his family is perpetually diningon, and
in time we learn that, ves indeed. � laemles are suburban canni-
bals. Who can resist the allure of m :1 a storyline?
'Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down t shown Wednesday night,
Apnl 17, 8 p.m. at Hendnx Theam Misery" screeas Thursday,
Fndav and Sattirday nights, Apnl 18, 19 and 20, also at 8 p.m.
'Tarents" will be presented Sunday night, Apnl 21 at 8 p.m.
Compiled by 1 is Marif ernigan
the only refuge for its inhabitants
This is the basis for 'TheGuardians
of the Galaxy
Of the seven members of this
team, four are decendants of Earth:
Vance Astro, Martinex, Nikki and
Charlie-27. The other three mem-
bers come from distant worlds in
the galaxy (Aleta, Starhawk, and
Yondu).
jim Valentino has successfully
brought back the heroes from an
jim Valentino, who writes and
draws the comic, succeeds in mak-
ing the group come alive. The per-
sonal matters are addressed and
the action is never far away. His
pacing of the stones makes for
pleasent reading. In only twelve
issues, he has brought them against
three powerful adversaries.
Initially, they were confronted
by a group called the Stark, after
TonvStark,a.ka.lronman. Ironman
almost forgotten pit in the Marvel sent his suit of armor into space so
Universe. The Guardians of the
Galaxy began when the reprillian
race called the Badoon tned to take
over the universe by eliminating its
foes, everybody. Each of the
Professor
the Badoon wouldn't be able to use
it against other humans.
A group of agressive people
recovered the ship with the armor
and began to use the armor for their
century astronaut that got lost in a
cybergenic sleep in his lost space
craft, was a big fan of Captain
America.
The search for Captain
America's shield has always been a
personal quest for him. TheGuard-
ians were on the trail of it when they
met the Stark. They got another
clue from that planet and then be-
gan to search for a new locabon, a
ship called Main Frame
At Main Frame they faced a
group that also wanted the shield,
the Force. The Force heard rumors
that the shield held special powers
and the leader wanted it. The
Guard iansand the Force battled for
and threw it down. Vance Astro
claimed it as hisown, and the power
he then had stemmed from his be-
lief in the nghteousness of Captain
Amenca. The Force left to pursue
new endeavors.
TheGuardians first quest, over-
all, was to find the lost planet of the
mutants of Earth, and, in issue nine,
they found it. Unfortunately, it was
not what they expected.
The planet underwent many
changes since Magneto tab the
mutants from Earth to this new
planet The planet was now niled
bv a steel hand with no freedoms
for the inhabitants of the world.
The Guardians freed them with a
great deal of trouble
Continued from page 7
Her life and experiences in
North Carolina remind her of Fort
Worth, Texas as it was 30 years ago,
she said, "The people are genuine.
They're very friendly. They're verv
open. They're very isolated in their
Southern philosophies, but yet
there's a line 1 guess you could cross
where they do accept you
She now lives in Farmville,
which she describes as a "nch re-
tirement tobacco town " She said,
"I'm real different than what they're
used to living in their neighbor-
hood, but they accept me as the
artist
She said people in many small
towns across Amenca would never
allow her to live close by. Life in
Farmville itself might be very dif-
ferent if she wen? black, she quietly
and regretfully. "1 don't think I'd be
in the neighborhood if I was black
Nevertheless, she said people in
North Carolina "are very nice and
very courteous. It may be just sur-
face but if s there, and I've enjoyed
it. I'vereally enjoyed my time here
Muhlbauer said her artwork is
derived from inspiration from ev-
ery dav life and situations, every
day human beings, isolated psy-
chological dramas and her percep-
tionsof them. She added that one of
her likes is to walk and drive to new
towns to find ideas and gather ma-
terial tor new painbngs
Muhlbauer said she gets "bet-
ter stories from other people about
what mvpaintingsare about From
her painhng titled "Sleeping with
Devils' came all kinds of interpreta-
tions from people that she said she
had not overtly intended. As a re-
sult, she recognizes the role sub-
liminal or unconscious ideasor feel-
ings play in the creation of her art-
work.
On Muhlbauer's standard re-
sume, it is written: "My paintings
embody an introspective dance with
both the devils and the delights of
mv soul Grace Hartigan, an in-
structor ot Muhlbauer's from the
Marv land Institute, told her artwork
has to be passionate If the work
was not passionate, it was said to be
"surface" and uninteresting.
Life as an artist is onlv begin-
ning for her, she said She has been
painting "seriously" for five vears,
which she considers to be a verv
short time. Before then, she con-
ducted demonstrations in photog-
raphy and sculpture but eventually
chose drawing and painting to ar-
tistically express herself.
Muhlbauer works on her own
artwork for about 40 hours a week.
Her living room has been adapted
into a studio, and she said she is
anxious to begin painting with oils
again. She currently works pnma-
nlv with watercolors. She also ex-
pressed considerable i nterest i n col -
laborating with fellow ECU artist
Benito Huerta tor an art project.
Much more painting is to be
done before she will have enough
works to "hit the market" and cre-
ate her own gallery for sales, she
said.
She has shown her work na-
tionwide but said she needs two or
three more years of work in paint-
ing before she can start a show.
The davs she paints are usually
separate from the days she teaches.
After a work day at ECU, she will
spend the evening sketching and
doing research, which can include
read mg and skimming books to look
for ideas. Tuesday, Thursday, Sat-
.�����
� �����
?�I
The

i
i
I
i

i

Student Stores
We
W e
Help us
remodeling!
have the floor plan!
' re ready to start
reduce our stock!
We'll be on the
Sidewalk
9: � $iftm�
(Ay
with great buys on Salesman's Samples: SHORTS
and T-SHIRTS ($3.98),and SWEATPANTS and
I
1 SWEATSHIRTS ($7.98). Also come check out
I
the reductions on selected marked-down wearing
apparel for adults and children. Drop by to
L browse through our 99c Old Edition Text Books;
urdav, and Sunday are her davs to
paint full time, she said and taocljp
estimated she spends at least $3,008
to $4,000 each year on art supplies.
Nevertheless, she said, "Pay-
ing the rent, paying the utilities -
thafs the biggest challenge. I think.
of mv life. If 1 can do that then I'm
real happy
She said she sees herself as a
struggling artist All artists are, she
said with a laugh.
Muhlbauer's interests are vast
Alifelongtnterestinarthasevolved
to work in painting, drawing, fig-
ure drawing, photography, news-
paper production and more. Each
of these interests have given her
good experiences. she sa id, a nd thev
all plaved a part in making her the
person she is today
Other interests include gar-
dening, hiking, walking, reading
and biking. "Kind of bonng, huh
she said, laughing again.
Muhlbauer said she is Uxiking
for a place to live for a while once
she is finished with her work at
ECU. She said she hopes for an-
other artist residency or teaching
jofc
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9
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(jUp MIAMI, FLORIDA
THE PLACE FOR PROFESSIONALS IN EDUCATION
If you are a qualified
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bntury Milky Way
!1 him Kit
the right to the shield andtheForoe
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i ni when the letdci cwne
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i racial powers resided in it
,nd threw 'i down in� tatro
nj itashisow n and the power
w, stemmed from his be
hteousness ctiaptain
1 Force left to pursue
endeavors
uarvlmn first quest over
� planet ol the
. iitenine
it was
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to this new
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I
ffhe �aiat Carolinian April 161991
9
Exchange
�aid Rk kard She said Kith
iesexperienced mostoi their
in the last two de ,ul�'s V
ih h up in most ol .i� ademii
rs ri ept fot the Si hool of
. ind 1 dm ation at EC1
i, I .i i( n h hi 't i.i and
Rickard ltd
, ersities n Britain didn t
nvirkel themselves the w .1
� versifies do over here .ihi
� iaidonlvabout lOjvr
I thi ttudentsgoon to hichei
n in the I mUi Kincdon
and the schookl didn't compete with
each other because the ooflcgea ape-
�uii�l in certain fields
"Now thev (schootd in Fn-
gland) are having to Uxk to new
prograns to make mestudents want
to come to thenv If you've got inter-
national exchanges it nukes the in-
tiiutnnisl(HikmonMttractiveshe
. !� exchange program b set
up so thai th�' number 01 students
ex hanged is negotiated each year.
We hope tn soe it grow said
Rickard.
She enjoys living and working
in England but considers it nice to
be from North Carolina. "I'm al-
ways proud to tell the people over
there about the kind of education
system we have in this state she
said.
"Any Student who is qualified
and wants to go to a university can
get a college education in North
Carolina she said, explaining the
she attended UNC-Charlotte and
was able to complete her college
Professor
Continued from page 7
studies by receiving financial aid.
She said she also enjoys telling
Britishers about the state's other at-
tractions and about North
Carolina's history which connects
with the history of England, a fact
she said, many Britishers confuse.
'Teople often ask me where is
North Carolina said Rickard. "I
tell them it is on the eastern sea-
board and is ne of the onginal colo-
nies she said.
"But they don't think of it as an
original colony Rickard added.
Continued from page 7
FOSDICKS
1890 SEAFOOD
756-2011
Lunch only
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onl
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Sun Fri
lot in
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Good anytime
Beverage not included
� the 1 artoon camel is a
Kia s,n s, diN ribing
� embedded in the
t u e s hcrmaphro
I . ld our fingei ovei
. . uiH'l 1 �u rv looking
Mit.il ere t
turn the t.u e of I
11 u ter upside down
hit hand and bkx k off
1 nosi and the rest ol
ith jusi the mouth .i ail
n looking .it .1 female
11 igarettc stuck in it"
en further, Key s,n s
� alv� a sfeatureasexv
Ai
woman in the background, "sug-
gest .1 somuI relationship between
in animal and a human "
Not surprisingly, the creators
.1 the Smooth Character" cam-
paign, New York ad firm Md arav
Erickson Worldwide express out-
rage al ke 's claims
I le S ir.iv�! I ie S out ot his
mind' sns associate creative di
rectoi Bob Cote 'It is absolutely,
categorically wrong to say thai the
camel st.i ewasintentionalry made
to look like genitalia it is absolutely
bizarre . Wyaperversemind would
think that
Key is not al all bothered by
vehement denial tromadmen. "One
thing everyone in this business
knows, you can't believe what an ad
agency savs. Thev lie all the time.
That's their business, and they're
extremely good at it
Key also says that "there is no
such thing asa photograph thatever
appears anymore without retouch-
ing, even news photographs
As evidence he cites the "anal
slit" airbmshed into the shoulder of
the weightlifter in a series of maga-
zine ads forSotoflex exercise equip-
ment, with the headline "No pain,
no gain
There is also the castration and
death images embedded in
Seagram's ad for Crown Royal
whiskey,captioned "Have you ever
seen a grown man cry?"
Following the uproar sur-
rounding the publication of Sub-
liminal Seduction, Key was fired from
the University of Western Ontario
where he was a tenured prof essor in
the journalism department.
These days he's making a much
better living on the lecture circuit
than heever could ha vein academia.
It is clear that after attending
tonight's presentation, our percep-
tion of favorite household-name
products may never be the same.
SwMBOFS
11 r r
Celebrates
&f
Wednt sda
IB
Proaresssive Dance Nielit
introducing
in Draft
1 15 Lill Boys
1 ,(K) kamikazees
1 adies live til 10:30
p.�iiiiF�.�iiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiimnmg
i
Introducing
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from Greenville Graphics
Now you have a source for those special r
casions when only a ribbon will complete -
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Ribbons have touched all our lives at on
t.me or another. From spelling bees to trac
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ECU vs. N.C. State
April 16, 7 p.m.
Come enjoy our food and drink
specials � then walk to the game!
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Phone 752-0123-Fax 752-0620
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rfiiiiiinitiinn:
IVKH. IWAii '1. Sn s IMS MONITOH
ANOWT tl,XK. INC lllf-KNT
THE
BATTLE
THE
HOLYFIELD AvXjt!j&.
chahpiok THE UNDisPUTED
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famovs brands
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ALL SII SPRISCS STYLES
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YourTan for Hundreds 01
These Dirty Old Men.
RONJOl'R-
r,Sl'ALC()RM-R-
tees
slums
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FOREMAN
HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP
OF THE WORLD!
LIVE! ON PAY-PER-VIEW
HIOMTIU Ml" rl.UA
FRIDAY, APRIL 19,1991
9 PM ET
yfod-
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etc.
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TOM TOGS OUTLET
YOUR GUESS OUTL�T
1900 DICKINSON AVENUE
ACROSS FROM PEPSI
j 9:30-5 M-SAT 1-5 SUN
830-0174
Break open your piggy-bank!
WZMB is sponsoring
a 25 Album Sale
Thursday April 18 during Barefoot on the Mall
A R O L I N A U N I V ERSI T Y
z
zs:
r g - s
ALLIED BLACKS for LEADERSHIP md EQUALITY
NOMINATIONS AND ELECTION OF
OFFICERS FOR 1991-92
will be held
Thursday, April 18, 1991
7:00 PM 2017 GCB
'If you are not part of the solution,
then you are part of the problem





ntiirv Milky Way
���
he Force
I lei win'
� � �und
ded in it
Mre
I HIT
ptam
Kit)c tn�t Carolinian Apra 16,1991
9
Exchange
Continued from page 7

i ides
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andth sehoold didn't compete with Rickaand
ea hothei because the collegesspe She enjoys living and working
v K)h, Jm, ertain fields �n England but considers it nice to
� ow they (sehoold in En be tmm North Carolina. "I'm al-
11 are having to Uxk to new wavs proud to tell the people over
nrtakethestudentswanf there about the kind ot education
system we have in this state she
said
"Any student who is qualified
and wants to go to a university can
get a college education in North
uimher of students (arolina she said, explaining the
. hated each yeai she attended UNC-Charlotte and
. it grow said was able to complete her college
, , If vou'vegOt inter
: sit i V1 the in
.Iti. tp. e
nd
ange program is set
ofessor
studies bv receiving financial aid
She said she also enjoys telling
Britishers about the state's other at-
tractions and about North
Carolina's history which connects
with the history of England, a fact
she said, manv Britishers contuse.
"People otten ask me when- is
North Carolina said Rickard "1
tell them it is on the eastern sea-
board and is ne ot the onginal eoli v
nies she said.
"But thev don't think of it as an
onginal colonv Rickard added
Continued from page 7
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
"mi 201 I
1 .unch onl
Small Shrin
Platter
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Sin I � r i
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Bu one
Regular Shrimp
Plattei al $6 50
Gel the 2i :
Retiiilai Shni .
pfattei 1 KM
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i�e noi ii
I
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1 .i human "
'o( i itors
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V . irldv Hie express out
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�� sa that the
i - tiona id
. . . u tafia it isabsolutely
id would
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vehement denial from admen. "One
thing everyone in this business
knows, vou can't believe what an .id
agency says They lie all the time.
Hut's their business, and they're
extremely good at it"
Key also says that there is no
,uch thing asa photograph thatever
appears anymore without retouch-
ing even news photographs
As evidence he cites the "anal
slit" airbrushed into the shoulder of
the weightlifter in a series of maga
Zine ads for Sokflex exercise equip-
ment with the headline "No pain,
no gain
i here is also the castration and
death images embedded in
Seagram's ad for Crown Royal
whiskev.caphcned Haveyoueer
s.vn a grown nun c ry!
Following the uproar sur-
rounding the publication of uh
IvmrudSeduction, Key was tired from
the University of Western Ontario
where he wasa tenured professor in
the journalism department.
rnesedayshe'smakingamuj h
better living on the lecture circuit
than heevera uU ha ein at aderrua
It is clear that atter attending
tonight's presentation, our percep-
tion of favorite household-name
products may never be the same.
ShaBOfS
� .
( lebrates
2
Wet
MB
Progresssi c Dam ' ight
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OMOTIVE
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�n.
ECU vs. N.C. State
April 16, 7 p.m�
Come enjo) our food and drink
specials � then walk to the game!
GliA
"Vtttii
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Phone 752-0123-Fax 752-0620
itrrrrniN111
nmm
!
�ril 18. 1991
NOW!
AND TOP RANK, INC FRKHKN.
THE
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THE
YFIELD AGES! FO
awMM0" THE UNDISPUTED
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mi iiii'iir n wit
FRIDAY, APRIL 19,1991
9PMET
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Your Tan For Hundreds Of
These Dirty Old Men.
FOREMAN
C II vl Li M.KK
Wo4-
OIUVOXNI
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("huitnfl VI
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� ' �
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.� if
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WtCertrl fie
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nnei 5 15C
RIDA
IOOLS
ION
nrniirn
inq lanoc; rnqp
�ll�nt Fnnqp Ranpfits
�AtklHiiHMl $� vhuryfif Uay ��f evrnl
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Sta. - The - tor
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rhursda) Apr 18 during Bawefoot on the Mall

ALLIED BLACKS for LEADERSHIP and EQUALITY
NOMINATIONS AND ELECTION OF
OFFICERS FOR 1991-92
will be held
Thursday, April 18, 1991
7:00 PM 2017GCB
"If you are not part of the solution,
then you are part of the problem





The ECU Student Union presents
Thursday, April 18th
Central Campus Mall
7f v �� - I h ' II si n t iO
'??. OU' 'O tf�Vt rj
ifeW
ECU'S own
m&
the Stegmonds
Noon-12:45 PM
�t rt �
comedic performance artist
Michel Lauziere
Comedy Zone Comedian
Todd Yohn
A Reggae Sunsplash with
Awareness Art Ensemble
Traditional Rock and Roll
Love Tractor
High Tech Sounds of
Stop the Press!
1:00 PM-200 PM
2:15 PM-3:00 PM
3:15 PM-4:15 PM
4:30 PM-600 PM
7:15 PM-800PM
"Rocky Horror Picture Show" DUSK
(Please don't bring rice - bring birdseed instead)
Novelty attractions will include:
Carnival Games � Make Your Own Music Video Booth
The Gyro �"Battle of the Wits" Game Show � World Robotic Boxing
Free tickets to these events will be available from the
Student Union Booth located to the left of the stage.
ABSOLUTELY NO ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES OR COOLERS ALLOWED!
April 16,1991
Pirates cau
By Matt Mumma
Sports Editor
An ominous thud on the
scoreboard signaled the end of the
game for ECU in the ninth inning in
Richmond's 4-3 win on Friday.
A three run blast in the ninth bv
centerfielder Mark FostergaveRich-
mond its only lead in the game It
proved to be the only one thev
needed.
The Spiders went on to win the
next game on Saturday, 4-3 That
win boosted their record to 11-1 in
theColonial Athletic Association as
they held on to first place in the
division.
Freshman Chad Tnplett had
two home runs in the game includ-
ing a two-run shot in the bottom of
the ninth in a desperate comeback
attempt that fell short. Richmond's
starter Sean Gavaghan struck out
two ECU batters in the ninth, effec-
tively squelching the Tirates' come-
back.
Gavaghan struck out nine ECU
battersand gave up seven hitsin the
win and improved his record I -
The Pirate pitc
trouble control! - I
ing 11 combined he
game Sophomore
walked three battn
inning, and itlool
a long da) for the P
ButAmbntsuiv
and retired the ski
men on I -
Thef'ir.i' -
bottom of tl
single bv junior Gl
dn ve in Ini
ond oi in en i
nd and �
big lead, but
fanned b
The Piral
fourth en th
homers, but a late
morid denied the I
Richmond's
Erskine keiiev
the sixth and a sa
eighth
I
The Piral
run to Richmond
Kill that man!
N C State won the North Carolina Rugby
tournammeni Sunday after beating ECU in the �
Irates place third i
By Gary Hurley
Staff Writer
ECU'S fnsbee team finished
third in the Mid-Atlanhc College
SectJonal Tournament Their sec-
tion includes any college team from
North Carolina or Virginia.
Virginia Tech hosted this year's
sectionals April
teams, UNC-W,
girua, ECU,
and Appalachiai
in the '91 colleg'l
A srructura!
tournament dn
had the Iratej
Wilmington in 1
tBB. j$p�PSSII' .
The lra� cm in thW m the Mid-Atlantic Coll.
crushed Duke 15-0 but lost to University of Virg-





nts
:45 PM
2:00 PM
-3:00 PM
-4:15 PM
6:00 PM
�8:00PM
ooth
tic Boxing
the
ALLOWED!
April 16,1991
�hz iEaHt (Earolinian
ii
:s�Ps
��
SPORTS
Pirates caught by Spiders' web, lose 4-3,4-3
By Matt Mumma
Sports Editor
n ominous thud on the
� rebound signaled the end oi the
e ime for ECU in theninth inning in
rtmond's 4-3 win on Friday.
A three run blast in the ninth by
n -vrriolder Mark Foster gave Rich-
mond its only lead in the game It
proved to be the only one thev
needed.
"he Spiders went on to win the
� i d cie on Saturday, 4 3 7Ti.it
boosted their record to 11-1 in
olonia Athletic Association as
the held on to first place in the
division.
Freshman Chad Tnplett had
two home runs in the game includ-
i two-run shot in the bottom of
the ninth in a desperate comeback
attempt that fell short. Richmond's
starter Sean Gavaghan struck out
two ECU batters in the ninth, effec-
tively squelching the Pirates' come-
back
Gavaghan struck out nine ECU
hattersand gave up seven hits in the
The Pirate pitching staff had
trouble controlling the ball, allow-
ing 11 combined bast1 on balls in the
game. Sophomore lim Ambrosius
walked three batters in the second
inning, and it looked like it might be
a long day tor the Pirates.
Put Ambmsiuscloanvlhishead
and retired the side leaving three
men on base
The Pirates scored a run in the
bottom of the second on an RBI
single by junior Clvnn Beck. Rock
drove in Tnplett who reached sec-
ond on an error
ECl loaded the bases in the
second and had a chance to take a
big lead, but senior Cory Rodick
fanned to end the inning.
The Pirates scored again in the
fourth on the hrM or Inplett's two
homers, but a late surge bv Rich-
mond denied the Pirates a win.
Richmond's right holder
Erskine Kelley had an RBI single in
the sixth and a sacrifice flv in the
eighth that tied thegameand setthe
stage for Foster's three run homer.
The Pirates lost another bv one
i and improved his record to 8-2. run to Richmond on Saturday in a
steady drizzle.
Junior Tom Moye (3-3) pitched
a complete game and also went 2-
for-4 with a homerun. He walked
only two Spiders and struck out
five.
The Pirates started out well in
the first as freshman Pat Watkins
lead off the game with a single.
Junior John Gast drove Watkins
home with an RBI single.
Richmond exploded in the third
inning with three runs and three
hits and forced ECU to come from
behind the rest of the game. With
men on second arid third
Richmond's Steve Bemhardt hit a
grounder to senior Corey Short at
first hase, who threw the ball past
catcher Davis Whitfield allowing
the Spider's first run in the inning.
ECU slowlv got back into the
hall game making two hits in the
fifth and sixth innings. Senior Berry
Narron drove in Whitfield in the
fifth,and Move homered in the sixth
to tie the game 3-3.
Richmond answered in the
eighth with a leadoff tnpleby Chnss
See Pirates, page 12
Dail RNd � ECU Photo Lab
Seniorfirstbaseman Corey Short puts a tag on a base runner Over the weekend. ECU lost two games to first
place Richmond and fell to 6-7 in the CAA
Roseboro leads track team at CAAs
By Rick Chann
Staff Writer
Cold and rainy conditions Sat-
urday a t George Mason had coaches
wondering whether to hold the
Colonial Athletic Association cham-
pionship track meet or not.
It was decided the meet would
go on in the rain, but a few coaches
decided not to run some of their
athletes and risk injury.
The women's team placed
fourth behind host George Mason,
James Madison and William and
Mary.
The men's team, composed
mainly of sprinters, decided not to
run many of their athletes to avoid
injuries, consequently, they placed
fifth in a He with UNC-W
The days competition began
with the 10,000 meter race. Defend-
ing conference champion Ann
Marie Welch, who has been ham-
pered by injuries all season, placed
third finishing the race in 38:15
The rrieristeam received punts
in an unaccustomed event, as Kyle
Sullivan placed fourth in the lOjOOO-
meter personal best with a time of
32:47.
Leading the women's team
once again was sophomore Danita
Roseboro. Roseboro tied for third in
the 100 meter wi th a George Ma son
runner finishing 12.2. She finished
second in the 200 meter in 25.3 de-
feating the same runner she tried in
the 400- meter.
In the men's 100 meter, one of
theonlvevents the men's teamcom-
peted in, Damon Desue ran 10.82,
and Ike Robinson ran 10.99 to finish
second and fifth, respectively. Brian
Williams was the only other point
getter for the Pirates as he finished
second in the 110-meter hurdles,
with a time of 14.5.
The men's team, the favorites
to win the 4x100, 4x400 relays and
possiblv the 490-meter, could have
scored many points in the sprinting
events, but the weather conditions
made Ovich Carson deride not to
run manv o( his athletes to keep
them healthv for more important
meets later in the season.
The women's team received
some gcxxj points in the shot put as
Jamie Rowee threw 41 TO" for sec-
ond place, and Susan Schram, de-
fending conference champ, took
third with a throw of 41'7 Chano
Cooper, another defending cham-
pion , placed third in the triple jump
with a jump of 36'2
Roseboro also competed on
ECU's two relay teams, each plac-
ing third. Roseboro was joined by
Jov Dorsev, Sherry Hawkins and
Diane Jacobs in the 4x100 relay fin-
ishing in 49.78 behind George Ma-
son and James Madison.
In the 4x400 relay, Roseboro
anchored the team of Gretchen
Harlev, Danielle Smith and Cindy
Speenev to a time of 4:13 just ahead
of UNC-W.
The Lady Pirates other points
came from Marianne Manni who
ran 18:57 in the 5,000-meter to place
fourth.
In the 800-meter for the men,
WilDuffranl:58towinhisheatand
finish just two seconds behind sixth
place. For the women, four athletes
competed in the 800-meter.
Harlev bed a personal best and
finished second in her heat with a
time of 2:19. Theresa Manni also
ran the 800-meter in a time of 5:03.
Catherine Norstrand finished the
800-meter in2 JO followed by Joanne
Thornton running a personal best
of 2:42.
Lacrosse team uses teamwork, depth to win
By Mike Marshall
Staff Writer
With a 9-1 record, the ECU la-
crosse team has won their division
and is in the playoffs on the road to
finals in Baltimore. After defeating
UNC-CH, William and Mary and
NC. State, ECU has earned their
spot in the playoffs.
Last Thursday, ECU defeated
N.C State9-3 in a very physical and
high-paced game. Drew Johnson
lead the Pirates with five goals while
Kelly Hoyt, Kevin Knight ar-J Scott
Smith all scored one goal.
The Pirate offense was literally
unstoppable, whereas the defense
stopped everything that came their
way along with goalie Phil Truiss,
who had anotheroutstandinggame.
"N.C. State came in overconfi-
dent and expected to walk all over
us, but thanks to PhilTurissand our
defense, we shut them down and
capitalized on their mistakes fresh -
man defensive mid-fielder Larry
Fortier said.
"As the season went on, we
started to get more serious because
we realized that we were a good
team and could make a name for
ourselves, as long as we didn't take
anything for granted Fortier said.
Manv things have contributed
to the success of the team. The most
important one is that there is no
friction between team members
because everyone contributes and
works well together. There is no
one real star, but there are many
good players and much depth on
the sideline.
A good example of this was on
Friday when ECU played William
and Mary and defeated them 16-11.
William and Mary, a far more supe-
rior team, fell to ECU because of the
Pirate's depth and teamwork.
This is by far one of the best
lacrosse teams ECU has ever seen.
With a 9-1 record and a division
title, the Pirates can only look to
accomplish more.
Their next game will be the first
round of the playoffs sometime this
week. Their opponent hasn't been
determined yet. But beassured, this
Pirate team will be ready for who-
ever it may be.
Irates place third in Mid-Atlantic Sectional Tourney
By Gary Hurley
Staff Writer
ECU's frisbee team finished
third in the Mid-Atlantic College
Sectional Tournament. Their sec-
tion inci udes any college team from
North Carolina or Virginia.
Virginia Tech hosted thisyear's
sectionals April 13 and 14. Only six
teams, UNC-W, University of Vir-
ginia, ECU, Duke, Virginia Tech
and AppalachianState participated
in the '91 college series.
A structural mistake bv U.P.A.
tournament director Steve Gross
had the Irates matched against
Wil mington in the first game of the
first day. ECU seemed to be still
sleeping as the Red Hot Seamen of
Wil mington rolled to a 15-5 victory.
The first loss woke the Irates up
and they took out all their frustra-
tions against Duke. Duke was shut
out 15-0 in the biggest romp of the
weekend.
To close the day, ECU faced the
The Irates came in third in the Mid-Atlantic College Sectionals at Virginia Tech last weekend. The Irates
crushed Duke 15-0 but lost to University of Virginia 15-12.
local team. Fresh Produce from Va.
Tech. The g?me was never close as
the Irates took the a in with a com-
fortable score of 15-5.
On Sunday, the Irates were
scheduled to play a first round game
against AppalachianState. Appala-
chian never showed which gave
ECU a win by forfeit.
Wilmington had already
wrapped up first place when the
Irates and Virginia met to decide
2nd place.
Everything was going ECU's
way. They took a 4-0 lead and closed
the half 8-4. The beginning of the
second half followed suit with ECU
going up 12-7, three points away
from a second place finish.
Irate Steve Walser said12-7 is
where everything went wrong for
us. From there we flopped The
Irates found themselves without a
zone offense.
Ken Earley said, "All of a sud-
den we couldn't even get the frisbee
out of our own endzone
Six turnovers in the Irates own
endzone allowed Virginia to con-
vert easy scores. Virginia not only
made up their deficit but took the
lead 14-12 before the Irates even
scored again. Virginia's game win-
ning point came in spite of an in-
credible defensive effort by Irate
See Irates, page 12
Moye adds versatility to
Pirate baseball team
By Owen Cox
Staff Writer
For Greenville native Tom
Moye, playing for the ECU base-
ball team is an experience he
will not soon forget. "I get a lot of
support from the people in
Greenville Moyesaid Ithelps
me more to know that people
are out there pulling for me
The junior, righthanded
designated hitter is one of sev-
eral Pirates who hail from Pitt
County, more specifically, Gre-
enville.
Moye is also the only Pirate
to see double duty in the field.
He has started 29 of the Pirates
34 games as the DH, and is hit-
ting over .250 with two home
runs and 11 runs batted in.
On the mound, he has
started eight games and pitched
in relief once, compiling a 3-3
record with an earned run aver-
age just over four.
Moye has had a tough two
years in a Pirate uniform. His
freshman year he broke his fin-
ger diving back to the bag and
was only able to pitch 18 in-
nings.
His sophomore season he
Tom Moye
got to swing the batand wasable
to pitch also. Now he's looking
forward to his senior season as
well as continued success this
season.
Moye likes designating hit-
ting when he is on the mound
because he feels it gets him more
into the game. '1 feel like I hit a
lot better when I'm pitching he
said. But as a result he gets tired
quicker because of running the
bases then going to pitch.
Reflecting on the Pirates,
Moye said: "We didn't play real
well against George Mason and
James Madison, so the win over
UNC really boosted our confi-
SeeMoye, page 12





12 (She gafitjgarolfnfan April 16, 1991
Robinson strives to be remembered at ECU Moye
By LaToya Hankins
Staff Writer
"I believe that my strength
comes from my desire to excel Ike
Robinson said.
Bom Isaac Wesley Robinson in
Wachuvia, Fla Robinson spent his
early yeu rs shu ttling from army base
to army base because of his step
father's involvement with the armed
forces.
He said that the experience
helped to shape his outgoing per-
sonality because it made him de-
velop the knack of making friends
quickly in the different cities in
which he lived.
He remembers always being
built for speed, even at birth.
"1 think running is a trait that
you are just bom with Robinson
said. He remembers challenging
children five years older than him
to races and winning, but it was the
other competition that he credits for
his agility and speed to this day.
"Wherelwasgrowingupthere
were these dogs who loved to chase
whoever happened to go that way
Robinson said. "I didn't have a
choice but to pass by there, so I
became fast real quick
He came to ECU from Lejune
High School in Jacksonville, where
he had spent the last three years of
high school. During that time he
excelled in football where he played
as a tailback for two years.
But it was his running skills
that bought him to ECU on a track
scholarship. He runs the 4x100 and
the 4x200 relays as well as blazing a
pa th in the 1 OOmeter and 200-meter.
He sees track as an individual
sport and the relays as being the
only time for the team to come to-
gether and be a part of something
that everyone of the team can ben-
efit from.
Robinson said he believes that
coming to college helps to separate
the men from the boys in track.
"You have to love running
Robinsonsaid. "Thepracticesaren't
a joke. You have to have what it
takes to make it. Everyone is as
good if not better than you, and that
is on your own team. I see it as this
, if you can't run with the big dogs
then stay on the porch
The track team, more com-
monly known to some as the Wheel,
is the image of what teamwork
should be in Robinson's view.
'The Wheel is like if s name-
sake, an organization in which ev-
eryone works together to support
the whole, like a spoke in a wheel
working together to keep every-
thing going right Robinson said.
Crew team remains undefeated Pirates
'To me that symbolizes unity
Fellow runner Udon Cheek
expressed this view of his team-
mate style.
"His running style is definitely
unorthodox Cheek said. "He has
his own running style which works
for him. He's laid back except when
it comes to running. Then he does
what he has to do
In ten years Robi nson sees him-
self financially secure and involved
with a track club. He said that he
went into his major, electronics,
because the job market is wide open
for people with a technical back-
ground.
Robinson said that he would
like to be known as leaving a mark
on society and 'That 50 years down
the line that I would have left
something behind that my name
would still be of everyone's lips
Continued from page 11
dence. Everyone wants to reach a
peak towards the end of the year. I
think everyone's playing real well
offensively and defensively. Some-
times, though, we are not concen-
trating
Last summer Moye had the
opportunity to play in the Valley
League in Virginia. The league was
for college players up to their junior
year, to play over the summer with
people from other teams across the
country.
Moye said: "1 enjoyed it. I got to
meet a lot of different guys from all
Continued from pag� 11
over the country
Among his memorable mo-
ments, Moye has played in two
NCAA Regionals.
He said, though, that his most
memorable moment was when he
was named Amateur Athlete of the
Year for Pitt County by the Hot
Stove League. Moye felt honored
because he was voted to this award
by the people of Greenville.
Moye hopes that this year's
baseball season will land him and
the Pirates into their third straight
Regional.
By Nicole Pratt
Staff Writer
The ECU men's rowing team
continued its winning streak Satur-
day as thev dominated crews in the
men's novice four event at Duke.
ECU and theCoi ogeof Charles-
ton were ncck-and-ncck until the
very end, when ECU pulled ahead
and be it Charleston by 15 seconds.
ThevalsolxMthvitsmimN.C.State,
Duke and L NC-CH.
The ECU women'screw placed
third to two Duke boats in the
women's novice four event, beat-
ing UNC-W and UNC-CH.
The ECU crew were also at
Duke, April 6. The men's team
rowed easily past crews from Duke
and UNC-W in the qualifying heat.
About one hour later in the
finals, they defeated crews from
William and Mary, Duke and the
University of Alabama at Hunts-
ville, finishing at least six lengths in
frontof the second place Williamand
Mary.
The ECU women's team failed
to advance to the finals, bearing a
Furman novice four but losing to
crews from Duke and the Univer-
sity of Alabama.
The entire ECU team consists
of eight women and five men. Most
of the schools they have competed
against have crews with 50 or more
students.
Piela. Spider pitcher Foster drove in
the winning run and secured his
first win of the season.
The Pirates tried to put some-
thing together in the eighth and
almost came away with another
home run by Moye. He smashed a
Irates
pitch to deep centerfield with two
men on base, but it was a little short
of the fence and a victory.
With the loss ECU moves to 18-
15-1 on the year and 6-7intheCAA.
The Pirates challenge N.C. State to-
night at 7 p.m. at Harrington Field.
Continued from page 11
Tommy Yarborough.
About the team's unorthodox
loss, defensive captain Dave Kelly
said, "Both of usgo on the Regionals,
and if we qualify for Nationals and
they don't, the game meant noth-
ing
Theteamawarded Keith Lewis
and MVP award in the third place
finish. Honorable mention was
given to Ben Joseph, Jon Jessue,
Tommy Yarborough and Dave
Kelly.
ECU qualified for the regional
tournament to be held April 27 and
28 at St. Mary's College of Mary-
land. The top finishers from the
Eastern Seaboard will be there.
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 16, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 16, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.806
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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