The East Carolinian, April 11, 1991






�to iEaat (Ear0ltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.65 No.24
Thursday, April 11,1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
10 Page.i
Scholars
debate
Gulf
conflict
By Heather Modlin
Staff Writer
Two professors argued the jus-
tification of the Persian Gulf War in
a debate sponsoaxi by the ECU
Philosophy Club Tuesday night.
Or. Robert Holmes of the Uni-
versity of Rochester, NY. and Dr.
Jonathan Schonscheck of Syracuse
University's LeMoyne College call
themselves "quarrelingcontempo-
raries" on the issue of war. 1 le then
presented hisargumentsin favor of
justified war in the Persian Gulf.
Schonsheck said that in order
to avoid political and economic in-
stability in the Gulf region, the de-
struction of Saddam Hussein's
military capabilities and the "de-
mvthologizing" of Saddam was
needed. He said sanctions would
not have achieved the desired re-
sult, regardless of the length of their
enactment.
Although he said he opposes
aspects of the Bush administration's
policy.Schonsheck said justification
for military action can be offered.
He said there are a "complex set of
interests" to take into account.
He said the peace slogan "No
blood for oil was "just silly He
said petroleum hasa variety of other
uses beside gasoline. It indirectly
provides a source for food and
medicine, he said.
"Uet us be very careful at as-
signing blame Schonsheck said in
defense of the United States' for-
eign policy. He said the significance
of Saddam's invasion of Kuwait
tnggeaxi American intervention.
Hesaid the outcome of the Per-
sian Gulf War could have been
worse and that military might had
to be used to protect American in-
terests abroad.
Holmes began by saying
A mencan action in the Persian Gulf
was unjust intervention "in a place
that we don't understand
Holmes spoke on the history of
the region and the significance of
Iraq's lack of access to water. He
also said there has been a history of
border disputes between Iraq and
See Gulf, page 3
Cleland to speak
at graduation
ECU News Bureau
Fila Photo
On Dec. 8.1990,1,600 ECU students graduated. An estimated 3,000 will graduate on May 11. Max Cleland,
a wounded Vietnam veteran and former head of the veterans administration, is scheduled to speak.
ECU to offer genealogy classes
Max Cleland, a wounded Viet-
nam veteran who became the
youngest man to head the Veterans
Administration (VA), will be the
1991 commencement speaker at
ECU May 11.
Cleland, now secretary of state
in his nativeGeorgia, wasdescribed
by a nationally syndicated colum-
nist as a man who "embodies as
much as any one person in public
life can, both the agonies and hopes
of the last 20 years
As Veterans Administration
chief in the Carter Administration,
Cleland worked on behalf of the
physically handicapped and,
through hisefforts, federaland state
legislation to aid handicapped
people was enacted.
He is known for inspirational
speaking and public service. He is
the author of a book. Strong at the
Broken Places, which stresses his
personal philosophy.
In 1968, while serving as an
Army captain in Vietnam, he was
wounded in a grenade explosion
and spent a year and a half in mili-
tary and veterans' hospitals.
Awarded the Silver Star for
gallantry in action,Cleland returned
to civilian life and politics.
At age 28, Cleland was elected
to the Georgia State Sena te from his
hometown distnet at I.ithonia, Ga.
Cleland is now in his third term.
In 1977, President limmyCarter
appointed Cleland to head the
Veterans Administration.
Appro xima tely 3,000 gradua tes
will receive degrees at the 10 a.m.
Saturday ceremony scheduled in
Ficklen Stadium.
ECU News Bureau
Ever since the publication of
Alex Haley's novel "Roots gene-
alogy hasbecome i me of America's
most popular pastimes.
The first place many people go
to start a search for their own roots
is the local library, but all too often
the librarian lacks the knowledge
and skills necessary to guide a ge-
nealogist
Tohelpsolvethisproblem.ECU
has developed a new course, "Ge-
nealogy for Librarians to be offered
on campus this summer The class
is believed to be the nation's first
genealogy course specifically de-
signed for the professional librar-
ian, according to Dr Donald Collins
of the ECU Department of Library
and Information Studies.
Dr. Collins, who will instruct
the lulv 1 to 19, three-semester-hour
class, is an experienced genealogist
as well as a library science instruc-
tor.
"Genealogical asearch consti-
tutes one of the most frequent uses
of libraries he said. "It also differs
substantially from other types of
library work. Our class � empha-
sizing library genealogical service
from the librarian's perspective �
isdesigned to meet the special needs
of this area
Collins noted that the course
will cover "all aspects of genealogy
in libraries"� history, genealogy
collections and services, sources of
genealogical information, problem
areas, and computer programs and
indexes.
"Both genealogical methods
and reference service for genealogy
patrons wall be taught Collinssaid.
Students will be instructed in the
use of sources found in typical li-
braries � census records on mi-
crofilm, indexes to public record
are library science ma jors, al thou gh
some professional librarians in pur-
suit of genealogy training or addi-
tional college credits are expected
to enroll also.
"Genealogy isanareaof library
service of which library schoolshave
failed to prepare students Collins
said. "Reference librarians tradi-
tionally dread the days when fam-
ily history seekers come in asking
for help. There is so much special-
ized material in this area, and the
MBRAKY
and published abstracts of court, typicallibrananhardlyknowshow
land or estate records.
Also, the class will focus on
records repositories and govern-
ment archives � prime resources
to which librarians can direct gene-
alogy patrons. Collins will devote
much time to genealogical tech-
niques, problems and terminology,
and conclude with surveys of such
specialized areas as the use of com-
puter programs in genealogy and
foreign genealogical research.
The class will take field trips to
the North Carolina genealogy col-
lection and the Archives Search
Room in Raleigh. Some graduate
srudentsenrolled may do individual
projects of reports dealing with ge-
nealogical acti vitiesina specific type
of library.
Dr. Collins anticipates that most
to begin to advise a genealogy
novice.
"Up until now, education for
hbranans prepanng to work in ge-
nealogy to any degree � in spe-
cialized libraries or with genea-
logical researchers � is practically
non-existent Collins said.
This lack of formal education
for genealogical librarians is "almost
certainly a result of the historically
low opinion in which librarians have
held genealogists he said. Gene-
alogists have long complained that
librarians seem to regard them with
disdain, disrespect or even outright
dislike.
Collins believes thislow esteem
for the family history researcher is
disappearing, but that it still exists
in some library circles, even though
participants in the course will be genealogists are among the most
seniors or graduate students who See Genealogy, page 2
FHo Photo
ECU will otter a class in genealogy this summer to train people to get the
most of their library's resources
Chapel Hill honors ECU Medical School founder
Special to The East Carolinian
CHAPEL HILL � Six people
have been honored with Distin-
guished Service Awards from the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill School of Medicine.
The awards were presented
Friday, April 5, by Dr. Stuart
Bondurant, dean of the school. Re-
Caviness, who opened
Raleigh's first internal medicine
practice in 1923, has spent six de-
cades treating patients from across
eastern North Carolina. He wasone
of America's first researchers to
work with insulin and helped find
of the Thomas A. Dooley Founda-
tion INTERMED-USA has dedi-
cated his professional life to caring
for the sick, feeding the hungry and
serving the needy in Third World
countries.
"In areas of the world in which
proper doses to make the new drug many go to bed hungry and never
a workable treatment for diabetics, receive medical attention, Dr.
Caviness was a pioneer member of Chaney and the staff of the founda-
cipients were Dr. Edwin W.Monroe the Rex Hospital medical staff in non have provided hope where
of Greenville; Dr. Verne S. Caviness
of Raleigh; Dr. Verne E. Chaney of
New York Gty; Dr. Harold J. Fallon
of Richmond, VA, Charles M.
Shaffer of Chapel Hill; and Dr.
Kenneth Sugioka of Chapel Hill.
Monroe, now the executive di-
rector of the Kate B. Reynolds
Charitable Trust, has devoted his
professional career to expand ing the
availability of health care in eastern
Raleigh and helped found Rex's
heart and blood pressure clinics.
He funded endowments in the
UNC School of Medicine mat have
resulted in the establishment of the
Verne S. Caviness professorship of
there was once only hopelessness
Bondurant said.
In Nepal, INTERMEDhasbeen
a major influence in the country's
development. When Chaney and
GMTERMED first went to southern
North Carolina. He helped spear- training opportunities for young
Jill Cherry � ECU Photo Lab
7-10 split
The Residence HaH Association's resident games were held
on the Central Campus MaH Wednesday.
head the establishment of the ECU
School of Medicine in Greenville
and was its health affairs adminis-
trator.
The ECU Medical School
produces large numbersof qualified
family medicine and primaryore
physiciansBondurant said. "More
importantly, it produces primary
caregivers who stay in North
Carolina and serve those who need
their talents and expertise. Dr.
Monroe's guidance and foresight
have played no small part in their
recruitment, training and reten-
tion
investigativemedicineand support Nepal in 1963,thearea was wracked
with disease and malaria so wide-
spread that the land could not be
farmed. Today, this region is virtu-
ally malaria-free and the most pro-
ductive in Nepal.
Fallon, who became chair of
the Department of Medicine at the
Medical College of Virginia in
Richmond in 1974, has built that
for the Verne S. Caviness General
Clinical Research Center.
"Because of Dr. Caviness' gen-
erosity, the center will provide
researchers and help create an en-
vironment in which clinical research
can prosper Bondurant said.
Chaney, presidentand founder
Dr. Edwin Monroe
department into one of national
prominence. He also is president-
elect of the American College of
Physicians.
Fallon served 11 years on the
UNC School of Medicine faculty
and excelled in researchof alcoholic
liver disease and alcoholic hepatitis.
"Great parts of the standard text-
See Honors, page 3
INSIDE THURSDAY
Editorial
The East Carolina Association
of Scholars has formed to
promote academic freedom.
Classified
Features n
Learn about vintage guitars and
alternative bands playing in
Greenville this weekend.
Sports 9
The ECU Pirates beat the
UNC Tarheels 3-2 in baseball
action in Chapel Hill
Comics





2 Bl?e �at (Earolinfan April 11, 1991
crimfS?ene
Genealogy
Public Safety investigates
trash container larceny
Aprils
1008�Rawl Building (north): responded to a student who had
possibly located his stolen bicycle. Unable to determine ownership;
bicycle was secured.
1538�Aycock Residence Hall: investigated a report of a larceny
of compact discs.
2037�Tyler Residence Hall (north): campus citation issued to
student for speeding.
2112�Location unknown: transported subject to magistrate's
office for order of arrest.
2156�Tyler Residence Hall: responded to a loud disturbance.
Same was handled by the officer.
2203�Scott Residence Hall: responded to a report of a shower
that would not rum off. A plumber was called.
2240�Minges Coliseum (west): investigated a breaking and
entering and larceny of a vehicle.
0008�Cotten Residence Hall (east): non-student given verbal
warning for illegal parking.
0025�Cott en, Flemingandjarvisresidencehallsarea: responded
to a report of suspicious people. Subjects were gone on arrival.
0547�Minges Coliseum (west): investigated a breaking and
entering and larceny of a vehicle.
April 9
1007�Minges Coliseum: responded toa report of two typewrit-
ers missing from athletics. The typewriters had been recovered from
the hallway on April 5, 1991 and turned over to the Association
Director of Athletics. Geared.
1234�Cotten Residence Hall: responded to a report of harass-
ing phone calls.
1242�Student Health Services: responded to a report of subjects
bkxrking the handicap ramp with bicycles. Tickets were issued to the
subject.
1415�Public Safety: responded to a report of larceny of trash
containers and a report of damage to a bicycle.
1439�Cotten Residence Hall (north): verbal warning given to
student for a one-way street violation.
1946�Location unknown: campus citation issued for no
operator's license.
2331�Jones Residence Hall: responded to andisturbance. Same
was handled by the residence hall advisor.
0030�Tenth Street and College Hill Drive: verbal warning
given to student for no headlights.
0OJ3�Scott Residence Hall: responded to assist with subjects
shooting fireworks; subjects were gone on arrival.
0114�Belk Residence Hall (east): investigated subjects playing
basketball. Subjects left the area.
0213�Aycock Residence Hall: found a subject's meal card.
0222�Fourth and Summit streets: a subject was transported to
the magistrate's office.
Crime Scene it taken from official Public Safety log
Continued from pagt 1
active supporters for local libraries.
Preparation for genealogy
librarianship has had to be infor-
mal, like an apprenticeship, as new
librarians observe experienced li-
brarians, Collins said.
"Also, many genealogical li-
brarians are self-educated persons
who are genealogical hobbyists
he said.
Collins himself developed ge-
nealogy skills while engaging in
searches for his own origins �
though not as a youth. In the rela-
tively young community of Miami,
Fla where Collins was bom and
reared, family history had little sig-
nificance.
"Almost everyone there was
from somewhere else; virtually no
one had roots tying them to the
area's history or heritage he said.
A move to Greenville in 1972 to
accept a teaching position at ECU
brought Collins into contact with
his origins. One grandfather had
moved to Florida around 1880 from
nearby Kinston, and when Collins
found an 1807 home built by his
great-great-grandfather John
Blackman Becton, he was "hooked"
on genealogy.
"This discovery started an in-
terest in family history that hastaken
me to the earliest days of the Caro-
linas, to 1500s Germany, 1600s Ire-
land he said.
Like any other new family tree
i tracer, Collins learned by doing,
aware that his library training had
not prepared him for this type of
research.
"Genealogical research is com-
parable to any other form of sub-
ject-field reference, and deserves to
be taken seriously in libraries
Collins said. "As a reference librar-
ian special izing in various means of
information retrieval, I enjoy the
research aspect of genealogy. How-
ever, when I came to realize that
training is both lacking and sorely
needed, I decided to develop the
new course
Collins said he has received
encouragement from professional
librarians across the nation.
East Carolina
Panhellenic
presents
i' L
FALL
FORMAL
RUSH
In h
1991
East Carolina University
�I �
TICKET INFORMATION:
�Register for Rush at the Student Store & the Croatan
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Honors
book literature on alcoholic over
disease came from Dr Fallon'snnd-
mg Bondurant said
Formerly vice chair of the IV
Department of Medioneand acting
chair for one year, Fallon was in-
strumental in establishing an inde-
pendent and centralized Depart
ment of Hospital Litwatone- at
Memorial Hospital
Shatter served 2 wars as the
secn-tary of the Medical Founda-
tion of North Carolina Im and is a
legendary 'missionary' tor UNC
Continued
Gulf
and the S hi �
Shatter I
first dinxlorcj
holding the
Because
proach to tiJ
rtogpiAi
Uruversir �
velopment
dav
' A I V
the hrst reol
Trustees v t
in is'M tor
Continued
oil-rich Kuwait that warts
Iraq's actions may have kvn Holme
unjustified, Holes said, but Amen- Warwas 1
can intervention was unustitied as was rw t �
well.
The Persian Cult, risis does not said
qualify as a just war, he sa .j tr
A just war, Holmes said mus( lis
have a just cause a legitiniat.
thonty, a nght intention, the proh- tht ; �
ability of successandthe stipulation
J.
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Honors
jgfre gqgt (EaroHnian April 11.1991 3
Continued from page 1
book literature on alcoholic liver
diseasecamefromDr. Fallon's find-
ing Bondurant said.
Formerly vice chair of the UNC
Department of Medicineand acting
chair tor one year, Fallon was in-
strumental in establishing an inde-
pendent and centralized Depart-
ment of Hospital Laboratories at
N.C. Memorial Hospital.
Shaffer served 25 years as the
secretary of the Medical Founda-
tion of North Carolina Inc and is a
legendary "missionary" for UNC
Gulf
oil-nch Kuwait.
Iraq's actions may rune boon
unjustified. Holes said, but Ameri-
can intervention was unjustified as
well.
The Persian Gulf crisis does not
qualify as a just war. ho said.
A just war, Holmes said, must
have a iust cause, a legitimate au-
thontv, a nght intention, the prob-
ability of successand the stipulation
and the School of Medicine.
Shaffer became the University's
first director of development in 1952,
holding the post until 1981
Because of his methodical ap-
proach to fund-raising, Shaffer is
recognized as the architect of the
University's highly successful de-
velopment structure that exists to-
day.
A UNC alumnus, Shaffer was
the first recipient of the board of
Trustees' William R. Davie Award
in 1984 for outstanding service.
Continued from page 1
that war is a last resort.
Holmes said the Persian Gulf
War wasdeficient in twoareas: there
was not right intervention,and war
was not the last resort.
He said there were no negotia-
tions and that alternatives were
dismissed.
"Bush wanted a U.S. solution to
the problem Holmes said.
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Mary Piland
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DAY!
-h To Hams Teeter!
k
asset
Potatoes
Swan Peroxide
Or Alcohol
2
16
12 Oz. Cans
6 Pack
si Cola
tesday, April 16,1991
v. Apnl 16. 1 Wl in Greenville Only
vaUrs W Ghrifc Accept Federal Food Stamps
Honors
(She gaBt (Earolfnfan drei 11.1991 3
Continued from page 1
book literature on alcoholic liver
diseasocamefrom Dr Fallon's find-
ing Bondurantsaid.
Formerly vice chair of the UNC
Department of Medicineand acting
chair tor one year, Fallon was in-
strumental in establishing an inde-
pendent and centralized Depart-
ment of Hospital Laboratories at
N.C. Memorial Hospital.
Shaffer served 25 yean as the
secretary of the Medical Founda-
tion of North Carolina Inc and is a
legendary "missionary" for UNC
Gulf
and the Scfuxl of Medicine.
Shaffer becamethe University's
hrstdirectorot development in 1952,
holding the post until 1981
Because oi his methodical ap-
proach to fund-raising, Shaffer is
recognized as the architect of the
University's highly successful de-
velopment structure that exists to-
day.
A UNC alumnus, Shaffer was
the first recipient of the board of
Trustees' William R. Davie Award
in 1984 for outstanding service.
Continued from page 1
oil-nch Kuwait.
Iraq's actions may have been
uniustitiod, Holes said, but Ameri-
can intervention was unjustified as
well.
The Persian (iulf crisis does not
quahtv as a just war, he said.
A fust war. 1 felines said must
have a nist cause a legitimate au-
thority, a right intention, the prob-
ability of successand the stipulation
that war is a last resort.
Holmes said the Persian Gulf
War wasdeficientin twoareas: there
v as not right intervention, and war
w as not the last resort
He said there were no negotia-
tions and that alternatives were
dismissed.
Hush wanted a U.S. solution to
the problem Holmes said.
ECONOMY MINI
STORAGE
USE YOUR
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
SHARE WITH A ROOMMATE
SPECIAL RATES MAY 1 - AUG 31
300 FARMER ST
GREENVILLE
757-0373
16 OZ PKG
THORN APPLE VALLEY
Sliced
Cooked Ham
GET ONE
FREE!
BUY ONE
IN THE DAIRY CASE
8-OZ. CTNR 100 CALORIE
Light n' Lively
Yogurt
GET ONE
FREE!
Roddenbery's
Peanut Butter
18-oz.
IN THE DELI-PASTRY SHOPPE,
WHITE, WHEAT OR ONION
Kangaroo Pocket
Pita Bread
FREE!
IN THE DAIRY CASE CHILLED
REGULAR OR HOMESTYLE
Tropicana
Orange Juice
64-oz.
nrninrTiiniani r nATTi re
NONRETURNABLE BOTTLE,
CAFFEINE FREE DIET COKE,
CAFFEINE FREE CLASSIC,
Diet Coke or
Coca Cola Classic
eca
Classic
BUY ONE
GET ONE
P4K�g2 FREE!
2-Ltr.
K 6-PAK 12-0Z. CANS $1.79 A
IN GLASS BOTTLE
Kroger
Apple Juice
.64-oz.
Attention ECU,
Your All New
Hit Radio Station is
&z SaatdJarnlttuan
Director of
Advertising
John F. Semelsberger II
Production Manager
Mary Piland
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
per column inch
National$6.00
Local Open Rate $5.00
Bulk Contract
Discounts Available
Business Hours: Monday - Friday 9:00 - 5:00
757-6366
Advertising
Representatives
David Bailey
Greg Jones
Tim Peed
Patrick Pitzer
Peadlines
for advertising:
Tuesday's issue -
4 PM Friday
Thursday's issue -
4 PM Monday
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
(DON'T WE ALL?)
$ WE ARE PAYING CASH $
FOR
�MCE CLOTHES
�STEREO &
VIDEO (T.V VCR)
�FURNITURE
�DORM
REFRIGERATORS
� MICROWAVES
�GOLD CLASS RINGS
�ALL GOLD
JEWELRY (GOOD OR
SCRAP)
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CATCH THE WAVE
THE BEST MUSIC MIX





Pirate Comics is holding another meeting- IN BED
(Ufa iSzast (TJaralinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Joseph L. Jenkins Jr General Manager
Michael D. Albuquerque, Managing Editor
Bi air Skinner, News Editor LfClair Harper, Asst. News Editor
Matt King, Taabtm Editor Stuart Oliphant, Asst Features Editor
Mail Momma, Sports Editor Kfrry Nester, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy Edwards, Copy Editor Jason Johnson, Copy Editor
Doug Morris, Editorial Production Manager
v�� Parker, Staff Illustrator
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician
Caki a Whiitield, Classified Ads Technician
Phong Luong, Business Manager
I.ARRY HUGGINS, Circulation Manager
SlUART Rosner, Systems Engineer
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
lhl. uti 'an i m ,m has served the I last Carol ma campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that directly affects
ECU students During the ECU school yew, 'he East Carolinian publishes twice a week with a circulation of 12.000. The East
ir. Union reser es the i igtti to refuse or discontinue any advertisements that disenminate on the basis of age, sex. creed or
nation 1 origin The masthead editorial in each edition does not necessarily represent the views of one individual, but, rather,
istmajorit) opinion of the Editorial Board. The Fast Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should
v limited to 250 words or less For purpose of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit letters for
, ubii .mon Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C,
. TC34; 01 call (�1�) 757-6V6.
SGA needs to promote interest
On Tuesday, we promised we would not run
ino'her editorial about student apatrn Well, we
( onsidering the low voter turnout, many ECU
Auc ntsmaynotbeawarethattheSC IA held elections
r. r executive offices on April 3. For those that did not
know about the elections, lets go over the results.
Alex Martin, who incidently ran unopposed,
vill be the new student body president, and Robin
Bla k (also unopposed) was selected as the new vice-
president. Eric Hillard defeated twoother candidates
for treasurer, and incunnbent KatieCarstens returns
.is s relarv.
For all we know, these students are a very
capable bunch of people. But perhaps it would be
more appropriate to say, for all we care thev are a
capable bunch of people.
Is it possible that we, the students, do not care
about theaptitudeoftheS candidates? The results
of the election would seem to indicate so. Consider
this 38 students voted. Let's see, 16,000 divided
by 38 equals a 2.5 percent voter turnout.
That'sa laughable amount evenry American-
n atlt sf'anJar fsanuonh worts to further take a wav
the redibility of the S .A.
With results like that, the organized votes from
one organization could sway the whole election.
In the past, many hae claimed that this was ,i
problem, that one group could vote a person into
offii e which is true. This is a problem, not to the
students who run for office, but to the entire student
in A:
The sad truth is that we don't give a damn who
m
I Kten, statisticians try to find out how a survey
,roup feels io within 95 percent of the truth. Luckily,
� e don't need statisticians to figure out this one; 97.5
percent did not vote.
That means 97.5 percent do not care, or at least
not enough to complain or do something about what
the Si A does or does not do. So if a fraternity's votes
gets their candidate in office, so what. What do we
care?
If some other group on campus generates
enough support to get their candidate in office (say
for example, the Students for Economic Democracy
or the Uitin Club or even the students that work at
�'Lds.Girmjdri)that'sokay, too, because we don't
care.
If oe Candidate stands beside a voting box and
gives out $! for everv vote, would any of the students
care? Probablv not.
There are two ways we could alleviate this
problem in the future.
The first suggestion goes to the SGA. Create an
office that handles public relations and encourages
awareness and participation in student government.
The second way involves the students, or rather
the 398 students who cared enough to vote in last
week's elections. Next year, do not vote.
Then the SGA could draw straws to see who
would win the executive positions. Better yet, thev
might just forget the whole process and save the
candidates from making a lot of embarrassing,
untullfillod promises.
(Remember Allen Thomas' voter registration
drive or his campus- wide recycling project that
would be expanded to the city? It's lucky for the
students that the city didn't wait for htm and has,
instead, instituted it's own recycling project.)
Perhapsifnoonewereelected, the SGA (minus
an executive board) would be forced to address a
situation that has been continuously neglected: en-
couraging students to become involved with ECU.
Letters To The Editor
Reader cites
lack of research
in column
To The Editor:
I was disappointed in an
editorial article written by Jason
Johnson on March 19.1 will re-
spect a well-researched opin-
ion, although several issues
Drought to light in the article
referring to Greenpeace lead me
to believe that research and fact
had little to do with the forma-
tion of the editorial
�)ason claimsGreen peace
activists preform actions with-
out trying to elicit change by
going through channels.
The fact is that
Creenpeace has endorsed nu-
merous letter-writing cam-
p ligns, especially one dealing
with the nuclear weapons pro-
duction and testing issue. The
letter campaign has been on-
going since 1970, it targets key
government officials world-
wide. Also, Greenpeace ha9
collected 14 million signatures
worldwide calling for an inter-
national, comprehensive
nuclear test ban treaty.
�Jason claims the french
"had" to blow up the
Greenpeace ship, The Rainbow
Warrior, because of pressure
Greenpeace was putting on the
French government for its
nuclear testing policy.
The verifiable fact is that
the commandos referred to who
blew up the ship were found
guilty of their actions and sent
to prison. The highly trained
comma ndos killed aGreenpeace
volunteer in one of the explo-
sions.
�Jason claims Greenpeace
activists are a menace to the
common hunter by trying to
scare away game.
The only position
Greenpeace has taken on hunt-
ing is opposition to hunting
threatened and endangered
species. Obviously, threatened
and endangered species cannot
withstand the "natural" popu-
lation control that hunting pro-
vides. A quick call to the main
office in Washington, D.Ccould
verify this policy.
� Jason also claims
Greenpeace dishonestly solic-
its money from hunting orga-
nizations.
This is a big accusation.
Unfortunately, Jason does not
list any specific instance or or-
ganization to back his claim. I
guess we are supposed to trust
him on this one.
� Jason claims Green-
peace "cuts its own throat"
because it has decided to non-
violently act out policies writ-
ten on paper, when going
through channels doesn't
work.
America was founded, in
part, by acts of civil disobedi-
ence. We strove to protect the
right to speakout,disagreeand
yes, to protest nonviolently. A
quick look at any history book
can verify this. I concede that
Jason has the right to find
Greenpeace offensive. Person-
ally, I find nuclear war and a
poisoned planet offensive.
Please take more consideration
for fact when preparing articles
and editorials.
Laura Herrmann
Greenville Resident
7HeK� HAS SHU &Zd HO BXPLMMlO iir trrn -K r amjc
R HE OS?l�FK flCCiPENTS AodWP ggfe
Let's Be Adamant
Education key to changing world
By Darek McCullers
Fditorial Columnist
There are manv reasons why
I want to become a teacher. I have
had the opportunity to observe a
variety of teachers in a number of
settings. Duringmv observations,
I ate lunch with them which al-
lowed me to get a sense of what
they were feeling. Most of them
seemed tired, frustrated and
unenthusiastic.
Mv educational philosophy
is simple; it is one of Black Na-
tionalism. When discussing this,
it is necessary tor people to un-
derstand that 1 am not a racist. I
can' the a racist by the definition of
the word which deals with power.
I do not have anv power to
withhold from white people or
anyone else. My concern is with
empowerment. I've talked to
manv of mv elders in this black
nation, and thev ha vebegun to see
the point that I will make
In retrospect, manv are ac-
curately seeing that the goal of the
Civil rights and human rights
struggle in America was no inte-
gration or separation; it was
power. We wanted power in eco-
nomics, politics, education and all
aspects of our lives that had been
taken a wav tor over 400 vears.
Black Nationalism means
that we control our community. 1
plan to promote this philosophy
on all fronts to include education,
religion,societyand politics. I have
some specific plans and philoso-
phies that can bring this into being.
There was an experiment
back in the late '60s in New York
with this principle of community
control that failed for a number of
reasons. One of the main reasons
could have been that it was too
wide in scope. Too manv people
were involved and this resulted
in mass confusion.
There should be pm met
educational control and develop
ment councils to be created by a
referendum of the citv's voters.
Thiscouncil will consist for five to
seven persons from each educa-
tional area or voting precinct who
are elected by the people in that
community. They should be per
sons who understand the educa-
tional process. They should be
given power to make curriculum
decisions in consultation with
higher authorities (such as the
superintendent) And be financed
through a bond referendum. As
an educator, I will work to see
such a decision occur
There must be a change in
the curriculum in the communities
that are predominentlv bla �
There must be a change in the
whole program. These students
must be made aware of the great
contributions that people for color
have made to the world through-
out try? course of history Also,
there must be educators who un-
derstand the psycho dynamic sol
the black community it was ob-
vious from my observations that
this does not happen.
A person who did not grow
up under the times when there
wascommunitvcontrol would not
understand this. There wasabond
between school, teacher and com
munity. At times, when wedisi uss
the subject, mv elders can talk
about teachers from years �
their characteristics and person-
alities, their lives and other things
We have lost this. 1 onlv re-
membera few of my teat hers, most
of whom were black Thev made
an impact on me like nobody else
could. If one of these teachers
disciplined you, thev told your
parents, and your parents dis i
plined you again. These people
were also a part of the n -
niry. Thev didn't make a 45n i
commute to teach manv stu lents
of whom they know nothing � �
and then leave again to �
able lifestyles in thesuburbs
black children in the ghetto -
tinued to suffer.
that's the wav it is i
That's the problem that net Is I
be addressed, and this is .
work to change as an edu H r
Students need to b
by someone who knows ai I
derstand them, rhey n � �
taught by someone wl
frustrated by the discrimu
against them, or the t.n t
ha te to teach these ugl)
k hiidren (Yes, that
the) think, and it's convi
their attitudes which I ha.
served.)
We need across ��
reforms. We need to see thi� i
the cities, counties and states I
Ameru a I want totea h be i -
mv the education of all foi I's
i hiidren as a priority, p.i
those who have hern I
through acts of denial and :
presston.
1 would like to 0OI
reiterating the point thai
racist 1 don't belie vewtaapar I r
I sim I) believe in concvn
in your community Iftttsal id
nmunity, work in it ftl
Indian community, work in it it -t
is an -sian or Hispanu mmu-
nity, Nork in it. It it is a white
community, work in it
together, we can changi
world, and 1 believe that the w r I
will change through edu abon �
that's whvl want to teach lp! int
return to mv community to finish
my education and start a
grassroots movement to change
the poll tical,sooal and ed
problems that confront us
Campus Spectrum
New group to promote Western culture
In recent years, campus
pressure groups have demanded
ever more stridently that Ameri-
can higher education eliminate the
allegedly "Eurocentric" and "pa-
triarchal bias of the curriculum.
In response, in order to support
and encourage an open intellectual
life, an organization of university
faculty, administrators, and
graduate students called the Na-
tional Organization of Scholars
was formed to promote the study
of Western culture. We have re-
cently formed a local chapter of
this organization, the East Caro-
lina Association of Scholars. We
encourage our colleagues to join
with us in recalling higher edu-
cation to its proper function of
grounding students in the rich
heritage of their civilization, and
in preserving academic freedom,
including the freedom to dissent
from "politically correct" positions
on women and minorities.
We believe that a work
should be added, retained or re-
moved from the curriculum on
the basis of its conformance to
generally applicable intellectual
and aesthetic standards, and we
oppose efforts to replace those
standards with the principle of
proportional representation of
authors, classified ethnically, bio-
logically or geographically. Excel-
lence knows no boundaries; me-
diocrity requires them.
We reject the notion that the
traditional curriculum excludes
the contributions of all but those
of European descent. Such claims
of exclusion are simplv false
Westemartand science draw upon
the achievements of non- Western
societies and have been absorbed
and further enriched by peoples
around the globe.
We believe that the ideal of
objectivity is subverted bv the
claim that peopleof different sexes,
races or ethnic backgrounds nec-
essarily understand basic prin-
ciples differently. We dispute the
notion that cognition is deter-
mined by group membership.
We believe that attacks on
rationality and objectivity as eth-
nocentric, patriarchal or oppres-
sive tend to undermine democ-
racy, tolerance for varied opinion
and civil discourse. We therefore
oppose programs of study de-
signed to instill specific political
opinions. The upholding of free
speech and rigorous analysis is
both the duty and privilege of the
university scholar.
Finally, we strongly support
the University's Equal Opportu-
nity Policy, which declares that
ECU "will recruit, hire, train and
promote persons in all positions
without regard to race, religion,
color, creed, national origin, sex,
age or handicapping condition
We believe that all faculty posi-
tions should be offered solely on
the basis of merit, and that race
and sex are irrelevant to good
teaching and to the search for
knowledge.
The National Association for
Scholars has no political affilia-
tion and welcomes members from
all parts of the political spectrum.
Among our supporters an
present chairman of the National
Endowment for the Humanities,
the president-elect for the Ameri-
can Political Science Asso iation,
the president-elect of the Amen-
can Sociological Association, a
former president of Amnesty 1
temational, and a large numberot
eminent academics Thev are
committed to the ideals, hitherto
held bv most American inteflectB-
als, of rationality, free speech open
debate on all subjects and ad-
vancement solely according to
ment. Those who are interested
supporting these ideals, in receiv-
ing further information about the
National Association of Scholar
or in joining the East Camlina
AssKiation of Scholars, are urged
to contact Dr. Steven MandclKer
of the Department of Philosophy
The East Carolina Associa-
tion of Scholars will hold its first
organizational meeting at 4 pm
on Monday, April 22, in the Great
Room (3 A) on the second floor of
Mendenhall. All interested per-
sons are invited to attend
Department of Philosphy
Dr. Steven Mandelker
Department of History
Dr. Michael Enright
Dr. Bodo Nischan
Dr. Anthony Papalas
Dr. Philip Adler
Dr. William Cobb
Department of English
1 Dr. McKay Sundwall
Rich s Nuthouse
Whiskers
HI ' Z
Hazardous Waste
itrs 7WA7BP7D
ihecvMsiKFiRMte).
TTuhw
TOMEUhi
wveecr
k ACocpJ
mM
The Law
This just in:
who wu eitoanhed u
lean thai The Smoker
wu � fnei. 1 be
thought dead.
I '
Joined by hn former
compatriot Batbraia.
The I iw ud Batbrata were
apcreheaded by the dread
Laftoa of Saokiaf Villaiai
-
What will be their
faieT Oaly tee.
ind the oext epitode
of Wkea
Friea4i
Become
Kacatct. will
tell.






Pirate Comics is holding another meeMng- IN BED
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to the search for
cnal Association for
no political aftiha
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Western culture
t,( al spot tnim
� rs are tht
in t the Nation!
the Humanities
' � �r the Amt'n
Association,
pet of the Amen-
il Asmh lation, a
t of Amnesty In-
. large number oi
�run s I'hey are
. tr.ik. hitherto
erii an intellectu-
frcespeech,0pefl
ut )-i ts and ad-
iv i I crding to
� ,arv interested m
� �ideals, inreceiv-
rmation about the
ition rf Scholars
e the fast Carolina
� - hdars, are urged
�teven Mandelker
irtn entoi Philosophy
East aroltni Associa-
' cholars will hold its first
� i meeting at 4 pm
" la) pnl22.intheCrrat
n the Mond floor of
ndenhall All interested per
in ii vited to attend
Department of Philosphy
! t Steven Mandelker
Department of History
I Michael Fnnght
r Bodo Niischan
1 r Anthony Papalas
Df Philip Adler
Dr. William Cobb
Department of English
Or McKavSundwall
M�






Piiate Comics is holding another ineettng IN BED
Who Happin?

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� � : lumanitics
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, � t the Ameri-
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� mnesty In
� �large numberoi
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, K ais, hitherto
in mtelkvtu-
i . peech open
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u i, cording to
� an interested in
. ideals, in receiv-
mation �bout the
irion it Scholars
the ! ast Carolina
� - holars, are urged
�. Mandelker
��t ol Philosophy
� ' arolina Asaoda-
� - ' lars will hold its first
meeting at 4 p m
��i 22 intheGreal
the second floor d
�� i interested p,f"
� I to attend
at all tat ult
'
lent and thai
I levant �
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nal Association tor
10 political affilia-
nes members from
Department of Philosphy
Steven Mandelker
Department of History
'r Mn hael Fnnght
Ir Bodo is�.han
lr Anthony Tapalas
IV Philip Adler
Dr Wilham Cobb
Department of English
Dr McKay Sundwall





i
6
CEJie iEant (Enrollment
April 11, 1991
April 11,1991
CLASSIFIEDS
SJ RVICI SCt
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES:
Term papers, dissertations, letters,
resumes, manuscripts, projects. Fast
rum around. Call Joan 75�v9255.
TYPING: Call 355-3611 after 5.30
p.m. or leave message. 5135page,
includes proofreading, spelling,
grammar check. Familiar with all
formats. Over 15 years experience.
TYPING SERVICE Just in time tor
those vear end papers. You write it
and I'll type it. Call 752-4289 and ask
for Rhonda.
TYPING SERVICE: Term Tapers,
Reports, Resumes, Ijetters, Theses,
Tvped on PC. Laser printer. Fast
turnaround. Call 756-1783.
FOR SALE
FENDER GUITAR AMP: Deluxe 85
758-0464.
FOR SALE Brand new moped and
helmet (used only 3 months), S700.
Workout equipment, $60. All ex-
penses paid vacation package for two
in the Florida resort of vour choice for
5 days 4 nights, S2lXT' Call 355-6284
and ieaw message.
FOR SALE Waterbed, semi-wave-
io mattress, bookcase headboard,
complete SI 75. Call Mike at 752-
FOR RENT
APARTMENT FOR SUMMER
SESSIONS. Female wanted to share
nice three bedroom, 2 12 bath
apartment WD, DW, AC. Access
to pool and tennis courts! Call im-
mediately! 355-3988, Elizabeth.
DOUBLEWIDE TRAILER on pri-
vate lot for rent in area. Call 459-9355
after 5:30 p.m.
ROOMMATE WANTED looking
for male non-smoker to share 2 bed-
room, fully furnished apartment for
shimmer. Oosetocampus. Call Kevin
or Brian at 355-$3?2.
ROOM AVAILABLE: Tar River,
$150month plus 12 utilities, 1 12
bath, fully furnished, AC. Available
for both summer terms Call Eric at
830-5206.
NEW 2 BEDROOM APT Sublet-
nng first and second summer sessions
One room. Dishwasher, disposal,
prA-ate patio, water paid and fully
furnished. $187month. 355-7587
NAGS HEAD AREA Student
Housing available for summer em-
ployment at the beach. Call Seagate
Realty (919) 441-3127.
AVAILABLE: Apartment to sublet
forsummer. Three bedroom, Wilson
Acres, 4 blocks to campus, phone
FORRl NT
758-6283. Ask for Jim.
APARTMENT TO SUBLEASE for
summer Two bedroom, one bath,
fully furnished. S295month plus
utilities. Call evenings, 752-5320.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom, 1 bath
apartment located at Cypress Gar-
dens on 10th Street. $375month.
Available immediately. Call 756-3320.
ROOMS FOR RENT Three rooms
available for summer, 4 rooms open
for next school year. Rent plus utili-
ties. Great location, house behind
Belk Dorm, College Hill.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 3 bedroom house Four blocks
from campus Own bedroom, $200
month plus 1 3 utilities Call 830-
9087.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed at
least both summer sessions $157.50
month plus 1II utilities, 2 bedroom,
lbath.no pets Call 355-1644.
SOMEONE NEEDED to share
town house apartment Two bed-
room. 1 12 bath, fullv famished,
need only to bring bed room furniture.
Keponib.e male student $175
month plus 12 utilities. 830438&
ROOMMATE WANTED Respon-
sible nule student tosiure2bed room
apt partially furnished, 12 mile
from campus $125month plus 12
utilities Available 8 May '91. Call
757-2859, leave message
ROOMIE NEEDED. Starting May
to share 2 bedroom, 1 12 bath,
dishwasher, pool, plus 24 hour
laundry mat, one mile from campus
for entire summer. SlSOmonthpius
12 utilities. Call 752-9459.
Beauului Place 10 Live
� All Ne� �
� AnU RcjkK r� K� �
I MY ERSITY APARTMENTS
2SVS� E 5ih Sirea
�Locaioi Near fcCU
�Seat Major Shopping Ccruen
�.crois r-rom Highwa i'auoi Suuon
Lunitad Offer $300 a moot
Contact J T or Tommy WUhamt
756 7815 or 830-1937
Office open Apt 8. 13 5 30pm
�AZALEA GARDENS'
ratxf, effcK Srm �i� and i
nalkTV Coapas.�.����� on.v M0 � a��
o maw teax �0�ll HOMfc Kl-VT L4 ��r
m n"e� partmea; �i ���� ihwb� � A�
Conua J "Cor Tominy WUhami
7567815
HELP WANTED
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT: fisheries. Earn $5,000
month. Free transportation! Room
and Board! OverSjOOOopenings. No
experience necessary. Male or Fe-
male. For 68-page employment
manual, send $8.95 to MfltL Research,
Box 84008, Seattle, WA 08124- Satis-
faction Guarantied.
LIBRARY WORKERS: Bnght.quick
part-timers needed to apply bar code
labels to books Mid Apnl-Mid June.
Two hours per day (afternoons) Mon-
Fri. Apply in person only, 3 p.m5
p.m. weekdays, Sheppard Memorial
Library, 530 Evans Street. No phone
calls
SUMMER INTERNSHIP: Find out
what IBM, Xerox and Fortune 500
companies like about our summer
program. If saving over $5000, in-
valuable career experienx, building
your resume, and college credit ap-
peal to you, call for an interview to-
day (919) 249-2213.
CLASSIFIED ADS TECHNICIAN
needed for summer sessions andcr
fall semester. Must be enrolled as
ECU student. Perfect job for English,
Broadcasting or journalism majors,
but all majors welcome. Part-time,
flexible hours, little experience nec-
essary. MacintoshMicrosoft Word
experience helpful. Apply in person
at The East Carotirmn or call 758-7652
after 5:30 p.m.
NANNY OPPORTUNITIES: San
Francisco-1 girl-$175week Chi-
cago-newborn-$175week; Con-
necticut-fwins$250week; Boston-
infant-$160week; Virginia-2 chil-
dren-$200week. Many positions
FOR SALE
available. One year commitment
necessary. Call 1-800-937-NANI.
EARTHSAFE Part-time sales. Sign
up ten households for recycling pick-
up and earn $100. Help save the
environment and earn good monev,
too. Call Cliff at 757-3063 for ap-
pointment.
WHAT ARE YOUR PI NS FOR
THE SUMMER- -Going to stay in
Greenville, go; ng to Summer School
Brady's currently has sales positions
available in juniors and Mens that
will run through the summer and
into the fall Fill your free time with
a part-time position with Brody'sand
Brodv'sforMen. ApplvBrody's.The
Plaza, Monday through Wednesday,
1 to 4 p.m.
MAKE$5OO-$15O0 WEEKLY stuffing
envelopes at home! Start now�rush
S.A.S.E. plus $1.00 to Home Em-
plovers, Inc 1120 Plain 8B, las
Cru'ces,NM 88001.
SUMMER JOBS AT NAGS HEAP
NC Would vou like to make at least
$1,01X100 a week? Would you like to
work on the bench? Are vou wiling
to train? K you are a motivated en
thosasric individual, call 306-296-
48-11 collect tor an Interview in you
local area
A NATIONAL CORPORATION
has position open for manager trainee.
Need decisive and competitive indi-
vidual seeking career in financial in-
dustry College preferred. We offer
competitive salaries and a full benefit
package Send resume to: P.O. Box
3802. Wilson, NC 27895.
PERSONALS
ALL SORORITIES: We're looking
forward to convocation. We'll see
you there. Love, the AHfIs
JUDY WILSON: Congratulations on
vour engagement! Wearesohappv
for you! Irve, ycnir Srgrna Sfsters.
DELTA CHI Thank you for the in
vitation Saruaia v night! It was great
meeting vou guv's! Good luck! Love,
Pi Delta.
CONGRATULATIONS to Tom
Musselman once again on a super job
on philanthropy and toTodd Griff en
HELP WANTED
PERSONALS
Pf HSONALS
for being a strong President. The
Brothers of Sigma Pi.
ALPHA OMICRON PI is pleased to
announce the Beta Xi pledge dass;
Cathleen Brysan, Kelsie Conrad,
Sherry Dameron, Jamie Debiase,
Lynn Henslev, Karen Isheie, Holly
Linville, Emily Smith, Melissa Smith,
Melissa Toretch, Shannon Wilson and
jen Lyons.
TO THE BETA CLASS OF PI
DELTA: It all started Friday night at
730. A tew got lost, but soon were
found. The house was rocking and
WC were jammin The singing was
great and the balloons were cute!
Alter nine, everyone was feeling fine!
What happened next, we can only
guest! Thanks for a great time! Love,
the sisters of li Delta
CONGRATULATIONS PI KAPPA
PHI torbeing "All-CampusChamps"
in the Gamma Sig Can Drive ben-
efiting the Dream Factory. Divisional
winners were larvis and Delta Sigma
rheta A special thanks goes to all
organizationsand students thatmadc
donations. We thank even-body for
their support,
SIGMA PI: What a wonderful Sun-
day afternoon together. We had a
blast. Looking forward to getting
together again. Love. AOT1.
ROBIN BLACK Congrats on SGA
vice-presidency! We know you'll do
a great job! Love, vour Sigma Sisters
ZTA. Weweredisappointedthatyou
cancelled out on us last Wednesday.
We would still like to do something
with vou The Brothers of Sigma Pi.
HOPEEVERYONEishavingaGreat
Greek Week. Love.AOTl.
CHI OMEGA: Sigma Pi would like
to thank you for making last
Thursday's Pre-downtown so much
fun. We are looking forward to our
next gathering.
BETA PHI PSI: We're really sorry
about the mix-up last week But. we'll
all have a blast this week Love, the
Sigmas.
HEY CADETS. Get the brass shined,
the uniforms cleaned, the shoes pol-
ished, the hair cut, the manicure, the
pedicure, the perm, whatever! But
DO NOT, I repeat DO NOT miss the
ball! lfs going to make history! See
your there. From�your Highest
Speed Hua Hua's The rV's.
LAURAHOLLEMAN: Congratson
becoming the 1st annual Greek
Goddess! You were great! We love
vou! Your Sigma Sisters
ROLL CHI: Theta Chi formal was a
blast! Congratulationstoalltheaward
recipients You guys have done an
outstanding job! Good luck to all the
graduating seniorsand theupcoming
pledges. God bless and Roll Chi!
SIGMA PI would like to thank all
ECU students and Greeks for helping
us make "ship-a-meal "a success and
a new tradition for us and the uni-
versity. Special thanks to Frank
Salamon (ECU Dining Services), Jay
Fairdoth of ARA and' his staff, Betty
Hardee, Dean Speier and everyone
else who helped Thanks again!
WELCOME DELTA CH! FRATER-
NITY: Looking forward to future
events. Love, AOFI.
SIGMA INTRAMURAL TEAMS:
You are all doing great! You always
make us proud to be SIGMAS! Love,
vour sisters.
0
S.S.T. OFF-CAMPUS MEETING:
Friday, April 12 at 7:30 p.m. Meet at
Mendenhall at 7:00 for ride. For in-
formation, call Sarah 931-8099,
Christie 931-8004.
AOTI: Colleen, Kim, Sharon, Susan,
Amv H Barbara Kyrvdall and Amy
P.�Keep up the great work. We are
behind you guys all the way. Love,
your Sisters!
DELTA CHI: Congratulations on
vour new colon v. Love, the Deita
Zetas.
AOfl: Sigma Pi would like to thank
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
COLLEGE SIT'DENTS TEACHERS- ADULTS AGE 19 and up
LINE UP SUMMER WORK now!
WHEN: Earlv MavJunetoLate WHAT: Field scounts to
AueustEarlv Sept.
WHERE: Eastern NC Cos.
Lenior. Craven, Pitt. Jones.
Onslow, Greene
PAY: Min 5.50hour plus
Mileage expenses
WSmIRESIUM3S 7C: MCSI - PO Box 179
Grifton, NC 28530
monitor crops. We train.
QUAL1F: Conscientious,
Good physical shape. Have
Own Vehicle, Reliable
If you're
Pregnant
and need help making choices
�Free, confidential professional
pregnancy counseling
�Financial assistance
�Help select adoptive family
1-800-632-1400
ys. The Children's Home Society
'C�SV of North Carolina
A United Way Agency
you for making Sunday's Softball
special and cook out such a blast. We
had a great time and are looking
forward to spending Greek Week
with you.
SIGMAS: Tonight�630 p.m. Be
there or be square.
ECU RUGGERS: This is the week-
end to show us what you are madeof
Good luck with the state tournament!
We're behind you -Tshya, Bonnieand
Susan.
ALPHA PHI hopes all ECU girls
enroll in Rush l. Go Greek!
THETA CHI presents our 3rd An-
nual See-Saw Mania for Special
Olympics starting at 7:00 Saturday,
April 13 and finishing on Sunday,
April 14. We would appreciate your
support. Donations will be collected
from local organizations and busi-
nesses Come out and support us!
ROLL CHI (Burger King on
Greenville Blvd.).
CONGRATULATIONS to Allyson
Stiles and Mike Daly on their en-
gagement We wish you the best of
luck. We love you both Love,Celeste
and friends!
GREEKS Greek Week has been
awesome so far. Thanks for
everyone's participation. Lets make
it one to remember. PIKES!
DO YOU HAVE DIFFICULTY re
la ting to people thatdon't understand
you? Do vou feel guilt and isolation
associated with feelings of
homosexualty? We understand and
are currently meeting on campus to
discuss these issues Call 757-6661.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
APTi?OWfOR
SUMMER POSITIONS AT
WANDSWORTH
COMMONS
GREENVOJ ES NEWEST NAME
IN MULT) FAMfl V HOI SIM;
ExceBcM loclOB n Xrlmgljn Bocier.i
Qnioe units available ( and two
rvtrtfn. io efficM � -irp�. range.
TvgcraUM. washer -Ji �: � k.ups Brut
OOMMKaiaa, ajHO with extra insulation
FREE BASIC-CABLE 1
he Reall- Oi4ip
758-4711
RinggoM lowers
l.tkinc Leases far Aucum
IW � 1 bedroom, I bedroom,A
EfTiceac Aparnems
CALL 752-2865
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
111 E. 3rd Street v
.TheLee Building
Green
ANNOUNCEMENTS
COLDENGIRLTRYQUTS
Attention interested dancers (who
can dazzle and sparkH Become
a part of the 1991 ECU Football
Sprit! Share the spotlight by per-
torming with the East Carolina Pi-
rates during the 1991 football sea-
son TheGOLDEN GIRLS DANCE
LINTEwiUholdtryouts April 13-14;
9 am A p.m. Saturday and 1 pm-
4 p m Sunday in Memorial Gym.
For moreinfonrarioivcall 757-6082.
SPinALOLYMnCS
The 1991 GiwfwiDeflttCo. Spe-
cial Olympics Spring Games wifl
beheklonAprfll9thatE.B.Aycock
Jr. High School in Greenville (rain
date April 24). Volunteers are
needed to help serve as buddies
chaperones for the Special Olym-
pics. Volunteers must be able to
work all day - from 9 ajn2 p.m.
(The first ones there will be as-
signed a position). An orientation
meeting will be held on Aprill 7 in
CJWJoyner Library, room 221 from
5-600p.rn. Free lunches and vol-
unteer t-shirtswill be provided the
day of the games to all volunteers
who haveattended rheorientarjon
session. For more mformabon,
rontact Lisa Mills at 8304551.
RESIDENT HALL
ASSOCIATION
The Resident Hall Association fil-
ing dates for offices in House
Counril and RHA are? Aprill 5th-
April 18th. There will be an intaest
session held April 15th at 5:00 p.m.
in the social room of Mendenhall.
Resident Hall AssooatiOTelections
will be from 9 am4 pm. in each
Residence Hall. Any questions,
call 7574709.
?miniTSSIJPPORTING
OaJR TROOPS
A meetingwiUbeheldby Students
StrpprjrttrvCHirTixwrjs on Friday,
April 12at 730pm. The location is
unknown at this time but mem-
bersmaycaUfcrirtfoiTOarJorL Sarah
931-a�9,Ouistie931-8004,Nancy
931-8080. Also check classified
Thursday for more information.
For all paid members there will be
a social after the business meeting.
HOiSrTTALmr
MANAGEMENT
ASSOCIATION
Hospitality Management Associa-
tion meeting to discuss Fall activi-
ties will be held April 15at2pm in
Room 237 HE
priTgnmFNTinsnoN
Have you seen the Pink Flamin-
gos? Barefoot on the Mall will be
here en April 18 starting at 12 pm.
Featuring the band Love Tractor
and comedian Todd Yohn.
lyimininGYCUJB
Dr. Mark D. Dibner of the North
OroliTOBiotBchnologyCenierwiU
speak about The Explosive
Growth of the US BkAechnoiogy
Industry: Trends and Opportuni-
tieson Tuesday, April 16at5pjn.
in Room BN 109 of the Science
Complex Anyone wishing to at-
tend the spring nek) trip to the
Outer Banks should also come to
this meeting.
RIPFIJKETHEVYIMW
ECU Recreational Services will be
srxxistxmgaWindSiirfinglwork
shoponAprill 1. ParticipantswiD
receive beginning instruction in
earner, tenrdnology, rigging,
safety and actual practice. The
workshop will take place at 7:30
pm.mtheChnstenburyGymPooi
and the cost is $3j00students and
$4.00faculty-staff-guest Come
out and learn a new doll white
having fun! For further informa-
tion call 757-6911 or slop by 117
Christenbtary Gym.
Hampton p
By Stuart Oliphant
Assistant Features Fditor
Do the names Martin.Gretsch,
Gibson and Rickenbacker ring a
belP
ProbabK si if vou plav guitar
that is But what many musicians
don't realize is that the qualify,
stringed instruments once pro-
duced in the Untied States have
disappeared to make room for low-
qualiry substitutes manufactured in
the Orient. Even more startling is
the fact that the Japanese buy over
50 percent of the vintage guitars
sold in the United States Vintage
guitarsare lea ving the United States
at an alarming rale
The Japanese, well knov -
their appreciation, .1- set Jitars
not just as instruments but abi as
works of art. The Japanese can buv
a vintage, American-mad
take it to Japan and gel twit
price they paid for il
"We'Amencar
junk and thevuseoi
our good stutt.
Hampton, vintage
and owner ��! ydet
iove gimmicks, bul
portant aspect ot ai
ongmalirv onginalij
According to
59 ;bsfn LesPauJ
a highly tlanxd t
much as $31 0
same guitar has
even profess�ona!i
selling price can pi'
- " A ymtag�
percent. I the fira
more than � �
-ed " 5a �
theimprtar
deckling I
n't dean -
wipe tb " I
Hamp1
Saturday Nigi
Nikki Meets
By Deanna Nevgloski
Suff VNntcr
On Saturday night. Chapel Hill-
based outfit, Nikki Meets the Hi-
bachi. will perform at the Fizz.
Comprised of Elaine Tola and
John Gillespie. Nikki Meets the
Hibachi is an all-onginal. acoustic
duo that has been compared to the
Indigo Girls, MJrack and
Richard and Lmda Thompson.
Formed in February 1988 n
Chapel Hill, bfikka Meets the Hiba-
chi has been described as
gressive tolk or 'acoustk rock n
roU
Horrna s Amorphous Hat, a five-
song EP released last year mack
Nikki Meets the Hibachi a band
deshnedforthebignrne. Thehighlv-
acclaimed EP set them on the road
to success and instantly put them
on the local music ma p. Before that,
their Roast RaKf cassette from ' 988
sold out. Pretty impressive for a
new band on the scene
The Bluett Sky is the third and
latest effort from Nikki Meets the
Hibachi. This release also marks
their first on Chapel Hill's baited
� �
TGS Studios, F
confection of 11
the acoustical heai
roll music.
Gradual 1
Gillespie savs the
ruresmoreu;�
mo - vat'
period
album was name
because it - pri
movement or a
d a vb as m c
- i
from one of I "j
Biggtr Rm
"Peacemaker" ar
a few of Ihesi - j
that make I
fresh air in the mi
the over-poj :
scene
"Davs Like
that incorporates t
of the ban
guitar sound Sd
ticular song car
heart wrenc-
uses so much in
In an unprecedented appreance the arternatrve folk chj
nigN Greenvilles only authentic Bistro is proud to
ECU Theater de
'Dannyan" "
By Joe Horst
S�ii Writer
Last Sunday and Monday
night the Theater Arts department
upheld its long-standing excellent
tradition in workshop productions.
The latest installment that has
graced the halls of Messick was a
srirrmg production of "Danny and
the Deep Hue Sea.
Directedby Paris Peet, the ac- paralleishis
tors treated audiences to a won- andshowcases
derfulstoryoftworjeoplevaliantry staying in touc
trying to tod rneaning in their dis- having one
mal lives. The actors briUiantiy partrnent,he
portrayed a vivid sense of behindhimand
rnankmds lifetime search for com- inanyacting
paruonship and I
one goes throuj
Bothactorsl
ovation for tt
workshop,
once again his
till tv as an actor;
with anii
His portray
hard-bitten
trying to maskl





(Ui?c iEaiit (Uamltnuiu
April 11. 1991
April 11,1991
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES:
reran papers, dissertations, letters,
resumes, manusenpts projects Fas!
mm around Call Kvin 756-9255.
nrflNC Call 385-3611 after 5-30
p m or leave message SI 35 'page,
ides proofreading spoiling,
� u � m chei k Familiar with all
formats Over 15 vears experience
rtriNGSi rvki
those war end papers 1 ou vnte it
.Kid I'll typeit Call 752-4289and ask
�or Khonda.
nmNG SERVICE. Term Papers
Reports, Resumes, I etters, Theses
I vped on PC. Laser pnnter Fast
. naround. Call 756-1783
FOR SALE
1 ENDER GUITAR AMP Deluxe85
i8-0464.
(R SALE Brand new moped and
et (used only 3 months), $700.
Workout equipment, Sf0. All ex-
, n �� jcs paid vacation package tor two
the Florida resort of your choio
: te, $200. Call 355-6284
. leave message
FOR SALE Waterbed, semi-wave-
mattress, bookcase headboard,
.Mete $175. CaD Mike at 7S2-
FOR RENT
PARTMET FOR SUMMER
SESSIONS: Female wanted to share
nice three bedroom, 2 12 bath
ipartment W D, DW( AC Access
i pool and tennis courts! Call tm-
nediateiy! 355-3988 Elizabeth
DOUB1 EWIDE TRAILER on pri-
vate lot for rent in area Call459 9355
after 530 p m.
ROOMMATE WANTED 1 ooking
�or male non-smoker to share 2 bed-
room, fully furnished apartment for
summer. Closetocampus. Call Kevin
�t Brian at 355-8372.
ROOM AVAILABLE: lar River,
� 'month plus 12 utilities, 1 12
�� fully furnished, AC Available
� both summer terms, ('all Fr,i at
- II 5206.
-1 iV 2 BEDROOM APT Sublet
. :rstand second summersessions.
room, lishwasher, disposal,
te patio, water paid and hilly
shed. $187month. 355-7587
NAGS HEAD AREA Student
1 lousing available for summer em-
ployment at the beach. Call Seagate
Realty (919) 441-3127.
AVAILABLE: Apartment to sublet
.mmer. Threebedroom, Wilsor
vTc 4 blocks to campus, phone
FOR RENT
758-6283. Ask for im.
APARTMENT TO SUBLEASE for
summer. Two bedroom, one bath,
fully furnished. S295month plus
utilities Call evenings, 752-5320.
I OR RUNT Two bedroom, 1 bath
apartment located at (. v press Gar-
dens on huh Street. $375month.
vailableimmediatel) Call756 3320
ROOMS FOR RENT rhree rooms
available tor summer, 4 rooms open
tor next school yeai Renl plus utili-
ties Great location, hous . d
Bek Dorm, College Hill
II MAI I ROOMMATI
share 3 bedroom hi us,
from campus Own bed � - I
month plus 13 utilities -
9087
FEMALE ROOMMATI
least both summer sessions $157 �
month plus 1 2 ualitk - .
1 bath, rtopetsall I : I
SOMEONE NEEDED to
townhcuse apartmenl rwo bed
1 12 bath, hi I u is! cd
cd ro
tilities 330-0388
Beauul I ive
� A �� �
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2SVS- Stl) MKCl
�Located S u I �
�Neai Majoi Shopping � eaten
�� �� tv. � !� Patrol suiicii
lautadOffei S300�moart
iuci 1 F .a tommy Williams
'36 "Ml or 830-1937
tfficc 'ix-p. -pt S, ;2 5 3(pm
�AZALEA GARDENS-
mi m iMtooaw tamtffcrt fMMft
� - :?a.cr� "re t�i tad ��� inrn i
i . - ; �i � � �e� � - � IW � �
�� -i KJ Ml AD umbmu
�. r � .� "wl ImAMI -
hi-
FOR SALE
available. One year commitment
necessary Call 1(X) W-NANI.
need only tobnng
Responsible n
ROOMMATL WANTED Respon-
siblemale student to share 2 bedroom
apt partially furnished. 12 mile
from campus SI25 month plus 12
utilities. Available 8 May '91. Call
757-2859, leave message
ROOMIE NEEDED Starting May
to share 2 bedroom, 1 12 bath,
dishwasher, pool, plus 24 hour
laundry mat, one mile from cai
tor entire summer. $180, month plus
12 utilities. Call 752-9459.
HELP WANTED
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT: fisheries. Earn $5,000
month. Free transportation' Rixm
and Board! Over8,flflBttp rungs. No
experience necessary. Male or Fe-
male lor 68-page employment
manual,send$8.95toM& Research,
Box 84008, Seattle, WA 98124 Satis
faction Guarantied.
LIBRARY WORKERS Hns:t,quick
part-timers needed to apply oar code
labels to books. Mid April-Mid lune.
Two hours per day (at term ons).Mon-
Fn. Applv in person only, 3 p.m5
p.m. weekdays, Sheppard Memorial
Library, 530 1 vansStreet No phone
calls
SUMMER EN IERNSH1P Find out
what IBM, Xenix and Fortune 500
companies like about our summer
program If saving over S! � � in-
valuable career experience, 1 i
your resume, and college cred
�peal to sou, call for ai ii
day (919) 249-2213.
CLASSIFIED ADS TECHNICIAN
needed for summer sessions and i r
fall semester. Must be enrolled as
ECU student Perfect job tor Ensh.
Broadcasting or Journalism majors,
but all majors welcome. Part-time,
flexible hours, little experience nec-
essary. Macintosh Microsoft Word
experience helpful. Apply in person
at The Eat Carolinian or call 758-7652
after 5:3(1 p.m.
NANNY OPPORTUNITIES: San
Francisco-1 giri-$175week Chi-
rago-newborn-S175week; Con-
necticut-twins-$250week; Boston
infant-Slridvveek; Virginia-2 chil-
dren -$200week. Many positions
EARTHSAFE Part-time sales !
up ten households Ilingpick
up and earn $100. Help save the
environment an. 1 eam ��nxi money,
too Call Cliff at 757-3063 tor ap
poinrment.
WHAI ARI H)l K PI s FOR
MIL SUMMER G lay i
(Ireenville, going to Summer S hool?
Brod) scurrentiy has sales positions
avail il i Juniors id Mens tl I
will run ugh the summer
into t: i � ill your free time wit!
apart position with Brod)
Brodi �fof M- ' . Br d) 's,Th(
. � �
1 to 4 p.m
MAK3 $500-$1500WEEKLYsru
esai r wne! Star! now i
S.ASI : IUS $1 00 tO Home t :
� - Inc 11. z Las

si MM1 R OHS M NAGSh! '
NT V
wort � " �.
to train?

local area
A NATIONAL CORPORA I ION
has position open for manager trainee.
Need decisive and competitive indi-
vidual seeking career in financial in-
dustry. College preferred. Weoffer
competitive salaries and a full bi nefil
package. Send resume to: P.O.Box
3802. Wilson NC ?v'
PERSONALS
ALL SORORITIES We re looking
forward to convocation. We'll see
you there 1 ove, the AE1 Is.
jl DYWT1 SON: Congratulations on
your engagement! We are so happy
ft ir oi' 1 ove, vonr Sigma Ststers
DELTAHI fnank . u for
itation Sal srdayi ghl 'r wa
me � guvs! Good luk
Pi Delta
CONGRATULATIONS to Tom
Musselman once again on a super job
on philanthn ipy and to Todd Griffen
HELP WANTED
for being a strong President The
Brothers of Sigma PL
ALPHA OMIC RON PI is pleased
announce the tkta Xi pledge i
( athleen Brysan, Kelsie C onrad.
Sherry Dameron. amie Debiase
l.vnn Itensliv, Karen lsheie, Holl)
l.inville Emil) Smith, Melissa Smith,
Melissa roretch,ShannonWilsonand
It'n 1 yons
i 0 THE BETA (LASS Ot PI
I l I I'A. It all started Friday night at
'si - few go� losl but soon wi re
d Ihe house was rocking and
i jammin Fhe singing was
i the balloons were cute!
fternin everyone was feelinj
i appened next, we can only
juess! rhanks for a great time! 11 ve
rsof Pi Delta
( ONGRATULATIONSP1 KAPPA
'in Ml-C pus hamps"
e I. imma Sigan 1 trive ben-
fitingthel hream 1 actory I
i rs verejarvisand I tltaSigma
i i � sp : � es to
ationsandsl i
: itions. Wetbas
SIGMA PI Whata m
��. � had a
: : ��� ird '
tog M HI
ROBIN HLAC K ngJ
vice-presjdenc) .��
a great job! Lovi � sters
I - Wcwt n disapp nted
cancellei ul ist Wed
We would -
with you. The Brothers of Sigma iv.
HOPEEVERYONI is! ivinga
( reek Week. Love, a HI.
CHI OMEGA Sigi a PI would like
to thank you for making last
Thursday's Pre downtown so much
fun. We are looking forward to our
next leathering
HI IA PHI PS1 We're reall) sorry
bout the i � las! wet kBut,we'U
.r it last this kveek 1 ove, the
HEi CADETS ; let the brass shined,
the uniforms deaned, the shoes :
ished, the hair cut, the manicure, the
DISPLAY CLASSFIED
COLLEGE STUDENTS TEACHERS- ADULTS AGE 19 and up
LINE I P SI MMER WORK now!
WHEN: Early MayJune to Late WHAT: Field scounts to
August Earh Se I
WHERE: Eastern NC Cos
Lenior, (!ra en, Pitt, Jones.
i Inslow, Greene
Mm 5.50hour plus
Mileage expenses
SHI r MSILTMISS r"
If you're
Pregnant
and need help making choices
�Free, confidential professional
pregnancy counseling
�Financial assistance
�Help select adoptive family
1-800-632-1400
The Children's Home Society
V of North Carolina
A United Way Agency
PERSONALS
pedicure, the perm whatever! But
f x) NOT, 1 repeat IX) NOT miss the
hall1 It's going to make history! See
your there. From your Highest
speed Hua Hua s: The IV"s.
LAURA HOI LEMAN: Congratson
becoming the 1st annual Creek
( Kidt-vs1 You were great! We love
you! Your Sigma Sisters
KOI ECU! Fhetal hi formal was.)
: tstM ongratulationstoalltheaward
recipients. You guys have done an
outstanding job! Good luck to all the
graduating seniorsand theupcoming
pledges God bless and Rollh
SIGMA t'i wi 1 like I - ail
ECU stiuientsand (. Ireeks or helping
usmake"ship-a-meal"a successand
a new tradition for us and the uni-
versity Special thanks to Frank
Salamor (E I Dining Services lav
Fairdothof ARA and I is staff, Betty
Hardee, Dear :wr and everyoi
else who helped 11 inks again!
WELCOME DELTA CHI FRATER-
in Looking r. rward to future
� ' '11
SIGMA INTRAMURAL TEAMS
You are all doing great' You always
tobeSK IMAS! Love,
vour sisters
SS.T. OFF-CAMPUS MEETING
1 riday, Ayr 12 it7:30p w Meet at
i for ride. 1 i
formal i Sarah 931-8099
� � -vi
AOTI Colleen, i
my H lv
P Ko ri �"
Low
v- Sisters
DELTA CHI Conj on
your new colon) Love, the !�
Zetas
AOTT. Sigma Pi would like to ma -
DISPUY CLASSIFIED
NDSWORTH
I (�MMONS
JNkWESTNAM
monitor crops. We train.
QUALIF: Conscientious,
(iinxJ physical shape, Have
(rwn Vehicle, Reliable
: MCSI-POBox 179
GriftoiKNC 28530 ,

FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
757-0003
lil E. 3rd Street
. Hie Lee Building
Greenville NC
Hours
M-F 8:30 am-3pm
PERSONALS
you for making Sunday's softball
special and cook out su h a blast V
had a great time and drv look .
forward to spending Greek Weel
with you.
SIGMAS Tonight 630 pin Be
there or lx square
ECU Rl (.CERS This is the wo
end to show us what you are mack
( cod luck with the state toumami
We'rebehindyou-Tshya.Bonnieand
Susan
ALPHA PHI hopes all ECU
enroll in Rush 9L GoGreek!
1HET A C HI presei te our 3
nual See-Saw Mama for Sp
Olympics starting at 7.00 Sarurda)
April 13 and fii on Sunday
April 4 We would appreciate yo
support Donations will be collected
from local . itions and busi
nesses om t ai d supp rl
ROLL CHI
vd.).
CONGRATULATIONS to Allyson
Shies and Mike Daly r, their
gagement We ��sh you rh best I
luck Weloveyoubom 1 ove,Ceteste
and friends!
GREEKS Ireek Week has 11
awes n e so far I hanks I
everyone's participation Lefsn �
it one to remember PIKES!
DO U)L HAVE DIFFICULTY n
itingi peopk dvatdon tunderstand
you? Do you feel guilt and isola
associated w'lth feelings
se laity? We understand and
an eetii g m campus I
lisi issthes ssues all 757 6661
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
APTLY NOWFOR
SUMMER POSITIONS AT
THE tST CAZCinUfJJ
V , J
Kiniold I owers
GOLDEN GIRL TRYOUTS
Attention interested dancers (who
can dazzle and sparkle) Become
a part of the 1991 ECU Football
Spirit! Share the spotlight by per-
h �rming with the East Carolina Pi-
rates during the 1991 football sea-
son TheGOLDENGIKLS DANCE
IJNE will hold tryouts April 13-14;
9 am A p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m -
4 pm. Sunday in Memorial Gym.
For more information, call 757-6982.
.SPFCIAL OLYMPICS
The 1991 Greenville-Pitt Co. Spe-
cial Olympics Spring Games will
be held on April 19thatE.B.Aycock
Jr. High School in Greenville (rain
date: April 24). Volunteers are
needed to help serve as buddies
chaperones for the Special Olym-
pics. Volunteers must be able to
work all day - from 9 a.m2 p.m.
(The first ones there will be as-
signed a position). An orientation
meeting will be held on April 17 in
Old Joyner Library, room 221 from
5-6:00 p.m. Free lunches and vol-
unteer t-shirts will be provided the
day of the games to all volunteers
whohaveattended the orientation
session. For more information,
contact! fea Mil'? !rt 80
MSJ
ASSOCIATION
The Resident Hall Association til-
ing dates for offices in House
Council and Rl 1A are ?Apnl 15th-
April 18th. There will be an interest
session held April l5that5D0p.m.
in the social room of Mendenhall
Resident Hall Association elections
will be from 9 a.m.4 pm. in each
Residence Hall. Any questions,
call 7574709.
STUOFNTS SUPPORTING
OURTROOPS
A meeting will be held by Students
SurjportinjrOuT Troops on Friday
April 12 at 730 p.m. Ihe location is
unknown at thb time but mem-
bers may call for information. Sarah
931 -8099, Chrisde 931 -8004, Nancy
931-8080. Also check classified
Ihursday for more information.
For all paid members there will be
a social after the business meeting.
HOSPITALITY
MANAGEMENT
ASSOCIATION
Hospitality Management Associa-
tion meeting to discuss Fall activi-
ties will be held April 15 at 2 pm in
RiMn237HE.
FCTlSTimFNT UNION
Have you seen the Pink Flamin-
gos? Barefoot on the Mall will be
here on April 18 starting at 12 pm
Featuring the band Love Tractor
and comedian Todd Yohn.
ECU BIOLOGY CLUB
Dr Mark D. Dibner of the North
Carolina Biotechnology Center will
speak about "The Explosive
Growth of the US. Biotechndogy
Industry: Trends and Opportuni-
ties" on Tuesday, April 16 at 5 p.m.
in Room BN 109 of the Science
Complex Anyone wishing to at-
tend the spring field trip to the
Outer Banks should also come to
this meeting.
RIOFLIKF THE WIND!
ECU Recreational Services will be
sponsoring a Wind Surfing 1 work
shop on April 11. Participants will
receive beginning instruction in
equipment, terminology, rigging,
safety and actual practice. The
workshop will take place at 7:30
pm.mtheChristeriburyGymPool
and the cost is $3.00shjdents and
$4.00faculty-staff-guest. Come
out and learn a new skill while
having fun! For further informa-
tion call 757-6911 or stop by 117
Christenburv Gvrn.
Hampton p
Bv StuartMiphant
Asslstj'
,ihs. ma � � �
bell?
that is E
don't n
strii
dh ed � ' i
disaj
quality
the
the fact 1
50 per � � �
sold
guitar m
atanala
Tht
their ap: re -
not
wort
a vii
take it I
Saturday Nigi
Nikki Meets
Bv Deanna Nevgh
Sufi k �

On Saturdav
basi itfil
bad ��� perfoi
mpnsed �
lohr
Hiba
luol
lnd rls, �
Richard and
Formed i n I
Chap I Hi 'ikt Meets!
�. hi rvis beei cnbed
gress ' �
roll
.�
son F.P r � - � �
Nikki M �
deshne I � �
acdaime I et l
� -
theii �-
sold It Pi
new hi: �
latest � ' - � - ' �
Hitachi Ihis i -
their first on Chap iessoi

rt�l
:�C
In an unprecedented appreance the aHemative folk i
night Greenville's only authentic Bistro is v:
ECU Theater de
'Danny am
Bv Joe Horst
Statf Writer
last Sunday and Mondav
night, the Theater Arts department
upheld its long-standing excellent
tradition in workshop productions
The latest installment that has
graced the halls c4 Messick was a
shmng production of "Dannv and
the Deep Blue Sea
Directed by Pans Feet, the ac-
tors treated audiences to a won-
derful story of two people valiantly
trying to find meaning in their dis-
mal lives. The actors bnlhantly
portrayed a vivid sense of
mankind's lifetime search for com
panionship and
one coo- th' j
Both actors
ovation tor thl
workshop. Chnj
once again his
rjhtyasanacton
withanimmens
His portrav
hard-bitten you
rrving to maskj
paralldshisprev
and showcases
staving in toucl
having one mcj
partment,hewi
behind him and
in anv acting i





April 11, 1991
April 11,1991
Bhg iEaBt (Earolf man
7
;4j.(j;
PERSONALS
PERSONALS
� i n ik ig S inda) s sotthall
ok out such a iist We
e u d are inking
( .nvk Week
S1GMAS I � ' W p n Ho
RL'GCtRS s is i week-
an madeof
i imamenr!
i Bonnieand
HA PHI 1 pes ECU girls
hd An
Special
� Sarurdaj
Sunday
. i ate your
collected
s and bus;
� �� us!
c on
i
VMS
C.R Ml I TIONS to Mlyson
Miki ' teh on 'heir en-
� i best of
Love,( eieste
GRLI K5
LS Ml
b has been
s make
CLASSIFIED
L
H Wl DIFFICU1 n re
den
� ilatit ��
� elings o(
di rstand and
ai pus to
DISPLAY CLASSFIED
APPL NOWFOR
SUMMER POSITIONS AT
FREE
EGNANCY
NESTING
ina Pregnancy ("enter
757-0003
II i E. 3rd Street
he Lee Building
Greenville, NC
Usmrs.
F8:30am-3pm
L seen the Pink Flarnin
t � t on the Mall will he
-nl 18 starting ai 12pm
the hand Love rractor
iian rodd ohn.
BIOLOGY CHJB
II) rhhner of the North
Ki tevhnologyCenterwiJl
Knit 'The Explosive
(heUS Biotechnology
ends and Opporhini-
esday, April 16at5p.m
FN 109 of the Science
nyone wishing to at-
kprinfll fieW hip to tK
Hiter fianks should also come to
'his meeting.
KiDLUKLmLMNDI
FLU Recreational Services will bo
ponsonnga Wind Surfing I work
shop on April 11 Participants will
receive beginning instruction in
equipment, terminology, rigging,
safety and actual practice. The
workshop will take place at 7:30
pm in theChristenbury Gym Pool
and the cost is $3.00students and
$4.00faculry-staff-guest. Come
out and learn a new skill while
having fun! For further informa
tion call 757-6911 or stop by 117
Christen bo rv Gym.
Hampton preserves disappearing art: guitar
By Stuart Oliphant
Assistant Features Fditor
1V the names Martin, C.retsch,
ibson and Ku kenbacker ring a
bi II?
Probably s�, if you play guitar
that is But what manv musicians
don't realize is that the quality,
inged instruments once pro-
duced in the United States have
-1 ppeared to make room tor low-
quality substitutes manufactured in
the Orient, Even more startling is
fad that the fapanese buy over
� percenl oi the vintage guitars
. d in the United States. Vintage1
truitareare leaving the United States
at an alarming rate
The I a pa nose, well known tor
their appreciation art. see guitars
not just as instruments but also as
works i A art l"ho Japanese can buy
tage, American-made guitar,
- it to fapan and get twice the
price they paid for it.
"We (Americaas)bu y Japanese
junk and thev use our monev to buy
our good stuff says Blame
Hampton, vintage guitar collector
and owner of Ayden Music. "People
love gimmicks, but the most im-
portant aspect of an instrument is
originality; onginalirvis what sells
According to Hampton, a '58-
"59 Gibson Les Paul Standard with
a highly flamed top can sell for as
much as $30,000. However, if the
same guitar has been rehnished,
even professionally rehnished, the
sol 1 ing price c n piiunmet to a mere
S5.0VO. "A vintage guitar with 90
percent of the finish gone is worth
more than one professionally re-
tinished sivs Hampton stressing
the importance of originality. When
deciding to sell, savs Hampton,
"don't clean it up � don't even
wipe the dirt off ot it
Hampton considers electric
guitars to be fad-oriented. Hamp-
ton says that popularity plays an
important role in determining the
price of an electric guitar. An ex-
ample of this is the Fender Music
Master (short scale). The Music
Master originally sold for around
$150, and it's worth the same
amount tixjav. "You can lose vour
rear-end dealing with electrics
sivs Hampton.
"The new electrics beat the old
electrics savs Hampton. "But, the
new acoustics don't even co mcclose
to theold ones because of the wood
And what does Hampton think
about Ovation guitars: 'The best
plastic guitar I've ever plaved, and
thev make great boat paddles too
Hampton's pnde and joy is a
'42 Martin D-45 acoustic, one of the
most valuable production instru-
ment in the historv of the world. A
vintage D-45 can range in price any-
where from $50,000 to $70,000. The
CM5 onginailv sold for $225. The
first D-45 was made for Gene Au try
in 33. Martin madeonlv 90 more of
the D-45's, hairing production in
'42.
Currently, Hampton is orga-
nizing the "Greater North Carolina
Guitar Show" to be held at the Ra-
leigh Civic and Convention Center
on Sept. 28 and 29. Topdealers from
around the world will beon hand to
trade and sell.
Guitars that should draw the
most interest include CF. Martin,
Gibson, Fender, Gretsch, National,
Bacon and Dav (B & D), Vega,
Paramount, Rickenbacker,
Stromherg, AC. Fairbanks and S.S.
Stewart FAngelico. Hampton en-
courages the public to grab their axe
and attend. Dealers will be paving
cash. So, if it's weird or old bring it
with vou. For more information call
Blaine Hampton (Avden Music),
(919)746-4116.
1jPI s�- �am . � m
�Lt wo Am� L 11 m
V1
Photo by Stuart Oliphant
Not only does Blaine Hampton collect guitars, but other stnnged instruments
as well Pictured here is an extremely rare Paramount bass banjo
Saturday Night Specials: Greenville's hardcore weekend
Nikki Meets the Hibachi
Bv Deanna Nevgloski
Statt Writer
On Saturday night, Chapel Hill-
based outfit, Nikki Meets the Hi-
i w ill perform at the Fizz.
v omprised of Elaine Tola and
� allespie, Nikki Moots the
hi is an all-original, acoustic
'� that has been compared to the
go (.iris. Miracle legion and
� ard and 1 indaThompson.
Formed in February 1988 in
v hapel lill, Nikki Meets the Hiba-
has been described as "pro-
gressi . e tolk or "acoustic rock 'n'
mna s Amorphous Hat, a five-
song EP released last vear, made
Meets the Hibachi a Kind
. d ft t the bigtime. Thehighlv-
laimed EP sot them on the road
s iccess and instantly put them
the local music map. Before that,
their Roast Beast cassette from lQ
sold out Pretty impressive for a
� w Kind on the scene.
The Blues! $ky is the third and
latest effort fmm Nikki Meets the
libachi. I"his release als� rruirks
thdr tirst on Chapel Hill's baikxJ
breath productions.
Produced bv lohn Plymale at
TGS Studios, The Bluest Sky is a
confection oi 11 songs that explore
tlx' acoustical heavens in nxrk and
roll music.
GraduatesofUNC-Chapel 1 fill,
Gillespie says the new aibum fea-
tures more upscale production and
more sngs that span a longer time
period. According to Gillespie, the
album was named The Bluest Sky
because it represents a "high
movement or a "pinnacle � as
gixxl a job as we wen able to do
"Shake Off the Cold Liken
from one oi their earlier records,
Bigger "Running in My Sleep
"Peacemaker" and "Love" are rust
a few ot the songs on The Bluest Sky
tKit make this band a breath of
fresh air in the music business and
the over-populated Chapel Hill
scene.
"Days Like These" is a tune
tKit incorporates the country style
of the Kinjo with the traditional
guitar sound. Some sav this par-
ticular song carries the typical
heartwrenching theme that Tola
uses so much in her lvncs, but she
insists that it is not, calling it a
"happv" song.
A well-established band
throughout the Southeast club cir-
cuit, Nikki Meets the HiKichi started
their "Bluest Skv" tour in March.
On stage, Nikki Meets the Hi-
bachi has Kvn described as "loud
and the lvncs pull the audience in
close to the stage Nikki Meets the
Hibachi plans to lour outside North
Carelina in order to keep W faith-
ful following tKit grew with the
release of Hanm's Amorphous Hat.
Although Carolina students
make up a large percentage of their
fans, Nikki Meets the HiKichi has
also gained the attention of music
lovers in the Kaleigh-LHirham area
as well.
The tour should last until the
end of April.
A Kind that combines the fine
sounds of alternative, folk and rock
and roU,Nikki Meets the Hibachi is
truly an original two-piece act that
sKiuld pick up more than a few
listeners before their stint at the Fizz
comes to an end this Saturday. It's
time to meet Nikki Meets the Hi-
bach.
v1 . 1pi
t jjLmnL
11 lUcowslf? mm M
Lm mm
LB
Photo Courtasy ot Antis�n
Antiseen brings their unorthodox style of thrash-o-delic rock-and-roll to the New Deli Saturday night Also
appearing at the slam-fest arethe Blue Green Gods and the never-reluctant Skullbuckle
Antiseen: "not your average fare"
-T�V m y-�� � 4
-
�1
S
Tal
wmtB
i -i'jSen" �jJSPr�i?rS
By Doug Morris
Staff Writer
Photo Courtasy ot Baitad Breath Production
in an unprecedented appreance the alternative folk duo, Nikki Meets the Habatchi will be at the Fizz Saturday
night Greenville's only authentic Bistro is proud to present the Chapel Hill based band.
ECU Theater department presents
'Danny and the Deep Blue Sea'
By Joe Horst
Staff Wriler
Last Sunday and Monday
night, the Theater Arts department
upheld its long-standing excellent
tradition in workshop productions.
The latest installment tiiat has
graced the halls of Messick was a
stirring production of "Danny and
the Deep Blue Sea
Directed by Paris Peet, the ac-
tors treated audiences to a won-
panionship and the trials and risks
one goes through in that search.
Both actors deserve a standing
ovation for their work in this
workshop. Christian Keiber proves
once again his tremendous versa-
tility asanactorand graces the stage
with an im-nense presence of being.
His portrayal of Danny as a
hard-bitten youngman desperately
Krista Conti gives a exemplary
performance also as Danny's female
counterpart. Witha harsh New York
accent,Conti left tiieaudience sitting
on theedgeof tfieir seats with frantic
anticipation. Throughout the whole
one-act play, Conti gives a hard-
edged, gritty performance that
worked beautifully with Keiber.
With Conti also having one yea r left
in the department, she will join
For most Kinds today, the ulti-
mate goal is to sign with a major
laM who will promote tK' Kind
and push them into stardom.
Not so for the Charlotte-based
Kind Antiseen.
"A lot of Kinds find a manager
and build a light rig for shows jnd
print the T-shirts Joe Young, the
band's guitarist said in an interview
with The Charlotte Observer.
'They're climbing the music
ladder the way yuppies climb the
corporate ladder. We play these
showcases for record exocs, and we
know there's no way thev' II hire us.
We make records for our own plea-
sure
It iseasv to see how some record
companies would be hesitant tosign
this band of business bashers. With
releases such as "Kill the Business
"My God Can Beat Up Your God"
and "Raw Shit this band is defi-
nitely not New Kids on the Block.
But Antiseen, comprised of
Young Jeff Clayton, Tom QKeefe
and Steve Sadler, still has experi-
enced success. They are preparing
to release another new album,
Southern Hostility, which is due out
in September on Rave Records. The
record will be the band's 22nd re-
lease to date.
Antiseen has seen a fewchanges
over the eight vears that thev have
Kvn playing. Most recently, thev
gained a new drummer. Sadler has
Kvn with the Kind for nearly a
vear.
The band regularly draws
akmt 300 people, most of whom
are die-hard fans. Clayton, the
band's singer descnKs them as
Like us, but a tot more twisted
Antiseen shares itsKsginnings
with fellow Charlotte-based band.
Fetehin' Bones. The two bands were
together for their first-ever perfor-
mance at The Barn in F3ooneonOct.
1,1983.
Since then, Antiseen has plaved
all over the world, including Aus-
tralia and Europe, most recentlv in
Charlotte and Atlanta.
When the Kind began, their
name was an expression of oppo-
sition to the music being produced
in the earlv '80s. Clayton says that
that still holds true for the music of
the early '90s.
"We don't feel that we have a
place in the music scene today. We
don't worry about what this band
or that is doing. We play for our-
selves, and if we like what we're
doing, uhat's good enough
Clayton said that Antiseenwas
influenced by bands they grew up
listening to, like The Ramones,
Motorhead or The Sex Pistols.
Antiseen is known, in part, for
their rough shows. Part of the repu-
tation comes from the fans slam
dancing, part from the Keating the
band members take.
"My whole Kdv's covered
with scars' Clavton said. "When
we plav we get reallv physical We
relate to tKi crowd. The cuts, the
bruises and the stitches come from
overanxious sKws
Relating for Clayton means
more than just Heeling the excite-
ment to the crowd. He has been
known on particularly reugh nights
to slam a broken Kettle or his mi-
crophone into his forehead until it
bleeds.
"We plaved two shows just re-
centlv and 1 got pretty banged up
Clayton said.
Antiseen will join Chapel Hill
natives BlueGreenCiodsand ECU's
own Skullbuckle Saturday night at
the New Deli
Skullbuckle will open, featuring
Greg Clayton, Dave Hathaway,
Charlie lnman and Jetf Young.
Clayton and Young are brothers of
Antiseen's guitarist and singer.
Blue Green Gods will play next
featuring Todd Gross, Antiseen's
sound man.
"It's kind of a family affair
said Clayton.
"It's not your standard fare, he
added, "We promise no one will
leave feeling like they've been
ripped off. You may not like it, but
you won't be bored
trying to mask his true emotions
parallelshispreviousone in "Beirut" Keiber in leaving a great history of
and showcases a talent well worth theater,
derful story of two people valiantly staying in touch with. With Keiber Though the language was very
trying to find meaning in their dis- having one more year in the de- coarse and guttural, it only served
mal lives. The actors brilliantly partrnent,hewillleaveafinelegacy to emphasize the overall theme of
portrayed a vivid sense of behind him and will surely succeed the play. This production is sure to
COMING UP
AtticNew DeliCRocksMendenhall :
ThursdayFridayFridayThursday
Blue DixieThe VeldtRaised by CowsFriday
FridaySaturdaySaturdaySaturday
Lord TracyAntiseenActiveGhost
SaturdayBlue Green GodsIngredientsSunday
Cold SweatSkullbuckleCuckoo's Nest
mankind's lifetime search for com- in any acting endeavor.
be an example of future endeavors.





Aprii 11.1991
(Bite lEast (Earulintan
RSONALS
PERSONALS
DISPUY CLASSIFIED
IS AT

I
� vLiy
; also cot
DE LIKE the vyiNpj
. vilihe
dSurfinglwi
Apnl ii Participants
� ruling instruction in
ent, terminol.
-lf" rtual pra bee Phe
ill take lace al 7:30
nthH hrfetenburyGymPc I
� stfc$3.00 jtudentsa
test (
I learn a new skill while
ng Km! Ror further infom
don call 757-6911 r stop by I
( hnsforibiirvf.
Hampton preserves disappearing art: guitar
h Stuarl Oliphant
v-tst.ini I eatures 1 ditoi
ims Martin,Gretsch,
ki nba kcr ring ,t
- ;t you pla guitar
nan musicians
thai the qualm
i nts , �n� e pn
I ntted Mates have
� I i makeroom forlow
anufacturedm
t-en more startling is
ipam so bu over
' intage guitars
' itCS l Ig,
'� ingthel. nitedStates
�-
Ik mow n v �
' fart ioej mtars
' t also as
- i inbm
" made guitar
price they paid tor it
Wet mericans)buyjapanese
junkandthcyuseourmonev to buy
our good stuff savs Blaine
I lampton intage guitar collcx tor
andownt rot WdenMusk People
love gimmicks, but the most im
portant aspect ol an instrument is
originality ;originality is what sells
i i nrdmg to lampti �n .i 8
Gibson I es Paul Standard with
.i highly flamed top can sell tor as
much as $30,1X10 However, it the
same guitar has been refinished,
even professionally refinished, the
sellingpri ecan plummet toa mere
00 A vintage guitar with ini
pen cut of the finish gone is worth
more than one prctrssK.ti.illv re-
finished siw I lampton stressing
port ei fonginalitv V hen
� '11, savs Hampton
' ' t up don't e
t hi 11 r t o f f of l
Hampton considers electric
guitars to be fad oriented Hamp
ton says that popularity piavs an
important role in determining the
price of an electric guitar An ex-
ample of this is the lender Musk
Master (short scale) The Music
Master originally sold tor around
$150, and it's worth the same
amount today. " on can lose your
rear-end dealing with electrics
savs t lampton.
'ITie new electrics beat the i �Id
clci trn s savs Hampton "But, the
newacousbcsdon'tevencome lose
tc the old ones because of thewi� h1
� im what does! lampton think
about t Kation guitars "The best
plastic guitar I've ever played. and
thev make great boat pad. lies too
I lampton s pride and joy is a
42 Martin I I 45 at nushi one of tin-
most valuable production instni-
ment in the hist. rv i �f the world A
vintage! M5 an rangeinpri eany-
where from $50AX) to $7 1.000. I he
CM5 originally sold tor $225 rhe
first D 45 was made for ieneAutrv
in '33 Martin madeonh 90mor I
the D-45's, halting prnduction in
42
( urrently, Hampton is orga
nizing the "(Ireater orth (. arolina
( antar Show" to ho held at the Ra-
leigh( ivi and( onventiont enter
onSept 2Hand29 rop dealers from
around the world will beon hand to
trade and sell
( iuitars that should draw the
most interest include I Martin,
( iibson, I endermtst h, Natii mal,
Bacon and I av (B v D), Vega
Paramount, Ri kenbacker,
Stromberg, AC I airbanksand S S
Stewart I fAngelico Hampton en-
courages the public to grab their a M
and attend I ealers will be paving
( ash So, it it's weird or i ild bnng it
withvou.Fi irmoreinfi irmatii m ill
Blaine Hampton (Ayden Music),
(919)746-4116.
Photo by Stuart Oiipham
Not onty does Blaine Han ; I r :oii?ctquitars but H trt dinstruments
as well Pictured ht-re is an extremely rare Paramount bass banjo
Saturday Night Specials: Greenville's hardcore weekend
Nikki Meets the Hibachi
H Deanna Nevgloski
iff VS ntcr
� du� ed l v ohn Plvn il I
� id Blue
11 infection ot 11 songs that explore
the a tical heavens in i -
roll musk
iduatesofl N I ;�
pie savs the new albi im fi i
furesn re upscale pn dm tion and
more songs that span a i time
� � period. A rdingl pie, th
album was nan � ' ��� .�- �
bet. ause it repi
menl � a : ru i as
gixxi a job as �� � vere able tod
i .����, . takei
from ne f their earlier n i rds
' ee p
I . i. emaker and 'L vc are just
t the soi n . - I �� .
that make this band a breath of
sot I n the road fresh air in the music business and
I instant em the over populatedhapel Hill
,j oforet seem
' i - �� �� � 8W I e.s l ike rhese is a tune
� � r i that incorporates the countrv st
nthesccr of the banjo with the traditional
" � � rd AnA guitar sound. Some sav this p,ir
kki Meets the ticular song carries the tvpical
is � - irks hcartwrenching theme that f"ola
: i hapel Hill's baited uses so much in her lyrics buthe
Meet �
I
' - - i �� .
i
hevi � . " ' " �
1 in Febi n 88 in
' ' Hiba-
� � . Hal � � �
� year mad
i ban
� -
insists that it is � . it a
happy song
A ell t stablish� I � and
throughout the Southeast club cir-
cuit, Nikki Meets the 1 fiba hi started
their bluest Sky tour in Mai I
i hn stage ikki Meets the ! h-
bachi has hvn described as 'loud
and the Ivrii s pull the audience in
close to the stage Nikki Meetsthe
� msl � ui utsideN(rth
( arolina in order to kei p the faith
tul following that grew with the
release i I lunna .
Althougharolina students
make upa large pen entageof their
� u ikki Meets the Hibachi has
� . teamed the atti ntii m � t musii
ii ivers in the Raleigh-I 'urham area
as well
I lie tour should last until the
end of April
A band that i �mbines the fine
soundsol alternative, tolk and rock
jnd roll Nikki Meetsthe I liKu hi is
trulv an original two-pie e .u t that
should pick up more than a few
listcnersbefore their stint at the Fizz
comes toan end this Saturday. It's
time to meet ikki Meets the Hi-
Ku hi
Ploio Courtesy of An!s�er
Antiseen bnnqc ��. - -mrihodox style o thrash-odehc rock and-rc ; o the New Deli Saturday night Also
appearing at the iam-fest arethe Blue Green Gods and the never-reluctant Skullbuckie
Antiseen: "not your average fare"
By Doug Morris
suit Writer
Photo Courtesy ot Bail�d Breath Production!
i n unprecedented appreance the alternative folk duo. Nikki Meets the Habatchi will be at the Fizz Saturday
I Greenville's only authentic Bistro is proud to present the Chapel Hill based band
ECU Theater department presents
'Danny and the Deep Blue Sea'
Bv joe Horst
Staff Writer
I ast Sunday n. Mond.iv
night, the Fneater Arts department
upheld its long-standing excellent
tradition in workshop productions
The latest installment that has
gn ed the halls ot Messick was a
stirring production of "Danny and
the Deep Sue Sea
Directed by Pans Poet, the ac-
tors heated audiences to a won-
lerful story of two people valiantlv
trying to find meaning in their dis-
mal lives The actors brilliantly
portrayed a vivid sense of
mankind's lifetime search for com-
panionship and the trials and risks
one goes through in that search
Both actors deserve a standing
ovation for their work in this
workshop.hristian Keiber proves
once again his tn-mendous versa
till tvas an actor ami graces the stage
with an immense presence of being.
His portrayal of Danny as a
hard-bitten young man desperately
trying to mask his true emotions
parallolshispreviousonein "Beirut"
and showcases a talent well worth
staving in touch with. With Keiber
having one more year in the de-
partment, he will lea ve a fine legacy
behind him and will surely succeed
in anv acting endeavor.
Krista C'onti gives a exemplary
perfonnancealsoasDanny'sfernale
counterpart. Witha harsh New York
accent,Conn left theaudieneesitting
on theedgeot their seats with frantic
anticipation. Inroughout the whole
one-act play, Conti gives a hard-
edged, gritty performance that
worked beautifully with Keiber.
WithConti also ha vingone year left
in the department, she will join
Keiber in leaving a great history of
theater.
Inough the language was very
coarse and guttural, it only served
to emphasize the overall theme of
the plav. Inis production is sure to
be an example of future endeavors.
1 t most bands today, the ulti-
mate goal is I � with a m.n. t
label who will promote the Kind
and push them into stardom
. it so fi r themarlotte has
Kind Antiseen
A lot of Kind find a man
and build a light t
print the P-shirt e Young, t
band's guitarist said in an interview
with '�:�� i barl � '� - �" ��'
"They're dimbing the music
ladder the way yuppies climb the
corporate ladder We plav these
showcasesfoT record ex cs and we
know there's no wav th !1 hire us
We make records for our own plea-
sure "
Itiseasvtosechow somerecord
companies would be hesitant to sign
thisband ol business bashers. With
releases such as Kill the 1'usiness.
"My God an Beat L'p Your (.i
and Raw hit this band is defi-
nitely not New Kids cm the BUvk
But Antiseen, comprised ol
Young, Jeff Dayton, Tom CKeefe
and Steve Sadler, still has experi
enced success. Ihev are pnpanng
to release anither new album,
SeufricTn Hosfiirv, which is due out
in September on Rave Records. The
record will K- the band's 22nd m
lease to date
Antiseen hasseena fiewchangea
��.or the eight vears that thev have
been playing. Most recently, thev
gained a new drummer Sadler has
been with the band tor near �

The band regularly dr i ��� 5
about ;t 11 people, most
.ire die-hard tans. Clavton, the
band s singer describes them as
ke us, but a lot more rw isto I
Kised band.
Fetchin Btines rhetwobandswere
� ther tor their tirst ever perfor-
mance at I "he Bam in K Tie on i. V t
1. 1983.
Sincethen, Antiseen has played
all over the world. iru luding Aus-
tralia and Europe most recently in
t harlotteand Atlanta
When the band began their
name was an expression ot oppo
sition to the music being produced
in the early nk c lavton s.nsthat
that still holds tnie tor the music ol
theearty 90s
We don't feel that we have a
place in the musk scene tiia We
don't worrv about what this band
or that is doing. We plav tor our
serves, and if we like what we re
doing, that s gcMvl enough
( lavton said that Anbseenwas
influenced bv bands thev grew up
listening to, like The Ramones,
Motorhoad or The Sex Pistols
Antiseen is known, in part, for
their rough shows Part of therepu-
� � -i comes tnm the fans slam
d incing, pirt from the beating the
Kind members take
V u hole K d - co . �
vitl - rs Qaytoi aid Vhen
we plav we get really physica
� to the crowd ine cuts, the
bruises and the stitches i
ranxious sh iws
Relating foi ton mi i
�� re thai i I fei ng the ex( ite
menl to t � �
known on particularly rough nights
to - am a broken bottle or his mi-
crophone into his forehead until it
Heeds
We placed two shows just re-
cently and 1 got pretty hanged up "
( lavton said
ntiseen will join t. hap 1 Hill
natives BlueGreenGodsandE(
own Skullbuckie Situ: i I
the Now Deli
kullbiK kle will open, featunng
(ireg (la ton, Dave 1 iatha �
Charlie Inman and left Young
Clayton and oung are brothers
Antiseen s guitarist and singer
Bluet ireen Gods will play next
featuring rodd Gross, Antiseen's
sound man.
kirn.i ot a family affair
said t layton
It s not vour standard tare, he
added, We promise nci one will
leave feeling like they've been
npped off. ou may not like it, but
VOU won t K' Kt1
COMING UP
AtHcNew DeliO RocksMendenhall
ThursdayFridayFridayThursday
Blue DixieThe VeldtRaised bv CowsFriday
FridaySaturdaySaturdaySaturday
Lord TracyAntiseenActiveGhost
Saturday-Blue Green GodsIngredientsSunday
Cold SwreatSkullbuckieCuckoo's Nest





April 11.1991
a Ottje taut (Earolinian April 11, 1991
METAL NOTES
�h� iEafit OIar0imfan
Metallica to release new LP in July
It's that time of the week, so sit back and read on!
Guns N' Roses will begin eoncerhzing across the country on
May 24 in Troy, Wis in support of Use Your Illusion,dueoutaround
the same time.
Cinderella, Lynch Mob and Nelson start their trek of the States
on April 25 in Green Bay, Wis. Metal Notes will keep you posted
on dates in the North CarolinaVirginia area.
Faith No More guitarist lim Martin will make a cameo in the
new sequel "Hill and Ted Go to Hell" as "the greatest guitar player
in the world"
Speaking of Faith No More, vocalist Mike Patton and his side-
kick band, Mr. Bungle, will release their debut album this summer.
Mr Bungle may tour select cities, depending on Patton's FNM
recording schedule.
Metallica s long-awaited record is slated for an early July
release.
Out in stores this week is White Lion's fourth LP, Mane At-
traction. Check out the tribute song "Blue Monday written by
guitarist Vito Bratia on the day Stevie Ray Vaughn died.
Slayer. Megadeth and Anthrax will begin a U.S. version of the
European "Clash of the Titans" tour on May 16.
Guitarist Merntt Cant lex-Faith or Fear) has completed the
double-axe HIM I ill in Overkill with Ray Cannavmo. The New
lersev thrash outfit plans to release their next LP in August.
Queensryche's fourth video from Empire will be for the song
let Citv Woman The follow up to the smash hit "Silent Lucidity
let Gty Woman" will be a live video clip.
Seattle-based Banshee hascallod it quits. Guitarist Terry Dunn
has a new band in the works called Gangland.
Great White .BulletBoysand Steelheart will invade Raleigh on
April 2 and Charlotte on Apnl 30. Great White is currently visible
via their video "Call It Rock " Roll Same goes for BulletBovs with
"THC Groove You can hear Steelheart on the radio with their
second single. "Everybody Loves Eileen
New �ldeostokocpaneyeonare Slay erV'Seasons in the Abyss
filmed in Fgvpt, Tyketto's "Forever Young Mr. Big's "Green-
rintedSivties Mind Pantera's TsychoCowboy" and ACDC's"An?
You Ready?"
Boston had bovs Extreme released "More Than Words" as their
third single from the sensational, but underrated, LP Pornograffitti.
"Wore Than Words" is a bittersweet ballad that should draw
attention to this band, although the heavier songs on the album fair
better than this particular song.
Greenville's Scythian added drummer Mark Petruska to their
lineup recently The bluesv-based quartet lscurrently searchingfor
a rhvthm guitarist. Interested and serious musicians call John Rae
�1752-6181.
Until next week, keep rockin
� Compiled by "Dizzy" Dejnnj Nevgloski
Typesetter
This week at FIZZ!
Fri Bill Clark Ensemble - JazzR&B from
Washington. DC. Advance tickets available
Sat. Nikki meets the Hibachi - High energy
acoustic duo from Chapel Hill
FOR RESERVATIONS, CALL 752-5855
is now accepting applications for the
following positions:
� Advertising Representative
Sports Writer
News Writer
Features Writer
$
This Week's Entertainment
Fri April 12
The Veldt
Saturday April 13
Antiseen
Anyone interested should apply in person at The
East Carolinian office. The office is located on the
second floor of the Publications Building across
from Joyner Library. For more information call
757-6366
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SUPER SAV INC, COUPON FOR A
T FREE
I second set ot prints
� with every disc or roll of color print film brought in tor processing i
! offer good through Apnl 15.1991
ECU Student Store Wnght Bldg.
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4b Pnnts not included
Coupon Must Accompanv Order
Cottonelle Tissue
4 roll pkg
890
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all 2 liter bottles
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Package of 5
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990
OVERTON'S
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n1 jAftvissratT
MOWC Of GMEENVR.U S MST MfATt"
OUAMTITT MQHTS MWftVfO
Open Sundays 12 Noon - 7 pm
Monday - Saturday 8 am - 8:30 pm
Prices Effective Wednesday, April 10
through Saturday April 13,1991
RACK ROOM SHOES
SUTTER'S CREEK PLAZA
95i North Veshn Blvd Rocky Mount, NCI
Phone 9H5 4244
TOWER'S SHOPPING COMPLEX MORFHFAD MARKFT PI A V
352 J Mairlaml Ir Raleigh. NC 49?; Arcnicll St 1or�-he�d I in. NC
Phone 83)5856 phonr M Ml
BUYERS, MARKET
Memorial Drive, Greenville. NC
Phone 355 51�
Football te
rhe Pirai
1
I

a hi
-
By Kerry Nester
Assistant Sports Fditor
Spring football prai bo �
for the Pirates March 27 and wili
conclude Apnl 20 with the annual
Great Pirate PtirpteGoki Pigskin
Pig-Out Partv in Ftckien Stadium
The festivities wiil ��
April 19 with live entertainment,
an appearance from
Mutant inja Turtles; md allthe
barbecue you can eat it pr
be a good time for t
Normallv, the main emphasis
of spnng football ; I
concentrate on fund
blocking and tackling, rather than
the next opponent.
Thisvear,h a
Bill Lewis and his
more experimenting
with position gr ups
"There will be -
mentation in the
tensive lines t sr�:�
someofourvounpi i
get them settled i:
rion Lewis sa
"Some players it th
bac k spots ma ysei - timeinthe
secondarv W re up
our secondarv Spring is a time for and h
observing
Problems in th - try re-
volve around the
ECU
ruggers
to defend
state title
Bv Doug Morris
Statt Writer
The ECU Rugby team a
trvingfor its third i ntie
this weekend, but this year, n
fans will not hav I see
them pla
This peat s state l
will be he'd here a I
Tournament wiil start around 9arn
on Saturdav and Sunday and will
run until 5 p.m.
Twenty tan wffl be paving
on four fields for the O iltegeor the
Club brackets Dui NC-Char-
lotte. UNC -
Appalachain State Uuversih
Guilford College wii a be -
ing for the college champions
Also, Cape Fear. Charlotte
Originals and the Raleigh Vipers
willbeplav I - rob Rack
ets.
ECL' is favoaxi going into the
tournament, with LNC ranked sec-
ond and Guilford College ranked
See Rugby pageiO
Howard Wt '
Plates :� '
Faldo looks to vu
AUGUSTA, Ga AP N
Faldo, seeking an unprecedented
third consecutive titk a the central
figure m the buildup to the Masters
He's under a spotlight with
every word and gesture and tacui
expression analvzed and prated for
hints and hidden meanings and
potential insights
Just outside the glare ot that
high-wattage illumination are the
other members ot what Faldo calls
"the Big Six his old mends pla
mates, competitors � and potential
rivals � from the European Tour
The last tew wars, we ve just
taken turns beating one another.
Faldo said
He will find out this week
whether his rum extends though
another meeting at Augusta, or it
if s now the time for another ot the
Big Six to step forward
At least four ot the other five
men who have cfominated the Eu-
ropean game in recent years have
more than an outside chance ot
blocking Faldo's path to a piece ot
golf history.
Seve Ballesteros (1980, '83) ot
Spain, Bemhard Langer (1965) of
Germany and Sandy Lyle (1988) oi
Scotland all have won mis title be-
fore.
they have
three Mas
and siv oi
But it
ottht
ot S.
Woosnam
� who ma 1
replacing Fakk
the toumai j
dav at the tag
Club
At
mtehisew
I I
lntemahonal tr
won three I I
one in lapc A
setting run-i
OfGoM
VNiththattd
turning his atter
the biggest
have he said
rhe 5-fao
recent winner i
needs only a n
his stature in
temational e
ropean Order
the second tirrj
To be rec
the world), yo





Id!
FILM DEVELOPING
iniim 111 in m in
$tf)l"f
11 H
e you feel like aiKmg.

Come in today
REGISTER
TO WIN!
"�aiMKUatm �: mlt
y
�- �.
SHOES
K In I I
4 H. 1991
dhe l�ast Qlaroltntan
Football team prepares for coming season
B) Kern Nestei
i .1 �
. ' n tball pi i. � �
Marcl vill , . �
km tin ,
irt) in I ii klen Stadium nl
lost I onald l rvh
( hits I I
k'i In
lll
IIK,
pld � nl! . test .1 duringsphng
dnlls
ide ivd ihirl fresh-
man 11' .1 v alkci transfei Mike
ind ii mil �rs 11 .iv is Render
md Iim Marshmon Also,running
hacks i ,n j; Hoyd and Anthony
nan will see plenty of work on
the detensi v p suit
ii 'thei emphasis of the
. ; - 'i iunir tor voung
. irtit tilai kio Msw hohave
Ishirted to ci tmpete for a
ur arsitv team ! ew is
icking position,
i transfei lom i ais
li � im the starring p isition
!l America
,
in. n
I � .1 ll 1�.nh api ears ti
inn 'sit n
ilthi ug� r.il other
ike an
.nils
udei
u ! ,i lor, Robert
�u' sidei the
x ar t.
.

startersare i �
� U's Michael Rhett carries the foot! i m
� �� � I team pr for 1 upcoming
including players at every skilk-d
position, except tor iw wide rv
ceh er spit
At quarterback, the Pirati
turn senior left Blake Last si as m
i ii
ECU
nggers
to defend
state title
IU 1 huiii Mom is
ike started .ill 11 games and ��� is


otball ;
i
� �


- .
� �
� nt, w ithUNi
luilfi rdollege ranked
ECU defeats Tarheels, 3-2
Fil� Photo
� � Rugby page 10
beal '
. � '� , �. nefoi t CU iuesday The
Richmond l-nday
i
Snorts 1 ditoi�.
Sophomore right hand.
1 loward Whitfield pitched hi:
. tletegamein ECl I's3 2victI t ; � � .
erUM hapel Hill ruesda�
"Whitfield lud a remark ilan ei
, crformar e on the moundIn th.
� : 1 fai his most ex eptii .
� In! ! � �
(hrerton said1 . 1 . - .I. � t-n it tli.isi inctum; vviin in.in.iuhv ii
1 he w m avt oged a I 1 loss 1i . . .f
I earliei this season that �
t, �. itra inningsid V:
Whitfield allowed only tin tin i �: , �
runs, one in tin hrst inniiig�
� i innings, and walked a mere�
two batti is i he Pirate di tens'
committed no errors, and II
1 leel runners w ere stranded oi-�
Kls-s.
outstanding defei
field s superb pitching won the'
� r us i h erton said
In the first inning i
en allanigota singleand�
second Hi- reached third on a�
fielder shoice and scored th 1Iitoi -
run of the game on a w ild piu hn 1:
rhe 1 leels did not scon ai i1tiv.
igh until theeighth.andbvthai:
re 5 rambling toct' '�
ii! in behind.i .�
The Pirates took the lead in tl�V, 1irthentl
third with some help from I (.1 l '� .opportune time to a �
pitcher ay MacMillan,who walkedon tlu'
Faldo looks to win third Masters
I il STA, I -a V
seeking an unpre cd
utivi title, isthei entral
the buildup to the Masi
He's under a spotlight, with
. word and gesture and fa il
: ress �n analyzed and probed for
tnd hidden meanings
� � � : il insights
lust outside the glare of that
� wattage illumination an
� - members i t what I a!d
Six his did friends pla
mpetitors andpotential
� . als from the European four
The last few cars W( i isl
� iken turns beating one anothei
lo aid
I le will find out this
� ther his turn extends tl
mother meeting at Augusta or i'
it snow the time tor .mother nt the
iix to stop forward
At least tour of the other five
men who have dominated tin Eu
ropean ynM- in recent years
more than an outside chan e t
blocking I aide's pith t i a pi I
golf hist(r
Seve BaUesteros (1980 B3) of
Spun, Bemhard Langer (1985) t
(lermany and Sandy 1 .vie I lijs,si t
Scotland all have won this title be
fore
' " �
: �

and � � til
Bui
oftht Bij eMariaO izal il
of Spa Ian
f Wall
I
i. I the t h.ltlipi
hurs

( lub
.i . :
hewa
izaba than a d ix n
i � ; ftsarti i lasl veai
� : i tl tents,
one i tnd s ired a n�cord
Withth it tt lundabi m in s novs
turninghisattent I smaiors,
the biggesl targel anyone can
ha v e he sui
fhe 5-foot-4 1 ' � nam i
t w mi .I t � leans also
needs only a major btle to confirm
his statute in golf I le s won ?4 in
ternational events and led the Eu
ropean i )rder of Merit last year tor
the so ond time
To be nt i ignized as No. 1 (in
the v orld), you have to win in the
ih m , m sii.un said,and made
i H he plans to till in that one
s n � il
I .ii . 11 ai pears tobeenv rging
i t�ngth) putting slump dnA
lid he is more omfortable com
nt the I lasters than i have
s
i In mercurial Ballesteiis,
i i two Masti rs and thn.v
nbsh l toens denies, that his in
t in golf has been diminished
� nth a i)ni d roll as
i and fathei
lump hi lid i hree
igo nothing happened until I
iht Britishipen. It can change
id.e
V iti . ideall) suited to
� itional dnd a history of
� i re, he remains a threat
So is Ronan Kattertv. a quietly
competent young man from
orthern Ireland, and a trio of
ustralians
(jo, Norman is the most
prominent, but not necessarily the
t proficient While he led the
American I(.A Tour in monev-
winnings and scoring average last
year, he did not plav particularly
well after a 67 76drubbingbyFakio
in the thud round head -to- head
confrontation in the British (x'n
Winningest
jockey suffers
career ending
auto accident
WOOD �
relati
winningest jocke) in hon
histo
after an i ident
Shoemaker 'suffered sj
injuries, the most oritk hichis
sis of his i
atod with a fracture an
of his neck Shoei
. indy,said inastatemenl
It was not immediately km wn
whether the former rick I
jeopardy of permanent pai
He was alone Mondaj -non
the tour wheel drive vehicle he was
driving overturned anvi rumbled
down a Svtix embankment near
suburbanSywim.as about Wmites
from downtown 1 os Angeles
Shoemaker was ai i sted on
ickwi of drunken driving Re-
sults of a blood alcohol test won t
be available tor about two weeks
the Highway Patrol said
Shoemaker was listed i n serious
condition at Centinela Hospital
Medical Center, known foi itse
See Jockey, page 10





FILM DEVELOPING
� �t44
ng
Rockport
Come in today
. REGISTER �
TO WIN

-
� �r
'
SHO�$
11. 1991
VI
Uu lEaat CLai iiltniau
I ootball team prepares for coming season
Kern -sit-i
-



� : I nthonv
'ken
' ' '
bCU
uggers
:o defend
tate title
'
. � ! I
I
ECU defeat I � - -i

w.
1 Matt M umma
Sports t ditoi
� i '
I
I
I
�tim

� .
: '
I . .
a me on a w ild pil
. I
fhePirat
Rugby
' � d with son
1 lacMillan, vh
Faldo looks to win thii J Masters

i

.
i
H' � '
Ihti � � ng ,it A i
� now the time 1 � ' ' �
� ' '� ; '�
�t least foui 1 " �� i
haved�
'�
in a itski � 1�
1 I'1 'n- ir title '
� histor)�
tei natii nal i
ii 1 Langif Men! ist ear for
(lermany and Sandy 1
�i tland .ill have w �n this tit 1
� � till in thai
i . " , . imp and
pens. d it his in
t in golf I
� �. � , . .i
i fathn
lu lid i
ippeni i until I
� � - tishOi en itant ha
: i lited to
. tional and a histoi I
� i ams .i threat
is Riman Raffert) . quieth
ompetent man t rom
In land and a trio oi
I ilians
C ii . ' man i the mosl
but not n � sai .U the
i , � u ni s htle he led the
ii. PGA 11'iir in miiley
� nnings and oring average l'st
i ,n. he did not pi.is particularly
veil .ittrt )'� '6drubbtngbj I aide
m the tlimt round head to ht-ad
Air out
JIIICh�rry ECU Photo I ,
vin in th : tation in the British t p�n
A local MichaelJordan look a like attempts I
in a game on campus
Winningesl
jock ufi
career end'
auto accident

-

� �
e vi a
the (bur heeldri
drivii

suburbariSanDimas ab �� I H
wntown
m k mak
icion oi drunki
� � blood it .
� ailabk? foi about I
Patrol -
Shoemaker was listi
condition at . entinel
Medical c enter, knov
i Jockey r





10 Phe CantdaroHntan April 11, 1991
Football
Continued from pay 9
and four touchdowns.
At tight end, the Pirates return
senior All-America candidate Luke
Fisher. Last season, Fisher was
named All-South Independent by
the Associated Press.
He caught 35 passes for 534
yards as a junior despite playing
with various injuries. He had a 91-
yard touchdown catch against
Florida State and a 69-yard touch-
down reception against Georgia.
Four starters will return on the
offensive line for the Pirates with
tackles Nick Wilson and Tom Scott,
guard Mike McCalop and center
Keith Arnold rounding out what
should be a very experienced line.
The Pirates have 34 lettermen
returning to the squad next fall and
also a large group of new players
ready to make an impact this the
coming season.
The team will get their chance
earlier than any ECU team ever has
before as they open the year at the
University of Illinois in a nationally
televised game on ESPN. This is the
Rugby
third.
"They're all tough teams se-
nior Pirate rugger Brian Dawson
said. "We've played them before,
though, so we have a really good
chance
The teams will be playing con-
tinuously on four fields: three be-
hind the Allied Healthbuildingand
one behind the Sports Medicine
Center.
The championship games will
0AVIO's
AUTOMOTIVE
Foreign fc Domestic
PARTS ft SHVICf
les ju, id��! i! ar ki.pt iven�H
510 N. CreeneSt.
Greenville, NC
830-1779
The
ORL
SAL
W
CllS'TOM MA'DE
(jC'For appointment call:
f( MScercy at 757-553 j
you ito&&xt
Rjund Tnp� starting at:
Miami-Caracas278
New York-Malaga 578
Chicago-Amsterdam 338
Raleigh-Tokyo 789
Los Angeles-Sydney 995
Greensboro-Paris 715
Greensboro-London 595
Ta-es no! deluded Restnctons apply
f a'es subioci o cnanqe One ways and
icu ;y t?s ava iaBie Work.Study Abroad
programs International Student & Teacher
ID.EURAIL PASSES ISSUED ONI
THE SPOT!
FREE Student Travel Catalog!
" ' Trawd
Council
1A1 Min�K Ctr��
Ninth Street. �
919-286-4664
RUGBY
State Tournament
This Sat. & Sun.
April 13th & 14th
Field by the
Allied Health Building
Come and support the
ECU Rugby team
going for their 3rd straight
State Championship
title
752-7303
ATTIC
In
Pirates first live appearance on the
station.
The exposure afforded our
university through opening our
1991 football season on national
television is certainly substantial
ECU DirectorofAthletksDave Hart
Jr. said.
'If s an excellent opportunity
for our football program and should
create excitement among our
alumni and fans
The game will be moved to
August 31 and will air at 406 p.m.
Continued from page 9
be held on Sunday beginning
around 2-3 p.m
The tournament is sponsored
by the NorthCarolina Rugby Union
who will hold the annual Awards
Banquet Saturday night.
Jockey
Continued from page 9
peruse in sports medicine
and orthopedic surgery.
"Every jockey's greatest
fear is being in a spill and
being permanently para-
lyzed' said Dan Smith, who
co-wrote Shoemaker's 1975
autobiography, "The Shoe
"Shoe led a charmed life in
that regard. He only had two
serious injuries
Shoemaker rode in
40350 races. His last serious
track accident was in 1969,
when he suffered a broken
pelvis and ruptured spleen.
He won the Kentucky
Derby four times and the
Belmont Stakes five. In 1986
he became the oldest Derby
winner.
FOSDICKS
1890 SEAFOOD
756-2011
Lunch only
Small Shrimp
Platter
only
$2.99
Sun-Fri
Beverage not included
Expires: 4-25-91
756-2011
Buy one
Regular Shrimp
Platter at $6.50
Get the 2nd
Regular Shrimp
Platter FREE
Good anytime
Beverage not included
Expires: 4-25-91
(P
The Pure Gold Dancer
Tryouts
A!I you can eat
1
A
s
shrimp and trout
$4.95 M avLiaAl'
(919) 758-0327
105 Airport Road
M-Th llam-8pm F-Sai liam-9pm Sun llan4pmj
��
Introducing
Stock and Custom Ribbons
from Greenville Graphics
Now you have a source for those special oc
casions when only a ribbon will complete -
celebration.
Ribbons have touched all our lives at oru
time or another. From spelling bees to tracl ,
meets, Bible studies to County Fairs, nbboni i
have become part of the American way of hf I
and now Greenville Graphics can supply stocl
and custom printed ribbons to fit almost an ,
occasion.
When only a ribbon will do, see
mwn
1310 E. 10th St. � Greenville
Phone 752-0123 � Fax 752-0620
ECU Recreational Services Presents �
For more information caH 757-4533
April 16-7:00 until 9:00 PM
April 17 - 9:00 until 10:00 PM
April 18 -7:00 until 9:00 PM
in the Memorial Gym
Gymnastics Room

IVcw of War
April 18,1991
Join in the fun at ECU'S Annual Barefoot
on the Mall and show your support to the
Ronald McDonald House.
Teams shall consist of ten members (male, female, co-rec) or
individuals may sign up on The Mall
A minimum $1.00 donation per participant requested

To register YOUR team
contact Kendra Curtis
at 757-6387 or stop by
104 Christenbury Gym
The House tK3 atebuifr
L
AUDITIONS
Ti Q. for Q1
II S ECU 3 0
GOLDEN GIRLS
April 13-14; Sat. 9:00-4:00, Sun 1:00-4:00
Memorial Gymnasium
tiF
Thursday April 11, 1991
The
Surf Report
Surf Shop
'Bikini Classic"
1st - $250.00
2nd - $100.00
3rd - $50.00
Doors Open 8:30
Bogies - 752-4668
The Surf Report (Plaza) - 355-6680
�M
209
East 5th St.
Concert
MCA
Recording
Artist
one
night
only!
"Deaf Gods
of Babylon"
Fri. April 12th
Sat April 13th: Cold Sweat - R&B at its best (opened for Chairmen)
ALLIED BLACKS lor LEADERSHIP and EQUALITY
NOMINATIONS AND ELECTION OF
OFFICERS FOR 1991-92
will be held
Thursday, April 18,1991
7:00 PM 2017 GCB
'If you are not part of the solution,
then you are part of the problem





Title
The East Carolinian, April 11, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 11, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.805
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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