The East Carolinian, April 4, 1991






Stye i�nBt (Earvlxmnrx
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.65 No.22
Thursday, April 4, 1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,(XX)
12 Pages
Eric Hillard wins SGA treasurer election
By I eClair I larper
sistant News t ditoi
� �
ird won the elei
irer Wednesday with
votes
illiarH
xiidb
I ni
iii
uii i sanu
eived 78 votes
e unopposed can-
counted since one
-t 1 pero
Alex Martin
Robin Black
1 lections chair Brvnd.ileisler not turnout todoanvthineabout it
said she was disappointed in the
ti i � imoul because she 1
n plaints about candidates run-
nun; unopposed, but students do
Three hundred ninerv eight
out of 16,000 is pretty pitiful she
said.
1 lilhard agreed v ith (leisler
Scientists study Gulf Stream
Researchers test for return of Red Tide
B I.
Special to
ie Baile)
ast Can linian
itbreakol
with h;ps that frequently travel
through the (lull Stream conduct-
ing other forms ol researt h
"The take water samples tor
red bde �� � - - " fi h usand periodically send them back
rred.n striction tome rester said. She then ana-
f fishn lyzes them for diseased cells and
ree i � reports her findincs to marine i "
mon
Red tide outbreaks arv most
immon in waters off of Florida
;st from earlv summer through I i
nacvcli that runsannually to
once in 14 years, the poisonous al
gaebloomsare transported insl i
The 1987 red tide outbreak off
the toast of Northarolina was the
first occurrence of the species n I
f lacksonville, Fla.
this case, a - tr ng inshore
intrusion by the ill h im along
the ' rthC arolina i tl i ed the
to the shor
Phvsical t.u tors sin h i r l�
: �� � � . mortal
� � ion i - lufort,
rteret
urn
: temp ratures
then �
. . .
iffe ted tl � I �� I � ; lon-
gevity of the hi �i
� it According loai ffii In port
� � � bv the National Marine Fisheries
during the 1987red tide, there were
forma 48 casesofshellfish poisoning from
Over 5 000a res I si. Ill
harvesting waters were Icsed,and
the economic loss to the coastal
communities was estimated at $23
million
. it onl v did the red hdecause
ntai nal ns, but it re ilted in
the fear that all s il xlswerepoi-
soi ed in some way said Patricia
s ler, �n ei � � nrro ntal health
program : � - i � . ththel vision
. - nmental Health in
' ' n head On.
I i .i g ie pi iduces se eral
p ons vvhu h cai mulate in
� � iin Kinds ol shelll
rs ii . lams are
tedby I redtid
area I ov� ler said.
"People didn't realize I
crabs shrimp and othci types of
fish wen af I
A moipi -ram. m
0 Nal nal Ma-
rine i ishw ries, is ii i � r ition.
Al ng witl ester's res- irch,
North � i has a hi t-line
with Florida to di cuss am dev I
oj �� ents
"It Florid bloom or any
important infcrmationaboutit,then
thev contact us fester said.
Spaces still available for ECU-Sorbonne classes
Foreign Language Department offers summer classes in France
Speri.il to TTie I ast Carolinian
Spaces are still available for the
EastC arolina I fruversity-Sorbonne
1W1 Summer Program in Tans,
accord ing to 1 H Martin Schwarz, of
the Department of Foreign Lan-
guages and Literatures who will
direct this year's group.
Ino program will take place
during the second summer session,
June 27-Aug. 2. Participating stu-
dents can earn six semester hoursof
credit
The total cost ' f 'he pros im.
exclusiveof lunch and dinner meals,
will cost approximately $2,600.
Schwarz has said this year's
program will Ix verv exciting. Stu-
dents will take a language course
(after a placement exam) at the
Sorbonne and a culture and civili-
zation course taught bv the program
director.
The latter course will include
study visits to several museums,
cathedrals, monuments, thet peras,
tin -liters and moviesand Versailles.
Students also have the option
of substituting an independent
Study course for one of the above
courses.
Participants will be hve to travel
on weekends For those who do not,
then will be optional organized
activities in and around Pans.
Scholarships are available for
qualified students with an Apnl 15
deadline tor submission. There are
also spaces available for non-stu-
dents who wish to participate on a
noncredH basis.
For more information, contact
Stephanie Evancho's office in
Brew vr A-117, or call 757-676.
Eric Hillard
"It could have been a lot
higher 'he said "1 think the prob-
lem was with the two different trea-
surer ele tions
1 le said he didn't think manv
thought tl ey needed to come up
with a nes way of handling the
elections
He said a new program pn-
post bv president eld t Alex Mar
tin should heli "mg more stu-
dents mvt �lved in elei Hi ns
"1 hop- that it will create more
parbopal � nschool.notjustbCA,
but in s, h ' lilliard said.
Milliard's goals as treasurer
im ludecreatingthepositionofE U
auditor, definii more clearly the
criteria for student groups seeking
mone � h n and irv reasing
the arm ml f SGA 1 from $25
Katie C arstens ,ri-
people realized then' was an elec- Martin was ui ; : - ed in h -
tion today Tl i pecial election for bid forSl.A presidcnt,as was vice
presidential candid in Bla V
and incumbei I '�� n ' irv Katie
treasurer that wascani elled caused
confusion among student he said
Hilhard also said that he Carstcns.
Coll�en Haimbaugh � ECU Photo Lib
Dr Oyeieye Oyediran spoke at ECU last Wednesday on the political
history of his home country, Nigeria
Yearly pap smears can detect cancer
Nigerian
professor
speaks on
choices
By Staccy I.ippincott
Special to The fast Carolinian
A professor from Nigeria sakl
thathiscountry'sgovcrnmentnee' is
more than an institutional svstcm
to make democracy w rkatale I
Wednesday at fenkins line Art
Center
Pr i )yeleyeh ediran, the
Thomas v Rivers Distinguished
Visiting ssor I r � mat
Studies, spoke on "Parliamentary
and Presidential Systems of G
emment: rheNigerianExperience
It was the professi r s iurth public
lecture at ECU
(Vcdiran discussed whether
the parliamentary or presidential
(Pntish or American) system of
government is Km tor democratic
development in the Ihird World
According to Oyediran, hying
to bring a democratic government
to the Third World has intrigued
manv political scientists. Since 1960,
whenNigeria gained independence
Britain, Nigeria hastriedh ith
the parliamentary d presidential
See Nigerian page 3
By Catherine Bush
Peer Health Educator
I lave vou had your yearly Pap
smear?
All females who are sexually
active or over the age of 18 should
have a Tap smear at least once a
year unless told otherwise by their
physician.
The process is simple and can
be performed by a doctor or a nurse
practitioner. A speculum is placed
in the vagina to hold the vaginal
wallsopen so that the cervix may be
seen.
The actual smear is done by
wiping a smooth spatula over the
cervix to get a sample of cells. The
cells are then examined in a labo-
ratory by a specialist.
A Pap smear is done to see
what type of changes are taking
place in the cervix. Pap smears can
detect early cervical cancer, genitals
warts(aindyloma), some infections,
and cellular changesldysplasia) that
can lead to cancer if untreated.
The following can result from a
Pap smear:
� No evidence of abnormal
cells. Only normal cells are present.
� No evidence of cancerous
cells. Cells are essentially normal
buy show a few chances, usually
due to inflammation. I"hese abnor-
malities frequently remrn to nt rmal
following appropriate treatment.
� Cellular abnormalities con-
sistent with a precancerous condi-
tion. These may be due to an infec-
tion, warts, or dysplasia. A
colposcopy (close look at thecervix)
will be performed and if any visible
lesions are present they can be
biopsied and treated
� Cellular abnormalities con-
sistent with a severe precancerous
condition. Colposcopy and appro-
priate treatment will be performed
as needed.
� Cellular abnormalities asso-
ciated with an invasive cancerous
condition. Treatment is needed.
If you have an abnormal Pap
smear vou will be notified bv your
physician or health care provider
and asked to return to discuss vour
Pap results and appropriate treat-
ment.
keep in mind that an abnormal
Tap di not necessarily mean can-
cerous tissue is present. There may
bean infection or even an incont ru-
sive Vp smear.
The following can help prevent
inconclusive 1'ap smear:
� PV not douche for 3 days
before having your Pap smear
� Do not use anv medicine or
foam that gtx?s inside your vagina
for 3 days before having your Vap
smear.
� Do not have sex for 24 hours
before having vour Pap smear.
The Student HealthCenterdoes
give Pap smears at a reduced price
A Pap and pelvic examination costs
$15.
To make an appointment, you
should call at least three weeks
ahead of time. Be sure to keep your
appointment or call a few days
ahead if a cancellation is needed.
Do not schedule vour appomt-
mentdurmgvi m ii Minsk ualperiod.
For moi � information call the
Student Health Center at 7377)4
or come bv the Student Health
Center Resource Room.
INSIDE THURSDAY
Editorial
New basketball coach Eddie
Payne should have time to
establish a winning program.
Features 7
The Soviet Acrobatic Revue,
performed in Wright Auditorium
Tuesday
Classified 6
Sports 9
ECU Pirates lose to NC
State Wolfpack 13-6 in
baseball Tuesday
Comics 12





20JI?e �aat (Earoltnian April 4,1991
crjmfS'ene
Public Safety officers unable to locate
suspicious subject at Minges Coliseum
April 1
0900�ROTC Building: went to locate a subject with the flag.
013�MingesColiseum: responded toa report of a male subject
making obscene gestures toward females. Subject was gone on
arrival
0939�Harrington Field: checked on a suspicious subject, pos-
sibly the one from 0913. Incident was cleared.
1128�Minges Coliseum: responded to a report of a suspicious
male subject returning to the area (reference to 0913). Were unable
to locate subject.
1202�Charles and Ninth streets: assisted Greenville police
with a traffic accident.
1247�Greene Residence Hall (east): responded to a report of
damage to a vehicle.
1455�Minges Coliseum: responded to a report of larceny of
scuba equipment.
1635�Public Safety: took a report of a bicycle larceny that had
occurred at the Biology Building.
2055�Jones Residence Hall (southwest): arrested a motorist for
dnving while intoxicated.
211fv�Mendenhall Student Center (west): issued a verbal
warning for driving on the sidewalk.
2133�Location unknown: issued a campus citation for driving
45 mph in a 15 mph zone.
2214�-College Hill Drive and 10th Street: student given verbal
warning for driving on the wrong side of the street
0052�College Hill Drive: state citation was given for expired
registration.
0140�14th and 12th streets: investigated report of suspicious
activity by two subjects.
0148- �14th Street: transported one subject to the magistrate's
office for having a concealed weapon on campus.
April 2
1504 -Tyler Residence Hall: responded to a report of a male
subject, currently banned, in the lobby. Non-student charged with
trespassing.
1911�McGinnis Auditorium: investigated smoke in the cos-
tume shop. Same was caused by an experiment.
2116�Fletcher Residence Hall: responded to report of loud
music. Same was not found.
2155�Fleming Residence Hall (south): campus citation issued
to student for speeding.
2205 -Aycock Residence Hall (east): state citation issued for no
operator's license.
2316�Jones Residence Hall: responded to a vehicle on fire.
Same was a small fire that did not require the fire department.
0053�Garrett Residence Hall (north): campus citation given to
student for speeding.
0227�Garrett Residence Hall: investigated a visitation viola-
tion on the third floor. Subject was gone on arrival.
� Crime Seme it taken from official Public Safety Log
The E.G. U. School of Music presents:
"An Evening of Original Compositions"
By:
Michael B. Dixon
composer
In Recital
TUESDAY, APRIL 9, 1991
at 8:15 PM
in Wright Auditorium
free admission
open to the public
New Adventures program educates, builds confidence in outdoors I Archaeologists narrow
By Kendra Curtis
Special to The East Carolinian
The New Ad ventures Program
is an experiential education pro-
gram within an outdoor adventure
setting.
The program was started in
1985 when the Pitt County Mental
Health Department and ECU com-
bined efforts to establish what was
then referred to as theRopesCourse.
The course, located on six acres
of wooded area behind the Allied
Health Building, was run though
the Leisure Sciences Department
until the spring of 1990 when it
became part of the program at
Recreational Services.
Currently, the course is under
the direction of Kathleen Hill, who
is the Assistant Director of Fitness
and Outdoor Recreation for Recre-
ational Services. Assisting Hill is a
groupof eight instructors who have
been working with the program for
over a year, and 14 new instructors
who have just finished a 40-hour
training program.
Training for the instructors in-
cludes CPRfirst aid certification,
technical training, group process-
ing and on-the-job experience.
One of the main objectives the
instructors focus on in the program
isdevetopinginterpersonal qualities
suchascourageand prideinoneself.
The program also focuses on
developinginterpersona! skills such
as working with others, communi-
this unusual experience.
The program is open to all ECU
students, faculty, and staff as well
as to the surrounding community.
There have already been 300 par-
ticipants in the program since last
summer including fraternity
groups, work units on campus, Pitt
cation and cooperation. By taking County Mental Health Department
groups of eight or 14 people at a personnel and athletic teams,
time through the course and going In order to go throughout the
through orientationdebriefing program, call 757-6387 three to four
sessions prior to and after the "ex- weeks prior to the desired date. A
perience individuals are able to fee which varies in accordance with
explore their feelings about them- thetypeofgroupgoingthroughthe
selves and others in relationship to course is required as well
College of Charleston students study PTL scandal
COLUMBIA, S.C.(AP) � Col-
lege of Charleston students are us-
ing the Jim Bakker fraud scandal to
learn about business ethics. A law-
suit against PTL's new owner,
MorrisCenillo,could add achapter
to their studies.
Gary Tid well said Tuesday his
business course, "Ethics and Evan-
gelism focuses on the defunct n
ligious empire's questionable busi-
ness practices � the things that
earned Bakker a federal prison sen-
tence.
"We look at PTL from the em-
bryonic stages right up to the
criminal trial" in 1989, he said.
The moral of Ethics and Evan-
gelism is that unethical business
practicesdon'tpavoff. "Thisshows
you can't do things thataredumb
Tid well said.
Cerullo, who rebaptized it New since 1989, when Bakker was tried
Heritage US.A. and sentenced. There is no text-
Tidwcll said he spent Monday book, but rather a 770-page collec-
in Columbia poring through court
documents in the Cerullo case.
Cerullo's Malaysian business
partners, who own 51 percent of
New Heritage, sued him for selling
$300 and $1,000 discount cards for
theme park attractions and hotel
rooms.
They said they never got any
money from the discount cards,
even though they own 51 percent of
the attractions for which discounts
were offered.
A hearing on that case is
scheduled for April 15 in Colum-
bia. Tidwell's class will be there.
"Ours is not to try to engage
ourself in bashing the conduct" of
religious empires, he said. '1 just
Cerullo's dealings appear teach a business course. Hopefully
similar to the way Bakker did the students learn the ability to be
business, Tidwell said. The PTL skeptical in business
estate was purchased last fall by Tidwell has taught the course
tion of trial court documents and
PTL promotional brochures.
Students watch videotapeclips
of PTL Club programs featuring
Bakker and his wife Tammy. They
also attended Bakker's trial in
Charlotte, N.C. A field trip to the
2,200-acre Christian theme park
near Fort Mill is required.
The students analyze PTL's
businessand promotionaldealsthat
were inconsistent with ethical
business practices, Tidwell said.
"We look at not only how Mr.
Bakker committed fraud,butalsoat
the different levels of the PTL or-
ganization he said, adding that
auditors, board members and fi-
nancial officers shared the blame
for the PTL fiasco.
"What I conclude and what the
class concludes is that if the real
culprits were asked to stand up, it
would be a room full of people. For
one reason or another they didn't
do the right thing he said.
The overselling of hotel space
was the core of Bakker's convic-
tions on fraud and conspiracy
charges.
Bakker sold 152,000 fully paid
lifetime lodging partnerships pro-
ducing $158 million.
In exchange for payments of
$1,000 or more, contributors were
promised free lodging during an-
nual trips.
Tidwell previously worked in
the enforcement division of the Se-
curities Exchange Commission in
Washington, investigating ac-
counting fraud and insider fraud
cases.
He said his course has been a
hit ever since he first started teach-
ing it. The course will be taught this
summer and is limited to 30 stu-
dents. "It's already sold out with
pre-registra tion
SJlje SaHtfflarritman
Advertising
Representatives
David Bailey
Greg Jones
Tim Peed
Patrick Pitzer
Director of
Advertising
John K Se-melsberger II
Production Manager
Mary Piland
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
per column inch
National$6.00
Local Open Rate $5.00
Bulk Contract
Discounts Available
Business I lours: Monday - Friday 9:00 - 5:00
757-6366
$29
oo

EYE
EXAM
Introducing
Stock and Custom Ribbons
from Greenville Graphics
Now you have a source for those special oc ,
casions when only a ribbon will complete t
celebration. !
Ribbons have touched all our lives at on j
time or another. From spelling bees to tracV ,
meets, Bible studies to County Fairs, ribbons
have become part of the American way of lift j
and now Greenville Graphics can supply stocV
and custom printed ribbons to fit almost an
occasion.
When only a ribbon will do, see
1310 E. 10th St. � Greenville
Phone 752-0123 � Fax 752-0620
� linn
m
MM
rrnrv!
AND BUY ONE
GET ONE FREE!
The Optical Palace has joined the
Optometric Eye Care Center Family
To celebrate, we are offering you:
-a complete professional eye exam
for $29 (contact lens exams and
fittings extra)
AND
-Buy one pair of glasses at regular
price and get a second pair free
Call our office to schedule your $29 eye exam, or
just stop by to check out our wide selection of
frames.
Offer valid through April 26, 1991
(Some restrictions apply)
oHOMenuc
�Y�CAR�C�KT�R
PA
YOU'LL LIKE THE WAY WE CARE FOR YOUR EYES
YOU'LL LIKE THE WAY WE CARE FOR YOUR EYES
Dr. Lewis L. 703 E. Greenville Blvd. Gary Hams
�ae� 756-4204
Optometrist
Licensed
Optician
The Student Union Productions Committee
And The RHA Present
Try your luck at poker,
blackjack, roulette,
and craps!
CeSfoW
Prizes H be auctioned off
(You could even win a VCR )
-Admission is FREE and refreshments are provided!
Monday, April 8th at 8pm
in the Mendenhall Multipurpose room
Qotden & v Notiono� Honor Society
�Chartering reception is April 23, 1991
�Two scholarships will be presented to
outstanding junior and senior members
?Career assistance including over 150
corporations with career opportunities
Deadline to Join: April 10, 1991
ST. ANN'S BAY, Jamaica (AP)
� Archeologists believe they may
soon find the 500-year-old remains
ofrwoshipsChristopherColumbus
and his crew lived on for more than
a year while marooned on Jamaica.
The caravels, the Capitana and
the Santiago de Palos, were the last
ships Columbus commanded and
would be the first recovered.
Columbus abandoned the ves-
selsfastened side-by-sideon a beach
when he and his crew of 115 were
rescued from Jamaica on July 29,
1504, at the end of his ill-fa ted fourth
voyage. He died in Spain two years
later.
The Capitana and the Santiago
de Palos are thought to be buried
under water, mud and sand at St.
Ann's Bay on Jamaica's northern
coast about 45 miles northwest of
Kingston. Attempts to find the ships
began in the 1930s.
Now, with sonar and probing
equipment and research of histori-
cal documents, nautical archaeolo-
gists have narrowed the search to a
relatively small portion of the Day.
They hope to recover at least
some the ships' a-mains by next
year, the 500th anniversary of Co-
lumbus' first voyage.
Nigerian
systems of government.
The parliamentary system oi
government was used first,because
of the strong influences of the Brit-
ish government.
After 1979, Nigerians debated
about if the presidential system of
government would be better than
their current system.
One point of argument was
whether the failure of the British
parliamentary system was due to
the men who operated the system
or due to the public.
In 1979 Nigeria experimented
Project directoj
of the Institute of h
ologvatTexasA&M
his chances, "on a'
an eght
Parrentbelievej
good of finding well
remains because t
aground in soft sedj
low water.
St. Ann's Bav i
coral reef, but the
altered over the ct
canes, eart ho, uakt-
positsof sand and
On a recent v
Ywone Edwards
National Heritage
in the project, saw
shi ps could be a bo
the island
Notonh
J
the first recovered
bus ship, thev wol
from a known carat
The sail i
speed and maneul
pelled much Span
guese exptor
16th centuries, but
about how they a el
No architecturl
caravel have bee
with the Am� -
tern of governmei
way the executive
shtuted. But in lwd
power of trie parliai
returned, and it
power until iZ
Ovediran di
takes more than justj
svstem to run a govei
government require
presidential and par!
of government.
Ovediran state!
was a variable labl
The East Carolinian is now a
forget-me-not cards, but we
Please make all deliveries to the
Building, across fro
.�
R A





(Efte lEaBt (Carolinian April 4,1991 13
fidence in outdoors I Arcliaeologists narrow search for Columbus' ship
the
r.im
thi unusual experience
I "he program in open to all ECU
students facuh) and staff as well
� �unding community.
here have alread) been VX) par-
in the program since last
irti luding fraternity
rk units on campus, Pi�
it Health Department
, . J ithletk teams.
ler hi go throughout the
' tvW7threetorbur
. . , desired date. A
sin accordance with
Ding through the
- � is well
dv PTL scandal
people tor
� they didn't
. ;aid
� hotel space
akker s convic-
onspiracy
m' fully paid
lerships pro-
� pa ments of
� ibutors were
during an-
worked in
ion of theSo-
mmission in
hgating ac-
der traud
as Ixvn a
tarted teach-
� tught this
d to ; I stu-
- ut with
00 EYE
EXAM
1) Bl Y ONE
ONE FREE!
2d Palace has joined the
: Eye Care Center Family
we are offering you:
ete : :ssional eye exam
ams and
AND
hj pair of glasses at regular
a a second pair tree
exam, or
tion of
i
iume restrict appK i
0PTOM�miC
CAR� C�KT�rPA
THE WA Wf I ARI KjK o-r EYES
llliw VVI CARI FOR YOUR EYES
i . Greenville Illd. Gary Hams
Licensed
Optician
756-4204
hi Honor Society
April 23, 1991
ie presented to
senior members
iding over 150
er opportunities
pril 10, 191
ST. ANN'S BAY, Jamaica (AP)
� Archoologists believe thev may
soon find the 500-year-old remains
erf two shipsChristopherCohirnbua
and his crew lived on for more than
a year while marooned on Jamaica.
The caravels, the Capitana and
the Santiago de Palos, were the last
ships Columbus commanded and
would bo the first recovered.
Columbus abandoned the ves-
sels fastened sido-bv-sideon a beach
when he and his crew of 115 were
rescued from Jamaica on July 29,
1504,at the end of his ill-fated fourth
voyage. 1 ledied in Spain two years
later.
The Capitana and the Santiago
de Palos are thought to be buried
under water, mud and sand at St.
Ann's Bay on Jamaica's northern
coast about 45 miles northwest of
Kingston Attempts to find the ships
began in the 1930s.
Now, with sonar and probing
equipment and research of histori-
cal documents, nautical archaeolo-
gists have narrowed the search to a
relatively small portion of the bay.
Thev hope to recover at least
some the ships' remains by next
year, the 500th anniversary ol Co-
lumbus' first voyage.
Project director James Parrent
of the Institute of Nautical Archae-
ologvatTexas A&M University rates
hischanees, "ona scale of oneto 10,
an eight
Parrent believes thechancesare
good of finding well-preserved hull
remains because the caravels ran
aground in soft sediment and shal-
low water.
St. Ann's Bay is sheltered by a
coral reef, but the beach has been
altered over the centuries by hurri-
canes, earthquakes, erosk n and do-
posits of sand and sediment.
On a recent visit to the site,
Ywone Edwards of the Jamaica
National Heritage Trust, a partner
in the project, said the Columbus
ships could be a boon to tourism on
the island.
Not onlv would the remains be
the first recovered from a Colum-
bus ship, thev would be the first
from a known caravel, Parrent said.
The sailing vessel, noted for its
speed and maneuverability, pro-
pelled much Spanish ,md Portu-
guese exploration in the 15th and
16th centuries, but little is known
about how thev were built.
No architectural plans of the
caravel have boon found. Parrent
Nigerian
systems of government.
The parliamentary system of
government was used first .because
of the strong influence's of the Brit-
ish government.
After 1979, Nigerians debated
about it the presidential system of
government would be better than
their current system.
One point of argument was
whether the failure of the British
parliamentary system was due to
the men who operated the system
or due to the public.
In 17 Nigeria experimented
with the American presidential sys-
tem of government because oi the
way the executive power was con-
stituted. But in 1983, the mil.iaiy
power of the parliamentary system
returned, and it plans to stay in
power until 1992.
Ovediran discovered that it
takes more man just the institutional
system to run a government A stable
government requires more than the
presidential and parliament systems
of government.
Ovediran stated that Nigeria
was a vanable lab tor democracy
hopes to learn much about the
vessel's design and technical capa-
bilities, possibly settling some of the
scholarly debate about its role in
Europe's expansion.
Artifacts could also provide
new insights into shipboard life in
the early 16th century and the ways
of the Arawak Indians who traded
with Columbus, the archaeologist
said.
Columbus' fourth voyage be-
gan from Spain on April 3, 1502,
withfourcaravelsand a crew of 140.
He was looking for a western pas-
sage to the Orient and its gold, silk
and spices.
Having abandoned two of his
leaky caravels off Panama, Colum-
bus deliberately ran the Capitana
and the Santiago de Palos aground
on Jamaica and built huts on them to
house the crew while they awaited
rescue.
The stranded Europeans, their
numbers reduced to 116, survived
for one vear and five days on fcxxi
provided bv local Arawaks.
Thev were rescued by two ships
summoned from neighboring
Hispaniola, which is now the island
shared bv 1 laid and the Dominican
Republic.
Continued from page 1
and a new project ism the works for
a suitable democratic system of
government.
'The project has advanced, "
sivs Ovediran. "The road is nar-
row, the gtvils aw clear, and the
determination is ever present
Ovediran began his 12- month
professorship in January. As a
graduate of the University of lin-
den and the University of Pitts-
burgh, he is the author of seven
bxxiksand articles on Nigerian poli-
ties. He has also served on govern-
mental commissions in Nigeria.
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i I i
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Prices In This Ad Effective Throui Tuesday. April 9 1991 In Wenbuic County! n Greenville Only
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Stye �a0f (Earolmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Joseph L. Jenkins Jr General Manager
Michael D. Albuquerque, Managing Editor
Blair Skinner, Nm Editor LeClair Harper, test. News Editor
Matt King, Features Editor Stuart Oliphant, test. Features Editor
Matt Mumma, Sports Editor Kerry Nester, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy Edwards, Copy Editor Jason Johnson, Copy Editor
Doug Morris, Editorial Production Manager Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Jeff Parker, Staff Illustrator Stuart Rosner, Systems Engineer
CHRIS Norman, Darkroom Technician Phong Luong, Business Manager
Carla Whitfield, Classified Ads Technician Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Ti �aCwmiu has served the East Caroh
ECl I students Dunng the ECU school year. The East Carolinian publishes twice a week wah a c.rculation of 12,000. The East
C arohman reserves the nght to refuse or d.scontmue any advertisements that discnminate on the bas.s of age. sex. creed or
national origin. The masthead ed.tonal in each edition does not necessarily represent the v.ews of one individual but rather
is a majority opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of v.ew Utters should
be limited to 250 words or has. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit letters for
pubhcat.on. Utters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg. ECU Greenville N C
27834; or call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Thursday, April 4, 1991
Payne must be given time to develop
With appointment of Eddie Payne as the new
head basketball coach last week, the university has
official closed the book on Mike Steele's coaching
career at ECU.
It seems Mr. Steele was just another in the
string of here-a-while-and-then-gone coaches that
began in the mid70s. And it is this string that has
been plaguing the Pirate basketball program for the
past two decades.
This is not to say that the Athletic Department
was not justified in its decision to fire Mr. Steele,
although they never did make their reasons public.
However, Mr. Steele's time here is finished,
and we should look at what our new coach has to
offer. And Mr. Payne's list of accomplishments is
rather impressive:
� In Charlotte at East Mecklenburg in High
School he earned all-city, all-county and all-state
honors during his senior vear.
� He was a walk-on at Wake Forest University
(1 970-73), where he later earned a scholarship and, in
his senior year, was named Wake Forest's Most
Valuable Player, received the Wake Forest Out-
standing Athlete Award and was selected for the
Atlantic Coast Conference All-Tournament team.
�He played professionally in France (1973-74).
� He served three years as a graduate assistant
coach at Clemson University (1975-78) while work-
ing toward hi� Masters of Education degree.
� He was head coach and athletic director at
Truett-McConnell College in Georgia, where he led
the team to the league championship with a 25-5
record and wasnamed Georgia JuniorCollegeCoach
of the Year by the Atlanta Tip-Off Club.
� He was assistant coach at ECU (1979-81)
under Larry Gilman (1979) and Dave Odom (1980-
81), During that time, the Pirates went an even 40-40.
� He was head coach and Athletic Director at
Belmont Abbey college (1981-86) where he compiled
a 103-52 win-loss record and was twice selected
NAIA District 26 coach of the year (1984 and 1986).
� He comes to the Pirate program from South
Carolina where he spent the last five years as an
assistant coach under George Fclton, also a former
assistant coach at ECU.
The biggest question in the minds of Pirate
fans, of course, is will he be able to make ECU win.
Only rime will tell.
But, perhaps more importantly ishow long will
he stav.
Since 1974 only two coaches, Mr. Steele and
Charlie Harrison, have been at ECU for more than
three years. Mr. Harrison staved from 1982-1986
with a 51-92 record and coached the worst season
that Pirate basketball has ever faced: the 1983-84
season when the Pirates went 4-24 (.143).
This trend contributes to theargument that Mr.
Steele was not given enough time to turn the ECU
program around.
It takes more than a couple of years to build a
winning basketball program.
Coaches need to recruit good plavers, teach
them how to plav at the college level and allow them
to grow into their talents. And it is harder for coaches
to recruit good players to a program that does not
have a winning tradition. This type Or commitment
takes more than three or four seasons.
Not since Tom Quinn (1966-73) has an ECU
basketball coach been given enough time to take
control of the team and turn it around. Mr. Quinn
started with a team that had gone 32-45 over the
previous three years and created a winning ECU
basketball tradition.
So how long will Mr. Payne be here? Unfortu-
nately, there are no soothsayers in Eastern North
Carolina jumping forward to answer, so we will
have to wait and see.
It would be a Pirate dream-come-true if Mr.
Payne turns out to be as good as Howard Porter
(1947-58), the wmningest Pirate basketball coach of
all time, who never had a losing season in his entire
tenure as coach.
But if the ECU basketball program does not
instantly pick up and the Pirates are not Colonial
Athletic Association champions next year, Mr. Payne
should be allowed some time to show his true mettle.
Letters To The Editor
ECU student
questions cause
of problems
To The Editor:
After reading the Letters
To The Editor section in the
March 25 issue, I was inspired
to write about Mr. Ronald
Mercer's No. 1 grievance
against ECU.
I agree that if the light in
the commuter parking lot was
of f then it certainly should ha ve
been on.
At the same time, it was
dark outside; was this student
so oblivious to hisher sur-
roundings that heshecould not
see the car's headlights? This is
a horrendous problem on ECU's
campus.
Students, thelifeline of this
(and all other) universities, walk
through this campus like they
are in another world, taking for
granted that drivers will see
them and stop.
It's absolutely amazing to
me that more students aren't hit
bycarsonthiscampusasa result.
This is a common occur-
rence in all parking lots, but it is
very prominent in front of and
behind Brewster Building,
where there are a lot of students
coming to and from the dorms.
I, myself, have witnessed
a student crossing 10th Street
during the 1 p.m. lunch hour
when traffic is very heavy, and
this student never once looked
anywhere but straight ahead
� causing several cars to (lit-
erally) hit their brakes.
Of course, we all know
that pedestrians always have
the right of way, no matter
where you are, but if Mr.
Mercer is so concerned about
ECU "sweeping things under
the rug maybe he should
think twice about the cause of
some of ECU's problems.
Julie Toler
Physics Department
Lets Be Adamant
Euro-centric thinking promotes 'Big Lie'
By Darek McCullers
Editorial Columnist
In one reader's response to
one of my recent articles, she made
a statement that generally articu-
lates the white way of thinking.
It is indicative of what a
prominent Indian author calls the
Big Lie. It is a Euro-centric way of
viewing things. It is the notion
that all good things came from the
White Anglo Saxon Protestant.
This is the notion that Afri-
can-Americans and other majori-
ties (the people of color in this
world are a majority) owe this op-
pressive and hypocritical minor-
ity everything that is good. This
notion will not stand up to the
facts.
It seems ironic that white
people always seem to think that
they have theanswerforevervone
else's problem, but thev can't see
their own.
In one of mv classes, a stu-
dent pointed out the irony in the
governments proposed solution
to African problems of famine and
scarcity
Thegovemment had a multi-
faceted proposal that included
encouraging the use of modem
technology, "correct" govern-
mental policies and encouraging
the small farmer.
The irony is that this white-
controlled government has failed
the small farmer here in America.
The use of technology in America
has made it impossible for the
small farmer to exist.
This government's policies
are not beneficial to most of its so-
called citizens. They considered
correct policies to be reducing or
eliminating social services, con-
verting from food crops to cash
crops (this goes to pay off foreign
debt and does not put food in the
mouths of Africans) and conver-
sion to a so-called democratic and
capitalist system of government.
These stringent require-
ments are put upon the African
nations before they can receive
money from the International
Monetary Fund of the World Bank,
which receives 25 percent of its
funding from the United States, or
the U.S. Agency of International
Development.
Itcameout in class that many
of these strings that they attach
are easy and proper to obtain by a
developed nation, but not for one
that is underdeveloped.
These conditions are inap-
propriate and only perpetuate the
dependency of these African na-
tions to the Western powers of
exploitation, domination, and co-
lonialism.
Indian author Alvin Josephy
brings out the fallacy of the white
man's presuppositions in his book
Red Power.
While talking about the
white man's method of oppres-
sion, he states, "Hedhewhite man)
has recognized (the problems)
though usually not recognizing
that he created them himself and
has tried an unending variety of
methods to solve them. The
methods have had one goal in
common: solution, to the white
man, meant forcing (people of
color) into the mainstream of the
dominant culture's way for life �
turning them into a white
This book is excellent be-
cause it exposes and breaks down
the case for the Big Lie.
This reader commented that,
"Most of the rights and responsi-
bilities claimed and enjoyed by
today's African-Americans origi-
nate in notions of law and justice
conceived and practiced bv the
Anglo-Saxon. . All the world we
call "free "owes an enormous debt
to Anglo-Saxon culture. There are
two problems that make this ar-
gument typical of the Big Lie.
An accurate portrayal for
history would reveal that the
legacy of freedom goes back to the
tribal structure, where the chief of
whatever the titular head was
called, was an instrument of the
people and not a dictator to the
people. This structure was used
by Africans and Native Ameri-
cans.
Josephy stated, "To Vitona,
Crotius, Locke, Montaigne,
Montesquieu, Boltaire and
Rousseau, (who were the reat
white political thinkers) Indian
liberty and self government pro-
vided a new polcstar in political
thinking This is t he true origin of
democracy.
The second part otthe fallacy
is how we think about freedom
The whites seem to thin tnat
freedom exists in the absence rj
slavery and Jim-Crowism These
people do not understand that
freedom is not tied tocourt rulings
and legislation.
Freedom can't be defined
through an abstract concept such
as opportunity. It is about power
Clvde Warrior, who was the
president of the National Indian
Youth Council in 17, made an
eloquent crv in his statement titled
"We Are Not Free"
He said, "There was great
material deprivation in thoJavy
but our old people felt rich because
they were free. We are poor in
spirit because we are not tree �
free in the most basic sense ot the
word. We are not allowed to make
those basic human choices and
decisions about out personal lite
and about the destinv of our
communities which is the mark of
free mahire people Our lives
pass us by without our desires w
aspirations havinganv eftext We
are not free. We do not make
choices. We are the poor
Therefore, I sav that it is time
for the people of color to awaken
It is time to promote unitv.
We must recognize that we
are a nation and exercise the
principles of Black Nationalism
That is to say that we take control
of the politics, economics and
education for our communities
This is the method by which we
will obtain our freedom.
Campus Spectrum
Vice Chancellor responds to recent editorial
1 wish to correct several er- torial, however, was the statement
rors of fact contained in your thatl500,000worthoflightinghad
March 28, 1991 editorial regard- been paid out of the Traffic and
ing the proposed vehicle registra- Parking Fund. This is absolutely
tion fee increases. untrue.
1 appreciate your opinion TheGeneralAdministration
that user fees should indeed be
expended in a manner directly
related to the services being pur-
chased. While not every expense
clearly falls into one category or
in any significant way under the
current fee structure
We must also now go back
and improve the appearance of
existing lots with attractive land-
scaping even though some believe
that campus beau tit icarion isa tnll
we should ignore. I do not share
that opinion.
Pa vi ng existing d i rt lo ts costs
approximately $1,000 per space
including landscaping, lighting
and curbing.
This is cheap compared to
parking decks which will cost ap-
B tO
of UNC provided stateappropria
tions of $500,000 to re-lamp the
entire campus to improve safety
with a large portion of those funds
being used to enhance lighting in
another, certainly the principle our parking lots
should apply. In addition, the campus in-
Indeed, bookkeeping and vested $78,000 of non-parking
management controls have been funds to expand the project to the .k .
significantly improved to cause point necessary. Residence halls �x,nL7y$10 o����
eachexpensetocomeundermuch and athletics paid for specific construct
closer scrutiny in the future. I am lighting associated with their fa-
personally making that commit- cilities above that.
Not one penny of traffic
funds were used for this major
improvement that most definitely
addresses the concerns of those
individuals parking on our cam-
pus.
The proposed ' &inaf WUI ae
behavior"oncampusforthosewho vehicle registration feeTis'wiuV jV
adhere to the rules and to impose out a doubt an issue requiring rn���L. 8 ' "
Hte �i j Huinng committee encourages students,
dete,consultationandcornrnon faculty and staff tobm.t con-
sense. oh, .�
ia� l structive recommendations re-
land EL2T n tmpUS' 8Mdln� Proposed fee struc-
SZT "andor�odsfortmprov
dennal or commercial property
ment.
Regarding last year's in-
crease in fines, the motivation was
not merely to bring our fines in
line with other institutions (al-
though that was a result), it was to
encourage appropriate parking
Certainly we have many op-
tions, but each has a cost.
We have a choice of living
with the conditions we have to-
day and seeing them steadily
worsen or we can make a bold
step forward and fund a progres-
sive program that will deal effec-
higher penalties for those who
disregard the rights of others and
in the process increase costs of
enforcement.
Your reference to meter col-
� jj.
lections being used for a "couple Vacant land is at a premium,
of Public Safety cookouts" does Parking must compete
not indicate that the amount refer- against the need for additional fa-
enced was approximately $10 to cilities.
$15 and occurred under a prior When land becomes avail-
administration, able we must be in a position to
The major error in your edi- purchase it, and we cannot do so
ng parking on campus.
Please take advantage of that
opportunity while the consulta-
tion process is occurring.
Richard Brown
v�ceChancelloTfor
Rainess Affairs
Displaced K
freezing, st
DIANA, Iraq APi . Fleeing
government foro - ��
branded
Wednesday in snow-capped
mountajj . Itt.r
fworkerss
porte .
:� ire
-
libonal homeland
� i
gees have ptk
border, but
not allowed ,
Refuj
Turf
T � I
column I
streli �
aloi
mounts
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� - MRM HWIOi � �r . � t - .
KKatMMl ��- m ttw �rwmc &
- a�
-
mc T R K F
Smoked
Turkey Breast
5-oz. Pkg.
Thompson White
Seedless Grapes
GOLDEN RIPE
Dole
Bananas
IN THE DAIRY CASE" CHILLED
Minute Maid
Orange Juice
FRITO LAV
Chee-tos or
Chee-tos Lights
NONRETURNABLE BOTTLE,
CAFFEINE FREE DIET COKE.
CAFFEINE FREE COCA COLA CLASSIC.
Diet Coke or
Coca Cola Classic
$109
Utr.
IPAK 12-0Z. CANS
iJ






MOKWAVS
.n UP Fo.
n just
Too FAX f
Sr?e gaat (Carolinian April 4, 1991 5
V- �-�

promotes 'Big Lie'
I
pectrum
i iu tatof to thel
�Mn hire was usedl
' Native A men -
ited To Vitoria,
ke Montaigne
Mire and
were the great
kers) Indian!
mi men t prcv
estar in political)
the Horignof
� t the fallacy
- ut freedom.
seem to think tnat
i n the absence of
� - .ism These
rstand that
(tied! mifl rulings
li ' be defined
�� i I "i i pt such
It ibout power
A .irner who was the
inal Indian
in ' 3�7, made an
� itcment ti tlcxi
- as great
� II thosedays,
� � H nth because
� poor in
X tree
- � � i - nse ot the
I tO make
�. ik rs and
ersonal life
destiny of our
the mark of
pie it lives
r 1'M res or
�tit t We
not make
��. poor
: 'i I viv that it istime
r to awaken
� rm '� unity
� re ognize that we
ind - re ise the
f Black N ahonalism
� i� a. take control
ei onomtCS and
ur . immunities.
� (hod by which we
A ir freedi m
ds to recent editorial
:
�tth. M
' ghttngin
- in
non-park
le project to the
Residence halls
for sp- ifii
with their fa
inv of tratti,
for this major
tost definitely
Eerns of those
g on our cdm-
d in rease in
t es is with
Isue requiring
i and common
Irhan campus,
J sides hv resi
rcial property
jprvmium.
ist compete
additional fa-
romes avail-
� position to
cannot do so
in any sigi ifit ant way under the
� '� � "r-n hire
. t ,iso now go hack
improve the appearance of
� th attractive land-
though some believe
pus beautincationisa frill
� ! Ao not share
pinion
i � e; existing dirt lots costs
r $1,000 per space
indsi aping, lighting
and curt
this is (heap compared to
� . leeks whit h will cost ap-
proximately $10,000 per space to
construi t
( erfainlv we have many op-
tions, but each has a cost
�'�� have a choice of living
with the conditions we have to-
day and seeing them steadily
worsen or we can make a bold
step forward and fund a progres-
sive program that will deal effec-
tively with our problems.
The Parking and Traffic
ommittee encourages students,
faculty and staff to submit con-
structive recommendations re-
garding the proposed fee struc-
ture and or methods for improv-
ing parking on campus.
Please take advantage of that
opportunity while the consulta-
tion process is occurring.
Richard Brown
Vice Chancellor for
Business Affairs
Displaced Kurdish refugees
freezing, starving in Iraq
DIANA, Iraq (AP) Fleeing
mment forces, several million
Kurdish refugees were stranded
Wednesday in snow-capped
mountains without food or shelter,
� workers said Many were re
d dying of starvation and ex-
po ure
-al
'�Vl1 e exodus has
en ptied map r cities in their
I were trying
- � border but ap-
i this I n 25
i - ercalled
the
i to three rr
li
.
ng in the
ditions.
a hit hare ��
avc run
?eofthe
perl irrned
- -
led
-
� �led
phot � litt1
hanci - ival.
A � � n I Hana said
. lied i t
' i ' nd posure,and many

ft usands � - �.
gees have piled up by the Iranian
border, but "our neighbors have
not allowed a single person in
Refugees a a also trying to get into
Turkev
The refugees formed a solid
column of more than o) miles
stretching from theoutskirtsot Hrbil
along twisting roads into the
mountains as far as Diana. Thev
were packed hghtlvintoall manner
of vehicle, some riding in carts, still
others on mules.
Whole families trudgedon foot,
carrying whatever they could. Chil-
dren .is y iung as age 5 carried ba-
bies strapped to their backs One
paraplegic was being laboriously
pushed uphill in a wheelchair.
Refugees said thev had been
.itt.i. ked by helicopter gunships n
�� r way oul of Erbil, which rs310
s north of Baghdad, and many
were killed.
! hey pleaded with foreign re-
pt rt rs for help, each echoing the
same appeal:
"We ni-ed help. The helicop-
ters are killing us. Wehaveno food.
We will d � Why is the I nited Ma
tit ns doing nothing to help us?"
said a young woman engineer, hi r
vok e (hoking with emotion.
Fhe Kurds' month-old upns-
ing was launched in the wake ol
Iraq's defeat in the Persian Gulf
War. It was the latest in a series ot
unsuccessful rebellions thiscenfury
by Kurds seeking autonomy in their
ancestral homeland, whichencom-
passes parts of Iran, Turkey, Iraq
and Syria.
In New York on Tuesday,
France sought to focus attention on
the Kurds' plight with a proposal
that the United Nations push for
pom talks between the Iraqi gov-
ernment and rebels it has fought
since being defeated by the US-led
allied coalition.
That would include the Shiite
Muslims in southern Iraq.
But discussion on the proposal
was postponed until after the Secu-
rity Council votes on a resolution
setting stiff terms for a permanent
cease-fire in the Persian Gulf War.
Turkey, facing a flood of
Kurdish refugees, also sought a so-
lution to the bloodshed but the
United States did not appear to be
offering any proposals or issuing
any warnings that might end the
strife
Washington has urged Iraqis
to topple Saddam Hussein. But it
has turned down rebel pleas for
military and hum.init.inan aid. not
wishing to be drawn into Iraq's in-
ternal turmoil.
Rebels have repeatedly accused
members of the U.Sled allies, es-
pecially the United States, of aban-
doning them hv not enforcing the
temporary cease-fire Kin on Iraq
using its aircraft tor military mis-
sions.
The official Iraqi News Agencv
predicted Tuesday that a few mote
days would beenoughtostampout
the fighting in the north with
Kurdish rebels.
Rodney Siren and� ECU Photo Lab
Just playing it safe
Although he was running unopposed. Student Government Association presidential candida'e
Alex Martin, who is currently the speaker of the house, campaigned near the polls Wednesday.
Copy of Declaration of Independence found
NEWYORK(AP) A pristine
copy of the Declaration ot Inde-
pendence printed on July 4, 177ft,
was discovered tucked behind a
painting bought for 54 at a flea
market and may fetch more than SI
million, an auction house saj s.
Arhiladi Iphuihnano llanaivst
bought the old, torn painting of a
country scene two summers ag i in
Adamstow n. Pa because he liked
the wood frame, said David Redden,
vice president of Sotheby's, which
authenticated the document
When tin. man removed the
painting, the frame fell apart and he
found a tolded-up document. Red-
den said.
SPRING
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Bananasw ibs JL
"IN THE DAIRY CASE" CHILLED
Minute Maid O $9
Orange Juiceim-oz. w
FRITO LAY
Chee-tos or QQ
Cheetos Lightsa�, irw
NONRETURNABLE BOTTLE,
CAFFEINE FREE DIET COKE,
CAFFEINE FREE COCA COLA CLASSIC,
Diet Coke or A
Coca Cola Classic
$109
"When wedxscussed the value,
he was completely stunned Red-
den said.
Sotheby'seshmated thecopv is
�wor1h$800jOOOk$1 IwriSkm. Ihe
auction house will otfer it tor sale
June 4. In January Ism1, another
cop of the Declaration of Indepen-
dence sold for a mcord $139 mii-
bon
The owner wishes to remain
anonymous and turned down an
interview request relayed bv
Sotheby's.
Redden said the document is
one oi 24 known su ryi ving copies I li
the Declaration of Independence
madebva Philadelphia printer, John
LXinlap, on the day theContini
press adopted the declaration.
rhe document ts 1512 inches
bv H V4 inches oi slightly yel-
lowed rag paper printed in black
ink.
"Here was the most important
single printed page m the world in
the most spectacularly beautiful
condition said Redden
It took one sect �id to know it
was ne,ht. But what rea"v aston-
ished us was the conchtior - so
fresh, SO clean
Redden speculated Dunlap
printed 200 copies for distribution
to government leaders, the Armv
and throughout the 13colonies.
H Z
All von can e;it
shrimp and trout
$4.95
h
M-Ili
VjALjOfAMEAL
(919)758-0327
105 Airport Road
am-8pm F-Sal liam-9pm Sun ll;un-4pm
2-Ltr.
MAK 12 07 CANS





6
SI?e gast (Sarultnuin
April 4, 1991
'� : .&-�$: y yjxS'iV V:
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES
rerm papers, dissertations, letters
resumes, manuscripts, projects. Fast
rum around Call loan 756-9255.
TYPING Call 155-3611 after 5:30
p m or leave message. S1.35page,
includes proofreading, spelling,
grammar check Familiar with all
formats (.h�t 15 years experience
FOR RENT
Want female non-smoker
to share I 3 ol expenses (SI 13 plus
phone and utilities) on two bedroom
apartn i nt foi summer and 'or next
APARTMENT HK SUMMER
SI SSIONS Female wanted to share
m, 2 1 '2 bath
�nt W D, DW AC Access
us courts! Call im-
!�.
i U i IV;
HS Elizabeth.
DOl BLEW1D! 1KA1LER on pri-
vatch tforn nl in area Call459-9355
iftei 5 V p m
ROOMMATE WANTED: Looking
: ma r non sm ker to share 2 bed-
oom, fullv furnished apartment for
summer. Qosetocampus. Call Kevin
Hr.jA at 355-8372.
ROOMMATE WANTED to sharca
i bedroom townhouse, Siw
FOR RENT
month plus 1 3 utilities. Nonsmoker
preferred Call 355-0966.
LOOKING FOR a female non
smoking roommate who is neat and
responsible, willing to pay half of
$475 plus utilities for next year. Call
931-7301.
NEED TWO female roommates to
share Georgetown apt Prefer non-
smoker CSl2750month plus utili-
ties). Needed during May. Ask for
Karen at 752-1585.
ROOM AVAILABLE Fir River,
S150month plus 1 2 utilities, 1 1 2
bath, fully furnished, C Available
for both summer terms. Call Eric at
830-5206.
NET DEI) One or two people to
sublet apartment I bednm Lose
to campus, possil leto release
S255.00month : us ul ties Call
757-0609 AsP '
FOR SALE
Will accept best offer tor all items
Call 758-7099 for details.
EOR SALE Brand new moped and
helmet (used only " months'). 57 r
Workout equipment S-1 All ex
penses paid vacation package for two
in me Florida resort of your choice for
5 days4 nights, $200 Call 355-6284
and leave message.
HELP WANTED
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT: fisheries. Earn 5,l
month. Free transportation! Room
and Board! Over 8,000openings No
experience necessary. Male or Fe-
male. For 68-page emplo
manual, send $8.95 toM&L Research,
Box 84008, Seattle, VVA 98124 Saris
faction Guaranteed
BABYSITTER NEEDED foi
mer Mondavi rida - I:
ning Ma 9th. c vw �
needed. 757-0629.
HELP WANTED
p ind earn $100 Help saw the
nonmenl and earn gixxi money,
CalK i�7 1063 for appoint-
ment
WHAT ARE YOUR FLANS EOR
1HI SUMMER Going to stay in
Greem e.goinj to Summer School?
! od) s currently has sales positions
a able in unkirs and Mens that
run through the summer and
the tall Rll your free time with
rrx position with Brody'sand
I 'vHrody'sJhe
igh V'ednoiav.
0 v s to
Plaza, M01
iD.m

AVAILABLE: Apai
for summer. 3 he.
Acres, 4 blocks to ran
April 4, ask tor im
t to sublet
m, Wilson
( all fcx fore
sHl
� N �
MURS1I, APARTMENTS
j
od �" - - � j � uh
���-i I 'inn A. iimi
VZALEX GARDENS
" r r . n i)WM IIIWlllll
" - - � � ' - &VV1
� s . � a �
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male or
female student wanted to share 3
bedroom house.fully furnished. Five
miles from campus, SUV plus 1 J
utilities and deposit Call 355-7282
Available now!
SOMEONE NEEDED to share
townhouse apartment Two bed-
room, 1 12 bath, fully furnished,
need only to bring bedroom furni-
ture. Responsible male student
$175moplus 12utilities 831 0388
SUMMER INTERNSHIP t
what IBM, Xerox an 1 Fortu
companies like ah ��
program. It saving ovi r S5 �
valuable career experiei ce,l . 2
your resume, and college credit ap-
peal to vou, call for an interview to-
day (919) 249 2211
CLASSIFIED ADS IK HNICIAN
needed for summer sessions an
fall semester. Must tx enrolled is
ECU student. Perfect job for 1 1 si
Broadcasting or foumalism majors
Part-time, flexible hours Madntosl
Microsoft Word experii 1 helpl .
Apply in person at The East Carolinian
or call 758-7652 after 5 H n m
PERSONALS
HEADING FOR EUROPE THIS
MMER? �, anytime with
� r S160 from the East
tied ir 'Y Times ft
1 AIRIinCH S 212-864-
rOMORROVV, IKACEY IS 22!
Happ) Birthdav, rracey! ILoveYoul
Loveal �: s Mike.
ALPHAPHI'S I ietpsyched forfor-
����� 1 night ton member.
THETA (HI & SIC; EP We would
" ' thank tl : you who have
ped us 0 � u I ousc during
' " ' � ' ri work is greatly
�. theZetas.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
PERSONALS
ZTA: It all started last Saturday night,
etas, dates and all�looi
siht. "Off to Washington we
shouted, as the bus roiled 1 togear
with Steve "Hall"ing � o irdesb-
nation grew near Wearrived (inone
piece), all now feelii g might)
then we danced and part
was time AJlon thebus,and read) to
go home, when Pam � rt ill and prayed
to the "porcelain throne Now tl �
party is over only memories of I
remain with usofZTA( 'ockta ' '�'
GRI I Ks
GreekWe k! It sj 1 gl t aBLAST!
Love, the Sigmas
COME ONE! COME Al U II A 5
First Annual h r�nis ind
touman ent for the Ass
Retarded Citizens. It's it I
a.m. , April 1
R( gisteri ow! Info I f nt
Store'til2 OFridav. Del
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
PERSONALS
at boom Prizes will be av irded
TO( TOGA! TOGA! �-
nual l1 Kappa Phi Toga All
� v Bus ride? I
��- - � - -pr.lMh7-
No b �� es ; lease
BROTHERS AND PLEDGES (i
SIGMA NU usl 1 '� w ��-�
gr ���: ate everyone on an INTEN ;
job keeping everything .�. thu ��
- � . � this semester Altl
tl ngl isn'tworked �����
work and pers vei t �
: � forn aking n proud to
be a Sigma NuH SinoereU " �
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
Kinggold Inwrfs
WANDSVVOR1
((MM( )s
(
; 'v- S
FOR SALE
FENDER GUITAR AMP
as 0464.
Wuxe
MUST SALE IMMEDIATELY
Men's Raleigh 10 s-Xd bike; S60,
Women's Huffy 12 speed bike S35
gas grill w, tank, wii
A c works great, SI 0 ar
clone w2 flopp disk drives
dow
I IBM PC
640K
NANNY OPPORTT
Francisco-1 girl SI7!
cago-newborn-S175
necticut-twinsS25fl
infant S160week;
dren-S200week. M
available One yeai
necessary. Call 1-800
EARTHNAEE Part-ti
up ten households for
NTTIIS San
1 n v
s) v
: t s
1
If you're
Pregnant
and need help making choices
�Free, confidential professional
pregnancy counse
'Financial assistance
�Help select adoptive family
1-800-632-1400
The Children's Home Society
of North Carolina
A United Way Agency
FREE
PREGNANCY
TESTING
! ree v C01 I v 1
Services & Cvwn
' .imim;i Pregnano�iit 1
757-0005
in r. 31 ; sti :
The I ec Building
Cjreein ille. i
lUrs
.
GQLDEN GIRL TRYOUTS
Attention interested dancers (who
can da; ). and sparkle) Become
part ol the 1991 ECU Football
Spirit! Share the spotlight by per-
ming with the Hast Carolina
Pirates during the 11 football
?asoi rhe CX)I DEN GIRI S
1 INE will hold trvouts
April 13-14; 9 .1 m A p.m. Satur-
day and 1 p.m. 4 p.m. Sunday in
Memorial Gym. For more infor-
mation, call 757 6982
bi'JLCMLQLrMPJCS
The 1991 Greenville-Pitt Co. Spe-
cial Olympics Spring Games will
le held on April 19th at E. B.
Aycock Jr. High School in Green-
ville (rain date: April 24). Volun-
teers are needed to help serve as
buddieschaperones for the Spe-
cial Olympics. Volunteers must
be able to work all dav - from 9
a m -2 p.m. (The first ones there
will be assigned a position). An
orientation meeting will be held
on April 17 in Old Jovner Library,
nxm 221 from 5-6:()0 p.m. Free
1 nrhandvolunteert-shirtswill
be provided the day of the games
to all volunteers who have at-
tended theorientutionsession. For
more information, contact Lisa
Mills at &0-4551
IMMUNIZATION OJN1C
Immunization Clinic being held at
the Student Health Center-Up-
date your tetanus now! Available
without appointment. Thursday,
April 4, 1991 from 8.00 a.m. to
1130 a.m. and from 1:00 p.m. to
100 p m. There is a $200 fee for
tl.h vaccination.
�0SQiC2QLiiLMUSlC
April 3-7-ECU Jazz Festival fea-
turing jazz greats Ethel Ennis and
Earl Amett with the ECU Jazz En-
sembte, under the direction of
( arroll Dashiell. The Festival will
feature masterclasses, open re-
hearsals and two concerts. Con-
certs are April 5th at 9:00 p.m. in
the A. I. Fletcher Recital hall and
April 7th at 8:15 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium. All events are free
and open to public For more in-
formation, call 757-6331.
EDUCATIONAL LOANS
AVAILABLE
Three educational loan programs
for North Carolina residents at-
tending colleges in or out of state
and for nonresidents attending
college in North Carolina are
available through College Foun-
dation, Inc. These loan programs
are funded by North Carolina
banksand other investors. Stafford
Loans are for dependent or inde-
pendent students and are based
on financial need. Supplemental
Loans are for independent self-
supporting students are are not
based on financial need. PLUS
Loans are for parents of depen-
dent students and are not based
on financial need. For more infor-
mation, write College Foundation
Inc 2100 Yonkers Road, P.O. Box
12100, Raleigh, NC 27W5-2100,or
call (919) 8214771.
STUDY ABROAD
EXCHANGE PROGKAMS
The Office of International Pro-
grams is still accepting applica-
tions for summer study abroad
programs as well as exchange pro-
grams for the academic year 1991 -
1992. Students may apply for
studies at Leicester Polytechnic
(England), Acadia University
(Nova Scotia, Canada) or other
semesteracademic year pro-
grams. Applications for the Na-
tional Student Exchange are also
being accepted for students who
want to spend an exciting semes-
ter or year a t one of over 99 col leges
or universities in the U.S. If you
think you might have trouble get-
ting the classes you need at ECU,
consider an exchange to another
campus' Comeby Brew ster A
ti pick up an application or call
757-6769 tor further information
on the programs available.
MCTUG OF WAR
loin in the fun at ECU'S Annua
Barefoot on the Mall and show
your support to the Ronald
McDonald House. Recreational
Services is sponsoring a McTug of
War competition. Get your team
of ten members (male, female, co-
red together and get psyched for
an afternoon of McTug ol War
fun! AminimumofSl -OOdonation
per participant is requested. For
further information, contact
Kendra Curtis at 757-6387or stop
by 204 Christenbury Gvm.
ECU5IUDENISURVEY
During the week of April 8-15, a
survey of student opinion of in-
struction will be conducted at
ECU. Questionnaires will be dis-
tributed in classes with enroll-
ments greater than five All stu-
dents will have the opportunity to
express opinions on the teaching
effectiveness of their instructors.
The survey will be conducted
during class time and will take
approximately 15 minutes to
complete. Student participation is
voluntary and no identities are
requested. Instructors have been
requested to leave the classnxim
while thequestionnairesarebeing
completed. Results of the survey
will be distributed to instructors
after final grades have been posted.
The teaching effectiveness ques-
tionnaire was created by the Fac-
ulty Senate Committee for Teach-
ing Effectiveness and the Office of
Planning and Research. The re-
sults of thesurvey,along with oOier
information and factors, are used
for administrative evaluation of
the instructor by the supervising
administrator within the depart-
nu nl or division.
COME DANCFj COME EAT!
COME PLAY?
� ' you ust can'l sleep. Lawn
party to kick oft Rl iA week. Fea-
tured bands and D.J. Free food.
. omeeniov
RESIDENT HALL
ASSOCIATION
I he Resident l lall Association fil-
ing dates for offices in House
Council and RH A are? April 15th-
April 18th. There will bean inter-
est session held April 15th at 5:00
p.m. in the social room of
MendenhaU. Resident Hall Asso-
ciation elei tions will be from 9
am 4p m. in each Residence Hall.
Any questions, call 7574709.
STUDENT NORIH
CAROLINA ASSOCJAJ1QN
0! EDUCATORS
SN( Al- End-of-the- Year Gala will
be Wednesday, April 10 at 5:00
p m. in Speight 313. We will be
honoring the seniors and electing
new officers. There will also be
refreshments and prizes! All Edu-
cation majors are invited to join
the fun.
STUDENTSEQRJJiE
MOTH U EARTH
Students tor the Mother Earth will
be meeting tonight at 5:30 in
Mendenhall Student Center. We
will be discussing plans for Bare-
foot on the Mall and Earth Day! If
you re interested in helping out,
please attend!
COMPOSER IN CONCERT
�Performances on Keyboards!
'Improv dance group performs
ballet! Two works performed
by wind ensemble and chorus!
All composed by one person?
Come see for yourself-Michael B.
Dixon, composer in concert at
Wright Auditorium, lues v-
9, at 8:15.
STUDENT IJNKffl
PRODUCTIONS
The Student Union Productions
Cornrnitteeand the Residence Hall
Association will he sponsorr
Casino Night, Monday, April 8th
al 8:00 p.m in the Multi-Purpose
Room oi Mendenhall. ir your
luck at winning a VCR or other
prizes
ADISCLT A BASKET
Shine up your frisbees because
registration for frisbeegoJf will be
held on Tuesday, Apnl 4 (1t 5 on
p.m. in BIO 103. All interested
individuals must attend this
meeting! For further information
call 757-6387 or stop bv 204
Christenburv Gvm.
EOLLAWSOaETi:
There will be a Law Society meet-
ing April 8,1991 at 5:15p.m. in 218
Ragsdale. Please attend: We will
beelectingnew officers! SubPartv
NCTEAOTLNG HOLLOW 5
Attention Sophomore Fellows:
Departure for the trip to New Bern
and Tryon Palace is scheduled for
12T5 p.m. on Apnl 8 All sopho-
mores are asked to meet the bus in
front of Speight. Utters concern-
ing the trip should be in your mail-
boxes.
SEMQR INFORMATION
CaMJVIIITEE
Extra! Extra! Read all about it!
Class rings, caps and gowns and
most importantly information on
the " slept with the Senior CW
T-shirts and concert on Wednes-
day,May8,1991. Where vou might
ask, can I do this? Thursday, April
4,1991 from 9 a.m4 p.m. in MSC
Multi-PurposeRoom. Botha men's
and women's class ring will be
drawn for at 4 p.m. Sponsored by
'� ns and IC I Studi 1 I S res
For more information call
4711
PHI At PHA THETA HISTOR
HONOR SOCIEH
I he Phi Alpha Theta I n
Honor Socu t along wi I th
Women's Studies Pi 1

sponsoringalectureon v man's
Role in Public 1 hstorv" to be c
bv Dr Fdie Mayo Curator ol
litical History, American Hisl 1
Museum, Smithsonian Insl
The date is April 5 at 3:00 in
Brewster B-201. Everyone is wel-
come to attend.
PAR TQRTHE COURSE
Recreational Services will be
sponsoring a golf classic tor the
spring semester. Registration v
take place on Wednesday, Apr
10 at 5:00 pm in BIO 103
CQURL SAND AND SEA!
Its a new Intramural Sport! Ex-
perience the thrill of volleyball on
all terrains! Registration ior all-
terrain volleyball will held on
Wednesday, April 10 at 530 p m
in BIO 103 Remember, a repre-
sentative fmn each team must at-
tend this meeting. For further in-
formation call 757-6387 or stop K
204 Chnstenbury Gvm. Get your
team together to "tackle the de-
ments" with Recreational Services
All-Terrain Volleyball!
ffiQMVJQLENIMHAVTQR
LCU Recreational Services is
sponsoring a wellness seminar
entitled "Defending Yourself from
Violent Behavior Public Safety
Chief Keith Knox will be sharing
felf-defense tips on April 10 from
5:00-6.00 Do y0ursejf a favor d
stop by this informative seminar
n-eeo. harge. For further infor-
mation call 757-6387.
April 4,1991
Soviet aero
turn Wright
into red cir
By Heather Modli
Stjff VVritfr
��'���
of this at horn
. ime over th� � . -
h begai
Tuesday i . � � �� - �
ditoriun �� �
Acn bal Res .� �� : � �
mime, contort i I acrol
ms perfon �� � � .

.v had inattraci for a
grouf s, and th � �
the troupe with a si
Mime At at . Elizarie a �
termed threi id lunnetl
and heck tedl
� . Especially entcrl
were his 1 portraya
The Artist � jsioan" and
"The Surgeon
The "Mam. -srkas" anci "Rus-
sian Folk Game -
theaudieno nbinabonoi
nigglingarn ��
pxTt'ormer VTadimir ,rr����
nized as Russia s Mationa '�-�
wowed theau liencewithl
and good humor
Tamaraand � � - . �
ToetryinM I � received audi-
ence appn . per
formed with � .
in sync with one mot!
was evid nt in tl � �
andthegyn . I � � �
their mover�
'� ta ier Bei
glingr itineappealed
tK' children - .
frunordift vitha
soco - ��
he wielded his � . I the
children on tl
Corsi Irina V
derrw
ibilm- and dexterih
Swan roul r perfon
inspired i . ains
from the aud
'
�.

'


'
.�
aDir- � �
with his � � j
changes
cultivate a g
withii �

� � � addei

mce
mainta i
.
� i
dance. "
their hand
drums �
-
a lull bei n
- n , ilkers he
madev �
like
the

sack-look
Ir � I
Ghost Rider cru
By Cliff Coffey
sutr Writei
One's poj possi-
Uybejudj
that person has ln n s, tl ugh,
popularity is deten �' � the
special appearances a ractei
makts in other comics Ts bi
true. Ghost Ridens the uneon tested
most popular character Marvel
Comics has
Ghost Rider, besides his own
title, can be found in Spiderman
numbershandThornumbers4
and 430, Marvel Comics Presents
numbers M thnuch 71, Punisher
War Journal numbers IN and J
Doet(r Strange number 28, Qoak
and Dagger number 18, Guardians
of the Galaxy number 13, Quasar
number 23 .and Moon Knight num-
ber 25. This list oi appearances is
onlv partial and takes place over
onlv two or three months
In his own title, which is con-
sidered to be one of the hottest com-
ics on the market, the Ghost Rider
ndes a herv motorcvele and pn
tects innocents with a vigilant cru-
- � ii
-
rin
There an I

If the con
supp
ptishes the i
makes the wh
hevabie
that
rum inl
burn-u it
around I
cycle that has
did happen
would come uncH
able be as they
happv endings, nol
no complete under
unflinching look a
bellv of a big citv
ThenewGho
the old Ghost Rdl
when? the compal
old Ghost Rider wf
Hell and the new
Cure rate for genii
NutTOfjf n� Skin C�r Institute
Sexually transmitted diseases
(STEXs) are big news items these
davs. But one ot the most common
SIP'S genital warts seems to have
been lost from the headlines in favor
of more critical pmblems such as
AIDS. A recent study has given
new information on the best treat-
ment for this troubling condition.
Genital warts (known medi-
cally as condylomas) are caused by
a specific virus, the human
papillomavirus (HPV), and usually
occur on the outside of the genitals
and in the perianal and anal region.
When treated early, genital warts
mav clear up and
viruscan linger so
occasional or freqv
In the past, od
men treatments t
wastheapphcatio
podophvlhn, a cl
from the May Apt
Now, accordu
view from the Cei
Control (CDC),
freezing genital wj
nitrogen-is the
therapy on the
ations of efficacy,
fects and recurrenj
In the review
noted that clinical I





April 4, 1991
I
PERSONALS
- res will be awarded
rOGA! 10 Aft.
lestoeach
' 11 pm only.
n PLEDGES OF
CW nesto con-
1NTENSE
� g within per-
N though ev-
ked it perfectly
pi rs vcrance will
1 rhankyou,
ik ng me proud to
ncerelv, Terrible
OWLAY CLASSIFIED
- v
I
i u i. i;
i'RI .ANCY
IF.STING
Prcun.mcinter
? (HUH
Sti :c
N
il j.r
s W wnpin
A nu.N
tE
jt it'
and
n on
lor (Lass
Wednes-
� on might
iav,Apnl
m in V1SC
thamens
g will he
w sired bv
it Stores
call 757-
: HISTORY
50CU n
� � a i listory
� with the
ram will be
i re on "Woman's
to be given
iratorofPo-
.Tiuin History
man Institute.
ril 5 at 3 CO in
rvorte is wel-
: I ML COURSE
en ices will be
. it classic tor the
en r Registration will
Wednesday, April
0 p.m. in BIO 1
Aias.VNDANDSEAJ
it imural Sport! F.x-
� nil .)?'volleyball on
itration for all
- all will held on
"�pnl 10 at S 30 p.m.
Remember, a repre-
e from each team must at-
eting I or further in-
757-6387 or slop by
iry Gym. Get your
' to "tackle the ele-
- rational Services
rrain Volleyball!
ULILNDLNG YOURSELf
ERQM VIOLENT BEHAViQR
Recreational Services is
sP"r i wellness seminar
entitled "Defending Yourself from
Violent Behavior Public Safety
Chief Kath Knox will be sharing
Selfdefense tips on April 10 from
S-00-6 00 Do yourself a favor and
st0P by this informative seminar
free of charge. For further infor-
mation call 737-6387.
Apwl
4.1991
QJJte �ast (gqrultnian
Soviet acrobats
turn Wright
into red circus
By Heather Modlin
staff Writer
� mt mber kids, don't try any
if home Words to this effect
t r tho loudspeaker before
began.
ida night at Wnght Au-
m the 27-member Soviet
Revue, complete with a
ntortionist and acrobahc
� rformed 16actS from folk
� tightrope walking. The
� in attraction for all age
md the audience honored
ne with a standing ovation
� nale
me Anatoly Elizanev per-
ree acts during the show,
ghted the audience with
Especially entertaining
humorous portrayals of
st, 'The Musician" and
;rgeon
i Matnoshkas" and "Rus-
lk (tames" acts entertained
. 1 ence with a combination oi
�i nd energetjcdancing. Star
p) vr Vladimir Serov, recog-
is Russia's National Artist,
d the audience with his skill
1 humor
I amara and Scigei Kothzrov's
ry in Motion" received audi-
roval. The couple per-
d with ease, their movements
. x wi th one another. Their skill
evident in the graceful flow,
� egymnasticabilityevidentin
movements.
Alexander Berenshtein's jug-
- utineappealod especially to
hildren. Although beset with
r difficulties, his talent with a
cer Kill and the skill with which
Yielded his batons, kept the
iren on the edge of their seats.
( ontortionist Irina Mulik
��rated considerable flex-
� and dexterity in her 'The
routine Her performance
I ired awe and sympathy pains
fr m the audience. "How can she
do that?" was a popular question.
"Comedy Acrobats" Anatoly
Zuzigov and Alexander Bahirev
delighted the audience with their
deceptively inep-t attempts at gym-
nastic achievement. Their farcical
routine amused the voung and old
alike.
The "Slack Wire" nmtinedem-
onstrated the skill of Vladimir
Serova and his wife Inna. His de-
termined smile, as he rode unicvele
across the wire with a table full of
china balanced atop his head,
thrilled theaudience. Hiscombined
feat of balancing on his head on top
oi the unicycle, which was atop the
wire, and then pedaling across the
wire, was definitely a crowd fa-
vorite.
Ana tohPituhim's "Magic with
a Difference" engaged theaudience
with his inexplicable wardrobe
changes on stage and his ability to
cultivate a garden on the stage
within seconds.
Anatoly Yamahanov's "Me
and My Ladder" routine thrilled
the audience. He fell twice, but his
perserverance and ingenuity
maintained the crowd's enthusi-
asm.
"Gopak a Ukrainian folk
dance, had the audience clapping
their hands in participation. The
drums of "Caucasian Rhvthms"
pleased theaudience and provided
a lull before the "Dagestan Tight-
rope Walkers" began.
The father and son team of
Shamhal and N'uhtar Avakarov,
complete wi th thei r whi te mop wigs,
made walkmgon the tightrope seem
like walking on the ground. Whin
the younger Abakarov fell while
executing a forward roll on top of
the ore, he picked himself up. Then,
he put on a blindfold and a potato
sack-looking garment and pro-
ceeded to walk across the tightrope
in the darkened auditorium. Really
now, he didn't have anything to
prove to us
Easter Weekend
becomes 'Gut Fesf
Photo Cour��v ot Th� Sovi�� Acrobatic R�vu�
The audience at Wright Auditorium was held captive by the troop of
Russian acrobats that was on assignment at ECU this week
The best part oi the routine OC-
curred when the elder Abakarov
appeared to have fallen from the
tightrope from atop his precarious
perch upon a drum.
His scream was convincing,
buy after his first two revolutions
around the tightrope, suspended
by his feet, we knew that it had been
rehearsed.
On the whole, the Acrobatic
Revue was an enjoyabte experience
tor children and adults who enjoy
the thrill of theoreusat any age. The
show had something for everyone
to enjoy.
Special to The Fat Carolinian
The traditional Myrtle Beach
"Bud Fest" was rather appropriately
dubbed "Cut Fest" by a group of
Appalachian State University stu-
dents this past weekend. Although
Budweiser no longer sponsors this
Easter weekend celebration, it
doesn't stop thousands of high
school and college students from
heading to North Mvrtle Beach for
four days of constant partying.
Although the weather was
somewhat dismal, students from
ASU to ECU, and UGA to UVA
congrega ted on the notonousOcean
Dnvcof North Myrtle Beach. Bright
"no vacancy" signs lit upmost hotel
windows, and houses all up and
down "O.D were packed with
young men and women clad in
different university sweatshirts.
Ocean Drive itself was backed up
with cars carrying kids with one of
two things on their minds: alcohol
and sate sex.
Alcohol was everywhere: in
houses, hotel rooms (which gener-
ally slept 4 to a bed and 6 to the
floor),inbarslikeCrazyZack's,and
on the beach. Ocean Drive was an
aluminium can collector's dream.
'There was no alcohol, and no
arrests responded North Myrtle
Beach Chief of Police, Charles
Sendlcr, when asked about this
"Bud Paradise 1 noted a bit of
sarcasm in his tone as he laughed
about it. 'To be honest, it was no
different than anv other Easter
weekend The police department
increased the number oi officers on
patrol trom 9 patrols per shift in the
dead oi winter, to 45 patrols tor
weekends like this one. "As usual
he continued, "the kids come from
everywhere, and we do our KM to
keep things under control
The Myrtle Beach police kept
691 people under control, at least
for a little while, as they carted them
to jail for everything from alcohol
violations to public fighting. Ac-
cording to Sendler, several were
taken downtown for offenses such
as indecent exposure, assault on
officers, simpledrugpossessionand
shoplifting. Sendler said about 80
percent of those arrested were vio-
lating of South Carolina's alcohol
laws, and most of them were un-
derage drinkers. No alcohol was
allowed in thestnvtsoron the beach.
And for those that got caught, they
paid a prettv pennv.
Not onlv did the average of-
fender spend about three hours in
holding cellsat the fail waiting to be
processed and freed, but they spent
a lot of cash to get out. Students
caught with an open container of
beer on the streets opted for a $68
ticket; liquor, a stiff $100; and alco-
hol on the beach, $216. That'sa lot of
monev to spend on one dnnk.
As you may believe, ECU un-
dergraduates were part of the
commotion and arrests. One ECU
sophomore busted for liquor pos-
session claimed, "It was only a
hundred bucks for an experience
I'll never forget. It won't go on my
record, and, to be quite honest, we
had fun in the process " She said
that she wouldn't want to go
through it again, though.
Four ECU men were appre-
hended whilednnkingbeennacar
on Ocean Drive. "I poured mvbeer
out on the floorboard. They couldn't
bust me, so I had to bail everybody
else out
Another ECU junior was in-
tercepted while trying to purchase
beer with a fake l.D. She too, was
taken to thoNorth Myrtle Beach jail,
and paid a $100 ticket. An ECU
female wascharged with assault on
an officer. Her bond was over $700.
Not e verve ne wa s on t he streets.
Those that rented houses were left
alone bv the police. "We pretty much
partied in the house and on the deck
facing O.D. We all had a blast, and
none of us got into any trouble. I've
seen a lot of it in the past, so we Wept
it contained to the property asmuch
as we could said an ECU senior.
An Appalachian State rugbv
player claimed that he "got a kick
watchingotherkidsgethngarrested
in the street nght below me
Renters west not the only ones
in the houses. Rocky lohnson of
See Gut, page 8
crusades with Moon Knight
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
hv's popularity could possi-
. v nidged bv how many friends
� person ha In Comics, though,
ilarity is determined by the
tal appearances a character
makes in other comics. This being
mie. Ghost Rideris the uncontested
most popular character Marvel
Comics has.
Ghost Rider, besides his own
title, can be found in Spiderman
nu mbers 6 and 7, Thor numbers429
and 430, Marvel Comics Presents
numbers 64 through 71, Punisher
War journal numbers 29 and 30,
I v h tor Strange number 28, Cloak
and Dagger number 18, Guardians
of the Galaxy number 13, Quasar
nu mber 23, and Moon Knight num-
ber 25. This list of appearances is
only partial and takes place over
onlv two or three months.
In his own title, which is eon-
s.dered to be one of the hottest com-
cson the market, the Ghost Rider
ndes a fiery motorcycle and pro-
tects innocents with a vigilant cru-
eltv towards evil doers. Flc shows
no mercv as he brutally returns the
criminals pain a thousand fold.
Howard Mackie scripts The
Ghost Rider and uses gntty realism
and harshness to attract readers.
There are no silver linings in this
comic, and none are to be expected.
If the comic seems depressing, ifs
supposed to be. It not only accom-
plishes the depressant quality, it
makes the whole situation more be-
lievable.
Ifs true that no man will ever
rum into a leather clad skeleton that
bums with the fires of hell and rides
around fighting crime on a motor-
cycle that has fire as wheels, but if it
did happen, the situation that man
would come under could believ-
ably be as they appear here. No
happy endings, no finished battles,
no complete understanding, just an
unflinching lookatlife in theunder-
belly of a big city.
The new Ghost Rider looks like
the old Ghost Rider, only there is
where the comparison ends. The
old Ghost Rider was a demon from
Hell, and the new one is not. Johnny
Blaze, the host of theold one's spirit
(Zarathos), has begun his hunt ot
the new one, who is hosted in the
bixlv of Dan Ketch. Dan Ketch has
had many problems in dealing with
being the host oi a demon such as
the Ghost Rider anthat comic dc vs
an excellent job of portraying his
turmoil. The meeting of these two
men has been hinted at for a few
issues and they will collide in Ghost
Rider number 14.
As far as the guest appearances,
thev have proven to be unsatisfac-
tory as far as dipicting Ghost Rider
as he is in his own title but, that is
always the problem with guest ap-
pearances.
Most have used him asa quiet,
actions-speak-louder-than words,
vigilante that has no regard for
sents His anger iTTigainst the
wrongful doings to innocence, and
it is shown passionately, but fails to
give anv indication of depth. True,
the comic is Moon Knight's, but
does that realty allow for shallow
treatment of anv character?
There are several things that
can make a character popular. One
is that his own book sells very well,
which indicates good stones, good
artwork, or both. Another reason is
that the character is mysterious and
shrouded in mystery, or that the
use of thecharacter in guest appear-
ances is handled well enough to
spark an interest in the character's
own title. In Ghost Rider's case, all
of these come into play.
GhostRideris written brilliantly
bv Howard M ackie and the art team
Vieiiaiue null naa m f - . . i
damage or destruction of personal of avierSaltares(penols)and Mark
property. While this is some what Texeira (inks) has produced some
true, his personality goes much
deeper and this is only shown in his
own comic.
Moon Knight number 25 is a
rare threat in its use of Ghost Rider.
His appearance is used as a vehicle
for anger, which is what he repre-
tects innocents with a vigilant cru- neuww� , - �
Cure rate for genital warts on nse
i,4���rr�-KiiiMV onstratcd cure rates with i
NutrogfM Skin Car Institute
Sexually transmitted diseases
(STDs) are'big news items these
davs. But one of the most common
STDs genital warts seems to have
ban lost from the headlines in favor
of more critical problems such as
AIDS. A recent study has given
new information on the best treat-
ment for this troubling condition.
Genital warts (known medi-
cally as condylomas) are caused by
a specific virus, the human
papillomavirus(HPV),and usually
occur on the outside of the genitals
and in the perianal and anal region.
When treated early, genital warts
may clear up and not return; but the
viruscan linger, sometimes causing
occasional or frequent recurrences.
In the past, one the most com-
mon treatments for genital warts
onsrrated cure rates with podo-
phyllin ranging from 22 percent to
77 percent, with recurrence rates as
high as 74 percent. The rates of
complete clearance of genital warts
of the most striking and memorable
art that hasappeared in a while. The
art of the book relatesdirectly to the
mixxl of the wnting and that is rare
in the comic medium. Since the
origin of the new Ghost Rider is
unknown fully, that mystery is fuel
for attraction.
The jury is still out on whether
ornotthecharacterofthenewGhost
Rider can survive the excessive at-
tention given to him currently.
COMING UP
was the application of a drugcalled withcryotherapy are63to88percent
podophyllin, a chemical extracted with recurrence rates much lower-
from the May Apple plant. only 21 to 39 percent.
Now, according to a recent re- "In one study, fewer treatments
view from the Centers for Disease were required to eradicate the warts
Control (CDC), cryotherapy-or with cryotherapy that with podo-
freezine genital warts with liquid phyllin" says Katherine M.Stone,
nitrogen-is the recommended M.D.Qirucal Research Investigator
therapy on the basis of consider-
ations of efficacy, cost, adverse ef-
fects and recurrence rates.
In the review, the researchers
noted that clinical trials have dem-
withtheCDC
Although electrodesiccation
(destruction of the lesions with con-
trolled high frequency electric cur-
See Warts, page 8
Attic
Thursday
Rev.BiUyCWirtz
Friday-
Left Wing Fascists
Saturday
Sidewinder
New Deli
Thursday
The Popes
Friday
Mind Over
Matter
Saturday
Sex Police
qRocks
Friday
The Mood
Saturday
Locals Only
Mendenhall
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
The Freshman
Sunday
Buckaroo Banzai





4 1991
PERSONALS
irdtxi
II ! IH.I.s OF
.
priuid t
CPIAYCLASSFIED
lv 1 1
(Y
( inter
v �
-PMl
�res
HlslOKi
Ml I
I RSE
� �r the fral r- will
sda Apnl
vndsta: port! Ex � volleyball on � . - tor all
held on
it 5 )0 p m
a an pre � team must at � irther in ' 187 r stop by
� I let your � the ele rw Services
INO YOURSELF LLM BLILWIOR
pril
' � �
than
; will be
! il Services is
� llness seminar
' � ling Yourself from
� � � i Public Safety
' Keith Knox will be sharing
' - tips on Apnl 10 from
' ' ODoj urseM a favor and
informative seminar
' barge hr further infor-
mant � 757-638
A ri 4.799
dhc East (CaruHntan
7
Soviet acrobats
turn Wright
into red circus
1 leather Modlin
Matt Writer
h i kids don't tr any
. Words to this effect
idspeaker before
ght at Wright An
member Soviet
C mplete with a
� � mist and ai robatk
� rmod 16a tsfromfolk
�� ; walking ITie
ittra tion tor all age
� . audi n. c honored
i standing ov ation
iti l Elizariev per-
eactsd iring the show.
� - �. �� e audience with
. - - �' . � ntcrtaining
n � us portrayals of
The Musician' and
' ' itrioshkas" and "Ruv
� s acts entertained
with a combination of
I nergeticdancing.Star
� . tdimir Serov, recog-
isia s National Artist
mdience with his skill
�nor
ara and Seigei KotUzrov s
n Motion' received audi-
� . il rhe couple per-
ease, their movements
ne another. Their skill
nt in the graceful flow,
�� � asticabilityevidentin
n ents.
zander Berenshtein's jug-
o, pealed especially to
1 though beset with
. ties, his talent with a
ind the skill with which
� - batons, kept the
the i �dee of their seats.
� rti nist Irina Mulik
� �� considerable flex-
� ii uteriry in her "The
� � Her performance
and svmpathv pains
hence "I low can she
do that was a popular question
"Comedy Acrobats" Anatolv
Zuzigov and Alexander Bahirev
delighted the audience with their
deceptively inept attempts at gym-
nastic achievement ITtur farcical
routine amused the young and old
alike
The Slack Wire" rout
ine dem-
onstrated the skill of Vladimir
Senna and his wife Irina. His de-
termined smile asherodeunicvcle
,k ross the wire with a table full of
china balanced atop his head.
thrilled theaudience. Hiscombined
feat of balancing on his head on top
of theunicvcle. which was a top the
wire, and then pedaling across the
wire, was definitely a crowd fa-
vorite.
Anatolv Pituhim's"Magic with
a Difference 'engaged theaudience
with his inexplicable wardrobe
changes on stage and his ability to
cultivate a garden on the stage
within seconds
Anatolv Yamahanov's "Me
and My Ladder" routine thrilled
the audience. He fell twice, but his
perserverance and ingenuity
maintained the crowd's enthusi-
asm
"Gopak a Ukrainian folk
dance, had the audience clapping
their hands in participation, rhe
drums ot "Caucasian Rhythms"
pleased the audience and provided
a lull before the "Dagestan Tight
rope1 Walkers" began.
The father and son team of
Shamhal and N'uhtar Avakarov,
complete with their whitemop wigs,
made walkingen the tightrope seem
like walking on the ground. When
the younger Abakarov fell while
executing a forward roll on top of
theore, he picked himself up. Fhen,
he put on a blindfold and a potato
sack-looking garment and pro-
ceeded to walk across the tightrope
in the darkened auditorium Really
now. he didn't have anything to
prove to us.
Easter Weekend
becomes 'Gut Fesf
The audience at Wn. I �� . Woriui
Russian acrobats that was on as?
rhe best part f the i urine ex
curred when the � lei ikarov
appeared to hav fa '�n the
tightrope from atop his re trious
perch upon a di
1 jis sen am ivas o �'
buy after his first two n . itii ns
around the tightrope, suspended
Special to rht East Carolinian
The traditional Mvrtle Bea h
"BudFest" wasratherappropriately
dubbed .ut Fest" by a group of
Appalachian State University stu
dents this past weekend Although
Budweiscr no longer sponsors this
Easter weekend celebration, it
doesn t stop thousands of high
st hool anvi college students from
heading to North Mvrtle Beach tor
tour days of constant partying
Although the weather was
s4-mewh.it dismal, students from
As! to ECU, and UGA to UVA
congregatedonthenotonous V can
Driveof North MyrtleBeach Bright
"novacar ' signslitupmost hotel
windows, and houses all up ai I
dov n "O.D were p i ked w it
young men and women clad in
different university sweatshirts
Ocean Drive itself was backed up
with cars carrying kids with one of
two things on their minds al� ohol
and. safe sex
Alcohol was everywhere: in
houses, hotel rooms which gener
ally slept 4 to a bod aixi to the
floor),inbarslikeCrazyZack's and
on the beach. Ocean Drive was an
aluminium can collector's dream.
"There was no alcohol, d no
arrests responded North Mvrtle
Beach Chief of Police, Charles
Sendlcr, when asked about this
"Hud Paradise I noted a bit of
sarcasm in his tone as he laughed
about it To he honest, it was I
different than any other Easter
weekend The police department
increased the number of officers on
patrol from 9 patrols per shift in the
dv,d of winh r, to 4 patrols ' i
weekends like this one. "As usual
he continued, "the kidscome from
everywhere,and wedoourbest to
keep things under control
The Mvrtle Beach police kept
jfeet we knew that it had been 691 people under control, at least
irsej for a little while, as they carted them
(n the whole, the Ac robatic
Photo Cour�sy at Tha Soviet AcroDatic Revu�
� iptive by the troop of
jnmenl it ; this week
B Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
I
pularity could possi-
. how manv friends
rsoi : is.ln omics,though,
letermined by the
ii ; . ir in es a character
� n ither comics. This being
. �Rideristheuncontested
popular character Marvel
s has
,host Rider, besides his own
� he found in Spiderman
n rs6aiKi7,Thorrtumbers429
130, Marvel Comics Presents
bers M thnuigh 71, Punisher
- loumal numbers 29 and 30,
� r Strange number 28, Cloak
.v.er number 18, Guardians
ialaxy number 13, Quasar
hi r?1and Moon Knight num-
I"his list of appearances is
partial and takes place over
two or three months.
In his own title, which is con-
� red to he one of the hottest com-
r the market, the Ghost Rider
le a fiery motorcycle and pro-
pi 's innocents with a vigilant cru
elty towards evil doers He shows
no mercy as he brutally returns the
cnminals pain a thousand fold.
Howard Mackie scripts The
Ghost Rider and uses gritty realism
and harshness to attract readers
There are no silver linings in this
comic, and none are to ho expected
If the comic seems depressing, it's
supposed to be. It not only accom-
plishes the depressant quality, it
makes the whole situation more be-
lievable.
It's true that no man will ever
mm into a leather clad skeleton that
bums with the firesof hell and rides
around fighting crime on a motor-
cvcle that has fire as wheels, but if it
did happen, the situation that man
would come under could boliev-
ably be as they appear here. No
happv endings, no finished battles,
no complete understanding just an
unflinchinglookatlifeintheunder-
belly of a big city.
The new Ghost Rider iookslike
the old Ghost Rider, only there is
where the comparison ends. The
old Ghost Rider was a demon horn
Hell, and the new one is not johnny
Blaze, the host of the oldn pint
(Zarathos), has begi nt of
the new one, who is ho ted 1 the
biH.lv of I an Ket h. 1 an K�� h has
had manv pn tblemsin dealing with
being the host of a demon su h as
theC .host Rider anthat comic does
an excellent job of portraying his
turmoil. The meeting ot these two
men has been hinted at tor a few
issuesand they will collide in Ghost
Rider number 14
Asfarastheguestappearances
they have proven to be unsatisfac-
tory as tar as dipicting (.host Rider
as he is in his own title but, that is
always the problem with guest ap-
pearances.
Most have used him asaquiet,
actions-speak -louder-than words,
vigilante that has no regard for
damage or destruction of personal
property. While this is some what
true, his personality goes much
deeper arid this is only shown in his
own comic.
Moon Knight number 25 is a
rare threat in its use of Ghost Rider.
His appearance is used as a vehn le
for anger, which is what he repre-
tects innocents with a vigilant cru- neu�uu��-�
Cure rate for genital warts on nse
i�,n.inMr.imhnti)n onstrated cure rates with i
Nutrian� Skin Car Institute
Sexually transmitted diseases
(STDs) are big news items these
lays But one of the most common
r-s genital warts seems to have
beenk -St I n �n the headlines in favor
I more critical problems such as
AIDS A recent study has given
new information on the best treat-
ment for this troubling condition.
Genital warts (known medi-
cally as condylomas) are caused by
a specific virus, the human
pap,llomavirus(HPV),and usually
occur on the outside of the genitals
and in the perianal and anal region.
When treated early, genital warts
may dear upand not return; but the
viruscan linger, sometimoscausing
occasional or frequent recurrences.
In the past, one the most com-
mon treatments for genital warts
was the application of a drug called
podophyllin, a chemical extracted
from the May Apple plant.
Now, according to a recent re-
view from the Centers for Disease
Control (CDC), cryotherapy-or
freezing genital warts with liquid
nitrogen-is the recommended
therapy on the basis of consider-
ations of efficacy, cost, adverse ef-
fects and recurrence rates.
In the review, the researchers
noted that clinical trials have dem-
onstrated cure rates with podo
phyllin ranging from 22 percent to
77 percent, with recurrence rates as
high as 74 percent. The rates of
complete clearance of genital warts
wnthciAothcrapvarco3to88 percent
with recurrence rates much lower-
onh21 to 39 percent.
"Inone study, few er treatments
were required to eradicate the warts
with crvotherapy that with ptxlo-
phyllin' says (Catherine M. Stone,
M.DClinical Research Investigator
with the CDC
Although electrodesiccation
(destruction of the lesions with con-
trolled high frequency electnc cur-
See Warts, page 8
� isanenjoyablt � perience
� � � �' i idults who enjoy
IIoft �' '� gP 'v
show had sometl tor everyone
to enjoy
n Knight
sents His ai � r is against the
w rongful domc.s to innoccn e and
it is shown passionately, but fails to
give any indication of depth. I rue,
the comic is Moon Knight's, but
does that really allow tor shallow
treatment of any character?
! here an' several things that
can nuke a (h iracter popular. One
is that his own Ixxik sells very well,
w hi h indicates gcxxi stories, good
artwork,or both. Another reason is
that the character ismysteriousand
shrouded in mystery, or that the
use of the character in guest appear-
ances is handled well enough to
spark an interest in the character's
own title In (host Rider's case, all
of these come into play.
Ghost RidcTis written brilliantly
by 1 toward Mackie and the art team
of Javier Saltares(pencib)and Mark
Texeira (inks) has produced some
of the most striking and memorable
art that hasappearedina while.The
artofthebookrelatesdirecthtome
minx! of the writing and that is rare
in the comic medium. Since the
origin of the new Chost Rider is
unknown fully, that mystery is fuel
for attraction.
The urv is still out on whether
ornotthechararterofthenewGhost
Rider can survive the excessive at-
tention given to him currently.
to kuI tor everything from alcohol
violations to public fighting Ac-
cording to Sendler, several were
taken dov ntown t. �r offenses six h
as indecent exposure, assault on
officers, simpledrug possession and
shoplifting Sendler said about HO
percent of those arrested were vio-
lating of South Carolina's alcohol
laws, and most oi them wen- un-
derage drinkers No alcohol was
allowed in thestreets Ton the beach
nd tor those that got caught, they
paid a pretty penny
Not only did tin' average of-
fender spend about three hours m
holding cells at the jail waiting to be
pro. i-ssti and freed,but they spent
,i lot of cash to get out Students
i augl ' ��- ith a open container ot
Nit on the streets opted tor a $68
� ket; liquor, a stiff $100; and alco-
onthelx ich $216 lhat'salotot
m �m v to spend on one drink.
As vi u may believe, bed un-
dergraduates were part ot the
n and arrests t ne E( L
I more busted tor liquor pos-
session claimed. It was only a
hundred buck- tor an evpenenoe
I'll nev r forget. It n'tg
record, and. to be quite st, we
had fun in tt pro ' il
that she wouldn't want t i .
through it again, though
four ECU men were appte
bended while drinking beer in a car
on( Xvan Drive. "1 poured mvhoT
out on the floorboard TheycoulcbVt
bust me, so 1 had t hail everybody
else out
Ano her E U junior was in-
tercepted while trin; to purchase
beer with a fake IP She too, was
� ikentotheNorthMyrtleBeachjail
and paid a $100 ticket An ECU
fi rnali ��� tscharged with assault on
anofficer Herfxnd wasover$700
Not even, one was. .nthestn1s
Those that rented houses were left
akmeby the p. lice. "We pretty much
paruedinthehouseandonthedeck
(icingO D We all had a blast and
none of usgot intoany tnuble I've
seen a lot of it in the past, so we kept
itcontained to the property asmuch
as we could, siid an ECU senior.
An Appalachian State nighv
player claimed that he 'got a kick
hingotherkidsgetting arrested
in the street right below me "
Renters were not the only ones
in the houses Rocky lohnson o
See Gut. page 8
COMING UP
AtHc
Thursday
Rev. Billy C.Wirtz
Friday
Left Wing Fascists
Saturday
Sidewinder
New Deli
Thursday
The Popes
Friday
Mind Over
Matter
Saturday
Sex Police
CXgocks
Friday
The Mood
Saturday
Locals Only
Mendenhall
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
The Freshman
Sunday
Buekaroo Banzai





8 �ht gaat (Earollnfan
April 4,1991
White Lion releases Mane Attraction
Let's jump right into the metal news with some info on new
releases that should be hitting stores this month and in the months
ahead.
White Lion will be roaring back into the metal market this month
with their fourth release (but only their third for Atlantic Records),
Mane Attraction. Metal Church charges back with their new record,
The Human Factor, out in stores now, along with Enuff 'Z Nuff and
their new-found look and Strength LP. Other releases include Mr. Big's
long-awaited second album. Lean Into It, and Bang Tango's Danciri
on Coab. Both albums are due in May or late spring.
Cinderella is set to begin their "Heartbreak Station" tour. Un-
fortunately, the Philly boys tour plans fell through last month with
the BulletBoys and Lynch Mob. Rumors have it that Nelson may be
the opening act for the tour. Still riding high with their After the Rain
LP, Nelson may have trouble mixing their fans with the Cinderella
crowd. I'll definitely be there to check this one out. (It's kind of like
having Trixter open up for Sepultura, huh?!?!?!?!) Metal Notes will
keep you posted on up-and-coming dates in the North Carolina
Virginia area.
Ozzy Osboume is still working on his new opus, due out this
year. He'll be getting help from Lemmy of Motorhead fame and, get
this, Sinead O'Connor. Hey, it was bound to happen, especially after
Aerosmith teamed up with Run DMC a few years ago.
Watch out for Scatterbrain'snew video "Down With the Ships
which con tains a medley of popularguitarriffs,and David Lee Roth's
"Sensible Shoes
Bassist Geezer Butler has repined Black Sabbath after his de-
parture from OzzVs band last year.
Steve Vai is currently producing the debut LP for Thomas
McRocklin, the junior guitar wiz who played LittleStevie Vai in Vai's
video "Audience is Listening
Tyketto is a new foursome from the Big Apple that should be
catching the metal industry's attention in the next few months.
Comprised of vocalist Danny Vaughn, guitarist Brooke St. James,
drummer Michael Clayton and bassist Jimi Kennedy, Tyketto will
release Don't Come Easy on A&M Records this month. The first
videosingle will be for thecut "Forever Young which can be heard
on radio stations across the country. If the vocals sound familiar, it's
probably because you may have heard Vaughn sing for Pete Wav's
1986 effort (after UFO) Waysted.
Vile Existence, North Carolina's answer to deathcore, recently
shot some promotional photosin a graveyard. The East Carolinian will
probe deeper into the musical minds of the gruesome foursome in a
future article. Stay tuned.
Anthrax screamer Joey Belladonna recently sang the national
anthem at the annual Truck and Tractor Pull at New York's Madison
SquareGarden. Meanwhile,therestofthebandisgearingupfortheir
first headlining tour in the States.
Until next week, play it loud or don't play it at all!
� Compiled by "Dizzy" Deanna Nevgloski
Gut
Continue from page 13
5601 Ocean Drive, brought 2 of his
college-aged children, 4 of their
friends, and his wife to their North
Myrtle Beach home last Friday. He
likes the idea of everyone celebrat-
ing on Ocean Drive. "I think it's
great. I did it when I was in college
and I bring my own kids down
now The only thing that really
bothers Johnson is all of the
Warts
rent) is as efficient as cryotherapy,
electrodesiccation requires injection
of anesthetic agents locally which
may make many patients shy away
from that procedure.
Laser therapy and treatment
with interferon has also been re-
viewed. The results of treatment
with interferon, which is much more
"whooin' and hoUenri He's usu-
ally in bed by midnight, and all of
the yelling keeps him up. Johnson
was also concerned about the
throwing of beer cans in the streets.
"Godown to the maindragof O.D'
tomorrow he explained, "beer
cans will be everywhere. If yall
were smart, you'd save them and
sell them for 24 cents a pound
Continued from page 13
April 4,1991
expensive, have been much less im-
pressive than other therapies. The
resultsof laser surgery depend upon
the skill of the surgeon. Laser
therapy is also expensive, and not
available in most treatment centers.
Dr. Stone and her colleagues
emphasize that people with genital
warts should avoid sex.
Thurs: Rev. Billy C. Wirtz
ATTIC
752-7303
209 East
Fifth Si.
An Evening of
outrageous music
and comedy
Fri: TOXIC POPSICLE &i�rr�c rAstsr$
(Sunshine alternative promotions)
Sat:
East
Coast
Powerhouse
1. Jesus Jones � Doubt
2. Dinosaur, Jr. � Green Mind
3. R.E.M. � Out of Time
4. Pop Will Eat Itself � Cure for Sanity
5. Godfathers � Unreal World
6. Kitchens of Distinctions � Strange Free World
7. Drivin' & Cryin' � Fly Me Courageous
8. Screaming Trees � Uncle Anesthesia
9. Dave Stewart & The Spiritual Cowboys
10. Royal Crescent Mob � Midnight Rose's
11. The Samples
12. Rhythm Corps � The Future's Not What It Used
To Be
13. Ride � Nowhere
May Grads: NO MONEY DOWN ON NEW CARS!
Call ALEX LONG for details
BUICK
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FOSDICKS
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Buy one
Regular Shrimp
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Get the 2nd
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Good anytime
Hecragc not included
Expires: 4-25-91
Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity of America
Zeta Psi Chapter
The Student Union Minority Arts Committe
in conjunction with
The East Carolina Jazz Ensemble
Present
the 1991 Eastern N.C. Jazz Festival
featuring
vocalist Ethel Ennis - April 3-7
AJ Fletcher Music School,
for more info call 757-6851
Ethel Ennis
wwP
m4j
Pl �-an�
Ar
�(&�( St-141fm
4 ,L
Earl Arnette
Since 1980, Mr.Arnett has free-lanced as a writer, producer and media
consultant. He has produced two albums and numerous concerts for his singer wife, Ethel
Ennis. From 1984 to 1988 he developed and operated Ethel's Place, an internationally
known Baltimore restaurant and music club now known as blues ally. He is also an ad-
junct, liberal arts faculty member at the University of Baltimore.
International acclaim came to Ethel Ennis in 1958, when � after a narjc .vide search�
Benny Goodman selected her as the female vocalist for an all-star band which toured Western
Europe and became the American highlight at the Brussels Worlds Fair. By the mid-1960's
Ethel was the most celebrated jazz-oriented singer from Baltimore since Billie Holiday (who
incidentally acknowledged her as "a musical singer with the great voice who doesn't fake)
�Schedule of Events
April 4th 11 AM Lecture -Room 101- Ethel Ennis 'Women in Jazz, Jazz Vocalists"
1 PM Lecture -Room 101- Earl Arnette 'Music Business"
April 5th 9 PM In Concert -AJ Fletcher Recital Hall- Ethel Ennis with the East Carolina University Jazz Ensemble
April 6th Jazz Ensemble Day -ECU Central Campus Mall-
10 AM ECU Jazz Bones, directed by George Broussard
10:45 AM ECU Contemporary Jazz Ensemble, directed by Paul Tardif
11:45 AM ECU Jazz Ensemble (B), directed by Dennis Alleman
1:30 PM University of District of Columbia, directed by Calvin Jones
2:30 PM TBA
3:30 PM ECU Jazz Ensemble (A), directed by Carroll Dashlell
In case of rain, activities will begin at 1:30 PM in the Fletcher School of Music Recital Hall.
CONCERT
April 7th ECU Jazz Ensemble 8:15 PM Wright Auditorium
Pirates lo
By Kerry Nester
Assistant Sports Editor
ECU traveled to Raleigh to take
on theWolfpack Tuesday afternoon
under crystal blue skies and a per-
fect afternoon for baseball. The Pi-
rates were trying to pick up their
first win this season against a Big
Four team.
After much success the past few
years against Atlantic Coast Con-
ference teams, its somet hi ng special
anytime ECU matches up against
an ACC foe.
Unfortunately for Pirate fans,
ECU managed only five hits and
dropped its 11 th game of the season
to N.C. State.
N.C. State jumped out to an
early six-run lead after only two
innings of play. ECU freshmen left-
hander Johnny Beck surrendered
two unearned runs in the first inning
to theWolfpack off twoPirateerrors.
In the second inning, N.C. State
ca pi tal ized on fi ve hi ts, scori ng fou r
runs, including a ground-rule
double from Jeff Pierce and a solo
home run from Steve Shi ngledecker.
The Pirates finally got on the
board with three runs coming in the
fourth inning. N.C Sta te head coach
Ray Tanner pulled starting pitcher
Pierce halfway through the inning
when ECU was gaining momen-
tum.
The Pirates got a single from
leading hitter John Gast, a double
Gallimore
from Tommy 1
before Wolff
Shawn Senior I
onslaught.
With the i
three runs, the
the heat once i
the fifth inninl
double and a
ECUaddet
inning to cut tl
PatCloughei
home run ba
inning for the
11-4.
The Pirate
lay down an
heading into t)
inning stretch!
runs off a wal
doubles from
Watkmstocutl
runs.
This force
forN.CState.Jl
in for Senior, ai
Pirates withoui
The final score!
the Wolfpack.
Forthegar
five hits and!
Wolfpack finisj
hits and one a
The PirateJ
to practice berol
headuptoRicr
tant weekend I
doubleheaderi
follows on Sui
Hunter Galiimore
By Walt Hammett
Special to the East Carolinian
Coming soon to a football sta-
dium near you "A Man Called
Hunter No, it's not the senes on
television. It is Hunter Gallimore's
senior season with the Pirates.
Gallimore, who plays wide re-
ceiver, came to ECU as a walk-on
from Hunt High School in Wilson.
Gallimore felt he had the ability to
go and play college football at the
Division 1-A level after a few trips
to the state championships at Hunt.
Although the odd� were
stacked against him, he would be-
Jigib
CINCINNATI (AP) � Pete
Rose is eligible to leave a halfway
house later this week, but will have
to work until midsummer to finish
a 1,000-hour community service
sentence for violating federal tax
laws.
TneformerCindnnari Redsstar
and manager said in an interview
published today that he enjoys his
court-ordered work as a gym
teacher's assistant at inner-city
schools and has tried to help out in
other ways.
"I was sitting in the school of-
fice my first day during a break and
I told mem, Til answer the phone if
you wish Rose told The Cincin-
nati Enquirer. 'TU do anything
Kizyzewski lead
IrJDIANAPOLB(AP) �You Perfect
could do worse. "Somuchl
You expected Hannibal about the bad I
Tarkanianand merest of that sullen tonight you sal
bunchfjomoutWestslashingand Kansas coach!
burning through the college bas- 'These were
ketball world and carrying all that you saw put
ghtters back to Vegas again night"
bated you got Duke. Ontopoft
On April Fool's Night whine like I
Squeaky dean Duke. Polite, it like
Well-spoken. Pay its hotel bills, grandstand
right down to the incidentals. Justwins
come only the I
history to plavl
level, he choos
Knowing
difficult at p.n
chose ECU ov
ofitsreputatio
walk-on has a
red-shirtedmlj
on to see hrrutel
His first bi
when he pi a v
caught seven
The highlight o
Gallimore caug
tion that setups
South Carolina!
After a yea
action, Gallir
ship; one of twe
eam one.
After ear
Gallimore felt'1
to work harck
earned it ThiJ
raised his lev
proved to be
yet
Havingstal
for eight gar
in some ai
Gallimore hadl
yards, two touq
erage of 21.2
Rose, 49,
month halfwi
Friday, said
community (
the US. Bureai
"At that
with his case
Hudson said.
The same'
uledtomake
Binrringham,
Levy, his bi
Rose, bas
leader, was;
months in
guilty to two
report income. J
Arthur Spit
$50,000andoi





i
April 4,1991
(51tc i�aHt (Carolinian
19
3
mis lories
uu. r.
1 Mo Time
Lit Itself
rs
1 Mritual C owboys � -
s ni; r ks'
i , . i
DICK'S
18W SI MOOD
i
i
� t wife, Ethel
"nationally
He an ad-
Hal
Wo
By Kerry Nester
Assistant Sports Editor
E I traveled to Raleigh to take
on the WolfpttckTueadayafternoon
under crystal blue skies and a per-
fect afternoon for baseball. The Pi-
rates were trving to pick up their
tn this season against a Pig
� team.
After much success the past few
against Atlantic Coast Con-
v teams, its something special
me ECU matches up against
foe
nfortunately for Pirate fans,
managed onlv five hits and
�j ttsl lth game of the season
� ' State.
N C State jumped out to an
six-run lead after only two
psoi plav. ECU freshmen left-
Icr lohnnv Bock surrendered
a � unearnedrunsinthefirstinning
Wdrpack off two Pirate errors.
the second inning, N.C. State
zed on five hits, scoring four
including a ground-rule
from Jeff Tierce and a solo
fromTommyEasonand threewalks
before Wolfpack relief pitcher
Shawn Senior could slow the ECU
onslaught.
With the lead trimmed to just
three runs, the Wolfpack fumed up
the heat once more with two runsin
the fifth inning off two singles, a
double and a sacrifice fly.
ECU added one run in the si xth
inning to ait the lead to 8-4. Then,
Tat Clougherty popped a three-run
home run blast in the bottom of the
inning for the Wolfpack to make it
11-1.
The Pirates were not going to
lay down and give up though;
heading into the famed "seventh-
inning stretch ECU scored two
runs off a walk and back-to-hack
doubles from C.lynn Beck and Pat
Watkins to ait the lead to only five
runs.
This forced a pitching change
forN.C. State. Jimmy Holland came
in for Senior, and he finished off the
Pirates without surrendennga run.
The final score was 13-6 in favor of
the Wolfpack.
For the game, ECU had six mas,
five hits and three errors The
run fromSteveShingJedecker.
rhe Pirates finally got on the
board with three runscomingin the Wolfpack finished with 13 runs, 13
-h inning. N.C. State head coach hits and one error
The Pirates onlv have one uay
to praaice before loading the bus to
head up to Richmond for an impor-
tant weekend of conference play. A
doubleheader with William & Mary
follows on Sunday.
Ka Tanner pulled starring pitcher
Pierce halfway through the inning
when ECU was gaining momen-
The Pirates got a single from
leading hitter John Gast, a double
Da.I Ra�d � ECU Phdo Lab
Senior shortstop Berry Narron makes the tag on a stolen base attempt. Tuesday, ECU played N C State in Raleigh and lost 13-6 Junior catcher
Tommy Eason went 2 for 5 with a double and a triple.
allimore returns
Hunter Gallimore
By Walt Hammett
Special to the East Carolinian
iming sHn to a football sta-
dium near vou "A Man Called
I lunter No, it's not the series on
ision It is Hunter Gallimore's
senior season with the Pirates.
Gallimore, who plays wide re-
ceiver, came to ECU as a walk-on
from Hunt High School in Wilson.
Gallimore felt he had the ability to
go and play college football at the
Division 1-A level after a few trips
to the state championships at Hunt.
Although the odds were
stacked against him, he would be-
CINC1NNAT1 (AP) � Pete
Rose is eligible to leave a halfway
house later this week, but will have
to work until midsummer to finish
a 1,000-hour community service
sentence for violating federal tax
laws.
The former Cincinnati Redsstar
and manager said in an interview
published today that he enjoys his
court-ordered work as a gym
teacher's assistant at inner-city
schools and has tried to help out in
other ways.
"1 was sitting in the school of-
fice my first day during a break and
comeonly the third player in Hunt's
history to play at the Division 1-A
level, he choose to trv it anyway.
Knowing that this would be
difficult at any school, Gallimore
chose ECU over N.C. State because
of its reputation as a school where a
walk-on has a chance. After being
red-shirted in 1987,Gallimore went
on to see limited action in 1988.
His first big year was in 1989,
when he plavcd in all 11 games and
caught seven passes for 131 yards.
The highlight of this year was when
Gallimore caught a 63-yard reeep-
tion that set upa touchdown against
South Carolina.
After a year of seeing plenty of
action, Gallimore earned a scholar-
ship; one of two walk-ons in 1987 to
earn one.
After earning a scholarship
Gallimore felt "even more pressure
to work harder to show he had
earned it This in turn must have
raised his level of play and 1990
proved to be Gallimorc's best effort
vet.
J
Having started at wide receiver
for eight games, Gallimore turned
in some amazing statistics.
Gallimore had 10 catches for 212
yards, two touchdowns and an av-
erage of 21.2 yards a catch, ECU
was just finding out what kind of
athlete it had.
Now that Gallimore is in his
senior season, the pressure to pro-
duce nviv be even more that before.
So he does everything he can to help
the team.
Besides plaving wide receiver,
Gallimore also is a backup on the
kick-off return team.
"1 just want to catch every Kill
and contribute to thespecial teams
Gallimore said.
Gallimore also feels that being
a senior involves a lot of leadership
"both on the practice field and in
helping some of the other inexpe-
rienced wide receivers to under-
stand the offense
Having been involved with the
ECU football program since Bill
Lewis came to the helm, Gallimore
feels the need to end his senior year
on a good note. Already the team
has set two goals for the 1991 season.
To raise their level of play and to
win tight games, and to eam a
chance to go to a bowl game.
Although these goals might
seem optimistic to some Pirate fans,
these goals are attainable. With an
experienced teamcomingback from
the 1990 campaign, the Pirates ex-
See Gallimore, page 10
Surf team
looks to
erase
stigma
By Dustin Shearon
Staff Writer
Rose, 49, will finish his three-
month halfway house sentence
Friday, said Denny Hudson, the
community corrections manager for
the US. Bureau of prisons.
"At that point,our involvement
with his case will be completed
Hudson said.
The same day, Rose is sched-
uled to make a paid appearance in
Birmingham, Ala according toCal
Levy, his business manager.
Rose, baseball's all-time hits
leader, was sentenced in July to five
months in prison after he pleaded
halfway house, must finish
five inner-city elementary schools.
When the school yearends June
7, Rose is to finish his sentence
working at a youth club. His pro-
bation officer refused to say when
Rose would finish his community
service. But at his current 40-hou-
per-week rate, Rose could finish by
mid-July.
Rose said he enjoys racing his
young students in sit-ups.
who works part-time at Turfway
Park, a racetrack near Cincinnati.
Since moving into the halfway
house Jan. 7, Rose has made paid
appearances at baseball card shows
in New York and Connecticut and
spoken a t a Q ncinnati country club.
Levy declined to say how much
Rose was paid.
All of Rose's appearances are
subject to approval by his federal
'Theoldmancanstillbringit probation officer John Cole. Cole
he told the Enquirer. The newspa
per said he gave the interview last
week.
Rose, who has received treat-
guilty to two counts of failing to
.told them, TH answer the phone if reportincome.US.DistrictJudgeS. ment for a compulsive gambling
vou wish Rose told The Cincin- Arthur Spiegel also fined him disorder, said he still loves horses
said he judged Rose's appearances
appropriate for his celebrity status.
Rose started work Jan. 14 as an
elementary school gym teacher's
aide. His duties have included su-
pervising students as they got on or
nab Enquirer. "I'll do anything $50,000and ordered him to work in and talked at length with a teacher off buses or as they ate breakfast at
Krzyzewski leads 'clean' Duke team to NCAA
1�� ru ic en nnacuimina and makes thp senseof the inevitable al
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) � You Perfect,
could do worse. "So much time is spent talking
You expected Hannibal about the bad things in sport, but
Tarkanianand the rest of that sullen tonight you saw the good things
bunch from out West, slashing and Kansas coach Roy Williams said,
burning through the college bas- 'These were real student-athletes
ketball world and carrying all that
glitters back to Vegas again.
Instead you got Duke.
On April Fool's Night.
Squeaky clean Duke. Polite.
you saw put on a great show to-
night"
Ontopofthat,thecoachdoesn't
whine like Dean Smith, doesn't lose
it like Bobby Knight, doesn't
Well-spoken. Pays, its hotel bills, grandstand like John Thompson,
right down to the incidentals Just wins, baby. Mike Krzyzewski
is so unassuming and makes the
Final Four so often that he could be
mistaken for the official caterer of
the NCAA.
But no more.
"Mike got something off his
back that never should have been
there in the first place Williams
said. "I mean winning tonight after
not winning the so-called 'biggame'
before
The truth is, you could have
lived with Kansas, but there was a
sense of the inevitable almost from
the outset Monday night.
Just 2:15 into the game. Bobby
Hurley motored past the midcourt
line and saw the Jayhawks rocking
back on their collective heels. So he
shoveled a two-handed pass to the
right of the basket that Grant Hill
caught one-handed outside the
backboard and in a single, swoop-
ing motion, slammed through the
goal.
It was drawn up by a coach
school.
There have been no complaints
about his work, district spokesman
ohn Brunner said.
Rose is to remain under the
federal court's supervision for one
vear from his January release from
a federal prison camp in Marion, 111.
Hehassold hissuburbanGncinnati
house and plans to move to Boca
Raton, Fla after his sentence ends.
He has said he might go into the
restaurant business and start a ca-
reer in broadcasting.
He was banned from baseball
in August 1989 for gambling. He is
eligible toretur to baseball but
commissioner Fay Vincent has not
said when that will be.
from the working-class southwest
side of Chicago, spotted and then
started by a skinny street kid from
Jersey and finished in fashion by
another with an athletic pedigree
from a well-to-do Virginia suburb.
Forall its reputation asabastion
of privilege and propriety, Duke
flashed some soul, too. Perfect.
Duke is precise, Duke is patient.
Duke is quick, Duke is tough And
Duke is the national champion be-
See Krzyzewski, page 10
Aftervearsof criticism the ECU
surf club is making a change for the
better.
Many people around campus
are not even aware that there is an
ECU surf club. Mike Oakley and
Tucker Rov are helping to rebuild
the team that had existed for five
vears now. Thev want to rebuild the
image of the team and make it
popular again as it once was before
the 1987 team destroyed their
reputation.
During the 1987 surf season the
Student Government loaned the
team vans to go to a competition at
Nags Head. When the team re-
turned the vans, they had been van-
dalized and an ECU-owned vidx
recorder was stolen because of ir-
rtsponsibility. Now Oakley, a
freshman, and Roy are turning the
teams reputation around.
During Easter vacation the two
a competed in Nags Head. Oakley
placed fourth and Roy placed sev-
enth in the Individual Senior Body
Board competition which was
sponsored by the Eastern Surf As-
sociation.
They had orginally gone to the
contest to represent ECU but since
there where only two surfers, and
five are needed to enter as a team,
they decided to enter as individu-
als. Recently Oakley talked to the
sponsor, and it turns out that the
team did so well that the ESA is
going to present ECU with a trophy
for their success at the tournament.
In the tournament the surfers
are judged in hard carving, which
are turns and curves in the waves,
drop knee, 360 degrees, 720degTees
and off the lip airs.
The ESA has district contest in
Virginia Beach, Nags Head and
Atlantic Beach. The contest's final
circuit starts in late spring and the
final circuit is run by points. With
the placing of each surfer in every
contest, they are allotted points and
at the end of the season the one with
the most points become the ESA
champion.
The ECU team has meetings
every week. Oakley said that cur-
rently there are about a dozen
members. He would like to see a
See Surf, page 10





April 4,1991
3Ik lEaat (Carolinian
19
5
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Hall
Wo
By Kerry Nester
sMtant Sports Fditor
l i traveled to RaJeigh to take
Wolfpack Tuesday afternoon
rj stal blue skies and a per
iftemoon tor baseball I"he Pi-
tt ere trying to pick up their
this season against .1 Big
te im
much success the past few
nst Atlantic Coast Con-
ims.its something special
ECU matches up against
runateH for Pirate tans,
iged only five hits and
lthgameof the season
State
itate jumped out to an
run lead after only two
� pi n ECU freshmen left-
ny Beck surrendered
1 rnedninsinthotirst inning
fpackofftwoPiratecrrors.
;e ond inning ' C.State
; onfivehits.seoringfouT
luding a ground-rule
� m left Pierce and a solo
�� mSteveShingledecker.
.rates finally gct on the
throe runscoming in the
N.C State head coach
r pulled starting pitcher
halfway through the inning
was gaining momen-
1 rates got a single from
itter lohn Cast, a double
fmmTommy Fa son and three walks
before Wolf pack relief pitcher
Shawn Senior could slow the ECU
onslaught.
With the lead trimmed to )ust
three runs, the Woltpack turned up
the heat once more with two runs in
the fifth inning off two singles, a
double and a sacrifice fly.
ECU added one run in the si xth
inning to ait the lead to 8-4. Then,
Pat Cloughertv popped a throe- run
home run blast in the bottom of the
inning for the Woltpack to make it
11-4.
The Pirates were not going to
lay down and give up though;
heading into the famed "seventh-
inning stretch ECU scored two
runs off a walk and back-to-back
doubles from Clvnn Rock and Pat
Watkinstocut the lead to only five
runs
This forced a pitching change
forN.CState.Jimmyl lollandcame
in for Senior, and he finished off the
Pirates without surrendering a run.
The final score was 13-6 in favor of
the Woltpack.
For the game, ECU had six runs,
five hits and three errors The
Woltpack finished with 13 runs. 13
hits and one error
The Pirates only have oix day
to practice before toadingthe bus to
head up to Richmond for an impor-
tant weekend of conference play. A
doublohoader with William &Mary
follows on Sundav.
Oail RMd � ECU Photo Lab
Senior shortstop Berry Narron makes the tag on a stolen base attempt fuesday layed N C State in Raleigh and lost 13-6 Junior catcher
Tommy Eason went 2 tor 5 with a double and a triple
allimore returns
i
Hunter Callimore
By Walt Hammett
,il to the Fast Carolinian
ioon to a football sta-
� � ir you "A Man Called
f :� s not the series on
It is 1 hinter (ialhmore's
- ieason with the Pirates
rm re. who plavs wide nv
ame to ECU as a walk-on
I int High School in Wilson.
re felt he had the ability to
1 play college football at the
in 1-A level after a few trips
ihestatecharnpfonshipsatHunt
Although the odds were
ked against him, he would be-
come onlv the third plaver in 1 hint's
history to play at the Envision 1-A
level, he choose to try it anyway
Knowing that this would be
difficult at any school, Gallimore
chose ECU over N.C State because
of its reputation as a schtH'l where a
walk-on has a chance After being
red-shirted in 1987,Gallimore went
on to see limited action in 1988
His first big year was in 198 �
when he played in all 11 gamesand
caught seven passes tor 151 yards,
"he highlight of this sear was when
Gallimore caught a 63-yard recep-
tion that set upa touchdown against
South Carolina.
After a year of seeing plcnt) of
action, Gallimore earned a scholar-
ship; oneof two walk-ons in 1987 to
earn one.
After earning a scholarship
Gallimore felt "even more pressure
to work harder to show he had
earned it This in turn must have
raised his level of play and WlHl
proved to be Gallimore's best effort
yet
Having started at wide receiver
for eight games, Gallimore turned
in some amazing statistics
Gallimore had 10 catches for 212
vards, two touchdowns and an av-
erage of 21.2 yards a catch, ECU
was just finding out vvh.it kind of
athlete it had.
Now that Gallimore is in his
senior season, the pressure to pro
dm e may be even more that before.
St 1 hedoes everything he can to help
the team.
Besides plavim: wide receiver,
Gallimore also is a backup on the
kit k off return team.
"1 ust want ti 1 . ate h every ball
and contributeto the special teams
Gallimore said.
(iallimorealso feels that being
,1 senior involves a lot of leadership
!th on the practice field and in
helping some of the other inexpe-
rienced wide receivers to under-
stand the offense
1 laving been involved with the
ECU football program since Bill
1 ewiscame to the helm, Gallimore
to Istheneed to end hissenioryear
on a giKni note. Already the team
hassettwogoalsforthel991 season.
To raise their level of play and to
win tight games, and to earn a
chance to go to a bowl game
Although these goals might
seem optimistic to some Pirate fans,
these goals are attainable. With an
experienced teamcomingback from
the Is) campaign, the Pirates ex-
See Gallimore, page 10
Surf team
looks to
erase
stigma
By Dustin Shearon
Staff Writer
Spike
Jill Ch�rry ECU Photo Lab
Three students play a heated game cf beach volleyball on
Tyler Beach on the Hill.
Rose, 49, will finish his three-
month halfway house sentence
Fndav, said Denny Hudson, the
community corrections manager for
the US. Bunau of pnsons.
"At that point, our involvement
with his case will be completed
Hudson said.
The same day. Rose is sched-
uled to make a paid appearance in
Birmingham, Alaaccording to Gal
Lew, his business manager.
Rose, baseball's all-time hits
leader, was sentenced in July to five
months in prison after he pleaded
guilty to two counts of failing to
. told them, THanswer the phone if reportincomcUS. District JudgeS
vou wish Rose told The Cincin- Arthur Spiegel also fined him
nab Enquirer. "I'll do anything $50,000and ordered him to work in
halfway house, must finish
CINATI (AP) - - Pete
' is eligible to leave a halfway
later this week, but will have
rk until midsummer to finish
a 1,000-hour community service
- once for violating federal tax
laws.
TheformerCinannati Redsstar
and manager said in an interview
published today that he enjoys his
court-ordered work as a gym
teacher's assistant at inner-city
schools and has tned to help out in
other ways.
"I was sitting in the school of-
fk e mv first day during a break and
five inner-city elementary schools.
When the school year ends June
7, Rose is to finish his sentence
working at a vouth club. His pro-
bation officer refused to say when
Rose would finish his community
service. But at his current 40-hour-
per-week rate, Rose could finish by
mid-July.
Rose said he enjoys racing his
young snidents in sit-ups.
'The old man can still bring it
he told the Enquirer. The newspa-
per said he gave the interview last
week.
Rose, who has received treat-
ment for a compulsive gambling
disorder, said he still loves horses
and talked at length with a teacher
who works part-rime at Turfway
Park, a racetrack near Cincinnati.
Since moving into the halfwav
house Jan. 7, Rose has made paid
appearances at baseball card shows
in New York and Connecticut ond
spoken at a Ci ncinnati country club.
Lew declined to say how much
Rose was paid.
All of Rose's appearances are
subject to approval by his federal
probation officer John Cole. Cole
said he Ridged Rose's appearances
appropriate for his celebrity status.
Rose started work Jan. 14 as an
elementary school gym teacher's
aide. His duties have included su-
pervising students as they got on or
off buses or as thev ate breakfast at
Krzyzewski leads 'clean' Duke team to NCAA
I �. . , �r,v w r�� 1 �r imAwnmmf and makes the sense of the inevitable al
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) � You
could do worse.
You expected Hannibal
Tarkanianandtherestofthatsullen
bunch from out West, slashing and
burning through the college bas-
ketball world and carrying all that
glitters back to Vegas again.
Instead you got Duke.
On Apnl Fool's Night.
Squeaky clean Duke. Polite.
Well-spoken. Pays its hotel bills,
right down to the incidentals.
Perfect.
"So much bme is spent talking
about the bad things in sport, but
tonight you saw the good things
Kansas coach Roy Williams said.
These were real student-athletes
you saw put on a great show to-
night
On topof that, the coach doesn't
whinelike Dean Smith.doesn't lose
it like Bobby Knight, doesn't
grandstand like John Thompson.
Just wins, baby. Mike Krzyzewski
is so unassuming and makes the
Final Four so often that he could be
mistaken for the official caterer of
the NCAA.
But no more.
"Mike got something off his
back that never should have been
there in the first place Williams
said. "1 mean winning tonight after
not winning the so-called 'biggame'
before
The truth is, you could have
lived with Kansas, but there was a
sense of the inevitable almost from
the outset Monday night.
Just 2.15 into the game Bobby
Hurley motored past the rrudcourt
line and saw the Jayhawks rocking
back on their collective heels. So he
shoveled a two-handed pass to the
right of the basket that Grant Hill
caught one-handed outside the
backboard and in a single, swoop-
ing motion, slammed thnmgh the
goal.
It was drawn up by a coach
SChOOl.
There ha e been m � complaints
about his work district spokesman
lohn Brunner said.
Rose is to remain under the
federal court s superv ision for one
vear from his anuai y release from
a federal prism camp in Marion, 111
He has sold his suburban Cincinnati
house and plans to move to Boca
Raton, Ha after his sentence ends.
He has said he might o into the
restaurant business and start a ca-
reer in broadcasting.
He was banned fn m baseball
in August 1999 for gambling. He is
eligible toretur to baseball but
commissioner Fay Vincent has not
said when that will be.
from the working-class southwest
side of Chicago, spotted and then
starttl bv a skinny street kid from
Jersev and finished in fashion by
another with an athletic pedigree
from a well-to-do Virginia suburb
Forall its reputation asa bastion
of privilege and propriety, Duke
flashed some soul, too. Perfect.
I Xi ke is precise, Duke ispatient.
LXike is quick, Duke is tough. And
Duke is the national champion be-
See Krzyzewski, page 10
AfteryearsofcritJeismtheEC U
surf club is nuking a change for the
better
Many people around campus
are not even aware that there is an
ECU surf club. Mike Oakley and
Tucker Rov are helping to rebuild
the team that had existed for five
years now. They wantto rebuild the
image of the team and make it
popular again as it once was before
the 1987 team destroyed their
reputation.
Du n ng the 1987 su rf season t he
Student Government loaned the
team vans to go to a competition at
Nags c,k. When the team re-
turned the vans, they had been van-
dalized and an ECU-owned vid�
recorder was stolen because of ir-
rtsponsibility. Now Oakley, a
freshman, and Roy are turning the
teams reputation around.
Dunng Easter vacation the two
a competed in Nags Head. Oakley
placed fourth and Roy placed sev-
enth in the Individual Senior Body
Board competition which was
sponsored by the Eastern Surf As-
sociation.
Thev had orginally gone to the
contest to represent ECU but since
there where only two surfers, and
hve are needed to enter as a team,
thev decided to enter as individu-
als. Recently Oakley talked to the
sponsor, and it rums out that the
team did so well that the ESA is
goi ng to present ECU with a trophy
for their success at the tournament.
In the tournament the surfers
are judged in hard carving, which
are turns and curves in the waves,
d rop knee, 360 degrees, 720 degrees
and off the lip airs.
The ESA has district contest in
Virginia Beach, Nags Head and
Atlantic Beach. The contest's final
circuit starts in late spring and the
final circuit is run by points. With
the placing of each surfer in every
contest, they are allotted points and
at the end of the season the one with
the most points become the ESA
champion
The ECU team has meetings
every week. Oakley said that cur-
rently there are about a dozen
members. He would like to see a
See Surf, page 10





I
4
Krzyzewski
Continued from MM �
cause Duke is all of those things at
once.
"As much as it was a failure for
us doing what we wanted to do, it
was Duke doing all of the things
that they needed to do to win
Williams said afterward, respect or
numbness or bom stealing his voice.
"They had an answer for ev-
erything we did
The Blue Devils con tested every
UNLV every basket. By laying
Gallimore
bodieson Larry Johnson and Stacey
Augmon until the Blue Devils had
bruises as blue as the royal blue on
their jerseys. Krzyzewski said the
day after that one that senior Greg
Koubek looked like he'd spent the
previous night wandering through
a minefield.
Koubek wore the bruises like a
badge of courage; after all, he came
to the Final Four with Krzyzewski
three straight years and came away
each time empty-handed.
Continued from page 9
Montreal hosts MLAFs Barcelona Dragore Is?
MONTREAL (AP) � They
booed the Canadian anthem,
cheered Bjom Nittmo and gave
American football a hero's welcome
when the Montreal Machine played
its first home game to a full house.
The Montreal entry in the new
World Leagueof American Football
only failed to please on the
scoreboard, where the visiting
the Alouettes of the Canadian Foot- peandivisionwimBarcelona,Spain; the Forum,
ball League folded from lack of fan Frankfurt, Germany, and London. 1 think playing in a for-
interest in 1987. Eachteaminthespringleaguepbys eign country like Barcelona and
In Monday nighf s only other 10 games. going through things like a long
game, ending me second weekend Barcelona, showing no signs of road trip makes us a closer-knit
of the new league, it was Frankfurt weariness of an 18-hour trip to team said wide receiver Gene
Montreal and unfazed by a noisy Taylor, who caught touchdown
crowd, spotted the Montreal Ma- passes of 21 and 5 yards from quar-
chine a 10-0 lead, then scored 34 terback Scott Erney.
10, San Antonio 3
The Montreal crowd that
greeted the Machine with a long
standing ovation as it took the
pect to reach their goals.
With spring practice having
already started, Gallimore is look-
ing forward to the Annual Spring
Game on April 20th.
Gallimore feels that "the offense
is really starting to come together
and that the passing game is look-
ing great With these kind of im-
provements the Pira tes will be ready
for their opening game in the fall
against Illinois televised by ESPN.
With a national television au-
dience watching the Pirates in their
first game of the season, Gallimore
feels "that the team will need to stay
focused and not let that kind of
attention interfere with its prepa-
ration
Whether or not Gallimore will
continue to astound people by his
progress, the fact that he walked on
at a Division 1-A school when the
odds were against him is some thing
that a lot of people in Eastern North
Carolina will soon not forget.
Barcelona Dragons won Monday American-sized lOO-by-50-yard
nighf s game 34-10. field was loud and enthusiastic.
"We have a good team, but 'Teople like American foot-
unfortunately no defense said ball said Dumont
Jean-Pierre Dumont, 26, of "I went to two or three Cana-
Montreal, one of 53,238 spectators dian football games, but I'll be at all
� the largest crowd in the WLAFs the games here
two-weekexistence�whojammed The WLAF, owned by 26 of the
OlympkStadiumforthe Machine's 28 National Football League teams,
inaugural home match. was created last winter with 10
It was the first official game of teams�six in the United States, the
professional football in the city since Machine in Canada and a Euro-
consecutive points. The triumph
boosted Barcelona's record to 2-0
and dropped the Machine to 1-1.
Spectators were taken aback
when, expecting the American an-
them before the game, a brass band
played Spain's anthem.
The Machine's Americans then
caught their first glimpseof Quebec
nationalism when thecrowd booed
"O Canada a common occurance
at Olympic Stadium that oddly
never happens for hockey games at
Running back Paul Palmer
added a 6-yard score, while Lydell
Can bulled over from the 1 for the
other Dragons' TD. Massimo Manca
booted field goals of 42 and 25 yards.
Emotionally charged by the
roars of encouragement from an
audience that seemed curiousabout
the new league, the Machine took a
10-0 lead in the first 11 minutes on
Nittmo's45-yard field goal and a 1-
yard touchdown plunge by
Broderick Sargent
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910 Cotanche Street
6-11 Sun-Wed
better rum out and would like to let
everyone know ihatyou do not have
to be a pro to join. He says the club
is about fun, not just competition.
The team has asked theStudent
Government for money for their
upcoming season. The money will
help for entry fees, transportation
Continued from
and traveling
team's new
reputation,itl
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Competition
team to organize ail
for the regionals i
801-ES. College Road
Wilmington, NC 28403
800-365-8003
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jlona Dragons
rv'ona spain,
h1 Umdon
eague plays
g no signs of
tir trip to
iois
Ma
� triumph
esat
the Forum.
I think plaving in a for-
eign country like Barcelona and
going through things like a long
road trip makes us a closer-knit
team said vvide receiver Gene
raylof who caught touchdown
passes of 21 and 5 jrawJs from quar-
terback Scoff Frnev
Running Kick Taul Palmer
added a 6-yafd seoe, while I vdell
( .it bulKxl over fflOfn the 1 tor the
rDfagpns'Tt) Massimo Manca
bt k ted field goals of 42 and 25 yards.
Emotionally charged bv the
encouragement from an
naMhatXTrn-clounousahout
w league the Machine took a
id in the first 11 minutes on
- 4 vard field goal and a 1-
vard fouchdown plunge bv
Broderk k Sargenl
irolinian
EDUCATOR
the quality of their
md assisting students
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and
KI( IIONi n: 5 m the Dept.

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2BS
?fSoodJtuff
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24 hrs Thurs-Sat
t
Surf
(Ehc agt Carolinian April 4, 1991 11
better mm out and would like to let
everyone know that you do not have
to he a pro to join. He says the club
,s .lhout fun, not just competition.
The team has asked the Student
Government tor money for their
upcoming season. The money will
help for entry fees, transportation
Contlnuft from M 9
and traveling expenses. With the
team's new success and revised
reputation, it hopes the request will
be approved for the new season.
Competition will begin for the
team to organize an A and B team
for the regionals next month.
Bo Jackson signs with Chicago White Sox
801-ES. College Road
Wilmington, NC 28403
800-365-8003
Local 931-8378 Ask for Stephanie
TWIN TRAVEL & CRUISES
WANTS TO SEND YOU AWAY - ON A Fl IN SHIPCRl USE
S J95O0 PER PERSON (PLUS PORT CHARGES $33.00 PP)
SEPTEMBER 5TH, 12TH.OR 19TH 1991
; HIS SPECIAL PRICE INCLUDES YOUR ROUNDTRIP AIRFARE
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SARASOTA, Fla. (AP) � Bo
Jackson signed a one-year contract
with the Chicago White Sox today,
less than two weeksafter itappeared
that a serious hip injury had ended
his baseball career.
Jackson's agent, Richard
Woods, said there was nothing in
the contract that would limit him
from playing football again in the
future. Jackson still is under contract
to the Los Angeles Raiders.
Jackson wasreleased last month
by the KansasGty Royals. Financial
terms were not disclosed.
" feel like a caged animal
Jackson said ata news conference at
the White Sox's spring training
camp.
He said it was hard for him to
get up each morning and pick up
his crutches, which he calls "my
other set of legs
"I'd like to throw them in the
garbage, but my doctor won't let
me he said.
The White Sox said they would
try to determine by the All-Star
break if he would be able to play
this year. The contact also includes
two option years for 1992 and 1993.
Woods said Jackson picked the
White Sox "because they were will-
ing to be patient with him. Their
attitude is if they get him this year,
thafs OK, but if they get him down
the road, thafs OK too
It was not immediately known
how much Jackson would get or
how he would be paid if he did not
play. But White Sox general man-
ager Ron Schueler said the contract
represented "a shared risk for both
parties
Woodssaid Jackson could have
gotten more money, but that was
not the deciding factor.
"Wecould have gotten a hell of
a lot more money if we had shopped
him around like a free agent type of
thing Woods said.
The Atlanta Braves were one
team interested in signing Jackon,
but Braves general manager John
Shuerholz said today Woods told
him Jackson wanted to stay in the
American League.
Woods said other fators in the
decision to sign with the White Sox
were the medical staff and the team's
on-field improvement last year. The
White Sox were second to Oakland
in the AL West in 1990.
"Of all the teams in the league,
the White Sox have the best chance
of going out and getting the ring
Jackson said. "It's not the fame, it's
not the money, it's the chance to go
outand get the world championship
ring
Woods said Jackson and his
wife, Linda, decided last weekend
on the White Sox. They came to
Woodsand said, "We want the Sox
Woodssaid.
Jackson was released by the
Royals on March 18 when team
doctor Steve Joyce determined the
28-year-old outfielder's football-
related hip injury would not allow
him to play baseball this season.
Joyce had also expressed
doubts about Jackson's ability to
return to the baseball or football
field ever again.
But Dr. James Andrews, a
leading orthopedic specialist in the
athletic field.examined Jackson and
did not rule out a return to pro
sports
Jackson has one year left on his
$7.4 million contract with the
Raiders. Raiders owener AI Davis
said the team will stick with him
and expects Bo to be ready to play
this season
r

CELEBRITY CRUISE LINE
"ACTIVE MILITARY FREE"
��WITH PURCHASE OF A REGULAR PRICE CRUISE
��RATE IS BASED ON A DOUBLE OCCUPANCY
PRICES FROM WILMINGTON. NC $795
PRICES FROM CHARLESTON. SC W
CAN ALSO ARRANGE OTHER SPECIAL GROUP RATES
The East Caroliniari is now accepting applications for
Classified Advertising technician. Anyone interested should
apply at The East Carolinian office on the second floor of the
Publications Building, across from Joyner Library.
qAVIO'S
AUTOMOTIVE
foreign k Domestic
PARTS � SfRVlCf
if It cpt ove tfi
510 N, Greene St.
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830-1779
CUSTOM 94ME
PjJ W&ESMA I'D &&SSES
(M or appoi ntment call:
((ittScercyat 757-55.17
TTIXACTWMHXT
cm nteAffxr
'KAscryAWT tkicts
F. N. Wolf & Co Inc
Investment Rankers
VVc are i full-service Investment firm expanding and
looking for entry level Account Executives
We are conducting one on one interviews at the
Ramada Inn
203 W. Greenville Blvd
Saturday April 6th
lor an interview time please call:
fret Piper George Hubbard
i 800 537 2190 RSVP 1-800-582-8444
Raleigh, NC Virginia Beach, VA
We are growing and expanding and we might be looking
for a person just like you to enter our training program.
ECONOMY MINI
STORAGE
USE YOUR
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
SHARE WITH A ROOMMATE
SPECIAL RATES MAY 1 - AUG 31
s�-�
Presents
300 FARMER ST
GREENVILLE
757-0307
Student Budget
Night
2:M)Pher!OYSl-25,MPORTS
2.75 ICE TEAS
�LADIES FREE
F ri The l J E at 5:00 "KEG PARTY" Free Adm 5-8: JO
�i
5T
6
The
ORL
for
SAL
MUmi Caracas 278
Mew York Malaga 578
Chicago-Amsterdam 338
Raleigh-Tokyo 789
los Angeles-Sydney 993
Greensboro-Paris 715
Greensboro-London 595
� rot fv.iudi R��!riCliO"� appty
(oS sutvpct to cfiar�� Oe ways "
'acuity WM available WclcStudy Abroad
Mpami nip�national Student 4 Teacner
EURAIL PASSES ISSUED ON
THE SPOT!
fULt Student Travel CatalogI
Council Travel
703 Ninth Street, ���, Durham
703 Mtnth Street. 9-
919 3�6 44
QUALITY FILM DEVELOPING
VoV
Center
SUPER SAVING COLTONjFORA
T FREE J
j I
j second set of prints
i with every disc or roll of color print film brought in for processing
� offer good through April 15. 1991
ECU Recreational Services Presents
NVcx of War
April 18,1991
Join in the fun at ECU'S Annual Barefoot
on the Mall and show your support to the
Ronald McDonald House
Teams shall consist of ten members (male, female, co-rec) or
individuals may sign up on The Mall
A minimum $1.00 donation per participant requested
s At
To register YOUR team
contact Kendra Curtis
at 757 6387 or stop by
104 Chnstenbury Gym
HouS "v
ECU Student Store Wright Bldg.
Greenville NC 27858
4x6 Prints not included
Coupon Must Accompany Order
Monday Through Saturday 10 AM Until 9 PM,
Sundav 1:30 PM Until 5:30 PM
-arollna east mall and
Hm Plat graanvilla
Your Latest Bonus:
Clinique
Clear Tomorrow'
Your .it no c�tra cjgejhateyer with any
(Unique purchase of 12.00 or more
Super Berry Superlipstick
Fawn SatinStarry Rose Eye Shadow Duo
7 Day Si rubream
I namatuallv Different Moisturizing Lotion
( larifving Lotion 2
1 yebrow CombBrush
One bonus to I customer
CLINIQUE
AaUergy Tested.
i(� Fragrance Free.
Shop Carolina East Mall and The Plaza. Greenville
CLINIQUE
clarifying
HUNGRY PIRATE
(The (Biggest (Burrito
You've "EverSeen!
f�t
Stuffed with beef, rice,
lettuce, beans, tomato bits,
sour cream and covered wiflj
enchilada sai.ee
��? Guaranteed to fill you up!
Bring in your Ballots for the
East Carolinian Key West Contest
521 Cotancfu St.
757 � 1666
$3.45
Strotd2 5'WukdcttF
' 11 �5)rVuJk$nds
r
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The easiest credit a student can get.
As a student, you probably want to
establish credit for the future. That's why
unlike most other banks. Citibank has
made it easy to apply for a Visa or
MasterCard.
You don't even need your parents to
co-sign. All you need is a photocopy of
your current validated student
ID.
And once you become a
Citibank cardmember. you can
use your Citibank card at over 7.6
million establishments and get cash
anytime at over 51,000 Automated
Teller Machines (ATMs) worldwide.
What's more. Citibank offers 24-hour
customer service. 7 days a week. So you
can always reach us whenever you need us.
While other banks give you the run-
around,Citibank believes you should spend
your time reading
Catch 22 Not living it
CITIBANQ
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you need to establish credit but because you're a
student you can't get credit from most banks until
you have established credit so you need to establish
credit but because you're a student you can't get
credit from most banks until you have established
credit so you need to establish credit but because
you're a student you can't get credit from most
banks until you have established credit so you need
to establish credit but because you're a student you
can't get credit from most banks until you have
established credit so you need to establish credit but
because you're a student you can't get credit from
most banks unul you have established credit so you
need to establish credit but because you're a student
you can't get credit from most banks until you have
established credit so you need to establish credit but
because you're a student you can't get credit from
most banks until you have established credit so you
need to establish credit but because you're a student
13
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vAiti moat .
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CATCH 22.
NO CATCH
It s easy to apply for a Citibank Visa or MasterCard
To find out how. just turn the page ?
DfACh HERE MOISTEN ALL SIDES. FOLD AND SEAL APPLICATION
Select One: Citibank Classic MasterCards or I Visa
DMdpfOCOWnng �' MM aEJpi-caf'0 yias cOrTtptata' I s" ' MeM MMf M N A k W Mm � a 3e not app'y to you
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Please sign this authorization
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 4, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 04, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.803
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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