The East Carolinian, April 2, 1991






�JE iEaHt (ftanrliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.65 No.21
Tuesday, April 2,1991
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 12,000
10 Pages
SGA Elections
Candidate for President
SGA Speaker to run unopposed
Alex Martin
By Shannan Copeland
StJtl Writer
Ale Martin, who will mn
unopposed for Student Govern-
ment Association president
Wedneday, wants to strengthen
actions between Green villeand
ECU students.
"W'v have .ni excellent rela-
tionship with the administra-
tion M.irtin said. "And I'd like
to mine that to work the sime
way with the city of Greenville.
The city has to realize that
we are mature young citizens
and we have to realize that the
decisions they make are for the
benefit of Greenville
Martin also slid he would
like to stress voter registration
among the students because city
council elections arc approach-
ing.
Martin, a junior majoring in
information processing, has
Served with the SGA for over a
ear. 1 le was on the student wel-
fare committee, the president's
summer cabinet and he is pres-
ently speaker oi the house
Martin said he hopes to start
a Irishman programcalled Purple
Pages. It will consist ot about 40
freshmen wh will serve as pages
to theexecutive officers, the legis
latureand the judicial branch.
It is modeled after the parts
within the Senate, he said
"I'm aiming at getting the
freshmen interested in the SGA
he said. "And also opening them
up to other opportunities the
campus has to offer
Martin said he would also
like to begin a summer camp that
would be a supplement to orien-
tation.
le said he got the idea at a
national conference from Texas
A&M
"It's more of a long term
goal he said. "It's verv popular
at Texas but it took 30 vears to
build
The program would teach
freshmen about different ECU
traditionsand let everybody get
to know one another, Martin
said.
Martin would also like to
work with the Pirate Gub to
bring Kick more traditions in
sports.
"I am really impressed with
other schools that have tradi-
tions to go along with athletics
he said. "It is really good for the
morale of the students
Martin said he plans on
holding forums once or twice a
vear. At these forums, anyone
may come and ask questions or
state problems to the executive
branch.
As for the possible 50 per-
cent parking fee increase: "I'll
oppose it unless they can prove
otherwise that we need this in-
crease he said.
Martin said he looks for-
ward to working with the ex-
ecutive branch, the legislature
and the student body.
"I will represent all students
to the best of my ability he
said.
Some of his campus activi-
ties include the ECU Board of
headers, the SGA Transit Board
and the Fine Arts Funding
Board.
Candidate for Vice-President
Black to stress relations with city
By LeClair Harper
Assistant News Fditor
Student lovemment Asso-
ciation Pav Representative
Robin Black will be running
unopposed tor SGA vice presi-
dent Wednesday.
In her role86 vice president
for SGA, one oi her main goals is
to work wi th minorities to make
the campus loss segregated.
Black, a junior communica-
tions major from Greensboro,
also hopes to help get freshmen
more involved in SGA and to
improve relations with the city
of Greenville.
She sud that she plans to
attend the city council meetings
with the president.
"I don't think (the city) re-
alizes how important ECU is to
Greenville she said. "(I want
to) show the city that we're here
to make Greenville a better
place.
Black said she hopes UI work
with campus recycling and possi-
bly find a way to work with Gre-
enville in setting up a recycling
plan.
Black also wants to improve
relations with students and fac-
ulty.
"I think (the faculty) need to
be encouraged to cater more to
the students she slid.
She wants faculty members
that students consider good
teachers to work with the rest of
the faculty to improve education.
Black is a member oi Sigma
Sigma Sigma Sorority and is vice
president for the Panhellenic
Council. She also works with
Purple Pride, a program for fresh-
men to increase minority aware-
J
ncss, and the ECU Board of Lead-
ers, an organization of minority
leaders.
She said her ability to work
Robin Black
with people, her new ideas, and
her ability to get jobs done will
enable her to boa successful SGA
vice president
After grad ua tion, Black hope
to work in advertising. She is
also interested in law.
"I'm planning on going to
law school, but that's a while in
the future she said.
Candidate for Secretary
Incumbent to run without opposition
Katie Carstens
By LaToya Hankins
Staff Writer
Incumbent Katie Carstens,
a junior marketing major from
Eden, N.C is running Unop-
posed for secretary of the Student
Government Association elec-
tion on April 3.
Her duties will include tak-
ing minutesat all SGA meetings,
keeping the roll books up to date
and appointing legislators to
committees as space becomes
available.
She became interested in stu-
dent government in her sopho-
more year through a friend.
Carstens served as a legisla-
tor until she wasappointed by the
Speaker of the House Alex Mar-
tintoserveoutthe term ofa former
secretary.
After getting to know the job
and the people, she felt secure
enough to run for re-election.
She has mixed feelings about
running unopposed.
'It is sort of sad that out of
16,000 students that there is not
that much interest in student
government, "she said. 'There are
three executive officers running
unopposed. That is not a very
good representation
Her goals for the upcoming
year are varied. She hopes to in-
crease student involvement in
SGA expand activities in the leg-
islation and increase awareness
of what the SGA does.
"A lot of things that are re-
ported don't get reported in the
right way she said.
She also plans to work with
unopposed presidential candi-
date Alex Martin on plans to
integrate freshmen into student
government.
She has hopesof improving
students' relationship with ECU
Public Safety and theGreenville
City Council.
Martin is looking forward
to working with Carstens in his
new role. T couldn't function
wi thout her he said. "She does
more than a secretary. She is
very instrumental in running
the legislation
In her spare time, Carstens
works as a nanny for a family
with three children. She wishes
that she had time to be involved
in more activities, but with
studying and SGA, "There is
not enough hours in the day for
me to accomplish everything
Candidates for Treasurer
Hillard stresses experience in race
Eric Milliard
By Jim Rogers
Staff Writer
Eric Hilliard,a candidate for
Student Government Associa-
tion treasurer in Wednesday's
election, has held four positions
in the SGA and was one of two
legislators nominated for Legis-
lator of the Year for 1990-91.
"I know how things work
said Hilliard, a junior Finance
major.
If elected to the SGA Trea-
surer position. Hilliard wants to
create the position of ECU audi-
tor. This person would be in
charge of checking all of the re-
ceipts from groups receiving
money from the SGA to ensure
the money is spent only for what
it was intended.
Hilliard said that there
should bea moredefinablecriteria
for student groups seeking monev
from the SGA. He said a way to
better educate student groups
aboutSG A fund allocation should
be set up, such as a weekly infor-
mation table set in front of the
Student Store.
Hilliard would like to raise
the maximum amount of money
available through SGA student
loans from the current limit of
$25 to $50.
"The loan limit should re-
flect inflationary rates Hilliard
said. He said the rising costs of
text books is justification for the
change.
Hilliard also expressed in-
terest in creating a council of
Recreational Services represen-
tatives who would be in charge
of funds for club sport teams
such as Ultimate frisbee, rugby
and lacrosse.
Hilliard was sophomore
class president in 1989-90 and is
serving as the SGA representa-
tive for solkitation and canvass-
ing.
Beamer looks to Treasurer's future
By Jim Rogers
Staff Writer
Junior Garv Beamer, candi-
date for Student Government
Association treasurer, said
building for the future and stu-
dent service are the key issues
facing the next treasurer.
"I am looking ahead to the
year 2000 Beamer said.
Beamer, a finance major
from Mount Airv, believes the
SGAshould "make more money
from money" through invest-
ments.
He said last year the SGA
investment return was less than
4 percent. Beamer would like to
see this increase to 8 percent by
making investments such as
certificates of deposit.
Beamer slid the SGA should
also solicit more money from ECU
alumni like other schools in the
state do.
This extra money could be
putinaseparatcaccount and used
for a matching funds program,
Beamer said.
The matching fu nds program
would be a way for student
groups to raise money on cam-
pus and the SGA would match a
certain percentage of the funds
raised.
This will increase service to
the student body and give stu-
dent groups a new way to be
awarded money, Beamer said.
Beamer said the student loan
limit of $25isappropriatebecause
it allows the SGA to service as
many students as possible with
lia.
Gary Beamer
the $6000 allotted each semester
for loans.
Beamer feels he is well-
suited for the office.
"I've got what it takes to
make a difference Beamer said.
Fry to support students in allocation
By Jim Rogers
Staff Writer
Michelle Fry
Michelle Fry, a sophomore
Speech, Language and Auditory
Pathology major, said that sup-
porting students will be her main
concern if she is elected Student
Government Associa tion treasurer
on Wednesday.
Fry said the SGA treasurer's
most important job will be to listen
and make fair decisions concern-
ing the allocation of money.
Fry said that history should
not be a factor in deciding how
much money a groupor organiza-
tion is allocated, because every
group's needs change each year.
"It needs to be decided on a
basis of need Fry said.
Fry, of Fremont, N.C, pres-
ently serves as the Residence Hall
Association treasurer for the 1990-
91 year.
She said that her posi tion with
the RH A hasallowed her to inter-
act with the SGA and tiecome
familiar with the duties of the
SGA treasurer.
If elected, Fry hopes to keep
the SGA running smoothly by
making judgements to support
students.
Fry sees the SGA Treasurer
position as a challenge.
New honor society to hold inductions
By Carrie Armstrong
Staff Writer
Omicron Delta Kappa, one of
ECU's newest honor societies will
be inducting approximately 40
members on April 14.
On March 25, Omicron Delta
Kappa became an official campus
organization after a three-year en-
deavor to become established at
ECU.
According to the organization's
historical records, Richard Edwards,
the executive assistant to the chan-
cellor, began working to form an
Omicron Delta Kappa Circle on Omicron Delta Kappa exists
campus in the fall of 1987,and in the primarily to recognize student
fall of 1988 a seriousattempt to form scholars who ha veachieved special
a chapter was undertaken. distinction in leadership. To be eli-
Eight ECU employees who are gible for membership a student
ODK members were located and must meet the following minimum
met several times during that fall
semester to plan and outline the
necessary steps to seek national
recognition. Student nominees were
sought out � 36 of whom were
invited to a reception hosted by the
Chancellor on March 15,1989. Af-
terwards, the students met several
times to work on a formal petition
for a charter.
requirements:
� Two semesters as a full-time
student at ECU.
� Junior, senior or graduate
standing.
� A minimum cumulative
grade point average of 3.00 if an
undergraduateor3.80ifagraduate.
� Exemplary character as evi-
See Honor, page 2
INSIDE TUESDAY
Editorial
4 Features
5 Sports
n
It is up to students to make
Greenville's recycling project
successful.
Val Kilmer recreates the legend
of Jim Morrison in the feature
film The Doors
( lasMtied �'
In baseball, the Pirates beat
Jacksonville 6-4 and tied them
in a ram-shortened game.
- �.





2 BI?e Emit (Harolfnfan April 2, 1991
-
CRIMP SENE
Officers investigate report of assault
on female at Minges Coliseum
March 27
1538- Harrington Field: assisted another officer pertaining toa
tight between the players and coaches. Same was settled by staff
members.
1854 - Minges Coliseum (pool area): investigated a suspicious
person report. Terson was gone on arrival.
2055�Public Safety: took a report of an assault on a female
relating to above suspicious person incident at 1854. Two officers
were called out for same.
0128 -Eighth and Cotanche streets: student given verbal warn-
ing for speeding and driving left of center. Student was advised to
park vehicle for having consumed a quantity of alcohol.
0217 -Scott Residence Hall courtyard: responded to a brawl.
Subjects were located and a report was filed.
March 28
1729�Belk Residence Hall: investigated a hit and run report. A
minor accident Report was filed.
2342�Fifth Street and Forest Hill Drive: non-student issued
(ampus citation for moving violations. Subject was turned over to
friends for transportation.
0028 -Evans and 14th streets: stopped a motorist at the request
of a .reenville officer. Driver was turned over to GFD officer for
.e.st.
0118 Belk Residence Hall (northwest): stopped a motorist for
speeding. Student was charged with driving while intoxicated and
e tpired driver's license.
0120 College Hill Drive and 14th streets: stopped student for
I eding. Same was charged with DVV1.
0244 -Belk Residence Hall: assisted residence hall staff in locat-
11 ig subject that had broken out the glass of a fire box. Were unable
to locate subject.
0518 �Third and Reade streets and Fifth and Reade streets:
three vehicles found to have driver's side windows broken out.
In vestigatorscalled out for possiblebreakingand enteringof vehicles.
March 29
192( -Public Safety: took a communicating threats report.
0327 -Cotten Residence Hall: campus citations issued to male
subject and female resident for visitation violation.
March 30
0022�Aycock Residence Hall (east): administrative campus
v itation given to student for breech of security.
0424�AustinBuilding(west):investigated report of unknowns
andalizing a bike rack.
March 31
2110 Scott Residence Hall: investigated an explosive device
thrown in the area.
2223 Clement Residence Hall: investigated a weapon viola-
tion. The weapon was not found.
Crime Scene is Uken from official ECU Public Safely Log.
Media Board to survey
students on yearbook
By Shannan Copeland
Staff Writer
The main thing it might effect
is whether there will be a magazine
format said Fran Frazier, chair
On Wednesday and Thursday, person of the media board.
students will have the opportunity
to fill out a survey on how they feel
about the yearbook situation.
On these days, there will be a
booth in front of the student store
from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.
The media board members,
who drew up the survey, will man
the booth and tally up the results on
Sunday.
Frazier said other schools, in
eluding UNC Charlotte, use this
format.
The magazine format is not
bulky like the old yearbook, Frazier
said.
Frazier said they are looking to
find out if the new style appeals to
students and if students are willing
to produce it.
SG A gives out $3,332 during
10-minute meeting Monday
By Shannan Copeland
Staff Writer
Two organizations received
money in Monday night's Student
Government Association meeting.
Phi Sigma Tau, a national phi-
losophy honor society, received
$2,000.
The honor society will hold a
Honor
dejwte on the effects of war in the
Middle East on April 9.
The Occupational Therapy
Student Organization received
$1332. They plan to use the monev
they received to attend a conference
in Cincinnati.
In other business, the SGA
passed a constitution for the Hospi-
tality Management Association
Continued from page 1
denced by the submission of three
character references, at least two of
which must be from faculty or staff
members of ECU.
� The achievement of special
distinction in at least one of five
major areas of leadership.
'Teople axv nominated bv 01-
therdeansordepartnvntheadsand
then those people are asked to fill
out an application which basically
asks GPA and extracurnailar ac-
tivities" said Jeff Skillen, who will
be inducted on April 14. "Then a
commit tee within the group judges
it against this point system that the
nationals gives us. It's based on a
five point system judging leader-
ship, athletic ability, artistic ability
� that sort of thing. The point of
OPEN-MIC NIGHT
TONIGHT
8:00 PM
STUDENT UNION
in the
UNDERGROUND
(Basement of Mendenhall)

Come out for some great entertainment and
help us decide who's best.
This is the UNDERGROUND'S last
show of the year!
Free Admission and Refreshments
Door Prizes!
Brought to you by the
Student Union Coffeehouse Committee.
STUDLNl UNION
Omicron Delta Kappa is to get as
wide a cross section of the univer-
sity as we possibly can.
"What we do is, for example,
under leadership if you are the
president of a club, or student gov-
ernment president you get five
points he said. 'The vice presi-
dent of a club gets four points, sec-
retary ofa club receives three points,
and soon. Then wegodowneachof
the headings and total up the
number of points, and x number of
piMntsequalsadmissionintoODK
Skillen said the committee that
judges potential members is set up
on an ad hoc basis comprised of
three members and the faculty ad-
visor and because of the point sys-
tem used to induct members, Omi-
cron Delta Kappa is a very selec
circle.
Tve met a lot of people in it
(ODK) that I otherwise wouldn't
ha ve met Skillen said. "Everybody
is so much into what they're doing,
and when you get to this level, ev-
erybody is so busy and such a per-
fectionist in their own right that you
would never meet them outright
Skillen said the organization
does community service activities,
such as helping with the scholar's
weekend that the university has for
select high school students in April.
The society will help to provide
housing for that event and make
follow-up phone calls to judge the
students' reaction to the university.
Katherine Jetter, president of
the society and nvmber of the char-
ter group, said before the organiza-
tion got early support from Chan-
cellor Eakin, who was a member of
ODK at Bowling Green University.
Jetter said ODK members can
nominate other students as poten-
tial members because they tend to
know of students who would meet
ODK's criteria. However, a nomi-
nation from a member does 1 I
guarantee that student membership
intothe society.They still have t og
through the application and point
system process.
Jetter said that what makes
ODK unique is that, "unlike other
honor organizations it recognizes
leadershi p as the strong poi nt other
than just scholastic ability
Cbtudent
jvernment
Association
APPLICATIONS
are currently being
accepted for
seats on the
Honor Board
and the position of
Attorney General.
Applications are
available in the SGA
office (upstairs
Mendenhall) or
209 Whichard.
For more information,
contact
Maria DeNoia
at 757-4184.
Communists cl
Albania's first
TIRANA, Albania (AV,
( ornmunists charted victory Mon-
day in Albania's first free election in
more than hi) years, saying they
would win about two-thirds of the
seats in a new parliament
The main opposition group
conceded it would fall short of (Dic-
ing the Communists bum power,
but predicted the party would fall
within months in Albania, which
� - List haa �
muruststr nghold.
N ffi lal results from Sunday -
voting wore released
��' I - municabc �� ; rimi-
alkan na-
tion, v.h) h is stn
neariyahalf-centuryofStalinist
rile and international i� 1 ition

ernbarrassingdefeats. The Alba
; resident and party teada
-
apital tea little kn
and the f ireign minister i. st as well
Xbehl,�� a entral I �
mitteesecretaryofthf Pan
the Communist! pred
fftcial results would give the partY
fc� ittw thirds of the 250seal
People's Assembly parlui
mi said the results w
important victor) I thi part)
that sh. �wed K � 1 � .
He said the (
willing to cooperate 1
hon in parliar
a new president ar
titution
But Sab Berish
the main opp
Party, told about
I
with the I
TheDf
in at least!
in the capita of 1
pro! 1 nir I
. .
( .
I
! 1, �
pi I
:
lei � � : .
-
-
SI)? EaatGJaroli!
Director of
Advertising
John E Semelsbeiger II
Repi
i )avid
Gi
rim
1 atric t
Production Manager
Mary Piland
DISP1 AY ADVERTISING
per column inch gr
National$6.00
local Open Rate $5.00
Bulk Contract
Discounts Available
Business 1 lours: Monday - Fridav c)
757-6366
RESERVE OFF
s
V
V
Mara-
rs -
?
BELIEVE
Excitei
tion. ar
lege
develop
take or
Ther
means
For Information Contact: Captain Gary B. Lear





ght taut Carolinian April 2, 1991 13
HI
;
be a
i
d to survey
yearbook
"The main thing it might effect
is whether there will bo a magazine
format said Fran Frazier, chair-
person erf tho media board.
Praziet nik! other schools, In-
cluding UNC Charlotte, use this
format
The magazme format is not
bulky like the old yearbook, Frazier
,r said they are looking to
� the new style appeals to
,nd it students ate willing
to produce it
ut $3,332 during
neeting Monday
effects of war in die
d � cn April 9.
I itional Therapy
zation received
to use the money
��end a conference
iti
� s ness, the SGA
�nfortherfoepi-
enl ssociation.
tued from page 1
mber of the char-
said before tho organiza-
port from Chan-
was rnemberol
i reen University.
n members can
� students as poten-
bers because thev tend to
a who would meet
nteria Il wever, a nomi-
n a merrier does not
nt membership
�� ha veto go
n and point
- said that what makes
unlike other
ns it recognizes
the strong point other
� . ll "illtV
ident
ernment
sociatior)
ICATIONS
urrently being
xepted for
leats on the
lonor Board
he position of
irney General.
lications are
tble in the SGA
ice (upstairs
ndenhall) or
�9 Whichard.
ore information,
contact
aria DeNoia
it 757-4184.
Communists claim victory in
Albania's first free election
TIRANA, Albania (AP) �
Communists claimed victory Mon-
day in Albania's first free election in
more than 60 years, saying they
would win about two-thirds of the
seats in a new parliament.
The main opposition group
conceded it would fall short of forc-
ing the Communists from power,
but predicted the party would fall
within months in Albania, which
was Europe's last hard lino Com
nuinisl stronghold.
Nootticul resuHshomSunday s
voting were released. Transporta-
tion and communicationare primi-
tive in the impoverished Balkan na-
tion, which is struggling to emerge
from nearly a halfentur) -ot Stalinist
rule and international isolation
TheCcmmurusts suffered some
embarrassing cfefeats. The Albanian
president and party leader, Rami �
Alia, lost his parliamentary race in
Ihecapital toa little know nengineer,
and the foreign ministei lost as well.
XheKI Ghoni, a Central Com-
mittee secretary of the Party ot Labor
the Communist' predicted
. 'tticial results would give the party
about two-thirds of the 250 seats ina
now People's Assembly parliament
Ghoni said the results were an
important victor) few the part)
that showed it "enjoys the full trusl
of the peopk
He said the Communists are
willing to cooperate with the opposi-
tion in parliament, which is to name
a new president and adopt a new
constitution
But Sali Berisha, a co-leader of
the main opposition Democratic
Partv, told about 3,000 supporters at
a rally "there will be no coalition"
with the Communists.
'rheDemocratshad an early lead
in at least 20of the 29 voting districts
in the capital of Tirana, according to
preliminary unofficial results based
on partial returns and opposition
sources.
Ghoni said the Communists
generally won 30 to 40 percent of the
vote in the capital. Earlier results
indicated the Communists would
prevail in the countryside and the
opposition would capture the does.
AskedaboutAlia'stuture Ghoni
sud Aha would continue to load the
party. Sources said Alia won only
about one third ii the vote in his
parliamentary contest.
Democratic Party supporters
predicted they would ultimately
prevail despite the election results.
"Yesterday, we marked not a
Democratic victory, but a victory for
democracy' said partv co-leader
GramozPashko "The( ornmunists
who sucked our blood for 46 years
aivtinisliod Withintvonii. nth- th. )
MEET THE CANDIDATE
Gary BEAMER
will be in pieces
'The democratic forces will be
decisive in the futmvlifein Albania
Berisha told the crowd at the party's
rally. '1 f we could n't win completely
todav, we shall gain it completely
alter some months
"liwn with the dictatorship
the crowd responded.
Alia, 66, took power in 1985 fol-
lowingthedeathotAlbania'sStalinist
h under, Enver Hoxha. He legalized
opposition parties and called the
elections after huge pro democracy
protests and an exodus that began
last when asylum-seekers began
storming embassies.
The voting was described by
Western observers as free, though
tainted by continued Communist
domination over the media and gov-
ernment, there were no reports of
election -related violence.
Some opposition leaders, how-
ever, raised accusations of ballot
fraud and other problems. Aspokes-
man for the 1 lemocrats, Gene Polio,
said he had received reportsof police
intimidation ot Democratic candi-
dates and supporters, unsealed bal-
lot boxes, andommunist posters
and suckers on the wallsoi polling
stations
The official ATA news agency
said 95 percent of the 1.9 million
cligil '�� voti rs turned out.
for SGA Treasurer
Qualifications
�Major: BusinessFinance
�7 years International &
Domestic Business Experience
�5 years Small Business
Management
Investment Portfolio
Management
�Any questions? Call me.
752-7081
)
V
Vote April 3
my motto
LeadFollowor Get Out of the Way
r
QHp iaHtCarattrtan
Director of
Advertising
John F. Sanelsberger D
Advertising
Representatives
David Bailey
Greg Jones
Tim Peed
Patrick Pitzer
Production Manager
Mary Piland
DISPI AY ADVERTISING
per column inch
(National$6.00
1 oca! Open Rate $5.00
Bulk Contract
Discounts Available
Business I lours: Monday - Friday 9:00 - 5:00
757-6366
Introducing
Stock and Custom Ribbons
from Greenville Graphics
Now you have a source for those special oc-
casions when only a ribbon will complete a
ci'i hr.ition.
Ribbon have touched all our lives at one
time or another. From spelling bees to track
meets Bible stud.es to County Fairs, nbbons
have become part of the American way of life
and now On-enville Graphics can supply stoCK
and custom printed ribbon- to fit almost any
occasion.
When only a ribbon will do, see
a&mm
1310 E. 10th St. � Greenville
Phone 752-0123 � Fax 752-0620
PINEBROOK APTS.
formerly Rivcrbluff
under new ownership
?Renovations Underway
1 Bedroom apts & 2 bedroom townhouses
12 price special for June & July (condhionar.
?Water, sewer and Basic Cable included in rent
p00l Low Deposit
?Pets Allowed (conditional) I aundry Room
?Accepting applications August 1
121 Riverbluff Rd.
758-4015
-umt nr ��� t.
RESERVE OFFICERS TR

aiNING CORPS
ECONOMY MINI
STORAGE
USE YOUR
STUDENT
DISCOUNT

J

SHARE WITH A ROOMMATE .
SPECIAL RATES MAY 1 - AUG 31
BELIEVE IT OR NOT, THIS GOT
IS IN CLASS.
Excitement and adventure is the course descrip-
tion and Army ROTC is the name. It's the one col-
lege elective that builds your self-confidence,
develops your leadership potential and helps you
take on the challenges of command.
There's no obhgauon until your junior year, and that
means there's no reason not to try it out nght now.
This Week's Entertainment
r
VfeA Anril 3
Cold Sweat
Thnrs April 4
The Popes
Friday April 5
Mind over Matter
ARMY
THE SMARTEST COLLEGE
COURSE TOUCAN TAKE.
For informal Contact Capia.n Gary B. Lcamon Has, Carol.na Un.versUy ARMY ROTC Raw, B,dg-Rm 344 757-69746967
Sawn1� April 6
Sex Police
Hours
Mon. 11 am-3pm
Tue. 11 am-3pm
Wed. II am-3pm
9pm-l am
Thurs. Ham-lam
Fri. 1 lam-lam
Sat-9pm-lam
513Cotanchc
(located across from UBE)
758-0080





Sire 3aat (Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Joseph L. Jenkins Jr General Manager
Michael D. Albuquerque, Managing Editor
Blair Skinner, News Editor
Matt King, Features Editor
Matt Mumma, Sports Editor
Amy Edwards, Copy Editor
LeClair Harper, Asst. News Editor
Stuart Oliphant, Asst. Features Editor
Kerry Nester, Asst. Sports Editor
Jason Johnson, Copy Editor
Doug Morris, Editorial Production Manager Larry Huggins, Circulation Manager
Jeff Parker, Staff Illustrator Stuart Rosner, Systems Engineer
Chris Norman, Darkroom Technician Phong Luong, Business Manager
Carl a Whitfield, Classified Ads Technician Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The Eist Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that directly affects
ECl I students. During the ECU school year, The East Carolinian puhlishcs twice a week with a circulation of 12,(KX). The East
Carolinian reserves the right to refuse or discontinue any advertisements that discriminate on the basis of age, sex, creed or
national origin. The masthead editorial in each edition does not necessarily represent the views of one individual, bui, rather,
is a majority opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters should
be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit letters for
publication, letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C ,
27834; or call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
Page 4, Tuesday, April 2, 1991
City recycling plan set to begin
On Wednesday at 6 a.m the city of
i ireenville will begin its most aggressive
md extensive recycling program to date.
City sanitation workers will begin col-
.ecting recyclable materials � newspapers,
aluminum cans, cardboard and plastic � in
a new public works' project.
The goal of this pilot project is to reduce
the a mount of unrecycled materials disposed
in area landfills each year.
And the beauty of the project, apart
trom the obvious "greener environment"
benefits, is that it will not cost taxpayers any
additional money to implement.
In fact, it will cost $3,000 less (per capita)
to recycle these materials than it would cost
to dump them in a landfill.
The project will run for a six-month
'rial period (on a bi-monthly basis) in the
following-neighborhoods:
�On the first and third Wednesday of
each month, in the Greenville Terrace,
Moyewood, College View, West
Meadowbrook and Chatham Circle neigh-
borhoods.
�On the second and fourth Wednesday
of each month, in the East Meadowbrook,
Johnston Heights, Colonial Trailer Park,
Wilson Acres and Green Springs neighbor-
hoods.
It is more than a coincidence that stu-
dents account for the majority of the residents
under observation in this project. As the
younger generation, we are the force behind
the current movement to create a better
environment.
Now we must concentrate our efforts
on making this project as successful as pos-
sible. Af terall, this is what many of us have
wanted for so long.
City officials have alreadv said if the
program is a success, plans will be made to
increase the project's scope to cover all Gre-
enville residents for another trial period of
18 months.
We need to prove to city officials and
the communitv that we are more than just
visitors in their environment; we are equal
partners in a desire to create a new atmo-
sphere of cooperation.
The city has placed the future of
curbside recvcling in our hands. It is up to us
to follow through on what we have re-
quested.
yitttmHrHHtP STlltX-NTS AT EASTCAROUHA
S L UNIVERSITY'S CAMAiS TO FlHO OUT NMT T�CV
JrttfT TO WEAR ON TH�IR COLUC� ftApiOl
YOU CAN hear all
( That on -me OTHER
STATOtiS PWW77
HrtAT AWUT
COU�GEW$Cf

WZMB, new rock 'n' roll deserve chance
By Matt King
Editorial Columnist
The other day, a friend of
mine told me that he couldn't
imagine anyone enjoying WZMB,
our campus radio station. Fine.
The next day I was working
outside with another friend who
ktvps the radio tuned to WRDU (a
local station of a lesser magnitude
than WZMB). When he went to
getlunch I took theopportunity to
changetheradiostationtoWZMB.
When my friend returned
and realized what had happened
he said, "What station is this?"
Theanswer wasobviousso I didn't
reply.
His next statement, as he
marched over to the radio to
change the dial was, "I ain't
iistenin' to no goddamn ya-ya
music I chuckled and kept
working.
Often, after someone hears
me verbally bash some retarded
rock dinosaur, like Boston for ex-
ample, they will ask me, "Well,
what kind of music do you like?"
In years gone by I might have
said any of a number of things.
In 1981 I might have said
Punk Rock. Circa 1983 it might
have been New Wave. I probably
would have said Alternative Rock
in 1985. A year or two later I would
have called it College Music.
For a while, the whole idea
of what to call the music I like
puzzled me, until it came to me
one day.
The music used in WZMB's
format can only becal led one thing
� rock 'n' roll.
Not only is it rock'n'roll, but
it is rock 'n' roll coming from
musicians who play it and record
it the way rock 'n' roll was origi-
nally started.
Think about it. When rock
music started, parents hated it.
Narrow-minded people thought
it was weird, and most musicians
in the industry had to work non-
stop to make any kind of decent
living.
Nowadays, the bands that
most people consider to be rock
stars(Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton,
Phil Collins, The Law, Peter
Gabriel, Heart, Van "Hagar
David Lee Roth and the Grateful
Dead just to name a few�I won't
even mention the metal bands)
know that no matter what they
put in the record stores, people
will flock to it.
Where's the inspiration you
say? There is none.
I don't want to say that bands
like the Rolling Stones aren't ca-
pable of making good rock 'n' roll,
because they have done it in the
past. But at this mega-millionaire
stage in their career it is only a
possibility, not a probability.
The real rock musicians are
out there everywhere, wri ting and
recording every day and playing
every night.
The real present-day rock
musicians put out two albums and
tour three times every 18 months.
The real rock musicianscan't
smash their guitars on stage be-
cause they only have one.
I could easily list 20 of these
bands, but you can listen to WZMB
for an hour and hear them your-
selves.
Their are two reasons that I
suggest that you listen to this "new
music" being played on college
radio:
First, it truly is great music
that will blow a breath of fresh air
into any CD library.
And second, you had better
get used to it now because in 20
years it will be blasting ou t of your
16-year-old's bedroom.
Average SAT Score vs. Percentage of Students
Taking SAT (1989)
Mirrimum Wag
Maxwell's Silver Hammer
Raising SAT scores ignores problem
By Scott Maxwell
Editorial Columnist
Everybody remembers. Out
of all 50 states plus the District of
This doesn't prove that
North Carolina doesn't have the
nation's lowest SAT scores, but it
makesonesuspicious. I remember
that in my Florida high school,
which prided itself on regularly
doesn't look like we had thou
it did.
(There's a big ironv h. -
the way. Citizens anrj -
around the country � inclu
to be fair, The East Carohnw.
Columbia, North Carolina's 1989
Scholastic Aptitude Test scores having'the highest SAT scores in apparently are too po
were the lowest.
Never mind that we had
been 30th out of 51 just the year
before. Taking last place was the
laststraw,and lawmakersdecided
to take action. Those SAT scores
had to go up.
Cut to 1991. They're still
debating what to do, and the whole
thing is getting increasingly wor-
risome. Some of their plans are
simply battling. For instance, one
scheme would withhold driver's
licenses from students who
dropped out ot high school.
This approach has plentv of
fatal flaws, not the least of which
is that it won't raise SAT scores.
Students who drop out of high
school are not generalb- those
whose SAT scores would be sig-
nificantly above average.
fortunately, most proposals
make more sense. Limiting the
number of hours students can
work while attending school, for
instance, and expanding the
availability of advanced place-
ment courses, stand a betterchance
oi improving standardized test
results. (They ought to have con-
sidered changing thecurnculum's
emphasis from mastering skills to
mastering thinking, or instilling
in students a love of learning for
its own sake, but for some reason
no such proposals areon the table.)
But in the midst of all this
raise-the-SAT-scoresemi-hvstena,
one small fact has been over-
looked. Believe it or not, in 1989,
North Carolina didn't have the
lowest SAT scores in the nation!
What we did have was the
lowest average SAT score. But
there's more to comparing SAT
scores than looking at the average.
Among cther things, one also
needs to consider the percentage
of students in each state who took
the test.
A graph of the raw data (like
the one beside this column) hints
that, asa general trend, the smaller
the percentage of students in a
state who took the test, the better
that state's average. Statistical
analysis confirms what the eye
suggests: there's a strong correla-
tion here.
the county, students who were grounded in math to detect s-
high academic achievers were the claim that North Carolinas I
encouraged to take the SAT and average SAT score was the nati
students who didn't do as well in lowest, is misleading I w
school were not encouraged. I also
know that this selective encour-
agement was not practiced at other
high schools in the county.
I suspect that something
similar is happening on a national
scale. I'll bet that in Iowa, the state
with the highest averageS AT score
and the second-lowest percentage
of students taking the test, guid-
ance counselors habitually en-
courage top students � and only
top students � to take the SAT.
Further, I'll bet that this dtx-sn't
regularly happen here in North
Carolina.
At any rate, it'sa sale bet that
if only a few of the students in a
state are taking the test, those
students are generally higher
achievers than the average. So in
states like Iowa, the students who
take the test are probably not a
representative sample but rather
are toward the high end of the
bell-shaped curve, and states like
North Carolina are getting more
representative samples.
Think of it this wav. Sup-
pose all states were asked to take a
sample oi their population and
report the average income of the
sample. Suppose further that Iowa
sampled the richest five percent of
its population, and NorthCarolina
sampled any 57 percent � even
its richest 57 percent.
Unsurprisingly, we'd probablybe
led to believe that Iowa was a much
richer state than North Carolina.
Iowa may indeed be a richer
state than North Carolina, and its
students may also get higher SAT
scores. But in neither case can we
conclude this is true simply from
what we have observed here; all
we really know is that in both
cases Iowa's top five percent does
better on average than North
Ca rolina'stop57 percent. Bigdeal.
Taking into account the per-
centage of individuals sampled in
each state is a step toward pro-
ducing a more accurate picture,
and at least with SAT scores we
begin to find that the real picture
have seen it myself it it .�. ren'tfot
a statistics professor hen
comparatively speaking I n
at math.)
It's almost painful to have1
point this out, since educati m
form in this state is long -
bv any measure. It's temptr
to leave the legislators a ne a
refrain from pointing out thti
they're doing what they're doing
for all the wrong reasons
Still, it must be done Sn
seemingly low SAT scores wen
the motivation for reform,
likelv that the goal of R I rm n
be raising the SAT scores
This is bad because 'it n A
improving education incidental-
if reform improves education, s
much the better, but it must filS
and foremost improve standard-
ized teM scores
In fart, we're alreadv seeing
signs that this is the cast practi-
cally all the reforms are aimed it
the students who take the 5A1
high school students, i- if educa-
tion at the elementary and
high school levels were irrelevart
Conversely, we risk devalu-
ing improvements in education
that don't lead to better s- T vons
If, by some wild chance. Nor!
Carolina's schools wore to Star)
teaching students how to thai
how to creatively apply know
edge, how to spot flaws in argu-
ments, and so on � SAT scores
might stay the same, even though
graduates were much better edu-
cated.
As it happens, we may not
run into either of these problem
for quite some time. It's likelv that
few of the proposed education
reforms will come to fruition, since
recent budget cuts mean fewfl
teachers as well as, read mv lips
no new textbooks.
But when la wmakersdo start
trying to improve North Carolina
schools � whether it's next ye
or next decade � don't let them
get away with just producing
bigger numbers.
Letter To The Editor
Reader finds
humor in Gulf
War column
To The Editor:
I would like to reply to an
editorial by Mr. Darek
McCuller's titled "Gulf War il-
lustrates oppression of blacks
I enjoyed the editorial a
great deal and found it highly
humorous, but 1 am unclear on
Mr. McCullers thinking on
certain points.
As a member of the prob-
lematic, dominating, Anglo-
Saxon manipulators, I recog-
nize tha t blacks often are treated
unjustly by individuals, but I
doubt we are planning this in-
justice in a great spooky con-
spiracy.
I currently am unaware
of who our secret leaders are as
I am just an "American exten-
sion Perhaps Mr. McCullers
could point them out for us.
Also could he please tell
me if Gen. Colin Powell is se-
cretly in on it and betraying his
race; he seemed pleased with
the results in the Middle East.
Mr. McCullers also de-
mand to let the Middle East have
an "Arab conclusion but at the
same time, he included a desire
for a U.N. contingency force of
50,000-100,000 troops. Are these
troops to be all Arabs?
Since we whites can't be
trusted, can we use Africans and
African Americans from the
United Nations?
If so, how does this sit with
Mr. McCuller's distaste for the
African Americans' "dispro-
portionate numbers" of "sweat,
blood and toil" represented in
the coalition forces.
By the way, the last infor-
mation I got on American casu-
alties in the war showed more
killed or injured "Anglo Sax
ons" than African Americans
so this must have been propa-
ganda from our secret leaders.
Gee, these guys are really on
top of details.
And concerning his ref-
erence to Thomas Jefferson, the
Virginia slaveholder makes a
great role model, considenng
be was mad at the British for
not returning over 8,000
American slaves after the
Revolutionary War,
In conclusion, as a mem-
ber of the most evil race to ever
walk the earth, I have one last
question. McCullers states
"this will not be the case in the
future" asa warning, but if this
is true, exactly what kind and
humane new world is it he is
predicting?
Mark Adams
Graduate student
History Education
WASHINGTON (AP) � Mil-
lions of Americans began earning
larger paychecks Monday as the
federal minimum wage jumped by
45 cents an hour to $425, but orga-
nized labor said the boost falls well
short of lifting many workers out of
poverty.
"They can't support a family
on this and in many cases can't
support themselves said Rudy
Oswald, chief economist of the AFL-
ClO, which wants the base wage
increased to $5.75 an hiur by April
1994.
The increase in the minimum
wage from $3.80 an hour is the
second step of a two part increase
Congress enacted in 199 after a
longand fierce battle with the White
House. President Bush had vetoed
an earlier version heconsidered tc
hard on businesses.
The first stepl
took effect a year
minimum wage wj
hour to$3.80. It wc
in nearly a decade
About3millio
the minimum waj
higher-paid wor
benefit because tH
pressure on empk
wages by comparJ
Sen Edward
Mass hairmano
and Human Resoi
called the 4
Roofs increase,
low-wage workei
"Just to resl
intheReagai I
should be $5.1!
Kennedy said
close the gap :nj
tinuingexploitati
Serb clan announc
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia (AP)
� AnethnicSerbencIavein Croatia
said Monday it was seceding from
the pro-Western republic to )oin
Serbia The declaration by Krajuu
further increased tensions m Yu-
goslavia, where two people died in
a weekend clash.
Krajina'sdecisiontoanneAiLselt
to Serbia, Yugoslavia's largest and
most populous republic, was an-
nounced at a rally by kra jink's
president, Milan Batik, and broad
cast by l'� li-
the capital i �
Serbia.
The six-
followed a i .
Croatian police
who were �
tional Park.)
Croatian poi
21 other � j
1 went) - "j
Army tanks
nel carriers
388
330
979
715
595
278
578
RouS "C� starting
Boston-London
Atlanta-San Jose
Raleigh-Hong Kong
Greensboro-Paris
Greensboro-London
Miami Caracas
New York-Malaga
laies not included Resections appty
Fares sojec: so change Ore ways and
'acjity 'ares available WcxX Study AoTac
procrarrs Intefnationa. Student 4 Tiacne-
ID.EURAIL PASSES ISSUED ON
THE SPOT!
FREE Student Travel Catalog:
Council T
1703 Ninth SUcct 6-9
Durham, NC 87705
919 286 4664
�tf� lEast
is now accepting applicatii
� Assistant Ne
� Assistant Feaj
� Copv Editor
� Editorial Pro)
� Director of A)
� Business Mai
� Advertising
. Typesetter
� Staff Writer
Anyone interested should apply in persj
located on the second floor of the Pubi
Deadline for applications is April
AMERICA'S FAVC
COMPl
save
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
Injw
appoi
J-teai
� Change Y(
� Replace Y
�Lube i
�Check RJ
Differenual
Washer and I
j 126 SE Greenville Blvd. 756J






of Students
80
mmer
nores problem
I
- we had thought!
- a big irony here,
i ns and med
try including,
; 05i Caroiiman
.ire too poorlvj
th to detect whvj
North Carolina's!
� i the nations!
Jing. I wouldn't,
� � .t weren 11 r
� fessor here, and!
speaking I'm goo :
� painful to have to
nee education re-
e is long overdue!
It'sh mptingjustj
. - itors alone and
I ointing out mat
hat thev're doing
� r iMns.
ii be done. Since
litres were
� t reform, it's
� reform u �
res.
� isf it makis
-incidental
� iucation, so
� t must first
. e standard
n idv seeing
iso pracb-
re aimed a:
ike the SAT.
� is it educa-
iry and junior
� re rrelevant
� risk devaln
� i m education
. -r SAT scores
inee. North
5 were to start
�show to thini
- apply knovvl-
� fl iws in argu-
5AT scores
�:ieven though
better edu-
� - s we may not
f these problems
� It'slikelythat
- posed education
n tofruition,since
Igel cuts mean fewer
II as. read my HpS,
oks.
. a hen la wma kcrs do sta rt
pj veNorthCarolin.1 J
whether it's next year
ie � don't let them
i � iv with just producing
- � imbers
� � �
c ulk �killed or lnrured "Anglo Sax-
than African Americans
�ellso this must have been propa-
b 1da from our secret leaders.
lying histhese guvs are really on
�. ithtop of details.
And concerning his Tcf-
A ��nce to Thomas lefferson, the
:ist ha �Virginia slaveholder makes a
but at thegreat role model, considering
he was mad at the Bnbsb. for
� eo(not returning over 8,000
Ire theseAmerican slaves after the
Revolutionary Way
can t beIn conclusion, as a mem-
cansandber of the most evil race to ever
rom thewalk the earth, I have one last
question. McCullers states
issitwith"this will not be the case in the
e for thefuture "asa warning, but if this
"dispro-is true, exactly what kind and
f "sweat,humane new world is it he is
rnted inpredichng?
ast infor-Mark Adams
pan casu-Graduate student
fed moreHistory Education
(She gagt (EaroHnian April 2, 1991 5
Minimum Wage raised to $42:
WASHINGTON (AP) � Mil- The first step of the increase poor he said, promising that his
Uons of Americans began earning took effect a year ago, when the committee will take up minimum
larger paychecks Monday as the minimumwagewentfrom$3.35an wage legislation this year or next,
federal minimum wage jumped by hourto$3.80.Itwasthefirstincrease Business executives dismissed
45 cents an hour to $425, but orga- in nearly a decade. the need for another boost in the
nized labor said the boost falls well About3 million Americanseam minimum wage, and the White
short of lifting many workers out of the minimum wage. But millions of House indicated it probably would
poverty. higher-paid workers also may oppose another increase.
'They can't support a family benefit because the boost could put
on this and in many cases can't pressureonemployerstoboosttheir
support themselves said Rudy wages by comparable amounts.
Oswald, chiefeconomist of the AR Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-
ClO, which wants the base wage Mass cha'rmanof the Senate Labor
and Human Resources Committee,
increased to $5.75 an hour by April
1994.
The increase in the minimum
wage from $3.80 an hour is the
second step of a two-part increase
Congress enacted in 1989 after a
longand fierce battle with the White
House. President Bush had vetoed
an earlier version he considered too
hard on businesses.
" don't know what kind of
dream world they're in John
Meritt, a senior vice president of
Hardee's restaurants, said of the
advocates of another increase.
"When (the cost oO your labor
islation that had not been intro-
duced. But he said the administra-
tion continues to maintain that an
increase in the minimum wage
translates into job losses.
The 1989 law also created a
below-minimum "training wage"
for teen-agers holding theirfirst jobs,
but Labor Department figures in-
dicate hardly any businesses are
using it The training wage rose
from$335anhourto$3.62Monday.
For a minimum-wage em-
ployee working 40 hours a week,
Trooper kills man attempting
to steal unmarked patrol car
called the 45-cent raise an "April
Fool's increase, well Mow what
low-wage workers deserve
"Just to restore the ground lost
in the Reagan years, the minimum
should be $5.15 an hour today
Kennedy said. Congress should
close the gap and end "this con-
tinuing exploitation of the working
component goes up, it ultimately Monday's 45-cent increase means a
gets passed on to the consumer raiseofabout$18aweek,oraweekly
Meritt said. Headded that if another income of $170.
wage increase were enacted soon, The $8,500 annual income for a
"We'd probably be out of business fulltime minimum-wage worker
at some point would be about $1,400 less than the
White House spokesman poverty line for a family of three, or
Stephen Hart said the administra- what the government calculates a
tion could not take a stand on leg- family must pay for basic needs.
naru on ousinesses. unuingexpioiuiiiuuui uit- mpn �� 0 , - - 9
Serb clan announces secession from Yugoslavia �
. . . . . . i:j,1 ( ri-aral rffort if anv.
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia (AP)
� An ethnic Serbenelavein Croatia
said Monday it was seceding from
the pro-Western republic to join
Serbia. The declaration by Krajina
further increased tensions in Yu-
goslavia, where two people died in
a weekend clash.
Krajina'sdecision to annex itself
to Serbia, Yugoslavia's largest and
most populous republic, was an-
nounced at a rally by Krajina's
president, Milan BabtC, and broad-
cast by Belgrade radio. Belgrade is
the capital of Yugoslavia as well as
Serbia.
The secession announcement
followed a clash Sunday between
Croatian police and ethnic Serbs
who were occupying Plitvice Na-
tional Park. One of the Serbs and a
Croatian policeman were killed, and
21 other people were injured.
Twenty-nine Serbs were arrested.
Armv tanks and armored per
sonnel earners were deployed on
key intersections, bridges and
around the main office of the na-
tional park, which borders Krajina
and is about 60 miles south of
Croatia's capital, Zagreb, the Yu-
goslavian news agency Tanjug re-
ported.
The clash came only days after
the leadersof the two republics held
a private meeting and reportedly
agreed to settle their differences
peacefully.
It was not immediately clear
what practical effect, if any, the
Krajina declaration would have.
There is no territorial link be-
tween Krajina, which is near the
northern Adriatic coast and entirely
within Croatia, and Serbia.
However, if the Serbian lead-
ership accepts the declaration, an-
other confrontation could follow
between Croatia, which has ties to
the West, and Serbia, which is con-
trolled by the renamed Socialists,
formerly the Communists.
GOLDSBORO (AP) � A
state Highway Patrol trooper
shot and killed a man he caught
breaking into his unmarked
patrol car, authorities said
Monday.
Trooper Robert Thaxton
caught a man breaking into his
Ford Mustangpatrolcararound
midnight Sunday, said Cuyler
Windham, senior assistant di-
rector of the State Bureau of In-
vestigation. The shooting oc-
curred at Thaxton's home in the
Wayne County community of
Pinkney.
"An individual broke into
the trooper's automobile
Windham said. "And when the
trooper confronted the indi-
vidualorindividualsintheyard,
that's when the individual was
shot and ran
Stacy Eugene Hamm, 21, of
the Nahunta area was declared
dead on arrival at Wayne Me-
morial Hospital, a hospital
spokesman said.
The trooper was not in ju red,
Windham said.
Windham said Thaxton
heard what he thought were
shots being fired outside his
home.
When Thaxton looked out
the window, he saw a man tak-
ing objects out of his unmarked
Ford Mustang patrol car. A win-
dow in the car had been smashed.
Thaxton grabbed his gun
and went outside to investigate.
Windham said the man either
approached or jumped at the
trooper from behind the car with
an object in his hand. Thaxton
fired one shot and the man ran.
Hamm was later found 1,000
feet away on N.C. 581. He had a
bullet wound in his chest.
A second subject may have
been involved, Windham said.
The case was turned over to
the SBI because a law enforce-
ment officer was involved.
Windham said the investi-
gation could be completed in the
next few days. The information
will be turned ovr to the District
Attorney's office.
Thaxton, a four-year veteran
of the patrol, has been assigned
to Wayne County for less than a
year, said Highway Patrol Sgt.
DO. Dixon of the local office.
Hamm had a record of con-
victions dating back to 1985, ac-
cording to Wayne County court
records. They included break-
ing, entry and larceny of a motor
vehicle; felonious larceny; driv-
ing while impaired, and assault
with a deadly weapon.
Rouv! Tnrw starting;
Boston-London
Atlanta-San Jose
Ralelgh-HongKong
Greensboro-Paris
Greensboro-London
Miami-Caracas
Hew York-Malaga
$388
330
979
715
595
278
578
gy
A ��'
i mTt
I axes not included Restrictions appty
Fares SuOfeci to cnanoe O.e wavs ad
faculty 'ares available WorkStudy Abroad
programs International Student & Tfeacer
ID.EURAIL PASSES ISSUED ON
THE SPOT!
FREE Student Travel Catalog!
Council
703 Ntrtth Street,
Durttam, NC
919-286-
rawd
a
Wednesday
- WZMB
Progresssive Dance Night
introducing
M0 Draft
1.15 Tall Boys
l.(K) Kamikazees
Ladies Free til 10:30
i
J
F. N. Wolf & Co Inc
Investment Bankers
We are a lull-service Investment firm expanding and
looking for entry-level Account Executives
We are conducting one on one interviews at the
Ramada Inn
203 W. Greenville Blvd
Saturday April 6th
For an interview time please call:
Gree Piper Geor�e Hubbard
-857-2190 RSVP 1-800-582-8444
Raleigh, NC Virginia Beach. VA
We are growing and expanding and we might be looking
for a person just like you to enter our training program.
The East
Carolinian is
now accepting
applications
for Classified
Advertisement
Technician.
FOSDICKS
Stic Saat (Earoltnian
is now accepting applications for the following positions:
� Assistant News Editor
� Assistaat Features Editor
� Copy Editor
� Editorial Production Manager
� Director of Advertising
� Business Manager
� Advertising Representative
� Typesetter
� Staff Writer
Anvone interested should apply in person atTte East Carolinian office. The officeis
Son "he second floor of the Publications Building across from JoynerLibrary.
Sadline for applications is April 4. For more information, call 757-6366.
I Hot Tub Rentals
756-2011
Lunch only
Small Shrimp
Platter
onlv
$2.99
I
I
I
l
I
l
l
I Sun-Fri
' Beverage not included
� Expires: 4-25-91
1890 SEAFOOD
on�"
Buy one
Regular Shrimp
Platter at $6.50
Get the 2nd
Regular Shrimp
Platter FREE
Good anytime
Beverage not included
Expires: 4-25-91
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
0
3
0
Q
o
& Sales
T
� U
B
B
I
E
Deliver Anywhere
Call for Reservation
RobLawler 975-1818
AMERICA'S FAVORITE OIL CHANGE"
COMPLETE 14 POINT SERVICE j
save 3.
00
(with this ad)
(expires April 30,1991)
In just 10 minutes with no
appointment here's what the
J-team can do for you:
� Change Your Oil
� Replace Your oil filter
� Lube Chassis
� Check A Fill Transmission,
Differential, Brake, tower Suing.
Washer and Battery Fluids
� Check Wiper Blades
� Inflate Tires to Proper Pressure
� Vacuum Interior
� Wash the Windows
� Check Air Filler System
FIRST
ANNUAL
ks"G TRAFFIC INJURY AND PREVENTION PROGRAM
� and the GkarviIleAthleticClub
GREENVILLE ATHLETIC CLUB A�4
Raquetball Tournament
April 12th, 13th & 14th
Location: Greenville Athletic Club
140 Oakmont Drive
Greenville, NC 756-9175
Entry Fee: First Event $25.00 Second Event $10.00
rriyrfrariKre Entries must be received by 12 noon, April 8th
Entry forms may be obtained at the Greenville Athletic Club. No
phone entries.
Award, Awards to 1st, 2nd and consultaion winners in each division
wasner anu oauay nuno .
1 126 SE Greenville Blvd. 756-25TOoilJm Saty
Hospitality. Food and beverages for entrants ail weekend
Greenville Athletic Club will be donating all proceeds
from entry fees to the Traffic Injury Prevention Program
and its efforts to decrease motor vehicle deaths in
Pitt County.
Special thanks to the following for their contributions:
Greenville Athletic Club Boulevard Bagel
WRQR
CPTs
COKE
Harris Teeter
Sweet Caroline's
Food Lion
Mike's Margaux's
Annabelles
Chico's
Dunkin Donuts
PTA Pizza
SMITHKLINE BEECHAM
Overton's Sports Center
Smithfields
Taco Bell
McDonald's
Grandaddy Rossers
Subway
Shabop's
Riverside Steak Bar
The Fizz
Final Score
Fosdick's
Szechuan Garden





6
CETlie iEast (garoHntan
April 2, 1991
OLAowlritUo
SERVICES OFFERED
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES:
Term papers dissertations, letters,
resumes, manuscripts, projects. Fast
'urn around. Call Kvsn 756 9255
niMNC, Call 355 J611 after 530
p.m or leave message SI J5 page,
ndudes proofreading, spelling,
grammar check Familiar with all
formats Over 15 years experience
WANTED TO BUY
l ED CASH? Graduating? Sellour
cruiserlCaU Artat830 0137and k ax e
rtessage
FOR RENT
iUBLEASI EFFICIENCY Ringgi Id
rowers Option to take over leas
fall S260mont! r ail ibleMaj I
�, 58 B15 Great location
WANT FEMA1� NON-SMOKI R
to share 1 '3of "cpenses (SI I; plus
phone and ' ntwobedroom
ipai tment tor summer and; or next
� Bl.
w 1 ED TO St HI EASE ver)
ict one bedrcx m apt. from May
ist You then have option to
tno eout resign a one year leaseor
i $255 m
, utilities, washer and di i
ook ij E I bus stop, nice apart
i , � complex. Call 1 isa at 758-
Sl ' 6
Ml.Mil E parrment to sublet
for summer rhree bedroom, Wil-
son Acres 4 blocks from campus
v before pril4 Phone758 6283
sk foi (in
ROOMM ME WANTED Maleor
FOR RENT
house, fully furnished. Five miles
from campus, SlOOmonth plus 1
3 utilities and deposit. Call 355-
7282. Available now!
APARTMENT FOR SUMMER
SESSIONS. Femalewanted toshare
nice throe bedroom, 2 1 '2 bath
apartment WD,DW,AC. Access
to pool and tennis courts! Call im-
mediately! 355-3988, Elizabeth.
DOUB1 EWIDE TRAI1 IK on pri-
vate lot for rent in area Call 459-
9355 after 5:30 p m.
ROOMMATE WANTED Look-
ing for male non-smoker to share 2
bedroom fully furnished apartment
tor summer Close to campus. Call
Kevin or Brian at i55 8372
SOMEONE NEEDED to share
townhouse apartment "wo bed-
room, 1 12 bath, fully furnished,
need only to bring bedroom furni-
ture. Responsible mah student,
SI75month plus 1.2 utilities SV
0388
HELP WANTED
1 h
euroom
� AU N
NIVERSm tfARTfoENTS
�Located Sei
. j,u tbuppu
� rsl From Mighw.i. 'ui' I Sui ��.
I imd OfTei ; � � uh
v -ioia T ,r t-Tunv Wuliaim
�y 'Hi J
" w) Kft i
�AZ WE t. Kl�l MS
� �� .KM . � I
��-� -� -� � �(m lrv
. spmita .�- 120 a �
.rf � .v II Hi -v. �
utt Xpwim � � �
niaa � A m
FOR SALE
FENDERGUITARAMP Deluxe85.
758-0464
Ml sr SALE IMMEDIATELY:
Men's Raleigh 10 speed bike; $60,
Women's Huff) 12 speed bike $35;
gas grill w 'tank, $40; window unit
A C works great, $100; and IBM PC
clone w2 floppy disk drives, 640K.
Will accept best offer for all items.
Call 758-7099 for details
SCHW1NN WORM) SPORT 12
speed, black. Good condition S100
negotiable. 830-3601 ask for Paul
HELP WANTED
BRODY'S is accepting applications
for part-time sale positions in Juniors
and Accessories Enthusiastic indi-
viduals who enjoy fashion and can
work flexible hours should apply
Brady's: The Plaza, Monday through
Wednesday 1-4 p.m.
BABYSITTER NEEDED for sum
mer Monday-Friday, 9-3 p.m. begin-
ning May 9th. Own transportation
needed. 757-0629.
SUMMER INTERNSHIP Find out
what IBM Xerox and Fortune 500
comp ' ke about our summer
program II saving over $5j000, in-
valuable career experience, building
your resume, and college credit ap-
peal to you call for an interview to-
dayv919) 19-2 13
CLASSIFIED ADS TECHNICIAN
needed foi summer sessions andor
tall semester MadntoshMicrosoft
Word experience helptul. Apply in
person al : : � MroHnktn on call
758-7652 aftei 5 K) p.m.
NANNY OPPORTUNTriES San
Francisco-1 girl-$175week Chi-
cago-newborn-$175week; Con-
necticut-twins S250 'week; Boston
infant-$160week; Virginia-2 chil-
dren-$200week Many positions
available. One year commitment
necessary Call 1-800-937-NANl
HELP WANTED: King Sandwich
will be accepting applications
Wednesday and Thursday, April 1
and 2 from 230-5:00 p.m. only. Full
and part-time jobs pply in person
only. No phone a
EARTHSAFE Part-time sales Sign
m tei I o ism rtolds for recycling pick-
up and earn $100. Help save the
envin nmeni and earn good money,
HELP WANTED
too. CallCliff at757-3063forappoint-
ment.
WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR
THE SUMMERGoing to stay in
Greenville, going to Summer School?
Brady's currently has sales positions
available in Juniors and Mens that
will run through the summer and
into the fall. Fill your free time with
a part-time position with Brody's and
Brady'sforMen. ApplyBrody's,The
PERSONALS
NEW ENGLAND BROTHERSIS-
TER (AMI'S MASSACHUSETTS
Mah-Kee-Nac for BoysDanbee for
C Srls Counselor portions for Pro
gram Specialists: All Team Sports,
especially Baseball, Basketball, Field
Hockey, Softball, Soccer and Volley-
baU;25Tennisopenings;also Archery,
Rifler Weight's litness and Biking;
other openings include Performing
Arts, Fine Arts. Newspaper, Photog-
raphy, Cooking, Sewing, Roller-
skating, Rocketry, Ropes, and Camp
Craft; All Waterfront Activities
(Swimming, Skiing, Sailing,
Windsurfing anoeKayaking). In-
quire: Mah-Kee-Nac03( �YS) 190Lin-
den Avenue, Glen Ridge, NJ 07028
Call 800 753 9118 DanbeeCGIRLS)
16 Horseneck Road, Montvilte, NJ
7 45 Call ' 301 776520
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
HEADING FOR EUROPE THIS
SUMMER? Jet there anytime with
A1RHITCH � for $160 from the East
Coast! (Reported in NY Times &
Lefs Go!) AIRHITCH � 212-864-
2000.
SORORITIES, FRATERNITIES &
GRADUATES: Now is the time to
get your tuxes and gowns altered
and tailored for spring formats and
graduation. We also do dressmak-
ing. 30 years experience and fast
dependable service. Call 3550354
M F 90-5-30,2421 Sharles Street,
(ireenville.
�X PLEDGES: Keep up the gcxxi
work You guvs are on the ball. The
light al the end of the tunnel is getting
brighter. Push harder and you'll start
to shme Word' The Brothers
LOST: Male cat, white with black
and gray Siamese markings. Blue
eyes. Answers to Casper. It ; �
know of whereabouts, call 752-8930
VOTI FOR FJUCHILUARD i r
SGA REASURER on Wed . April
3rd The ONLY candidate with SGA
experience
PERSONALS
OPEN MIC NIGHT Come out to
the Underground Open Mic Nij
and check out some ot E I J's bands
and comedians. The show is tonight
in the Underground (Basement of
Mendenhall)at5-00p m Admissions
and refreshmentsare fret � red
by the Student Union Coffo
Committee
WHEN ITS MM I: FOB Rl
PARTY, you should 1
go. Cometo803Hoi kerl
tit Pit aj i idogrov � �
wild and the Pi Kaj
Especially com
gonna toga all nighl St �
ready for Annual Toga I
wear nothing under
we're gonna do I
TOME BE I AIM EDGE i SSOI
riA: Youguysare K P
up the good w k!
to Friday night! 1 � �
Il.V
DISPLAY CLASSFISD
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
r
Ringgold Towers
. 1 aking I cases fa ugusi
1991 ' bedroom, 2 bedroom, &
Efftcenc) Apartments,
CAI I 752-2865
1
BUY ONE i
GET ONE!
FREE I
BLEND IN;
PytNT SAl r
ECU Biolog) lub
Wednesday April
Thursda) April
7:30 am - l:00pn

FAST FUNDRA1S1NG PRO-
CRAM SlOOOinjustoneweek Earn
up toSlOOOfor your campus organi-
ation Plus a chance at ;o(RX) more'
rHaprogram works! Noinvestme; :
needed G � 932-0928 Ex! S
t sk si MMER I MP1 OY-
Ml M fisheries Earn -
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
i ree transportabor
I Board! ('wrSAX
erience necessary
Ki�
Mal � ' �
male. For 68-page employment
manual send $8.95 to M&1 Research,
Bo, 84008, Seattle, WA 98124-Satis-
n Guaranteed.
WANDSWORTH
COMMONS
WIlliJ-SNEWES � ' v
INM .11 I AMU V HCM Si- G

i , to! 0 md s"1
r gy cffk " ' ' u � �
"
i. H MC MM

lu Rt .ill � I '�" i'P
758-4711
OPEN I NDER
MAN ()-KSHIIJ
Sill 1 SERVING YOU
withca i rn Bi'
WD l! SPRODUCTS
i R( iss I R( i! 11,1 Rl M
l STAURAJSl
II I I 1 M k I I I
Hi DIS 01 NT WITH
�11 DIM ID ON REPAIRS
) sl K ICb
L
316 E. 10th St. 758-0000
cxp. 4-15-91
xJ&W' Biolo
11 i
Ro� m S
J
If you're
Pregnant
and need help making choices
�Free, confidential prolessioi
pregnancy counseling
�Financial assistance
�Help select adoptive family
I
�� I IHltl MKVl
KOAl �k I' I (ireenv ille, NC
1-800-632-1400
y The Children's Home Society
of North Carolina
1 A United Way Agency
Wi � '� .i��S
GOLDEN GlRl TRYOUTS
Attention interested daiKers(who
can dazzle and sparkle) Become
.i p,irt of the 1991 KCU RxtKill
Spirit! Share the spotlight by per-
forming with the Euist Carolina
Pirates during the 1941 kxnball
season. The GOl DEN GIRLS
DANCE LINE will hold tryouts
April 13-14; 9 a.nv-4 p.m SaUir-
dav and 1 p m.4 p.m. Sunday in
Memorial Gym. For more infor-
mation, call 757-6962.
ginning April 3, 1991. Room as-
signments will be made in the
Department of University Hous-
ing, 201 Whiohard Building, April
3 and 4. Ehe rent for a term of
summer sehtxtl is $175 (Gotten,
Memingand!arisHalls$210)for
a semi-private room and $2n)
(Gotten, Fleming and aris 1 lalls-
-$3tKl) for a private room Resi-
dence halls to be used for summer
schcxM are: Gotten and Fleming
(women); lamsmen); Slay (co-
ed).
STEC1A1 OLYMPICS
The 11 Greenville 1'itt Co. Spe-
Otympks Spnng Games will
be held on April 19th at E. B.
Ayoxk Jr. 1 ligh School in Green-
ville (rain date: April 24). Volun-
teers are needed to help serve as
budcHeschaperones for the Spe-
cial Olympics. Volunteers must
he able to work all day from 4
j m -2 pm (The first (Mies there
will be assigned a position) An
orientation meeting will he held
on April 17 in Old loyner Library,
nxm 221 from S6(X) p.m. Free
lunches and volunteer t-shirrs will
be provided the day of the games
to all volunteers who have at-
tended the orientation session. For
more information, contact Lisa
Mills at 8304551.
SUMMERSOiQQI. 1991
RQQMEESEBYAT1QRS1GR-
HPJNEQBMATJLQfc!
Residence Hall room payments for
Summer School 1991 will be ac-
cepted in the Cashier's Office,
Room 105, Spilman Building, be-
ECl! SCHOOL OEMLJSJC
April 37ECU Jazz Festival fea-
turing jazz greats Ethel Ennis and
Earl Arnett with the ECU Jazz En-
semble, under the direction of
Carroll Dashiell. The Festival will
feature masterclasses, open re-
hearsals and two concerts. Con-
certs are April 5th at 9:00 p.m. in
the A J Fletcher Recital hall and
April 7th at 8:15 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium. All events are free
and open to public. For more in
formation, call 757-6331.
EDUCATION AL LOANS
AVAILABLE
Three educational loan programs
for North Carolina residents at-
tending colleges in or out of state
and for nonresidents attending
college in North Carolina are
available through College Foun-
dation, Inc. These loan programs
are funded by North Carolina
banksandotherinvestors. Stafford
Loans are for dependent or inde-
pendent studentsand are based on
financial need. Supplemental
Ixvins are for independent self-
supporting students are are not
based on financial need PLUS
Loans are for parents of depen-
dentstudentsandarenot based on
financial need. For more informa-
tion, writeCollegeFoundation Inc
Z100YonkersRoad,P.O.Box12100
Raleigh, NC 27bO5-210O, or call
(919)8214771.
STLJDY ABROAD
EXCHANGE PRQGRAMS
The Office of International Pro-
grams is still accepting applica-
tions for summer study abroad
programs as well as exchange
programs for the academic year
1991-1991 Students mav apply for
studies at Leicester Polytechnic
(England), Acadia University
(Nova Scotia, Canada) or other
semesteracademic year pro-
grams. Applications for the Na-
tional Student Exchange are also
being accepted for students who
want to spend an exciting semes-
ter or year at oneof over99colleges
or universities in the U.S. If you
think you might have trouble get-
ting the classes you need at ECU,
consider an exchange to another
campus! Come by Brewster Ml7
to pick up an application or call
757-6769 for further information
on the programs available.
MCTUGQFWAR
Join in the fun at ECU'S Annual
Barefoot on the Mall and show
your support to the Ronald
McDonald House. Recreational
Services is sponsoring a McTug of
War competition. Get your team
of ten members (male, female, co-
red together and get psyched for
an afternoon of McTugof War fun!
A minimum of $1.00 donation per
participant is requested. For fur-
ther information, contact Kendra
Curtis at 757-6387 or stop by 204
Christenbury Gym.
SiNSATTONALSClYIEI
ACRQBAnCREVUE
The Sensational Soviet Acrobatic
RevuecomestoECU April 2,1991,
Wright Auditorium,8:00p.m. Call
Central Ticket Office at 757-4788.
Sponsored by the Student Union
Minority Arts Committee.
HABITAT FiQAHliMANir
Habitat for Humanity is having an
information meeting on Tuesday,
April 2 at 7:00 p.m. in Rawl, Room
130. We will discuss activities of
the ECU Chapter along with ex-
plaining the purpose of Habitat.
Everyone is invited! If interested,
and can't attend, contact Mark at
757-3356 or Kim at 752-2930.
CANOETADDLE2
learn beginningand intermediate
instruction on the Tar River in
Canoeing and Kayaking. ECU
Recreational Services will bespon-
soring a workshop on April 4 from
3:00-6:00 p.m. Interested partici-
pant should meet at Christenbury
Gymat2:30p.m. The cost is $4.00
students and $5.00faculty, staff
and guests. Get ready to roll, tip
and have some fun! For further
information, call 757-6911.
$100 fee tor this vaccination
STOJiSMOKlNG
Kick the habit! The Student Health
Service offers a Stop Smoking pro-
gram free of charge. For more
information or to sign up, call 757-
6794. The program starts on April
2nd.
SQFTBALL HQMIRUJS
DERBY
Derby days are here! Registration
for the Softball Home Run Derby
will be on Tuesday, April 2 at 5.00
p.m. in BIO 103 All interested
individuals must attend this
meeting. For further information,
call 757-6387 or stop by 204
Christenbury Gym.
OJUMmMEETJMi
Greenville Society of Friends,
Philip Mitchell, Clerk, 355-7230.
Meeting for Worship9 a.m. Sun-
days. First Day School of Chil-
dren-9a.m.Sundays. Visitorsand
children welcome. "Ye Are My
Friends" John 15:14. Pot luck ev-
ery second Sunday, 12 noon, Uni-
tarian Universalist Fellowship
Hall, 1110 Arlington Blvd Comer
of Sunset (one bkx east of Me-
morial Drive).
IMMUNIZATION CLINIC
Immunization Clinic being held at
the Student Health Center-Up-
date your tetanus now! Available
without appointment. Tuesday
and Thursday, April 2 and 4,1991,
from 8:00 am. to 11:30 a.m. and
1:00 p.m. to 4:00 pm. There is a
April 2,1991
I
FCU SURVEY
During the week ot A; I
survey ot student opini
stractionwulbeoonducteda
Questionnaires will be distributed
indasseswithenioBmenb
than five All students will 1
the opportunity to exj u-
ions on the teaching effectr I
of their instructors, he �
willbeconductedduringvL
and will take approximately 15
minutes to complete Student
participation is voluntary anil no.
identities are requested Insti
tors have been requested to lea e
the classroom while the questi
nairesarebeingcompletvd Res
of the survey will bectistril ute
instructors after final grades have
been posted. The teaching effe
nvenessquestionnaire w-as cni ted
by the Facultv Senate Commit �
for Teaching Effectiveness and th-
OfficeotPlanningand lnstm iti
Research. Theresultiofthesunev,
along with other information and
factors, are used for administra-
tiveevaluationof theinstruct irb)
the supervising administi
within the department or di vi-
STUDENT UNION
EEQDLICTJOISIS
The Student Union ProducHons
Committeeand the Residence Hall
Association will be sponsoring
Casino NighL Monday, April 8th
at 8:00 p.m. in the Mulu-Purpose
RoomofMendenhall. WmaVCR!
Oliver St
By Michael Albuquerque
Managing f ditor
Twent) dfrom
the Earth,and im Morrison still
holds the p werl
diences with h mysl fe I. �
of splendor and
der ingmenl - �
tainki
in .in eeril) ithent
Morrison, I I
manneri
OllVtT
"The ! v - '
ultn
AHI
y

Va1 - -
and captures If
i
Val Kitmer unleashes a pateme I
infamous concert in New Haven Conn
Local man becoi
NADTO area prl
Bv Matt King
Fatures Editor
The Easter weekend celebra-
tions began early tor Terobal
Emmetstein when earlv on March
28 he received word that he had
been voted North Carolina Chapter
president of The National Associa-
tion of Deaf Telephone Operators
(NADTO).
Emmetstein signed that he was
overwhelmed withexponentialjo)
"1 cant wait to tell my mother he
wrote on a small piece of paper
One look at Emmetstein's stu-
dio apartment lets a visitor know
thatheismtheprcsenceofonewho
navs painstaking attention to de-
tail The room is dust free, and it
smells like something between a
lemon and a lilac, a lemlac.
The small kitchen area is a
model of efficiency, all the small
appliances are mounted to the un-
derside of cabinets. A canpener,
coffee maker, electnc juicer and a
horizontal knife rack levitate 12
inches off the counter.
The small sink glistens and
there is not a dish of any type in
sight. At the end of the six-or-so feet
of counter space there is an empty
area, where in another time there
might have been a dishwasher.
ranged p:
van
psej
trom viej
matching
seat on the
Two
complete!
Against tl
phone
EfiunetsM
phone. It
chairs on
The
GompuM
it looks
plugged
same de
job.
The
the sou rx
andtrar
screen.
he typcsi
chine ar
ized voiq
"It
when!
ground I
He
thing coj
comput
simply:





April 2, 1991
�' ' v0- ,�
�?-�
� .�Xvv im �:�
PERSONALS
ope 1HS OPEN MIC N1GH1 Come i tto
� out son
lians. Thes
ground I

I's I Mt I
ini.M

DISPLAY CLASSIFIED
PLANT SALi
I l Kiolou ful.
JIFIED
ONI
-V 1 1

TiursdaAj .
10 pn
3

�regnant
I help making choices
Free, confidential
pregnancy "
Financial wtstaiiHJ
Help select adoptrve family
10-632-1400
Children's Home Society
of North Carolina
A United Way Agency
i
it in
IL HI

irolln i
to , I . ss
hirtn �' ri -
i - I ucted d i
Rut � will take appro
i - � � mplei
I inti ofuntai ai
tend this requested lr I
nrbrmarjon, tors have been requested to k
4 � om bilethe i
will be di; I
fter final
4 The beat I ing
sttonnairewascn
�if Facult) Senah
hil n ,

Res an h rftsi fttv i
along ith other inform iti n
i factors, are used t . Kknii
i eilowship dveevaiuationof Ihetnstnjcl
KdComer the supervising administr
east of Me within the department or di vi
TINC,
I
I
I a rii
CLINIC.
eingheldat
( enter-Up-
Available
Tuesday
.nd4,1991,
JO a.m. and
There is a
STUDENT UNION
I'KODUCTIONS
Hie Student Union Pnx.1i
Committeeand the Residence Hall
Association will be iponjorlng
Casino Night, Monday, April Hth
at Sffl pm. in the Miilti -Purpose
RoomofMendenhall. WinaVCR!
April 2,1991
(Bhz lEagt (garoHnian
7
Oliver Stone recreates the Lizard King
Bv Michael Albuquerque
Managing Editor
Twenty years removed from
the Earth, and Jim Morrison still
holds the power to captivate au-
diences with his mystic lifestyle
oi splendor and excess.
I beKeve in a prolonged
derailment of the senses to ob-
1 i in kn m ledge Val Kilmer says
in an eerily authentic copv of
Morrison, both in voice and
mannerisms.
Oliver Stone's new movie.
The Doors delivers precisely
what the original Lizard King ut-
tered some 23 years ago. The en-
tire movie overwhelms you with
its roller-coaster ride through the
excesses of Morrison's life � and
ultimate death.
Although some people, in-
cluding many critics, complain
that Stone has created nothing
more than a 2-hour music video.
Stone realized that, to a large ex-
tent, that's exactly what
Morrison's life was.
The endless sex, drugs and
rock 'n' roll depicted in "The
Doors" are merely consequences
Photo Courtesy of 1 rt-Star Pictures
. al Kilmer displays a striking resemblance to rock's grand shaman
and captures the singer's self-destructive essence perfectly
of Morrison's attitude toward life
and death,and theexperiencesthey
hold.
"I am interested in anything
about revolt, disorder, chaos
especially activity that seems t-
have no meaning he once said
"It seems to me to be the road
toward freedom �external revolt
is a wav to bring about internal
freedom. Rather than starting in-
side, I start outside reach the
mental through the physkaL"
Interspersed with background
music (predominantly original
Doors' material), Stone creates cf-
fective,and often painful,seenesof
tension and rnadnessat a blistering
pace.
The music is as timelv and
fresh today as it was 20 years ago
and suppliesanexcellent backdrop
for some unforgettable concert
scenes.
Unfortunately, between the
boozing, womanizing and pill
popping, Stone leaves very little
time for any character d� vetop
nient tor Kilmer, or an vot the i tin r
actors for that matter.
Morrison often described
himself as a sensitive individual
hidden bv the face oia clown, win i
at the most crucial moment would
alwavsappear to ruin the moment.
Such is the life ofoneof the last true
rock stars � a star that was des-
tinedtofallbyhisveryownactkin.
However, the break-neck
speedofTheDoors" leaves Kilmer
little time to show us this or any
other clues to unlock the secretst i
Morrison and his cohorts.
Never mind that the mov ie is
titled alter the band. St me doesn't
Photo Courtesy ot Tn-Slar Pictures
Val Kilmer unleashes a patented. Morrison scream and leaps into action as The Doors begin their
infamous concert in New Haven. Conn with "Back Door Man
Photo Courtesy ot Tri-Star Pictures
In concert Jim Morrison (Val Kilmer) defiantly expresses his contempt for the establishment - "You're
all a bunch of fuckm' slaves This leads to frequent run-ms with the law
even bother to let the other band
members have more than a few
pan shots per scene.
Ihis is a one-man show, and
Kilmer plays it to the hilt. Accord-
ing to members of the him crew,
Kilmer sent memos to everyone
involved with the project, request-
ing he be referred to only as im.
In fact, throughout the movie,
he keeps you wondering if maybe
Morrison isn't really alive, circa
1969, and playing the lead role.
Asa result, we are only given
glimpses of some equally tme act-
ing by others, specifically Kyle
MacLachlan (of Twin Peaks"
tame) as keyboardist Ray
Manzarek and Meg Ryan as
Pamela Courson, Morrison's
common law wife.
Stone provides no answers as
to why lohn I Vnsmore (played by
Kevin Dillon I frequently becomes
upset with Morrisonandhis'woris
ethics" or why Robby Krieger
(played by newcomer Frank
Whaley) is so influenced by the
Lizard King.
Equally battling are the rea-
sons tor Morrison's self-destruc-
tive nature. Again Stone gives us
little background. We are merely
outside observers in Morrison's
rush tii his inevitable death �just
as all those close to him were.
While the movie retains its au-
thentic tv for the most part, Stone
uses his artistic license whenever
and wherever the mood stnkes
him.
The scene involving
See Stone, page 8
Photo Courtesy ot Tri-Star Pictures
Jim Mornson and common-law wife Pamela Courson (Meg Ryan)
attend a Eurosnob bash hosted by famed artist Andy Warhol
Local man becomes
N ADTO area president
By Matt King
Features Editor
The Easter weekend celebra-
tions began early for Percibal .
Emmetstein when early on March
28 he received word that he had
been voted North Carolina Chapter
president of The National Associa-
tion of Deaf Telephone Operators
(NADTO).
Emmetstein signed that he was
overwhelmed with exponential joy.
"I can't wait to tell my mother he
wrote on a small piece of paper.
One look at Emmetstein's stu-
dio apartment lets a visitor know
tha t he is i n the presence of one who
pays painstaking attention to de-
tail. The room is dust free, and it
smells like something between a
lemon and a lilac, a lemlac.
The small kitchen area is a
model of efficiency, all the small
appliances are mounted to the un-
derside of cabinets. A can-opener,
coffee maker, electric juicer and a
horizontal knife rack levitate 12
inches off the counter.
The small sink glistens and
there is not a dish of any type in
sight. At the end of the six-or-sofeet
of counter space there is an empty
area, where in another time there
might have been a dishwasher.
Now, there are six, neatly ar-
ranged plastic containers that hold
various recyclable materials.
A pseudo-closet hides the bed
from view and there are two
matching chairs and a small love
seat on the hardwood floors.
Two walls are covered with
completely full book shelves.
Against the fourth wall there is the
phone machine that allows
Emmetstein to communicate on the
phone. It stands next to one of the
chairs on a modest cherry desk.
The machine is called the
Computelephone voice generator,
it looks much like a phone that is
plugged into a computer and is the
same device Emmetstein uses at his
job.
The Compuphone interprets
thesoundsthatcomeoverthe phone
and translates them into words on a
screen. When Emmetstein replies
he types his message into the ma-
chine and it generates a computer-
ized voice to send to a caller.
"It works very well, except
when there is a great deal of back-
ground noise signs Emmetstein.
He explains that when some-
thing comes over the phone that the
computer does not understand it
simply shows four x'son the screen.
See NADTO, page 8
Web-shooter confronts
reptile in McFarlane epic
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
appearance. A voodoo witch that
was Kraven's lover dupes
Spidemian into believing that he is
soei ng Kra ven back from the grave.
The witch wants SOWS sort of re-
Todd McFarlane is considered
the "hottest" artist in comic books
today.Sopopularinfactthathewas venge on Spiderman, though the
given the chance to start his own reader is unsure of what -
title, and take on Marvel Comics
biggest character, Spiderman. Todd
McFarlane took the chores of writ-
ing, penciling, and inking the newest
of five Spiderman titles, simpK
called SPIDERMAN, and it bevame
the largest selling issue of any comic
ever published
Spiderman is lured into track-
ing a blood-thirsty killer, who is
actually the I Jard in the powers of
the witch. Doom drums pound
louder and louder inside
Spidemun's liead ashegrowscloser
to finding the witch. The story car-
ries Spidemian into Kraven's old
ThenewSpidermantitlestarted house, which explodes violently,
with a five-issue story that allowed Throughout the tale, Spiderman
the writing ability of Todd wonderswhyheiscaughtupmthis
McFarlane to be seen. McFarlane battle, and not even in the end does
used two old foes of Spiderman to he get any answers. Afterhedeteats
begin the series, the Lizard and the Lizard and the witch, the witcn
Kraven. The Lizard began as a uses her voodoo powers and disap-
doctorwhowastryingtofindaway pears with the Lizard. This leaves
to grow his arm back by using the Spiderman to continue wondering
regenerationabilityof lizards. When why the whole episode happened,
he finally developed a serum, he and wondering when he will come
failed to test it before he used it and under attack from them again.
turned himself into a giant lizard.
The Lizard has been shown as
slowly goingmore and more insane,
andinSPDERMi4Nl,heisshown
without any human rationality.
Kraven, who was shown killed
a couple of years ago, makes an
The story, called Torment
shows McFarlane'sbest work in the
comic book medium. His style is
allowed to be spread out all over
each page. His caricature style is
very pleasing to the eye, but his art
See Spiderman, page 8





PERSONALS
ant
l help making choices,
LiX
0-632 14
bit I'lM I NION
propi noNs
; i d
� �
I
loom hall Wii
4 7 2.7997
uHje lEagt (Carolinian
7
Oliver Stone recreates the Lizard King
B Michael Albuquerque
Managing Editor
t years removed from
. ind im Morrison still
the power to captivateau-
es with Ins mystk lifestyle
dor .md excess.
� licve in a prolonged
� � sciN's to ob
alKiln � i r
i rily authentic copy ot
tx th in voi e and
ins.
r Stone new movie,
I oors vii livers precisel)
wh.it the original Lizard Kingut
tered some 23 years ago. The en-
tire movie overwhelms you with
its roller coaster rule through the
ex esses ot Morrison's life and
ultimate death.
Although some people, in-
cluding many critics, complain
that Stone has created nothing
more than a 2 hour musk video
Stone realized that toalargeex
tent, that's exactl) what
Morrison's lite was.
rhe endless sex, drugs and
rock n roll depicted in "Th�
Doors" are merelv consequences
ot Morrison's attitude toward
anddeath.andtheexperience;
hold
I am intere te I
about revolt, disordi i I i
espet tallv a tivity th tl ' �
have no meaning he one -
"It seems to me to be th n id
toward freedom external revolt
is a way to bone, ah nit i
freedom Rather thai
side 1 start i mtside I '
mental through the physi al
Interspersed wit
music r I n
vi irs' matei
tii rive,and often painful,scenesof
tensionand ma.In.�� sat iblistering
i
fresh toda i
andsupplic � �
for s me nnton
Photo Cour1�sy ot Tn-Star P.cturas
� . ays a sfi - i resemblance to rocks grand
� singer's self '� I live essence pert '
; and
entl
ttal
s enes
I nteitunati-h . n the
boozing womani; ing i
popping Stone leavi
� � an chat
n � ��,
ictoi
Morrison often eli
himself as a sensitive indiv ulna:
hidden h thefaceol icl �� who
at the m -t i n
alw i. s ipyx artoruii tl
Si histhelifi foi fth
nxk sars a Stai
tii edl fallb
wever, t
peedol Th I -
little -
� . lues to un - �
Morrison and his
Photo Cour-osy ct Tn Star Pictures
�� rison (Val Kilmer) defiant expo �
r his leads to frequent in
titled aftt rthel

Photo Courtesy o! Tri 3' �r P
� a( rtenled, Morrisoi � �� ,nto
�� n rjew Haven, Conn with Back Door Man
� � �
r to let the ether band
members ha e more than a few
tsper scene.
1 his is a one-man show, and
it to the hilt. Accord-
i mbers of the film crew,
Kilmer sent monies to everyone
I with the project, request-
. ben ferred toonly as im
out)
� nderingif ma �
� � rison isn't reilh air. � i
and playing the lead role
.1 :
' I i �
� � . � fkrally K.
in Teaks"
tame as keyl oardist Raj
I Mi � ��
� � � � f c
, . I . rsas
� � n plaved by
tlyh nes
' ' � : ' I is verk
� Frank
: the
ffling are the rea-
' ' rison's sell destruc-
in gain St res us
� . kground. We are merely
.ervers in Morrison's
ith just
� close te him were
� themo' k retainsitsau-
� r the most part. Stone
: - henever
rever the mood strikes
, e involving
Stone page 8
Photo Courtesy ot Tn-Star
Jim Morrison and "n ���� ��"
attend a Eurosnobt i ted by fa arttst And
Pictures
Ryan
Local man becomes
N ADTO area president
By Matt King
1 ltures I ditOI
I"he Easter weekend cctebra
began early for Percibal .
EmmetStein when early on March
- ; � received word that he had
iorthCarolma( hapter
l nt of The National Assocfai-
I ; leaf Telephone Operators
' DTO)
Emmetstein signed that he was
rwhelrnedwithexponentialjoy.
m'l wait to tell my mother he
wrote on a small piei eof paper.
f ne look at 1 mmetstem's stu
Ik) apartment lets a visitor know
that he is inthepresnof one who
painstaking attention to de-
tail The room is dust free, and it
smells like something between a
lemon and a lilac, a lemlac.
rhe small kitchen area is a
model of efficiency, all the small
appliances are mounted to the un-
derside of cabinets. A can-opener,
cofftv maker, electric juicer and �
horizontal knife rack levitate 12
inches off the counter.
The small sink glistens and
there is not a dish of any type in
sight Atthcendofthesix-or-sofeet
of counter space there is an empty
area, where in another time there
might have been a dishwasher.
Now, there are six, neatly ar-
ranged ptastk containers that hold
various recyclable materials
A pseudo closet hides the bod
from view and there are two
matching chairs and a small love
seat on the hardwood floors
Two walls are covered with
completely full hook shelves.
Against the fourth wall there is the
phone machine that allows
Emmetstein to communicate on the
phone. It stands next to one ot the
chairs on a modest cherry desk.
The machine is called the
( omputelephone voice generator,
it looks much like a phone that is
plugged into a computer and is the
same device Emmetstein uses at his
job.
The C.ompuphone interprets
thesou ndsthatcomeoverthc phone
and translates them into wordson a
screen. When EmmetStein replies
he types his message into the ma-
chine and it generates a computer-
ized voice to semi to a caller.
"It works very well, except
when there is a great deal of back
ground noise signs Emmetstein
He explains that when some-
thing comes over the phone that the
computer does not understand it
simply shows four x'son the screen.
See NADTO, page 8
Web-shooter confronts
reptile in McFarlane epic
S. . n.ln.l , ;ti h th.l
By Cliff Coffey
Stjff Writer
odd McFarlane isconsidered
the "hottest" artist in comic books
today Sopopularin fact hat he w as
given the chance to start his ,
title, and take on Marvel Comic-
biggest character. Spiderman odd
McFarlane took the chores of writ
ing, penciling, and mkim; the newest
of five Spiderman titles, sim I
niwt SPIDERMAN. and it bet ame
thelargestseUingissuei fan) comic
ever published.
ThenewSpidenivintitlestarted
with a five-issue story that allow ed
the writing ability of I odd
McFarlane to be seen. McFarlane
used two old foes of Spiderman to
begin the series, the Lizard and
Kraven. The Lizard began as a
doctor who was trying to find a way
to grow his arm back by using the
regeneration ability of lizards. When
he finally developed a serum, he
failed to test it before he used it and
turned himself into a giant lizard
The Lizard has been shown as
slowlygoingmoreand more insane,
andinSPDERMANl,heisshown
without any human rationality.
Kraven, who was shown killed
a couple of years ago, makes an
appearance A voodoo witch that
. Kraven's I. v r dupes
kerman into believing mat heis
seeinj -he grave
The witch wants some sort of re-
venge on Spidem hough tl'
reader is unsure of what it IS.
Spiderman is hoed into track-
ing a blood thirsty killer, who is
actuall) the I iard in tho powers ot
me witch Doom drums pound
loudei and ! uder inside
SpkJi m lashegrowsdoaer
Bndinj the witch Hie story car
rk s Spiderman into Kraven's old
house, which explodes violently.
Throughout the tale Spiderman
wonders why heiscaughtupinAis
battle, and not even in thecnul does
hegetanv answers Alter he defeats
me Lizard and the m itch, the witca
uses her voodoo powersand disap-
pears with tlx- I izard This leaves
Spiderman to continue wondering
why the whole episode happened,
and wondering when he will come
under attack from them again.
The story, called 'Torment
shows McFarlane'sbest work in the
comic book medium. His style is
allowed to be spread out all over
each page. His caricature style is
very pleasing to the eye, but his art
See SpkJerman, page 8





PERSONALS
99
5l)c lEaat Ularuliuiau
7
Oliver Stone recreates the Lizard King
h.iel Mbuquerque
I diloi
'i mn ih.1 in im
i
Itl ' pi ru�l I I- r M ��� I
� � . ai .I �
tin- � erw helms von with
itsn llei � isterridi i
' . ;� and
ultimate death
in
in i nti n plain
, s
thai
roll depii '� I in
! i v mcai

� � � '



"
� � - .vhetK'vei
Stone ; i ii
1 ocal man becomes
N ADTO area president
llv Matt Kim;
itures I diloi
irly for Pei
. . trly on Man h
,1 word that h
ilina haptcr
, . �,��� �� i
. . �. ntialjov
� � he
� . � � jn' � tn
� ,�� a vi it- r know
j ��. fon '��� i
�nslaV Mention 1 � �
lu d it
thing betweei i
, ml r
mall kit hen area is a
, �. all the small
lounted to the un
� �. t cabinets A can opener,
coffei maker, ekctrk juicer and a
horizontal knife rack levitate 12
m off the counter
11 small sink glistens an,i
m. re is not a dish of any type in
Sight Attheendotthesixor sofeet
r space there isan empty
area, where hi another time there
might have been a dishwasher
itii
edplast
� � ii �
� pseud - ' I '�� "
from view and there an I
mati hing i hair � and a sma I � �
4 H on the hardwood fit i
rwo walls ire c cred
(omplctely full I 1 helvi
� ' the fourt thei the
j i m.i. hine thai allows
tsteint the
phone It � tai
: n a i lest erry desV
I he mai hine i called the
( omputelepht ne �� � '��� � t,r-
it looks mu h like a phone that is
luggi d into icomputei ind is the
hi . dev iceEmmetsteii � it his
I
I heomj upl inteq rets
the uM.isth.it. on ovei thephone
and translates them into words on a
st reen When I mmel t in replies
he types his me age into the ma
chine and it generatesa i omputer
ii .I voice to send toa aller
' it works very well, except
when then- is a great deal of ba k
ground noise signs 1 rnmetstein
He explains that when some
thi ng tomes o vir the phone that the
computer does not understand it
simplvshowstourx'sonthes. reen
See NADTO page 8
Web-shooter confronts
reptile in McFarlant epic
to
gr
nt
bit
Bylittoffe
st.itt V i ,t. I
��
�� � ai tist in comi b
the cha ' tart I
ii,l taki i Mai i i
tt hai � �
m"� 1 arlane t ok thechon
ing penciling,and inkii
ol ' Spidi rman I
.ailed
ever published
rhcnewSpiderman titles!
with a five issui story that ail.
the writing abilit) of fodd
M Farlane to be seen M
used twold foes � rman to
begin the series, the Lizard
Kraven I he I izard I
doctor who was trying to find i
to grow his arm back by using the
regeneratkmabiliryoflizards When
he finally developed a serum, he
failed to test it before he used it and
turned himself into a giant lizard
The Lizard has Ken shown as
slowly goingmore arid rnoreinsane,
andinSPfDEJ?MANl,hetsshown
without any human rationality
Kraven, who was shown killed
a couple Of wars ago, makes an
I
the
ll It is.
I into t
l
. , � o is
. wers oi
- pound
s fa
'� .
iven's old
: 1, ntl
S id rman
vonderswh . � tupinthis
. intl end da
rs tt- i hedeteats
the 1 izard and the wit h the wit. i
uses her voodoop iwersand dtsap
pears with the I izard rhis leaves
Spiderman I ww dering
whv the whole episod happened
and wondering when he will come
under attack from mem again.
I "he Story calked torment
showsMcFariane sbestwockmthe
comic book medium. His style -
allowed to be spread out all ovei
each page His caricature style is
very pleasing to the eye, but his art
See Spiderman page 8





I

& (Blic gngt Haroinjan�April 2, 1991
April 2,1991
Russians invade ECU Campus; circus comes to Hendrix
'This is not your planet monkey -boy
Buckaroo Banzai comes to Mendenhall
This week the Student Union Films Committee, ever on the
quest of t1mating,enrkhinganci entertaining the ECU community,
presents iwptfw gn.it week of films. "Powaqqatei "The Fresh-
man" and "The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai" are this week's
free flicks screening at fondrix Theatre.
"Powaqqatsi" is ((dfrey Reggio's long -awaited follow up to
his unique masterpiece, "Koyaanisqatsi Although clearly a com-
panion piece to the earlier film, 'Towaiq.itsi" (a Hop term for'life
consuming life") does not so much repeat "Koyaanisqatsi" as
compliment if, standing as a distinct work.
"Powaqqatsi" centers in the relationship Ix't ween humans and
the environment, concentrating more OB the human side of the
equation
Marlon Brando makes Matthew Brnderick and offer he can't
refuse m The Freshman a kooky offbeat comedy that's been
dubbed the college comedy hit of 1990
Brando, in a hilarious send-up of his "Godfather" mleas Don
Corteone, pkrysa powerful organised i rime leader with an eligible
daughter (Penelope Ann Miller). Matthew Broderick is the idealistic
,)tw ambitious NYlI fn hman whose academic career gi ts off to a
Kid start when he's conned out of all lus belongings just one hour
after he at rives in New York His situation changes dramatically
when Brando in his first starring role siiu e WSO gives him a part-
time )oband offers to show him the popes.
Then are so many reasons to love The Freshman that it's
imp ssiMeto now where to begin. So much of the film's appeal is
derived if m it- fresttnes rhat it m uki be unfab to divulge any
inoreii.toniuitioii.iUittheplot.Suffueittosuythatiteali.irtlthat
,ilmst Steals the show.
Sunday night bungs a special showingoi thecuhdasak The
Adventure, oi Buckaroo Banai-Across the Eighth 1-Hinension
PeterVVellerrKohHop' )playsBuckanKKmAii, equal pa rtsphysi-
eist, neuro surgeon, nxk singer and cult hero, vvho plunges into a
heart stopping, hilarious adventure when he enters the Eighth
Dimension Tht mtaByofi the wall, Ham action-packed comodv
also stars John Lithgow, EBen Barkinand Jeff c .oldbhim.
"Pnwaqqatsi 'willbeslovnionWednesday,Aprfl vvOOpm.
The Fnhnian" screens Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights,
April 4, 5 and o. also at iV pm The outrageous 'Adventures of
Buckaroo Banzai wiB be featured Sunday sight April 7at 8:00pm.
Admission to these and all Student Union films is free with a valid
student IP.
The Student 1 Inion him Committee thanks iist Coast Musk
and Video for use of their t.ifx-s in the review of the-se films.
ECU News Bureau
The So viet Acrobatic Revue will
1 perform at ECU Tuesday, April 2,
in Wright Auditorium, beginning
at 8 p.m.
The event is sponsored by the
ECU Student Union Minority Arts
Committee.
The 27-member troupe�con-
tortionists, clowns and acrobats �
edy
Secttor,markeringdirector at ECU'S
Mendenhall Student Center. This
will be a truly exciting evening for
the entire family he said.
TheSoviet Acrobatk Revuehas
won world-wide acclaim on its in-
ternational tours, and its members
have been praised for their dexter-
willprescntl7actsfeaturingmagic, ity and graceful re-creations of the
wire-walking, juggling and com- Russiancircustraditionwruchdates
back to the time of the czars. throughout the United States
Theshowisdesignedtoappeal The star performers include Canada, with a concludingjperfor-
toallagegroups,accordingtoSruart acrobat VTadmirSerov,designated mance in Philadelphia scheduled
as Russia's National artist, his ac-
robat wife Irina Serova, mime artist
Anatoly Elizariev, juggler Ahmed
Dianov and a father-son tightrope
team, Nuhtar and Shamhal
Abakarov, who perform blind-
folded on the high wire.
On this tour, the troupes' sec-
ond tour of North America, the re-
vue is appearing in 65 cities
Stone
for late May.
Advance tickets for the Soviet
Acrobatic Revue's ECU perfor-
mance are $10 for the general pub
lie, $8 for ECU faculty and staff and
$6 for ECU students and youth. All
tickets sold at the door will be $10
Tkketsarea vailableat the ECU
Central TicketOffke in Mendenhall
Student Center.
Continued from page 7
Manzarek's wedding party has
drawn the most flak, from Manzarek
himself, as absolute fabrication but
probably does portray an accurate
representation of the lovehate re-
lationship Morrison and Courson
had for each other.
Considering how willingly
Manzarek and the rest of The Doors
accepted $750,000 for the movie
rights, he shouldn't be complaining
ton much.
Another unfortunate error oc-
curs when Stone portrays Courson
asmoreorlessa victim of Morrison's
brutally abusive nature � a claim
that has been refuted by those close
to the band.
Although Stone plays it other-
wise, it seems they were equally
mean and spiteful toward each
other.
To Stone's credit, he ignores
themyth that Morrison really didn't
die in a Parisian bathtub on July 3,
1971. (Probably more likely is
Courson's confession to long-time
Door'sfriend Danny Sugerman that
Morrison overdosed on heroin she
gave him that evening.)
Another nice touch is the way
Stone portrays "death" in almost
every scene in the movie. (Pay close
attention to the bald Indian in the
beginning of the movie and ho w he
keeps getting closer to Morrison
throughout the show.)
The movie gives fans an excel-
lent way to visually experience The
Doors, especially for those too
young to remember it first hand.
And when you combine this
NADTO
with some excellent background
material, namely Sugerman'sbooks
No One Here Gets Out Alive, Won-
derland Avenue and The Doors: An
Illustrated History, you can get a
pretty good idea of what The Doors,
and the '60s were all about.
Ultimately, Krieger summed
the movie up best in a recent inter-
view with Guitar Schcxil magazine.
"Anybody who was portrayed
in it is probably going to hate it, but
1 think the fans will probably like
it he said.
Continued from page7
"Usually it is not a problem
unless someone's dialect is so bad
that nothing but four X's come up
on the screen types Emmctstem.
Emmetstein has worked for
Carolina Telephone for 16 years.
For the first 10 years he tells that he-
was a data procissor for the coin
pany. ITicn, in 1985, this new tele-
communications device allowed
Spiderman
him to fulfill a childhood da-am.
"Ever since I was a little child I
wanted to be like Sara on the Andy
Griffith show, helping people and
getting paid for it signs
Fmmetstcin.
Emmetstein has been a mem-
ber of NADTO since the organiza-
tions beginning in 1986.
"1 was just a plain-Jane due
paying member for five years, as a
matter of fact, I've only been to two
of the their conventions explains
Emmetstein.
He explained how one of
NADTCs national representatives
called up and offered him the job.
"It was like a dream come true,
I almost popped I was so excited
he signed.
Emmetstein got the job because
the old area president woke u p one
day and could hear, so naturally he
wasn't eligible anymore.
Emmetstein is a living testa-
ment who proves that all good
things come to those who wait.
To Percibal J. Emmetstein w�
say congratulations and a happy
belated April Fool's Day.
Continued from page 7
in Spiderman was never in ques-
tion. Fie has proven his ability time
and again. Starting his run on DC
Comics INFINITY INC he moved
to Marvel Comics and THE HULK.
On THE HULK his popularity be-
gin. He then moved to THE
AMAZING SPIDERMAN,and from
mere he made comic book hist' ry
in becoming the writerartist of the
biggest selling comic in history. I lis
first issue of THE HULK (330) is
selling at S20, his first issue of THE
MAZING SPIDERMAN (298) is
selling at $52, and only eight-
months-old, SPIDERMAN 1 is
selling up to $46.
Thewritingof Todd McFarlane
has come under much criticism,
even though he admitted that the
first few issues would be timid and
short of plot lines, readers thrashed
his first issue, which mostly con-
sisted of beautiful artwork and very
little story.
While it is true that the
writing for the first issue was poor,
McFarlane admitted to that. The
fact tnathiswritingabiliry improved
immensely over the five-issue story
lineof Torment and is now better
than a few writers that are currently-
writing comics. McFarlane uses
stark realism tocarry hisstctriesand
does not avoid controversial issues
to make his poi nt. While his wn ting
hasa way to go to be considered one
of the best writers in comics, at the
pace that he is improving, it won't
be too long.
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
ECU Student Union
Making'W Things Happen At ECU
Program Hotline 757-6004
?All you can eat
shrimp and trout
$4.95
"1
71
L
AWBMJOTAMEAL
(919)758-0327
105 Airport Road
M-Th llain-Spm F-Sat llam-9pm Sun UPJ
pAVID's
AUTOMOTIVE
foreign I Domestic
PABTS � SfRVICf
:s prvijrl if ar kept .vcrniiiH
510 N. CreeneSt.
Greenville, NC
830-1779
i
y

� ��-�
i
Student I Inion Productions Committee
and The R.H.A. present
CASINO NIGHT
TRY YOUR LUCK AT POKER, BLACKJACK,
ROULETTE and CRAPS!
PRIZES will be auctioned off at the end!
-Admission is EREE and refreshments provided
WHEN? Monday, April 8th from 8-10:30 pm
WHERE? Mendenhall Multipurpose room
:This Week At Hendrix Theatre
QUALITY FILM DEVELOPING
?o�
Center
3y
SUPER SAVING COUPON FOR A
T FREE
I
j second set of prints
� with every disc or roll of color print film brought in for processing
offer good through April 15, 1991
ECU Student Store Wright Bldg. 4x6 Prints not included
Greenville NC 27858 Coupon Must Accompany Order
gdden 2gy; National Honor Society;
�FSOKNKXNU FIW A IXIK.HTFUl COMEDY
Wed April 3 8 pm
POWAQQATSI
ItCADVDfnABi
rHE
FRESHMAN
Thurs-Sat
April 4-6 8pm
rx
Sun April 7 8 pm
ECU ID oh Cumimt Films Pass is Required fob Admission
iil

?Chartering reception is April 23, 1991
'Two scholarships will be presented to
outstanding junior and senior members
'Career assistance including over 150
corporations with career opportunities
Deadline to Join: April 10, 1991
Pirate batsm
By Owen Cox
Suff Writer
ECUpickedupa much-needed
6-4 baseball win against the na-
tionally ranked Jacksonville Dol-
phins Thursday night.
The Pirates, keyed by a strong
pitching performance by juruorTom
Moye, rallied after an early deficit
to come back against a strong Jack-
sonville club
Coach Gary Overtd
the Pirate effort: 'Th.j
ths year that is a
We needed a wi
opponent and w�. .
However ,hePirat
early 1-0. Dolphin
Marc Manni I
third on a wild pit I
another wild pitch
added anothi -
fifth tot . adv;
r �
-
w

Scott Robinsondelivers a pitch in the second game aga.n
due to rain in the eighth inning and ECU was held to a 7
Crew team p
By Nicole Pratt
Staff Writer
The ECU Crew Team found
-outhard work pay-off last weekend
KyhtfUheycqrnethcgTie wjh a bronze
medal t'rom"tnc Aupista Invita-
tional Regatta in Augusta, Co
John JuAiitis. David Burnette.
Tom Barrv. Mike McCuiley. and
jStephanJeCmwy competed in the
novice four event and came in firs!
in their heat, allowing them to ad-
vance to the finals.
They beat out Michigan State,
Augusta College and Georgia Tech
in the preliminaries and wen!
against Tampa, Florida Institute ot
Technology and the University oi
Tennessee-Chattanwga in the fi-
nals.
in i
neck-in-neck
mark, where UP -
their second winds
and finish within tJ
other. ECl
second s a fter Ta m pa
409 '
S
Karen Ja
Shanm
women s j
UTC, Tulai"
placed third in th�.
time of about I
The Augusta C
finished this cent ij
utesbut still ad
because they won tj
one other scho
said. She said UI
Irates claim first pi.
By Gary Hurley
Suff Writer
The ECU Ultimate team won
their first finals appearance of 1991.
The Irates knocked off Columbia in
the B-Bracket championship game
of the Easter Eggstravaganza this
past weekend in Wilmington.
The tournament's competition
consisted of both college and pro-
fessional teams from Rhode Island
to Florida. The Irates never lost to a
college team but were knocked out
of the A-Bracket by two pro teams.
On Saturday, the hate's first
$ game was against Suny Purchase.
Purchase qualified
nationals last
to their reputal
ECU won handily t
6.
"Weoutiasted tj
throwing and defej
player David Meivj
about our chances
Tournament this vi
Philadelphia
Double Secret. ga
than they could hai
the game went E
they telll 5-5.
In third round
met Flordia'sVioJ
4"
Sale!
Freshman catcher Lisa Corpew slides into second j
Community Junior College.






vIIk Cunt (liarolinian
Apwl 2, 1991
April 2, 1991
Campus; circus comes to Hendrix
ECU News Bureau
edy.
The Soviet Acrobatic Revue will
perform at ECU Tuesday, April ?.
in Wright Auditorium, beginning
at 8 p.m.
The event is sponsored by the the entire family he said
"This is not your planet monkey -boy
Buckaioo Banzai comes to Mendenhall
!Tu week the Student Inion Films Committee ever on the
quest of educating .ciuk him;and entertaining tlvl O community,
presents another great week ot film- Towaqqatsi' "The Fresh-
man" aixi The Adventures ot Buckaroo Banzai are this week's
free flicks screening at Hendrix Theatre.
Powaqqatsi" is drrey Reggio's long awaited follow-up to
s unique masterpiece TCoyaanisqatsi Although clearly a com-
panion piecete theearlk rtilr Towaqqatsi (a ! lopi term ivr 'lite
. onsuming life I do
complii m nt '
ECU Student Union Minority Arts
Committee.
The 27-member troupe � con-
tortionists, downs and acrobats �
will present 17actsfeaturingmagic,
wire-walking, juggling and com
back to the time of the czars.
The show is designed to appeal The star performers include
toallagegmups,according to Stuart acrobat VladrmrSerov, designated
Secttor,marketingdirector at ECU'S as Russia's National artist, his ac-
Mcndenhall Student Center. "This robat wife IrinaSerova, mime artist
will be a truly exciting evening for Anatoly Elizariev, juggler Ahmed
Dianov and a father-son tightrope
Stone
a .i
� much repeat 'Koyaanisqatsi as
distinct work
If tther" role as Don
kI r ith an eligible
r, aqqatsi cenh rsontherelariorfc hip between humansand
. - nent concentrai r�g mo�e on me human side of the
ition
v - Matthew PnxWrick and offer he can't
refuse in ' Freshman a hook) offbeat comedy that's been
dubbed the - '�� get : ol llXa
Brai do :x .i ralarkuis � 1.1 p I
( Vflrtecme pi ivsa I i '�'� d i
daughter(I n lopeAru v lilk r) Mattl��� Bnxlei krkisthekk ilistic
andambiti u V.N' fi I i inwIioseaKradenuciareergetsoffloa
had start w 11 n he's conned out of all h s belongings just onehoui
irrivesinNi ��"� His situation changes dramatically
whenBrando in his first starring role since 1980 eshimapart-
time job ami offers tosl him me ropes
� - to 1 ' - � ' that it's
imp � b in ' chofl
tod : v- � tirtodh Igcany
on . .�� i) rhatiti
ium ipi-vialsli king��t tl? cult class I1k
; � � Buckamo Banzai-Across the i ighth . �imenskm
PeterWi Robocop piaBucltfHPOolUnzai,equalpartsphysi-
cist neun - irgeon nvk singer and cult hero, who plunges into a
heart stt ��� ng hilarious adventure when hi' enters me Eighth
Dimensi � Ft th wall.Nzam action-packed corned
also .� Barkii 1 lot r t ioktWurn
. , tesda) "�� I Opm
IheFivshman screens Thursday Frtdaj and Saturda) nights
toriH 5 and 6. also at 811 pm The outrageous Adventures c4
Buckar ' � � " I ' M '��" ' '
. �, these and all Student Unkm films is free with a valid
� lent ID ,
Hk v thank l � istMuik
us, �;� � �. iew oi these films.
Manzarek's wedding party has
drawn the most flak, from Manzarek
himself, as absolute fabrication but
probably does portray an accurate
representation of the love hate re
lationship Morrison and Courson
had tor each other.
Considering how willingly
Manzarekand the rest ot The Doors
accepted $750,000 tor the movie
rights, he shouldn'tbecomplaining
tor much
Another unfortunate erroi
curs when Stone portrays Coura m
NADTO
Mofll
in
. i
-tsteti
Usually it is not a p
unless someone's dialed is
that nothing but four X's a
on the screen types Emm
Emmetstein has � rk I I i
( arolina Telephone for
For the first 10 years he tells that he
was a data processor for tl
pany rhen, in 1985 mist � �
communications device
Spiderman
in Spiderman was never in ques-
tion He has proven his ability time
and again Starting hisrui iD
ComicslNFlNrn IN �-�
to Marvel Comics and 77 fl � . &
On THE Hlfl K hs popularity be-
gan He then moved !
AM V ISPIDl RW ,v- ii Ifi
there he made comic be kh
in becoming the writer artisti ftl
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
ECU Student Union
MakingY&y Things Happen At ECU
fA
Program Hotline 757-6004
f
��V.c
x
Student Union Productions Committee
and The R.il A present
CASINO NIGHT
TRY YOUR LUCK AT POKER. BLACKJACK,
ROULETTE and CRAPS!
?PRIZES w ill be auctioned off at the end!
-Admission is FREE and refreshments provided
WHEN? Monday, April 8th from 8-10:30 pm
WHERE? Mendenhall Multipurpose room
:This Week At Hendrix Theatre �
1 l�M��v II I m UK M MN Mil l� U� �vlAIMJH
Wed April 3 8 pm
POWAQQATSI
THE ACVEHTURB Of
THE ,
FRESHMAN
Thurs-Sat
April 4-6 8pm
IAN 1 Al
Sun April 7 8 pm
ECU ID or Current Films Pass is Required for Admission
The Soviet Acrobatic Revuehas
won world -wide acclaim on its in-
ternational tours, and its members
have been praised for their dexter-
ity and graceful icoeaUora of the
Russiancircus tradition whichdates
team, Nuhtar and Shamhal
Abakarov, who perform blind-
folded on the high wire.
On this tour, the troupes' sec-
ond tour of North America, the re-
vue is appearing in 65 cities
throughout the United States and
Canada, with a concluding perfor
mance in Philadelphia scheduled
for late May
Advance tickets for the Soviet
Acrobatic Revue's ECU perfor-
mance are $10 for the general pub
lie, $8 for ECU faculty and staff and
$6 for ECU students and youth. All
tickets sold at the door will be $10
Ticketsareavailableat the ECU
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center.
Continued from page 7
asmoreorlessa victim of Morrison's
brutally abusive nature � a claim
that has been refuted by the sedose
to the band
Although Stone plays it other-
wise, u seems they were equally
mean and spiteful toward each
other.
To Stone's credit, he ignores
themyth that Morrison really didn't
die iii a Parisian bathtub on luh
1971. (Probably more hkelv is
Courson's confession to long-time
' vtsfriend DannySugerman that
Morrison overdosed on heroin she
gave him that evening.)
Another nice touch is the was
Stone portrays "death in almost
every scene in the movie. (Tay close
attention to the bald Indian in the
beginrungof the movie and how he
keeps getting closer to Morrison
throughout the show.)
The movie gives fans an excel-
lent way to visually experience The
Doors, especially for those too
young to remember it first hand.
And when vou combine this
with some excellent background
ma teria 1. na nu-1 y Sugerma n s books
Ho One Here Gets Out Alive, Won-
Jerland Avenue and The P'vr; An
IBystnded History, you can get .�.
pretty good idea of what The Doors.
and the 60s were all about
Ultimately, Krieger summed
the movie up best in a recent inter-
view with Gutter v i magazii
"Anybodywh i
in it is probably going to hate it, hut
1 think the fans will probably like
it he said
Continued from page 7
him to fulfil a childhood dream
"Eversmoel was a little child 1
wanted tobe like Sara on the Andy
i iriffith show . helping people and
getting paid tor it signs
Emmetstein
Emmetstein has been a mem-
ber of NA1ITTO since the organiza-
tions beginning in llJv
"1 was nist a phiin lane due
paying member tor five years, as a
matter of tact, I've only been to two
oi the their conventions explains
Emmetstein
He explained how one of
NADTO's national representatives
called up and offered him the Kb.
"It was like a dream come true.
I almost popped ! was so excited
he signed.
Emmetstein got the pbbeca -
theold area president woke upne
day and could hear, s. i naturally he
wasn't eligible anymore.
Emmetstein is a living �
ment who proves that ail .
things come to those who wait.
To Percibal ! Emmetsteii
say congratulati. us and a 1
belated Apnl Fool's Day
Continued from page 7
biggest selling comk in history. I lis
firsl f i ��
;i ' :v atS first issueol THE
MAZIS ERMAK 298) is
selling at "2 and only eight-
monthsold IMAN �1 is
selling up ft $46
Thewritii Id Mel arlane
has come under rmi I ism,
even thouch he admitted that the
first few issues would be timid and
short oi plot lines, readers thrashed
his first issue, which mostly con-
ststedofbeauufu artwork and very
little story.
While it is true that the
writing tor the first issue was poor,
McFaitane admitted to that The
factthatraswritingability improved
orunenselyoveTthefive-issuestory
BneofTormentand isnowbetl i
thuin a few writers trvi! arecurrentlv
writing comics McFarlane u
stark realism toca rry his u
does not avoid controversial is
to rruike his point. While his wn ring
hasawaytogotobeconsideredone
of the best wrih rs incomi
pace that he is impn ving, it
rx- too long
S
�All you can eat
shrimp and trout
$4.95
(919)758-0327
105 Airport Road
M Hi llain-8pm I- Sal llam-9pm Sun Llam-4pm
0Mp$
AUTOMOTIVE
foftgn k Ocm�iiiC
RABTS h SERVICE
510 N. Creene St.
Creenille. NC
830779
IS QUALITY FILM DEVELOPING
�VxoVO
Center
"f-
FREE
SUPER SAVING COUPON FORA
I
I
I
I second set ot prints
Iuiih ever) disc or roll of color pnnt film brought in for processing j
offer good through Apnl 15.1991
ECU Student Store Wnght Bldg
Greenville NC 27858
4h PrinLv not included
Coupon Musi Accompam OrO
Golden !Igv National Honor Society
STUDENT UNION
STUDENT UNION
�Chartering reception is April 23, 1991
�Two scholarships will be presented to
outstanding junior and senior members
�Career assistance including over 150
corporations with career opportunities
Deadline to Join: April 10, 1991
Fixate batsm
By Owen Co
Staff Writer
ECU pi- ked
h-4 baseball wii
tionallv ranki-vi � �
phmsThursc! a)
The Pirates key
pitchingpc-rt. �
Move, rallu-1 al
to come bad
sonvilleclub
I
W
Scxin Rob
due to r3
Crew team p
By Nicole Pratt
Stjtt V-
The ECU Ci
out hard � -
whlh4t ii
nvda " ' '
tiona
lohr
Tom Bai
novice I
in their heat a
vanceti the!
Thej
Aug
in the pre
against I
Technok
Tennessei �
ruih
Irates claim first pi
Bv Gary Hurle)
sun Writet
The ECU I
their first I
Thebatesknocked N
the B-Bradket dh
ot the Easter Eggsb ivagai
past weekend in Wilmn
ThetoumaTJi
consistti ot Knh coflegE
Sessional tc. nsft
to Florida The Irates -u �- a
eoBege team but were k
oflheA-Bradketb)
On Saturda) e irate -
$ game was ainst Him Pun 9


Phil
thar
met I
I
L
Safe!
Freshman catcher Lea Corpew slides into second
Community Junior College





I
April 2, 1991
SMfg lEast (garpltnian
9
comes to Hendrix
v cz�irv
:ers include
� V designated
1 artist his ac-
Iva. mime artist
gder Ahmed
son hghtrope
li -hamhal
ferform blind-
throughout the United Suites and
Canada, with a concluding perfor-
mance in Philadelphia scheduled
tor late Mav
Advance tickets tor the Soviet
Acrobatic Revue's ECU perfor-
mance are $10 tor the general pub
be $8 tor ECU tau!t and statt and
o for ECU students aixl vouth. All
tickets sold at the door will be $10
ricketsareavailableattheECU
tralTk IcetOfficeinMendenhall
� Center
Continued rom page 7
, �� . ��� � kground
. iugerman'sbooks
. � � , r. n
. �
Doors
immed
c � iest in a re ent inter-
, .� i a � � ne
. orti �yed
ngtohateil but
1 thinV probably like
Continued trom page 7
:�1 lilse
ipone
ilK he
ii .��� ire
tcstas
tgooq
.
-in we
ind a 1vippy
Continued trom page 7
n. W'tter
n i urrently
me uses
�� ricsand
' IJ U( �
�� s .nrmg
-it redone
YAMUc,

AUTOMOTIVE
toiiQn & Dom�ltiC
PARTS i SIBVICI
830-1779
FILM DEVELOPING
inter ,�-
Satiny-
ink
FRIK
i
i
ik1 set ot prints I
ighl in tor processing i
m
I
4x6 Prints not included
Coupon Musi Accompany Order
I lowor Society
April 23, 1991
ie presented to
senior members
luding over 150
er opportunities
pril 10, 1991
PORTS
Pirate batsmen pick up two against Dolphins
By Owen Cox
Staff Writer
: c I pickedupa much-needed
baseball win against the na-
ranked Jacksonville Dol-
ns rhursday night.
he Pirates, keyed by a strong
� ingperfcmrtancebyjuniorTom
rallied after an early deficit
a k against a strong lack
dub
Coach Gary Overton said about
the Pirate effort: "This is the win
this year that is a shot in the arm
We needed a win over a quality
opponent and we got that tonight
HoweverJhe Pirates, fell behind
early 1-0. Dolphin leadofi batter,
Marc Marini doubled, moved to
third on a wild pitch, then scored on
another wild pitch. Jacksonville
added another run in the top of the
fifth to take a 241 advantage.
In the bottom of the fifth, the
Pirate Kits came alive. They sent 10
men to the plate and got some help
from the jacksonvilledefenseasthey
scored four runs in the bottom half
of the frame. Move, who also was
the designated hitter, lead off the
inning with a double. ChadTriplett
then reached on an error.
(ilvnn Bock reached first on a
catcher's interference call to load
the bases Pat VVatkins singled to
Celeste Hootfman � ECU Photo Lab
Scott Robinsondelivers a pitch in the second game against Jacksonville on March 29. The game was called
�to rain in the eighth inning and ECU was held to a 7-7 tie
center, scoring Moye. Barry Narron
then singled to center allowing
Triplett and Beck to score. After a
David Leisten flyout,Tommy Eason
was intentionally walked to load
the bases.
John Gaststruckout,and Corey
Short walked to drive in the fourth
Pirate run of the inning. Moye, who
led of the inning, grounded to third
to end the inning.
The Pirates added two more
runs, on Corey Short's two RBI
single, to go ahead 6-2.
Jacksonville was not finished,
however, they hit Moye for two
runs as four consecutive Dolphin
batters reached.
Lyle Hartgrove relieved Moye,
and got the next Jacksonville batter
to ground into a double play to
preserve a two run lead. Hartgrove
then retired the side in order in the
ninth to get his first saveof the year
On offense, Eason went 1-2,
VVatkins went 21 and Narron was
2-5 with two runs batted in. Short
also had two runs Kitted in for the
Pirates.
Move, who is now 3-1, allowed
six hi.sand three earned runs, while
walking one batter and hitting one
with a pitch. Moye also had seven
Strikeouts including four in the first
inning.
"Tom Moye had hisbest outing
of the vear CoachOverton said of
Move'sperformance.Headdedthat
Move may have ran out of steam
because he was doubling as the
designated hitter and had to run the
bases.
ECU had to scratch and claw in
their next game that afternoon to
come away with a 7-7 tie agai nst the
Dolphins.
The game was called in the
eighth due to showers and became
the Pirates first tie this season.
The Pirates jumped to an early
lead with a run in the bottom of the
first. The bottom of the second also
brought some runs for the Pirates.
Chad Triplett struckout to start
the inning. Glynn Beck singled to
center. Pat VVatkins followed with a
single to left. After Barry Narron
reached on a fielder's choice, David
1 listen singled to left b i bring home
Beck.
The Pirates second run st ored
when Narron crossed home just
before Leisten wastagged out en a n
attempted steal.This put the Pirates
up 3-0.
Jacksonville woke up in the top
of the third, rocking Pirate starter
Jamie Bell. The Dolphins pushed
across six runs on tour hits and
were helped bv three walks and
two Pirate errors to take the lead, 6-
3. In the inning the Dolphins
roughed up two Pirate pitchers.
Jacksonvilleadded another run
in the fifth to make it a 7-3 ballgame.
ECU scored three times in the
sixth to cut the lead to one. Triplett,
Beck and VVatkins had consecutive
singles. Narron reached on a field-
ers choice and moved up when the
pitcher for Jacksonville threw the
ball away for an error. Both Beck
and VVatkins scored on the throw
Leisten sacrificed Narron to
third. Tommy Eason then grounded
sharply to the second basemanwho
threw out Narron as he was trying
to score. John Gast closed out the
inning by flying to right.
The seventh inning brought the
rain as well as the tying run for the
Pirates. Corey short struckout to
lead off the inning Tom Moye
walked, and Triplett singled. Beck
then reached on an error which al
lowed Moye to score the tying run.
VVatkins grounded out to second
for the final out
In the top of the eighth, with
one out and a Dolphin runner on
third, the game was halted because
of rain. Play resumed about twenty
minutes later with Jacksonville
scoring two runs to take a 9-7 lead.
Due to the rain, play was sus-
pended for good during the Pirate
half of the inning. Since the Pirates
did not complete their at bat, the
score reverted back to the last
completed inning, the seventh, in
which the score was still 7-7.
At the plate, the Pirates were
paced by Beck and VVatkins, both
were 3-4. Leisten and Triplett also
chipped in two hits a piece as the
Pirates banged out 12 hits.
Sophomore right-hander
Howard Whitfield turned in a
strong outing in relief as he went
three scoreless innings allowing
only one hit. He gave the Pirates a
chance bv holding the Dolphins in
check.
With the tie ECU'srecord went
to 15-9-1. The Pirates faceN.C State
Udav in Raleigh.
team pulls
Augui
By Nicole Pratt
Staff Writer
The ECU Crew Team found
: rd w( rk paysoff last weekend
hevcamehqrne withabronae
!al from the Augusta Invit.i
ti nal Regatta in Augusta, (la.
ohn uzaitis, David Burnette,
.i Barry, Mike McCuUey, ami
phanieCreaseycompeted in the
icefi iurevent and came in first
their heat, allowing them to -
v ance to the finals
"hey beat out Michigan State,
. sta C oDege and Georgia Tech
the preliminaries and went
i nst ampa, Florida Institute ot
nology, and the University ot
ei nessee-Chattanooga in the fi-
L'TC, Tampa and ECU were
neck-in-neck until the 1500-meter
mark, where U IX and Tampa got
their second winds to pull awav
and finish within two seconds of
each other. E I finished about 10
secondsafter Tampa and FIT about
4(1 seconds aftt r EG
Sam Carter, Ang a n,
KarenJacobeily,Jennifer i irderand
Shannon Nobles rao I in the
women's novice four enl igainst
L rC,Tulaneand Jacksonville and
placed third in their heat with a
time of about 13 minutes
The Augusta College women
finished this event mover 14 min-
utes but still advanced to the finals
because they won their heat (only
one other school was in it art r
Niid.Slies.iid it theoffk
time, E I' would have been in the
finals.
Schools came trom as far as
Wisconsin and Canada, and all of
the Ivy League teams but one were
present. National teams from
( anada .md Russia also competed
in the regatta. The Canadian men's
and women's teams beat the Kus-
si. i teams in the international eight
e ent.
: I i hosted i scrimmage
against Skidmore College. N.C.
state and UNC-Wilmington on
March 21 and was victorious in two
of three events.
The ECU women borrowed an
eight shell and a coxswain from
Skidmore and beat them bv 22 sec-
onds. It was the first time ECU had
four of them and raced.
The ECU men faced upagamst
N.C. State and Skidmore in a four
event and finished the 1,000-meter
course in 3:39:94, marking another
victory for the Pirates. N.C. State
a nd Skid more crossed theTirusrili he
22 and 48 seconds later.
Four of the ECU women com-
peted in a four event against fresh
crews from Skidmore and UNC-W
and lost to Skidmore by a mere
eight-tenths of a second.
ECU rowing coach Tom Allan
said he is pleased with the accom-
plishments his team so far. Seven of
the 14 team members have only
been rowing since January. ECU
has races set up for every weekend
until final exams. Thev will be row-
Beeman breaks
athletic stereotyp
By Colleen Kirkpatrick
Suit Wiit.f
iais
11 w ed in an eight and the first, time ing at Duke this weekend.
first
By Gary Hurley
Staff Writer
The ECU Ultimate team won
their first finals appearance of 1991.
The I rates knocked off Columbia in
the B-Bracket championship game
of the Easter Eggstravaganza this
past weekend in Wilmington.
1 Tie tournament's competition
consisted of both college and pro-
fessional teams from Rhode Island
to Florida. The Irates never lost to a
college team but were knocked out
(4 the A-Bracket by two pro teams.
On Saturday, the hate's first
game was against Suny Purchase.
Purchase qualified tor collegiate
nationals last year but failed topla)
to their reputation, in Wilmington
ECU won handily by a score ol 13
6.
"Weoutlastedthem in running,
throwing, and defense, "said Irate
player David Melvin, "It says a lot
about our chances for the National
Tournament this year
Philadelphia's pro team,
Double Secret, gave the I ra tes more
than they am Id handle. Nothing in
the game went ECU'S way, and
they fell 15-5.
In third round action the Irates
met Flordia's Vicious Cycle for the
second tune this season Vicious
v. alked past the Irates in Miami but
in North Carolina, the game was
harder fought.
Vicious Cycle controlled half-
tinv with a thav point lead, 8-5.
The Irates fought Kick and tied the
score al 11. An Irate drop in the
endone would have put ECU in
the lead Instead Vicious capital-
ized on the turnover and lead 12-11.
From there the game went
downhill forthelrates.Viciousused
FCL"s untimely turnovers, includ-
ing a dropped "pull the equiva-
lent of a kick-off in football, to win
15-11.
The Irates finished the day as
they started, with a win. Their sec-
ond win was over Raleigh's Bnck.
Strong play by Tom Acoi, Chad
Russette, David Melvin and Dave
Graheck led to the Irate victory.
Sundav'sfirstgamewasagainst
Virginia Tech's Fresh Produce.
Again the Ira tes had no trouble with
a college team, rolling to a 15-6 vic-
tory. The Irates only allowed one
point scored against them in the
second half.
For the championship game,
ECU faced Columbia, South Caro-
lina. Columbia jumped out 2-0 and
See Irates. page 10
Robert Lee Beeman II, the
outside linebacker tor the ECU
football team, graduated in De-
cember with a GPA oi a 4.0
Beeman majored in Industrial
Technology with a minor in
Business.
Beeman, from Montgomery
Al began playing football at
ECU as a freshman after being
in the Marine Corps for three
and one-half years. He lettered
three out of four years and was
awarded with the most presti-
gious award that an athlete can
receive this past year. He had
been voted by the coaches and
players as The Most Outstand-
ing Male Scholar Athlete. He
also held the position oi Team
Captain this season and was
given the jerry T. Brooks Award.
Beeman was awarded for
his scholastic as well as his ath-
leocachievement. He wasgiven
the Omega Psi Phi Award, the
Kappa Alpha Psi Award, and
the Richard Broad hurst Award.
He has also become a nominee
for a national graduate school
fellowship for $7,000 given by a
national academic honor soci-
ety.
V
R.L. Beeman
Beeman's success can be at-
tributed to his families support,
including his daughter, Jacquetta
and his drive to see black
Americans succeed.
"If it wasn't for Jacquetta, I
probable wouldn't try so hard
Beeman said. "I think it would
be a shame tor me not to come to
school and do my best. I took
advantage of every opportunity
to study and get the most out of
my classes
He said that he found the
secret to academic success was
reading hismaterial beforeclass.
Besides playing football,
Beeman is a member of Alpha
Phi Alpha Fraternity at ECU and
See Beeman, page 10
Williams, Welch lead track teams at N.C. State
By Rick Chann
Staff Writer
:
i

Safe!
Freshman catcher Lisa Corpew slides into second base in an exhibition game against Hutchmson
Community Junior College.
TheMen'sand Women'sTrack
Teams competed at the Raleigh re-
lays held at North Carolina State
University this past Friday and Sat-
urday.
Rainy conditions on Friday
forced an hour and a half delay in
the running events and moved the
field events to Saturday.
The pool rainy conditions were
less than ideal for the sprints but the
distance events saw many competi-
tors take advantage of these condi-
tions to turn some fast times.
Many of the times were good
enough to qualify many of the ath-
letes for the NCAA Championship
meet.
Friday's sprinting events were
the trials for the finals to be held on
Saturday. Brian Williamsgot things
started for ECU by running the 1 IO-
meter high hurdles in 14.61 and
advancing to the finals.
The women then got their turn
in the 100-meter dash. Sophomore
Danita Roseboro ran 12.25 and
moved on to the finals.
Also competing in the 100-m
dash were Joy Dorsey, running a
12.89 and Sherry Hawkins, running
a 13.61.
After the 1 12 hour delay be-
cause of thunder and lightning the
runningeventsresumed with Udon
Cheek running a 53:64 in the 400
meter Intermediate Hurdles, which
earned him the right to compete in
the finals.
The distance events then took
over for the rest of the night. First up
was the 4x1500-meter Relay, which
saw the team of Theresa Marini,
Catherine Norstrand, Marianne
Marini and Gretchen Harley com-
pete with a time of 20:46 for 9th
place.
Anne Marie Welch competed
in the 5000-meter (3.1miles)with a
time of 18:47. Kyle Sullivan then
stepped on to the track for the long
and fast, 25 lap 10,000-m (6.2 miles)
race.
The runners took advantage of
weather conditions to runsomc fast
times. Four runners lead by Bob
Henes of NCSU ran under 29 min-
utes and qualified for the NCAA
meet. Sullivan ran a personal best
with his time of 32:54.
Saturday's events were lead off
by the Men's 5000-meter, in which
Ricky Chann ran a 16:25 and Matt
Morris a 16:42. The men's sprint
team then took over with Williams
competing in the 110-meter high
hurdle finals with a fourth place
finish of 14:49.
The4xl 00 relay wasdomina ted
by ECU. Ike Robinson lead off by
giving ECU the lead which was
never challenge as the baton based
to Damon Desue, Junior Davis, and
brought home for the victory over
See Track, page 10






comes to Hendrix
czars.
mers include
v, designated
artist, his ac-
va, mime artist
iggter Ahmed
-son tightrope
nd Shamhal
?rtorm bhnd-
vire.
troupes' sec-
kmenca, the ri1-
m 65 cities
throughout the United States and
Canada, with a concluding perfor-
mance in Fniladelphia scheduled
for late May.
Advance tickets for the Soviet
Acrobatic Revue's ECU perfor-
mance are $10 for the general pub-
lic, $8 for ECU faculty and staff and
$t for ECU students and youth. All
rickets sold at the door will be $10
Ticketsare availableat the ECU
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center.
Continued from page 7
on heroin she
fctg.)
i jch i the way
Itn in .ilmot
en ic- (Pav dose
Id Indian in the
I . i'and how he
to Morrison
ans an excel
fexperienceThe
r those too
first hand
'mbino this
years, as ,i
een to two
� explains
ros
iim tlu
i.itn'
Ovl
d be timid and
adorstb.rashoi
:h mostly con-
I work and von
true that the
� � rhe
; oil
e-issuestorv
"1
with some excellent background
material, namdySugeiTnan'sbooks,
No One Hew Gets Out Alive, Won
i venue and The Doors: An
,�� lory you can got a
pretty good idea ol what The Ivrs
anvl tho 60s were 11 about.
Ultimately, Krieger summed
the movie up best in a recent inter-
view withGuitai Si : �' magazine.
"Anybody w ho was portrayed
in it is probably going to hateit but
! think the tans will probably like
it ho said
Continued trom page 7
Emmetstein gotthejobbecaust
the old area president woke up one
day and could hear, s1 naturally he
wasn't eligible anymore
Emmetstein is a living testa-
ment who proves that all good,
things come to those who wait
To Percibal ! Emmetstein we
s.n congratulations and a happy
belated April Fool's Day
Continued trom page 7
line of'Tormentand is now better
than a few writers that arocurrentlv
writing comics. McFarlane uses
stark realism to carry his storiesand
does not avoid o ntroversial issues
tomaiehis point. While his writing
hasa way to go to be considered one
ol the Ix'st writers in comics, at the
pace that he is in . i
be to
it won't
I-1
t
oUP's
am-4pm
AUTOMOTIVE
� ingn k Dom�StiC
PARTS k SIKVICI
510 N. Creene St.
Greenville, NC
830-1779
WWtTTWTW
FILM DEVELOPING
inter
FREE
FOR A
1
I
I
lond set ol prints I
ol Dolor print film brought in f( r processing �
eood through April 15, 1991
4x6 Prints not included
Coupon Must Accompany Order
Honor Society
April 23, 1991
le presented to
senior members
uding over 150
jer opportunities
pril 10, 1991
April 2, 1991
olhg 4Eaat (Jlarultnian
9
SPORTS
Pirate batsmen pick up two against Dolphins
By Owen Cox
Staff Writer
ECU picked upa much-needed
tv4 baseball win against the na-
tionally ranked Jacksonville Dol-
phins Thursday night.
The Pirates, keyed by a strong
pi tchi ng performance by juniorTom
Move, rallied after an early deficit
to come back against a strong Jack-
sonville club.
Coach Gary Over ton sa id about
the Pirate effort: "This is the win
this year that is a shot in the arm.
We needed a win over a quality
opponent and we got that tonight
However,he Pirates, fell behind
early 1-0. Dolphin leadoff batter.
Marc Marini doubled, moved to
third on a wild pitch, then scored on
another wild pitch. Jacksonville
added another run in the top of the
fifth to take a 2-0 advantage.
In the bottom of the fifth, the
Pirate bats came alive. They sent 10
men to the plate and got some help
from the Jacksonvilledefenseasthey
scored four runs in the bottom half
of the frame. Moye, who also was
the designated hitter, lead off the
inning with a double. Chad Triplett
then Reached on an error.
Glynn Beck reached first on a
catcher's interference call to load
the bases. Pat Watkins singled to
center, scoring Moye. Barry Narron
then singled to center allowing
Triplett and Beck to score. After a
David Leistenflyout, Tommy Eason
was intentionally walked to load
the bases-
John Gast struckou t, and Corey
Short walked to drive in the fourth
Piraterunof theinning. Moye, who
led of the inning, grounded to third
to end the inning.
The Pirates added two more
runs, on Corey Short's two RBI
single, to go ahead 6-2.
Jacksonville was not finished,
however, they hit Moye for two
runs as four consecutive Dolphin
batters reached.
Lyle Hartgrove relieved Moye,
and got the next Jacksonville batter
to ground into a double play to
preserve a two run lead. Hartgrove
then retired the side in order in the
ninth to get his first save of the year.
On offense, Eason went 1-2,
Watkins went 2-4 and Narron was
2-5 with two runs batted in. Short
also had two runs batted in for the
Pirates.
Moye, who is now 3-1, allowed
sixhi;sarid three earned runs, while
walking one batter and hitting one
with a pitch. Moye also had seven
strikeouts including four in the first
inning.
'Tom Moye had hisbest ou ting
of the year Coach Overton said of
Move's performance. He added that
ECU had to scratch and claw in third. Tommy Eason then grounded
their next game that afternoon to sharply to the second basemanwho
come away with a 7-7 tie against the
Dolphins.
The game was called in the
eighth due to showers and became
the Pirates first tie this season.
The Pirates jumped to an early
lead with a run in the bottom of the
first. The bottom of the second also
brought some runs for the Pirates.
Chad Triplett struckout to start
threw out Narron as he was trying
to score. John Gast closed out the
inning by flying to right.
The seventh inning brought the
rain as well as the tying run for the
Pirates. Corey short struckout to
lead off the inning Tom Moye
walked, and Triplett singled. Beck
then reached on an error which al-
lowed Moye to score the tying run.
the inning. Glynn Beck singled to Watkins grounded out to second
center. Pat Watkins followed with a for the final out.
single to left. After Barry Narron In the top of the eighth, with
reached on a fielder's choice, David one out and a Dolphin runner on
l-eisten singled to left tobringhome third, the game was halted because
Beck. of rain. Play resumed about twenty
The Pirates second run stored minutes later with Jacksonville
when Narron crossed home just scoring two runs to take a 9-7 lead,
before Leisten was tagged out on an Due to the rain, play was sus-
attempted steal. This put the Pirates
up 3-0.
Jacksonville woke up in the top
of the third, rocking Pirate starter
Jamie Bell. The Dolphins pushed
across six runs on four hits and
were helped by three walks and
two Pirate errors to take the lead, 6-
3. In the inning the Dolphins
roughed up two Pirate pitchers.
JacksonvHleadded another run
in the fifth to make it a 7-3 ballgame.
ECU scored three times in the
sixth to cut the lead to one. Triplett,
Beck and Watkins had consecutive
singles. Narron reached on a field-
ers choice and moved up when the
Celeste Hoottman � ECU Photo Lab
Scott Robinsondelivers a pitch in the second game against Jacksonville on March 29. The game was called
due to rain in the eighth inning and ECU was held to a 7-7 tie.
Moye may have ran out of steam pitcher for Jacksonville threw the
because he was doubling as the ball away for an error. Both Beck
designated hitterand had to run the and Watkins scored on the throw.
bases. Leisten sacrificed Narron to
pended for good during the Pirate
half of the inning. Since the Pirates
did not complete their at bat, the
score reverted back to the last
completed inning the seventh, in
which the score was still 7-7.
At the plate, the Pirates were
paced by Beck and Watkins, both
were 3-4. Leisten and Triplett also
chipped in two hits a piece as the
Pirates banged out 12 hits.
Sophomore right-hander
Howard Whitfield turned in a
strong outing in relief as he went
three scoreless innings allowing
only one hit. He gave the Pirates a
chance by holding the Dolphins in
check.
With the tie ECU'S record went
to 15-9-1. The Pirates face N.C. State
today in Raleigh.
team pulls third in Augui
By Nicole Pratt
Staff Writer
The ECU Crew Team found
i at hard work pay-off last weekend
u vti cajTghqrjne wjh afaronae
� edal from' trie Augusta TnvTta-
ti rial Regatta in Augusta, Ga.
lohn Juzaitis, David Burnette,
I m Barry, Mike McCulley, and
StephanieCreasey competed in th.
novice four event and came in first
in their heat, allowing them to ad-
vance to the finals.
They beat out Michigan State,
Augusta College and Georgia Tech
in the preliminaries and went
against Tampa, Honda Institute of
Technology, and the University of
Tennessee-Chattanooga in the fi-
nals.
UTC, Tampa and FCU were
neck-in-neck until the 1500-meter
mark, where UTC and Tampa got
their second winds to pull away
and finish within two seconds of
each other. ECU finished about ID
seconds after Tampa and FIT about
40 seconds after ECU.
Sam Carter, Angie Brown,
Karen Jacobellv. JenniferCorderand
Shannon Nobles raced in the
women's novice four event against
UTC, Tulane and Jacksonville and
placed third in their heat with a
time of about 13 minutes.
The Augusta College women
finished this event in over 14 min-
utes but still advanced to the finals
because they won their heat (only
one other school was in it ), Carter
said. She said if theotficials went b
time, R U would have been in the
finals.
Schools came from as far as
Wisconsin and Canada, and all of
the Ivy League teams but one were
present. National teams from
four of them and raced.
The ECU men faced up against
N.C. State and Skidmore in a four
event and finished the 1,000-meter
course in 33954, marking another
victory for the Pirates. N.C. State
Canada and Russia also competed aiSkidrrKrccrossedthe7i
in the regatta. The Canadian men's 22 and 48 seconds later.
first
By Gary Hurley
Staff Writer
The ECU Ultimate team won
their first finals appearance of 1991.
The Irates knocked off Columbia in
the B-Bracket championship game
of the Easter Eggstravaganza this
past weekend in Wilmington.
The tournament's competition
consisted of both college and pro-
fessional teams from Rhode Island
to Horida. The Irates never lost to a
college team but were knocked out
of the A-Bracket by two pro teams.
On Saturday, the Irate's first
j game was against Suny Purchase.
Purchase qualified for collegiate
nationals last year but failed to play
to their reputation, in Wilmington.
ECU won handily by a score of 13
6.
"Weoutlasted thenun running
throwing, and defense, "said Irate
player David Melvin, "It says a lot
about our chances for the National
Tournament this year
Philadelphia's pro team.
Double Secret, gave the Irates more
than they could handle. Nothing in
the game went ECU's way, and
they fell 15-5.
In third round action the Irates
met Hordia's Vicious Cycle for the
and women's teams beat the Rus-
sian teams in theintemationaleight
event.
ECU hosted a scrimmage
against Skidmore College, N.C.
State and UNC-Wilmington on
March21 and was victorious in two
of three events.
The ECU women borrowed an
eight shell and a coxswain from
skidmore and beat them by 22 sec-
onds. It was the first time ECU had
i wed in an eight and the first time
second time this season. Vicious
walked past the Irates in Miami but
in North Carolina, the game was
harder fought.
Vinous Cycle controlled half-
time with a three point lead, 8-5.
The Irates fought back and tied the
score at 11. An Irate drop in the
endzone would have put ECU in
the lead. Instead Vicious capital-
ized on the turnover and lead 12-11.
From there the game went
downhill for thelrates. Vicious used
ECU's untimely turnovers, includ-
ing a dropped pull the equiva-
lent of a kick-off in football, to win
15-11.
Four of the ECU women com-
peted in a four event against fresh
crews from Skidmore and UNC-W
and lost to Skidmore by a mere
eight-tenths of a second.
ECU rowing coach Tom Allan
said he is pleased with the accom-
plishments his team so far. Seven of
the 14 team members have only
been rowing since January. ECU
has races set up for every weekend
until final exams. They will be row-
ing at Duke this weekend.
The Irates finished the day as
they started, with a win. Their sec-
ond win was over Raleigh's Bnck.
Strong play by Tom Acoi, Chad
Russette, David Melvin and Dave
Graheck led to the Irate victory.
Sunday'sfirstgamewasagainst
Virginia Tech's Fresh Produce.
Again the Irates had no trouble with
a college team, rolling to a 15-6 vic-
tory. The Irates only allowed one
point scored against them in the
second half.
For the championship game,
ECU faced Columbia, South Caro-
lina. Columbia jumped out 2-0 and
See Irates, page 10
Beeman breaks
athletic stereotype
By Colleen Kirkpatrick
�-� Sutf Writer ��
Robert Lee Beeman II, the
outside linebacker for the ECU
football team, graduated in De-
cember with a GPA of a 4.0.
Beeman majored in Industrial
Technology with a minor in
Business.
Beeman, from Montgomery
Al began playing football at
ECU as a freshman after being
in the Marine Corps for three
and one-half years. He lettered
three out of four years and was
awarded with the most presti-
gious award that an athlete can
receive this past year. He had
been voted by the coaches and
players as The Most Outstand-
ing Male Scholar Athlete. He
also held the position of Team
Captain this season and was
given the Jerry T. Brooks Award.
Beeman was awarded for
his scholastic as well as his ath-
letic achievement. He was gi ven
the Omega Psi Phi Award, the
Kappa Alpha Psi Award, and
the Richard Broadhurst Award.
He has also become a nominee
for a national graduate school
fellowship for $7,000 given by a
national academic honor soci-
ety.
y
R.L. Beeman
Beeman's success can be at-
tributed to his families support,
indud ing hisdaughter, Jacquetta
and his drive to see black
Americans succeed.
"If it wasn't for Jacquetta, I
probable wouldn't try so hard
Beeman said. "I think it would
be a shame for me not to come to
school and do my best. I took
advantage of every opportunity
to study and get the most out of
my classes
He said that he found the
secret to academic success was
reading his material beforeclass.
Besides playing football,
Beeman is a member of Alpha
Phi Alpha Fraternity at ECU and
See Beeman, page 10
Williams, Welch lead track teams at N.C. State
By Rick Chann
Staff Writer
Dail Rm4 � ECU Photo Lab
Safe!
Freshman catcher Lisa Corpew slides into second base in an exhibition game against Hulchinson
Community Junior College
TheMen'sand Women'sTrack
Teams competed at the Raleigh re-
lays held at North Carolina State
University this past Friday and Sat-
urday.
Rainy conditions on Friday
forced an hour and a half delay in
the running events and moved the
field events to Saturday.
The pool rainy conditions were
less than ideal for the sprints but the
distanceeventssaw many competi-
tors take advantage of these condi-
tions to him some fast times.
Many of the times were good
enough to qualify many of the ath-
letes for the NCAA Championship
meet.
Friday's sprinting events were
the trials for the finals to be held on
Saturday Brian Williams got things
started for ECU by running the 110-
meter high hurdles in 1441 and
advancing to the finals.
The women then got their turn
in the 100-meter dash. Sophomore
Danita Roseboro ran 12.25 and
moved on to the finals.
Also competing in the 100-m
dash were Joy Dorsey, running a
12.89 and Sherry Hawkins, running
a 1341.
After the 1 1 2 hour delay be-
cause of thunder and lightning, the
runningevents resumed withUdon
Cheek running a 53:64 in the 400
meter Intermediate Hurdles, which
earned him the right to compete in
the finals.
The distance events men took
over for the rest of the raght.Firstup
was the4xl500-meter Relay, which
saw the team of Theresa Marini,
Catherine Norstrand, Marianne
Marini and Gretchen Hariey com-
pete with a time of 20:46 for 9th
place.
Anne Marie Welch competed
in the 5000-meter (3.1miles)with a
time of 18:47. Kyle Sullivan then
stepped on to the track for the long
and fast, 25 lap 10,000-m (6.2 miles)
race.
The runners took advantage of
weather conditions to run some fast
times. Four runners lead by Bob
Henes of NCSU ran under 29 min-
utes and qualified for the NCAA
meet. Sullivan ran a personal best
with his time of 3254.
Saturday'sevents were lead off
by the Men's 5000-meter, in which
Ricky Chann ran a 1625 and Matt
Morris a 16.42. The men's sprint
team men took over with Williams
competing in the 110-meter high
hurdle finals with a fourth place
finish of 14:49.
The4xl OOretoy wasdominated
by ECU. Ike Robinson lead off by
giving ECU the lead which was
never challenge as the baton based
to Damon Desire, Junior Davis, and
brought home for the victory over
See Track, page 10





10 Hire �qgt (flarolfnian April 2, 1991
Pirate golfers show character against top schools Irates
Maginnes takes fourth, leads team to sixth overall
Continued from page 9
By Francis Vaughn
SUf f Writer
The ECU golf team played in
the 22nd annual Furman
IntcirollegiateQilftounumentthis
past weekend .Seven ot the 24 teams
entered were rated in the top 20 in
the country
Last year's poor performance
by the Pirates in the tournament
ended their hopes ol advancing to
the NCAA tournament A similar
performance would hurt them this
year.
The first day brought heavy
rains and thunderstorms for most
of the golfers. Fortunately, the first
day of play was cancelled before
the Pirates teed off. This made the
golf tournament 36 holes instead of
54.
The Pirates took advantage of
the rain out and posted a five over
par 293 in the first round. They
trailed leader South Carolina by
eight shots. Senior Co-captain John
Maginnes paced the Pirates with a
three under par 69. He trailed first
round leader Carl Paulson of South
Carolina by one shot.
"We finally put ourselves in
position to win a big tournament.
ITie past few tournaments we had
been fighting from behind after bad
starts said Head Coach Hal
Morrison. "The kids showed a lot of
poseand character on thcgolf course
today. They are learning to control
themselves better after bad shots.
I'm really pleased the way they
handled the good with the bad
The Pirates got off to a bad start
the final day but showed their ma-
turity and patience to shoot a three
over par 291.The Pi rates finished in
sixth place losing to South Carolina
by seven shots.
David Duval of Georgia Tech
captured the individual honor with
a six under par total of 158. John
Maginnes finished tied for 4th with
a three under par total of 141. The
Sophomore tandem of Mike "The
Worm" Feague and Ryan "Pretty
Boy" Pema each chipped in with
72's the last day. Feague finished
with 145 and Perna with 147 fin-
ishing 11th and 15th respectively.
The Pirates greatly improved
their chances to go to the NCAA
tournament this coming weekend.
They have won threeof the last four
since Coach Morrison has been at
ECU. The Conference tournament
will be held in Wilson at Wilson
Country Club beginning Friday
April 5.
Tarkarrian faces toughest loss against Duke
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) Time
didnothmgtohe.il krrv arkanian's
agony.
A day after his team missed the
best shot it will ever have .it his
kctball greatness, the pain felt by
the UNLV coach had only deep
ened.
And the knowledge that he's
facing NCAA sarw tions and losing
fourstarterstromtlu-dose knit team
that won 45 straight games ever
two seasons didn 11
"I'll never have a group like
this again i.i inian said. 'This
was a very spev ial group of kids.
They did everything well .ill y ear.
Tarkanian was nearly incon-
solable Sunday, emerging briefly
from his hotel to escort Larry
fohnson to pick up his U.S. Basket-
ball Writers Association player of
the year award at a local hotel.
The night had done nothing to
dim the memory of a great lost
chance, with dreams of an
undefeated season and a second
consecutive national titie shot down
in a semifinal loss to Puke.
His Kunnin' Rebels, the bas-
ketball juggernaut that was sup-
posed to win it all, never even made
it to the final game.
"It's worse today Tarkanian
said. "I just keep replaying it over
and over in mv mind "
Nearly as distraught vs.is
lohnson, who uttered lh ight
words during the televised cer-
emony but was in no iihhh.1 to dis-
cuss the details of the 79-77 loss.
Johnson signed autographsand
bantered with fans, then made ar-
rangements 10 go to lunch with
Shaquille O'Neal of LSU, another
nominee for the writers' award.
"1 le can barely talk, he's hurt-
mgso much inside Tarkanian said
of his star forward.
Johnson's hurt may have been
compounded by hisdecision to pass
the ball to Anderson Hunt rather
than launch his own 3-pointer or
drive to the basket to try and tie the
game in the final few seconds.
I hr two-time All-American, the
centerpiece of UNLV's success,
brought the ban up court for the
final trvand was briefly open before
passing to 1 hint for a desperation
Beeman
shot that clanged off the run.
"We had the ball in the hands
of our best player in the open court
and he gave it up' Tarkanian said.
"Larry had a gcxxl chance to create
something, but he gave the ball up.
But without Lirrv we don't even
get here. 1 le's carried this team for
two years
Losing was an unfamiliar ex-
perience for Johnson, whose team
had gone more than a year since its
last defeat
"Once you suffer a loss, you
don't want t talk basketball he
sud. "You don't want to turn on a
TV, to look at a newspaper
Would he pass to Hunt again if
given a second chance?
"I don't know he replied.
Continued from page 9
held the position ol president of the
ETA NU chapter In November, he
was named "heC ollegiate Brother
of the Year for the state of North
Carolina
Heals, held the highestGPA
in his fraternity. 1 le recently has
been named Southern Region
Brother of the Year which ten k place
m Jackson, Miss and consisted of
members ot Alpha Phi Alpha from
seven different states competing for
National Collegiate Brother ot the
Year, which will he held in Balti-
more
Beeman is an active member in
his church. I le speaks to the youth
group about "the importance of
staying in high 9choo1 and going to
college He is also planning on
helping with the church Easter egg
hunt this weekend.
Beeman helps out with the
Greenville Community Shelter
RxkI of I Iomeless Program. He ex-
plained how his fraternity held a
party in which people could be ad-
mitted for half price it they brought
a can of icmkI.
Bee ma n sud I n my spa re ti me
I enjoy listening to music and being
one of the fellows
His plans for the future include
The East Carolinian is the students' newspaper
played out the half with their two
point lead intact, 7-5. The two teams
traded pointsin the second half and
in a game to 13, the Irates found
themselves down 12-10.
Goal line defense by Chris Hall
and Keith Lewis denied Columbia
the score and allowed ECU'S of-
fense into the the game at 12. This
sent the game to a point lap of 15 or
win by two points.
Again Columbia scored then
the Irates matched them. With a
score tied at 14, the next point would
decide the winners of the game.
Columbia turned the frisbee
over a couple of times but so did
ECU on a couple of pick calls. E ven-
attending law school possibly at
Harvard University or The Univer-
sity of Virginia. Beeman said that
being a lawyer will be his way of
contributing to society.
His long term ambitions con-
sist of becoming an Ambassador to
a African Nation and a U.S. Con-
gressman.
"1 doall I can do Beeman said
1 don'tUke set tlingforsecond best"
Track
tuahy a Gary Hurley hammer to
Ken Earley finished the game 15-14
in the Irate's favor.
"With the collegiate season
around the comer, a finals victory
means even more to us, " com-
mented Irate Steve Walser.
The team awarded Tom Acoi
the most valuable player award for
the tournament. Runner up was
Tony Quill for his play against Co-
lumbia.
Now the team prepares to head
to Pennsylvania for an Ivey League
College Tournament. On Apnl 13
and 14, the Irates will bequalifying
for the 1991 collegiate nationals at
Va. Tech.
Continued from page 9
St. Augustines, and NCSU.
The sprinters also dominated
the 4x200 relay by leading from
wire to wire.
The relay was once again lead
off bv Robinson who teamed with
Davis, Desue, and Brian Irvin to
once again defeat 2nd place NCSU
for 1st place in 1:23.4.
The women tracketeers were
lead by Roseboro in Saturday
events. Roseboro ran in the KX)-
meter dash finals, finishing4th with
a time of 12.22.
She then lead off in both the 4
xlOO, and 4x200 relays. The 4x100
relay team of Roseboro, Joy Dorsey,
Diane Jacobs, and Sherry Hawkins
finished 6th in their heat in the time
of 49:47.
Dance Around And Bare
Your Tan For Hundreds Of
These Dirty Old Men.
Tuesdays
March 19; 26
April 2 9
Finals:
v 16
Weekly Prizes:
Winner�$100
Runner Up$25 Gilt Certificate
Final Prizes:
nner�S3c.
Runner Up�$150
X
HILTON
INN
Ft rJays
M irch 22 29
� 5 '2 19 26
Finals:
May 3
Weekly Prizes:
-ner-SiOO
Final Prizes:
W mer-OOO
P -s A F'ee Saturday N p
Stay AtTheHHrjri
For more
information call 355-5000
Phi Mu Alph Sinfonia Fraternity of America
Zeta Psi Chapter
The Student Union Minority Arts Committee
in conjunction with
The East Carolina Jazz Ensemble
Present
the 1931 Eastern IM.C. Jazz Festival
featuring
vocalist Ethel Entlis - April 3-7
AJ Fletcher Music School,
for more info call 757-6851
Ethel Ennis Earl Arnette
�Schedule of Events
April 3rd 2 PM Open Rehearsal -Boom 101-
Ethel EnnisECU Jazz Ensemble
April 4th 11 AM Lecture -Room 101-
Ethel Ennis "Women in Jazz, Jazz Vocalists"
1 PM Lecture -Room 101-
Earl Arnette "Music Business"
April 5th 9 PM In Concert -AJ Fletcher Recital Hall-
Ethel Ennis with the East Carolina University
Jazz Ensemble
April 6th Jazz Ensemble Day -ECU Central Campus Mall
10 AM ECU Jazz Bones,
directed by George Broussard
10:45 AM ECU Contemporary Jazz
Ensemble, directed by Paul Tardrf
11.45 AM ECU Jazz Ensemble (B),
directed by Dennis AJIeman
1:30 PM University of District of Columbia,
directed by Calvin Jones
2:30 PM TBA
3:30 PM ECU Jazz Ensemble (A),
directed by Carrol Dashieil
In case of rain, activities wil begin at 1.30 PM in the Fletcher
School of Music Recital Hall.
CONCERT
April 7th ECU Jazz Ensemble
8:15 PM
Wright Auditorium





10 Site �aat (CarolinianApril 2, 1991
Pirate golfers show character against top schools Irates
Maginnes takes fourth, leads team to sixth overall
Continued from page 9
By Francis V.mghn
StJtt Wiil.r
l"ho ECU goM team played in
the 22nd annual 1 urman
IntercoltegJatc( iolf tournament this
past (weekend Se enoi the 24 teams
entered wen? ratixi in the top 20 in
the country
last year's pooi px rformanoe
bv the Pirates in the tournament
ended their hopeso( advancing to
the NCAA tournament A similar
performance w cmld hurl them tins
year
rhe hi t ) � ' heavy
rains and thi i most
of the golfers. Fortunately, the first
day ot play was cancelled before
the Pirates teed off. This nwde the
goll tournament 36 holes instead of
54.
l"he Pirates took advantage of
the rain out and posted a five over
par 293 in the first round. They
trailed leader South Carolina by
eight shots. Senior Co-captain lohn
Maginnes paced the Pirates with a
three tinder par 69. 1 le trailed first
round leader Carl Paulson of South
Carolina by one shot.
"We finally put ourselves m
position to win a big tournament
I"he paM tew tournaments we had
been fighting from behind after bad
starts' said Head Coach Hal
MorrisonThe kids showed a lot of
poseand character on the golf course
today. They are learning to contml
themselves better after bad shots.
I'm really pleased the way they
handled the good with the bad
The Pirates got off to a bad start
the final day but showed their ma-
turity and patience to shwt a three
over Mr 2 1 The Pirates finished in
sixth place losing to South Carolina
by seven shots.
David Duval of Georgia Tech
captured the individual honor with
a six under par total of 158. )ohn
Maginnes finished tied for4th with
a three under par total of 141. I"he
Sophomore tandem of Mike "The
Worm" Feague and Ryan "Pretty
Boy" Pema each chipped in with
72's the last day. league finished
with 14 and Perna with 147 fin-
ishing 11th and 15th respectively.
The Pirates greatly improved
their chances to go to the NCAA
tournament this coming weekend.
They have won three of the last four
since Coach Morrison has been at
ECU. TheConference tournament
will ho helil in Wilson at Wilson
Country lub beginning Friday
April 5
Tarkanian faces toughest loss against Duke
INDIAN 11 ime
dldnothi:ii ian s
agony
A dav aft! inissedthe
host shot iit has
ketbail grcdtni�
the UNL
ened
And t he's
facing V
fourstarti-�
that won 1� ovei
two seasi
Til �ki
this agj
was a veiit kids
They did (year
rarkaii
solablc v-
trom hi���
ohnson to pick up his 11 S. Basket
hall Writers Association player ot
the year award at a local hotel
rhe night had done nothing to
dim the memory ol a great lost
chance, with dreams ol an
undefeated season and a second
consecutivenationaltitleshotdown
in a semifinal loss to Duke
1 iis Kwnnm Rebels, the has
ketbail juggernaut that was sup
po ied to win it all, never even made
it tv- tin' final game
t � worse toda) larkanian
said I jusl keep rcpla ing it i v i !
and over in my mind
. ,ui as distraught was
(ohnson, who utlerr h, dghl
words during fhe televised cer
emonv but was m no mood to dis-
cuss the details ot the 79 77 loss
Johnson signed autographsand
bantered with fans, then made ar-
rangements to go to lunch with
Shaquille O'Neal ot LSU, another
nominee tor the writers' aw.ird.
"1 le can barely talk, he's hurt-
ing so much inside Tarkanian said
of his star torward
ohnson's hurt may have been
compounded by hisdecision to pass
the ball to Anderson Hunt rather
than launch his own 3-pointer or
drive to the basket to try and tie the
game in the final few seconds
fhetwo timeAIl American,the
centerpiece of UNLV's success,
brought tlv ball up court ka the
final try and was briefly open before
passing to 1 hint tor a desperation
Beeman
shot that clanged off the rjm.
"We had the ball in the hands
ot our best player in the open - ourt
anil he gave it up larkanian said.
"Larry had a good i nance to create
something, hit he gave the ball up.
But without ! .it we don't even
get here. He's carried this team tor
two years
Losing was an unfamiliar ex-
perience tor fohnson, whose team
had gone more than a year since its
last defeat
"Or e you suffer a loss, you
don t want 1.1 ilk basketball, he
said i v�u don't want to turn on a
TV, to took at a nevspaper
Would he pass to! hint again il
given a second - haix e?
"1 don't know he replied.
Continued from page 9
held the p ' t of the
ETAN1 chaptet i iber he
was nan1' . I
of the Year I te of North
Carolina
He a
in his fraten u entlv has
been nan
Brotheri I -
in lacks, : V
members of A
r
i ol
from
seven different statescompeting for
ationalollcgiatc Brother ol the
Year whi� h will be held in Balti-
more.
IV eman is an active member in
his church He speaks to the youth
�� �up aS ut the importance ol
sta ing in high school and going to
college I le i also planning on
helping with thehun h Easter egg
hunt this weekend.
Beeman helps out with the
Greenville Community Shelter
Food of H nieless Program. 1 ieex-
plained how his fraternity held a
parts in whk h people could K- ad-
mitted tor halt price it they brought
a can ol food
Beeman said, "In my spare time
1 enjov listening to music and being
one of the fellows
11 is pi.uis tor the future include
attending law school possibly at
Harvard University or TheUn . � i
sity ol Virginia. Beeman said that
being a lav ver will be his way of
contributing to so tetv
1 hs long ti rm ambitions con-
sist of in Ambassad
a Afri an 'ahi n and a U5.1
gressman
"Idoall lean - - said.
" I don't likes i � indbest
The East Carolinian is the students' newspaper
played out the half with their two
point lead intact, 7-5.The two teams
traded pointsin the second half and
in a game to 13, the Irates found
themselves down 12-10.
Coal line defense by Chns 1 lall
and Keith Lewis denied Columbia
the score and allowed ECU'S of-
fense into the the game at 12 This
sent the game to a point lap of !5or
win by two points.
Again Columbia scored then
the (rates matched them. With a
SCOrebedat 14, the next point would
decide the winners of the game
Columbia turned the frisbee
over a couple of times but 50 did
ECU on a couple of pick calls. Even-
Track
tually a Garv Hurley hammer to
Ken Earley finished the game 15-14
in the Irate's favor.
"With the collegiate season
around the comer, a finals victory
means even more to us, " com-
mented Irate Steve Walser.
The team awarded Tom Acoi
the most valuable plav r award h r
the tournament. Runner up was
Tony Quill for his play against Co-
lumbia.
Now the team prepares to hea
to Pennsylvania for an Key U
College Tournament. On April P
and 14, the Irates will bequalifying
tor the bWi collegiate nationals at
Va. Tech.
Continued from page 9
St. Augustines, and NCSU.
The sprinters also dominated
the -l x ?tm relay by leading from
wire to wire.
The relay was once again lead
off by Robinson who teamed with
Davis, Desue, and Brian Irvin to
once again defeat 2nd place N( SU
for 1st place in I 234
Tie women tracketeers were
lead bv Roseboro in Saturdays
events. Roseboro ran in the
meter dash finals, Rnishing4th v. I
a time of 12.2
She then lead off in both the 4
xlOO, and 4x200 relays Hie 4. �
relay team ot Ri seboro,J y I)�rsi y.
1 harte aeobs, and Sherry t lav. -
finished6th in their heat in the time
ol 49:47.
Dance Around And Bare
Your Tan For Hundreds Of
These Dirty Old Men.
� ��
etUpt!
Finals-
Weekly Prizes
A
Final Pnzes:

X
HILTON
INN
!
Finals:
Weekly Prizes:
Final Prizes;
CYY
� c
ryS H r
tg - �
For more
information call 355-5000
Phi Mu Alph Sinfonia Fraternity of America
Zeta Psi Chapter
The Student Union Minority Arts Committee
in conjunction with
The East Carolina Jazz Ensemble
Present
the 1391 Eastern IM.C. Jazz Festival
featuring
vocalist Ethel Ennis-April 3-7
AJ Fletcher Music School,
for more info cali 757-6851
Ethel Ennis Earl Arnette
�Schedule of Events
April 3rd 2 PM Open Rehearsal -Room 101-
Ethel EnnisECU Jazz Ensemble
April 4th 11 AM Lecture -Room 101-
Ethel Ennis "Women in Jazz, Jazz Vocalists"
1 PM Lecture -Room 101-
Earl Arnette "Music Business"
April 5th 9 PM In Concert -AJ Fletcher Recital Hall-
Ethel Ennis with the East Carolina University
Jazz Ensemble
April 6th Jazz Ensemble Day -ECU Central Campus Mall
10 AM ECU Jaz2 Bones,
directed by George Broussard
10:45 AM ECU Contemporary Jazz
Ensemble, directed by Paul Tardif
11:45 AM ECU Jazz Ensemble (B),
directed by Dennis Alleman
1:30 PM University of District of Columbia,
directed by Calvin Jones
2:30 PM TBA
3:30 PM ECU Jazz Ensemble (A),
directed by Carroll Dashtell
In case of rain, activities will begin at 1:30 PM in the Fletcher
School of Music Recital Hall.
CONCERT
April 7 th ECU Jazz Ensemble
8:15 PM
Wright Auditorium





10 elic fcmU (Taruliuian April 2, 1991
Pirate golfers show character against top schools rates
Continued from page 9
Machines takes fourth, leads team to sixth overall
Bv Fran is aughn
SUM Writer
lhc K I o it tram played in
the 22nd annual I urman
intercoDegiati ncntthis
pest weekend Itearrts
enti-md vscn the top 20 in
the count
Last ui! . � martee
by the Pii imcnl
ended th
the NCAA I milar
performan i
year
rhe '
ram and I
oi thegotfers Fortunately, the tirst
day ot plav was cancelled before
the Pir.iti-s teed ofl rhas made tin-
goM tournament ViKiUiastead ot
-
The Pirates took advantage ot
the rain out and posted a five over
par 293 in the tirst round They
trailed leader tith Carolina by
eight shots. Senioro captain John
Maginnes paced the Pirates with a
three under par 69 1 c trailed first
round leader t arl Paulson of South
i arolina bv one hot
We finally put ourselves hi
position to wm ,i big tournament,
past tew tournaments we had
been righting from behind after bad
starts said Head Coach Hal
Morrison. Ihe kids show iti a lot of
poseandchafilCler on Itegptf course
today. They are learning to control
themselves better after bad shots.
I'm really pleased the wav thev
handled the good with the bad
Ihe Pirates got oft fto a Kid start
the final dav but shower! their ma-
turity and patience to shoot a three
over par 21 The Pi rates finished in
sixth place losing to Smth Carolina
bv seven shots
David Duval ot Georgia Tech
captured the individual honor with
a six under par total of 158 John
Maginnes finished tied tor4th with
a three under par total of 141 Ihe
Sophomore tandem of Mike Ihe
Worm Feague and Kyan "Pretty
Boy" I'erna i.k h chipped in with
72s the last day Feague finished
with 14 and IVrna with 147 fin-
ishing 11th and lth respectively
llu i'li.e id) improved
their than to go to the AA
tournament this coming weekend.
They have won three of th
sinceo.n li Mi rrist m has bei i al
hi 1 he Conl e tournament
will be held in il ion at W
( ountrv i I i
April 5
Tarkanian faces toughest loss against Duke
INDI N.
didnotl
agon

N-st shot
kctba
the 1 � .
ened
Ami

four start i
that wo;
twos
-
this
was t �
llu . 1 .
-
-
fn n
Beeman
held the p
N-
vsas nan'
in hi '
been r

in Jacks i
men �
letailsot the 79 loss
sh �t that
lohnson to pick up his 1 S Basket
ball Writei '� sociatioi i lyei I Johnson signed autographsand
the year award at a local bantered with fans, then made ar- ofoui -
Ihe night had done nothing to rangements to go to lunch with andh � msaid
dim the memorv of a great lost liHe O'Neal oi LSU, another "Larryhad i I
rice, with dreams ot an nominee for the writers'award. sometl tl � I "It up
undefeated season and a & rely talk he'shurt- But vvitl
tsecutivenati omu hinsideTarkaniansaid
� ike. ot has star forward twi .
His Runnin Rebels, the ba hnsoi l.urt mav have been
mpoundedbyhisdecisiontopass perici - - '
'� nderson 1 hint rather had . trsn
than. laun. h his own i pointer or iasl d' '
. el - the basket totn and tieth
the I til � ds
�r M nn, .m,tin
gemaul that �-��
, � revei

� � ia . '
t keep rej
: � r n
Nearly a hsti
Mn.
word I
n hi
- .
I �� � . . Ifl
: � � ant I I -
said I
TV, to look at anev ; pei
� � �
:
� � � � cd cer
enterpu � ol ! L v s sui
brought ii up court tor the
finaltrvand was briefly open before gh
� . hint tor a dcsperati I �
Continued from page 9
mpel
� � . ' �'�
Beeman helps out with the attend chool p
tl

� int thi fVeekei I
mmunity Shelter
I in Ball Food of I Pi gram. 1 lee
� ins fraternity held, a
membi rn partvin . � - : � uld be ad
� . ed for half price it they bn
rtan. e . ' a .an of f(XXJ
ngto Bcvmansaki'lnmysparetime
nning oi i ng to music and I �
asti r egg one oi the fellows
forth futurcinclude
� �
His
ti
The East Carolinian is the students' newspaper
played out the halt with their two
point lead intact, 7-5 The two teams
traded pointsinthesecondhatfand
in a game to 13, the Irates found
themselves down 12 in.
( ,oal bnedefonsi bv hrisHaB
and Keith 1 ewis denied i olumbia
the score and allowed H IPs of
tense into the the game at 12 This
sent the game to a point lap of 15or
win by two points.
Againolumbia scored then
the Irates matched them With a
score bed at 14, the next point v.
1. the winners of the gai
( olumbia turned the frisbee
irr .1 . ouple ol times but so did
I i U i mai i tuplei if p fc calls i
Track
tually a (,arv Hurley hammer to
Ken Earley hnished the' game 1S-14
in the I rate's favor
"With the collegiate season
around the comer, a finals vi I I �
means even more to us,
men ted Irate Steve Walser
The team awarded Tom A i
the most valuable player award t r
the tournament Runner up w is
I onv Quill tor his plav against
lumbia
Now the team prepai I
to Pennsylvania for an Ivey b
College Tournament. On April 13
dnd 14, the Irates wiD
t. r the 1991 collegiate nal
rech
Continued from page 9
�t V ind N
The sprinter - loi
�:� ; � 10 relay by I id
I
off b on who teamed with

I place NCS1
ieboro in S
events. Roseboro ran in tht
� � � ish finals I
a tune of 1? f
She then lead off ml
. � and 4x2O0i
. team or; eboi - - �
� e Jacobs, an I rry H
finished 6th in th i I
f 49:47
Dance Around And Bare
Your Tan For Hundreds Of
These Dirty Old Men.

Weekly Prizes
Final Prizes
X
MILTON
INN
0 (!
Finals

Weekly Prizes
Final Prizes
- -�
1 II
information call 355-5000
Phi Mu Alph Sinfonia Fraternity of America
Zeta Psi Chapter
The Student Union Minority Arts Committee
in conjunction with
The East Carolina Jazz Ensemble
Present
the 1991 Eastern IM. C. Jazz Festival
featuring
vocalist Ethel Ennis-April 3-7
AJ Fletcher Music School,
for more info call 757-6851
Ethel Ennis Earl Arnette
�Schedule of Events
April 3rd 2 PM Open Rehearsal -Room 101-
Ethel EnnisECU Jazz Ensemble
April 4th 11 AM Lecture -Room 101-
Ethel Ennis "Women in Jazz, Jazz Vocalists"
1 PM Lecture -Room 101-
Earl Arnette "Music Business"
April 5th 9 PM In Concert -AJ Fletcher Recital Hall-
Ethel Ennis with the East Carolina University
Jazz Ensemble
April 6th Jazz Ensemble Day -ECU Central Campus Mall
10 AM ECU Jaz2 Bones,
directed by George Broussard
10:45 AM ECU Contemporary Jazz
Ensemble, directed by Paul Tardif
11:45 AM ECU Jazz Ensemble (B),
directed by Dennis Alleman
1:30 PM University of District of Columbia,
directed by Calvin Jones
2:30 PM TBA
3:30 PM ECU Jazz Ensemble (A),
directed by Carroll Dashiell
In case of rain, activities will begin at 1:30 PM in the Fletcher
School of Music Recital Hall.
CONCERT
April 7th ECU Jazz Ensemble
8:15 PM
Wright Auditorium





Title
The East Carolinian, April 2, 1991
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 02, 1991
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.802
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy